WorldWideScience

Sample records for carcinogenic food contaminants

  1. Food derived carcinogenic amnoimidazoazaarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik

    Carcinogenic aminoimidazoazaarenes are formed during cooking of meat and fish. Important factors for the formation of these compounds are meat type, cooking temperature and time. The compounds are genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. In animal feeding studies the compounds tested so far we...... of the exocyclic amino group. Estimations of human cancer risk have indicated that ingestion of food containing aminoimidazoazaarenes are of importance....

  2. Use of in silico models for prioritization of heat-induced food contaminants in mutagenicity and carcinogenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Falko; Buhrke, Thorsten; Wenzel, Irina; Andrack, Jennifer; Hielscher, Jan; Lampen, Alfonso

    2017-01-16

    Numerous Maillard reaction and lipid oxidation products are present in processed foods such as heated cereals, roasted meat, refined oils, coffee, and juices. Due to the lack of experimental toxicological data, risk assessment is hardly possible for most of these compounds. In the present study, an in silico approach was employed for the prediction of the toxicological endpoints mutagenicity and carcinogenicity on the basis of the structure of the respective compound, to examine (quantitative) structure-activity relationships for more than 800 compounds. Five software tools for mutagenicity prediction (T.E.S.T., SARpy, CAESAR, Benigni-Bossa, and LAZAR) and three carcinogenicity prediction tools (CAESAR, Benigni-Bossa, and LAZAR) were combined to yield so-called mutagenic or carcinogenic scores for every single substance. Alcohols, ketones, acids, lactones, and esters were predicted to be mutagenic and carcinogenic with low probability, whereas the software tools tended to predict a considerable mutagenic and carcinogenic potential for thiazoles. To verify the in silico predictions for the endpoint mutagenicity experimentally, twelve selected compounds were examined for their mutagenic potential using two different validated in vitro test systems, the bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and the in vitro micronucleus assay. There was a good correlation between the results of the Ames test and the in silico predictions. However, in the case of the micronucleus assay, at least three substances, 2-amino-6-methylpyridine, 6-heptenoic acid, and 2-methylphenol, were clearly positive although they were predicted to be non-mutagenic. Thus, software tools for mutagenicity prediction are suitable for prioritization among large numbers of substances, but these predictions still need experimental verification.

  3. Assessment of the DNA Damage in Human Sperm and Lymphocytes Exposed to the Carcinogen Food Contaminant Furan with Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Pandir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this work was to assess the damage of DNA in human blood cell and spermin vitro under the influence of furan. These cells were administered 0-600 μM of furan at 37 and 32oC for 30 and 60 min, respectively. A significant increase in tail DNA%, tail length and moment indicating DNA damage was observed at increasing doses when compared to the controls. The treatment with 300 and 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 86.74 ± 2.43 and 93.29 ± 8.68 compared to the control tail DNA% in lymphocytes. However, only 600 μM of furan showed a maximum increase of 94.71 ± 6.24 compared to the control tail DNA% in sperm. The results suggested that furan caused DNA damage in lymphocytes at increasing doses, but appeared to have not the same effect on human sperm at the low doses. Genotoxic activity had an impact on the risk assessment of furan formed on the food for human cells. Therefore, it would be important to further investigate these properties of furan as the food mutagen.

  4. Processing Contaminants in Food Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granby, Kit; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Fromberg, Arvid

    Contaminants like acrylamide, furan or PAHs (polyaromatic hydrocarbons) as e.g. Benz(a)pyrene may be formed during food processing. All of the substances are genotoxic carcinogens, and for that reason mitigation strategies to reduce the levels are needed. Examples of the formation of the processing...

  5. KEYNOTE LECTURES-KL1 New development in risk assessment of genotoxic carcinogens in foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun-Shi

    2006-01-01

    @@ The no-observed-effect level (NOEL) in a study of carcinogenicity for compounds that are both genotoxic and carcinogenic represents the limit of detection in that bioassay, rather than an estimate of a possible threshold. Therefore, for those genotoxic and carcinogenic contaminants (e.g. acrylamides, PAHs, etc.) in foods it is not possible to develop health-based guidance values (e.g. ADI or PTWI) using the traditional NOEL and safety/uncertainty factors.

  6. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat: What about environmental contaminants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2016-02-01

    In October 26, 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) issued a press release informing of the recent evaluation of the carcinogenicity of red and processed meat consumption. The consumption of red meat and processed meat was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans", and as "carcinogenic to humans", respectively. The substances responsible of this potential carcinogenicity would be generated during meat processing, such as curing and smoking, or when meat is heated at high temperatures (N-nitroso-compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines). However, in its assessments, the IARC did not make any reference to the role that may pose some carcinogenic environmental pollutants, which are already present in raw or unprocessed meat. The potential role of a number of environmental chemical contaminants (toxic trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated naphthalenes and perfluoroalkyl substances) on the carcinogenicity of consumption of meat and meat products is discussed in this paper. A case-study, Catalonia (Spain), is specifically assessed, while the influence of cooking on the concentrations of environmental pollutants is also reviewed. It is concluded that although certain cooking processes could modify the levels of chemical contaminants in food, the influence of cooking on the pollutant concentrations depends not only on the particular cooking process, but even more on their original contents in each specific food item. As most of these environmental pollutants are organic, cooking procedures that release or remove fat from the meat should tend to reduce the total concentrations of these contaminants in the cooked meat.

  7. Field ecology, fungal sex and food contamination involving Aspergillus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several species within the genus Aspergillus are capable of producing a myriad of toxic secondary metabolites, with aflatoxin being of most concern. These fungi happen to colonize important agricultural commodities, thereby having the potential to contaminate our food with carcinogenic aflatoxins. P...

  8. Chemical food contaminants; Chemische Lebensmittelkontaminanten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Technische Univ. Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Chemical food contaminants are substances which are neither present naturally in the usual raw material used for food production nor are added during the regular production process. Examples are environmental pollutants or contaminants derived from agricultural production of crops or livestock or from inadequate manufacturing of the food product itself. More difficult is the classification of those compounds formed during regular manufacturing such as products of thermal processes including flavoring substances. In these cases, it is common practice to call those compounds contaminants which are known for their adverse effects such as acrylamide, whereas constituents which add to the food-specific flavor such as Maillard products formed during roasting, baking etc. are not termed contaminants. From a toxicological viewpoint this distinction is not always clear-cut. Important groups of chemical contaminants are metals such as mercury or lead, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls and related pollutants, which are regularly found in certain types of food originating from background levels of these compounds in our environment. Furthermore, natural toxins form microorganisms or plants, and compounds formed during thermal treatment of food are of major interest. In general, a scientific risk assessment has to be carried out for any known contaminant. This comprises an exposure analysis and a toxicological and epidemiological assessment. On these grounds, regulatory and/or technological measures can often improve the situation. Major conditions for a scientific risk assessment and a successful implementation of regulations are highly developed food quality control, food toxicology and nutritional epidemiology. (orig.)

  9. Human health risk due to consumption of vegetables contaminated with carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sardar [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China). Inst. of Urban Environment; Peshawar Univ. (Pakistan). Dept. of Environmental Science; Cao, Qing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environemntal Sciences

    2012-02-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are persistent, toxic, and carcinogenic contaminants present in soil ecosystem globally. These pollutants are gradually accumulating in wastewater-irrigated soils and lead to the contamination of vegetables. Food chain contamination with PAH is considered as one of the major pathways for human exposure. This study was aimed to investigate the concentrations of PAH in soils and vegetables collected from wastewater-irrigated fields from metropolitan areas of Beijing, China. Origin of PAH, daily intake, and health risks of PAH through consumption of contaminated vegetables were studied. Soil samples were collected from the upper horizon (0-20 cm) of both wastewater-irrigated and reference sites and sieved (<2 mm mesh) and then followed by freeze-drying at -50 C and 123 {+-} 2 Pa. Standing vegetables were also collected from the same sites used for soil sampling and divided into roots and shoots, thoroughly washed with deionized water, and freeze-dried. PAH were extracted using the Soxhlet method with 200 mL DCM for 24 h, and the extracts were cleaned with silica adsorption chromatography prepared with silica gel, alumina, and capped with anhydrous sodium. The final concentrated extracts (soil and vegetable) were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Agilent 6890). Bioaccumulation factors, daily intake of PAH, and carcinogenicity of PAH were calculated by different statistical equations. Results indicate that the soils and grown vegetables were contaminated with all possible carcinogenic PAH (declared by USEPA 2002) except indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene. The highest concentration (242.9 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) was found for benzo(k)fluoranthene (BkF), while lowest (79.12 {mu}g kg{sup -1}) for benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The emission sources of PAH were both pyrogenic and petrogenic in nature. However, the total concentrations of PAH were lower than the permissible limits set by different countries like Canada, Denmark and Germany

  10. Fungi and mycotoxins: Food contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić-Tanackov Sunčica D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of fungi on food causes physical and chemical changes which, further affect negatively the sensory and nutritive quality of food. Species from genera: Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Alternariа, Cladosporium, Mucor, Rhizopus, Eurotium and Emericella are usually found. Some of them are potentially dangerous for humans and animals, due to possible synthesis and excretion of toxic secondary metabolites - mycotoxins into the food. Their toxic syndroms in animals and humans are known as mycotoxicoses. The pathologic changes can be observed in parenhimatic organs, and in bones and central nervous system also. Specific conditions are necessary for mycotoxin producing fungi to synthetize sufficient quantities of these compounds for demonstration of biologic effects. The main biochemical paths in the formation of mycotoxins include the polyketide (aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, zearalenone, citrinine, patulin, terpenic (trichothecenes, aminoacid (glicotoxins, ergotamines, sporidesmin, malformin C, and carbonic acids path (rubratoxins. Aflatoxins are the most toxigenic metabolites of fungi, produced mostly by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus species. Aflatoxins appear more frequently in food in the tropic and subtropic regions, while the food in Europe is more exposed to also very toxic ochratoxin A producing fungi (A. ochraceus and some Penicillium species. The agricultural products can be contaminated by fungi both before and after the harvest. The primary mycotoxicoses in humans are the result of direct intake of vegetable products contaminated by mycotoxins, while the secondary mycotoxicoses are caused by products of animal origin. The risk of the presence of fungi and mycotoxin in food is increasing, having in mind that some of them are highly thermoresistent, and the temperatures of usual food sterilization is not sufficient for their termination. The paper presents the review of most important mycotoxins, their biologic effects

  11. 17. Exposure and Metabolism of Heterocyclic Amine Food Mutagens/Carcinogens in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Carcinogens produced from overcooked foods are extremely mutagenic in numerous in vitro and in vivo test systems. One of these mutagens, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP) induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats and has been implicated in dietary epidemiology studies for raising the risk of

  12. Levels of Genotoxic and Carcinogenic Compounds in Plant food Supplements and Associated Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Restani, P.; Boersma, M.G.; Delmulle, L.; Rietjens, I.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the selection, analysis and risk assessment of genotoxic and carcinogenic compounds of botanicals and botanical preparations which can be found in plant food supplements (PFS). First an inventory was made of botanical compounds that are of possible concern for human healt

  13. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  14. Perinatal toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of styrene-acrylonitrile trimer, a ground water contaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A; Malarkey, David E; Hejtmancik, Milton R; Gerken, Diane K; Chhabra, Rajendra S

    2013-12-06

    Styrene acrylonitrile (SAN) trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site's ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN Trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant.

  15. International Conference on Harmonisation: guidance on testing for carcinogenicity of pharmaceuticals. Notice. Food and Drug Administration, HHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing a guidance entitled "S1B Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance outlines experimental approaches to evaluating the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals to humans that may obviate the necessity for the routine conduct of two long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies

  16. Potential food contaminants and associated health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshin, Sharda Shah; Lall, Shyam Bala; Gupta, Suresh Kumar

    2002-03-01

    The potential toxicants in food are derived from natural or industrial sources. Compounds like lectins and glycoalkaloids that are toxic to man are naturally present in some vegetables like potatoes or legumes. A wide variety of marine toxins mostly produced by dinoflagellates occurring secondarily in molluscs and mussels are usually ingested by human beings causing poisoning. On the other hand, toxic compounds find their way into food during manufacture, storage, or transportation. These include largely the industrial contaminants, persistent organic pollutants (POP), pesticides, heavy metals, and toxins of fungal and bacterial origin. Further, toxic compounds like higher alcohols may be produced as byproducts during processing. Migration of compounds from packaging materials into packaged food like contamination with lead from solder in certain metal cans is well known. Additives (emulsifiers, preservatives, and antioxidants) could also influence the quality of foods. Solvent residues may find their way into food as a result of their use in extraction processes like the use of trichloroethylene and methylene chloride in decaffeination of coffee. In addition, poor hygiene, storage, and preparation may also lead to food contamination by various microbes and ova or cysts of nematodes. The problem of food contamination can be overcome to a great extent by regular surveillance and monitoring programmes and strict implementation of food and adulteration act. In the present review some of these aspects of food contamination have been discussed in detail.

  17. Colon preneoplasia after carcinogen exposure is enhanced and colonic serotonergic system is suppressed by food deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannen, Vinicius; Fernandes, Cleverson R; Stopper, Helga; Zanette, Dalila L; Ferreira, Frederico R; Frajacomo, Fernando T; Carvalho, Milene C; Brandão, Marcus L; Elias Junior, Jorge; Jordão Junior, Alceu Afonso; Uyemura, Sérgio Akira; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Garcia, Sérgio B

    2013-10-04

    Calorie restriction regimens usually promote health and extend life-span in mammals. This is partially related to their preventive effects against malignancies. However, certain types of nutritional restriction failed to induce beneficial effects. The American Institute of Nutrition defines calorie restriction as diets which have only 40% fewer calories, but provide normal amounts of necessary food components such as protein, vitamins and minerals; whereas, food restriction means 40% less of all dietary ingredients plus 40% less calories. Our study aimed to test the hypothesis that the latter type of food deprivation (40% less food than consumed by standard fed rats) might increase cancer risk instead of reducing it, as is generally assumed for all dietary restrictive regimens. Since the endogenous modulation of the colon serotonergic system has been observed to play a role during the early steps of carcinogenesis we also investigated whether the serotoninergic system could be involved in the food intake modulation of cancer risk. For this, rats were exposed to a carcinogen and subjected to food deprivation for 56 days. Triglyceride levels and visceral adipose tissue were reduced while hepatic and colonic lipid peroxidation was increased. This dietary restriction also decreased serotonin levels in colon, and gene expression of its intestinal transporter and receptors. Finally, the numbers of preneoplastic lesions in the colon tissue of carcinogen-exposed rats were increased. Our data suggest that food deprivation enhances formation of early tumorigenic lesions by suppressing serotonergic activity in colon tissue.

  18. The Food and Beverage Occurrence of Furfuryl Alcohol and Myrcene—Two Emerging Potential Human Carcinogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex O. Okaru

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades, compounds present in foods and beverages have been implicated in the etiology of human cancers. The World Health Organization (WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC continues to classify such agents regarding their potential carcinogenicity in humans based on new evidence from animal and human studies. Furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene are potential human carcinogens due to be evaluated. The major source of furfuryl alcohol in foods is thermal processing and ageing of alcoholic beverages, while β-myrcene occurs naturally as a constituent of the essential oils of plants such as hops, lemongrass, and derived products. This study aimed to summarize the occurrence of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene in foods and beverages using literature review data. Additionally, results of furfuryl alcohol occurrence from our own nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis are included. The highest content of furfuryl alcohol was found in coffee beans (>100 mg/kg and in some fish products (about 10 mg/kg, while among beverages, wines contained between 1 and 10 mg/L, with 8 mg/L in pineapple juice. The content of β-myrcene was highest in hops. In conclusion, the data about the occurrence of the two agents is currently judged as insufficient for exposure and risk assessment. The results of this study point out the food and beverage groups that may be considered for future monitoring of furfuryl alcohol and β-myrcene.

  19. Spectral imaging for contamination detection in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Jens Michael

    application of the technique is finding anomalies I supposedly homogeneous matter or homogeneous mixtures. This application occurs frequently in the food industry when different types of contamination are to be detected. Contaminants could be e.g. foreign matter, process-induced toxins, and microbiological...... spoilage. Many of these contaminants may be detected in the wavelength range visible to normal silicium-based camera sensors i.e. 350-1050 nm with proper care during sample preparation, sample presentation, image acquisition and analysis. This presentation will give an introduction to the techniques behind...

  20. Review of PAH contamination in food products and their health hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vasudha; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    Public concern over the deleterious effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has grown rapidly due to recognition of their toxicity, carcinogenicity, and teratogenicity. The aim of this review is to describe the status of PAH pollution among different food types, the route of dietary intake, measures for its reduction, and legislative approaches to control PAH. To this end, a comprehensive review is outlined to evaluate the status of PAH contamination in many important food categories along with dietary recommendations. Our discussion is also extended to describe preventive measures to reduce PAH in food products to help reduce the risks associated with human intake.

  1. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and a food contaminant with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for seven food additives (advantame; glucoamylase from Trichoderma reesei expressed in Trichoderma reesei; glycerol ester of gum rosin; glycerol ester of tall oil rosin; glycerol ester of wood rosin; nisin; and octenyl succinic acid modified gum arabic) and an assessment of dietary exposure to cadmium from cocoa and cocoa products. Specifications for the following food additives were revised: annatto extracts (solvent-extracted bixin and solvent-extracted norbixin); Benzoe tonkinensis; food additives containing aluminium and/or silicon; mineral oil (medium viscosity); modified starches; paprika extract; phosphates (analytical methods for the determination of phosphorus and revision of specifications); 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; potassium aluminium silicate; and potassium aluminium silicate-based pearlescent pigments. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of the food additives and contaminant considered.

  2. Food Safety Legislation Regarding Of Aflatoxins Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketney, Otto

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of the European Union (EU) is to reduce certain contaminants in foodstuffs to acceptable levels. The occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in food was considered to be one of the most important issues of global food security to protect the health of humans and animals, over 100 nations have established maximum tolerable levels for aflatoxin in food. Although EU legislation covers many aspects of food safety was not legally establish an integrated framework that could effectively combat and cover all sectors of the food chain. Monitoring and reporting levels of aflatoxins after controls are essential actions that assist to identify potential risks to human health. The review process for aflatoxin regulations is a complex activity involving many factors and stakeholders.

  3. Real and perceived risks for mycotoxin contamination in foods and feeds: challenges for food safety control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milićević, Dragan R; Skrinjar, Marija; Baltić, Tatjana

    2010-04-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic compounds, produced by the secondary metabolism of toxigenic moulds in the Aspergillus, Alternaria, Claviceps, Fusarium, Penicillium and Stachybotrys genera occurring in food and feed commodities both pre- and post-harvest. Adverse human health effects from the consumption of mycotoxins have occurred for many centuries. When ingested, mycotoxins may cause a mycotoxicosis which can result in an acute or chronic disease episode. Chronic conditions have a much greater impact, numerically, on human health in general, and induce diverse and powerful toxic effects in test systems: some are carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic, estrogenic, hemorrhagic, immunotoxic, nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, dermotoxic and neurotoxic. Although mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products still occurs in the developed world, the application of modern agricultural practices and the presence of a legislatively regulated food processing and marketing system have greatly reduced mycotoxin exposure in these populations. However, in developing countries, where climatic and crop storage conditions are frequently conducive to fungal growth and mycotoxin production, much of the population relies on subsistence farming or on unregulated local markets. Therefore both producers and governmental control authorities are directing their efforts toward the implementation of a correct and reliable evaluation of the real status of contamination of a lot of food commodity and, consequently, of the impact of mycotoxins on human and animal health.

  4. Dietary factors, food contamination and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; He, X.Z.; Liu, L.Z.; Lai, H.; Chen, W.; Lan, Q. [NCI, Bethesda, MD (United States). Occupational & Environmental Epidemiology Branch

    2008-09-15

    In rural Xuanwei County, China, the high incidence of lung cancer is attributable largely to burning smoky coal indoors for heating and cooking without adequate ventilation. Such burning generates very high levels of indoor air pollutants, including carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which could contaminate foodstuffs in the home. Thus, residents could be exposed to carcinogenic coal emissions not only via inhalation but also via ingestion of these foodstuffs. A population-based case-control study of 498 lung cancer patients and 498 controls was conducted from 1985 through 1990 in Xuanwei. The interviewer-administered study questionnaire queried the frequency of food items commonly consumed in this region. Overall and sex-specific multiple logistic regression models were constructed to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for consumption of these foods. Intake of rice, green vegetables, mushrooms and fresh meat was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. In contrast, intake of corn, buckwheat, radishes, peppers, melons, pickled vegetables, and salt-preserved meats was associated with reduced risk. The detrimental. effect of ingesting green vegetables (OR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.28-4.48) is consistent with previous reports. These findings suggest that in Xuanwei, food contamination by environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may be an important risk factor for lung cancer, and that differential contamination of foods by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons possibly explained the different associations with lung cancer risk.

  5. Reduction of carcinogenic 4(5)-methylimidazole in a caramel model system: influence of food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seulgi; Ka, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2014-07-09

    The effect of various food additives on the formation of carcinogenic 4(5)-methylimidazole (4-MI) in a caramel model system was investigated. The relationship between the levels of 4-MI and various pyrazines was studied. When glucose and ammonium hydroxide were heated, the amount of 4-MI was 556 ± 1.3 μg/mL, which increased to 583 ± 2.6 μg/mL by the addition of 0.1 M of sodium sulfite. When various food additives, such as 0.1 M of iron sulfate, magnesium sulfate, zinc sulfate, tryptophan, and cysteine were added, the amount of 4-MI was reduced to 110 ± 0.7, 483 ± 2.0, 460 ± 2.0, 409 ± 4.4, and 397 ± 1.7 μg/mL, respectively. The greatest reduction, 80%, occurred with the addition of iron sulfate. Among the 12 pyrazines, 2-ethyl-6-methylpyrazine with 4-MI showed the highest correlation (r = -0.8239).

  6. Potential contaminants in the food chain: identification, prevention and issue management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Francis P

    2007-01-01

    Contaminants are a vast subject area of food safety and quality. They are generally divided into chemical, microbiological and physical classes and are present in our food chain from raw materials to finished products. They are the subject of international and national legislation that has widened to cover more and more contaminant classes and food categories. In addition, consumers have become increasingly aware of and alarmed by their risks, whether rightly or not. What is the food industry doing to ensure the safety and quality of the products we feed our children? This is a valid question which this article attempts to address from an industrial viewpoint. Chemical food safety is considered a complex field where the risk perception of consumers is often the highest. The effects of chronic or acute exposure to chemical carcinogens may cause disease conditions long after exposure that can be permanently debilitating or even fatal. It is also a moving target, as knowledge about the toxicity and occurrence data of new chemical contaminants continues to be generated. Their identification, prevention and management are challenges to the food industry as a whole. A reminder of the known chemical hazards in the food chain will be presented with an emphasis on the use of early warning to identify potential new contaminants. Early warning is also a means of prevention, anticipating food safety concerns before they become issues to manage. Current best management practices including Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points relating to the supply chain of baby foods and infant formulae will be developed. Finally, key lessons from a case study on recent contamination issues in baby food products will be presented.

  7. Removal of probable human carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated water using molecularly imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupadam, Reddithota J; Khan, Muntazir S; Wate, Satish R

    2010-02-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) adsorbent for carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was prepared using a non-covalent templating technique. MIP particles sized from 2 to 5 microm were synthesized in acetonitrile by using six PAHs mix as a template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. When compared with the non-imprinted polymer (NIP), the MIP showed an excellent affinity towards PAHs in aqueous solution with binding capacity (B(max)) of 687 microg g(-1)MIP, imprinting effect of 6, and a dissociation constant of 24 microM. The MIP exhibited significant binding affinity towards PAHs even in the presence of environmental parameters such as dissolved organic matter (COD) and total dissolved inorganic solids (TDS), suggesting that this material may be appropriate for removal of carcinogenic PAHs. The feasibility of removing PAHs from water by the MIP demonstrated using groundwater spiked with PAHs. In addition, the MIP reusability without any deterioration in performance was demonstrated at least ten repeated cycles.

  8. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    OpenAIRE

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2013-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carc...

  9. Rapid testing methods for food contaminants and toxicants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiachi Chiou; Arthur Ho Hon Leung; Hang Wai Lee; Wing-tak Wong

    2015-01-01

    Food safety is one of the major concerns in every country regardless of the economic and social development. The frequent occurrence of food scandals in the world has led the Chinese government to implement several strategies to fortify the food supply system to a high food safety standard. This relies heavily on laboratory testing services but conventional methods for detection of food contaminants and toxicants are limited by sophisticated sample preparation procedures, long analysis time, large instruments and professional personnel to meet the increasing demands. In this review, we have incorporated most of the current and potential rapid detection methods for many notorious food contaminants and toxicants including microbial agents, toxic ions, pesticides, veterinary drugs and preservatives, as wel as detection of geneticaly modiifed food genes and adulterated edible oil. Development of rapid, accurate, easy-to-use and affordable testing methods could urge food handlers and the public to actively screen for food contaminants and toxicants instead of passively relying on monitoring by the government examination facility. This review also provides several recommendations including how to encourage the public to engage in the food safety management system and provide optimal education and ifnancial assistance that may improve the current Chinese food safety control system.

  10. Contaminants in food supplements and associated health risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, N.M.

    2014-01-01

      Summary Through the increasing use and availability of food supplements on the market, safety Aconcerns relating to the safety of these food supplements are growing as well. The aim of the present PhD thesis was to investigate the presence and actual levels of contaminants of concern in sel

  11. Analysis of Food Contaminants, Residues, and Chemical Constituents of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Baraem; Reuhs, Bradley L.; Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The food chain that starts with farmers and ends with consumers can be complex, involving multiple stages of production and distribution (planting, harvesting, breeding, transporting, storing, importing, processing, packaging, distributing to retail markets, and shelf storing) (Fig. 18.1). Various practices can be employed at each stage in the food chain, which may include pesticide treatment, agricultural bioengineering, veterinary drug administration, environmental and storage conditions, processing applications, economic gain practices, use of food additives, choice of packaging material, etc. Each of these practices can play a major role in food quality and safety, due to the possibility of contamination with or introduction (intentionally and nonintentionally) of hazardous substances or constituents. Legislation and regulation to ensure food quality and safety are in place and continue to develop to protect the stakeholders, namely farmers, consumers, and industry. [Refer to reference (1) for information on regulations of food contaminants and residues.

  12. Prevention of nephrotoxicity of ochratoxin A, a food contaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creppy, E E; Baudrimont, I; Betbeder, A M

    1995-12-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by ubiquitous Aspergilli, mainly by Aspergillus ochraceus and also by Penicilium verrucosum. It was found all over the world in feed and human food and blood as well as in animal blood and tissues. The most threatening effects of OTA are its nephrotoxicity and carcinogenicity, since this mycotoxin is nephrotoxic to all animal species studied so far and is increasingly involved in the Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), a human chronic interstitial nephropathy which is most of the time associated to urinary tract tumours. Since it seems impossible to avoid contamination of foodstuffs by toxigenic fungi, detoxification and detoxication for OTA are needed. To reduce or abolish the OTA-induced toxic effects, several mechanisms were investigated. The results of these investigations showed that some of the potential antidotes were efficient in preventing the main OTA toxic effects whereas some others were not. Promising compounds are structural analogues of OTA, and/or compounds having a high binding affinity for plasma proteins such as piroxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Some enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, radical scavengers, vitamins, prostaglandin (PG) synthesis inhibitors, (such as piroxicam), pH modificators, adsorbant resin such as cholestyramine etc. are efficient in vivo. Some of the results obtained in vivo were already confirmed in vitro and gave useful information on how to safely use these antidotes. The most generally acting compound seems to be A19 (Aspartame), a structural analogue of OTA and phenylalanine. When given to rats A19 (25 mg/kg/48 h) combined to OTA (289 micrograms/kg/48 h) for several weeks largely prevented OTA nephrotoxicity and genotoxicity. When given after intoxication of animals with OTA it washes out the toxin efficiently from the body. In vitro, A19 (10 micrograms/ml) prevents OTA (20-500 micrograms/ml) binding to plasma proteins. Its general

  13. Exposure to food contaminants during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Hon-Tong, Anne; Charles, Marie-Aline; Forhan, Anne; Heude, Barbara; Sirot, Véronique

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, the fetus is exposed to contaminants from its mother's diet. This work provides an assessment of the dietary exposure of pregnant women to inorganic contaminants (aluminum, mercury, lead, inorganic arsenic, cobalt), polychlorodibenzodioxins, polychlorodibenzofurans, dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs, NDL-PCBs), polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs), perfluoroalkyl acids, mycotoxins (zearalenone, patulin, trichothecenes), and heat-generated compounds (acrylamide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Consumption data of 2002 pregnant women aged 18 to 45 from the EDEN cohort study were combined with contamination data from the second French total diet study to assess the exposure before pregnancy (n=1861) and during the third trimester of pregnancy (n=1775). Exposure was also assessed considering the season during which the third trimester of pregnancy occurred. Significant changes in consumptions during pregnancy and between seasons were associated with differences in exposures for some substances. Some contaminant exposures appeared to be of health concern. Margins of exposure to acrylamide (635 to 1094 for mean), inorganic arsenic, lead, and BDE-99 (≤100) were too low to exclude all risks. For NDL-PCBs, T-2 and HT-2 toxins, and deoxynivalenol, significant exceedings of toxicological reference values were found before pregnancy, but there was no significant exceeding in the third trimester.

  14. Monitoring program for mycotoxin contamination in Uruguayan food and feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, M; Dawson, R; Costarrica, M L

    1996-01-01

    A pilot study for monitoring mycotoxin contamination in food and feeds was implemented by the Technological Laboratory of Uruguay (LATU) with the technical assistance of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). The scope of the study was to determine the potential hazard posed by priority food-contaminant and feed-contaminant combinations. The choice of foods and contaminants to be monitored was based on the importance of the food in the total diet, the economic importance of the product and the potential health risk posed by the specific combination. The principal commodities selected were wheat, barley and rice. Also included were com, soy, dairy products, feeds, dried fruits and legumes, oil seeds, cocoa beans and organ meats. Mycotoxins analyzed (TLC/densitometry) were aflatoxins, zearalenone, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol (DON) and ergot alkaloids. The survey results (1993-95) showed differences in both incidence and levels of mycotoxin content for the principal commodities. Of all food/feed categories analyzed, feed had the highest values for all mycotoxins. Samples containing DON in levels above 1000 ng/g were found in all groups. Ochratoxin A was not detected in any of the samples. Rice and soy beans were the categories with lowest aflatoxin incidence. Uruguayan regulatory limits for all toxins analyzed were exceeded for wheat, barley and rice in less than 3, 9 and 7% of samples, respectively. The data on actual mycotoxin levels in different foods will help identify sources of contaminations and areas where control measures should be improved, enable better risk assessment by proper estimation of mycotoxin intake, assist in the establishment of tolerances and adequate guidelines, aid in the implementation of a national program and provide economic benefits by improving grain quality.

  15. An overview on mycotoxin contamination of foods in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Wageh Sobhy; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2014-06-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites that contaminate various feedstuffs and agricultural crops. The contamination of food by mycotoxins can occur before production, during storage, processing, transportation or marketing of the food products. High temperature, moisture content and water activity are among the predisposing factors that facilitate the production of mycotoxins in food. Aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone are all considered the major mycotoxins produced in food and feedstuffs. In Africa, mycotoxin contamination is considered to be a major problem with implications that affect human and animal health and economy. Aflatoxin-related hepatic diseases are reported in many African countries. Ochratoxin and fumonisin toxicity in humans and animals is widespread in Africa. The available, updated information on the incidence of mycotoxin contamination, decontamination and its public health importance in Africa is lacking. The aim of this review is to highlight, update and discuss the available information on the incidence of mycotoxins in African countries. The public health implications and the recommended strategies for control of mycotoxins in food and agricultural crops are also discussed.

  16. PREVALENCE AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF FOOD BORNE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION IN SOME EGYPTIAN FOOD food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Selim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of food borne bacterial contamination in some Egyptian food. Total viable bacteria and total coliform bacteriawere isolated from different sources of food; carbohydrates (bread, flour and basbousa, vegetables (outer and inner tissues of potato and outer and inner tissues of cucumber and proteins (mincedmeat, cheese and milk. The study resulted in maximum value of total viable bacteria found in outer tissue of potato 68X104±1.0, while the minimum value found in inner tissues of potato andcucumber. The study resulted in total coliform was maximum value in minced meat 6.4X103±0.3. Basbousa and inner tissue of potato and cucumber were free from coliforms. The ability of isolatesto producing proteolytic enzymes was tested, we found that 326 isolate (63.92% from all isolates had this ability, thus we selected most 2 potent proteolytic isolates. The two isolates were identifiedas Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. The identification confirmed by microlog 34.20 system and 16SrRNA for two isolates and the same result was founded. Sensitivity tested for the most potentproteolytic species to 12 of the most commonly used antibiotics in the Egyptian pharmacy. The results showed that all species were sensitive to most of antibiotics, except B. cereus which was strongly susceptible to azteronam and ceftazidim. The data showed that raw meat, cooked food products, and raw milk were most commonly contaminated with foodborne pathogens and many pathogens were resistant to different antibiotics. The study provided useful information for assessment of the possible risk posed to consumers, which has significant public health impact.

  17. A review of mammalian carcinogenicity study design and potential effects of alternate test procedures on the safety evaluation of food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A W; Dayan, A D; Hall, W C; Kodell, R L; Williams, G M; Waddell, W D; Slesinski, R S; Kruger, C L

    2011-06-01

    Extensive experience in conducting long term cancer bioassays has been gained over the past 50 years of animal testing on drugs, pesticides, industrial chemicals, food additives and consumer products. Testing protocols for the conduct of carcinogenicity studies in rodents have been developed in Guidelines promulgated by regulatory agencies, including the US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration), the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) for the EU member states and the MAFF (Ministries of Agriculture, Forestries and Fisheries) and MHW (Ministry of Health and Welfare) in Japan. The basis of critical elements of the study design that lead to an accepted identification of the carcinogenic hazard of substances in food and beverages is the focus of this review. The approaches used by entities well-known for carcinogenicity testing and/or guideline development are discussed. Particular focus is placed on comparison of testing programs used by the US National Toxicology Program (NTP) and advocated in OECD guidelines to the testing programs of the European Ramazzini Foundation (ERF), an organization with numerous published carcinogenicity studies. This focus allows for a good comparison of differences in approaches to carcinogenicity testing and allows for a critical consideration of elements important to appropriate carcinogenicity study designs and practices. OECD protocols serve as good standard models for carcinogenicity testing protocol design. Additionally, the detailed design of any protocol should include attention to the rationale for inclusion of particular elements, including the impact of those elements on study interpretations. Appropriate interpretation of study results is dependent on rigorous evaluation of the study design and conduct, including differences from standard practices. Important considerations are differences in the strain of animal used, diet and housing practices, rigorousness

  18. Risks associated with melamine and related triazine contamination of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Re; Riviere, Je

    2010-01-01

    Recent adulteration of milk products with melamine (ME) in several countries caused adverse health effects and even deaths in infants. Earlier, in 2007, contamination of pet food with ME and its related contaminants was associated with many clinical cases of canine and feline nephrotoxicity, and in some cases mortality. ME is a triazine compound that is often detected with other triazine analogs such as cyanuric acid. As is the custom in some livestock operations, the contaminated pet food was mixed with feed intended for the swine and poultry industry. This practice has raised several questions as to whether ME and its related triazines would adversely affect the health of these food animals, and whether meat products derived from swine and poultry could contain high-enough levels of these contaminants to warrant public health concern. Data for this review article were obtained from recent research efforts in our laboratory, peer-reviewed publications cited in PubMed, and information available at USDA, US FDA, and WHO websites. The primary issues discussed are related to (1) the chemistry and interactions between ME and its triazine analogs; (2) reported animal and human exposures with possible pathways through which ME can enter the human food chain; (3) mammalian toxicology; (4) comparative pharmacokinetics (PK) and modeling strategies used to predict residue levels; and (5) emerging issues and management strategies.

  19. Formation and reduction of carcinogenic furan in various model systems containing food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Sil; Her, Jae-Young; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to analyse and reduce furan in various model systems. Furan model systems consisting of monosaccharides (0.5M glucose and ribose), amino acids (0.5M alanine and serine) and/or 1.0M ascorbic acid were heated at 121°C for 25 min. The effects of food additives (each 0.1M) such as metal ions (iron sulphate, magnesium sulphate, zinc sulphate and calcium sulphate), antioxidants (BHT and BHA), and sodium sulphite on the formation of furan were measured. The level of furan formed in the model systems was 6.8-527.3 ng/ml. The level of furan in the model systems of glucose/serine and glucose/alanine increased 7-674% when food additives were added. In contrast, the level of furan decreased by 18-51% in the Maillard reaction model systems that included ribose and alanine/serine with food additives except zinc sulphate.

  20. Recycled paper-paperboard for food contact materials: contaminants suspected and migration into foods and food simulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Nicoleta A; Tiberto, Francesca; Vasileiadis, Sotirios; Lamastra, Lucrezia; Trevisan, Marco

    2013-12-15

    Contaminant residues in food packaging is a new challenge of our time, as it may pose a threat for consumers. Higher levels of contaminants were observed in food packaging made by recycled materials, even if little information is available for some groups of contaminants. The present study proposes a procedure for analyzing three different groups of organic contaminants in recycled paper and paperboard. Seventeen commercial samples were analyzed for the presence of bisphenol A (BPA), bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), nonylphenol monoethoxylate (NMP) and nonylphenol di-ethoxilate (NDP). Not all the samples contained all the contaminants; BPA was the only substance present in all the samples. The concentrations detected were quite high and, in most of the cases, in agreement with results reported in previous studies. Substance migration tests from spiked/non-spiked samples for two dry foods and Tenax® food simulant were undertaken. BPA migration quotients were always lower than 1%, whereas the migration quotients of DEHP were higher than 2.0%. The highest nonylphenols migration quotients were 6.5% for NMP and 8.2% for NDP. Tenax® simulates well the contaminants migration from paperboard to dry food, in some cases being even more severe than the food.

  1. The Relationships between Selection and Processing Food with Escherichia coli Contaminant on Food Stall Serving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tris Eryando

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli in food stalls surrounding the X Campuss in Depok, year 2012. The research conducted to examine food safety, which were served in surrounding the campus X in Depok. Escherichia coli (E. coli existence was used to indicate the quality of hygiene and sanitation of the food that was served. Using the cross sectional method, the research examined the persons who served the food to be sold in the food stalls in the campus. There were 173 food servers chosen as the respondents from 10 different food stalls around the university. The existence of E. coli examined in the microbiology laboratory in the Faculty of Public Health. Using the most probable number (MPN method found that 59.54% of the food served in the campus were contaminated E. coli. Factors affecting the existence of E. coli were the raw materials (vegetables treated and the length of cooking of the materials (rice/beens. The improper treatment such as washing with no running water or even unwashed vegetables had 5 times risk of the E. coli contamination. Cooking less than 15 minutes was also more risky than cooking more than 15 minutes. As a result, this is very important to find a method to improve knowledge and to increase practical skills in food safety. Furthermore, in this research area may give contribution to avoid E. coli contamination which will prevent unnecessary illness among students in the campus.

  2. Heating of food and haemoglobin adducts from carcinogens: possible precursor role of glycidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindsø Landin, H; Tareke, E; Rydberg, P; Olsson, U; Törnqvist, M

    2000-11-01

    Studies of adducts from reactive compounds to haemoglobin (Hb) by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the N-alkyl Edman method reveals the occurrence of N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)valine (diHOPrVal) at levels of 1-2 pmol/g Hb, in persons without known exposure. The hypothesis that this background originates from glycidol or related compounds during heating of food was tested in experiments with rats. Animals fed fried animal feed for 30 or 72 days showed an increase of the diHOPrVal level by about 50% compared with controls. Several arguments, such as the formation of reactive oxiranes by heat-induced dehydration of glycol configurations in glycerol and sugars, support the idea that glycidol (or e.g. glycidyl esters) are precursors of the adduct. In Hb samples, reduced for stabilisation of aldehyde adducts, relatively high levels of adducts determined as diHOPrVal were found, although without significant relation to frying of the feed. There is thus no indication that reduction in vivo of, for example, the Schiff base from glyceraldehyde, is a pathway for formation of the diHOPrVal. The background level of diHOPrVal in humans Hb is low, and the cancer risk associated with exposure to the specific alkylator-probably glycidol-formed in cooking, is therefore presumably low. The result implies, however, that low-molecular mass mutagenic oxiranes formed during the heating of food should be studied further.

  3. FOOD: an interactive code to calculate internal radiation doses from contaminated food products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.; Hoenes, G.R.; Soldat, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    An interactive code, FOOD, has been written in BASIC for the UNIVAC 1108 to facilitate calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products. In the dose model, vegetation may be contaminated by either air or irrigation water containing radionuclides. The model considers two mechanisms for radionuclide contamination of vegetation: direct deposition on leaves and uptake from soil through the root system. The user may select up to 14 food categories with corresponding consumption rates, growing periods and either irrigation rates or atmospheric deposition rates. These foods include various kinds of produce, grains and animal products. At present, doses may be calculated for the skin, total body and five internal organs from 190 radionuclides. Dose summaries can be displayed at the local terminal. Further details on percent contribution to dose by nuclide and by food type are available from an auxiliary high-speed printer. This output also includes estimated radionuclide concentrations in soil, plants and animal products.

  4. Traditional and modern Greenlandic food - dietary composition, nutrients and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutch, Bente; Dyerberg, Jørn; Pedersen, Henning Sloth

    2007-01-01

    , the intakes of vitamin A, vitamin D, and iron were extremely high and borderline toxic. The levels of contaminants such as organochlorins and heavy metals were also strongly correlated with the relative content of local food in the diet. The best balance between potentially beneficial and harmful substances...... increase their frequency of these diseases. However, since the 1970s it has become evident that the marine-based Inuit diet also contains high levels of potentially toxic lipophilic organic pollutants and heavy metals. Since these two food related opposing health effects appear to be inseparable...... and the modern food from 2004 to 2006, significant differences were found in the dietary composition. The percentage of local food had decreased, to a present average of about 20% and with it the dietary content of n-3 fatty acids. Also, the intakes of many vitamins and minerals had decreased, and were below...

  5. Impact of food processing and detoxification treatments on mycotoxin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlovsky, Petr; Suman, Michele; Berthiller, Franz; De Meester, Johan; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Perrin, Irène; Oswald, Isabelle P; Speijers, Gerrit; Chiodini, Alessandro; Recker, Tobias; Dussort, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal metabolites commonly occurring in food, which pose a health risk to the consumer. Maximum levels for major mycotoxins allowed in food have been established worldwide. Good agricultural practices, plant disease management, and adequate storage conditions limit mycotoxin levels in the food chain yet do not eliminate mycotoxins completely. Food processing can further reduce mycotoxin levels by physical removal and decontamination by chemical or enzymatic transformation of mycotoxins into less toxic products. Physical removal of mycotoxins is very efficient: manual sorting of grains, nuts, and fruits by farmers as well as automatic sorting by the industry significantly lowers the mean mycotoxin content. Further processing such as milling, steeping, and extrusion can also reduce mycotoxin content. Mycotoxins can be detoxified chemically by reacting with food components and technical aids; these reactions are facilitated by high temperature and alkaline or acidic conditions. Detoxification of mycotoxins can also be achieved enzymatically. Some enzymes able to transform mycotoxins naturally occur in food commodities or are produced during fermentation but more efficient detoxification can be achieved by deliberate introduction of purified enzymes. We recommend integrating evaluation of processing technologies for their impact on mycotoxins into risk management. Processing steps proven to mitigate mycotoxin contamination should be used whenever necessary. Development of detoxification technologies for high-risk commodities should be a priority for research. While physical techniques currently offer the most efficient post-harvest reduction of mycotoxin content in food, biotechnology possesses the largest potential for future developments.

  6. Consumer contribution to food contamination in Brazil: modelling the food safety risk in the home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Paulo Olinto da Motta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne diseases are among the most widespread public health issues, killing about 2.2 million people annually, and costing hundreds of billions of US dollars for governments, companies, families and consumers (WHO, 2007. In Brazil, foodborne diseases acquired in the home account for 55% of notified outbreaks (BRASIL, 2012. Several studies have investigated aspects of consumer behaviour concerning food poisoning, mapping practices in the home, but it remains a challenge to obtain a full picture of the consumer contribution to food contamination (REDMOND and GRIFFITH, 2003. This study aimed to assess the risks of food contamination in the home. A questionnaire containing 140 questions concerning food safety knowledge, handling practices, personal hygiene and basic health care, covering the stages when the food is under the control of the consumer, was developed and used to gather data for analysis. Appropriate scores were attributed to the questions (consequences to food safety and answers (likelihood of food contamination. A risk estimate algorithm and an appropriate risk ranking scale were used to assess the results. From August 2011 to March 2012, survey questionnaires were collected from 2,775 consumers in Brazil across 19 out of 27 state capitals. The study found risky practices with the potential to lead to food poisoning occurrences in the domestic environment in the following handling steps: food transportation, food preparation, cooking and the handling of leftovers. The personal hygiene, age, formal education, family income and basic health care habits represented the factors most related to the risky practices of consumers, which could orientate food safety educational campaigns for the Brazilian population.

  7. Contamination of Aflatoxins in Different Kinds of Foods in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the contamination of total aflatoxins (AFs) in different kinds of foods including corn, peanut, rice,walnut, and pine nut in six provinces and two municipalities in China. Methods A total of 283 samples of corn, peanut, rice,walnut and pine nut were randomly collected from local markets in Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hubei, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang provinces, as well as in Shanghai and Chongqing municipalities. The samples were ground to which acetonitrile/water solution was added. After filtering, the extract was transferred into a MycoSepTM purifying column and was pressed slowly. Then the purified liquid was derivatized with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and assayed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results AFs were detected in 70.27% of corn samples, with a mean level of 27.44 μg/kg and the highest level of 1098.36 μg/kg. In peanut, the AFs detection rate was 23.08%, with a mean level of 0.82 μg/kg and the highest level of 28.39 μg/kg.Very few rice samples with AFs were detected. The AFs levels were very low in walnut and pine nut. Conclusion Corn is the food most seriously contaminated with AFs in China. AFB1 is the main aflatoxin which is found as a contaminant in foods.

  8. FoodBioTimerAssay: a new microbiological biosensor for detection of Escherichia coli food contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Berlutti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Prevention of foodborne diseases is a fundamental goal for public health and industries engaged in food preparation and distribution. The correct procedure to ensure an effective prevention of foodborne diseases consists essentially in microbiological monitoring and enumeration of indicator microorganisms of faecal contamination at critical control points along the food producing procedures. Here, we propose a new microbiological biosensor, called FoodBioTimerAssay (FBTA, for rapid and reliable detection of Escherichia coli as indicator of faecal contamination in food and surface samples.

    Methods: A total of 122 samples were analysed using both experimental FBTA and Reference method. FBTA employs FBTM medium and counts bacteria through microbial metabolism measure: the time required for colour switch (red-to-yellow of FBTM, due to E. coli metabolism, is correlated to initial bacterial concentration.

    Results: FBTA results showed an overall agreement percentage with Reference method equal to 97.54%. Discrepancies concerned three samples (1 food and 2 surface samples. Moreover, the time required to perform FBTA method was 3-fold shorter than Reference one.

    Conclusions: FBTA method may be considered a useful tool for detection of E. coli contamination in food and surface samples. Therefore, FBTA method may be successfully employed in risk analysis of foodborne diseases.

  9. Evaluation of sugar-cane bagasse as bioadsorbent in the textile wastewater treatment contaminated with carcinogenic congo red dye

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Sartório Raymundo; Romina Zanarotto; Marciela Belisário; Madson de Godoi Pereira; Joselito Nardy Ribeiro; Araceli Verónica Flores Nardy Ribeiro

    2010-01-01

    A methodology involving sugar cane bagasse bioadsorbent was developed in order to remove the carcinogenic congo red dye from aqueous medium. The results showed high efficiency with retention of 64 ± 6% in synthetic congo red solution and 94 ± 5% in effluent enriched with congo red, at 10.0 g of the bioadsorbent. The adsorption system provided a maximum adsorption capacity of 4.43 mg/g. Tests showed independence adsorption properties, when compared with the column flow rates. The treatment uni...

  10. Traditional and modern Greenlandic food - Dietary composition, nutrients and contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutch, Bente [Centre for Arctic Environmental Medicine, Aarhus University, Building 260, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000, Aarhus (Denmark)], E-mail: bd@mil.au.dk; Dyerberg, Jorn [Capio Diagnostic, a.s., Nygaardsvej 32, DK-2100, Copenhagen O (Denmark); Pedersen, Henning Sloth [Centre for Arctic Environmental Medicine, Aarhus University, Building 260, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000, Aarhus (Denmark); Centre of Primary Health Care, Box 1001, DK-3900 Nuuk, Greenland (Denmark); Aschlund, Ejner; Hansen, Jens C. [Centre for Arctic Environmental Medicine, Aarhus University, Building 260, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2007-10-01

    Objectives: High levels of n-3 fatty acids and other nutrients in traditional Inuit food appear to provide some protection against the typical diseases of affluent industrialized societies: cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. An increased intake of imported food among Inuits will probably increase their frequency of these diseases. However, since the 1970s it has become evident that the marine-based Inuit diet also contains high levels of potentially toxic lipophilic organic pollutants and heavy metals. Since these two food related opposing health effects appear to be inseparable, the phenomenon has been known as 'The Arctic Dilemma'. However, both the fatty acid composition and the contaminant levels vary in Greenlandic food items. Thus in principle it is possible to compose a diet where the benefits and risks are better balanced. Our objectives of this study were to compare traditional and modern meals in Greenland concerning the dietary composition, nutrients, and health indicators among the consumers. Study design: The present study was a cross-sectional dietary survey as part of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment, Human Health Programme (AMAP). These results were compared with older dietary surveys in Greenland. Methods: Dietary components, fatty acids, and nutrients in 90 local meals collected by duplicate portion method in Uummannaq town, north Greenland 2004 and in Narsaq, south Greenland 2006, were compared with 177 duplicate meals sampled in the village of Igdslorsuit, Uummannaq, district, 1976 and also compared with other dietary studies in Greenland 1953-1987. Anthropometric measures (weight, height, and body mass index, BMI) and blood lipids were measured as health indicators among the participants. Results: Between the traditional foods sampled or analysed 30-50 years ago and the modern food from 2004 to 2006, significant differences were found in the dietary composition. The percentage of local food had decreased, to a present

  11. The Food Contaminant Deoxynivalenol Exacerbates the Genotoxicity of Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payros, Delphine; Martin, Patricia; Secher, Thomas; Bracarense, Ana Paula F. L.; Boury, Michèle; Laffitte, Joelle; Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An increasing number of human beings from developed countries are colonized by Escherichia coli strains producing colibactin, a genotoxin suspected to be associated with the development of colorectal cancers. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent mycotoxin that contaminates staple food—especially cereal products—in Europe and North America. This study investigates the effect of the food contaminant DON on the genotoxicity of the E. coli strains producing colibactin. In vitro, intestinal epithelial cells were coexposed to DON and E. coli producing colibactin. In vivo, newborn rats colonized at birth with E. coli producing colibactin were fed a DON-contaminated diet. Intestinal DNA damage was estimated by the phosphorylation of histone H2AX. DON exacerbates the genotoxicity of the E. coli producing colibactin in a time- and dose-dependent manner in vitro. Although DON had no effect on the composition of the gut microbiota, and especially on the number of E. coli, a significant increase in DNA damage was observed in intestinal epithelial cells of animals colonized by E. coli strains producing colibactin and coexposed to DON compared to animals colonized with E. coli strains unable to produce colibactin or animals exposed only to DON. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the genotoxicity of E. coli strains producing colibactin, increasingly present in the microbiota of asymptomatic human beings, is modulated by the presence of DON in the diet. This raises questions about the synergism between food contaminants and gut microbiota with regard to intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:28292979

  12. Strategies for the detection of food pathogens and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hearty, Stephen; Leonard, Paul; Sheehan, Alfredo Darmanin;

    We routinely use Biacore for affinity ranking and kinetic characterisation of diverse panels of hybridoma-derived and recombinant antibodies against a wide range of different clinically relevant antigens for diagnostic applications. Generally the analytes of interest are haptens or defined protei...... to date with using Biacore for analysis of food contaminants and in particular the challenges associated with large analyte detection......We routinely use Biacore for affinity ranking and kinetic characterisation of diverse panels of hybridoma-derived and recombinant antibodies against a wide range of different clinically relevant antigens for diagnostic applications. Generally the analytes of interest are haptens or defined protein...... molecules and once suitably high affinity antibodies have been isolated, it is relatively straightforward to design and optimise concentration-based assays using SPR. Recently we have investigated the potential of applying Biacore technology to routine food analysis. Our experiences have shown...

  13. Development of a high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the routine detection of the carcinogen acrylamide in food, via rapid derivatisation pre-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Andrew; Fodey, Terence; Elliott, Christopher

    2008-02-11

    The spontaneous formation of the neurotoxic carcinogen acrylamide in a wide range of cooked foods has recently been discovered. These foods include bread and other bakery products, crisps, chips, breakfast cereals, and coffee. To date, the diminutive size of acrylamide (71.08 Da) has prevented the development of screening immunoassays for this chemical. In this study, a polyclonal antibody capable of binding the carcinogen was produced by the synthesis of an immunogen comprising acrylamide derivatised with 3-mercaptobenzoic acid (3-MBA), and its conjugation to the carrier protein bovine thyroglobulin. Antiserum from the immunised rabbit was harvested and fully characterised. It displayed no binding affinity for acrylamide or 3-MBA but had a high affinity for 3-MBA-derivitised acrylamide. The antisera produced was utilised in the development of an ELISA based detection system for acrylamide. Spiked water samples were assayed for acrylamide content using a previously published extraction method validated for coffee, crispbread, potato, milk chocolate and potato crisp matrices. Extracted acrylamide was then subjected to a rapid 1-h derivatisation with 3-MBA, pre-analysis. The ELISA was shown to have a high specificity for acrylamide, with a limit of detection in water samples of 65.7 microgkg(-1), i.e. potentially suitable for acrylamide detection in a wide range of food commodities. Future development of this assay will increase sensitivity further. This is the first report of an immunoassay capable of detecting the carcinogen, as its small size has necessitated current analytical detection via expensive, slower, physico-chemical techniques such as Gas or Liquid Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

  14. Utilization of charge-transfer complexation for the detection of carcinogenic substances in foods: Spectroscopic characterization of ethyl carbamate with some traditional π-acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Abdel Majid A.; Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.

    2013-04-01

    The study of toxic and carcinogenic substances in foods represents one of the most demanding areas in food safety, due to their repercussions for public health. One potentially toxic compound for humans is ethyl carbamate (EC). EC is a multi-site genotoxic carcinogen of widespread occurrence in fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. Structural and thermal stability of charge-transfer complexes formed between EC as a donor with quinol (QL), picric acid (PA), chloranilic acid (CLA), p-chloranil (p-CHL) and 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB) as acceptors were reported. Elemental analysis (CHN), electronic absorption spectra, photometric titration, IR, and 1H NMR spectra show that the interaction between EC and acceptors was stabilized by hydrogen bonding, via a 1:1 stoichiometry. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis indicates that the formation of molecular CT complexes was stable, exothermic and spontaneous. Finally, the CT complexes were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The results indicated that the [(EC)(QL)] complex exhibited strong antimicrobial activities against various bacterial and fungal strains compared with standard drugs.

  15. Consumption of organic meat does not diminish the carcinogenic potential associated with the intake of persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez; Boada, Luis D; Mendoza, Zenaida; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valerón, Pilar F; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Almeida-González, Maira; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2015-04-19

    Numerous studies have shown an epidemiological link between meat consumption and the incidence of cancer, and it has been suggested that this relationship may be motivated by the presence of carcinogenic contaminants on it. Among the most frequently detected contaminants in meat are several types of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and it is well known that many of them are carcinogenic. On the other hand, an increasing number of consumers choose to feed on what are perceived as healthier foods. Thus, the number of consumers of organic food is growing. However, environmental contamination by POPs is ubiquitous, and it is therefore unlikely that the practices of organic food production are able to prevent this contamination. To test this hypothesis, we acquired 76 samples of meat (beef, chicken, and lamb) of two modes of production (organic and conventional) and quantified their levels of 33 carcinogenic POPs. On this basis, we determined the human meat-related daily dietary exposure to these carcinogens using as a model a population with a high consumption of meat, such as the Spanish population. The maximum allowable meat consumption for this population and the carcinogenic risk quotients associated with the current pattern of consumption were calculated. As expected, no sample was completely free of carcinogenic contaminants, and the differences between organically and conventionally produced meats were minimal. According to these results, the current pattern of meat consumption exceeded the maximum limits, which are set according to the levels of contaminations, and this is associated with a relevant carcinogenic risk. Strikingly, the consumption of organically produced meat does not diminish this carcinogenic risk, but on the contrary, it seems to be even higher, especially that associated with lamb consumption.

  16. Evaluation of sugar-cane bagasse as bioadsorbent in the textile wastewater treatment contaminated with carcinogenic congo red dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Sartório Raymundo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A methodology involving sugar cane bagasse bioadsorbent was developed in order to remove the carcinogenic congo red dye from aqueous medium. The results showed high efficiency with retention of 64 ± 6% in synthetic congo red solution and 94 ± 5% in effluent enriched with congo red, at 10.0 g of the bioadsorbent. The adsorption system provided a maximum adsorption capacity of 4.43 mg/g. Tests showed independence adsorption properties, when compared with the column flow rates. The treatment units could be operated with flexibility. From the results, it was possible to conclude that sugar cane bagasse could be an adequate bioadsorbent.Neste trabalho foi desenvolvida uma metodologia de remoção do corante carcinogênico congo red de sistemas aquosos. Os resultados mostraram uma elevada eficiência de remoção sendo de 64 ± 6% para soluções sintéticas de vermelho congo, e 94 ± 5% para efluente industrial enriquecido com vermelho congo utilizando 10 g de bioadsorvente. A capacidade máxima adsotiva encontrada foi de 4,43 mg/g. Os testes de percolação revelaram independência das porcentagens adsortivas em relação às vazões das colunas. Estes resultados indicam viabilidade de uso do bagaço de cana-de-açucar no tratamento de efluentes contendo o congo red.

  17. Food Adulteration and Bio-magnification of Environmental Contaminants: A Comprehensive Risk Framework for Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehreen eMajed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article thoroughly investigates the severity of the prevailing environmental conditions and evaluates the resulting threats to food intake and public health in Bangladesh by establishing relationship among different contaminant transfer mechanisms to human. It describes the potential of certain contaminants to get bio-magnified through the food chain. A database was prepared on a number of contaminants in the study area that are responsible for rendering different foods vulnerable to produce long term or short-term health effects. Contaminants that have been identified in the food sources were categorized in a continuum based on their allowable daily intake. A protocol has been developed which will enable the assessment of the potential of a contaminant to bio-magnify through food chain to understand the contribution of a contaminant on different levels of food chain. The study also provides a detailed assessment of the public health risks associated with direct ingestion of adulterated foods and intake of contaminants through food chain or water intake. Their intake to human body was quantified, which provides an indication of the toxicity level of the contaminants and possible impact on human health. The traditional four steps of risk assessment technique have been employed for some model contaminants (including metals, organic contaminants and food adulterants. Additionally, existing rules and regulations of Bangladesh were identified with possible limitations that can play significant role in controlling the food adulteration practices and concentration of contaminants in the environment and human body. Finally, a holistic approach to necessary interventions has been prescribed at policy, treatment and evaluation level to prevent the water pollution and food adulteration. Thus, a much-needed comprehensive framework is prescribed in this study to promote safety in food handling, preserve environment and improve health-based strategies in

  18. A survey on Bacterial Contamination of Food Supply in the West of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehereh Faramarzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Transfer of food born diseases is a common problem in hygiene and public health. The bacteria are the most important factors of food contamination and intoxications. The aim of this study is to determine the bacterial contamination of food supply in the west of Tehran supermarkets. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 642 samples of foods were taken randomly from west of Tehran supermarkets. The levels of bacterial contamination of the foods were assessed in the department of food and drug microbiology of lab, affiliated to Iran University of medical science. Results: Salads were the most (50% and protein products (6.36% the least rate in terms of mesophilic bacteria contamination. Also, sweets (13.46% and protein products (1.73% in terms of Coliforms. Salads (58.33% and dairy products (9.84% with respect to Escherichia coli, sweets (4.81% and salads (0% in terms of Staphylococcus aureus, sweets (4.81% and dairy products (0.39% with respect to Bacillus cereus, were the most and least contaminated foods, respectively. Conclusion: In overall, salads had the most contamination percentage with respect to mesophilic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus (P . According to our study, we conclude that training of dealers and food suppliers are necessary and healthy principals should be followed. Also supervision on food packing and storage should be considered to prevent food microbial contamination.

  19. Attractiveness of food and avoidance from contamination as conflicting stimuli to habitat selection by fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cristiano V M; Rodríguez, Elizabeth N V; Salvatierra, David; Cedeño-Macias, Luis A; Vera-Vera, Victoria C; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Ribeiro, Rui

    2016-11-01

    Habitat selection by fish is the outcome of a choice between different stimuli. Typically, the presence of food tends to attract organisms, while contamination triggers an avoidance response to prevent toxic effects. Given that both food and contaminants are not homogeneously distributed in the environment and that food can be available in contaminated zones, a key question has been put forward in the present study: does a higher availability of food in contaminated areas interfere in the avoidance response to contaminants regardless of the contamination level? Tilapia fry (Oreochromis sp.; 2.5-3.0 cm and 0.5-0.8 g) were exposed to two different effluent samples, diluted along a free-choice, non-forced exposure system simulating a contamination gradient. Initially, avoidance to the effluents was checked during a one hour exposure. Afterwards, food was added to the system so that the availability of food increased with the increase in the level of contamination, and the avoidance response to contamination was checked during another hour. Results clearly showed a concentration-dependent avoidance response for both effluents during the first hour (i.e., with no food). However, in presence of the food, the avoidance pattern was altered: organisms were propelled to intermittently move towards contaminated areas where food availability was higher. The incursions were taken regardless of the potential risk linked to the toxic effects. In conclusion, even when the risk of toxicity was imminent, tilapia fry were more intensively stimulated by the attractiveness of the food than by repulsion to the contamination.

  20. Raman spectroscopy-based detection of chemical contaminants in food powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy technique has proven to be a reliable method for qualitative detection of chemical contaminants in food ingredients and products. For quantitative imaging-based detection, each contaminant particle in a food sample must be detected and it is important to determine the necessary sp...

  1. Carcinogenic N-nitrosodimethylamine as a contamination in drugs containing 4-dimethylamino-2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-one (amidopyrine, aminophenazone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrand, G; Spiegelhalder, B; Kann, J; Klein, R; Preussmann, R

    1979-01-01

    A total of 68 commercially available drugs containing amidopyrine were investigated for contamination with the strong carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). All samples contained varying amounts of NDMA. About half of the drugs contained 1--10 micrograms/kg, 40% contained 11--50 micrograms/kg, 7% contained 51--10 micrograms/kg and one sample had 370 micrograms/kg. NDMA-contents in batches of pure amidopyrine that had been utilized for preparation of drugs were higher than those in the respective drugs: about one-third was in the range of 20--50 micrograms/kg, one-third had 51--100 micrograms/kg, and one-third was above 100 micrograms/kg. There was, however, no correlation between NDMA-contents of batches of the pure substance and NDMA-contents of the drugs prepared from these batched. NDMA concentrations in the samples were inhomogenously distributed. It could be demonstrated that amidopyrine in substance reacts extremely rapidly with nitrogen oxides from the air to form NDMA. Ascorbic acid, which prevents nitrosamine formation in aqueous-acidic solution, under these conditions had no protective effect.

  2. Climate change-contaminant interactions in marine food webs: Toward a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alava, Juan José; Cheung, William W L; Ross, Peter S; Sumaila, U Rashid

    2017-02-17

    Climate change is reshaping the way in which contaminants move through the global environment, in large part by changing the chemistry of the oceans and affecting the physiology, health, and feeding ecology of marine biota. Climate change-associated impacts on structure and function of marine food webs, with consequent changes in contaminant transport, fate, and effects, are likely to have significant repercussions to those human populations that rely on fisheries resources for food, recreation, or culture. Published studies on climate change-contaminant interactions with a focus on food web bioaccumulation were systematically reviewed to explore how climate change and ocean acidification may impact contaminant levels in marine food webs. We propose here a conceptual framework to illustrate the impacts of climate change on contaminant accumulation in marine food webs, as well as the downstream consequences for ecosystem goods and services. The potential impacts on social and economic security for coastal communities that depend on fisheries for food are discussed. Climate change-contaminant interactions may alter the bioaccumulation of two priority contaminant classes: the fat-soluble persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as the protein-binding methylmercury (MeHg). These interactions include phenomena deemed to be either climate change dominant (i.e., climate change leads to an increase in contaminant exposure) or contaminant dominant (i.e., contamination leads to an increase in climate change susceptibility). We illustrate the pathways of climate change-contaminant interactions using case studies in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. The important role of ecological and food web modeling to inform decision-making in managing ecological and human health risks of chemical pollutants contamination under climate change is also highlighted. Finally, we identify the need to develop integrated policies that manage the

  3. ""Sudan Red I"" and China's Food Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAOTIANBI

    2005-01-01

    FIVE days after the UK Food Standards Agency announced the recall of food contaminated with the carcinogenic dye Sudan Red I, China's food safety authorities demanded a comprehensive examination of all domestically produced food. Evidence suggests that Cbina's Food Safety Administration acts in accordance with international practices, and has the ability to deal with emergencies.

  4. Isolation and Identification of Carcinogen Acenaphthene-Degrading Endemic Bacteria from Crude Oil Contaminated Soils around Abadan Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Kafilzadeh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: PAHs are non-polar organic compounds consisting of two or more fused benzene multi-rings. Among these compounds, acenaphthene is a multi-ring hydrocarbon that occurs abundantly in nature. Use of microorganisms to clean the contaminations of soil can be cheap and effective. The most important acenaphthene-degrading bacteria are pseudomonas, micrococcus, and Bacillus. The goal of this study was to isolate and identify the bacteria which degrade acenaphthene in soils around Abadan Refinery and to investigate the relation between the levels of environmental pollution with acenaphthene. Materials and Methods: Soil samples were collected from three areas around Abadan Refinery. The number of the bacteria was counted on the nutrient agar culture with and without acenaphthene. Isolation of the bacteria was done by culturing the samples on acenaphthene broth with a mineral-salt medium, and on an acenaphthene agar medium. Then, the bacteria were identified via biochemical diagnostic tests. Results: The logarithm average of the bacteria was 4.786 ± 0.073 at a medium with acenaphthene, which was 6.671 ± 0.073 less than that of the control medium. The maximum number of degrading bacteria was 7.089 ± 0.089 at Station C, and the minimum number of the degrading bacteria was 4.485 ± 0.089 at Station B. In this study, Bacillus sp, Micrococcus Luteus, Corynebacterium sp, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas sp bacteria were isolated and identified in terms of frequency, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the soil around Abadan Refinery contained a great number of acenaphthene degrading bacteria, especially Bacillus and Micrococcus.

  5. Ridascreen® fast peanut, a rapid and safe tool to determine peanut contamination in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Immer, U.; Reck, B.; Lindeke, S.; Koppelman, S.

    2004-01-01

    During the last years allergenic substances in food have gained more and more attention. Stricter rules for a peanut free food labelling demand a peanut contamination less than 5 ppm. The maintenance of a high quality of food products with regards to allergenic exposure is preferable warranted with

  6. ORGANIC CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION IN SEDIMENTS, POLYCHAETES (NEREIS VIRENS) AND THE AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS IN A LABORATORY FOOD CHAIN EXPERIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the transfer of organic contaminants from an environmentally contaminated marine sediment through a simple marine food chain. The infaunal polychaete, Nereis virens, was exposed to contaminated sediment collected from the Passa...

  7. Pathways and factors for food safety and food security at PFOS contaminated sites within a problem based learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Gianfranco; D'Hollander, Wendy; Oliaei, Fardin; Stahl, Thorsten; Weber, Roland

    2015-06-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and related substances have been listed in Annex B of the Stockholm Convention. The implementation requires inventories of use, stockpiles, and environmental contamination including contaminated sites and measures for (risk) reduction and phase out. In most countries monitoring capacity is not available and therefore other approaches for assessment of contaminated sites are needed. Available informations about PFOS contamination in hot spot areas and its bio-accumulation in the food webs have been merged to build up a worst-case scenario We model PFOS transfer from 1 to 100ngL(-1) range in water to extensive and free-range food producing animals, also via the spread of contaminated sludges on agriculture soils. The modeling indicates that forages represented 78% of the exposure in ruminants, while soil accounted for >80% in outdoor poultry/eggs and pigs. From the carry-over rates derived from literature, in pork liver, egg, and feral fish computed concentration falls at 101, 28 and 2.7ngg(-1), respectively, under the 1ngL(-1) PFOS scenario. Assuming a major consumption of food produced from a contaminated area, advisories on egg and fish, supported by good agriculture/farming practices could abate 75% of the human food intake. Such advisories would allow people to become resilient in a PFOS contaminated area through an empowerment of the food choices, bringing the alimentary exposure toward the current Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 150ngkg(-1)bodyweightd(-1) proposed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).

  8. Food toxicology. Residues and contaminants: Risks and consumer protection; Lebensmitteltoxikologie. Rueckstaende und Kontaminanten: Risiken und Verbraucherschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nau, H. [Tieraerztliche Hochschule Hannover, ZA Lebensmitteltoxikologie (Germany); Steinberg, P. [Potsdam Univ., Inst. fuer Ernaehrungswissenschaft (Germany); Kietzmann, M. (eds.) [Tieraerztliche Hochschule Hannover, Inst. fuer Pharmakologie, Toxikologie/Pharmazie (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    In a detailed introduction, the basic methods of risk assessment for potentially toxic food constituents are presented as well as the analytical methods applied for measuring even very small concentrations of contaminants. The main classes of substances relevant in foods ar represented, i.e. animal drugs, fungicides and herbicides, natural toxins, contaminants, prions from BSE-infested animals and residues of 'new' proteins and 'new' DNA from genetically modified foods. New legislation in Germany and Europe is presented including the National Residue Monitoring Plant which is to enable annual monitoring of residue concentrations in foods derived from animals. (orig.)

  9. Dioxin contamination in food - Bayreuth, Germany, from September 28 to October 1, 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büchert, Arne; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Dyke, P.;

    2001-01-01

    prominent recent example is the Belgian dioxin contamination of feeding stuff in 1999. The Belgian dioxin contamination was not detected due to dioxin monitoring programs but by their direct biological effects seen in animals. Four other cases of dioxin contamination have been detected in Europe since 1997...... due to local monitoring programs. One of them (citrus pulp pellets 1998) was in a much larger scale than the Belgian dioxin contamination. The general population's exposure to dioxins and PCBs is still in the same range (1-4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg body weight and day) as the recently revised WHO tolerable......Dioxin and PCB monitoring programs for food and feeding stuff in most countries of the world, including many European Countries are currently inadequate. Better control of food production lines and food processing procedures is needed to minimize entry of dioxin to the food chain and will help...

  10. Synthetic routes to the food carcinogen 2 amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (8-MeIQx) and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, S

    1995-01-01

    A review of five different routes to the synthesis of the grilled or fried food carcinogen 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (8-MeIQx) and of closely related compounds developed in different laboratories is presented. Interest in the synthesis of these amines began in the late 1970s when the research group led by Professor T. Sugimura (National Cancer Center, Tokyo) detected extremely high mutagenicity in the charred parts of fish and meat that could not be explained only by the presence of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. A number of new mutagenic heterocyclic amines have been detected, isolated and identified since then (de Meester, 1989; Overvik and Gustafsson, 1990; Felton and Knize, 1991; Jägerstad et al., 1991). It is still not entirely clear how these compounds are formed during cooking. For the "IQ-group" of the amines (2-amino-3-methylimidazo-quinoline and -quinoxaline congeners), a formation pathway from Maillard reaction products and creatinine was conceived by Professor K. Olsson (this laboratory) and presented at the 183rd meeting of the American Chemical Society, Las Vegas in 1982 (Jägerstad et al., 1983). However, the amounts of the amines formed during cooking or in model reaction systems are very small. Therefore, efficient and unambiguous synthetic methods yielding the compounds in isomerically pure form are required for reference purposes in analytical work and structure-biological activity studies. For instance, compare the mutagenicity of 4,8- and 5,8-DiMeIQx, and PhIP and its 3-methyl isomer shown on the following page. The pure compounds are also required in large quantities for long-term animal feeding studies. The length of this article does not allow a presentation of the published synthetic methods for all the heterocyclic amines. Therefore, the syntheses of only one of the food mutagens, 8-MeIQx, and some related compounds are presented. This will hopefully demonstrate the sort of problems the organic chemist encounters and some

  11. Survival of foodborne pathogens on stainless steel surfaces and cross-contamination to foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusumaningrum, H.D.; Riboldi, G.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Beumer, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    The retention of bacteria on food contact surfaces increases the risk of cross-contamination of these microorganisms to food. The risk has been considered to be lowered when the surfaces are dry, partly because bacterial growth and survival would be reduced. However, some non-spore-forming bacteria

  12. 77 FR 5481 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on....) positions that will be discussed at the 6th Session of the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Food (CCCF) of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex), which will be held in Maastricht, The Netherlands, March...

  13. 75 FR 10206 - Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Codex Alimentarius Commission: Meeting of the Codex Committee on... of the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Food (CCCF) of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Codex was established in 1963 by two United Nations organizations,...

  14. Cold plasma rapid decontamination of food contact surfaces contaminated with Salmonella biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-contamination of fresh produce and other foods from persistent pathogen reservoirs is a known risk factor in processing environments. Industry requires a rapid, waterless, zero-contact, chemical-free method for removing pathogens from food-contact surfaces. Cold plasma was tested for its abili...

  15. Disliked food acting as a contaminant in a sample of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S D; Harris, G; Bell, L; Lines, L M

    2012-06-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that a disliked food can act as a contaminant to liked food during childhood. While this has been investigated in an infant sample, the current paper presents the first study to investigate this phenomenon in a sample of young children (4 years 5 months-6 years 1 month old, N=30). Children were shown a liked food at different stages of being contaminated by a disliked food. At each stage, the children were asked to rate their willingness to consume the liked food on a 3-point hedonic scale. The data show that children reduce their rating of a liked food once it has been in contact with a disliked food, in comparison to a like-like combination control measure. The data also show that girls show greater sensitivity than boys to this form of contamination and that the younger children are more likely to show a prolonged response (rating of the liked food does not return to the unadulterated level) than the older children in the sample. Several possible reasons for these findings are discussed including disgust, inferred distaste and associational contamination.

  16. Behavioral response in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea) offered a choice of uncontaminated and cadmium-contaminated food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidar, Primoz; Bozic, Janko; Strus, Jasna

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to find out whether Porcellio scaber discriminates against Cd-contaminated food. The foraging behavior in animals offered uncontaminated and Cd-contaminated food simultaneously was quantified for 48-h employing computer-aided video tracking. To see whether the isopods' selection of less contaminated food could diminish the influence Cd on food consumption, growth, metal assimilation, moulting and mortality, Cd-dosed food (20, 45, 200 and 450 mg kg(-1) dry weight) was offered together with untreated food for 3 weeks. Data from the video tracking experiments revealed that animals visited Cd-dosed food as often as untreated food, but spent much less time near Cd-dosed food. Discrimination against Cd-contaminated food increased with previous experience with contaminated food and/or with increased Cd body burden. In 3 weeks exposure uncontaminated food preference rose with time of exposure and cadmium concentration in food and reached a maximal preference ratio of 65% (untreated food): 35% (Cd-dosed food). The decreased consumption of Cd-dosed food was compensated by the increased consumption of control food. Cadmium body burden increased with time of exposure and cadmium concentration in food consumed, while the influence of Cd on food consumption, growth and moulting was diminished.

  17. Molt frequency of the isopod Porcellio scaber, as a measure of zinc-contaminated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobne, D.; Strus, J. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Biology

    1996-02-01

    The effect of zinc-contaminated leaf litter (250--10,000 {micro}g/g dry wt.) diets on molting in Porcellio scaber, a terrestrial isopod was measured under controlled conditions. The duration of the premolt stage, the period between two successive ecdyses and the rate of molting, was followed during the exposure. Increased zinc concentration in the food caused prolongation of the molt cycle and decreased molt frequency. The duration of the premolt stage was not changed. Molt cycle was not affected drastically due to food deprivation. The application of molt cycle response to contaminated food in toxicity tests is discussed.

  18. Morphological significance of cladosporium contaminants on materials and utensils in contact with food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Toshiko; Park, Bong Joo; Aihara, Maki; Ri, Noritoshi; Saito, Toshiko; Sawada, Takuo; Takatori, Kosuke

    2006-06-01

    Cladosporium contaminants on materials and utensils that come into contact with food were morphologically investigated. The most common contaminants, C. cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum, were detected on the samples. The morphological changes of the Cladosporium species were investigated by using stereoscopic, optical light, fluorescent, and scanning electron microscopes. Microscopically the Cladosporium contaminants were observed as aggregated dark brown spots, strongly pigmented, irregularly swollen, and in long chains. Using fluorescent microscopy, the Cladosporium mycelia were clearly stained with fluorescein diacetate as viable cells, but the old cells were mostly non-viable, as shown by staining with propidium iodide. The dynamics of the morphological changes showed that the penetrating mycelia were closely attached to the surface of the materials and utensils under investigation. These results provide information about the significance of Cladosporium contamination on materials and utensils in contact with food and may contribute to the control of fungal contamination.

  19. Dioxin contamination in food. Bayreuth, Germany, from September 28 to October 1, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchert, A; Cederberg, T; Dyke, P; Fiedler, H; Fürst, P; Hanberg, A; Hosseinpour, J; Hutzinger, O; Kuenen, J G; Malisch, R; Needham, L L; Olie, K; Päpke, O; Rivera Aranda, J; Thanner, G; Umlauf, G; Vartiainen, T; van Holst, C

    2001-01-01

    Dioxin and PCB monitoring programs for food and feeding stuff in most countries of the world, including many European Countries are currently inadequate. Better control of food production lines and food processing procedures is needed to minimize entry of dioxin to the food chain and will help to avoid dioxin contamination accidents. This would also improve the ability to trace back a possible contamination to its source. European guidelines for monitoring programs should be established to ensure comparable and meaningful results. These guidelines should define the minimum requirements for the design of monitoring programs, analytical methods, and quality assurance. Though data from Northern Europe shows that the general population exposure to dioxin and PCB has decreased during the last ten years these compounds continue to be a risk of accidental contamination of the food chain. The most prominent recent example is the Belgian dioxin contamination of feeding stuff in 1999. The Belgian dioxin contamination was not detected due to dioxin monitoring programs but by their direct biological effects seen in animals. Four other cases of dioxin contamination have been detected in Europe since 1997 due to local monitoring programs. One of them (citrus pulp pellets 1998) was in a much larger scale than the Belgian dioxin contamination. The general population's exposure to dioxins and PCBs is still in the same range (1-4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg body weight and day) as the recently revised WHO tolerable daily intake (TDI). There is concern that short-term high level exposure to dioxins, furans, and PCB may cause biological effects on the human fetal development and further research is required. Further actions to control sources building on considerable advances already made in many countries may need to be supplemented by measures to prevent direct contamination of feeding stuff or food to reduce general population exposure further.

  20. The level of Escherichia coli contamination in foods and drinks sold at canteens campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Susanna

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial contamination is a common phenomenon in foods served in campus canteens and my cause physical illness which will affect academic activity. The aim of this study was to rank the level of Escherichia coli contamination in food and drink in campus canteens.Methods: Forty nine (49 foods and 24 types of drink were examined using conventional agar broth method for calculation of most probable number (MPN. The steps of the mothod were presumptive test for coliforms, fecal coliforms and E. coli, confirmes test for coliforms, fecal coli and E. coli and then completed test for E. coli. An analysis for contamination by E. coli in meals, utensils, and on the hands of the server was also undertaken. The data analyzed in percentage and rank all type of foods and drinks, also rank based on the location.Results: Almost all type of meals was contaminated. Meals with chili sauce were the most risky from the contamination of E. coli (90.15 %, then followed by dry meals (38.89%, while the wet meals were the the most unrisky meals. In  drinks, the highest was lacy juice, followed by jambu (guava juice, then Sirsak and Orange juices on the third rank, while the mango juice was the lowest contamination. Melon juice, cappucino and fruit-coctail did not have E. coli  contamination.Conclusion: The contamination in the top three rank of contamination could be from the utensils used and foodhandler. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:66-70Keywords: campus, canteen, drink, Escherichia coli, food

  1. Sporulation of Bacillus spp. within biofilms: a potential source of contamination in food processing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faille, C; Bénézech, T; Midelet-Bourdin, G; Lequette, Y; Clarisse, M; Ronse, G; Ronse, A; Slomianny, C

    2014-06-01

    Bacillus strains are often isolated from biofilms in the food industries. Previous works have demonstrated that sporulation could occur in biofilms, suggesting that biofilms would be a significant source of food contamination with spores. In this study, we investigated the properties of mono-species and mixed Bacillus biofilms and the ability of Bacillus strains to sporulate inside biofilms. Bacillus strains were able to form mono-species biofilms on stainless steel coupons, with up to 90% spores after a 48 h-incubation. These spores were highly resistant to cleaning but were easily transferred to agar, mimicking the cross-contamination of food, thereby suggesting that biofilms would be of particular concern due to a potential for Bacillus spore food contamination. This hypothesis was strengthened by the fact that Bacillus strains were able to form mixed biofilms with resident strains and that sporulation still occurred easily in these complex structures.

  2. Food processing as an agricultural countermeasure after an accidental contamination event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igreja, Eduardo; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Prado, Nadya M.P.D., E-mail: elainerochedo@gmail.com.br, E-mail: eduigreja@gmail.com, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Diogo N.G., E-mail: dneves@biof.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho

    2013-07-01

    Food processing allows significant reduction in the radionuclide contamination of foodstuffs. The effects of processing on contaminated food depend on the radionuclide, the type of foodstuff and the method of processing. The effectiveness of radionuclide removal from raw material during processing can vary widely; however, processing of raw materials of vegetable and animal origin is often considered one of the most effective countermeasures for reducing the radioactive contamination of the foodstuff to or below permissible levels, and can be applied both domestically and in industrial processing of food. The food processing retention factor, Fr, is the fraction of radionuclide activity that is retained in the food after processing; it is obtained by the product of two quantities, the processing efficiency, Pe, that is the ratio of the fresh weight of the processed food to the weight of the original raw material, and the processing factor, Pf, that is the ratio of the radionuclide activity concentrations in the processed and in the raw material. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the reduction in dose due to food processing after a nuclear or radiological accident. Radionuclides considered were Cs-137, Sr-90 and I-131. The effect on total diet of individuals was investigating for a typical diet of the Southeast region, where the Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants are located. The effect was analyzed considering the use of the processing technologies after contamination events occurring in different seasons of the year. (author)

  3. Relative importance of dissolved and food pathways for lead contamination in shrimp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisson, F.; Cotret, O.; Teyssie, J.-L.; El-Baradeie, M.; Fowler, S.W

    2003-12-01

    The relative importance of dissolved and food pathways and the influence of food type in the bioaccumulation and retention of lead in the shrimp Palaemonetes varians were examined using a radiotracer method. Shrimp were exposed to {sup 210}Pb-labelled seawater or fed two types of {sup 210}Pb-labelled food, viz. mussels or worms. The amount of radiotracer accumulated by shrimp was examined over a 7-day period, followed by a 1-month and a 7-day depuration period for the dissolved and food source, respectively. Steady state in the uptake was reached after 2 days exposure to dissolved lead, with a resultant estimated concentration factor of 98 {+-} 3. Transfer factors following ingestion of contaminated mussels and worms were lower than unity for both food types, with lead transfer from worms being significantly higher than that from mussels. Accumulation of dissolved Pb by shrimp was found to occur mainly through adsorption on the exoskeleton with a minor accumulation in the internal tissues probably resulting from the intake of seawater for osmoregulation. In contrast, lead taken up from contaminated food was readily absorbed and bound in the internal tissues of P. varians. Although the transfer of lead to P. varians through the ingestion of contaminated food was low (TF < 1%), it still represented 4 to 8% of the lead content in the prey which is a significant additional contribution of lead to the shrimp body burden. Independent of food type, following ingestion of contaminated food, approximately 23-27% of total lead accumulated in shrimp was located in the edible parts (e.g. muscle). Therefore, the food pathway is suggested to be a significant contributor to the lead transfer to humans through ingestion of contaminated shrimp. After exposure to contaminated food, lead loss kinetics were described by a two-component model, whereas Pb loss following direct uptake from seawater was best described by a three-component model. The additional compartment representing 64

  4. Substitution of carcinogenic solvent dichloromethane for the extraction of volatile compounds in a fat-free model food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayot, Nathalie; Lafarge, Céline; Bou-Maroun, Elias; Cayot, Philippe

    2016-07-22

    Dichloromethane is known as a very efficient solvent, but, as other halogenated solvents, is recognized as a hazardous product (CMR substance). The objective of the present work is to propose substitution solvent for the extraction of volatile compounds. The most important physico-chemical parameters in the choice of an appropriate extraction solvent of volatile compounds are reviewed. Various solvents are selected on this basis and on their hazard characteristics. The selected solvents, safer than dichloromethane, are compared using the extraction efficiency of volatile compounds from a model food product able to interact with volatile compounds. Volatile compounds with different hydrophobicity are used. High extraction yields were positively correlated with high boiling points and high Log Kow values of volatile compounds. Mixtures of solvents such as azeotrope propan-2-one/cyclopentane, azeotrope ethyl acetate/ethanol, and mixture ethyl acetate/ethanol (3:1, v/v) gave higher extraction yields than those obtained with dichloromethane.

  5. Strategies for the detection of food pathogens and contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hearty, Stephen; Leonard, Paul; Sheehan, Alfredo Darmanin;

    that molecular contaminants such as microbial toxins and drug/pesticide residues translate well onto Biacore-based assay formats. However, larger and more complex entities such as spores and whole bacterial cells represent an altogether more difficult challenge. Here, we present an overview of our experiences...

  6. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants. Eightieth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a brief description of general considerations addressed at the meeting, including updates on matters of interest to the work of the Committee. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and/or dietary exposure data for seven food additives (benzoates; lipase from Fusarium heterosporum expressed in Ogataea polymorpha; magnesium stearate; maltotetraohydrolase from Pseudomonas stutzeri expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; mixed β-glucanase, cellulase and xylanase from Rasamsonia emersonii; mixed β-glucanase and xylanase from Disporotrichum dimorphosporum; polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- polyethylene glycol (PEG) graft copolymer) and two groups of contaminants (non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and pyrrolizidine alkaloids). Specifications for the following food additives were revised or withdrawn: advantame; annatto extracts (solavnt extracted bixin, ad solvent-extracted norbixin); food additives containing aluminium and/or silicon (aluminium silicate; calcium aluminium silicate; calcium silicate; silicon dioxide, amorphous; sodium aluminium silicate); and glycerol ester of gum rosin. Annexed to the report are tables or text summarizing the toxicological and dietary exposure information and information on specifications as well as the Committees recommendations on the food additives and contaminants considered at this meeting.

  7. Raman spectroscopy-based detection of chemical contaminants in food powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Bae, Abigail

    2016-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy technique has proven to be a reliable method for qualitative detection of chemical contaminants in food ingredients and products. For quantitative imaging-based detection, each contaminant particle in a food sample must be detected and it is important to determine the necessary spatial resolution needed to effectively detect the contaminant particles. This study examined the effective spatial resolution required for detection of maleic acid in tapioca starch and benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour. Each chemical contaminant was mixed into its corresponding food powder at a concentration of 1% (w/w). Raman spectral images were collected for each sample, leveled across a 45 mm x 45 mm area, using different spatial resolutions. Based on analysis of these images, a spatial resolution of 0.5mm was selected as effective spatial resolution for detection of maleic acid in starch and benzoyl peroxide in flour. An experiment was then conducted using the 0.5mm spatial resolution to demonstrate Raman imaging-based quantitative detection of these contaminants for samples prepared at 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% (w/w) concentrations. The results showed a linear correlation between the detected numbers of contaminant pixels and the actual concentrations of contaminant.

  8. Furan: A critical heat induced dietary contaminant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariotti, María S.; Granby, Kit; Rozowski, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The presence of furan in a broad range of heat processed foods (0-6000 μg kg-1) has received considerable attention due to the fact that this heat induced contaminant is considered as a "possible carcinogenic compound to humans". Since a genotoxic mode of action could be associated with furan-ind...

  9. Single versus combined exposure of Hyalella azteca to zinc contaminated sediment and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lien T H; Muyssen, Brita T A; Janssen, Colin R

    2012-03-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca was exposed for 28 d to different combinations of Zn contaminated sediment and food. Sediment exposure (+clean food) resulted in increased Zn body burdens, increased mortality and decreased body mass when the molar concentrations of simultaneously extracted Zn were greater than the molar concentration of Acid Volatile Sulfide (SEM(Zn)-AVS>0), suggesting that dissolved Zn was a dominant route of exposure. No adverse effect was noted in the food exposure (+clean sediment), suggesting selective feeding or regulation. Combined exposure (sediment+food) significantly increased adverse effects in comparison with sediment exposure, indicating contribution of dietary Zn to toxicity and bioaccumulation. The observed enhanced toxicity also supports the assumption on the presence of an avoidance/selective feeding reaction of the amphipods in the single sediment or food exposures. During 14 d post-exposure in clean medium, the organisms from the same combined exposure history received two feeding regimes, i.e. clean food and Zn spiked food. Elevated Zn bioaccumulation and reduced reproduction were noted in amphipods that were offered Zn spiked food compared to the respective organisms that were fed clean food. This was explained by the failure of avoidance/selective feeding behavior in the absence of an alternative food source (sediment), forcing the amphipods to take up Zn while feeding. Increasing Zn body burdens rejected the assumption that Zn uptake from food was regulated by H. azteca. Our results show that the selective feeding behavior should be accounted for when assessing ecological effects of Zn or other contaminants, especially when contaminated food is a potential exposure route.

  10. Invasive Fungal Infections Acquired from Contaminated Food or Nutritional Supplements: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Chiller, Tom M; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-07-01

    Fungi are an integral part of the natural environment and, therefore, play many roles in relation to food: some fungi are used in food production, some are food sources themselves, and some are agents of food spoilage. Some fungi that contaminate food can also be harmful to human health. The harmful but noninfectious health consequences of mycotoxins have been well-characterized, but the extent to which fungi in food pose a risk for invasive infections is unknown. We conducted a literature review to identify cases of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) believed to have resulted from ingestion or inhalation of food, beverages, or dietary supplements (excluding Saccharomyces infections). We identified 11 publications describing cases or small outbreaks of IFIs related to foods or beverages and three describing IFIs related to dietary supplements. These food-associated IFIs were predominantly mold infections, and the few yeast infections were associated with dairy products. Suspected foodborne IFIs appear to be rare, but are increasingly described in the electronically searchable literature. They are associated with a variety of foods, are due to a variety of fungal pathogens, and primarily occur in persons with immunosuppressive conditions or other predisposing factors. Various guidelines for high-risk patients recommend avoidance of certain food products that may contain high levels of fungi, but further work is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of these restrictive diets in preventing fungal infections. The relationships between food spoilage, food insecurity, and IFI risk are another area that may warrant further exploration.

  11. EFSA CONTAM Panel (EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain), 2015. Scientific Opinion on risks for public health related to the presence of chlorate in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    Following a request from the European Commission, the risks to human health related to the presence of chlorate in food were assessed by the EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel). The presence of chlorate in food can arise from the use of chlorinated water for food processin...

  12. Virus hazards from food, water and other contaminated environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Lázaro, D.; Cook, N.; Ruggeri, F.M.; Sellwood, J.; Nasser, A.; Nascimento, M.S.; Agostino, D' M.; Santos, R.; Saiz, J.C.; Rzezutka, A.; Bosch, A.; Girones, R.; Carducci, A.; Muscullo, M.; Kovac, K.; Diez-Valcarce, M.; Vantarakis, A.; Bonsdorff, C.H.; Roda Husman, de A.M.; Hernández, M.; Poel, van der W.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous viruses of human or animal origin can spread in the environment and infect people via water and food, mostly through ingestion and occasionally through skin contact. These viruses are released into the environment by various routes including water run-offs and aerosols. Furthermore, zoonoti

  13. Restaurant industry preparedness against intentional food contamination: results of a South Carolina survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Kanwat, C P; Smith, Lillian U; Li, Yi-Jhen; Sros, Lekhena; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Food safety and food defense are both responsibilities of public health agencies. Food safety practices within restaurants are regulated by state and local public health laws based on the US Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code. However, little is known about preemptive practices against intentional food-borne outbreaks within restaurants. The researchers administered a survey to a 50 percent random sample of South Carolina's restaurants, a state that relies heavily on tourism and the restaurant industry for its economic well-being. The survey received a response rate of 15 percent. The food defense practice items fall under three functional categories: employee management and training practices; vendor and delivery-related practices; and physical facilities and operational security practices. This study presents the results, classified by geographic region. Findings indicate some key areas of vulnerability that need attention to protect the public from mass food outbreaks due to intentional contamination. Of concern, there is much variation in practices by geographic region. On the basis of the survey, recommendations are made to improve restaurant preparedness against food-borne outbreaks from terrorism and malevolent contamination.

  14. Flow cytometric analysis of microbial contamination in food industry technological lines – initial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Czaczyk

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Flow cytometry constitutes an alternative for traditional methods of microorganisms identifi cation and analysis, including methods requiring cultivation step. It enables the detection of pathogens and other microorganisms contaminants without the need to culture microbial cells meaning that the sample (water, waste or food e.g. milk, wine, beer may be analysed directly. This leads to a signifi cant reduction of time required for analysis allowing monitoring of production processes and immediate reaction in case of contamination or any disruption occurs. Apart from the analysis of raw materials or products on different stages of manufacturing process, the fl ow cytometry seems to constitute an ideal tool for the assessment of microbial contamination on the surface of technological lines. Material and methods. In the present work samples comprising smears from 3 different surfaces of technological lines from fruit and vegetable processing company from Greater Poland were analysed directly with fl ow cytometer. The measured parameters were forward and side scatter of laser light signals allowing the estimation of microbial cell contents in each sample. Results. Flow cytometric analysis of the surface of food industry production lines enable the preliminary evaluation of microbial contamination within few minutes from the moment of sample arrival without the need of sample pretreatment. Conclusions. The presented method of fl ow cytometric initial evaluation of microbial state of food industry technological lines demonstrated its potential for developing a robust, routine method for the rapid and laborsaving detection of microbial contamination in food industry.

  15. Challenging conventional risk assessment with respect to human exposure to multiple food contaminants in food: A case study using maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R; Connolly, L; Frizzell, C; Elliott, C T

    2015-10-01

    Mycotoxins and heavy metals are ubiquitous in the environment and contaminate many foods. The widespread use of pesticides in crop production to control disease contributes further to the chemical contamination of foods. Thus multiple chemical contaminants threaten the safety of many food commodities; hence the present study used maize as a model crop to identify the severity in terms of human exposure when multiple contaminants are present. High Content Analysis (HCA) measuring multiple endpoints was used to determine cytotoxicity of complex mixtures of mycotoxins, heavy metals and pesticides. Endpoints included nuclear intensity (NI), nuclear area (NA), plasma membrane permeability (PMP), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial mass (MM). At concentrations representing legal limits of each individual contaminant in maize (3ng/ml ochratoxin A (OTA), 1μg/ml fumonisin B1 (FB1), 2ng/ml aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 100ng/ml cadmium (Cd), 150ng/ml arsenic (As), 50ng/ml chlorpyrifos (CP) and 5μg/ml pirimiphos methyl (PM), the mixtures (tertiary mycotoxins plus Cd/As) and (tertiary mycotoxins plus Cd/As/CP/PM) were cytotoxic for NA and MM endpoints with a difference of up to 13.6% (p≤0.0001) and 12% (p≤0.0001) respectively from control values. The most cytotoxic mixture was (tertiary mycotoxins plus Cd/As/CP/PM) across all 4 endpoints (NA, NI, MM and MMP) with increases up to 61.3%, 23.0%, 61.4% and 36.3% (p≤0.0001) respectively. Synergy was evident for two endpoints (NI and MM) at concentrations contaminating maize above legal limits, with differences between expected and measured values of (6.2-12.4% (p≤0.05-p≤0.001) and 4.5-12.3% (p≤0.05-p≤0.001) for NI and MM, respectively. The study introduces for the first time, a holistic approach to identify the impact in terms of toxicity to humans when multiple chemical contaminants are present in foodstuffs. Governmental regulatory bodies must begin to contemplate how to safeguard the population when

  16. Metamorphosis alters contaminants and chemical tracers in insects: implications for food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Johanna M; Walters, David M; Wesner, Jeff S; Stricker, Craig A; Schmidt, Travis S; Zuellig, Robert E

    2014-09-16

    Insects are integral to most freshwater and terrestrial food webs, but due to their accumulation of environmental pollutants they are also contaminant vectors that threaten reproduction, development, and survival of consumers. Metamorphosis from larvae to adult can cause large chemical changes in insects, altering contaminant concentrations and fractionation of chemical tracers used to establish contaminant biomagnification in food webs, but no framework exists for predicting and managing these effects. We analyzed data from 39 studies of 68 analytes (stable isotopes and contaminants), and found that metamorphosis effects varied greatly. δ(15)N, widely used to estimate relative trophic position in biomagnification studies, was enriched by ∼ 1‰ during metamorphosis, while δ(13)C used to estimate diet, was similar in larvae and adults. Metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were predominantly lost during metamorphosis leading to ∼ 2 to 125-fold higher larval concentrations and higher exposure risks for predators of larvae compared to predators of adults. In contrast, manufactured organic contaminants (such as polychlorinated biphenyls) were retained and concentrated in adults, causing up to ∼ 3-fold higher adult concentrations and higher exposure risks to predators of adult insects. Both food web studies and contaminant management and mitigation strategies need to consider how metamorphosis affects the movement of materials between habitats and ecosystems, with special regard for aquatic-terrestrial linkages.

  17. Metamorphosis alters contaminants and chemical tracers in insects: implications for food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Johanna M.; Walters, David M.; Wesner, Jeff S.; Stricker, Craig A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Zuellig, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Insects are integral to most freshwater and terrestrial food webs, but due to their accumulation of environmental pollutants they are also contaminant vectors that threaten reproduction, development, and survival of consumers. Metamorphosis from larvae to adult can cause large chemical changes in insects, altering contaminant concentrations and fractionation of chemical tracers used to establish contaminant biomagnification in food webs, but no framework exists for predicting and managing these effects. We analyzed data from 39 studies of 68 analytes (stable isotopes and contaminants), and found that metamorphosis effects varied greatly. δ15N, widely used to estimate relative trophic position in biomagnification studies, was enriched by 1‰ during metamorphosis, while δ13C used to estimate diet, was similar in larvae and adults. Metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were predominantly lost during metamorphosis leading to 2 to 125-fold higher larval concentrations and higher exposure risks for predators of larvae compared to predators of adults. In contrast, manufactured organic contaminants (such as polychlorinated biphenyls) were retained and concentrated in adults, causing up to 3-fold higher adult concentrations and higher exposure risks to predators of adult insects. Both food web studies and contaminant management and mitigation strategies need to consider how metamorphosis affects the movement of materials between habitats and ecosystems, with special regard for aquatic-terrestrial linkages.

  18. Food contamination by hydrocarbons from lubricating oils and release agents: determination by coupled LC-GC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, K; Artho, A; Biedermann, M; Egli, J

    1991-01-01

    We have found that many foods are contaminated with mineral oil products used as lubricating oils/greases or as release agents. The mineral oil base of such products usually consists of branched alkanes ranging between C17 and C35. It forms a broad 'hump' of unresolved compounds in the gas chromatogram. Examples of such products are described; contamination is shown for a sample of bread, bonbon, and chocolate, respectively. The results suggest that contamination of foodstuffs with mineral oils does not always receive the required attention. However, there is also a lack of guidelines.

  19. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: Why sea ice matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pucko, M.; Stern, Gary; Macdonald, Robie

    2015-01-01

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical...... the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibriumbased on Henry's lawconstants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest...... to multi-year ice and, therefore, the dynamic balance between contaminant inventories and contaminant deposition to the surface ocean is being widely affected by the large-scale icescape transition taking place in the Arctic....

  20. Determination of contamination pathways of phthalates in food products sold on the Belgian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Holderbeke, Mirja; Geerts, Lieve; Vanermen, Guido; Servaes, Kelly; Sioen, Isabelle; De Henauw, Stefaan; Fierens, Tine

    2014-10-01

    As numerous studies have indicated that food ingestion is the most important exposure pathway to several phthalates, this study aimed to determine possible contamination pathways of phthalates in food products sold on the Belgian market. To do this, concentrations of eight phthalates (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP), dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP)) were determined in 591 foods and 30 packaging materials. In general, the four most prominent phthalates in Belgian food products were DEHP, DiBP, DnBP and BBP. Special attention was given to the origin of these phthalates in bread, since high phthalate concentrations (especially DEHP) were determined in this frequently consumed food product. Phthalates seemed to occur in Belgian bread samples due to the use of contaminated ingredients (i.e. use of contaminated flour) as well as due to migration from phthalate containing contact materials used during production (e.g. coated baking trays). Also the results of the conducted concentration profiles of apple, bread, salami and two cheese types revealed the important role of processing - and not packaging - on phthalate contents in foods.

  1. Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from consuming aquatic food resources from chemically contaminated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozonoff, D. (Boston Univ. School of Public Health, MA (United States)); Longnecker, M.P. (UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from contaminated waters must confront the problems of long latency and rarity of the end point (cancer). The latency problem makes determination of diet history more difficult, while the low frequency of cancer as an end point reduces the statistical power of the study. These factors are discussed in relation to the study designs most commonly employed in epidemiology. It is suggested that the use of biomarkers for persistent chemicals may be useful to mitigate the difficulty of determining exposure, while the use of more prevalent and timely end points, such as carcinogen-DNA adducts or oncogene proteins, may make the latency and rarity problems more tractable.

  2. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2009-05-15

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  3. Using the Melamine Contamination of Foods to Enhance the Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, Doris Renate; Jensen, Anna Chick

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the chemistry of the triazine compound, melamine, is presented as well as a brief discussion of the health impacts on humans and pets when melamine contaminates milk products and pet food. Melamine has repeatedly been in the news, and its topical nature provides an excellent springboard for applications of a variety of chemical…

  4. Using lytic bacteriophages to eliminate or significantly reduce contamination of food by foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriophages (also called 'phages') are viruses that kill bacteria. They are arguably the oldest (3 billion years old, by some estimates) and most ubiquitous (total number estimated to be 10(30) -10(32) ) known organisms on Earth. Phages play a key role in maintaining microbial balance in every ecosystem where bacteria exist, and they are part of the normal microflora of all fresh, unprocessed foods. Interest in various practical applications of bacteriophages has been gaining momentum recently, with perhaps the most attention focused on using them to improve food safety. That approach, called 'phage biocontrol', typically includes three main types of applications: (i) using phages to treat domesticated livestock in order to reduce their intestinal colonization with, and shedding of, specific bacterial pathogens; (ii) treatments for decontaminating inanimate surfaces in food-processing facilities and other food establishments, so that foods processed on those surfaces are not cross-contaminated with the targeted pathogens; and (iii) post-harvest treatments involving direct applications of phages onto the harvested foods. This mini-review primarily focuses on the last type of intervention, which has been gaining the most momentum recently. Indeed, the results of recent studies dealing with improving food safety, and several recent regulatory approvals of various commercial phage preparations developed for post-harvest food safety applications, strongly support the idea that lytic phages may provide a safe, environmentally-friendly, and effective approach for significantly reducing contamination of various foods with foodborne bacterial pathogens. However, some important technical and nontechnical problems may need to be addressed before phage biocontrol protocols can become an integral part of routine food safety intervention strategies implemented by food industries in the USA.

  5. Listeria monocytogenes cross-contamination of cheese: risk throughout the food supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauders, B D; D'Amico, D J

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been the most common microbial cause of cheese-related recalls in both the United States and Canada in recent years. Since L. monocytogenes is inactivated by pasteurization, the majority of these cases have been linked to environmental and cross-contamination of fresh-soft, soft-ripened, and semi-soft cheeses. Cross-contamination of foods with L. monocytogenes is a continuous risk throughout the food supply chain and presents unique challenges for subsequent illness and outbreak investigations. Reports on outbreaks of listeriosis attributed to cross-contamination downstream from primary processing help highlight the critical role of epidemiological investigation coupled with coordinated molecular subtyping and surveillance in the recognition and investigation of complex foodborne outbreaks. Despite their complexity, environmental sampling throughout the supply chain coupled with improved genotyping approaches and concomitant analysis of foodborne illness epidemiological exposure data are needed to help resolve these and similar cases more rapidly and with greater confidence.

  6. Development and applicability of an in vitro digestion model in assessing the bioaccessibility of contaminants from food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versantvoort CHM; Kamp E van de; Rompelberg CJM; SIR

    2004-01-01

    Food is considered a major source for exposure to many contaminants. Only the fraction of the contaminant that is released from the food (bioaccessible) and is bioavailable (concentration in blood, organ and tissues) can exert toxic effects. The oral bioavailability of compounds is dependent on the

  7. Traditional food consumption behaviour and concern with environmental contaminants among Cree schoolchildren of the Mushkegowuk territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hlimi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate factors influencing consumption of traditional foods (e.g. wild game, fish and concerns about environmental contaminants among schoolchildren of the Mushkegowuk Territory First Nations (Moose Factory, Fort Albany, Kashechewan, Attawapiskat, and Peawanuck. Study design: Cross-sectional data collection from a Web-based Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (WEB-Q. Methods: Schoolchildren in grades 6–12 (n = 262 responded to 4 of the WEB-Q questions: (a Do you eat game? (b How often do you eat game? (c How concerned are you about the environmental contaminants in the wild game and fish that you eat? (d I would eat more game if… [6 response options]. Data were collected in 2004 (Fort Albany, 2005 (Peawanuck, 2006 (Attawapiskat, 2007 (Moose Factory and 2009 (Kashechewan. Hierarchical log-linear modelling (LLM was used for analyses of multi-way frequency data. Results: Of the schoolchildren answering the specific questions: 174 consumed game; 95 reported concerns about contaminants in game; and 84 would increase their game consumption if it were more available in their homes. LLM revealed significant differences between communities; schoolchildren in Moose Factory consumed game “rarely or never” at greater than expected frequency, and fewer than expected consumed game “at least once a day”. Schoolchildren in Kashechewan had greater frequency of daily game consumption and few were concerned about contaminants in game. Using LLM, we found that sex was an insignificant variable and did not affect game consumption frequency or environmental contaminant concern. Conclusion: The consumption of traditional foods differed between communities and appears to be related to contamination concerns. In addition, latitudinal variation appears to influence the frequency of traditional food consumption in children; children in the most southerly location consumed traditional food less frequently.

  8. Traditional food consumption behaviour and concern with environmental contaminants among Cree schoolchildren of the Mushkegowuk territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlimi, Tina; Skinner, Kelly; Hanning, Rhona M; Martin, Ian D.; Tsuji, Leonard J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate factors influencing consumption of traditional foods (e.g. wild game, fish) and concerns about environmental contaminants among schoolchildren of the Mushkegowuk Territory First Nations (Moose Factory, Fort Albany, Kashechewan, Attawapiskat, and Peawanuck). Study design Cross-sectional data collection from a Web-based Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (WEB-Q). Methods Schoolchildren in grades 6–12 (n =262) responded to 4 of the WEB-Q questions: (a) Do you eat game? (b) How often do you eat game? (c) How concerned are you about the environmental contaminants in the wild game and fish that you eat? (d) I would eat more game if… [6 response options]. Data were collected in 2004 (Fort Albany), 2005 (Peawanuck), 2006 (Attawapiskat), 2007 (Moose Factory) and 2009 (Kashechewan). Hierarchical log-linear modelling (LLM) was used for analyses of multi-way frequency data. Results Of the schoolchildren answering the specific questions: 174 consumed game; 95 reported concerns about contaminants in game; and 84 would increase their game consumption if it were more available in their homes. LLM revealed significant differences between communities; schoolchildren in Moose Factory consumed game “rarely or never” at greater than expected frequency, and fewer than expected consumed game “at least once a day”. Schoolchildren in Kashechewan had greater frequency of daily game consumption and few were concerned about contaminants in game. Using LLM, we found that sex was an insignificant variable and did not affect game consumption frequency or environmental contaminant concern. Conclusion The consumption of traditional foods differed between communities and appears to be related to contamination concerns. In addition, latitudinal variation appears to influence the frequency of traditional food consumption in children; children in the most southerly location consumed traditional food less frequently. PMID:22456047

  9. The Importance of Endospore-Forming Bacteria Originating from Soil for Contamination of Industrial Food Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Heyndrickx

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific endospore formers have become important contaminants in industrial food processing. The direct or indirect soil route of contamination or dispersal is the start of events or processes in the agrofood chain that eventually leads to important problems or concerns for food safety and/or quality. Three important food sectors are discussed in this paper. In the dairy sector, Bacillus cereus, the most important pathogen or spoilage organism in this sector, and Clostridium tyrobutyricum, the most important spoiler in certain cheeses, both contaminate pasteurized milk through the faecal and/or (at least for B. cereus the direct soil route. In the fruit juice industry, Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, present on raw fruits, has become a major quality-target organism. In the ready-to-eat food sector, B. cereus and other aerobic endospore formers are introduced via vegetables, fruits, or herbs and spices, while anaerobic spore formers like nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium estertheticum pose safety and spoilage risks in chilled packaged foods, respectively.

  10. Contrasting time trends of organic contaminants in Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W; Riddle, Martin J; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine; van Franeker, Jan Andries

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that pelagic Antarctic seabirds show significant decreases in concentrations of some persistent organic pollutants. Trends in Adélie penguins and Southern fulmars fit in a general pattern revealed by a broad literature review. Downward trends are also visible in pelagic fish, contrasting sharply with steady or increasing concentrations in Antarctic benthic organisms. Transfer of contaminants between Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs is associated with seasonal sea-ice dynamics which may influence the balance between the final receptors of contaminants under different climatic conditions. This complicates the predictability of future trends of emerging compounds in the Antarctic ecosystem, such as of the brominated compounds that we detected in Antarctic petrels. The discrepancy in trends between pelagic and benthic organisms shows that Antarctic biota are still final receptors of globally released organic contaminants and it remains questionable whether the total environmental burden of contaminants in the Antarctic ecosystem is declining.

  11. Glyphosate: environmental contamination, toxicity and potential risks to human health via food contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shahla Hosseini; Ogbourne, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Glyphosate has been the most widely used herbicide during the past three decades. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classifies glyphosate as 'practically non-toxic and not an irritant' under the acute toxicity classification system. This classification is based primarily on toxicity data and due to its unique mode of action via a biochemical pathway that only exists in a small number of organisms that utilise the shikimic acid pathway to produce amino acids, most of which are green plants. This classification is supported by the majority of scientific literature on the toxic effects of glyphosate. However, in 2005, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) reported that glyphosate and its major metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), are of potential toxicological concern, mainly as a result of accumulation of residues in the food chain. The FAO further states that the dietary risk of glyphosate and AMPA is unlikely if the maximum daily intake of 1 mg kg(-1) body weight (bw) is not exceeded. Research has now established that glyphosate can persist in the environment, and therefore, assessments of the health risks associated with glyphosate are more complicated than suggested by acute toxicity data that relate primarily to accidental high-rate exposure. We have used recent literature to assess the possible risks associated with the presence of glyphosate residues in food and the environment.

  12. The level of Escherichia coli contamination in foods and drinks sold at canteens campus

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bacterial contamination is a common phenomenon in foods served in campus canteens and my cause physical illness which will affect academic activity. The aim of this study was to rank the level of Escherichia coli contamination in food and drink in campus canteens.Methods: Forty nine (49) foods and 24 types of drink were examined using conventional agar broth method for calculation of most probable number (MPN). The steps of the mothod were presumptive test for coliforms, fecal col...

  13. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: why sea ice matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pućko, Monika; Stern, Gary A; Macdonald, Robie W; Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F; Wong, Fiona; Barber, David G; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-02-15

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical-chemical properties (e.g. 2-3-fold increase in exposure to brine-associated biota), and 2) depend on physical-chemical properties and, therefore, differentiate between contaminants (e.g. atmospheric loading of contaminants to melt ponds over the summer, and their subsequent leakage to the ocean). We estimate the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibrium based on Henry's law constants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest risk of increased exposures through melt pond loading and drainage due to the high ratio of melt pond water to seawater concentration (Melt pond Enrichment Factor, MEF), which ranges from 2 for dacthal to 10 for endosulfan I. Melt pond contaminant enrichment can be perceived as a hypothetical 'pump' delivering contaminants from the atmosphere to the ocean under ice-covered conditions, with 2-10% of CUPs annually entering the Beaufort Sea via this input route compared to the standing stock in the Polar Mixed Layer of the ocean. The abovementioned processes are strongly favored in first-year ice compared to multi-year ice and, therefore, the dynamic balance between contaminant inventories and contaminant deposition to the surface ocean is being widely affected by the large-scale icescape transition taking place in the Arctic.

  14. Application of accelerated solvent extraction in the analysis of organic contaminants, bioactive and nutritional compounds in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hanwen; Ge, Xusheng; Lv, Yunkai; Wang, Anbang

    2012-05-11

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) has become a popular green extraction technology for different classes of organic contaminants present in numerous kinds of food and feed for food safety. The parameters affecting ASE efficiency and application advancement of ASE in the analysis of organic contaminants, natural toxins compounds as well as bioactive and nutritional compounds in animal origin food, plant origin food and animal feed are reviewed in detail. ASE is a fully automated and reliable extraction technique with many advantages over traditional extraction techniques, so it could be especially useful for routine analyses of pollutants in food and feed.

  15. Application of the Margin of Exposure (MoE) Approach to Substances in Food that are Genotoxic and Carcinogenic Example: Benzo[a]pyrene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the work of an expert group established by the International Life Sciences Institute - European branch (ILSI Europe) to follow up the recommendations of an international conference on "Risk Assessment of Compounds that are both Genotoxic and Carcinogenic: New ...

  16. Longer Contact Times Increase Cross-Contamination of Enterobacter aerogenes from Surfaces to Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Robyn C; Schaffner, Donald W

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial cross-contamination from surfaces to food can contribute to foodborne disease. The cross-contamination rate of Enterobacter aerogenes on household surfaces was evaluated by using scenarios that differed by surface type, food type, contact time (<1, 5, 30, and 300 s), and inoculum matrix (tryptic soy broth or peptone buffer). The surfaces used were stainless steel, tile, wood, and carpet. The food types were watermelon, bread, bread with butter, and gummy candy. Surfaces (25 cm(2)) were spot inoculated with 1 ml of inoculum and allowed to dry for 5 h, yielding an approximate concentration of 10(7) CFU/surface. Foods (with a 16-cm(2) contact area) were dropped onto the surfaces from a height of 12.5 cm and left to rest as appropriate. Posttransfer, surfaces and foods were placed in sterile filter bags and homogenized or massaged, diluted, and plated on tryptic soy agar. The transfer rate was quantified as the log percent transfer from the surface to the food. Contact time, food, and surface type all had highly significant effects (P < 0.000001) on the log percent transfer of bacteria. The inoculum matrix (tryptic soy broth or peptone buffer) also had a significant effect on transfer (P = 0.013), and most interaction terms were significant. More bacteria transferred to watermelon (∼0.2 to 97%) than to any other food, while the least bacteria transferred to gummy candy (∼0.1 to 62%). Transfer of bacteria to bread (∼0.02 to 94%) was similar to transfer of bacteria to bread with butter (∼0.02 to 82%), and these transfer rates under a given set of conditions were more variable than with watermelon and gummy candy.

  17. Intervention strategies for the reduction of microbiological contamination on the hands of food handlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naína Lopes de JESUS

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate intervention strategies for the reduction of microbiological contamination on the hands of food handlers. The study was conducted from January 2009 to December 2014 at a food and nutrition company in Curitiba, Brazil. Samples from the hands of 877 handlers were collected for microbiological analysis. The intervention strategies applied during each year were: 2009, substitute the use of odorless liquid soap and an antiseptic product by one product; 2010, was increasing the staff of technical supervisors and conducting biannual training; 2011 was to move the lavatories for handwashing, and the use of 70% alcohol gel; 2012, was to increase the frequency of the training of food handlers; 2013, was new weekly monitoring, to evaluation of the use of bactericide soap; 2013 and 2014 was implemented an internal program to verify food production. The intervention introduced in 2011 the 2012 and 2013 the 2014 reduced the contamination of the hands of food handlers. The use of 70% alcohol gel, the moving of the location of the lavatories, weekly monitoring of the use of bactericide soap and implementation of the internal program, were the strategies that contributed the most to the reduction of the microbial.

  18. Identification of fatty foods with contamination possibilities by plasticizers when stored in PVC film packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Duval Barros

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Poly-(vinyl chloride (PVC requires the addition of plasticizers - additives that give flexibility and malleability for its processing into flexible film. The most used ones are: di-(2-ethylhexyl adipate (DEHA and di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP. Toxic effects of DEHP have been observed by several authors. Phthalates are being replaced by alternative substances in PVC flexible products, because of their possible toxicological effects. DEHA is a substitute for phthalates widely used as a plasticizer in PVC materials for involving food. Some authors have shown that the exposure to DEHA also induces toxicity. A cross-sectional study was performed to identify which fatty foods carry the possibility of contamination by DEHP and DEHA. Eighteen different foods with at least 3% (m/m fat and the possibility of being wrapped in plastic film were determined. This study suggested that all foods were subject to contamination by DEHP and DEHA in those conditions - in decreasing consumption order of 96 to 22% in the convenience sample. New guidelines on the limits of DEHA and DEHP established by the Brazilian legislation, as additives in PVC film for packaging fatty food, are still relevant to ensure human health.

  19. [Role of environment in complex diseases: air pollution and food contaminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Giet, D

    2012-01-01

    Our polluted environment exposes human beings, along their life, to various toxic compounds that could trigger and aggravate different complex diseases. Such a phenomenon is well recognized for cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases and cancers, but other chronic inflammatory disorders may also been implicated. The most common factors, but also the most toxic, and thereby the most extensively investigated, are air pollutants (both indoor and outdoor pollution) and various contaminants present in drinking water and food (organic compounds, chemical products, heavy metals, ...). The complex interrelationships between food and pollutants, on the one hand, and between gene and environmental pollutants, including the influence of epigenetics, on the other hand, deserve further careful studies.

  20. Microbiological and chemical contamination in different types of food of non-European origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Casalinuovo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the markets of the European Union (EU the presence of food imported from non-European countries such as Asia, Africa and America is increasingly more widespread. Non-European countries, indeed, are much more competitive in terms of prices compared to European countries. For these reasons, EU has issued important laws. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of these regulations, estimating the levels of microbiological and chemical contamination of food samples of 91 different matrices imported from third countries. The microbiological methods used are those required by the UNI EN ISO, while for the determination of chemical parameters validated methods according to the Standard UNI EN ISO 16140:2003 were used. Our investigation revealed qualitative or quantitative microbial contamination in 23 out of 91 samples analysed (25.2%. We found high total microbial loads in alimentary conserves, multiple bacterial contamination (Salmonella thiphymurium, Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus and viral contamination (Norovirus in shellfish of the species Cassostrea gigas, and the presence of other pathogens in various products such as hamburgers (Yersinia enterocolitica, frozen fish (Listeria monocytogenes and honey (Bacillus cereus. With regard to chemical contamination, 24 samples of different food products were analysed. In 9 samples (37.5%, the levels of the following substances exceeded the permitted limits: histamine (fish conserves, mercury (crab meat, cadmium (crab meat and fish conserves, lead (cheese and honey and polyphosphates (chicken meat. Despite the limited number of samples analysed, these data prompt reflection on the need to implement a more detailed and rigorous activity of monitoring and control in order to guarantee adequate levels of safety with regard to the consumption of foodstuffs imported into the EU from non-European countries.

  1. Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Byron, E.R. [CH2M Hill, Sacramento, CA (United States); Freas, K.E. [CH2M Hill, San Jose, CA (United States); Casados, E.M.; Kidwell, J.J. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, San Diego, CA (United States). SW Division

    1994-12-31

    The authors conducted a study to determine whether environmental contaminants occurred in fish and invertebrates at concentrations that could be harmful to birds feeding in the estuarine salt marsh at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), which is part of Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Seal Beach. Management of the refuge is focused primarily on endangered species, especially the light-footed clapper rail and the California least tern. Important food-chain organisms taken by rails (e.g., crabs and snails) and least terns (small fish) were sampled and analyzed for inorganic and organic contaminants that might be related to Navy activities at the Station. Results indicated that those contaminants are not likely to have lethal effects on rails or terns, although some chemicals (including cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc and DDE) occurred at elevated concentrations in portions of the marsh. Possible sublethal effects also were evaluated and will be discussed.

  2. Aflatoxin Contamination in Food and Body Fluids in Relation to Malnutrition and Cancer Status in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Tchouanguep, Félicité M; Moundipa, Paul F; Tchana, Angele N.

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are food contaminants usually associated with hepatitis, immunodepression, impairment of fertility and cancer. The present work was to determine the presence of aflatoxins in eggs, milk, urine, and blood samples that were collected from various sources and periods; and hepatitis B virus antigen in blood samples. Aflatoxin was found in eggs (45.2%), cow raw milk (15.9%), breast milk (4.8%), urine from kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor children (45.5%), and sera from primary liver...

  3. Risk assessment of Belgian adults for furan contamination through the food chain

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Risk assessment is an interdisciplinary process used to quantify the risk linked to a hazard. In the present paper, it is applied to quantify the risk linked to furan ingestion through the food chain for the Belgian adult population. Two approaches, deterministic and probabilistic, are carried out in parallel. The deterministic method relies on a case-study, whereas the probabilistic approach involves statistical distributions of contamination and consumption data to calcu...

  4. Toxicity Mechanisms of the Food Contaminant Citrinin: Application of a Quantitative Yeast Model

    OpenAIRE

    Amparo Pascual-Ahuir; Elena Vanacloig-Pedros; Markus Proft

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are important food contaminants and a serious threat for human nutrition. However, in many cases the mechanisms of toxicity for this diverse group of metabolites are poorly understood. Here we apply live cell gene expression reporters in yeast as a quantitative model to unravel the cellular defense mechanisms in response to the mycotoxin citrinin. We find that citrinin triggers a fast and dose dependent activation of stress responsive promoters such as GRE2 or SOD2. More specifical...

  5. A review of public concerns and reactions about food safety following a release of food contaminants (radioactive or otherwise)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, B. [Department of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomews and the Royal London School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    This study was carried out, by questionnaire and personal interview, to assess the extent of the public's knowledge of the procedures employed by MAFF, and other agencies following a food contamination incident involving radioactive contamination. It was also designed to gauge the public's perception of relative risk from routine discharges into the environment and other agents. The study populations were located in 5 locations - 3 near nuclear facilities, and 2 control groups (1 close to a potential chemical polluting plant). The study was not intended to be rigorous (in terms of sex, age and socio-economic group) in random selection of subjects for interview but it was judged that a fairly representative selection of views was obtained from about 50 people at each location. Overall, and importantly, although about 60% claimed that some their diet was locally grown, most people even in these rural areas purchased nearly all of their food and milk in supermarkets. It was difficult to get the interviewees to take the concept of a large incident involving food bans seriously but they seemed to expect the local authority and the police to be prominent in announcing the news. They did not seem to have much confidence in the broadcast media but, when prompted, thought that a MAFF 'hot-line' would be of greatest use in obtaining on-going information. House to house leaf letting was also mentioned as an effective means of disseminating information. Every-one seemed to want more clear information about food contamination in advance of it becoming a real problem - although how they would react to this information was not clear. All groups were fairly conservative when asked about personal risk but became more extreme over risks to society as a whole, particularly in relation to transport and the environment. Overall, as expected, the public perception of relative risk was somewhat divorced from reality. Because of their geographical location and

  6. A Raman chemical imaging system for detection of contaminants in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kaunglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Mo, Chang Yeon

    2011-06-01

    This study presented a preliminary investigation into the use of macro-scale Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the presence of chemical contaminants. Melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentrations (w/w) of 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% and images of the mixtures were analyzed by a spectral information divergence algorithm. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, and urea were each separately mixed into dry milk at concentrations of (w/w) of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 5.0%, and an algorithm based on self-modeling mixture analysis was applied to these sample images. The contaminants were successfully detected and the spatial distribution of the contaminants within the sample mixtures was visualized using these algorithms. Although further studies are necessary, macro-scale Raman chemical imaging shows promise for use in detecting contaminants in food ingredients and may also be useful for authentication of food ingredients.

  7. Contamination of Ethiopian paper currency notes from various food handlers with E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiko, Adem; Abdata, Kasahun; Muktar, Yimer; Woyesa, Mezene; Mohammed, Abdela

    2016-01-01

    Contamination rate of Ethiopian paper currency notes handled by various food handlers with Escherichia coli and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was assessed. A total of 384 Ethiopian Birr (ETB) notes were randomly sampled from meat handlers at butchers, bread and the related food handlers at cafeteria, fruit and vegetables handlers at supermarket, and milk sellers both at open market and dairy station. Fifty control new currencies were also sampled from Commercial Bank of Ethiopia. Both surfaces of the currency were swabbed using wet sterile cotton. The swab was overnight incubated in buffered peptone water. A loop full was streaked on eosin methylene blue agar and followed by biochemical test on presumptive E. coli colonies. Randomly selected isolates were exposed to chloramphenicol (C-30 µg), neomycin (N-30 µg), oxytetracycline (OT-30 µg), polymyxin-B (PB-300 IU) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT-1.25/23.75/µg) susceptibility using disc diffusion techniques. E. coli was not isolated from currency used as control. A total of 288 (75 %) currency notes were found carrying E. coli. E. coli prevalence was ranges from 67.2 % at open market milk sellers to 87.2 % at dairy station milk sellers; from 64.8 % on ETB 100 to 82.9 % on ETB 1. Differences were not observed in E. coli prevalence on currency notes from among almost all food handlers (P > 0.05). Susceptibility of tested isolates to each chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 100 %, and to polymyxin-B was 97.3 %. High resistance (83.7 %) was observed to neomycin. The finding indicates, contaminated food can be a source of E. coli for further contamination of currency which again transfer through various foods ready for consumption.

  8. Model approach to estimate the probability of accepting a lot of heterogeneously contaminated powdered food using different sampling strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Antonio; Pasquali, Frédérique; De Cesare, Alessandra; Manfreda, Gerardo

    2014-08-01

    Current sampling plans assume a random distribution of microorganisms in food. However, food-borne pathogens are estimated to be heterogeneously distributed in powdered foods. This spatial distribution together with very low level of contaminations raises concern of the efficiency of current sampling plans for the detection of food-borne pathogens like Cronobacter and Salmonella in powdered foods such as powdered infant formula or powdered eggs. An alternative approach based on a Poisson distribution of the contaminated part of the lot (Habraken approach) was used in order to evaluate the probability of falsely accepting a contaminated lot of powdered food when different sampling strategies were simulated considering variables such as lot size, sample size, microbial concentration in the contaminated part of the lot and proportion of contaminated lot. The simulated results suggest that a sample size of 100g or more corresponds to the lower number of samples to be tested in comparison with sample sizes of 10 or 1g. Moreover, the number of samples to be tested greatly decrease if the microbial concentration is 1CFU/g instead of 0.1CFU/g or if the proportion of contamination is 0.05 instead of 0.01. Mean contaminations higher than 1CFU/g or proportions higher than 0.05 did not impact on the number of samples. The Habraken approach represents a useful tool for risk management in order to design a fit-for-purpose sampling plan for the detection of low levels of food-borne pathogens in heterogeneously contaminated powdered food. However, it must be outlined that although effective in detecting pathogens, these sampling plans are difficult to be applied since the huge number of samples that needs to be tested. Sampling does not seem an effective measure to control pathogens in powdered food.

  9. Sources of calicivirus contamination in foodborne outbreaks, Denmark, 2005-2011 - the role of the asymptomatic food handler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina T.; Lisby, Morten; Fonager, Jannik;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Norovirus is the predominant cause of foodborne disease outbreaks. Virus contamination may occur during all steps of food processing from production to preparation and serving. The relative importance of these different routes of contamination is unknown. Methods. The purpose of this ......Background. Norovirus is the predominant cause of foodborne disease outbreaks. Virus contamination may occur during all steps of food processing from production to preparation and serving. The relative importance of these different routes of contamination is unknown. Methods. The purpose...... of this study was to estimate the proportions of outbreaks caused by asymptomatic and symptomatic food handlers. Reported foodborne norovirus and sapovirus outbreaks (n=191) occurring over a seven-year period were extracted, reviewed, and categorized according to the available evidence for source...... of contamination. Results. In 64 (34%) of the outbreaks, contamination from food handlers took place during preparation or serving of food. In the majority of these outbreaks (n=41; 64%), the food handlers were asymptomatic during food handling. Some had been in contact with ill household members before handling...

  10. Analytical Applications of Nanomaterials in Monitoring Biological and Chemical Contaminants in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Young-Rok

    2016-09-28

    The detection of food pathogens is an important aspect of food safety. A range of detection systems and new analytical materials have been developed to achieve fast, sensitive, and accurate monitoring of target pathogens. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of selected nanomaterials and their applications in food, and place focus on the monitoring of biological and chemical contaminants in food. The unique optical and electrical properties of nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles, nanorods, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, nanopores, and polydiacetylene nanovesicles, are closely associated with their dimensions, which are comparable in scale to those of targeted biomolecules. Furthermore, their optical and electrical properties are highly dependent on local environments, which make them promising materials for sensor development. The specificity and selectivity of analytical nanomaterials for target contaminants can be achieved by combining them with various biological entities, such as antibodies, oligonucleotides, aptamers, membrane proteins, and biological ligands. Examples of nanomaterial-based analytical systems are presented together with their limitations and associated developmental issues.

  11. Eradication of high viable loads of Listeria monocytogenes contaminating food-contact surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia ede Candia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the efficacy of cold gaseous ozone treatments at low concentrations in the eradication of high Listeria monocytogenes viable cell loads from glass, polypropylene, stainless steel and expanded polystyrene food-contact surfaces. Using a step by step approach, involving the selection of the most resistant strain-surface combinations, 11 Listeria spp. strains resulted inactivated by a continuous ozone flow at 1.07 mg m-3 after 24 or 48 h of cold incubation, depending on both strain and surface evaluated. Increasing the inoculum level to 9 log CFU coupon-1, the best inactivation rate was obtained after 48h of treatment at 3.21 mg m-3 ozone concentration when cells were deposited onto stainless steel and expanded polystyrene coupons, resulted the most resistant food-contact surfaces in the previous assays.The addition of naturally microbiologically contaminated meat extract to a high load of L. monocytogenes LMG 23775 cells, the most resistant strain out of the 11 assayed Listeria spp. strains, led to its complete inactivation after four days of treatment.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the survival of L. monocytogenes and the effect of ozone treatment under cold storage conditions on expanded polystyrene, a commonly-used material in food packaging. These results could be useful for reducing pathogen cross-contamination phenomena during cold food storage.

  12. Active Infrared Thermography for Seal Contamination Detection in Heat-Sealed Food Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlien D’huys

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Packaging protects food products from environmental influences, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the quality of the packaging material and of the closure or seal. A common problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of seal contamination, which can cause a decreased seal strength, an increased packaging failure risk and leak formation. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal contaminated packages from the production chain is crucial. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heated seal bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. Thermal image sequences of contaminated seals were recorded shortly after sealing. The detection performances of six thermal image processing methods, based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profiles, thermal signal reconstruction, pulsed phase thermography, principal component thermography and a matched filter, were compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify seal contamination, and processed thermal images were mapped to these references. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter 0.60 mm was obtained for the method based on a fit of the cooling profiles. Moreover, the detection performance of this method did not depend strongly on the time after sealing at which recording of the thermal images was started, making it a robust and generally applicable method.

  13. Microbial behaviour and cross contamination between cargoes in containerized transportation of food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abban, Stephen

    involved in foodborne disease outbreaks and their use in the present study have been discussed. Both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have been used in various experiments. The history of containerized transportation and its revolutionary role in the world of commerce is also briefly traced...... contamination scenarios involving both biotic and abiotic surfaces alongside the factors affecting the process have been briefly discussed. Cleaning and disinfection scenarios in related food hygiene environments have been looked into in the literature as well. The experimental work was in several phases...... the role of selected wavelengths and the type of surface material on the sensitivity of detecting various food residues on the surfaces. Wavelengths in the 365-445 nm regions consistently illuminated both plant and animal food residue to different extents; the optimal wavelength differed for various...

  14. Aflatoxins in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Pietri

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. The aflatoxin group is comprised of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, B2, G1 and G2. In addition, aflatoxin M1 (AFM1, a hydroxylated metabolite of AFB1, is excreted in the milk of dairy cows consuming an AFB1-contaminated ration. AFB1 has shown extreme acute and chronic toxicity and carcinogenic activity in animals; the acute toxicity of AFM1 is nearly equal to that of AFB1, but its potential carcinogenic hazard is about one order of magnitude less than that of AFB1. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classified AFB1 as a human carcinogen (group 1 and AFM1 as a possible carcinogen (group 2A. Recently, the possibility of a synergistic carcinogenic interaction between HBV chronic infection and dietary exposure to AFB1 arose from the observation of their co-existence in countries with high incidences of HCC and was confirmed by further experimental and epidemiological studies. However, the carcinogenic potency of AFB1 is considered much lower in populations where chronic hepatitis infections are rare. For the first time in 2003, significant problems arose in Italy, due to the aflatoxin contamination of maize. The summer was extremely hot and dry and A. flavus is very competitive under these conditions as the plants are stressed. Maize grain is normally utilized in the food supply for dairy cows and as such led to the severe and widespread contamination of milk with AFM1. In the following years (2004-2006, different climatic conditions as well as better compliance with guidelines by farmers, led to a dramatic reduction of the problem.

  15. Portable gliadin-immunochip for contamination control on the food production chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriacò, Maria Serena; de Feo, Francesco; Primiceri, Elisabetta; Monteduro, Anna Grazia; de Benedetto, Giuseppe Egidio; Pennetta, Antonio; Rinaldi, Ross; Maruccio, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common digestive disorders caused by an abnormal immune reaction to gluten. So far there are no available therapies, the only solution is a strict gluten-free diet, which however could be very challenging as gluten can be hidden in many food products. Furthermore an additional problem is related to cross-contamination of nominal gluten-free foods with gluten-based ones during manufacturing. Here we propose a lab on chip platform as a powerful tool to help food manufacturers to evaluate the real amount of gluten in their products by an accurate in-situ control of the production chain and maybe to specify the real gluten content in packages labeling. Our portable gliadin-immunochips, based on an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy transduction method, were first calibrated and then validated for both liquid and solid food matrixes by analyzing different beers and flours. The high specificity of our assay was also demonstrated by performing control experiments on rice and potatoes flours containing prolamin-like proteins. We achieved limit of quantification of 0.5 ppm for gliadin that is 20 times lower than the worldwide limit established for gluten-free food while the method of analysis is faster and cheaper than currently employed ELISA-based methods. Moreover our results on food samples were validated through a mass spectrometry standard analysis.

  16. Consumer perceptions of risks of chemical and microbiological contaminants associated with food chains: A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kher, S.V.; Jonge, de J.; Wentholt, M.T.A.; Deliza, R.; Cunha de Andrade, J.; Cnossen, H.J.; Lucas Luijckx, N.B.; Frewer, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    The development and implementation of effective systems to identify vulnerabilities in food chains to chemical and microbiological contaminants must take account of consumer priorities and preferences. The present investigation attempted to understand consumer perceptions associated with chemical an

  17. Conversion of Suspected Food Carcinogen 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Sulfotransferases and Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Postmitochondrial Tissue Preparations of Humans, Mice, and Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Benjamin; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Monien, Bernhard H

    2016-01-01

    The food contaminant 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is formed by heat- and acid-catalyzed reactions from carbohydrates. More than 80% of HMF is metabolized by oxidation of the aldehyde group in mice and rats. Sulfo conjugation yields mutagenic 5-sulfoxymethylfurfural, the probable cause for the neoplastic effects observed in HMF-treated rodents. Considerable metabolic differences between species hinder assessing the tumorigenic risk associated with human dietary HMF uptake. Here, we assayed HMF turnover catalyzed by sulfotransferases or by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) in postmitochondrial preparations from liver, kidney, colon, and lung of humans, mice, and rats. The tissues-specific clearance capacities of HMF sulfo conjugation (CL(SC)) and ALDH-catalyzed oxidation (CL(OX)) were concentrated to the liver. The hepatic clearance CL(SC) in mice (males: 487 µl/min/kg bw, females: 2520 µl/min/kg bw) and rats (males: 430 µl/min/kg bw, females: 198 µl/min/kg bw) were considerably higher than those in humans (males: 21.2 µl/min/kg bw, females: 32.2 µl/min/kg bw). The ALDH-related clearance rates CLOX in mice (males: 3400 ml/min/kg bw, females: 1410 ml/min/kg bw) were higher than those of humans (males: 436 ml/min/kg bw, females: 646 ml/min/kg bw) and rats (males: 627 ml/min/kg bw, females: 679 ml/min/kg bw). The ratio of CL(OX) to CL(SC) was lowest in female mice. This finding indicated that HMF sulfo conjugation was most substantial in the liver of female mice, a target tissue for HMF-induced neoplastic effects, and that humans may be less sensitive regarding HMF sulfo conjugation compared with the rodent models.

  18. Circumstances associated with the contamination of food by aflatoxin in a high primary liver cancer area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rensburg, S J; Kirsipuu, A; Coutinho, L P; Van Der Watt, J J

    1975-05-24

    The variable incidence of primary liver cancer has been shown to be related to the average daily intake of aflatoxin in various parts of the world. This study was made to detect and report strategic points of contamination of foodstuffs in the region with the highest known incidence of liver cancer. Methods of food production, harvesting, storage and preparation were examined, and defects which promote fungus growth on food were found at each stage. Most meals consisted of a single dish with three basic ingredients -- a protein, bulk carbohydrate and green vegetables. Groundnuts were the main source of protein, but were also the main cause of aflatoxin contamination, since casual traditional methods of agriculture are not suited to the production of this exotic crop. Aflatoxin production appears to occur in the main sources of carbohydrate, such as cassava and maize, during storage. Leaves of various kinds provide substitutes for green vegetables and common methods of handling the crop promote fungal growth. Western-type foods had a particularly low aflatoxin content, or were free of it. Education and economic opportunities external to the subsistence economy structure are contributing to the westerisation of some living habits, a process believed to be responsible for the observed decrease in the incidence of primary liver cancer. Current knowledge indicates that a pertinent but simple educational programme could further markedly reduce the incidence of the disease.

  19. Dioxins contamination of food in Italy: an overview of the situation 1999-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scortichini

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Istituto Zooprofilattico dell’Abruzzo e Molise ‘G. Caporale’ (IZS A&M has been monitoring contamination of food by the polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDD and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDF as part of the National Surveillance Plan (NSP in Italy since 1999, on license from the Italian Ministry of Health. Between 1999 and 2000, 238 samples (including meat, fish, eggs, milk, fat, feedstuffs were analysed. The results of the tests were expressed in terms of international toxic equivalents (I-TEQs from NATO/CCMS, 1988 and World Health Organization toxic equivalents (WHO-TEQs. These results showed contamination levels comparable to those detected in similar studies conducted in other European countries for products such as milk (mean: 0.81 pg I-TEQ/g fat, meat (mean: 0.73 pg I-TEQ/g fat and fat (mean: 0.51 pg I-TEQ/g fat. The highest dioxin content was found in fish (mean: 5.28 pg I-TEQ/g fat and fish feeds (mean 6.60 pg ITEQ/ g fat. These two matrices also showed complete duplication of contamination profiles. Other edible matrices (milk, meat, eggs revealed the presence of HpCDD and OCDD. This could be due to the introduction into Italy of the animal feed additive choline chloride contaminated by these congenerse.

  20. Lead Contamination in Selected Foods from Riyadh City Market and Estimation of the Daily Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeid A. Al Othman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine lead contamination in 104 of the representative food items in the Saudi diet and to estimate the dietary lead intake of Saudi Arabians. Three samples of each selected food items were purchased from the local markets of Riyadh city, the capital of Saudi Arabia. Each pooled sample was analyzed in triplicate by ICP-AES after thorough homogenization. Sweets (0.011–0.199 μg/g, vegetables (0.002–0.195 μg/g, legumes (0.014–0.094 μg/g, eggs (0.079 μg/g, meat and meat products (0.013–0.068 μg/g were the richest sources of lead. Considering the amounts of each food consumed, the major food sources of lead intake for Saudi can be arranged as follows: vegetables (25.4%, cereal and cereal products (24.2%, beverages (9.7% sweets (8.2%, legumes (7.4%, fruits (5.4% milk and milk products (5.1%. The daily intake of lead was calculated taking into account the concentration of this element in the edible part of the daily consumption data which were derived from two sources, (a the KSA food sheet provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO and (b from questionnaires distributed among 300 families in Riyadh city. The results showed that the daily intakes of lead according to the two sources are 22.7 and 24.5 μg/person/day respectively, which are lower than that mentioned by The Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA, whereas it is comprabale with that of other countries.

  1. Accidental and deliberate microbiological contamination in the feed and food chains — How biotraceability may improve the response to bioterrorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutsson, Rickard; van Rotterdam, Bart; Fach, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    A next frontier of the global food safety agenda has to consider a broad spectrum of bio-risks, such as accidental and intentional contaminations in the food and feed chain. In this article, the background for the research needs related to biotraceability and response to bioterrorism incidents ar...

  2. Potential contamination issues arising from the use of biofuel and food industry by-products in animal feed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granby, Kit; Mortensen, Alicja; Broesboel-Jensen, B.

    2012-01-01

    By-products are secondary or discarded products from manufacturing. Contamination of by-products used for feed may result in carryover to animal food products and hence have impact on either animal health or food safety. Feed by-products from bioethanol production include, for example, 'dried dis...

  3. Feasibility study of contaminant detection for food with ULF-NMR/MRI system using HTS-SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi, E-mail: hatukade@ens.tut.ac.jp; Tsunaki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Abe, Takayuki; Hatta, Junichi; Tanaka, Saburo

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Feasibility of application of ultra-low field (ULF) NMR/MRI was studied. •ULF-NMR/MRI system utilized HTS-rf-SQUID and permanent magnet of 1.1 T. •Magnetic contaminants in water were successfully detected by NMR measurements. •Non-magnetic contaminants in water were distinguished by 1D-MRI measurements. -- Abstract: We have developed an ultra-low frequency (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system utilizing an HTS-SQUID for an application of contaminant detection in food and drink. In the system, a permanent magnet of 1.1 T was used to pre-polarize protons in a water sample. We measured NMR signals from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as stainless steel (SUS304), aluminum, and glass balls using the system. In the case that the contaminant was the SUS304 ball, the NMR signal intensity was reduced compared to that from the sample without the contaminant due to the remnant field of the contaminant. One-dimensional (1D) MRIs of the samples were also acquired to detect non-magnetic contaminants. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect various contaminants in foods.

  4. Environment contamination by mycotoxins and their occurrence in food and feed: Physiological aspects and economical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capcarova, Marcela; Zbynovska, Katarina; Kalafova, Anna; Bulla, Jozef; Bielik, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of food and feed by mycotoxins as toxic metabolites of fungi is a risk not only for consumers resulting in various embarrassment regarding health status and well-being, but also for producers, companies and export market on the ground of economic losses and ruined stability of economic trade. As it is given in historical evidence, the contamination of food by mycotoxins is a topic as old as a history of mankind, finding some evidence even in the ancient books and records. Nowadays, the mycotoxins are used in modern biotechnological laboratories and are considered an agent for targeting the specific cells (e.g., defected cells to eliminate them). However, this promising procedure is only the beginning. More concern is focused on mycotoxins as abiotic hazard agents. The dealing with them, systematic monitoring, and development of techniques for their elimination from agricultural commodities are worldwide issues concerning all countries. They can be found alone or in co-occurrence with other mycotoxins. Thus, this review aims to provide widened information regarding mycotoxins contamination in environment with the consequences on health of animals and humans. The inevitability for more data that correctly determine the risk points linked to mycotoxins occurrence and their specific reactions in the environment is demonstrated. This review includes various symptoms in animals and humans that result from mycotoxin exposure. For better understanding of mycotoxin's impact on animals, the sensitivities of various animal species to various mycotoxins are listed. Strategies for elimination and preventing the risks of mycotoxins contamination as well as economical approach are discussed. To complete the topic, some data from past as historical evidences are presented.

  5. Accumulation and toxicity of aluminium-contaminated food in the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodburn, Katie; Walton, Rachel; McCrohan, Catherine; White, Keith

    2011-10-01

    The accumulation and toxicity of aluminium in freshwater organisms have primarily been examined following aqueous exposure. This study investigated the uptake, excretion and toxicity of aluminium when presented as aluminium-contaminated food. Adult Pacifastacus leniusculus were fed control (3 μg aluminium/g) or aluminium-spiked pellets (420 μg aluminium/g) over 28 days. Half the crayfish in each group were then killed and the remainder fed control pellets for a further 10 days (clearance period). Concentrations of aluminium plus the essential metals calcium, copper, potassium and sodium were measured in the gill, hepatopancreas, flexor muscle, antennal gland (kidney) and haemolymph. Histopathological analysis of tissue damage and sub-cellular distribution of aluminium were examined in the hepatopancreas. Haemocyte number and protein concentration in the haemolymph were analysed as indicators of toxicity. The hepatopancreas of aluminium-fed crayfish contained significantly more aluminium than controls on days 28 and 38, and this amount was positively correlated with the amount ingested. More than 50% of the aluminium in the hepatopancreas of aluminium-fed crayfish was located in sub-cellular fractions thought to be involved in metal detoxification. Aluminium concentrations were also high in the antennal glands of aluminium-fed crayfish suggesting that some of the aluminium lost from the hepatopancreas is excreted. Aluminium exposure via contaminated food caused inflammation in the hepatopancreas but did not affect the number of circulating haemocytes, haemolymph ion concentrations or protein levels. In conclusion, crayfish accumulate, store and excrete aluminium from contaminated food with only localised toxicity.

  6. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, V., E-mail: Vladimir.Scholtz@vscht.cz; Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Čeřovský, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  7. Decision aiding handbooks for managing contaminated food production systems, drinking water and inhabited areas in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Brown, J.; Howard, B.J.;

    2010-01-01

    non-crisis conditions, to engage stakeholders and to develop local and regional plans. The handbooks can also be applied as part of the decision-aiding process to develop a recovery strategy following an incident. In addition, the handbooks are useful for training purposes and during emergency......Three handbooks have been developed, in conjunction with a wide range of stakeholders to assist in the management of contaminated food production systems, inhabited areas and drinking water following a radiological incident. The handbooks are aimed at national and local authorities, central...... exercises. To realise their full potential, the handbooks should be customised at national, regional and local levels. © EDP Sciences, 2010...

  8. The food-contaminant deoxynivalenol modifies eating by targeting anorexigenic neurocircuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardet, Clémence; Bonnet, Marion S; Jdir, Rajae; Sadoud, Medhi; Thirion, Sylvie; Tardivel, Catherine; Roux, Julien; Lebrun, Bruno; Wanaverbecq, Nicolas; Mounien, Lourdes; Trouslard, Jérôme; Jean, André; Dallaporta, Michel; Troadec, Jean-Denis

    2011-01-01

    Physiological regulations of energy balance and body weight imply highly adaptive mechanisms which match caloric intake to caloric expenditure. In the central nervous system, the regulation of appetite relies on complex neurocircuitry which disturbance may alter energy balance and result in anorexia or obesity. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on contaminated cereals and its stability during processing and cooking explains its widespread presence in human food. DON has been implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and farm animals including weight loss. Here, we provide the first demonstration that DON reduced feeding behavior and modified satiation and satiety by interfering with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation. Moreover, our results strongly suggest that during intoxication, DON reaches the brain where it modifies anorexigenic balance. In view of the widespread human exposure to DON, the present results may lead to reconsider the potential consequences of chronic DON consumption on human eating disorders.

  9. Arsenic as a food chain contaminant: mechanisms of plant uptake and metabolism and mitigation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P; Meharg, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is an environmental and food chain contaminant. Excessive accumulation of As, particularly inorganic arsenic (As(i)), in rice (Oryza sativa) poses a potential health risk to populations with high rice consumption. Rice is efficient at As accumulation owing to flooded paddy cultivation that leads to arsenite mobilization, and the inadvertent yet efficient uptake of arsenite through the silicon transport pathway. Iron, phosphorus, sulfur, and silicon interact strongly with As during its route from soil to plants. Plants take up arsenate through the phosphate transporters, and arsenite and undissociated methylated As species through the nodulin 26-like intrinsic (NIP) aquaporin channels. Arsenate is readily reduced to arsenite in planta, which is detoxified by complexation with thiol-rich peptides such as phytochelatins and/or vacuolar sequestration. A range of mitigation methods, from agronomic measures and plant breeding to genetic modification, may be employed to reduce As uptake by food crops.

  10. Extraction, chemical characterization and narcosis toxicity in a field contaminated marine food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beekman, M.; Klamer, H.; Wezel, A. van [National Inst. for Coastal and Marine Management, The Hague (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Lug worms, mussels and flounder were chronically exposed to contaminated sediment from the Rotterdam Harbour in a marine mesoscosm. The sediment contained a variety of known and unknown contaminants. The amount of toxic stress in the System was evaluated by extraction of the biota and testing of the extracts to Microtox{reg_sign}. An extract of biota is a reflection of the bioavailable contaminants and their biotransformation products that induce toxicity in the organism. First different extraction procedures were evaluated in the mussel. Samples were Soxhlet extracted for 16 hr, with (1) acetone/hexane, (2) ethylacetatehexane, (3) chloroform/hexane or (4) chloroform/methanol as a solvent. The different extracts were analyzed on total lipid amount, lipid composition (HPLC-ELSD), contaminant composition (HPLC-UV, HPLC-fluorescence and GC-MS) and on their toxicity on Microtox{reg_sign}. The chloroform/methanol extraction yielded almost twice as much lipids compared to the other procedures, the difference was mainly explained by a more efficient extraction of the polar lipids. The contaminant chromatograms showed approximately the same spectra for the four procedures, the toxicity of the extracts to Microtox{reg_sign} was somewhat higher for extraction procedure 4. The worm and flounder samples were extracted with chloroform/methanol and also tested on their toxicity by Microtox{reg_sign}. The difference in toxicity between the different species was correlated with their difference in {delta}{sup 15}N, a parameter to indicate the trophic position in the food web. The use of the testing of organisms` extracts in Microtox{reg_sign} for the assessment of the toxic stress in a field situation is discussed.

  11. Food chain analysis of exposures and risks to wildlife at a metals-contaminated wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, G A; Blanchet, R J; Linder, G

    1996-03-01

    A food chain analysis of risks to wetland receptors was performed in support of a baseline ecological risk assessment at the Milltown Reservoir Sediments Superfund site in Montana. The study area consisted of over 450 acres of primarily palustrine wetland contaminated with metals from mining wastes transported from upstream sources (average of 465 mg/kg for Cu in sediments, and 585 mg/kg in soils). The food chain analysis focused on several species of terrestrial and semiaquatic animals indigenous to montane wetlands of the northern Rocky Mountains. Receptors consisted of mice, voles, muskrats, beaver, various waterfowl species, osprey, bald eagles, and deer. Samples of aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates, small mammal tissues, fish tissue, aquatic and terrestrial vegetation, soils, sediment, and surface water were collected and analyzed for As, Cd, Cu, and Zn. A linear multimedia food-chain model was constructed to estimate daily intakes of the metals for each receptor, with assumed values for ingestion of aquatic and terrestrial food items, ingestion of local surface water, and incidental ingestion of soils and/or sediments. Evaluation of health risks to the receptors was performed by comparison of exposures expressed as daily intakes to a suite of toxicity values. The range of values consisted of the lower end of chronic toxicity data found in toxicology databases or the literature for the same or similar species, modified to account for extrapolation uncertainties. Daily intakes of chemicals of concern were below or within the range of toxicity values for all receptors. The weight of evidence from the food chain analysis and earlier bioassessment and ecological studies suggest that the health of the wetland receptors is at minimal risk due to the presence of elevated metals in sediments, upland soils, water, or food items at the site.

  12. What Are We Putting in Our Food That Is Making Us Fat? Food Additives, Contaminants, and Other Putative Contributors to Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Amber L.; Jennifer J. Schlezinger; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    The “chemical obesogen” hypothesis conjectures that synthetic, environmental contaminants are contributing to the global epidemic of obesity. In fact, intentional food additives (e.g., artificial sweeteners and colors, emulsifiers) and unintentional compounds (e.g., bisphenol A, pesticides) are largely unstudied in regard to their effects on overall metabolic homeostasis. With that said, many of these contaminants have been found to dysregulate endocrine function, insulin signaling, and/or ad...

  13. Food contaminant zearalenone and its metabolites affect cytokine synthesis and intestinal epithelial integrity of porcine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Daniela E; Motiu, Monica; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-05-29

    The intestinal epithelium is the first barrier against food contaminants. Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic mycotoxin that was identified as a common contaminant of cereal grains and food and feedstuffs. In the present study, we have investigated the in vitro effects of ZEN and some of its metabolites (α-ZOL, β-ZOL) in concentrations of 10-100 µM on a swine epithelial cell line: Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). We demonstrated that both ZEN metabolites were more toxic for IPEC cells as resulted from the XTT test, while for doses lower than 10 µM, only β-ZOL showed a more pronounced cytotoxicity versus epithelial cells as resulted from neutral red assay. ZEN has no effect on TER values, while α-ZOL significantly decreased the TER values, starting with day 4 of treatment. β-ZOL had a dual effect, firstly it induced a significant increase of TER, and then, starting on day 6, it induced a dramatic decrease of TER values as compared with on day 0. Concerning the cytokine synthesis, our results showed that ZEN has a tendency to increase the synthesis of IL-8 and IL-10. By contrast, α- and β-ZOL decreased the expression of both IL-8 and IL-10, in a dose dependent manner. In conclusion, our results showed that ZEN and its metabolites differently affected porcine intestinal cell viability, transepithelial resistance and cytokine synthesis with important implication for gut health.

  14. Toxicity mechanisms of the food contaminant citrinin: application of a quantitative yeast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Vanacloig-Pedros, Elena; Proft, Markus

    2014-05-22

    Mycotoxins are important food contaminants and a serious threat for human nutrition. However, in many cases the mechanisms of toxicity for this diverse group of metabolites are poorly understood. Here we apply live cell gene expression reporters in yeast as a quantitative model to unravel the cellular defense mechanisms in response to the mycotoxin citrinin. We find that citrinin triggers a fast and dose dependent activation of stress responsive promoters such as GRE2 or SOD2. More specifically, oxidative stress responsive pathways via the transcription factors Yap1 and Skn7 are critically implied in the response to citrinin. Additionally, genes in various multidrug resistance transport systems are functionally involved in the resistance to citrinin. Our study identifies the antioxidant defense as a major physiological response in the case of citrinin. In general, our results show that the use of live cell gene expression reporters in yeast are a powerful tool to identify toxicity targets and detoxification mechanisms of a broad range of food contaminants relevant for human nutrition.

  15. Toxicity Mechanisms of the Food Contaminant Citrinin: Application of a Quantitative Yeast Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Pascual-Ahuir

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are important food contaminants and a serious threat for human nutrition. However, in many cases the mechanisms of toxicity for this diverse group of metabolites are poorly understood. Here we apply live cell gene expression reporters in yeast as a quantitative model to unravel the cellular defense mechanisms in response to the mycotoxin citrinin. We find that citrinin triggers a fast and dose dependent activation of stress responsive promoters such as GRE2 or SOD2. More specifically, oxidative stress responsive pathways via the transcription factors Yap1 and Skn7 are critically implied in the response to citrinin. Additionally, genes in various multidrug resistance transport systems are functionally involved in the resistance to citrinin. Our study identifies the antioxidant defense as a major physiological response in the case of citrinin. In general, our results show that the use of live cell gene expression reporters in yeast are a powerful tool to identify toxicity targets and detoxification mechanisms of a broad range of food contaminants relevant for human nutrition.

  16. Engineered Nanoparticles as Potential Food Contaminants and Their Toxicity to Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaomo; Nguyen, Trang H D; Lin, Mengshi; Mustapha, Azlin

    2016-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), such as metallic or metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs), have gained much attention in recent years. Increasing use of ENPs in various areas may lead to the release of ENPs into the environment and cause the contamination of agricultural and food products by ENPs. In this study, we selected two important ENPs (zinc oxide [ZnO] and silver [Ag] NPs) as potential food contaminants and investigated their toxicity via an in vitro model using Caco-2 cells. The physical properties of ENPs and their effects on Caco-2 cells were characterized by electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) techniques. Results demonstrate that a significant inhibition of cell viability was observed after a 24-h of exposure of Caco-2 cells to 3-, 6-, and 12-mM ZnO NPs or 0.5-, 1.5-, and 3-mM Ag NPs. The noticeable changes of cells include the alteration in cell shape, abnormal nuclear structure, membrane blebbing, and cytoplasmic deterioration. The toxicity of ZnO NPs, but not that of Ag NPs after exposure to simulated gastric fluid, significantly decreased. Scanning transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO and Ag NPs penetrated the membrane of Caco-2 cells. EDS results also confirm the presence of NPs in the cytoplasm of the cells. This study demonstrates that ZnO and Ag NPs have cytotoxic effects and can inhibit the growth of Caco-2 cells.

  17. Clenbuterol - regional food contamination a possible source for inadvertent doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddat, S; Fußhöller, G; Geyer, H; Thomas, A; Braun, H; Haenelt, N; Schwenke, A; Klose, C; Thevis, M; Schänzer, W

    2012-06-01

    The misuse of the sympathomimetic and anabolic agent clenbuterol has been frequently reported in professional sport and in the livestock industry. In 2010, a team of athletes returned from competition in China and regular doping control samples were taken within the next two days. All urine samples contained low amounts (pg/ml) of clenbuterol, drawing the attention to a well-known problem: the possibility of an unintended clenbuterol intake with food. A warning that Chinese meat is possibly contaminated with prohibited substances according to international anti-doping regulations was also given by Chinese officials just before the Bejing Olympic Games in 2008. To investigate if clenbuterol can be found in human urine, a study was initiated comprising 28 volunteers collecting urine samples after their return from China. For the quantification of clenbuterol at a low pg/ml level, a very sensitive and specific isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay was developed using liquid/liquid re-extraction for clean-up with a limit of detection and quantification of 1 and 3 pg/ml, respectively. The method was validated demonstrating good precision (intra-day: 2.9-5.5 %; inter-day: 5.1-8.8%), accuracy (89.5-102.5%) and mean recovery (81.4%). Clenbuterol was detectable in 22 (79%) of the analyzed samples, indicating a general food contamination problem despite an official clenbuterol prohibition in China for livestock.

  18. MudPIT analysis of alkaline tolerance by Listeria monocytogenes strains recovered as persistent food factory contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Rolf E; Latham, Roger; Mellefont, Lyndal; Ross, Tom; Bowman, John P

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline solutions are used to clean food production environments but the role of alkaline resistance in persistent food factory contamination by Listeria monocytogenes is unknown. We used shotgun proteomics to characterise alkaline adapted L. monocytogenes recovered as persistent and transient food factory contaminants. Three unrelated strains were studied including two persistent and a transient food factory contaminant determined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The strains were adapted to growth at pH 8.5 and harvested in exponential phase. Protein extracts were analysed using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) and protein abundance compared by spectra counting. The strains elicited core responses to alkaline growth including modulation of intracellular pH, stabilisation of cellular processes and reduced cell-division, independent to lineage, MLST or whether the strains were transient or persistent contaminants. Alkaline adaptation by all strains corresponded to that expected in stringent-response induced cells, with protein expression supporting metabolic shifts concordant with elevated alarmone production and indicating that the alkaline-stringent response results from energy rather than nutrient limitation. We believe this is the first report describing induction of a stringent response in different L. monocytogenes strains by alkaline pH under non-limiting growth conditions. The work emphasises the need for early intervention to avoid persistent food factory contamination by L. monocytogenes.

  19. Risk assessment and emerging chemicals hazards in foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Moscato

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The main beliefs relating to the risk assessment of chemicals in foods, new chemicals in raw material as well as in food processing are briefly presented. Evaluation reviews of representative chemicals found in traditional and novel foods are given. Old and new processes or newly recognized compounds, that require careful assessment in terms of their potential human health impact, are discussed. As example of processing-related contaminants, a risk assessment for acrylamide, is described, providing two different approaches in food safety assessment and the management of carcinogenic contaminants.

  20. The Correlation between Eating Utensils and Place of Sales in the Contamination of Escherichia coli in Food Sold at Campus Food Stalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Susanna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, in general, the safety of food that is sold at any canteens in the campuses, the eating utensils are handled and the food stalls are managed are still uncertain. This research was aimed to understand the correlation between the eating utensils handling and the contamination of Escherichia coli (E. coli in the food sold by the food vendors in the campus. The cross-sectional design research applied on the food stalls in the university campus in Depok with a total number of 173 consumers as respondents. The variables observed as independent variables were the sanitation of the eating utensils and the sanitation of the dining place. The examination method of the Most Probable Number (MPN for E. coli was conducted to assess the food’s hygiene. The data analyzed using the chi-square test and followed by the logistic regression. The result showed that more than half of the food samples (59.54% were contaminated by E. coli. The storage place of the eating utensils was most significantly correlated with the E. coli contamination of the served food with an OR=0.45 (0.21-0.87. Therefore, it is necessary to promote the awareness of this risk and reinforce supervision by the Health Authorities and by the management of the place of sales to provide guidance to the food vendors and to the consumers as well. Further research is recommended to observe the E. coli contamination through clean water, eating utensils, the hands of the consumers and the napkins used to wipe dry the eating utensils.

  1. Land management of bracken needs to account for bracken carcinogens - a case study from Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Donnelly, Eric; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    Bracken ferns are some of the most widespread ferns in the World causing immense problems for land managers, foresters and rangers. Bracken is suspected of causing cancer in Humans due to its content of the carcinogen ptaquiloside. Ingestion of bracken, or food and drinking water contaminated wit...... be based on actual and site specific determinations of the ptaquiloside content. Care must be taken to avoid leaching from cut ferns to aquifers and other recipients and appropriate precautionary measures must be taken to protect staff from exposure to bracken dust....

  2. Saline Agriculture in the 21st Century: Using Salt Contaminated Resources to Cope Food Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ladeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the continue increase of the world population the requirements for food, freshwater, and fuel are bigger every day. This way an urgent necessity to develop, create, and practice a new type of agriculture, which has to be environmentally sustainable and adequate to the soils, is arising. Among the stresses in plant agriculture worldwide, the increase of soil salinity is considered the major stress. This is particularly emerging in developing countries that present the highest population growth rates, and often the high rates of soil degradation. Therefore, salt-tolerant plants provide a sensible alternative for many developing countries. These plants have the capacity to grow using land and water unsuitable for conventional crops producing food, fuel, fodder, fibber, resin, essential oils, and pharmaceutical products. In addition to their production capabilities they can be used simultaneously for landscape reintegration and soil rehabilitation. This review will cover important subjects concerning saline agriculture and the crop potential of halophytes to use salt-contaminated resources to manage food requirements.

  3. Toxic pyrrolizidinalkaloids as undesired contaminants in food and feed: degradation of the PAs from Senecio jacobaea in silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Jiminez, J; Kuschak, M; Roeder, E; Wiedenfeld, H

    2013-07-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) can show a hazardous potential for men and animals. They can act as cancerogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic and fetotoxic agents. One pathway of a human intoxication is its occurence as contaminants in food and feed. Here, the contamination of cereals already led to severe and fatal intoxication episodes. Besides this, milk is of special concern as it is the main food for children which show a very high susceptibility for a PA intoxication. Milk can contain PAs in case the milk producing animals have access to contaminated feed. In this context it is of special interest whether the PA content of contaminated silage remains stable during the ensiling procedure or show a more or less high level of decomposition. We could show that ensiling will not lead to PA-free silage.

  4. Rapid detection of norovirus in naturally contaminated food: foodborne gastroenteritis outbreak on a cruise ship in Brazil, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; do Carmo Sampaio Tavares Timenetsky, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a prevalent pathogen of foodborne diseases; however, its detection in foods other than shellfish is often time consuming and unsuccessful. In 2010, an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred on a cruise ship in Brazil, and NoV was the etiologic agent suspected. The objectives of this study were to report that a handy in-house methodology was suitable for NoV detection in naturally contaminated food, and perform the molecular characterization of food strains. Food samples (blue cheese, Indian sauce, herbal butter, soup, and white sauce) were analyzed by ELISA, two methods of RNA extraction, TRIzol(®) and QIAamp(®), following conventional RT-PCR. The qPCR was used in order to confirm the NoV genogroups. GI and GII NoV genogroups were identified by conventional RT-PCR after RNA extraction by means of the TRIzol(®) method. Two GII NoV samples were successfully sequenced, classified as GII.4; and they displayed a genetic relationship with strains from the Asian continent also isolated in 2010. GII and GI NoV were identified in distinct food matrices suggesting that it was not a common source of contamination. TRIzol(®) extraction followed by conventional RT-PCR was a suitable methodology in order to identify NoV in naturally contaminated food. Moreover, food samples could be processed within 8 h indicating the value of the method used for NoV detection, and its potential to identify foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks in food products other than shellfish. This is the first description in Brazil of NoV detection in naturally contaminated food other than shellfish involved in a foodborne outbreak.

  5. Aflatoxin Contamination in Food and Body Fluids in Relation to Malnutrition and Cancer Status in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félicité M. Tchouanguep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are food contaminants usually associated with hepatitis, immunodepression, impairment of fertility and cancer. The present work was to determine the presence of aflatoxins in eggs, milk, urine, and blood samples that were collected from various sources and periods; and hepatitis B virus antigen in blood samples. Aflatoxin was found in eggs (45.2%, cow raw milk (15.9%, breast milk (4.8%, urine from kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor children (45.5%, and sera from primary liver cancer patients (63.9%; HbsAg was also detected in 69.4% of the serum samples, but there was no association between both factors. Both AF and hepatitis B virus seem to be risk factors that could increase the incidence and prevalence rates of malnutrition and cancer in Cameroon.

  6. Aflatoxin contamination in food and body fluids in relation to malnutrition and cancer status in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchana, Angele N; Moundipa, Paul F; Tchouanguep, Félicité M

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are food contaminants usually associated with hepatitis, immunodepression, impairment of fertility and cancer. The present work was to determine the presence of aflatoxins in eggs, milk, urine, and blood samples that were collected from various sources and periods; and hepatitis B virus antigen in blood samples. Aflatoxin was found in eggs (45.2%), cow raw milk (15.9%), breast milk (4.8%), urine from kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor children (45.5%), and sera from primary liver cancer patients (63.9%); HbsAg was also detected in 69.4% of the serum samples, but there was no association between both factors. Both AF and hepatitis B virus seem to be risk factors that could increase the incidence and prevalence rates of malnutrition and cancer in Cameroon.

  7. Measurement of metallic contaminants in food with a high-T{sub c} SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Natsume, Miyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Hotta, Naoki; Matsuda, Takemasa; Spanut, Zarina A; Hatsukade, Yoshimi [Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2004-04-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a high-T{sub c} SQUID system for detecting metallic contaminants in foodstuffs. There is a demand for the development of systems for detecting not only magnetic materials but also non-magnetic materials such as Cu and aluminium in foodstuffs to ensure food safety. The system consists of a SQUID magnetometer, an excitation coil and a permanent magnet. For a non-magnetic sample, an AC magnetic field is applied during detection to induce an eddy current in the sample. For a magnetizable sample, a strong magnetic field is applied to the sample prior to the detection attempt. We were able to detect a stainless steel ball with a diameter of 0.1 mm and a Cu ball less than 1 mm in diameter, for example.

  8. Evaluation of the Hydrophobic Grid Membrane Filter for the Enumeration of Moulds and Yeasts in Naturally-Contaminated Foods

    OpenAIRE

    V.H. Tournas

    2009-01-01

    Over 240 food samples from six food groups (tree nuts, grains and grain products, dried fruits, fresh produce, fruit juice, and dairy products) were tested for levels of fungal contamination using the NEO-GRID hydrophobic grid membrane filter (HGMF) and the FDA official (BAM) method. Results showed that HGMF performed very well for all tested commodities giving yeast and mould (YM) counts similar to those of the BAM (reference) method. Statistical analysis of the data (t-test) revealed no sig...

  9. Contaminants in food chains of arctic ungulates: what have we learned from the Chernobyl accident?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The Chernobyl accidenr of 1986 caused radioactive contamination of widespread areas of reindeer pasture in Scandinavia. Reindeer {Rangifer tarandus are especially exposed to radioactive fallout due to their wintet diet, of which lichens are an important part. Much knowledge about the transfer of radiocaesium to reindeer, and via reindeer meat to man, was accumulated by intense scientific investigations, undertaken during the 1960s and 1970s, following nuclear weapons testing. Various ways to reduce the transfer of radiocaesium to animals and humans were also developed during this time. Much of the older knowledge proved to be of great value in the attempts to determine potential consequences of the Chernobyl accident and to suggest possible ways to ameliorate the effects of contamination. After Chernobyl, not only did reindeer prove to be a problem; many other food products originating ftom natural and semi-natural ecosystems were found to accumulate significant amounts of radiocaesium. Intense scientific work has produced new knowledge about the role of ungulates in the transfer of nutrients and contaminants within these systems. Different measures, like providing uncontaminated feed, use of caesium binders, altering the time of slaughter have been used with good results to minimize the transfer of radiocaesium to animals grazing natural pastures. The high cost of countermeasures has enforced consideration of cost against risk, which may also be of general interest with respect to other forms of pollution. Information, introduction of countermeasures and so forth would be more efficient in case a similar accident were to happen again. The Chernobyl accident is an obvious example of how human failures when dealing with a modern technical system can have global consequences and also be a potential threat to what we like to think of as the unspoiled wilderness of the Arctic.

  10. The Impact of Glucuronidation on the Bioactivation and DNA Adduction of the Cooked-Food Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malfatti, M A; Ubick, E A; Felton, J S

    2005-03-31

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) catalyze the glucuronidation of many different chemicals. Glucuronidation is especially important for detoxifying reactive intermediates from metabolic reactions, which otherwise can be biotransformed into highly reactive cytotoxic or carcinogenic species. Detoxification of certain food-borne carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HAs) is highly dependent on UGT1A-mediated glucuronidation. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), the most mass abundant carcinogenic HA found in well-done cooked meat, is extensively glucuronidated by UGT1A proteins. In humans, CYP1A2 catalyzed N-hydroxylation and subsequent UGT1A-mediated glucuronidation is a dominant pathway in the metabolism of PhIP. Therefore, changes in glucuronidation rates could significantly alter PhIP metabolism. To determine the importance of UGT1A-mediated glucuronidation in the biotransformation of PhIP, UGT1A proficient Wistar and UGT1A deficient Gunn rats were exposed to a single 100 {micro}g/kg oral dose of [{sup 14}C]-PhIP. Urine was collected over 24 h and the PhIP urinary metabolite profiles were compared between the two strains. After the 24 h exposure, livers and colon were removed and analyzed for DNA adduct formation by accelerator mass spectrometry. Wistar rats produced several PhIP and N-hydroxy-PhIP glucuronides that accounted for {approx}25% of the total amount of recovered urinary metabolites. In the Gunn rats, PhIP and N-hydroxy-PhIP glucuronides were reduced by 68-92%, compared to the Wistar rats, and comprised only 4% of the total amount of recovered urinary metabolites. PhIP-DNA adduct analysis from the Gunn rats revealed a correlation between reduced PhIP and N-hydroxy-PhIP glucuronide levels in the urine and increased hepatic DNA adducts, compared to the Wistar rats. These results indicate that UGT1A-mediated glucuronidation of PhIP and N-hydroxy-PhIP is an important pathway for PhIP detoxification. Failure to form glucuronide conjugates

  11. The food-contaminant deoxynivalenol modifies eating by targeting anorexigenic neurocircuitry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Girardet

    Full Text Available Physiological regulations of energy balance and body weight imply highly adaptive mechanisms which match caloric intake to caloric expenditure. In the central nervous system, the regulation of appetite relies on complex neurocircuitry which disturbance may alter energy balance and result in anorexia or obesity. Deoxynivalenol (DON, a trichothecene, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on contaminated cereals and its stability during processing and cooking explains its widespread presence in human food. DON has been implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and farm animals including weight loss. Here, we provide the first demonstration that DON reduced feeding behavior and modified satiation and satiety by interfering with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation. Moreover, our results strongly suggest that during intoxication, DON reaches the brain where it modifies anorexigenic balance. In view of the widespread human exposure to DON, the present results may lead to reconsider the potential consequences of chronic DON consumption on human eating disorders.

  12. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Terry; Bowser, Darlene

    2003-12-10

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium.

  13. Uptake and translocation of organophosphates and other emerging contaminants in food and forage crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Trine; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Stuanes, Arne O; Norli, Hans Ragnar

    2013-07-01

    Emerging contaminants in wastewater and sewage sludge spread on agricultural soil can be transferred to the human food web directly by uptake into food crops or indirectly following uptake into forage crops. This study determined uptake and translocation of the organophosphates tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) (log Kow 2.59), triethyl-chloro-phosphate (TCEP) (log Kow 1.44), tributyl phosphate (TBP) (log Kow 4.0), the insect repellent N,N-diethyl toluamide (DEET) (log Kow 2.18) and the plasticiser N-butyl benzenesulfonamide (NBBS) (log Kow 2.31) in barley, wheat, oilseed rape, meadow fescue and four cultivars of carrot. All species were grown in pots of agricultural soil, freshly amended contaminants in the range of 0.6-1.0 mg/kg dry weight, in the greenhouse. The bioconcentration factors for root (RCF), leaf (LCF) and seed (SCF) were calculated as plant concentration in root, leaf or seed over measured initial soil concentration, both in dry weight. The chlorinated flame retardants (TCEP and TCPP) displayed the highest bioconcentration factors for leaf and seed but did not show the same pattern for all crop species tested. For TCEP, which has been phased out due to toxicity but is still found in sewage sludge and wastewater, LCF was 3.9 in meadow fescue and 42.3 in carrot. For TCPP, which has replaced TCEP in many products and also occurs in higher residual levels in sewage sludge and wastewater, LCF was high for meadow fescue and carrot (25.9 and 17.5, respectively). For the four cultivars of carrot tested, the RCF range for TCPP and TCEP was 10-20 and 1.7-4.6, respectively. TCPP was detected in all three types of seeds tested (SCF, 0.015-0.110). Despite that DEET and NBBS have log Kow in same range as TCPP and TCEP, generally lower bioconcentration factors were measured. Based on the high translocation of TCPP and TCEP to leaves, especially TCPP, into meadow fescue (a forage crop for livestock animals), ongoing risk assessments should be conducted to

  14. Development and evaluation of novel sensing materials for detecting food contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Sindhuja

    Rapid detection of food-borne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as organic acids and alcohols released by bacterial pathogens is being used as an indicator for detecting bacterial contamination in food by our research group. One of our current research thrusts is to develop novel sensors that will be sensitive to specific compounds (at low operating temperature) associated with food safety. This study evaluates two approaches employed to develop sensors for detecting acid and alcohols at low concentrations. Chemoresistive and piezoelectric sensors were developed based on metal oxides and olfactory system based biomaterials, respectively to detect acetic acid, butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, and 1-hexanol. The metal oxide based sensors were developed by the sol-gel method. A zinc oxide (ZnO) sensor was found to be sensitive to acetic acid with lower detection limit ranging from 13-40 ppm. The three-layered dip-coated gold electrode based ZnO sensors had a LDL of 18 ppm for acetic acid detection. The ZnO-iron oxide (Fe2O3) based nanocomposite sensors were developed to detect butanol operating at 100°C. The 5% Fe/Zn mole ratio based ZnO-Fe2O3 nanocomposite sensors had high correlation coefficients (>0.90) of calibration curves, low butanol LDLs (26 +/- 7 ppm), and lower variation among the sensor responses. The ZnO and ZnO-Fe2O3 nanocomposite sensors showed potential to detect acetic acid and butanol at low concentrations, respectively at 100°C. QCM based olfactory sensors were developed from olfactory receptor and odorant binding protein based sequences to detect low concentrations of acetic acid and alcohols (3-methyl-1-butanol and 1-hexanol), respectively. The average LDLs for acetic acid as well as alcohols detection of the QCM sensors were 0.80. Finally, a computational simulation based peptide sequences was designed from olfactory receptors and evaluated as sensor material for the detection of alcohols at low concentrations. The results indicated

  15. Contamination of an arctic terrestrial food web with marine-derived persistent organic pollutants transported by breeding seabirds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, Emily S., E-mail: echoy087@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Kimpe, Linda E., E-mail: linda.kimpe@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mallory, Mark L., E-mail: mark.mallory@ec.gc.c [Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Iqaluit, NU, X0A 0H0 (Canada); Smol, John P., E-mail: smolj@queensu.c [Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Lab (PEARL), Department of Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Blais, Jules M., E-mail: jules.blais@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    At Cape Vera, Devon Island (Nunavut, Canada), a colony of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) concentrates and releases contaminants through their guano to the environment. We determined whether persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from seabirds were transferred to coastal food webs. Snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis) were the most contaminated species, with {Sigma}PCB and {Sigma}DDT (mean: 168, 106 ng/g ww) concentrations surpassing environmental guidelines for protecting wildlife. When examined collectively, PCB congeners and DDT in jewel lichen (Xanthoria elegans) were lower in samples taken farther from the seabird colony, and increased with increasing {delta}{sup 15}N values. However, only concentrations of p'p-DDE:{Sigma}DDT and PCB-95 were significantly correlated inversely with distance from the seabird cliffs. Linkages between marine-derived POPs and their concentrations in terrestrial mammals were less clear. Our study provides novel contaminant data for these species and supports biovector transport as a source of organic contaminants to certain components of the terrestrial food web. - This study provides evidence of contaminant transport by seabirds to a coastal Arctic food web.

  16. Application of computer-assisted molecular modeling (CAMM) for immunoassay of low molecular weight food contaminants: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunoassay for low molecular weight food contaminants, such as pesticides, veterinary drugs, and mycotoxins is now a well-established technique which meets the demands for a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective analytical method. However, due to limited understanding of the fundamental aspects of i...

  17. EURANOS. Generic handbook for assisting in the management of contaminated food production systems in Europe following a radiological emergency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Howard, B.J.; Jones, A.;

    for application in the pre-release, emergency and longer term phases of an incident. Sources of contamination considered in the handbook are nuclear accidents, radiological dispersion devices and satellite accidents. Agricultural and domestic food production systems are considered, including the gathering of free...

  18. The Effect of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 Expression on the Mutagenicity and Metabolism of the Cooked-Food Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4-5,b]pyridine in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malfatti, M A; Wu, R W; Felton, J S

    2004-08-13

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase proteins (UGT) catalyze the glucuronidation of both endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. In previous studies UGT1A1 has been implicated in the detoxification of certain food-borne-carcinogenic-heterocyclic amines. To determine the importance of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) in the biotransformation of the cooked-food carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), genetically modified CHO cells that are nucleotide excision repair-deficient, and express cytochrome P4501A2 (UV5P3 cell line) were transfected with a cDNA plasmid of human UGT1A1 to establish the UDPglucuronosyltransferase 1A1 expressing 5P3hUGT1A1 cell line. Expression of the UGT1A1 gene was verified by screening neogene expressing clonal isolates (G-418 resistant) for their sensitivity to cell killing from PhIP exposure. Five of eleven clones were chosen for further analysis due to their resistance to cell killing. Western blot analysis was used to confirm the presence of the UGT1A1 and CYP1A2 proteins. All five clones displayed a 52 kDa protein band, which corresponded to a UGT1A1 control protein. Only four of the clones had a protein band that corresponded to the CYP1A2 control protein. Correct fragment size of the cDNAs in the remaining 4 clones was confirmed by RT-PCR and quantification of the mRNA product was accomplished by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of UGT1A1 in the transfected cells was 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} fold higher relative to the UV5P3 parental cells. One clone (No.14) had a 10 fold higher increase in expression at 1.47 x 10{sup 5} over the other three clones. This clone was also the most active in converting N-hydroxy-PhIP to N-hydroxy-PhIP glucuronide conjugates in microsomal metabolism assays. Based on the D{sub 50} values, the cytotoxic effect of PhIP was decreased {approx}350 fold in the 5P3hUGT1A1 cells compared to the UV5P3 control cells. In addition no significant increase in mutation frequency was observed in the

  19. Carcinogenic compounds in alcoholic beverages: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflaum, Tabea; Hausler, Thomas; Baumung, Claudia; Ackermann, Svenja; Kuballa, Thomas; Rehm, Jürgen; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2016-10-01

    The consumption of alcoholic beverages has been classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) since 1988. More recently, in 2010, ethanol as the major constituent of alcoholic beverages and its metabolite acetaldehyde were also classified as carcinogenic to humans. Alcoholic beverages as multi-component mixtures may additionally contain further known or suspected human carcinogens as constituent or contaminant. This review will discuss the occurrence and toxicology of eighteen carcinogenic compounds (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, glyphosate, lead, 3-MCPD, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, pulegone, ochratoxin A, safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages as identified based on monograph reviews by the IARC. For most of the compounds of alcoholic beverages, quantitative risk assessment provided evidence for only a very low risk (such as margins of exposure above 10,000). The highest risk was found for ethanol, which may reach exposures in ranges known to increase the cancer risk even at moderate drinking (margin of exposure around 1). Other constituents that could pose a risk to the drinker were inorganic lead, arsenic, acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate, for most of which mitigation by good manufacturing practices is possible. Nevertheless, due to the major effect of ethanol, the cancer burden due to alcohol consumption can only be reduced by reducing alcohol consumption in general or by lowering the alcoholic strength of beverages.

  20. Food coloring agents and plant food supplements derived from Vitis vinifera: a new source of human exposure to ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solfrizzo, Michele; Piemontese, Luca; Gambacorta, Lucia; Zivoli, Rosanna; Longobardi, Francesco

    2015-04-08

    Grape pomaces are increasingly being used as starting material in the industrial production of plant food supplements (PFS), food coloring, and tartrates, but they are at risk of ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination, a mycotoxin with nephrotoxic and carcinogenic effects. We analyzed 24 commercial PFS and 13 food coloring samples derived from Vitis vinifera, mainly pomaces, using a HPLC-FLD method for OTA determination. OTA was found in 75% of PFS samples and 69% of food coloring samples at levels of food coloring agents derived from V. vinifera suggests that maximum permitted level(s) should be established for this mycotoxin in these products.

  1. Enhanced surveillance on food-borne disease outbreaks: dynamics of cross-contamination in biocidal wash procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munther, Daniel; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-03-21

    Understanding the geographic and temporal spread of food-borne diseases associated with fresh produce is crucial for informing adequate surveillance and control. As a first step towards this goal, we develop and analyze a novel three stage model at the processing/sanitization juncture in the fresh produce supply chain. The key feature of our model is its ability to describe the dynamics of cross-contamination during commercial wash procedures. In general, we quantify the degree of cross-contamination in terms of model parameters. Applying these results in the case of Escherichia coli O157:H7 contamination of fresh-cut romaine lettuce, we identify the mean wash time and free chlorine concentration as critical parameters. In addition to showing how these parameters affect contamination levels, we recommend that in order to prevent potential source misidentification, at least 2.2 mg/L of free chlorine should be used during a wash lasting at least 30s.

  2. Analysis of reaction products of food contaminants and ingredients: Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) in canned foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, L.; Bradley, E.L.; Bas, R.C.; Verhoeckx, K.C.M.; Driffield, M.; Harmer, N.; Castle, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) is an epoxide that is used as a starting substance in the manufacture of can coatings for food-contact applications. Following migration from the can coating into food, BADGE levels decay and new reaction products are formed by reaction with food ingredients. The

  3. Cat serum contamination by phthalates, PCBs, and PBDEs versus food and indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braouezec, Clélie; Enriquez, Brigitte; Blanchard, Martine; Chevreuil, Marc; Teil, Marie-Jeanne

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) with semi-volatile properties are emitted to indoor air and, thus, humans might get exposed to these compounds. Pet cats spend the major part of their lifetime at home and might integrate indoor contamination so that they could mirror the human exposure. Three classes of EDCs, polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and phthalates (PAEs), were simultaneously considered and quantified in the serum of cats (Felis silvestris catus) living in the Paris area (France). The main compound concentrations by decreasing importance order were as follows: for PAEs, di-n-butyl phthalate (79,900 ng L(-1)) next di-iso-butyl phthalate (53,200 ng L(-1)), di-iso-nonyl phthalate (43,800 ng L(-1)), and di-ethylhexyl phthalate (32,830 ng L(-1)); for PCBs, CB153 (1378 ng L(-1)) next CB52 (509 ng L(-1)), CB101 (355 ng L(-1)), CB110 (264 ng L(-1)), and CB118 (165 ng L(-1)); and for PBDEs, BDE 153/154 (35 ng L(-1)) next BDE47 (10.7 ng L(-1)). Total serum concentrations as mean ± standard deviation were 107 ± 98 μg L(-1) for ∑9PAEs, 2799 ± 944 ng L(-1) for ∑19PCBs, and 56 ± 21 ng L(-1) for ∑9BDEs. The three chemical groups were found in cat food: 0.088 ng g(-1) for ∑9BDEs, 1.7 ng g(-1) for ∑19PCBs, and 2292 ng g(-1) for ∑9PAEs and in indoor air: 0.063 ng m(-3) for ∑9BDEs, 1.5 ng m(-3) for ∑19PCBs, and 848 ng m(-3) for ∑9PAEs. Contaminant intake by food ingestion was approximately 100-fold higher than that by indoor air inhalation.

  4. Techniques for carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburger, E K

    1981-09-01

    Short-term tests to detect genetic, chromosomal, or DNA damage are now required by regulatory agencies for any new compound proposed for commercial production. Furthermore, full-scale carcinogenicity tests may be required for certain compounds. In this circumstance, the compound-related factors including stability, purity, physical properties, and chemical structure and reactivity must be considered. Animal factors include species and strain of test animal, route of administration, age, sex, diet, and spontaneous tumor incidence. A team of qualified investigators with experience in various disciplines is required to conduct the studies properly. Quality control measures and adherence to the code of good laboratory practice are also necessary during all phases of the study. The investment in a carcinogenicity study therefore becomes fairly substantial in terms of both time and money.

  5. Technical Report, Outcome of the public consultation on the draft Scientific Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Contaminants on the Food Chain (CONTAM) on acrylamide in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    The EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel) has endorsed its draft Scientific Opinion on the risks to public health related to the presence of acrylamide (AA) in food. The opinion has undergone a public consultation from 1 July 2014 to 15 September 2014. Overall, EFSA has...... received 120 comments from various interested parties including national agencies, academia, industry and individuals in their private capacity. This report summarises the outcome of the public consultation, and lists and provides a brief summary of the comments received and how they were taken...

  6. Accidental and deliberate microbiological contamination in the feed and food chains--how biotraceability may improve the response to bioterrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Rickard; van Rotterdam, Bart; Fach, Patrick; De Medici, Dario; Fricker, Martina; Löfström, Charlotta; Agren, Joakim; Segerman, Bo; Andersson, Gunnar; Wielinga, Peter; Fenicia, Lucia; Skiby, Jeffrey; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2011-03-01

    A next frontier of the global food safety agenda has to consider a broad spectrum of bio-risks, such as accidental and intentional contaminations in the food and feed chain. In this article, the background for the research needs related to biotraceability and response to bioterrorism incidents are outlined. Given the current scale of international trade any response need to be considered in an international context. Biotraceability (e.g. the ability to use downstream information to point to processes or within a particular food chain that can be identified as the source of undesirable agents) is crucial in any food-born outbreak and particular in the response to bioterrorism events. In the later case, tested and proven biotraceability improves the following: (i) international collaboration of validated tracing tools and detection methods, (ii) multi-disciplinary expertise and collaboration in the field of food microbiology and conceptual modeling of the food chain, (iii) sampling as a key step in biotracing (iv) optimized sample preparation procedures, including laboratory work in Biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratories, (v) biomarker discovery for relevant tracing and tracking applications, and (vi) high-throughput sequencing using bio-informatic platforms to speed up the characterization of the biological agent. By applying biotraceability, the response phase during a bioterrorism event may be shortened and is facilitated for tracing the origin of biological agent contamination.

  7. Performance of food safety management systems in poultry meat preparation processing plants in relation to Campylobacter spp. contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampers, Imca; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Luning, Pieternel A; Marcelis, Willem J; Dumoulin, Ann; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2010-08-01

    A diagnostic instrument comprising a combined assessment of core control and assurance activities and a microbial assessment instrument were used to measure the performance of current food safety management systems (FSMSs) of two poultry meat preparation companies. The high risk status of the company's contextual factors, i.e., starting from raw materials (poultry carcasses) with possible high numbers and prevalence of pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., requires advanced core control and assurance activities in the FSMS to guarantee food safety. The level of the core FSMS activities differed between the companies, and this difference was reflected in overall microbial quality (mesophilic aerobic count), presence of hygiene indicators (Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli), and contamination with pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter spp. The food safety output expressed as a microbial safety profile was related to the variability in the prevalence and contamination levels of Campylobacter spp. in poultry meat preparations found in a Belgian nationwide study. Although a poultry meat processing company could have an advanced FSMS in place and a good microbial profile (i.e., lower prevalence of pathogens, lower microbial numbers, and less variability in microbial contamination), these positive factors might not guarantee pathogen-free products. Contamination could be attributed to the inability to apply effective interventions to reduce or eliminate pathogens in the production chain of (raw) poultry meat preparations.

  8. Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak associated with a contaminated food container in a school in Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L G; Zhou, X Y; Lan, Z; Li, L; Li, Z; Chen, W; Wang, J Y; Zhang, L J

    2016-01-01

    On 13 June 2013, a fever and diarrhoea outbreak occurred in a boarding school in Sichuan Province. We conducted a field investigation and compared food exposure of 81 case students and 104 control students (years 7 and 8) in order to identify the source of infection. There were 401 cases identified (399 students and two cooks). The attack rates were 23-46% in nursery, primary, and secondary schools, but 0% in the high school. Eighty-five percent of case students, consumed cowpea salad compared to 60% of control students at lunch on 12 June (odds ratio 3·1, 95% confidence interval 1·3-7·8). The cowpeas were stored at room temperature for 3 h in a bucket previously used to store raw ingredients. The bucket was cleaned using water without a disinfectant. There were two buckets of cowpea, one for the high-school students and another for the other students. This Salmonella outbreak was likely caused by the cowpea salad due to cross-contamination via a storage bucket.

  9. Cumulative risk assessment for plasticizer-contaminated food using the hazard index approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J W; Chen, C Y; Yan, B R; Chang, M H; Tseng, S H; Kao, Y M; Chen, J C; Lee, C C

    2014-06-01

    Phthalates strongly and adversely affect reproduction, development and liver function. We did a cumulative risk assessment for simultaneous exposure to nine phthalates using the hazard index (HI) and the levels of nine phthalates in 1200 foodstuff samples. DEHP (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) present the highest level (mean: 0.443 mg/kg) in 1200 samples, and the highest average daily dose (ADD) was found in DEHP, ΣDBP(i + n) (the sum of dibutyl phthalate [DBP] isomers [DnBP + DiBP]) posed the highest risk potential of all the phthalates. In seven phthalates, the 95th percentiles of the ADDs for ΣDBP(i + n) in 0-6-yr-old children accounted for 91% (79-107%) of the tolerable daily intake, and the 95th percentiles of the HIs for the anti-androgenic effects of five phthalates in 0-3-yr-old children and 4-6-yr-old girls were >1. We conclude that the health of younger Taiwanese may be adversely affected by overexposure of phthalate-contaminated foods.

  10. Heavy Metal Contamination of Foods by Refuse Dump Sites in Awka, Southeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. C. Nduka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of heavy metals from refuse dumps on soil, food, and water qualities in Awka, Nigeria was studied. Soil samples (top and 1.35 m deep were collected from five refuse dumps digested with conc. HNO3 and HClO4. The heavy metals (lead, manganese, arsenic, chromium, cadmium, and nickel in vegetables (spinach, fluted pumpkin, root crop (cocoyam, and surface and ground water were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. Chemical properties of the soil and bacteria were determined. Heavy metals were found to be more concentrated at a depth of 1.35 m. Manganese was high in shallow wells and borehole water samples with the highest levels as 0.538 and 0.325 mg/l, respectively. Nickel levels in the borehole sample ranged from 0.001 to 0.227 mg/l, whereas the highest level of lead was 0.01 mg/l. The Obibia stream had the highest levels of manganese and lead. Linear regression analyses showed that the relationship between soil heavy metals and farm produce heavy metals was strong. Taken together, we may conclude that the consumption of leafy vegetables and crops produced on contaminated soils may pose a health risk to those that reside around the refuse dumps.

  11. Recent Advances and Uses of Monolithic Columns for the Analysis of Residues and Contaminants in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Díaz-Bao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic columns are gaining interest as excellent substitutes to conventional particle-packed columns. These columns show higher permeability and lower flow resistance than conventional liquid chromatography columns, providing high-throughput performance, resolution and separation in short run times. Monoliths possess also great potential for the clean-up and preparation of complex mixtures. In situ polymerization inside appropriate supports allows the development of several microextraction formats, such as in-tube solid-phase and pipette tip-based extractions. These techniques using porous monoliths offer several advantages, including miniaturization and on-line coupling with analytical instruments. Additionally, monoliths are ideal support media for imprinting template-specific sites, resulting in the so-called molecularly-imprinted monoliths, with ultra-high selectivity. In this review, time-saving LC columns and preparative applications applied to the analysis of residues and contaminants in food in 2010–2014 are described, focusing on recent improvements in design and with emphasis in automated on-line systems and innovative materials and formats.

  12. Product quality risk perceptions and decisions: contaminated pet food and lead-painted toys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tianjun; Keller, L Robin; Wang, Liangyan; Wang, Yitong

    2010-10-01

    In the context of the recent recalls of contaminated pet food and lead-painted toys in the United States, we examine patterns of risk perceptions and decisions when facing consumer product-caused quality risks. Two approaches were used to explore risk perceptions of the product recalls. In the first approach, we elicited judged probabilities and found that people appear to have greatly overestimated the actual risks for both product scenarios. In the second approach, we applied the psychometric paradigm to examine risk perception dimensions concerning these two specific products through factor analysis. There was a similar risk perception pattern for both products: they are seen as unknown risks and are relatively not dread risks. This pattern was also similar to what prior research found for lead paint. Further, we studied people's potential actions to deal with the recalls of these two products. Several factors were found to be significant predictors of respondents' cautious actions for both product scenarios. Policy considerations regarding product quality risks are discussed. For example, risk communicators could reframe information messages to prompt people to consider total risks packed together from different causes, even when the risk message has been initiated due to a specific recall event.

  13. A novel approach for the detection of potentially hazardous pepsin stable hazelnut proteins as contaminants in chocolate-based food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerdaas, Jaap H; Wensing, Marjolein; Knulst, André C; Stephan, Oliver; Hefle, Susan L; Aalberse, Rob C; van Ree, Ronald

    2004-12-15

    Contamination of food products with pepsin resistant allergens is generally believed to be a serious threat to patients with severe food allergy. A sandwich type enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure pepsin resistant hazelnut protein in food products. Capturing and detecting rabbit antibodies were raised against pepsin-digested hazelnut and untreated hazelnut protein, respectively. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.7 ng/mL hazelnut protein or hazelnut in 1 g food matrix and a maximum of 0.034% cross-reactivity (peanut). Chocolate samples spiked with 0.5-100 microg hazelnut/g chocolate showed a mean recovery of 97.3%. In 9/12 food products labeled "may contain nuts", hazelnut was detected between 1.2 and 417 microg hazelnut/g food. It can be concluded that the application of antibodies directed to pepsin-digested food extracts in ELISA can facilitate specific detection of stable proteins that have the highest potential of inducing severe food anaphylaxis.

  14. A multi-state outbreak of Salmonella serotype Thompson infection from commercially distributed bread contaminated by an ill food handler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, A C; Palumbo, M S; Meyers, H; Abbott, S; Rodriguez, R; Werner, S B

    2005-10-01

    Foodborne transmission is estimated to account for 95% of non-typhoidal Salmonella infections reported in the United States; however, outbreaks of salmonellosis are rarely traced to food handlers. In August 2000, an increase in Salmonella serotype Thompson infection was noted in Southern California; most of the cases reported eating at a restaurant chain (Chain A) before illness onset. A case-control study implicated the consumption of burgers at Chain A restaurants. The earliest onset of illness was in a burger bun packer at Bakery B who had not eaten at Chain A but had worked while ill. Bakery B supplied burger buns to some Chain A restaurants in Southern California and Arizona. This outbreak is notable for implicating a food handler as the source of food contamination and for involving bread, a very unusual outbreak vehicle for Salmonella . Inadequate food-handler training as well as delayed reporting to the health department contributed to this outbreak.

  15. Carcinogens formed when Meat is Cooked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Salmon, C P; Knize, M G

    2003-05-30

    Diet has been associated with varying cancer rates in human populations for many years, yet the causes of the observed variation in cancer patterns have not been adequately explained (Wynder et al. 1977). Along with the effect of diet on human cancer incidence is the strong evidence that mutations are the initiating events in the cancer process (Vogelstein et al. 1992). Foods, when heated, are a good source of genotoxic carcinogens that very likely are a cause for some of these events(Doll et al. 1981). These carcinogens fall into two chemical classes: heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). There is ample evidence that many of these compounds are complete carcinogens in rodents(El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991). Heterocyclic aromatic amines are among the most potent mutagenic substances ever tested in the Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity test (Wakabayashi et al. 1992). Both classes of carcinogen cause tumors in rodents at multiple sites, (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991) many of which are common tumor sites in people on a Western diet. An HAA, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine), and a PAH, B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene), of comparable carcinogenic potency caused mammary gland tumors in a feeding study in female rats (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995). In addition, PhIP has recently been shown to cause carcinomas in the prostate of the male rat (Shirai et al. 1997). Complementing the rodent cancer studies are numerous human case-control and prospective studies suggesting a relationship between overheated beef, chicken, and lamb, and cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, and stomach (Sinha et al. 1999; Ward et al. 1997; Zheng et al. 1998).

  16. CASCADE - Chemicals as contaminants in the food chain. A network of excellence for research, risk assessment, and education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeberg, M.; Haakansson, H. [Karolinska Institutet, Insitute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Pongratz, I.; Gustavsson, J.Aa. [Karolinska Institutet, Dept. of Biosciences, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Harmful effects of chemical contaminants in food are of major health concern in Europe today. Lack of integration between basic research, risk assessment, and education severely hampers the efforts to reach European excellence in this area. The research activities that are carried out are small in scale and are not well integrated into a coherent structure. To tackle the fragmentation problems and to achieve synergistic effects and full European research potential, the European Commission has initiated a Network of Excellence called CASCADE or ''Chemicals as contaminants in the food chain: a network of excellence for research, risk assessment, and education'' The contract is running for five years and is worth over 14 million with partners from eighteen research centres. The network has the potential and goal to be a world force in knowledge on health issues related to chemical contaminants in food. Focus is on chemical residues that act via and/or interfere with cell regulation at the level of nuclear receptors. The risk assessment integration parts of the network aim to increase the awareness among scientists and others of the need to bring multiple aspects of scientific information into use in risk assessment.

  17. Bacterial contamination of blenderized whole food and commercial enteral tube feedings in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, M M; Sorreda-Esguerra, P; Santos, E E; Platon, B G; Castro, C G; Idrisalman, E R; Chen, N R; Shott, S; Comer, G M

    2001-12-01

    Hospital-prepared tube feedings from four Philippine acute-care hospitals were analysed for microbial contamination. Two feedings were prepared on three separate days at each hospital. The tube feedings were either blended natural whole foods or a reconstituted commercial powdered nutritional product. Samples of each feeding were collected for coliform count and standard plate count at the time of preparation and at 1, 2 and 4 h after preparation after maintenance at room temperature (26-31 degrees C). At the time of preparation, mean coliform and standard plate counts for all samples were 10.3 most probable number per gram (MPN/g) and 7.4x10(4)colony-forming units per gram (cfu/g), respectively. Nine of 24 samples (38%) had coliform counts greater than 10 MPN/g, and 22/24 (92%) samples had standard plate counts greater than 10(3) cfu/g. There were significant increases in mean coliform and standard plate counts over 4 h (P=0.0005 and P=0.008, respectively). At 4 h after preparation, the mean coliform and standard plate counts were 18.2 MPN/g and 2.1x10(5) cfu/g, respectively. At this time, 18/24 (75%) samples had coliform counts greater than 10 MPN/g and 20/24 (83%) samples had standard plate counts greater than 10(5) cfu/g. The results of this study show that the microbial quality of the majority of the hospital-prepared enteral tube feedings analysed were not within published guidelines for safety.

  18. Contaminants and microorganisms in Dutch organic food products: a comparison with conventional products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, L A P; Bokhorst, J G; Northolt, M D; van de Vijver, L P L; Broex, N J G; Mevius, D J; Meijs, J A C; Van der Roest, J

    2008-10-01

    Organic products were analysed for the presence of contaminants, microorganisms and antibiotic resistance and compared with those from conventional products. No differences were observed in the Fusarium toxins deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in organic and conventional wheat, during both a dry period and a very wet period which promoted the production of these toxins. Nitrate levels in head lettuce produced organically in the open field were much lower than those in conventional products. In iceberg lettuce and head lettuce from the greenhouse, no differences were detected. Organically produced carrots contained higher nitrate levels than conventional products. Both organic and conventional products contained no residues of non-polar pesticides above the legal limits, although some were detected in conventional lettuce. Organic products contained no elevated levels of heavy metals. Salmonella was detected in 30% of pig faeces samples obtained from 30 organic farms, similar to the incidence at conventional farms. At farms that switched to organic production more then 6 years ago no Salmonella was detected, with the exception of one stable with young pigs recently purchased from another farm. No Salmonella was detected in faeces at the nine farms with organic broilers, and at one out of ten farms with laying hens. This is comparable with conventional farms where the incidence for Salmonella lies around 10%. Campylobacter was detected in faeces at all organic broiler farms, being much higher than at conventional farms. One of the most remarkable results was the fact that faeces from organic pigs and broilers showed a much lower incidence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, except for Campylobacter in broilers. It is concluded that the organic products investigated scored as equally well as conventional products with regard to food safety and at the same time show some promising features with respect to antibiotic resistance.

  19. Contamination of food with residues of antibiotics in the sulphonamide class, risk can be avoided

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lidia Chitescu,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfadimethoxine, sulfamethoxazole, sulfaquinoxaline and sulfadiazine are the most common usedsulfonamides in veterinary practice. The recommended withdrawal periods if not observed before slaughteringof the medicated animals, the products may obtain from such animals may be contaminated with residue. Theinterest in having reliable methods able to detect low amounts of sulfonamides in food is very actual. In thisstudy, a multiresidue analysis was performed to simultaneously determine those four sulfonamides in chickenmuscle tissue by the Waters LC.Criteria of validation: specificity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantification, and linearity,according to the European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, show that the method can detect differentkinds of sulfonamides within one run, without mass spectrometry analyses, or Fluor metric derivatization ofanalyts.The method is accurate, simple, economical in both time and cost, capable of detecting sulfonamidesresidues below the maximum residue limits (MRL and easy to perform to routine samples, in normal conditionof laboratory.The sulfonamides were extracted with acetonitrile and acetone and dichloromethane. N-hexane wasadded for defeating the sample. Separation was carried out on a Zorbax SB- C18 analytical column, using asmobile phase a mixture of 75:25 = di-natrium-hydrogenphosphat solution 6 g/1000 ml (pH = 8.5 : methanol.The detection wavelength was set at: 254 nm Calibration graphs were linear with very good correlationcoefficients in the concentration range from 0.320 to 1.5μg /mL. The limits of quantification (LOQ for thesulfonamides were in the range of 6.6–0.34 μg /kg. The recovery for spiked chicken muscle with 50–150 μg/kg ranged more than 70%. The relative standard deviation (Reds of the sulfonamides for six measurementsat 50 go/kg, 100 μg /kg and 150 μg /kg was less then 15%.The applicability of the method to the analysis of chicken muscle tissue was

  20. Susceptibility of food-contaminating Penicillium genus fungi to some preservatives and disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinskaite, Loreta

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic fungi are able to contaminate and deteriorate various food products and can subsequently cause health problems. Long usage of the same preservatives and disinfectants against spoilage fungi may lead to the development of fungal resistance to those chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of 3 Penicillium genus fungi, isolated from foodstuffs, to organic acid preservatives and some disinfectants, taking into consideration 2 aspects of their development: spore germination and mycelial growth. Susceptibility of Penicillium spinulosum, P. expansum and P. verruculosum to the preservatives, namely benzoic acid, sodium lactate, potassium sorbate, as well as disinfectants such as Topax DD, Suma Bac D10, Biowash and F210 Hygisept, was investigated. The biocides were used at concentrations of 0.1, 1.0 and 10%. Of the preservatives, benzoic acid and potassium sorbate showed the best inhibition, both on spore germination and mycelial growth. Benzoic acid at a concentration of a 0.1% reduced spore germination by 33-55%, and mycelial growth by 54-97%, whereas at 1% the inhibition was 74-85% and 97-100%, respectively. The effect of the disinfectants at a concentration of 0.1% on spore germination was 25-84% and on colonial growth 68-97%, while at 1.0% the reduction in spore germination reached 53-91% and the inhibition of growth 89-100%. In most cases, the same concentrations added to the media showed higher inhibitory effect on mycelial growth than on spore germination. It was noticed that the fungi responded rather unevenly towards the biocides, showing individual susceptibility.

  1. EFSA CONTAM Panel (EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain), 2015. Scientific Opinion on acrylamide in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    EFSA was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on acrylamide (AA) in food. AA has widespread uses as an industrial chemical. It is also formed when certain foods are prepared at temperatures above 120 °C and low moisture, especially in foods containing asparagine and reducing sugars. The CONTAM...... day and 0.6 to 3.4 µg/kg b.w. per day, respectively. The main contributor to total dietary exposure was generally the category ‘Potato fried products (except potato crisps and snacks)’. Preferences in home-cooking can have a substantial impact on human dietary AA exposure. Upon oral intake, AA...

  2. The use of one- and two- photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy for the optical characterization of carcinogenic aflatoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, L.; Meulebroeck, W.; Raeymaekers, S.; Thienpont, H.

    2014-09-01

    Carcinogenic and toxic contaminants in food and feed products are nowadays mostly detected by destructive, time-consuming chemical analyses, like HPLC and LC-MS/MS methods. However, as a consequence of the severe and growing regulations on food products by the European Union, there arose an increased demand for the ultra-fast, high-sensitive and non-destructive detection of contaminants in food and feed products. Therefore, we have investigated fluorescence spectroscopy for the characterization of carcinogenic aflatoxins. With the use of a tunable titanium-sapphire laser in combination with second and third harmonic wavelength generation, both one- and two-photon induced fluorescence excitation wavelengths could be generated using the same setup. We characterized and compared the one- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectra of pure aflatoxin powder, after excitation with 365nm and 730nm respectively. Moreover, we investigated the absolute fluorescence intensity as function of the excitation power density. Afterwards, we applied our characterization setup to the detection of aflatoxins in maize grains. The fluorescence spectra of both healthy and contaminated maize samples were experimentally characterized. In addition to the fluorescence spectrum of the pure aflatoxin, we observed an unwanted influence of the intrinsic fluorescence of the maize. Depending on the excitation wavelength, a varying contrast between the fluorescence spectra of the healthy and contaminated samples was obtained. After a comparison of the measured fluorescence signals, a detection criterion for the optical identification of the contaminated maize samples could be defined. As a result, this illustrates the use of fluorescence spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the non-destructive, real-time and high-sensitive detection of aflatoxins in maize.

  3. Aflatoxins in Iran: Nature, Hazards and Carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Farhud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown that mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products is a challenge for individual's health espe­cially in developing countries. Improper production and storage of foods, prepare conditions for aflatoxin production in crops, especially rice, wheat, pistachio, walnut, almond, etc which are the main sources of foods for people. Feeding live­stock by contaminated bread is another way of human exposure to mycotoxins, especially aflatoxin and because of expen­sive methods for detecting and analyzing aflatoxin in laboratory; it is not measured in foods. This manuscript is a review of some Iranian and nonIranian reports about aflatoxin, its exposure ways, its adverse effect on human health and nutrition, as well as methods for reducing its exposure. Based on studies on foods, aflatoxin exposure is high in Iran. Since livestock feeding by contaminated bread is one of the potential ways for milk contamination, we should control and reduce aflatoxin contamination by improving production process, storage condition and livestock feeding as soon as possible. Pistachio is one of the most important exporting products of Iran and to maintain Iran's position in exporting of this product, specific regulations on lowering its contamination with aflatoxin should be considered seriously. Finally, effective controlling of all food and feedstuffs which are vulnerable to aflatoxin contamination is necessary to prevent its effects.

  4. Review of arsenic contamination, exposure through water and food and low cost mitigation options for rural areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anitha Kumari; Tjell, Jens Christian; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid found to be an important groundwater contaminant of mainly natural geogenic origin worldwide particularly in large deltas and along major rivers in poor regions of South- and East-Asia. Excessive and long-term human intake of toxic inorganic As with food and water...... chemical threat to public health ever experienced and arsenicosis is spreading to regions where near-sterile well water loaded with As has replaced microbial suspect surface water containing lower As concentrations. This review provides an overview of the state of the art knowledge on the water and food...... As intake and exposure, and how the As chemistry in water and food may influence chosen mitigation strategies. Although reports on severe health effects from exposure to As in water are abundant there are several weak points in our knowledge on causes and prevalence of arsenicosis in order to devise...

  5. Evaluation of the Hydrophobic Grid Membrane Filter for the Enumeration of Moulds and Yeasts in Naturally-Contaminated Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.H. Tournas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 240 food samples from six food groups (tree nuts, grains and grain products, dried fruits, fresh produce, fruit juice, and dairy products were tested for levels of fungal contamination using the NEO-GRID hydrophobic grid membrane filter (HGMF and the FDA official (BAM method. Results showed that HGMF performed very well for all tested commodities giving yeast and mould (YM counts similar to those of the BAM (reference method. Statistical analysis of the data (t-test revealed no significant differences between the two methods for all foods tested. Regression analysis showed that there was a good fit linear relationship between the two methods for most of the commodities examined. Some difficulties were encountered during counting of the colonies on HGMF since the size of the grid is very small and the number of possible colonies per plate can reach 1600.

  6. Evaluation of the Hydrophobic Grid Membrane Filter for the Enumeration of Moulds and Yeasts in Naturally-Contaminated Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.H. Tournas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Over 240 food samples from six food groups (tree nuts, grains and grain products, dried fruits, fresh produce, fruit juice, and dairy products were tested for levels of fungal contamination using the NEO-GRID hydrophobic grid membrane filter (HGMF and the FDA official (BAM method. Results showed that HGMF performed very well for all tested commodities giving yeast and mould (YM counts similar to those of the BAM (reference method. Statistical analysis of the data (t-test revealed no significant differences between the two methods for all foods tested. Regression analysis showed that there was a good fit linear relationship between the two methods for most of the commodities examined. Some difficulties were encountered during counting of the colonies on HGMF since the size of the grid is very small and the number of possible colonies per plate can reach 1600.

  7. Fungal dissemination by housefly (Musca domestica L.) and contamination of food commodities in rural areas of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoku, J Z; Barnard, T G; Potgieter, N; Dutton, M F

    2016-01-18

    Several insects that act as vectors, including houseflies (Musca domestica L.), are often considered to be an important source of fungal contamination in human foods. Houseflies are also involved in the transmission of bacterial pathogens that may pose a serious hazard to human health. Thus, the rural population of South Africa, as typified by that in the Gauteng Province investigated in this study, is at high risk from fungal exposure disseminated by houseflies and it is therefore important to assess the role of flies in contaminating various food commodities. Eighty four samples of houseflies (captured from households and pit toilets) were studied for their potential to carry fungal spores into food commodities. The fungi occurring in samples of raw maize (15) and porridge (19) were also assessed. Fungal isolates were identified based on morphological characteristics by conventional identification methods. Fifteen genera of fungi were isolated and identified, of which Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Cladosporium, Moniliella and Mucor were the most prevalent in all three sample types analysed. The incidence rates of fungal contamination per total fungal count isolated in houseflies, maize and porridge were recorded with mean fungal load of 2×10(8) CFU/ml, 1×10(7)CFU/g and 2×10(7)CFU/g respectively. Additionally, A. flavus, A. parasiticus, F. verticillioides, F. proliferatum, P. verrucosum, P. aurantiogriseum and M. suaveolens were the most frequent fungal isolates in houseflies with incidence rate of 34%, 11%, 27%, 21%, 22%, 17% and 32% respectively. F. verticillioides, A. flavus, A. niger and P. oslonii were the most prevalent species contaminating porridge and maize with incidence rate of 23%, 32%, 16% and 28% in maize samples, while incidence rates of 59%, 15% and 29% were recorded in porridge samples with the exception of F. verticillioides. The prevalence of these genera of fungi may pose serious health risks.

  8. Review of arsenic contamination and human exposure through water food in rural areas in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Celia

    2016-05-01

    The Red River Delta in Vietnam is one of the regions whose quaternary aquifers are polluted by arsenic. Chronic toxification by arsenic can cause severe illnesses such as cancer, skin lesions, developmental defects, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and diabetes. In this study, a food processing craft village in the Red River Delta was investigated regarding the potential risk faced by the population due to arsenic. The potential sources of arsenic are the groundwater, the crops grown in the surroundings, and animal products from local husbandry. However, the occurrence of arsenic in nature is variable, and its bioavailability and toxicity depend very much on its specification: trivalent compounds are more toxic and often more mobile than pentavalent compounds, while inorganic species are generally more toxic than organic ones. Local conditions, such as the redox potential, strongly influence its specification and thus potential bioavailability. The introduction to this work elucidates the key factors which potentially cause human exposure to arsenic: the geological setting of the study area, land and water use patterns, and the current state of research regarding the mobilization, bioavailability and plant uptake of arsenic. Although the study area is located in a region where the groundwater is known to be moderately contaminated by arsenic, the level of arsenic in the groundwater in the village had not previously been determined. In this study, water use in the village was examined by a survey among the farmers and by water analyses, which are presented in the following chapters. Four main water sources (rain, river, tube well and a public municipal waterworks) are used for the different daily activities; the highest risk to human health was found to be the bore well water, which is pumped from the shallow Holocene aquifer. The water from the bore wells is commonly used for cleaning and washing as well as to feed the animals and for food processing

  9. Fecal contamination of food, water, hands, and kitchen utensils at the household level in rural areas of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana I; Lanata, Claudio F; Hartinger, Stella M; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Padilla, Beatriz; Ochoa, Theresa J; Lozada, Michelle; Pineda, Ines; Verastegui, Hector

    2014-01-01

    The study described in this article evaluated sources of contamination of children's food and drinking water in rural households in the highlands of Peru. Samples from children's meals, drinking water, kitchen utensils, and caregivers' and children's hands were analyzed for total coliforms and E. coli counts using Petrifilm EC. Thermotolerant coliforms in water were measured using DelAgua test kits while diarrheagenic E. coli was identified using polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR). Thermotolerant coliforms were found in 48% of all water samples. E. coli was found on 23% of hands, 16% of utensils, and 4% of meals. Kitchen cloths were the item most frequently contaminated with total coliforms (89%) and E. coli (42%). Diarrheagenic E. coli was found in 33% of drinking water, 27% of meals, and on 23% of kitchen utensils. These findings indicate a need to develop hygiene interventions that focus on specific kitchen utensils and hand washing practices, to reduce the contamination of food, water, and the kitchen environment in these rural settings.

  10. It is time to regulate carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines in cigarette tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act gives the Food and Drug Administration power to regulate tobacco products. This commentary calls for immediate regulation of the carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N’-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) in cigarette tobacco as a logical path to cancer prevention. NNK and NNN, powerful carcinogens in laboratory animals, have been evaluated as “carcinogenic to humans” by the International...

  11. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  12. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Lash, Lawrence H; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. The strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE.

  13. Cancer and non-cancer health effects from food contaminant exposures for children and adults in California: a risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Rainbow

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of current cumulative dietary exposure assessments, this analysis was conducted to estimate exposure to multiple dietary contaminants for children, who are more vulnerable to toxic exposure than adults. Methods We estimated exposure to multiple food contaminants based on dietary data from preschool-age children (2–4 years, n=207, school-age children (5–7 years, n=157, parents of young children (n=446, and older adults (n=149. We compared exposure estimates for eleven toxic compounds (acrylamide, arsenic, lead, mercury, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, endosulfan, dieldrin, chlordane, DDE, and dioxin based on self-reported food frequency data by age group. To determine if cancer and non-cancer benchmark levels were exceeded, chemical levels in food were derived from publicly available databases including the Total Diet Study. Results Cancer benchmark levels were exceeded by all children (100% for arsenic, dieldrin, DDE, and dioxins. Non-cancer benchmarks were exceeded by >95% of preschool-age children for acrylamide and by 10% of preschool-age children for mercury. Preschool-age children had significantly higher estimated intakes of 6 of 11 compounds compared to school-age children (p Conclusions Dietary strategies to reduce exposure to toxic compounds for which cancer and non-cancer benchmarks are exceeded by children vary by compound. These strategies include consuming organically produced dairy and selected fruits and vegetables to reduce pesticide intake, consuming less animal foods (meat, dairy, and fish to reduce intake of persistent organic pollutants and metals, and consuming lower quantities of chips, cereal, crackers, and other processed carbohydrate foods to reduce acrylamide intake.

  14. Food contamination with polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in Belgium. Effects on the body burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Larebeke, N; Covaci, A; Schepens, P; Hens, L

    2002-11-01

    The core paper of this debate shows that persistent organic pollutant residues of the 12 chemicals targeted for a phase out under the Stockholm Convention are present in almost all categories of food in the US food supply. For dioxins, the study does not use measured data, but is based upon potential dioxin residues in selected food items. Polychlorinated biphenyls are not included in the study. In this paper we discuss selected data of polychlorinated biphenyl and dioxin concentrations in Belgian food. Some of these exposures are chronic, others are attributable to incidents. Both result in high body burdens in Belgium. The paper also compares the current concentrations in food with the recent standards launched by the EU for dioxins in food, and discusses whether these values adequately protect European citizens.

  15. Demonstration of generic handbooks for assisting in the management of contaminated food production systems and inhabited areas in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Duranova, T.

    2010-01-01

    and inhabited areas were used. Feedback from all of the demonstrations was positive with constructive criticism given on how to improve the navigation, structure and format of the handbooks. All of the key improvements highlighted during the demonstrations were taken into account and included in version 2......Two handbooks have been developed in conjunction with a wide range of stakeholders that provide assistance in the management of contaminated food production systems and inhabited areas following a radiological incident. Emergency centres in Member States not involved in the development...... of these handbooks were invited to take part in demonstration activities to establish whether the handbooks would be useful for the purposes of contingency planning and accident management. Some eight centres took part. Emergency exercises or similar events based on scenarios involving contamination of the foodchain...

  16. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment.

  17. Carcinogen testing. Fact and fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J A

    1988-10-15

    In the absence of human information on the carcinogenicity of chemical substances, one must rely primarily on information from long-term animal testing. Although far from perfect, animal studies seem to be reasonable predictors of the human experience, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Short-term tests for genotoxicity may be helpful for establishing priorities for chemical testing, but they are not as strong indicators of potential carcinogenicity as had been previously thought. New directions in toxicologic research hold the promise for scientists being able to perform more reasoned assessments of carcinogenic risk.

  18. Acrylonitrile: a suspected human carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerselman, W; van der Graaf, M

    1984-01-01

    The literature on carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile (an important intermediate in the chemical industry) is reviewed. The three main conclusions are: (1) Acrylonitrile has genotoxic effects in various tests in microorganisms and in mammal cells. (2) Chronic exposure to acrylonitrile causes tumours in rats. (3) Results of epidemiological studies indicate that acrylonitrile may be a human carcinogen. From this it is clear that acrylonitrile is very probably carcinogenic to humans. Therefore the authors plead for a reduction of acrylonitrile standards to the lowest practicable limit.

  19. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  20. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  1. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  2. Bacterial diversity of floor drain biofilms and drain waters in a Listeria monocytogenes contaminated food processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciol, Monika; Schornsteiner, Elisa; Muhterem-Uyar, Meryem; Stessl, Beatrix; Wagner, Martin; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2016-04-16

    Sanitation protocols are applied on a daily basis in food processing facilities to prevent the risk of cross-contamination with spoilage organisms. Floor drain water serves along with product-associated samples (slicer dust, brine or cheese smear) as an important hygiene indicator in monitoring Listeria monocytogenes in food processing facilities. Microbial communities of floor drains are representative for each processing area and are influenced to a large degree by food residues, liquid effluents and washing water. The microbial communities of drain water are steadily changing, whereas drain biofilms provide more stable niches. Bacterial communities of four floor drains were characterized using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to better understand the composition and exchange of drain water and drain biofilm communities. Furthermore, the L. monocytogenes contamination status of each floor drain was determined by applying cultivation-independent real-time PCR quantification and cultivation-dependent detection according to ISO11290-1. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes of drain water and drain biofilm bacterial communities yielded 50,611 reads, which were clustered into 641 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), affiliated to 16 phyla dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. The most abundant OTUs represented either product- (Lactococcus lactis) or fermentation- and food spoilage-associated phylotypes (Pseudomonas mucidolens, Pseudomonas fragi, Leuconostoc citreum, and Acetobacter tropicalis). The microbial communities in DW and DB samples were distinct in each sample type and throughout the whole processing plant, indicating the presence of indigenous specific microbial communities in each processing compartment. The microbiota of drain biofilms was largely different from the microbiota of the drain water. A sampling approach based on drain water alone may thus only provide reliable information on planktonic bacterial cells but might not allow conclusions

  3. Health benefits of 'grow your own' food in urban areas: implications for contaminated land risk assessment and risk management?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-21

    Abstract Compelling evidence of major health benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and outdoor interaction with \\'greenspace\\' have emerged in the past decade - all of which combine to give major potential health benefits from \\'grow-your-own\\' (GYO) in urban areas. However, neither current risk assessment models nor risk management strategies for GYO in allotments and gardens give any consideration to these health benefits, despite their potential often to more than fully compensate the risks. Although urban environments are more contaminated by heavy metals, arsenic, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins than most rural agricultural areas, evidence is lacking for adverse health outcomes of GYO in UK urban areas. Rarely do pollutants in GYO food exceed statutory limits set for commercial food, and few people obtain the majority of their food from GYO. In the UK, soil contamination thresholds triggering closure or remediation of allotment and garden sites are based on precautionary principles, generating \\'scares\\' that may negatively impact public health disproportionately to the actual health risks of exposure to toxins through own-grown food. By contrast, the health benefits of GYO are a direct counterpoint to the escalating public health crisis of \\'obesity and sloth\\' caused by eating an excess of saturated fats, inadequate consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables combined with a lack of exercise. These are now amongst the most important preventable causes of illness and death. The health and wider societal benefits of \\'grow-your-own\\' thus reveal a major limitation in current risk assessment methodologies which, in only considering risks, are unable to predict whether GYO on particular sites will, overall, have positive, negative, or no net effects on human health. This highlights a more general need for a new generation of risk assessment tools that also predict overall consequences for health to more effectively guide

  4. Elevated contaminants contrasted with potential benefits of ω-3 fatty acids in wild food consumers of two remote first nations communities in northern Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A Seabert

    Full Text Available Indigenous communities in Boreal environments rely on locally-harvested wild foods for sustenance. These foods provide many nutritional benefits including higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs; such as ω-3 than what is commonly found in store-bought foods. However, wild foods can be a route of exposure to dietary mercury and persistent organic pollutants (POPs such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs. Here, we show a strong association between the frequency of wild food consumption in adults (N=72 from two remote First Nations communities of Northern Ontario and environmental contaminants in blood (POPs and hair (mercury. We observed that POPs and mercury were on average 3.5 times higher among those consuming wild foods more often, with many frequent wild food consumers exceeding Canadian and international health guidelines for PCB and mercury exposures. Contaminants in locally-harvested fish and game from these communities were sufficiently high that many participants exceeded the monthly consumption limits for methylmercury and PCBs. Those consuming more wild foods also had higher proportions of potentially beneficial ω-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. These results show that the benefits of traditional dietary choices in Boreal regions of Canada must be weighed against the inherent risks of contaminant exposure from these foods.

  5. [Fiber as a carcinogenic agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, F

    1987-04-01

    According to the findings that long, thin, and durable fibres have a high carcinogenic potency after intrapleural and intraperitoneal administration, the elongated shape of a particle represents a carcinogenic agent; this physical phenomenon is a special cause of cancer. It induces a biological process which can lead to cancer by several as yet unknown steps. However, the properties of the material the fibres are made of determine the carcinogenic potency of a fibre in a secondary way although they do not seem to be responsible for the true carcinogenic agent. For example, these properties determine the degree of solubility and flexibility. The persistence of fibres in the tissue is a very important property with regard to their carcinogenic effect because the formation of a tumour takes many years or some decades. It can be assumed that a fibre has to remain by the bronchial or serosa tissue until the induction of tumour cells occurs. If this hypothesis is correct, there could be a "durability threshold value" for fibres whose length and diameter would otherwise indicate a high carcinogenic potency. There are indications that other fibre properties apart from length, diameter and durability are important for tumour induction, however, at present, they cannot be included in a definition of carcinogenic fibres. It is proposed to classify all natural and man-made mineral fibres with an aspect ratio of greater than 5:1 as carcinogenic when they are longer than 3 microns, thinner than 1 micron (or can split into such fine fibres) and when they can persist in the tissue for more than 3 years.

  6. Genotoxicity of three food processing contaminants in transgenic mice expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1 and 1A2 as assessed by the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høie, Anja Hortemo; Svendsen, Camilla; Brunborg, Gunnar; Glatt, Hansruedi; Alexander, Jan; Meinl, Walter; Husøy, Trine

    2015-10-01

    The food processing contaminants 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 2,5 dimethylfuran (DMF) are potentially both mutagenic and carcinogenic in vitro and/or in vivo, although data on DMF is lacking. The PHIP metabolite N-hydroxy-PhIP and HMF are bioactivated by sulfotransferases (SULTs). The substrate specificity and tissue distribution of SULTs differs between species. A single oral dose of PhIP, HMF or DMF was administered to wild-type (wt) mice and mice expressing human SULT1A1/1A2 (hSULT mice). DNA damage was studied using the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. No effects were detected in wt mice. In the hSULT mice, PhIP and HMF exposure increased the levels of DNA damage in the liver and kidney, respectively. DMF was not found to be genotoxic. The observation of increased DNA damage in hSULT mice compared with wt mice supports the role of human SULTs in the bioactivation of N-hydroxy-PhIP and HMF in vivo.

  7. Food contamination from epoxy resins and organosols used as can coatings: analysis by gradient NPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, M; Grob, K

    1998-07-01

    Normal phase LC with gradient elution enabled the analysis of a broadened range of oligomers of BADGE (Bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether) and Novolak compounds in canned foods, such as sea foods in oil, meat products and soups. A major component released from Bisphenol-A resins was identified as the cyclo-(Bisphenol-A monoglycidyl ether) dimer and was commonly present in foods at concentrations of around 1 mg/kg. For the epoxy Novolaks, concentrations of the three- to six-ring compounds often far exceeded those of BFDGE (Bisphenol-F diglycidyl ether) and reached 20 mg/kg in foods. A two-step acylation is proposed for the detection of epoxy components.

  8. Ionic-liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for high-throughput multiple food contaminant screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yee-Man; Tsoi, Yeuk-Ki; Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes an innovation of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction enabling multiple-component analysis of eight high-priority food contaminants in two chemically distinctive families: Sudan dyes and phthalate plasticizers. To provide convenient sample handling for solid and solid-containing matrices, a modified dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure used an extractant precoated frit to perform simultaneous filtration, solvent mixing, and phase dispersion in one simple step. A binary ionic liquid extractant system was carefully tuned to deliver high quality analysis based only on affordable LC with diode array detector instrumentation. The method is comprehensively validated for robust quantification with good precision (6.9-9.8% RSD) in a linear 2-1000 μg/L range. Having accomplished enrichment factors up to 451, the treatment enables sensitive detection at 0.09-1.01 μg/L levels. Analysis of six high-risk solid condiments and sauces further verified its practical applicability within a 70-120% recovery range. Compared to other approaches, the current dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction treatment offers major advantages in terms of minimal solvent (1.5 mL) and sample (0.1 g) consumption, ultra-high analytical throughput (6 min), and the ability to handle complex solid matrices. The idea of performing simultaneous analysis for multiple contaminants presented here fosters a more effective mode of operation in food control routines.

  9. Potential for Biomagnification of Contaminants within Marine and Freshwater Food Webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    biomagnify within the food web. Heavy metals were examined in fishe’s from the Chao Phraya River Estuary in Thailand (Polprasert 1982). The average Cr... Chao - Phraya River EstuarySThail1and. Water Res. 16:775-784. Potter, L., D. Kidd, and D. Standiford. 1975. Mercury Levels in Lake Powell: Bioamplification...contents in an 39 S epibenthic food web. Polprasert (1982) also ranked fishes in the Chao Phr~ya River Estuary according to trophic level. Based upon the

  10. Contaminants in sediment, food-chain biota, and bird eggs from the Newport Bay watershed, Orange County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolo, Gary M; Byron, Earl R; Ohlendorf, Harry M

    2016-02-01

    Groundwater-related discharges in the San Diego Creek/Newport Bay watershed in Orange County, California have the potential to adversely affect the surface waters within the watershed and would likely not comply with the established total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for the watershed. In 2004 and 2005, we studied the concentrations of contaminants of TMDL concern (particularly selenium [Se]) in birds that are at risk of exposure to contaminated food items because they feed and nest in the Newport Bay watershed. Most bioaccumulation is from elevated Se in groundwater downstream of a historic terminal swamp. Se bioaccumulation was observed in all biota tested, and DDE was found in fish and bird egg samples. Effects of contaminants on fish and birds are inconclusive due to the management disturbances in the watershed (e.g., flood control) and lack of bird nesting habitat. Although a significant relationship was observed between DDE concentrations and eggshell thinning in American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) eggs, the shell thinning in avocet and other species examined was not enough to result in hatching failure. Further focused monitoring efforts will be needed to characterize the exposure and risk levels.

  11. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices.

  12. Human exposure to dioxins through the diet in Catalonia, Spain: carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Juan M; Domingo, Jose L; Bocio, Ana; Casas, Conrad; Teixidó, Angel; Müller, Lutz

    2003-03-01

    The main objectives of this study were to estimate the dietary intake of dioxins by the population of Catalonia, Spain, to determine which food groups showed the greatest contribution to this intake, and to assess the health risks potentially associated with the dietary dioxin intake. From June to August 2000, food samples were randomly acquired in seven cities of Catalonia. Dioxin concentrations were determined in 108 samples belonging to the following groups: vegetables, fruits, pulses, cereals, fish and shellfish, meats and meat products, eggs, milk and dairy products, and oils and fats. Estimates of average daily food consumption were obtained from recent studies. Total dietary intake of dioxins for the general population of Catalonia was estimated to be 95.4 pg WHO-TEQ/day (78.4 pg I-TEQ/day), with fish and shellfish (31%), diary products (25%), cereals (14%) and meat (13%) showing the greatest percentages of contribution to dioxin intake. The contribution of all the rest of food groups to the total dietary intake was under 20%. The non-carcinogenic risk index of dioxin intake through the diet was in the range 0.34-1.36, while the carcinogenic risk level was 1,360 excess cancer over a lifetime of 70 years. Our results corroborate the decreasing tendency in dietary intake of dioxins found in recent studies (2000-2001) from various countries.

  13. Processing-Dependent and Clonal Contamination Patterns of Listeria monocytogenes in the Cured Ham Food Chain Revealed by Genetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Marina; Scaltriti, Erika; Cozzolino, Paolo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele; Pierantoni, Marco; Foni, Emanuela; Pongolini, Stefano

    2015-11-20

    The quantitative and qualitative patterns of environmental contamination by Listeria monocytogenes were investigated in the production chain of dry-cured Parma ham. Standard arrays of surfaces were sampled in processing facilities during a single visit per plant in the three compartments of the food chain, i.e., ham production (19 plants) and postproduction, which was divided into deboning (43 plants) and slicing (25 plants) steps. The numbers of sampled surfaces were 384 in ham production, with 25 positive for L. monocytogenes, and 1,084 in postproduction, with 83 positives. Statistical analysis of the prevalence of contaminated surfaces showed that in ham production, contamination was higher at the beginning of processing and declined significantly toward the end, while in postproduction, prevalence rose toward the end of processing. Prevalence was higher in the deboning facilities than in slicing facilities and was dependent on the type of surface (floor/drainage > clothing > equipment). The qualitative pattern of contamination was investigated through an analysis of the survey isolates and a set of isolates derived from routine monitoring, including longitudinal isolations. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis revealed a remarkable clonality of L. monocytogenes within plants, with the detection of 16 plant-specific clones out of 17 establishments with multiple isolates. Repeated detections of clonal isolates >6 months apart were also observed. Six was the maximum number of between-isolate differences in core SNPs observed within these clones. Based on the same six-SNP threshold, three clusters of clonal isolates, shared by six establishments, were also identified. The spread of L. monocytogenes within and between plants, as indicated by its clonal behavior, is a matter of concern for the hygienic management of establishments.

  14. Chrysotile, tremolite and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C; McDonald, A D

    1997-12-01

    It has been suspected for many years that amphibole fibres in the tremolite series, a low level contaminant of chrysotile asbestos, may contribute disproportionately to the incidence of mesothelioma and perhaps other exposure-related cancers. A cohort of some 11,000 Quebec chrysotile workers, 80% of whom have now died, provided the opportunity to examine this hypothesis further. An analysis was made of deaths from mesothelioma (21), cancers of the lung (262), larynx (15), stomach (99), and colon and rectum (76), in men employed by the largest company in Thetford Mines, with closely matched referents. Risks were estimated by logistic regression for these five cancers in two groups of mines--five mines located centrally and ten mines located peripherally; tremolite contamination had been demonstrated to be some four times higher in the former than in the latter. Odds ratios for work in the central mines were raised substantially and significantly for mesothelioma and lung cancer, but not for the gastric, intestinal or laryngeal cancer sites. In the peripheral mines, there was little or no evidence of increased risk for any of the five cancers. The hypothesis that, because of the difference in distribution of fibrous tremolite, cancer risks in the central area would be greater than in the periphery was thus substantiated. That the explanation may lie in the greater biopersistence of amphibole fibres than chrysotile is important in framing policies for the use and control of asbestos and is directly relevant to the selection of man-made mineral fibre substitutes.

  15. Surprising findings following a Belgian food contamination with polychlorobiphenyls and dioxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepens, P J; Covaci, A; Jorens, P G; Hens, L; Scharpé, S; van Larebeke, N

    2001-02-01

    We found that 12.1% of Belgian export meat samples from chicken or pork, unrelated to the PCB/dioxin crisis from 1999, contained more than 50 ng polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)/g fat and that 6.5% of samples contain more than 20 ng/g fat for the sum of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) and its metabolites. Part of this background contamination stems from imported animal feed ingredients (fish flour and grains), sometimes contaminated by recent use of DDT, as can be deduced from the ratio between DDT and its main metabolite, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE). However, after comparing PCB concentrations in fish flour and grains with those found in meat, we suggest that the high concentrations stem from recycled fat. This is the first paper describing background concentrations of PCBs in animal meat from Belgium.

  16. The Food-Contaminant Deoxynivalenol Modifies Eating by Targeting Anorexigenic Neurocircuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Clémence Girardet; Marion S Bonnet; Rajae Jdir; Medhi Sadoud; Sylvie Thirion; Catherine Tardivel; Julien Roux; Bruno Lebrun; Nicolas Wanaverbecq; Lourdes Mounien; Jérôme Trouslard; André Jean; Michel Dallaporta; Jean-Denis Troadec

    2011-01-01

    Physiological regulations of energy balance and body weight imply highly adaptive mechanisms which match caloric intake to caloric expenditure. In the central nervous system, the regulation of appetite relies on complex neurocircuitry which disturbance may alter energy balance and result in anorexia or obesity. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on contaminated cereals and its stability during processing and cooking explains its widespread pres...

  17. Monitoring of Aflatoxin contamination at market food chain in East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina A. Rahmianna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Peanut is a cheapest source of protein especially for developing countries communities and mostly it obtained from traditional markets. Earlier studies showed that aflatoxin incidence was relatively less at the farmer/trader levels while it is significantly higher at retail levels especially in traditional markets. Present study was conducted to understand the factors leading to the post-harvest building up of aflatoxin in peanuts sold in traditional market and in supermarket. This study was carried out at Pasuruan regency, East Java Province, Indonesia from March 2005 to June 2006. During study period peanut grains were collected from wholesalers, retailers and supermarkets at three months interval. In each sampling point, 2kg of grains was obtained and then was divided into eight parts for the analysis of parameters namely seed moisture content, physical quality, Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin B1 contamination. The results showed that seed water contents at wholesalers, collectors, and retailers in traditional wet markets were almost lower than 10%. They were thus ‘safe’ from aflatoxin B1 contamination as seed moisture contents were below the aflatoxin risk zone. Time of sampling did not affect the level of aflatoxin B1 contamination. Under controlled condition generated from air-tight container, the influence of seed moisture content and A. flavus infection on aflatoxin production was significant.

  18. Using a bank of predatory fish samples for bioindication of radioactive contamination of aquatic food chains in the area affected by the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryshev, I I; Ryabov, I N; Sazykina, T G

    1993-11-01

    From the analysis of experimental data on radioactive contamination of various fish, it is suggested that predatory fish specimens can be used as bioindicators of radionuclide accumulation in reservoir food chains of the Chernobyl emergency area. The increased content of cesium radionuclides were detected in the muscle tissue of predatory fish collected in various regions of the Chernobyl emergency area. In most of the water bodies studied, maximum contamination levels of predatory fish by radionuclides of cesium occurred in 1987-1988, whereas in 'nonpredatory' fish the concentration of cesium was maximum, as a rule, in the first year following the accident. The exposure doses of fish of various ecological groups and ages are estimated. The exposure doses of various population groups, using fish from contaminated water bodies, are also estimated. When forming the environmental data bank for the Chernobyl accident zone it is suggested that perch, pike-perch and pike be used as bioindicators of radioactive contamination of food chains.

  19. Current issues involving screening and identification of chemical contaminants in foods by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehotay, S.J.; Sapozhnikova, Y.; Mol, J.G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Although quantitative analytical methods must be empirically validated prior to their use in a variety of applications, including regulatory monitoring of chemical adulterants in foods, validation of qualitative method performance for the analytes and matrices of interest is frequently ignored, or g

  20. Adaptation and mitigation options to manage aflatoxin contamination in food with a climate change perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wambui, J. M.; Karuri, E. G.; Ojiambo, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the impact of climate change remains vital for food safety and public health. Of particular importance is the influence of climatic conditions on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and production of their toxins. Nevertheless, little is known about the actual impact of climate change...

  1. Carcinogenicity of hair dye components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duuren, B L

    1980-03-01

    The available animal carcinogenicity data on hair dye components was reviewed. From this review it became clear that certain hair dye components, some of which are still in hair dye formulations now on the market, are animal carcinogens. The compounds of concern that are still in use are: 3-amino-4-methoxyaniline, 2-nitro-4-aminoaniline and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyaniline. Certain azo dyes formerly used, and related compounds still in use, contain the benzidine moiety. Two of these compounds, Direct Blue 6 and Direct Black 38, have been shown to be metabolized in animals to the human carcinogen benzidine. Furthermore, skin absorption studies carried out with radiolabeled hair dye components applied to animal or human skin have conclusively shown that these compounds are systemically absorbed and excreted. Known cocarcinogens such as catechol and pyrogallol, which enhance benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenicity on mouse skin, are used as hair dye components. It is not known whether such compounds will enhance the carcinogenicity of substituted aniline hair dye chemicals. The available epidemiologic data are not sufficient to link hair dye use with an increased incidence in human cancer.

  2. Fate of selected microorganisms when introduced as cross-contamination inocula into simulated food trash compartment waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Richard; Hummerick, Mary; Richards, Jeffrey; Birmele, Michele; Roberts, Michael

    counts and general cultivation-based methods. Detection and enumeration of challenge microbes was accomplished by cultivation-based microbiological methods with specific selective media and by molecular methods using quantitative stocktickerPCR (qPCR) with stocktickerDNA primers specific for each challenge organism. stocktickerDNA was extracted and purified from residual wastes with a stocktickerDNA isolation kit (Mo Bio), and quantified (NanoDrop) from standard curves prepared from pure culture isolates of each challenge organism. QPCR was conducted on a Roche LightCycler 480 using the Roche stocktickerSYBR Green Master Mix Kit. The identity of all challenge microbes in recovered isolates was verified by stocktickerDNA sequencing (stocktickerABI 3130 Genetic Analyzer - Applied Biosystems). To date, concentrations of challenge microbial populations at concentrations ranging from ˜107 - 108 have been added to simulated food waste and extracted either immediately after mixing or after 1 week of storage. Cultivation-based counts indicated that 5 of 6 challenge microbes could be recovered from simulated food wastes after inoculation for both concentrations. Only S. enterica serovar typhimurium could not be detected at week 0 for the 107 inoculum. Between week 0 and 1, challenge microbes increased in density: S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa increasing up to 4 orders of magnitude from the 107 inoculum. Molecular results for the week 0 and week 1 stored samples indicated that the relative concentrations of target stocktickerDNA for the challenge microbes had increased between 1 and 3 orders of magnitude. These preliminary studies demonstrate that potential problems regarding pathogens as cross-contaminants from other waste streams could develop during storage of space mission solid wastes. Ongoing studies are examining longer storage times up to 6 weeks. The results can be used to determine requirements and criteria for waste treatment prior to storage and provides a

  3. Does temporal variation of mercury levels in Arctic seabirds reflect changes in global environmental contamination, or a modification of Arctic marine food web functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Jérôme; Grémillet, David; Traisnel, Gwendoline; Amélineau, Françoise; Bustamante, Paco

    2016-04-01

    Studying long-term trends of contaminants in Arctic biota is essential to better understand impacts of anthropogenic activities and climate change on the exposure of sensitive species and marine ecosystems. We concurrently measured temporal changes (2006-2014) in mercury (Hg) contamination of little auks (Alle alle; the most abundant Arctic seabird) and in their major zooplankton prey species (Calanoid copepods, Themisto libellula, Gammarus spp.). We found an increasing contamination of the food-chain in East Greenland during summer over the last decade. More specifically, bird contamination (determined by body feather analyses) has increased at a rate of 3.4% per year. Conversely, bird exposure to Hg during winter in the northwest Atlantic (determined by head feather analyses) decreased over the study period (at a rate of 1.5% per year), although winter concentrations remained consistently higher than during summer. By combining mercury levels measured in birds and zooplankton to isotopic analyses, our results demonstrate that inter-annual variations of Hg levels in little auks reflect changes in food-chain contamination, rather than a reorganization of the food web and a modification of seabird trophic ecology. They therefore underline the value of little auks, and Arctic seabirds in general, as bio-indicators of long-term changes in environmental contamination.

  4. Chesapeake Bay fish–osprey (Pandion haliaetus) food chain: Evaluation of contaminant exposure and genetic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Rebecca; Rattner, Barnett A.; McGowan, Peter C.; Hale, Robert C.; Karouna-Reiner, Natalie K.; Erickson, Richard A.; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    From 2011 to 2013, a large-scale ecotoxicological study was conducted in several Chesapeake Bay (USA) tributaries (Susquehanna River and flats, the Back, Baltimore Harbor/Patapsco Rivers, Anacostia/ middle Potomac, Elizabeth and James Rivers) and Poplar Island as a mid-Bay reference site. Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) diet and the transfer of contaminants from fish to osprey eggs were evaluated. The most bioaccumulative compounds (biomagnification factor > 5) included p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), total polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and bromodiphenyl ether (BDE) congeners 47, 99, 100, and 154. This analysis suggested that alternative brominated flame retardants and other compounds (methoxytriclosan) are not appreciably biomagnifying. A multivariate analysis of similarity indicated that major differences in patterns among study sites were driven by PCB congeners 105, 128, 156, 170/190, and 189, and PBDE congeners 99 and 209. An integrative redundancy analysis showed that osprey eggs from Baltimore Harbor/Patapsco River and the Elizabeth River had high residues of PCBs and p,p′-DDE, with PBDEs making a substantial contribution to overall halogenated contamination on the Susquehanna and Anacostia/middle Potomac Rivers. The redundancy analysis also suggested a potential relation between PBDE residues in osprey eggs and oxidative DNA damage in nestling blood samples. The results also indicate that there is no longer a discernible relation between halogenated contaminants in osprey eggs and their reproductive success in Chesapeake Bay. Osprey populations are thriving in much of the Chesapeake, with productivity rates exceeding those required to sustain a stable population.

  5. Identification and measurement of pesticide contaminants in food products by electron impact GC/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tusa, Florina; Moldovan, Zaharie [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Vlassa, Mircea, E-mail: zaharie.moldovan@itim-cj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes Bolyai University, 11 Arany Janos, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    The paper concern is determination of eight pesticides in food products samples. The target compounds are: Lindane, Heptachlor, Aldrin, o,p-DDE, Dieldrin, Endrin, p,p'-DDT, and Methoxychlor. The compounds quantities were performed from chromatographic area obtained in full scan GC/MS mode after baseline separation and by comparation with surrogate internal standard area (Diphenylamine). The samples were concentrated by extraction with organic solvents (acetone) by Solid-Liquid Extraction (SLE) procedures the recovery factors being better than 80% except for Heptachlors. The coefficient of correlation of detector response function was better than 0.913 and LOQ under 0.015 {mu}g/g. The method enables to determine pesticides at low {mu}g/g in food supplements.

  6. Technical University of Denmark Microbiological contaminants in food in the European Union in 2004-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helwigh, Birgitte; Korsgaard, Helle; Grønlund, Anne Christine Jørgensen

    . Relative high levels of non-compliance were also found among samples reported as ‘Other RTE products’ tested at processing. From 2006 to 2009, a decrease in number of investigations in non-compliance was observed in fish and fishery products tested both at processing and retail, as well as for soft cheeses...... and/or sampling stage information were excluded, only 44% of all data reported for 2004 to 2009 could be considered for in-depth analyses. Furthermore, some investigations were reported without specific indication of e.g. animal species, type of vegetable or type of cheese. Due to the difficulty...... products. L. monocytogenes was found more frequently in bovine meat products compared to pig meat products and poultry meat products. Fishery products, soft cheeses and meat products were the food categories most frequently found to be in non-compliance with the L. monocytogenes food safety criteria...

  7. Evaluation of Heavy Metals Contamination from Environment to Food Matrix by TXRF: The Case of Rice and Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabjola Bilo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the chemical analysis of contaminated soils of India and the rice grown in the same area. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a well-established technique for elemental chemical analysis of environmental samples, and it can be a useful tool to assess food safety. Metals uptake in rice crop grown in soils from different areas was studied. In this work soil, rice husk and rice samples were analyzed after complete solubilization of samples by microwave acid digestion. Heavy metals concentration detected in rice samples decreases in the following order: Mn > Zn > Cu > Ni > Pb > Cr. The metal content in rice husk was higher than in rice. This study suggests, for the first time, a possible role of heavy metals filter played by rice husk. The knowledge of metals sequestration capability of rice husk may promote some new management practices for rice cultivation to preserve it from pollution.

  8. Inter-Taxa Differences in Iodine Uptake by Plants: Implications for Food Quality and Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Siasou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although iodine is not essential for plants, they take it up readily and, in foodchains, are significant sources of iodine for organisms with an essential requirement for it. During several nuclear accidents radioiodine has been an important component of releases of radioactivity and has caused serious contamination of foodchains. Differences in iodine uptake by different plant taxa are, therefore, important to nutritional and radioecological studies. Using techniques we have developed for a range of other elements, we analyzed inter-taxa differences in radioiodine uptake by 103 plant species and between varieties of two species, and analyzed them using a recent, phylogenetically-informed, taxonomy. The results show that there are significant differences in uptake above and below the species level. There are significant differences between Monocots and Eudicots in iodine uptake, and, in particular, hierarchical ANOVA revealed significant differences between Genera within Families. These analyses of the taxonomic origin of differences in plant uptake of iodine can help the prediction of crop contamination with radioiodine and the management of stable iodine in crops for nutritional purposes.

  9. Effects of contaminant exposure and food restriction on hepatic autophagic lysosomal parameters in Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegseth, Marit Nøst; Gorbi, Stephania; Bocchetti, Raffaella; Camus, Lionel; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Regoli, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Lysosomal autophagic responses, such as lysosomal membrane stability, neutral lipids (NL), lipofuscin (LF), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, are valuable measures of cellular early-onset effects induced by environmental stress factors, such as contaminant exposure and fasting. In this study, these parameters were analysed and related to levels of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) in 40 Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) chicks. Chicks were experimentally exposed to HOCs through diet and went through a period of nutrient deprivation at the end of the experiment. HOC exposure and fasting were conducted separately and in combination. NL storages were depleted, and lysosomal membranes were destabilised after HOC exposure and nutrient deprivation. These responses were not related specifically to one type of stress or the extent of the treatment. No synergistic or additive effects from the combination of HOC exposure and fasting were observed. LF accumulated, and MDA levels increased as a result of fasting, but were unaffected by HOC exposure. LF accumulation was strongly associated with the percent weight change in the chicks. Large weight loss was associated with high LF levels, and slight weight gain was associated with low LF levels. Hence, food deprivation affected all the measured parameters, and HOC exposure decreased NL levels and lysosomal membrane stability in HG chick liver. Furthermore, autophagic lysosomal parameters have frequently been applied as biomarkers of cellular health status in previous studies of marine and terrestrial invertebrates, and this study suggests that these parameters may be good candidates for biomarkers of cellular health status in seabirds as well.

  10. A relevant exposure to a food matrix contaminated environmentally by polychlorinated biphenyls induces liver and brain disruption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounnas, Fayçal; Privé, Florence; Lamarche, Fréderic; Salen, Patricia; Favier-Hininger, Isabelle; Marchand, Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Venisseau, Anais; Batandier, Cécile; Fontaine, Eric; de Lorgeril, Michel; Demeilliers, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants present in dietary fats. Most studies evaluating PCB effects have been conducted with a single compound or a mixture of PCBs given as a single acute dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo PCB toxicity in a realistic model of exposure: a low daily dose of PCBs (twice the tolerable daily intake (TDI)), chronically administered (8 weeks) to rats in contaminated goat milk. Liver and brain PCB toxicities were investigated by evaluating oxidative stress status and mitochondrial function. PCB toxicity in the liver was also estimated by transaminase enzymatic activity. This study shows that even at low doses, chronic PCB exposure resulted in a statistically significant reduction of mitochondrial function in liver and brain. In the liver, oxygen consumption in the condition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production (state 3) decreased by 22-29% (p < 0.01), according to the respiratory substrates. In the brain, respiratory chain complexes II and III were reduced by 24% and 39%, respectively (p < 0.005). The exposed rats presented higher lipid peroxidation status (+20%, p < 0.05) and transaminase activity (+30%, p < 0.05) in the blood. Thus, our study showed that exposure of rats to a daily realistic dose of PCBs (twice the TDI in a food complex mixture of environmental origin) resulted in multiple disruptions in the liver and brain.

  11. Carcinogenic risk of copper gluconate evaluated by a rat medium-term liver carcinogenicity bioassay protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Masayoshi; Usuda, Koji; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi; Furukawa, Satoshi [Nissan Chemical Industries Limited, Toxicology and Environmental Science Department, Biological Research Laboratories, Saitama (Japan); Igarashi, Maki [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Laboratory of Protection of Body Function, Department of Food and Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Nakae, Dai [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Laboratory of Protection of Body Function, Department of Food and Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Public Health, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Carcinogenic risk and molecular mechanisms underlying the liver tumor-promoting activity of copper gluconate, an additive of functional foods, were investigated using a rat medium-term liver carcinogenicity bioassay protocol (Ito test) and a 2-week short-term administration experiment. In the medium-term liver bioassay, Fischer 344 male rats were given a single i.p. injection of N-nitrosodiethylamine at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. as a carcinogenic initiator. Starting 2 weeks thereafter, rats received 0, 10, 300 or 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate in diet for 6 weeks. All rats underwent 2/3 partial hepatectomy at the end of week 3, and all surviving rats were killed at the end of week 8. In the short-term experiment, rats were given 0, 10, 300 or 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate for 2 weeks. Numbers of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive lesions, single GST-P-positive hepatocytes and 8-oxoguanine-positive hepatocytes, and levels of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the liver were significantly increased by 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate in the medium-term liver bioassay. Furthermore, hepatic mRNA expression of genes relating to the metal metabolism, inflammation and apoptosis were elevated by 6,000 ppm of copper gluconate both in the medium-term liver bioassay and the short-term experiments. These results indicate that copper gluconate possesses carcinogenic risk toward the liver at the high dose level, and that oxidative stress and inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signaling statuses may participate in its underlying mechanisms. (orig.)

  12. Occurrence, uses, and carcinogenicity of arylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King-Thom

    2015-01-01

    Arylamines are chemically synthesized and contained in oxidants, epoxy polymers, explosives, fungicides, pesticides, colorants, polyurethanes, and used in rubber, pharmacology, cosmetics, and other chemical industries. Many arylamines are ubiquitously present in cigarette smoke, cooking fume hoods, foods, automobile exhaust, industrial sites, etc. Some arylamines can be generated through azo reduction by intestinal, skin, and environmental microorganisms from azo dyes that are widely used. Arylamines can also be generated by reduction of the nitro-group containing polyhydrated hydrocarbons including muntions. Some arylamines are released by burning nitrogen containing organic materials at high temperatures. Some medical drugs are also arylamines. Furthermore, many arylamines are essential constituents of normal metabolism or the result of abnormal metabolism or dietary sources. Some arylamines are mutagenic, carcinogenic or the cause of other kinds of maladies. Some arylamine are considered the major etiological agents of bladder tumors in humans and animals but may also induce other types of cancers in various organs. The organ, tissue, and species specificity of the arylamine-inducing carcinogenesis may be determined by their availability, distribution, and the presence of metabolic activation/detoxicification enzymes of each organ or tissue of different species. The ubiquitous arylamines, therefore, pose serious hazards to human health and environment. This article will address the occurrence, uses, carcinogenicity, and other arylamines-induced diseases.

  13. Potential food contaminants and associated health risks%潜在的食品污染剂和与之相关的健康危险

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharda Shah PESHIN; Shyam Bala LALL; Suresh Kumar GUPTA

    2002-01-01

    The potential toxicants in food are derived fromNatural or industrial sources. Compounds like lectins andglycoalkaloids that are toxic to man are naturally presentin some vegetables like potatoes or legumes. A widevariety of marine toxins mostly produced by dinoflagel-lates occuring secondarily in molluscs and mussels areusually ingested by human beings causing poisoning. Onthe other hand, toxic ~ds find their way into foodduring manufacture, storage, or transportation. Theseinclude largely the industrial contaminants, persistentorganic pollutants (POP), pesticides, heavy metals, andtoxins of fungal and bacterial origin. Further, toxiccompounds like higher alcohols may be produced asbyproducts during processing. Migration of compoundsfrom packaging materials into packaged food likecontamination with lead from solder in certain metal cansis well known. Additives (emulsifiers, preservatives,and antioxidants ) could also influence the quality offoods. Solvent residues may find their way into food asa result of their use in extraction processes like the use oftrichloroethylene and methylene chloride in decaffeinationof coffee. In addition, poor hygiene, storage, andreparafion may also lead to food contamination byvarious microbes and ova or cysts of nematodes. Theproblem of food contamination can be overcome to a greatextent by regular surveillance and monitoring programmesand strict implementation of food and adulteration act.In the present review some of these aspects of foodcontamination have been discussed in detail.``

  14. Thermally induced process-related contaminants: the example of acrolein and the comparison with acrylamide: opinion of the Senate Commission on Food Safety (SKLM) of the German Research Foundation (DFG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Sabine; Habermeyer, Michael; Baum, Matthias; Steinberg, Pablo; Lampen, Alfonso; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    α,β-Unsaturated aliphatic carbonyl compounds are naturally widespread in food, but are also formed during the thermal treatment of food. This applies, for example, to the genotoxic carcinogen acrylamide (AA), but also to acrolein (AC), the simplest α,β-unsaturated aldehyde. First observations indicate that human exposure to AC may be higher than the exposure to AA. The DFG Senate Commission on Food Safety therefore compared data on AC and AA available in the scientific literature, evaluating current knowledge on formation, occurrence, exposure, metabolism, biological effects, toxicity, and carcinogenicity and defined knowledge gaps as well as research needs in an opinion on November 19, 2012, in German. The English version was agreed on April 17, 2013.

  15. Norovirus contamination levels in ground water treatment systems used for food-catering facilities in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Ram; Lee, Sung-Geun; Park, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Yup; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol; Rhee, Ok-Jae; Park, Jeong-Woong; Lee, Jeong-Su; Paik, Soon-Young

    2013-07-02

    This study aimed to inspect norovirus contamination of groundwater treatment systems used in food-catering facilities located in South Korea. A nationwide study was performed in 2010. Water samples were collected and, for the analysis of water quality, the temperature, pH, turbidity, and residual chlorine content were assessed. To detect norovirus genotypes GI and GII, RT-PCR and semi-nested PCR were performed with specific NV-GI and NV-GII primer sets, respectively. The PCR products amplified from the detected strains were then subjected to sequence analyses. Of 1,090 samples collected in 2010, seven (0.64%) were found to be norovirus-positive. Specifically, one norovirus strain was identified to have the GI-6 genotype, and six GII strains had the GII, GII-3, GII-4, and GII-17 genotypes. The very low detection rate of norovirus most likely reflects the preventative measures used. However, this virus can spread rapidly from person to person in crowded, enclosed places such as the schools investigated in this study. To promote better public health and sanitary conditions, it is necessary to periodically monitor noroviruses that frequently cause epidemic food poisoning in South Korea.

  16. Chronic dietary risk characterization for pesticide residues: a ranking and scoring method integrating agricultural uses and food contamination data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougadère, Alexandre; Reninger, Jean-Cédric; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Leblanc, Jean-Charles

    2011-07-01

    A method has been developed to identify pesticide residues and foodstuffs for inclusion in national monitoring programs with different priority levels. It combines two chronic dietary intake indicators: ATMDI based on maximum residue levels and agricultural uses, and EDI on food contamination data. The mean and 95th percentile of exposure were calculated for 490 substances using individual and national consumption data. The results show that mean ATMDI exceeds the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for 10% of the pesticides, and the mean upper-bound EDI is above the ADI for 1.8% of substances. A seven-level risk scale is presented for substances already analyzed in food in France and substances not currently sought. Of 336 substances analyzed, 70 pesticides of concern (levels 2-5) should be particularly monitored, 22 of which are priority pesticides (levels 4 and 5). Of 154 substances not sought, 36 pesticides of concern (levels 2-4) should be included in monitoring programs, including 8 priority pesticides (level 4). In order to refine exposure assessment, analytical improvements and developments are needed to lower the analytical limits for priority pesticide/commodity combinations. Developed nationally, this method could be applied at different geographic scales.

  17. [Viral contamination of food products: a poorly understood public health problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C K; Torres, E A

    1998-06-01

    Throughout the world there have been several epidemics of food-borne diseases (FBD) about which there is lack of sufficient information for public health institutions to take appropriate measures. This study was conducted for the purpose of contributing to the dissemination of information on these diseases and their etiologic agents, epidemiology, and control. The study was based on data from 61 sources, including review articles, reports of outbreaks, and databases. Results reveal considerable underregistration and lack of data on FBD throughout the various countries, with viruses being the second most important cause of FBD in the United States of America. Two agents, Norwalk virus and hepatitis A virus, were the fifth and sixth most frequent causes, respectively, although the former was the single most frequent cause of FBD in 1982 and the second most frequent cause of water-borne diseases during the period from 1986 to 1988. Despite the scarcity of information on the problem, rotavirus, poliovirus, hepatitis E virus, astrovirus, and small gastroenteric viruses are also important causes of FBD. We also discuss the importance of viral zoonoses, especially hemorrhagic fevers transmitted by contact with rodent feces and tick-borne viral encephalitides (Lassa fever). There is discussion of the controversial mad cow disease and its potential transmission through food products, as well as of dietary aspects of the management of AIDS and other viral infections. Finally, measures for the prevention and control of FBD are described.

  18. Probabilistic risk assessment of dietary exposure to single and multiple pesticide residues or contaminants: Summary of the work performed within the SAFE FOODS project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaveren, van J.D.; Boon, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    This introduction to the journal's supplement on probabilistic risk assessment of single and multiple exposure to pesticide residues or contaminants summarizes the objectives and results of the work performed in work package 3 of the EU-funded project SAFE FOODS. Within this work package, we develop

  19. Food crop accumulation and bioavailability assessment for antimony (Sb) compared with arsenic (As) in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Susan C; Tighe, Matthew; Paterson, Ewan; Ashley, Paul M

    2014-10-01

    Field samples and a 9-week glasshouse growth trial were used to investigate the accumulation of mining derived arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in vegetable crops growing on the Macleay River Floodplain in Northern New South Wales, Australia. The soils were also extracted using EDTA to assess the potential for this extractant to be used as a predictor of As and Sb uptake in vegetables, and a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test (SBET) to understand potential for uptake in the human gut with soil ingestion. Metalloids were not detected in any field vegetables sampled. Antimony was not detected in the growth trial vegetable crops over the 9-week greenhouse trial. Arsenic accumulation in edible vegetable parts was risk of exposure through short-term vegetable crops is low. The data also demonstrate that uptake pathways for Sb and As in the vegetables were different with uptake strongly impacted by soil properties. A fraction of soil-borne metalloid was soluble in the different soils resulting in Sb soil solution concentration (10.75 ± 0.52 μg L(-1)) that could present concern for contamination of water resources. EDTA proved a poor predictor of As and Sb phytoavailability. Oral bioaccessibility, as measured by SBET, was risk from soil borne As and Sb in the floodplain environment.

  20. Optimisation of pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) for rapid and efficient extraction of superficial and total mineral oil contamination from dry foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Sabrina; Scolaro, Marianna; Barp, Laura; Purcaro, Giorgia; Sander, Maren; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2014-08-15

    Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) represents a powerful technique which can be conveniently used for rapid extraction of mineral oil saturated (MOSH) and aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) from dry foods with a low fat content, such as semolina pasta, rice, and other cereals. Two different PLE methods, one for rapid determination of superficial contamination mainly from the packaging, the other for efficient extraction of total contamination from different sources, have been developed and optimised. The two methods presented good performance characteristics in terms of repeatability (relative standard deviation lower than 5%) and recoveries (higher than 95%). To show their potentiality, the two methods have been applied in combination on semolina pasta and rice packaged in direct contact with recycled cardboard. In the case of semolina pasta it was possible to discriminate between superficial contamination coming from the packaging, and pre-existing contamination (firmly enclosed into the matrix).

  1. Dehydropyrrolizidine Alkaloid Toxicity, Cytotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan L. Stegelmeier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid (DHPA-producing plants have a worldwide distribution amongst flowering plants and commonly cause poisoning of livestock, wildlife, and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of DHPA metabolism, toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions, and routes of exposure, and pathogenesis of acute poisoning. Intoxication is generally caused by contaminated grains, feed, flour, and breads that result in acute, high-dose, short-duration poisoning. Acute poisoning produces hepatic necrosis that is usually confirmed histologically, epidemiologically, and chemically. Less is known about chronic poisoning that may result when plant populations are sporadic, used as tisanes or herbal preparations, or when DHPAs contaminate milk, honey, pollen, or other animal-derived products. Such subclinical exposures may contribute to the development of chronic disease in humans or may be cumulative and probably slowly progress until liver failure. Recent work using rodent models suggest increased neoplastic incidence even with very low DHPA doses of short durations. These concerns have moved some governments to prohibit or limit human exposure to DHPAs. The purpose of this review is to summarize some recent DHPA research, including in vitro and in vivo DHPA toxicity and carcinogenicity reports, and the implications of these findings with respect to diagnosis and prognosis for human and animal health.

  2. Dehydropyrrolizidine Alkaloid Toxicity, Cytotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegelmeier, Bryan L.; Colegate, Steven M.; Brown, Ammon W.

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid (DHPA)-producing plants have a worldwide distribution amongst flowering plants and commonly cause poisoning of livestock, wildlife, and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of DHPA metabolism, toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions, and routes of exposure, and pathogenesis of acute poisoning. Intoxication is generally caused by contaminated grains, feed, flour, and breads that result in acute, high-dose, short-duration poisoning. Acute poisoning produces hepatic necrosis that is usually confirmed histologically, epidemiologically, and chemically. Less is known about chronic poisoning that may result when plant populations are sporadic, used as tisanes or herbal preparations, or when DHPAs contaminate milk, honey, pollen, or other animal-derived products. Such subclinical exposures may contribute to the development of chronic disease in humans or may be cumulative and probably slowly progress until liver failure. Recent work using rodent models suggest increased neoplastic incidence even with very low DHPA doses of short durations. These concerns have moved some governments to prohibit or limit human exposure to DHPAs. The purpose of this review is to summarize some recent DHPA research, including in vitro and in vivo DHPA toxicity and carcinogenicity reports, and the implications of these findings with respect to diagnosis and prognosis for human and animal health. PMID:27916846

  3. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Abysique

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolus from the mouth to the esophagus. To better understand DON effects on ingestive behaviour, we have studied its effects on rhythmic swallowing in the rat, after intravenous and central administration. Repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve or of the tractus solitarius, induces rhythmic swallowing that can be recorded using electromyographic electrodes inserted in sublingual muscles. Here we provide the first demonstration that, after intravenous and central administration, DON strongly inhibits the swallowing reflex with a short latency and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, using c-Fos staining, a strong neuronal activation was observed in the solitary tract nucleus which contains the central pattern generator of swallowing and in the area postrema after DON intravenous injection. Our data show that DON modifies swallowing and interferes with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation.

  4. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abysique, Anne; Tardivel, Catherine; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Félix, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolus from the mouth to the esophagus. To better understand DON effects on ingestive behaviour, we have studied its effects on rhythmic swallowing in the rat, after intravenous and central administration. Repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve or of the tractus solitarius, induces rhythmic swallowing that can be recorded using electromyographic electrodes inserted in sublingual muscles. Here we provide the first demonstration that, after intravenous and central administration, DON strongly inhibits the swallowing reflex with a short latency and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, using c-Fos staining, a strong neuronal activation was observed in the solitary tract nucleus which contains the central pattern generator of swallowing and in the area postrema after DON intravenous injection. Our data show that DON modifies swallowing and interferes with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation.

  5. Rapid determination of acrylamide contaminant in conventional fried foods by gas chromatography with electron capture detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Dong, Yi; Ren, Yiping; Zhang, Ying

    2006-05-26

    Gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was successfully developed and applied for the rapid determination of acrylamide in conventional fried foods, such as potato crisps, potato chips, and fried chicken wings. The method included defatting with n-hexane, extraction with aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl), derivatization with potassium bromate (KBrO3) and potassium bromide (KBr), and liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The final acrylamide extract was analyzed by GC-ECD for quantification and by GC-MS for confirmation. The chromatographic analysis was performed on the HP-INNOWax capillary column, and good retention and peak response of acrylamide were achieved under the optimal conditions (numbers of theoretical plates N = 83,815). The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.1 microg kg(-1) on the basis of ECD technique. Recoveries of acrylamide from conventional samples spiked at levels of 150, 500 and 1000 microg kg(-1) (n = 4 for each level) ranged between 87 and 97% with relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 4%. Furthermore, the GC-ECD method showed that no clean-up steps of acrylamide derivative would be performed prior to injection and was slightly more sensitive than the MS/MS-based methods. Validation and quantification results demonstrated that this method should be regarded as a new, low-cost, and robust alternative for conventional investigation of acrylamide.

  6. Modification of energy balance induced by the food contaminant T-2 toxin: a multimodal gut-to-brain connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaigé, Stéphanie; Djelloul, Mehdi; Tardivel, Catherine; Airault, Coraline; Félix, Bernadette; Jean, André; Lebrun, Bruno; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Dallaporta, Michel

    2014-03-01

    T-2 toxin is one of the most toxic Fusarium-derived trichothecenes found on cereals and constitutes a widespread contaminant of agricultural commodities as well as commercial foods. Low doses toxicity is characterized by reduced weight gain. To date, the mechanisms by which this mycotoxin profoundly modifies feeding behavior remain poorly understood and more broadly the effects of T-2 toxin on the central nervous system (CNS) have received limited attention. Through an extensive characterization of sickness-like behavior induced by T-2 toxin, we showed that its per os (p.o.) administration affects not only feeding behavior but also energy expenditure, glycaemia, body temperature and locomotor activity. Using c-Fos expression mapping, we identified the neuronal structures activated in response to T-2 toxin and observed that the pattern of neuronal populations activated by this toxin resembled that induced by inflammatory signals. Interestingly, part of neuronal pathways activated by the toxin were NUCB-2/nesfatin-1 expressing neurons. Unexpectedly, while T-2 toxin induced a strong peripheral inflammation, the brain exhibited limited inflammatory response at a time point when anorexia was ongoing. Unilateral vagotomy partly reduced T-2 toxin-induced brainstem neuronal activation. On the other hand, intracerebroventricular (icv) T-2 toxin injection resulted in a rapid (food intake. Thus, we hypothesized that T-2 toxin could signal to the brain through neuronal and/or humoral pathways. The present work provides the first demonstration that T-2 toxin modifies feeding behavior by interfering with central neuronal networks devoted to central energy balance. Our results, with a particular attention to peripheral inflammation, strongly suggest that inflammatory mediators partake in the T-2 toxin-induced anorexia and other symptoms. In view of the broad human and breeding animal exposure to T-2 toxin, this new mechanism may lead to reconsider the impact of the consumption of

  7. Intestinal carcinogenesis of two food processing contaminants, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, in transgenic FVB min mice expressing human sulfotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Camilla; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Alexander, Jan; Knutsen, Helle K; Hjertholm, Hege; Rasmussen, Tone; Husøy, Trine

    2012-12-01

    Humans express sulfotransferases (SULTs) of the SULT1A subfamily in many tissues, whilst the single SULT1A gene present in rodents is mainly expressed in liver. The food processing contaminants, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), are bioactivated by human SULT1A1 and SULT1A2. FVB multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mice, which spontaneously develop tumors and flat aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in intestine, were crossed with transgenic FVB mice expressing human SULT1A1 and 1A2 (hSULT) in several tissues, giving rise to wild-type and Min mice with and without hSULT. One-week-old Min mice with or without hSULT were given HMF (375 or 750 mg/kg bw) or saline by gavage three times a week for 11 wk. In another experiment, the F1 generation received subcutaneous injections of 50 mg/kg bw PhIP or saline 1 wk before birth, and 1, 2, and 3 wk after birth. HMF did not affect the formation of tumors, but may have induced some flat ACF (incidence 15-20%) in Min mice with and without hSULT. No control mouse developed any flat ACF. With the limitation that these putative effects were weak, they were unaffected by hSULT expression. The carcinogenic effect of PhIP increased in the presence of hSULT, with a significant increase in both incidence (31-80%) and number of colonic tumors (0.4-1.3 per animal). Thus, intestinal expression of human SULT1A1 and 1A2 might increase the susceptibility to compounds bioactivated via this pathway implying that humans might be more susceptible than conventional rodent models.

  8. The carcinogenic effects of aspartame: The urgent need for regulatory re-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffritti, Morando; Padovani, Michela; Tibaldi, Eva; Falcioni, Laura; Manservisi, Fabiana; Belpoggi, Fiorella

    2014-04-01

    Aspartame (APM) is an artificial sweetener used since the 1980s, now present in >6,000 products, including over 500 pharmaceuticals. Since its discovery in 1965, and its first approval by the US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) in 1981, the safety of APM, and in particular its carcinogenicity potential, has been controversial. The present commentary reviews the adequacy of the design and conduct of carcinogenicity bioassays on rodents submitted by G.D. Searle, in the 1970s, to the FDA for market approval. We also review how experimental and epidemiological data on the carcinogenic risks of APM, that became available in 2005 motivated the European Commission (EC) to call the European Food and Safety Authority (EFSA) for urgent re-examination of the available scientific documentation (including the Searle studies). The EC has further requested that, if the results of the evaluation should suggest carcinogenicity, major changes must be made to the current APM specific regulations. Taken together, the studies performed by G.D. Searle in the 1970s and other chronic bioassays do not provide adequate scientific support for APM safety. In contrast, recent results of life-span carcinogenicity bioassays on rats and mice published in peer-reviewed journals, and a prospective epidemiological study, provide consistent evidence of APM's carcinogenic potential. On the basis of the evidence of the potential carcinogenic effects of APM herein reported, a re-evaluation of the current position of international regulatory agencies must be considered an urgent matter of public health.

  9. Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athnasios, Albert K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this review of analytical methods include: additives, adulteration, contamination, decomposition, carbohydrates, color, enzymes, fats, oils, fatty acids, flavor, identifying compounds, inorganic methods, moisture, organic acids, nitrogen processes, and vitamins. (MVL)

  10. Content Validation and Semantic Evaluation of a Check-List Elaborated for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farage, Priscila; Puppin Zandonadi, Renata; Cortez Ginani, Verônica; Gandolfi, Lenora; Pratesi, Riccardo; de Medeiros Nóbrega, Yanna Karla

    2017-01-06

    Conditions associated to the consumption of gluten have emerged as a major health care concern and the treatment consists on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Providing safe food for these individuals includes adapting to safety procedures within the food chain and preventing gluten cross-contamination in gluten-free food. However, a gluten cross-contamination prevention protocol or check-list has not yet been validated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform the content validation and semantic evaluation of a check-list elaborated for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination in food services. The preliminary version of the check-list was elaborated based on the Brazilian resolution for food safety Collegiate Board Resolution 216 (RDC 216) and Collegiate Board Resolution 275 (RDC 275), the standard 22000 from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 22000) and the Canadian Celiac Association Gluten-Free Certification Program documents. Seven experts with experience in the area participated in the check-list validation and semantic evaluation. The criteria used for the approval of the items, as to their importance for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination and clarity of the wording, was the achievement of a minimal of 80% of agreement between the experts (W-values ≥ 0.8). Moreover, items should have a mean ≥4 in the evaluation of importance (Likert scale from 1 to 5) and clarity (Likert scale from 0 to 5) in order to be maintained in the instrument. The final version of the check-list was composed of 84 items, divided into 12 sections. After being redesigned and re-evaluated, the items were considered important and comprehensive by the experts (both with W-values ≥ 0.89). The check-list developed was validated with respect to content and approved in the semantic evaluation.

  11. The breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) restricts exposure to the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, AE; Jonker, JW; Wagenaar, E; Brinkhuis, RF; Schellens, JHM; Beijnen, JH; Schinkel, AH

    2003-01-01

    The food carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is the most abundant heterocyclic amine found in various protein containing foods. PhIP is mutagenic and carcinogenic in rodents, inducing lymphomas in mice and colon, mammary and prostate carcinomas in rats. It has also been

  12. The adsorption of a range of dietary carcinogens by alpha-cellulose, a model insoluble dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, L R; Roberton, A M; Watson, M E; Kestell, P; Harris, P J

    1993-12-01

    One of the ways dietary fibers may protect against colorectal cancer is by adsorbing carcinogens and carrying them out of the digestive tract, thus lessening interaction of the carcinogens with the colonic tissue. We investigated this mechanism of action by testing in vitro the abilities of a range of carcinogens, including known animal colon carcinogens, to adsorb to alpha-cellulose, which we have used as a model insoluble dietary fiber. The carcinogens were N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and a number of heterocyclic aromatic amines which have been found in heated foods. It was found that the ability of a carcinogen to adsorb to alpha-cellulose is strongly related to the hydrophobicity of the carcinogen measured as the calculated logarithm of the partition coefficient between 1-octanol and water (C log P). The hydrophilic carcinogen, NMU, (C log P = -0.204), adsorbed only poorly, whereas the very hydrophobic carcinogen, B[a]P, (C log P = 6.124), adsorbed strongly. Carcinogens with intermediate hydrophobicities showed intermediate abilities to adsorb.

  13. Lead (II) detection and contamination routes in environmental sources, cookware and home-prepared foods from Zimatlán, Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, M; Merino-Sánchez, C; Hall, C; Grieshop, J; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, M E; Handley, M A

    2009-04-01

    An interdisciplinary investigation, involving environmental geochemists, epidemiologists, nurses, and anthropologists, was undertaken to determine the contamination source and pathway of an on-going outbreak of lead poisoning among migrants originating from Zimatlán, Oaxaca, Mexico and living in Seaside, California, and among their US-born children. An initial investigation in Seaside identified grasshopper foodstuff ("chapulines") imported from Mexico and consumed as snacks, as containing alarmingly high lead concentrations (up to 2300 mg/kg). The focus in the present work concentrates on the Oaxacan area of origin of the problem in Mexico, and two potential sources of contamination were investigated: wind-borne dusts from existing mine residues as potential contaminants of soil, plant, and fauna; and food preparation practices using lead-glazed ceramic cookware. Over a three year period, sampling was conducted in Oaxaca using community-level sampling and also targeted sampling with families of cases with lead poisoning in California. In addition to fresh field chapulines, we analyzed for total lead: soil, water, mine residues, and plant materials, both from areas adjacent to or at an abandoned waste site containing mine tailings, and from fields where chapulines are collected; foodstuffs gathered in community markets or in a food transport business; and foodstuffs and cookware gathered from relatives of case families in California. Also, selected new and used lead-glazed clay cookware was extracted for lead, using 0.02 M citric acid and with 4% acetic acid. The results indicated significant presence of lead in mine wastes, in specific foodstuffs, and in glazed cookware, but no extensive soil contamination was identified. In-situ experiments demonstrated that lead incorporation in food is made very efficient through grinding of spices in glazed cookware, with the combination of a harsh mechanical action and the frequent presence of acidic lime juice, but without

  14. 食品添加剂和污染物法典委员会简介%Brief Introduction of Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants (CCFAC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓瑜

    2001-01-01

    @@ 食品添加剂和污染物法典委员会(Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants,简称CCFAC),主持国为荷兰,成立于1964年,通常每年举办一次会议,至今已举办了33次会议.其主要的工作内容有:

  15. Target and non-target screening strategies for organic contaminants, residues and illicit substances in food , environmental and human biological samples by UHPLC-QTOF-MS

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Hernández, Félix; Díaz San Pedro, Ramón; Sancho Llopis, Juan Vicente; Ibáñez Martínez, María

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we illustrate the potential of ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF MS) for large scale screening of organic contaminants in different types of samples. Thanks to the full-spectrum acquisition at satisfactory sensitivity, it is feasible to apply both (post)-target and non-target approaches for the rapid qualitative screening of organic pollutants in food, biological and environmental samples. ...

  16. A Review of Class I and Class II Pet Food Recalls Involving Chemical Contaminants from 1996 to 2008

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Commercial pet food in USA is generally safe, but adulteration does occur. Adulterated food has to be recalled to protect pets and public health. All stakeholders, including food firms, distributors, and government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) participate in food recall. The objective of this review is to describe the pet food recall procedure from start to finish, and to review class I and II pet food recalls from 1996 to 2008, with a specific focus on those due to...

  17. The impact of low-dose carcinogens and environmental disruptors on tissue invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, Josiah; Nangami, Gladys N.; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Koturbash, Igor; Odero-Marah, Valerie; McCawley, Lisa; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Luqmani, Yunus; Chen, Zhenbang; Papagerakis, Silvana; Wolf, Gregory T.; Dong, Chenfang; Zhou, Binhua P.; Brown, Dustin G.; Colacci, Annamaria; Hamid, Roslida A.; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Amedei, Amedeo; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bisson, William H.; Eltom, Sakina E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to stimulate new ideas regarding low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens and their potential to promote invasion and metastasis. Whereas a number of chapters in this review are devoted to the role of low-dose environmental mixtures and carcinogens in the promotion of invasion and metastasis in specific tumors such as breast and prostate, the overarching theme is the role of low-dose carcinogens in the progression of cancer stem cells. It is becoming clearer that cancer stem cells in a tumor are the ones that assume invasive properties and colonize distant organs. Therefore, low-dose contaminants that trigger epithelial–mesenchymal transition, for example, in these cells are of particular interest in this review. This we hope will lead to the collaboration between scientists who have dedicated their professional life to the study of carcinogens and those whose interests are exclusively in the arena of tissue invasion and metastasis. PMID:26106135

  18. Soil processes and tree growth at shooting ranges in a boreal forest reflect contamination history and lead-induced changes in soil food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selonen, Salla; Setälä, Heikki

    2015-06-15

    The effects of shooting-derived lead (Pb) on the structure and functioning of a forest ecosystem, and the recovery of the ecosystem after range abandonment were studied at an active shotgun shooting range, an abandoned shooting range where shooting ceased 20 years earlier and an uncontaminated control site. Despite numerous lead-induced changes in the soil food web, soil processes were only weakly related to soil food web composition. However, decomposition of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) needle litter was retarded at the active shooting range, and microbial activity, microbial biomass and the rate of decomposition of Pb-contaminated grass litter decreased with increasing soil Pb concentrations. Tree (P. sylvestris) radial growth was suppressed at the active shooting range right after shooting activities started. In contrast, the growth of pines improved at the abandoned shooting range after the cessation of shooting, despite reduced nitrogen and phosphorus contents of the needles. Higher litter degradation rates and lower Pb concentrations in the topmost soil layer at the abandoned shooting range suggest gradual recovery after range abandonment. Our findings suggest that functions in lead-contaminated coniferous forest ecosystems depend on the successional stage of the forest as well as the time since the contamination source has been eliminated, which affects, e.g., the vertical distribution of the contaminant in the soil. However, despite multiple lead-induced changes throughout the ecosystem, the effects were rather weak, indicating high resistance of coniferous forest ecosystems to this type of stress.

  19. Deconjugation of N-glucuronide conjugated metabolites with hydrazine hydrate - Biomarkers for exposure to the food-borne carcinogen 2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2007-01-01

    The metabolism of the carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) has been investigated in rabbit liver S9. Two phase I metabolites, N-2-OH-PhIP and 4'-OH-PhIP were identified based on UV and mass spectra and co-elution with reference standards. Fortification of the incubation...... with UDGPA resulted in a complete glucuronidation of PhIP and N-2-OH-PhIP, while 4'-OH-PhIP was only partly glucuronidated. Also, the PhIP metabolite 5-OH-PhIP was completely glucuronidated by rabbit liver S9, while 5-OH-PhIP was a poor substrate for CYP mediated hydroxylation. The glucuronic acid conjugates...... of PhIP and 5-OH-PhIP. The data show that hydrazine hydrate can hydrolyse N-glucuronides of metabolites of PhIP, glucuronides that are unsusceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. In addition the data indicate that humans metabolise a large fraction of ingested PhIP to genotoxic metabolites. The chemical...

  20. Enzymes oxidizing the azo dye 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol (Sudan I) and their contribution to its genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborova, Marie; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Frei, Eva; Hodek, Petr; Martinek, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    Sudan I [1-(phenylazo)-2-naphthol, C.I. Solvent Yellow 14] is an industrial dye, which was found as a contaminant in numerous foods in several European countries. Because Sudan I has been assigned by the IARC as a Category 3 carcinogen, the European Union decreed that it cannot be utilized as food colorant in any European country. Sudan I induces the malignancies in liver and urinary bladder of rats and mice. This carcinogen has also been found to be a potent mutagen, contact allergen and sensitizer, and exhibits clastogenic properties. The oxidation of Sudan I increases its toxic effects and leads to covalent adducts in DNA. Identification of enzymatic systems that contribute to Sudan I oxidative metabolism to reactive intermediates generating such covalent DNA adducts on the one hand, and to the detoxification of this carcinogen on the other, is necessary to evaluate susceptibility to this toxicant. This review summarizes the identification of such enzymes and the molecular mechanisms of oxidation reactions elucidated to date. Human and animal cytochrome P450 (CYP) and peroxidases are capable of oxidizing Sudan I. Of the CYP enzymes, CYP1A1 is most important both in Sudan I detoxification and its bio-activation. Ring-hydroxylated metabolites and a dimer of this carcinogen were found as detoxification products of Sudan I generated with CYPs and peroxidases, respectively. Oxidative bio-activation of this azo dye catalyzed by CYPs and peroxidases leads to generation of proximate genotoxic metabolites (the CYP-catalyzed formation of the benzenediazonium cation and the peroxidase-mediated generation of one-electron oxidation products), which covalently modify DNA both in vitro and in vivo. The predominant DNA adduct generated with the benzenediazonium cation was characterized to be 8-(phenylazo)guanine. The Sudan I radical species mediated by peroxidases reacts with the -NH2 group in (deoxy)guanosine, generating the 4-[(deoxy)guanosin-N(2)-yl]Sudan I product. Sudan I

  1. Food Safety and Bioavailability Evaluations of Four Vegetables Grown in the Highly Arsenic-Contaminated Soils on the Guandu Plain of Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw-Wei Su

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination in a large area of agricultural fields on the Guandu Plain of northern Taiwan was confirmed in a survey conducted in 2006, but research concerning the relationship between bioavailable As concentrations in contaminated soils and crop production in Taiwan is not available. Pot experiments were conducted to examine the growth and accumulation of As in four vegetable crops grown in As-contaminated soils and to assess As intake through consumption. The phytotoxic effects of As in soils were not shown in the pot experiments in which vegetable crops were grown in soils contaminated with different As levels in situ collected from Guandu Plain (120–460 mg/kg or artificially spiked As-contaminated soils (50–170 mg/kg. Experimental results showed that the bioavailable As extracted with 0.5M NaHCO3 from soils can be used to estimate As concentrations in vegetables. The As concentrations in the vegetables were compared with data shown in the literature and As limits calculated from drinking water standards and the provisional tolerance weekly intake (PTWI of inorganic As established by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO. Although the As levels in the vegetables were not high and the bioavailability of As in the soils was quite low, long-term consumption may result in higher As intake in the human body.

  2. [Advances in non-carcinogenic toxicity of trichloroethylene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peiwu; Li, Xuan; Liu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-09-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent and an important industrial material. Due to mass production and use, and improper waste disposal, TCE has become a common environmental contaminant, so there is a wide range of occupationally and environmentally exposed population. Occupational and environmental exposure to TCE can produce toxic effects on multiple organs and systems. This paper is a review of the immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, neurotoxicity, teratogenic effect and other non-carcinogenic toxic effects of TCE from the aspects of epidemiological study, experimental evidence on animals and toxic mechanisms.

  3. Freshwater Vulnerability to Nitrate Contamination as an Indicator of Sustainability and Resilience within the Water-Energy-Food Nexus of the California Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanus, L.; Geyer, G.; Gurdak, J. J.; Orencio, P. M.; Endo, A.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The California Coastal Basin (CCB) aquifers are representative of many coastal aquifers that are vulnerable to nonpoint-source (NPS) contamination from intense agriculture and increased urbanization combined with historical groundwater use and overdraft conditions. Overdraft has led to seawater intrusion along parts of the central California coast, which negatively affects food production because of high salinity concentrations in groundwater used for irrigation. Recent drought conditions in California have led to an increased need to further understand freshwater sustainability and resilience within the water-energy-food (WEF) nexus. Assessing the vulnerability of NPS contamination in groundwater provides valuable information for optimal resource management and policy. Vulnerability models of nitrate contamination in the CCB were developed as one of many indicators to evaluate risk in terms of susceptibility of the physical environment at local and regional scales. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed to predict the probability of NPS nitrate contamination in recently recharged groundwater and to identify significant explanatory variables as controlling factors in the CCB. Different factors were found to be significant in the sub-regions of the CCB and issues of scale are important. For example, land use is scale dependent because of the difference in land management practices between the CCB sub-regions. However, dissolved oxygen concentrations in groundwater, farm fertilizer, and soil thickness are scale invariant because they are significant both regionally and sub-regionally. Thus, the vulnerability models for the CCB show that different explanatory variables are scale invariant. This finding has important implications for accurately quantifying linkages between vulnerability and consequences within the WEF nexus, including inherent tradeoffs in water and food production in California and associated impacts on the local and regional economy

  4. [Chemical residues and contaminants in food of animal origin in Brazil: history, legislation and actions of sanitary surveillance and other regulatory systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisso, Bernardete Ferraz; Nóbrega, Armi Wanderley de; Marques, Marlice Aparecida Sípoli

    2009-01-01

    Food safety became a relevant subject due to the increasing search for a better way of life and consciousness of the consumers to stand on one's rights to acquire healthy products. The use of substances in animals destined for human consumption requires from pharmacokinetics to residue depletion studies, with the establishment of limitative values so that do not constitute a risk to health. Beyond the substances used deliberately, others coming from environment contamination or contamination of feeding stuffs consumed by these animals may reach human through the diet. The aims of this paper are to collect and discuss the main federal acts covering chemical residues and contaminants in food of animal origin in Brazil, besides those on measures to control veterinary medicinal products and additives for use in animal nutrition. The chronological presentation of the legal basis intends to facilitate the interpretation of the acts inside respective political and economics scenarios. The actions proposed from the different agents involved into the regulatory systems are discussed from the public health point of view.

  5. Aflatoxin is not a probably human carcinogen: the published evidence is sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoloff, L

    1989-12-01

    Since the early 1960s, when aflatoxin, the mold-produced contaminant of a number of important food commodities, was found to be a potent hepatocarcinogen for laboratory rats, there has been a sustained search for evidence to support the regulatory presumption that aflatoxin is a probable human carcinogen. The developing laboratory evidence of differences between species in metabolism of aflatoxin and susceptibility to its oncogenic effects indicated that humans were probably refractory to aflatoxin carcinogenesis, but the early epidemiological evidence indicated otherwise. That epidemiological evidence, however, contained flaws so that Working Groups of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) meeting in 1970, 1976, and 1982, although ignoring the biochemical evidence, did consider the available epidemiological evidence insufficient for a conclusion of human carcinogenicity. During the 1970s and 1980s, studies on the connection between chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and primary liver cell cancer (PLC), the expected lesion from aflatoxin exposure, had established a very strong etiological relationship between HBV and PLC. Since all the epidemiological studies of aflatoxin and PLC conducted prior to 1982 had been of populations with endemic HBV infection, and, in addition to other flaws, had not been controlled for this confounding factor, there was a solid basis for their rejection. Most epidemiological studies in the 1980s of aflatoxin and PLC were either in the United States, where HBV-infected groups could be excluded from the study, or, when in areas of chronic HBV infection, attempts were made to include that factor. The study of U.S. populations showed no difference in mortality rates from PLC that could be attributed to aflatoxin exposure. The studies of populations with endemic HBV infection produced no convincing evidence to support a primary role for aflatoxin in the induction of human PLC, although an accessory role to HBV

  6. Biomarkers of food-borne carcinogen heterocyclic aromatic amines%食品致癌物杂环胺的生物标记物的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭利娟

    2016-01-01

    高温烹调加工肉类食品过程中所产生的杂环胺( HAAs)是一类具有致突变,致癌作用的物质。相关流行病研究显示,长期摄入高温烹调的、富含HAAs的肉类食物,提升了前列腺癌、乳腺癌、肠癌的患病风险。但现有研究成果尚不能对HAAs的摄入与相关癌症风险的关系进行有效评估。寻找长效、稳定的生物标记物并建立高选择性、高灵敏度的检测方法是该项研究的关键所在。本综述着重讨论了可能应用于分子流行病学研究中HAAs的生物标记物,包括HAAs、HAA的代谢物、DNA加合物和蛋白质加合物。同时也对用于HAAs生物监控的分析方法进行了讨论。%Heterocyclic aromatic amines ( HAAs ) are carcinogens and mutagens that are formed during the high-temperature cooking of meats .A number of studies have reported a positive association between well-done meat consumption and cancer risks of the human prostate , mammary and colon .However , the association of HAAs formed in cooked meat and cancer risks has been difficult to establish .There is a critical need to establish stable , long-term biomarkers of HAAs , and develop corresponding methods with high selectivity and sensitivity .In this re-view, we highlight the biomarkers of HAAs that may be implemented in molecular epidemiology studies , including HAAs, their metabolites , DNA adducts and protein adducts .The advanced analytical approaches that have been successfully developed to biomonitor biological effects of these chemicals are also discussed .

  7. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT TO FOOD CONTAMINANTS ON EDIBLE FISH, CLAMS AND CRUSTACEANS IN A COASTAL ENVIRONMENT FACING A MINING AND INDUSTRIAL AREA IN SARDINIA (SULCIS-IGLESIENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. Piras

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The risk assessment following exposure of the local population to the consumption of fishery products caught in the Boi Cerbus lagoon, located in country of Portoscuso (Sardinia, followed the phase of sampling, analysis and data-collection “site-specific”. Overall, the fishery products samples are part of the following zoological groups: fish (grey mullets, soles and gobies, bivalve (cockles and crustaceans (crabs. It was also agreed that further investigation were implemented in a targeted way, directing attention to critical issues that emerged from the first phase, represented by heavy metals such as Cadmium, Lead, Mercury and the (metalloid Arsenic that, for the purposes of food safety, are still contaminants with high concern for the potential impact on human health. For the risk analysis through food intake, three different procedures for exposure assessment were considered: the regulation by law, the assessment according to US-EPA approach and the assessment according to EU harmonized method. For a wider opportunity for exposure assessment through ingestion of food from contaminated areas, also for their risk management, a single approach to the risk analysis is not be considered sufficient.

  8. Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, M R; Diehl, V

    2004-10-01

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible.

  9. EFSA CONTAM Panel (EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain), 2015. Scientific Opinion on nitrofurans and their metabolites in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    Nitrofurans are antimicrobial agents not authorised for use in food-producing animals in the European Union. Nitrofurans are rapidly metabolised, occurring in animal tissues as protein-bound metabolites. The European Commission requested EFSA to provide a scientific opinion on the risks to human...... health related to the presence of nitrofurans in food and whether a reference point for action (RPA) of 1.0 µg/kg for the marker metabolites is adequate to protect public health. Data on occurrence of nitrofuran marker metabolites in food were extracted from the national residue monitoring plan results...... and from the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF). The CONTAM Panel concluded that these data were too limited to carry out a reliable human dietary exposure assessment. Instead, human dietary exposure was calculated for a scenario in which a single nitrofuran marker metabolite is present at 1.0 µg...

  10. 食品中化学污染物风险评估研究进展%Review on the risk assessment for chemical contaminants in food

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周妍; 闻胜; 刘潇; 毛燕妮; 罗苹; 李永刚; 陈明; 史廷明

    2014-01-01

    化学污染物是影响全球食品安全和危害人体健康的主要因素之一。对食品中化学污染物进行风险评估是保障食品安全、促进食品贸易和健全食品安全体系的重要手段。本文简要介绍了化学污染物风险评估的内容和基本方法,对国外化学污染物风险评估开展情况进行了概述,重点对国内开展的食品中化学污染物风险评估的研究进展进行综述,包括重金属、有机污染物、农药残留、黄曲霉毒素等,并对国内开展食品中化学污染物风险评估的方法进行了分析比较。重金属、农药残留和黄曲霉毒素方面的评估结果均表明:儿童的膳食暴露量偏高,需引起重视。此外提出目前我国食品中化学污染物风险评估中存在的主要问题和建议,为进一步开展化学污染物风险评估提供借鉴。%ABSTRACT:Chemical contaminants are of immediate and serious concern to food safety and human health. Risk assessment for chemical contaminants in food not only protects food safety and human health, but also enhances consumer protection and facilitates international trade. Conceptions, classification and methods ap-plication on chemical risk assessment were introduced in this paper. The risk assessment of chemical contami-nants in foreign countries was summarized, and progress in research of chemical contaminants risk assessment in food at home was reviewed in detail, including heavy metals, organic pollutants, pesticides, and aflatoxin etc. The methods of these risk assessment were analyzed and compared. The assessment results of heavy metal, pesticide residues and aflatoxin showed that:children's dietary exposure is high. Main problems in chemical risk assessment in China at present were pointed out and advices were given on further complete chemical risk assessment.

  11. Wholesomeness of irradiated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raica, Nicholas; McDowell, Marion E.; Darby, William J.

    1963-01-15

    The wholesomeness of irradiated foods was evaluated in mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys over a 2-year period, or 4 generations. Data are presented on the effects of a diet containing radiation-processed foods on growth, reproduction, hematology, histopathology, carcinogenicity, and life span. (86 references) (C.H.)

  12. Mineral fibre persistence and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J C

    1998-10-01

    Epidemiological research during the past 40 years has demonstrated with increasing clarity that amphibole asbestos fibres--crocidolite, amosite and tremolite--are more carcinogenic than chrysotile. A smaller number of well-controlled studies using lung burden analyses, while adding to the specificity of this conclusion, have shown that amphibole fibres also differ from chrysotile in being far more durable and biopersistent in lung tissue. Analyses of mesothelioma and lung cancer in a large cohort of Canadian chrysotile miners and millers have recently shown that the low-level presence of fibrous tremolite in these mines, rather than the chrysotile, may well be responsible. The high risk of lung cancer, but not of mesothelioma, in the chrysotile textile industry remains anomalous and cannot be explained in this way. These various findings are directly relevant to the choice of the experimental methods which should be used for screening man-made fibres for industrial use. Although it is clear that biopersistence is a major determinant of cancer risk in animals, and perhaps also in man, other factors affecting the biological activity of mineral fibres may also be important.

  13. Effects of dietary exposure to herbicide and of the nutritive quality of contaminated food on the reproductive output of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa da Silva, M; Abrantes, N; Rocha-Santos, T A P; Duarte, A C; Freitas, A C; Gomes, A M; Carvalho, A P; Marques, J C; Gonçalves, F; Pereira, R

    2016-10-01

    Risk assessment of pesticides has been based on direct toxic effects on aquatic organisms. Indirect effects data are taken into account but with limitations, as it is frequently difficult to predict their real impacts in the ecosystems. In this context the main aim of this work was to assess how the exposure to the herbicide pendimethalin (Prowl(®)), under environmentally relevant concentrations, may compromise the nutritional composition of food for a relevant group of primary consumers of freshwater food webs-the daphnids, thus affecting their reproduction performance and subsequently the long-term sustainability of active populations of this grazer. Therefore, Daphnia magna individuals were chronically exposed in a clean medium to a control diet (NCF - i.e., non-contaminated green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata) and to a contaminated diet (CF - i.e., the same monoalgal culture grown in a medium enriched with pendimethalin in a concentration equivalent to the EC20 for growth inhibition of algae), during which reproductive endpoints were assessed. The algae were analysed for protein, carbohydrate and fatty acid content. The chemical composition of R. subcapitata in the CF revealed a slight decrease on total fatty acid levels, with a particular decrease of essential ω9 monounsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, the protein content was high in the CF. D. magna exposed to CF experienced a 16% reduction in reproduction, measured as the total number of offspring produced per female. Additionally, an internal pendimethalin body burden of 4.226μgg(-1) was accumulated by daphnids fed with CF. Hence, although it is difficult to discriminate the contribution of the pesticide (as a toxic agent transferred through the food web) from that of the food with a poor quality-compromised by the same pesticide, there are no doubts that, under environmentally relevant concentrations of pesticides, both pathways may compromise the populations of freshwater grazers in the long term

  14. [Surveys on the contamination of marine fish with non-O1 Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus and food poisoning cases by these organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, H; Hayashi, M; Gyobu, Y

    1991-02-01

    The present paper describes the relationship between the contamination with non-O1 Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus of marine fish, with special reference to the seasonal variation and the concentration of contamination, and the actual cases of domestic food poisoning by these organisms. A 10 year survey revealed that non-O1 Vibrio cholerae (non-O1 V. cholerae) strains were frequently isolated from fish during the summer season with some variations from one year to another, and isolates from fish showed similar biological properties to those of isolates from diarrhea cases of over-sea travellers. Experimentally enteropathogenic strains were included among these isolates. Vibrio mimicus (V. mimicus) strains were also isolated from fish, the frequency being not so high as in the case of non-O1 V. cholerae Strains of serovar O-41 which was most predominant among strains from diarrhea cases were also detected among the isolates from fish. The viable cell counts, however, were very small with regard to both non-O1 V. cholerae and V. mimicus From these observations, factors causing food poisoning by non-O1 V. cholerae or V. mimicus seemed to be essentially similar to those by Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus); that is, the food poisoning by non-O1 V. cholerae or V. mimicus is apt to occur in the summer season and is caused by the consumption of raw fish, although the frequency might be significantly low in comparison to that of V. parahaemolyticus. The actual cases of the domestic food poisoning by non-O1 V. cholerae or V. mimicus were retrospectively surveyed by the literature.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Outbreaks where food workers have been implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. Part 9. Washing and drying of hands to reduce microbial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ewen C D; Michaels, Barry S; Smith, Debra; Greig, Judy D; Bartleson, Charles A

    2010-10-01

    During various daily activities at home and work, hands quickly become contaminated. Some activities increase the risk of finger contamination by pathogens more than others, such as the use of toilet paper to clean up following a diarrheal episode, changing the diaper of a sick infant, blowing a nose, or touching raw food materials. Many foodborne outbreak investigation reports have identified the hands of food workers as the source of pathogens in the implicated food. The most convenient and efficient way of removing pathogens from hands is through hand washing. Important components of hand washing are potable water for rinsing and soaps to loosen microbes from the skin. Hand washing should occur after any activity that soils hands and certainly before preparing, serving, or eating food. Antimicrobial soaps are marginally more effective than plain soaps, but constant use results in a buildup of the antimicrobial compound on the skin. The time taken to wash hands and the degree of friction generated during lathering are more important than water temperature for removing soil and microorganisms. However, excessive washing and scrubbing can cause skin damage and infections. Drying hands with a towel removes pathogens first by friction during rubbing with the drying material and then by wicking away the moisture into that material. Paper rather than cloth towels should be encouraged, although single-use cloth towels are present in the washrooms of higher class hotels and restaurants. Warm air dryers remove moisture and any surface microorganisms loosened by washing from hands by evaporation while the hands are rubbed together vigorously; however, these dryers take too long for efficient use. The newer dryers with high-speed air blades can achieve dryness in 10 to 15 s without hand rubbing.

  16. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  17. Meat Processing Plant Microbiome and Contamination Patterns of Cold-Tolerant Bacteria Causing Food Safety and Spoilage Risks in the Manufacture of Vacuum-Packaged Cooked Sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Jenni; Rahkila, Riitta; Ali, Javeria; Rousu, Juho; Björkroth, K Johanna

    2015-10-01

    Refrigerated food processing facilities are specific man-made niches likely to harbor cold-tolerant bacteria. To characterize this type of microbiota and study the link between processing plant and product microbiomes, we followed and compared microbiota associated with the raw materials and processing stages of a vacuum-packaged, cooked sausage product affected by a prolonged quality fluctuation with occasional spoilage manifestations during shelf life. A total of 195 samples were subjected to culturing and amplicon sequence analyses. Abundant mesophilic psychrotrophs were detected within the microbiomes throughout the different compartments of the production plant environment. However, each of the main genera of food safety and quality interest, e.g., Leuconostoc, Brochothrix, and Yersinia, had their own characteristic patterns of contamination. Bacteria from the genus Leuconostoc, commonly causing spoilage of cold-stored, modified-atmosphere-packaged foods, were detected in high abundance (up to >98%) in the sausages studied. The same operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were, however, detected in lower abundances in raw meat and emulsion (average relative abundance of 2%±5%), as well as on the processing plant surfaces (processing plant surfaces but to a lesser extent (food safety concerns related to their resilient existence on surfaces.

  18. Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Ready-to-Eat Foods: Detection of S. aureus Contamination and a High Prevalence of Virulence Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Moi Puah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of food poisoning. Its pathogenicity results from the possession of virulence genes that produce different toxins which result in self-limiting to severe illness often requiring hospitalization. In this study of 200 sushi and sashimi samples, S. aureus contamination was confirmed in 26% of the food samples. The S. aureus isolates were further characterized for virulence genes and antibiotic susceptibility. A high incidence of virulence genes was identified in 96.2% of the isolates and 20 different virulence gene profiles were confirmed. DNA amplification showed that 30.8% (16/52 of the S. aureus carried at least one SE gene which causes staphylococcal food poisoning. The most common enterotoxin gene was seg (11.5% and the egc cluster was detected in 5.8% of the isolates. A combination of hla and hld was the most prevalent coexistence virulence genes and accounted for 59.6% of all isolates. Antibiotic resistance studies showed tetracycline resistance to be the most common at 28.8% while multi-drug resistance was found to be low at 3.8%. In conclusion, the high rate of S. aureus in the sampled sushi and sashimi indicates the need for food safety guidelines.

  19. Application of the margin of exposure (MoE) approach to substances in food that are genotoxic and carcinogenic: example: (CAS No. 96-23-1) 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol (DCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gary; Leblanc, Jean-Charles; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2010-01-01

    1,3-Dichloro-2-propanol (DCP) is formed in foods under a variety of conditions. It was positive in a variety of in vitro genotoxicity tests, but was negative in two in vivo studies. DCP produced neoplasms at several sites in rats. Kidney tumours in male rats were selected as the critical tumour type. Dose-response modelling of the data for DCP gave a BMDL(10) for combined kidney carcinomas and adenomas in male rats of 9.62 mg/kg-body weight (bw)/day. The exposure of humans was estimated at an average of 0.00009 mg/kg-bw/day and a high exposure of 0.000136 mg/kg-bw/day. The MOEs for these exposures were 100,000 and 70,000, respectively.

  20. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salviano dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1–10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food. PMID:26904662

  1. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Paula Salviano dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1–10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food.

  2. Wholesomeness of irradiated foods, especially potatoes, in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, Tsuyoshi [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    Food irradiation was established under the auspices of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission. In 1967, studies on the efficacy of food irradiation, irradiation techniques and wholesomeness of irradiated foods were begun on potatoes and 6 other items (onions, rice, wheat, vienna sausage, fish-paste products, and mandarin orange) by a project team consisting of scientists from various broad academic fields under the sponsorship of the Science and Technology Agency. Wholesomeness of irradiated foods generally includes the following three points. The first one is the toxicity consisting of chronic toxicity test which predicts the effect when food is continuously ingested for long time, e.g., carcinogenicity test, teratogenicity test which predicts the effect of reproduction and generation for multigeneration, and mutagenicity test which detects the cytogenic possibility. The second is the nutritional adequacy as evaluated by effect on growth, physiological function and nutritional contents. The last one is microbiological safety concerning to microorganic resistance and tolerance by irradiation. In 1972, on the basis of the reports on toxicological aspects that we mainly carried out, nutritional and other aspects, 0.15 kGy level for sprout inhibition of potato which was the first practical use for food irradiation in Japan was permitted by Food Sanitation Act. The safety of food contaminants and food additives, its object for use the same as food irradiation, is confirmed by toxicity test employed experimental animals. Limitation of food additives and residual limitation of food contaminants are decided by the results in toxicity test. And these insure humansafety. It is important and necessary to choose the irradiation or chemicals for food in view of human health. (author)

  3. Contaminated commercial dehydrated food as source of multiple Salmonella serotypes outbreak in a municipal kennel in Tuscany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Selmi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a large outbreak of canine salmonellosis in a municipal kennel in Tuscany. During the outbreak, 174 samples of ‘diarrhetic’ and ‘normal’ faeces and two batches of commercial dehydrated dog food were cultured for pathogenic bacteria. The results of 25, out of a total of 41 dogs (60.9% revealed at least one faecal sample as being positive for Salmonella; incidence per sampling ranged from 12.5% to 34%. Nine of 10 samples of dehydrated food were positive. Ten totally different serotypes were isolated from dry food and faeces: the results of the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis referred to similarity between the Salmonella Montevideo, Muenster and Worthington isolates recovered from both the food and canine faecal samples.

  4. INITIAL AND PRESENT SITUATION OF FOOD CONTAMINATION IN JAPAN AFTER THE ACCIDENT AT THE FUKUSHIMA DAI-ICHI NUCLEAR POWER PLANT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Tatsuo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in March 2011 affected not only the terrestrial environment of Fukushima prefecture and the surrounding area, but also the marine area facing the NPP. Our present study is focused on the concentrations of radionuclides in agricultural products of Fukushima and sea-foods collected off Fukushima after the accident. The regulation value for radiocesium in vegetables, meat and fish was revised from 500 Bq/kg-wet to 100 Bq/kg-wet on 1 April 2012. The overall activity of radiocesium in these products was found to be within the limit of tolerance in respect to Japanese and also international regulations, but there is still radiocesium found at activities greater than this level in edible wild plants, wild mushrooms and game such as boar meat. Although the activities of radionuclides exceeding the regulatory limits were not detected in marine products collected off Fukushima after April 2015, the commercial marine fishery has not received approval in the affected areas except for certain species. We learned from the Fukushima accident that long-term kinetic studies of radionuclides in terrestrial and marine environments is extremely important for prevention of internal contamination, since contamination with radionuclides occurs via the food chain in the environment.

  5. Probabilistic intake assessment and body burden estimation of dioxin-like substances in background conditions and during a short food contamination episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijens, B; De Henauw, S; Dewettinck, K; Talloen, W; Goeyens, L; De Backer, G; Willems, J L

    2002-07-01

    The objective was to perform a dioxin body burden estimate based on a probabilistic intake assessment of PCDDs, PCDFs and dioxin-like PCBs because of the so-called 1999 'Belgian dioxin incident'. Monte Carlo simulation techniques were used to combine detailed 7-day food intake data on the individual level from a sample of 14-18-year-old adolescents with 'background' and 'incident-related' food contamination data. In background conditions, 3% of the adolescents had an intake dioxin-like contaminants, while fish constituted the main source at the higher percentiles of intake. During the dioxin incident, the estimated median dioxin intake showed a moderate increase. At the 99th percentile, the highest intake level, and the 95% upper bound uncertainty level, peak body burden-23.73 ng TEQ kg(-1) bw-remained below body burdens that in the experimental animal or in man are accompanied by a population-based observable increase in the incidence of adverse effects. The 1999 Belgian dioxin incident most likely did not affect public health in Belgium in a measurable way, although exceptions remain possible on the individual level.

  6. Bioaccumulation Experiments in Mussels Contaminated with the Food-Borne Pathogen Arcobacter butzleri: Preliminary Data for Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Ottaviani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate, at a laboratory scale, the ability of this microorganism to grow in seawater and bioaccumulate in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis maintained in constantly aerated tanks, containing twenty litres of artificial seawater. Three concentrations of A. butzleri LMG 10828T were tested (about 5×106 CFU/mL, 5×104 CFU/mL, and 5×102 CFU/mL. Following contamination, enumeration of A. butzleri was performed from water and mussels each day, for up to 96 h. Three contamination experiments with artificial seawater in absence of mussels were also performed in the same manner. In the experiments with mussels, A. butzleri declined in water of approximately 1 log every 24 h from the contamination. In artificial seawater without mussels the concentration of A. butzleri remained on the same logarithmic level in the first 48 h and then decreased of about 1 log every 24 hours. In mussels, the concentration was approximately 2 log lower than the exposition level after 24 h from the contamination, and then it decreased exponentially of 1 log every 24 h. Our findings suggest that in the experimental conditions tested A. butzleri is neither able to effectively grow in seawater nor bioaccumulate in mussels, at least in the free and cultivable form.

  7. Contamination and Critical Control Points (CCPs along the processing line of sale of frozen poultry foods in retail outlets of a typical market in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji, V. O

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Over the years, there have been considerable increases in the consumption of frozen poultry foods across Nigeria. Little attention has been paid to the microbial quality of these foods and hence constitutes a threat to public health. The contamination levels (Enterobacteriaceae and Listeria counts and the presence of pathogenic E. coli, Salmonella and Listeria along the processing line of sale of frozen poultry foods were assayed in retail outlets. Methodology and results: Bacteriological counts and bacterial isolation were carried out using standard plate methods, while the direct slide agglutination technique was utilized for serology. Bacteriological assay revealed extremely high counts (Listeria count (LC: 7.784±1.109 - 9.586±0.016 log cfu/cm2; Enterobacteriaceae count (EC: 7.151±0.213 - 9.318±0.161 log cfu/cm2, higher than stipulated by International Food Standard Agencies. The highest count for EC (9.318±0.161 log cfu/cm2 and LC 9.586±0.016 log cfu/cm2 was from the weighing scale and processing table. Averagely, LC (8.598±0.733 log cfu/cm2 was higher than EC (8.145±0.936 log cfu/cm2. Weighing scale had counts significantly different (p < 0.05 from all others for EC. But there were no significant differences in LC. Weighing scale and meat tables were critical control points (CCPs in the processing line for sale of frozen poultry meats in the retail outlets. E. coli spp., E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., Salmonella Enteritidis, Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were isolated along the processing line. Conclusion, significance and impact of the study: Results of this study indicated that poultry meat are easily contaminated along the processing line of sale and may act as a potential risk to public health if counteractive measures are not applied to reduce microbial contamination during storage, sale and distribution to consumers.

  8. Identification and characterization of toxicity of contaminants in pet food leading to an outbreak of renal toxicity in cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Roy L M; Motlagh, Safa; Quijano, Mike; Cambron, R Thomas; Baker, Timothy R; Pullen, Aletha M; Regg, Brian T; Bigalow-Kern, Adrienne S; Vennard, Thomas; Fix, Andrew; Reimschuessel, Renate; Overmann, Gary; Shan, Yuching; Daston, George P

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes research relating to the major recall of pet food that occurred in Spring 2007 in North America. Clinical observations of acute renal failure in cats and dogs were associated with consumption of wet pet food produced by a contract manufacturer producing for a large number of companies. The affected lots of food had been formulated with wheat gluten originating from China. Pet food and gluten were analyzed for contaminants using several configurations of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS), which revealed a number of simple triazine compounds, principally melamine and cyanuric acid, with lower concentrations of ammeline, ammelide, ureidomelamine, and N-methylmelamine. Melamine and cyanuric acid, have been tested and do not produce acute renal toxicity. Some of the triazines have poor solubility, as does the compound melamine cyanurate. Pathological evaluation of cats and dogs that had died from the acute renal failure indicated the presence of crystals in kidney tubules. We hypothesized that these crystals were composed of the poorly soluble triazines, a melamine-cyanuric acid complex, or a combination. Sprague dawley rats were given up to 100 mg/kg ammeline or ammelide alone, a mixture of melamine and cyanuric acid (400/400 mg/kg/day), or a mixture of all four compounds (400 mg/kg/day melamine, 40 mg/kg/day of the others). Neither ammeline nor ammelide alone produced any renal effects, but the mixtures produced significant renal damage and crystals in nephrons. HPLC-MS/MS confirmed the presence of melamine and cyanuric acid in the kidney. Infrared microspectroscopy on individual crystals from rat or cat (donated material from a veterinary clinic) kidneys confirmed that they were melamine-cyanuric acid cocrystals. Crystals from contaminated gluten produced comparable spectra. These results establish the causal link between the contaminated gluten and the adverse effects and provide a mechanistic explanation

  9. Allergen sanitation in the food industry: a systematic industrial scale approach to reduce hazelnut cross-contamination of cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Martin; Baltruweit, Iris; Gruyters, Helwig; Ibach, Anja; Mücke, Ingo; Matissek, Reinhard; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Recently, we investigated the impact of shared equipment on cross-contamination of cookies at a pilot plant scale. Based on those findings, this study investigated the extent and subsequent sanitation of hazelnut cross-contamination (HNCC) of cookies at the industrial scale. Similarly, a product change from cookies with hazelnut ingredient to cookies without hazelnut was performed on standard equipment. HNCC in the hazelnut-free follow-up product was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for each production device and the applied cleaning procedure. All experiments were repeated in duplicate. The highest HNCC was found in concordance with previous studies after mere mechanical scraping: more than 1,000 mg of hazelnut protein per kg was quantified in the follow-up product after processing by a cookie machine. Additional cleaning with hot water decreased the HNCC irrespective of the processing device to levels at or below 1 mg of hazelnut protein per kg. Furthermore, raw materials for cookie production were monitored over a period of 24 months for unwanted preloads of hazelnut and peanut: hazelnut was quantified in 16% of the investigated raw materials as being between 0.26 and 90 mg/kg. Further critical control points at the industrial scale, where cross-contamination might occur, were identified but did not display noteworthy sources of cross-contamination. In conclusion, the quantitative monitoring of the cleaning efficiency at the industrial scale confirmed the procedure of manual scraping plus wet cleaning as a qualified sanitation procedure to effectively reduce the hazelnut protein cross-contamination down to a level at which severe hazelnut-related allergic reactions are unlikely to occur.

  10. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and are utilized commercially. In this review, we used molecular pathway analysis to understand the toxicity and carcinogenic mechanisms of these metals. Our analyzed data showed that above-mentioned metallic substances induce oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell death processes, resulting in increase the risk of cancer and cancer-related diseases. Thus, we might think phytochelatin molecules and antioxidative phytochemical substances are helpful for prevention of heavy metal-induced cancer. PMID:26734585

  11. High-performance ion mobility spectrometry with direct electrospray ionization (ESI-HPIMS) for the detection of additives and contaminants in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midey, Anthony J., E-mail: anthony.midey@excellims.com; Camacho, Amanda; Sampathkumaran, Jayanthi; Krueger, Clinton A.; Osgood, Mark A.; Wu, Ching

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new ESI source was built for direct ionization from syringe. •Phthalates, food dyes, and sweeteners detected with high-performance IMS. •Phthalates directly detected in cola, soy bubble tea matrices with simple treatment. -- Abstract: High-performance ion mobility spectrometry (HPIMS) with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source detected a series of food contaminants and additive compounds identified as critical to monitoring the safety of food samples. These compounds included twelve phthalate plasticizers, legal and illegal food and cosmetic dyes, and artificial sweeteners that were all denoted as detection priorities. HPIMS separated and detected the range of compounds with a resolving power better than 60 in both positive and negative ion modes, comparable to the commonly used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but with most acquisition times under a minute. The reduced mobilities, K{sub 0}, have been determined, as have the linear response ranges for ESI-HPIMS, which are 1.5–2 orders of magnitude for concentrations down to sub-ng μL{sup −1} levels. At least one unique mobility peak was seen for two subsets of the phthalates grouped by the country where they were banned. Furthermore, ESI-HPIMS successfully detected low nanogram levels of a phthalate at up to 30 times lower concentration than international detection levels in both a cola matrix and a soy-based bubble tea beverage using only a simplified sample treatment. A newly developed direct ESI source (Directspray) was combined with HPIMS to detect food-grade dyes and industrial dye adulterants, as well as the sweeteners sodium saccharin and sodium cyclamate, with the same good performance as with the phthalates. However, the Directspray method eliminated sources of carryover and decreased the time between sample runs. Limits-of-detection (LOD) for the analyte standards were estimated to be sub-ng μL{sup −1} levels without extensive

  12. Arsenic in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants Metals Arsenic Share ... of the Method used to Measure Arsenic in Foods Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometric Determination of Arsenic, ...

  13. Single and joint effects of Zn and Cd on Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda) exposed to artificially contaminated food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidar, Primoz; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Strus, Jasna

    2009-11-01

    This study aimed at determining effects of Zn, Cd and their equitoxic mixtures on metal assimilation and food consumption of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber, in relation to metal availability in the food. Cd was four times less water-extractable than Zn. Cd or Zn extractability was affected neither by metal concentration nor by the presence of the other metal. In single metal exposures, assimilation efficiency (AE) was up to five times higher for Cd than for Zn. In a mixture, AE of Cd significantly increased at low mixture concentrations and decreased at high mixture concentrations. AE of Zn significantly increased at intermediate mixture concentrations. Effects of the Zn and Cd mixture on food consumption were additive (28-day EC(50,total)=1.10TU; EC(50,water-extractable)=1.18TU) when based on total and water-extractable concentrations but antagonistic when related to internal metal concentrations in the isopods (EC(50,internal)=1.40TU).

  14. 即食食品中金黄色葡萄球菌污染情况调查%Investigation on Staphylococcus aureus contamination in instant food

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗军; 向晓霞

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解万州区即食食品中金黄色葡萄球菌的污染状况,为食物中毒预警和食品安全的危险性评估提供科学依据.方法:采用随机抽样方法采集宾馆、餐馆、酒吧等场所出售的自制熟肉制品、豆制品、凉菜、饮料等四大类即食食品,按照国标GB4789.10~2010[1]的方法进行检测,再根据检测结果进行评价分析.结果:所采样品中金黄色葡萄球菌总检测率为8.0%,其中凉菜类为11.8%,豆制品为7.3%,卤菜类为5.0%,饮料为5.4%.结论:万州区即食食品在一定程度上存在着金黄色葡萄球菌污染,居民饮食健康受到潜在的中毒威胁.%Objective:To know the situation of staphylococcus aureus contamination in instant foods in WanZhou district and provide scientific basis for the early warning of food poisoning and the hazard assessment of food safety.Methods:Four kinds of instant food samples,including self-cooked well-done meats,bean products,cold dishes and drinks,were randomly collected from hotels,restaurants,bars and other places for pollution detection based on the methods in GB4789.10-2010,then the results were analyzed and assessed.Results:The total positive rate of staphylococcus aureus in the samples was 8.0%,while 11.8% for cold dishes,7.3% for bean products,5.0% for bittern dishes and 5.4% for the drinks.Conclusion:Staphylococcus aureus contamination was found in instant foods in Wanzhou district,indicating potential risk for poisoning to people's health.

  15. Emerging nanotechnology for detection of mycotoxins in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra; Jogee, Priti S; Ingle, Avinash P

    2015-01-01

    The term mycotoxin was coined for toxic metabolites secreted by some fungi in food, food products and feed. The most prominent mycotoxins include aflatoxins (AFs), deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, ochratoxin, fumonisin and patulin. Among these some are proved to be strong carcinogenic agents such as AFs B1 while others are under suspicion to have carcinogenic effects. Ingestion of such mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed pose to a threat, mycotoxicoses. Various conventional techniques are available for the detection of mycotoxins, but unfortunately as a consequence of their constraint, the development of new and rapid techniques is the need of the hour. The use of nanotechnology for the development of nanobiosensors would be the alternative sensitive methods for the rapid detection of mycotoxins. Implementation of nanomaterials in the fabrication of nanobiosensors and their use for the detection of the mycotoxins in food and feed is the centre of interest of this review. We have inventoried nanomaterials applied for weaving nanobiosensors, which includes carbon nanotubes, nanowires, nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanorods and nanofibers. In addition, we have extensively reviewed available nanobiosensors specific for different mycotoxins, their advantages and challenges.

  16. Arsenic Speciation in Plankton Organisms from Contaminated Lakes: Transformations at the Base of the Freshwater Food Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caumette, Guilhem; Koch, Iris; Estrada, Esteban; Reimer, Ken J. (Royal)

    2012-02-06

    The two complementary techniques high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis were used to assess arsenic speciation in freshwater phytoplankton and zooplankton collected from arsenic-contaminated lakes in Yellowknife (Northwest Territories, Canada). Arsenic concentrations in lake water ranged from 7 {micro}g L{sup -1} in a noncontaminated lake to 250 {micro}g L{sup -1} in mine-contaminated lakes, which resulted in arsenic concentrations ranging from 7 to 340 mg kg{sup -1} d.w. in zooplankton organisms (Cyclops sp.) and from 154 to 894 mg kg{sup -1} d.w. in phytoplankton. The main arsenic compounds identified by HPLC-ICP-MS in all plankton were inorganic arsenic (from 38% to 98% of total arsenic). No other arsenic compounds were found in phytoplankton, but zooplankton organisms showed the presence of organoarsenic compounds, the most common being the sulfate arsenosugar, up to 47% of total arsenic, with traces of phosphate sugar, glycerol sugar, methylarsonate (MMA), and dimethylarsinate (DMA). In the uncontaminated Grace Lake, zooplankton also contained arsenobetaine (AB). XANES characterization of arsenic in the whole plankton samples showed AsV-O as the only arsenic compound in phytoplankton, and AsIII-S and AsV-O compounds as the two major inorganic arsenic species in zooplankton. The proportion of organoarsenicals and inorganic arsenic in zooplankton depends upon the arsenic concentration in lakes and shows the impact of arsenic contamination: zooplankton from uncontaminated lake has higher proportions of organoarsenic compounds and contains arsenobetaine, while zooplankton from contaminated area contains mostly inorganic arsenic.

  17. Investigation on Furan Levels in Pressure-Cooked Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana P. Arisseto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Furan is a food processing contaminant classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans. As the occurrence of furan has been reported in a variety of foods processed in sealed containers, the objective of this work was to investigate if the contaminant can be found in home-cooked foods prepared in a pressure cooker. For that, several foods including beans, soy beans, whole rice, beef, pork, potato, and cassava were pressure-cooked and analyzed for the furan content by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry preceded by a headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC/MS. Furan was not found above the limit of quantification in the pressure-cooked samples. No furan has either been found in reheated samples after 24 hours under cold storage. Although levels up to 173 μg/kg were already reported for commercial canned/jarred foods, it seems that the cooking in a pressure cooker may not represent a concern in relation to the occurrence of furan in foods.

  18. Carcinogenic effects of benzene: Cesare Maltoni's contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2002-12-01

    Cesare Maltoni's contributions to understanding, identifying, and characterizing widely used commercial chemicals in experimental animals are among the most important methods developed in the history of toxicology and serve to protect working men and women, the general population, and our environment from hazardous substances. Maltoni developed experimental methods that have reached the "platinum standard" for protection of public health. Benzene was among the 400 or more chemicals that Maltoni and his associates tested for carcinogenicity. In 1976, Maltoni reported that benzene is a potent experimental carcinogen. Maltoni's experiments clearly demonstrated that benzene is carcinogenic in Sprague-Dawley rats, Wistar rats, Swiss mice, and RF/J mice when administered by inhalation or ingestion. Benzene caused carcinomas of the Zymbal gland, oral cavity, nasal cavities; cancers of the skin, forestomach, mammary glands, and lungs; angiosarcomas and hepatomas of the liver; and hemolymphoreticular cancers. Thus, benzene was shown to be a multipotential carcinogen that produced cancers in several species of animals by various routes of administration. On November 2, 1977, Chemical Week reported that Maltoni provided a "bombshell" when he demonstrated the "first direct link" between benzene and cancer. In this paper, I shall summarize early experiments and human studies and reports; Maltoni's experimental contribution to understanding the carcinogenicity of benzene in humans and animals; earlier knowledge concerning benzene toxicity; and benzene standards and permissible exposure levels.

  19. Cell-mediated mutagenesis by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1978-01-01

    The cell-mediated mutation system, with the proper choice of metabolizing cells, can be used to detect the mutagenic activities of different classes of chemical carcinogens. When fibroblastic cells were used as the metabolizing cells, a correlation between the in vivo carcinogenic activity and the in vitro mutagenic activity of 11 aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons was observed. When primary liver cells were used as the metabolizing cells, three known liver carcinogens were demonstrated to be mutagenic by the cell-mediated assay, while two non-carcinogenic analogues were not mutagenic. These results from the cell-mediated system suggest that the reactive intermediates of the carcinogens are stable enough to be transferred from the metabolizing cells to the V79 cells. The cell-mediated mutagenesis system is a simple in vitro assay which may simulate the in vivo situation. It was concluded that this approach could be extended to the co-cultivation of cells from other organs or tissues with mutable mammalian cells.

  20. Food Protection Has Many Facets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bailus, Jr.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Developments in food protection are described for microbiological contaminants, delicatessen foods, seafoods, mycotoxins, food additives, and regulatory surveillance. Proposed and advocated is a cooperative, basic data, monitoring program focusing on microbiological, chemical, nutritional, toxicological, and related food quality indices. (BL)

  1. The use of a PCR-generated invA probe for the detection of Salmonella spp. in artificially and naturally contaminated foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülte, M; Jakob, P

    1995-08-01

    Part of the invasion A gene (invA) of slamonellae (Rahn et al., 1992) was amplified and labelled simultaneously with digoxigenin by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This was used as gene probe for a colony hybridization assay which included nitrocellulose filter incubation on modified Rambach agar. 312 Salmonella and 268 non-Salmonella strains were hybridized with the invA probe. No false-negative or false-positive results were obtained. In 11 beef samples, which had been contaminated artificially with Salmonella, the test strain was recovered quantitatively with the invA probe. Salmonellae could be detected in 29 samples of 104 further foods of animal origin by means of the gene probe assay in contrast to 27 samples which were positive by the standard method. The invA probe assay allows for the quantitative estimation of Salmonella in fresh meat samples within 48 h. However, with frozen samples a pre-enrichment step is necessary.

  2. In Silico Methods for Carcinogenicity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Azadi; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Screening compounds for potential carcinogenicity is of major importance for prevention of environmentally induced cancers. A large sequence of alternative predictive models, ranging from short-term biological assays (e.g. mutagenicity tests) to theoretical models, have been attempted in this field. Theoretical approaches such as (Q)SAR are highly desirable for identifying carcinogens, since they actively promote the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal tests. This chapter reports and describes some of the most noted (Q)SAR models based on the human expert knowledge and statistically approach, aiming at predicting the carcinogenicity of chemicals. Additionally, the performance of the selected models has been evaluated and the results are interpreted in details by applying these prediction models to some pharmaceutical molecules.

  3. [Leather azo dyes: mutagenic and carcinogenic risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clonfero, E; Venier, P; Granella, M; Levis, A G

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity data on azo dyes used in the leather industry. Two water soluble benzidine-based dyes were classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). No other dyes have been evaluated by the IARC. Of the 48 azo dyes assayed in the Salmonella/microsome test, 20 gave positive results. Attention is drawn to the important role of the in vivo metabolism of azo compounds, which includes a preliminary reduction of the azo bonds and subsequent release of the aromatic amines of the dye. A useful assay (Prival test) for evaluating the mutagenic properties of azo dyes involves a reductive step that permits the release of any genotoxic agents present in the compounds. A list of leather azo dyes is furnished that are considered as potentially harmful due to the presence of a carcinogenic aromatic amine (benzidine, p-aminobenzene and derivatives) in their formulae.

  4. The ISS Carcinogens Data Bank (BDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Roberto; Ceccarelli, Federica; Costamagna, Francesca Marina; D'Angiolini, Antonella; Fabri, Alessandra; Ferri, Maurizio; Riva, Giovanni; Roazzi, Paolo; Trucchi, Daniela; Marcello, Ida

    2008-01-01

    The Data Bank on Carcinogens (Banca Dati Cancerogeni, BDC) is a factual data bank, available on the Istituto Superiore di Sanità website, aimed at supporting the risk management decision making of central and local administrators. It can also represent a valuable tool for industry. The available information on carcinogenicity evaluations/classifications produced by European Union and by other institutions (IARC, USEPA, NTP, CCTN) is presented in a concise form accompanied by bibliographic references enabling the users to consult the original sources and, in some cases, to be directly connected to the relevant website. The classifications carried out by each organization in accordance with its own criteria assign the examined agents to specific qualitative categories and do not include quantitative assessment. BDC intends to provide an easy tool for experts, researchers and risk managers dealing with carcinogenic agents.

  5. Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity of beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R

    1987-07-01

    The carcinogenicity of a number of beryllium compounds has been confirmed in experiments on laboratory animals and this metal has to be treated as a possible carcinogenic threat to man. These carcinogenic properties are associated with mutagenic activity as shown by the results of short-term tests performed in vitro with beryllium chloride and beryllium sulfate. These soluble beryllium compounds can produce some infidelity of in vitro synthesis, forward gene mutations in microorganisms and in mammalian cells. They are also able to induce cell transformation. In addition to the positive results obtained in several short-term assays beryllium compounds have been found to bind to nucleoproteins, to inhibit certain enzymes needed for DNA synthesis, to bind nucleic acids to cell membranes and to inhibit microtubule polymerization. The teratogenicity of beryllium salts is relatively unknown and needs additional investigation.

  6. Occurrence of aflatoxin in some of the food and feed in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koirala P

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are many contaminants like aflatoxin present in food products. Aflatoxin in comparison to many other contaminants is very toxic and also carcinogenic. There are reports of outbreak of aflatoxin toxicity in many parts of the world. AIM: To find out the level of aflatoxin in common food and feed. SETTING: The study was conducted in 16 districts of the Eastern region of Nepal. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Samples were collected from retailers and whole sellers from 1995 to 2003. Common food items that had high chances of infestation were collected. Food sample were taken to the laboratory to estimate the level of aflatoxin. The thin layer chromatography method was used to detect aflatoxin in the samples and comparison of fluorescence of sample spot with fluorescence of standard for estimation. RESULT: There were 832 samples for aflatoxin detection and estimation. One-third samples were found to be contaminated with aflatoxin. The highest percentage of contamination was found in peanut butter/vegetable oil (42.5% and the lowest in areca nut (25%. Highest proportion of cornflakes samples were found to be contaminated with aflatoxin by more than the recommended value (30 ppb and contamination in peanut was the lowest. CONCLUSION: People consume many common food items that contain aflatoxin. It is of high importance for the concerned department to give attention to this important public health issue. Even in small doses, continuous consumption can lead to many health problems. So it is of paramount importance to detect and control these contaminants in food items.

  7. Contamination of food samples from Malaysia with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and estimation of human intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Yin-Hui; Chiang, Pui-Nyuk; Jaafar, Hajjaj Juharullah; Gan, Chee-Yuen; Majid, Mohamed Isa Abdul

    2014-04-01

    A total of 126 food samples, categorised into three groups (seafood and seafood products, meat and meat products, as well as milk and dairy products) from Malaysia were analysed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). The concentration of PCDD/Fs that ranged from 0.16 to 0.25 pg WHO05-TEQ g(-1) fw was found in these samples. According to the food consumption data from the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) of the World Health Organization (WHO), the dietary exposures to PCDD/F from seafood and seafood products, meat and meat products, as well as milk and dairy products for the general population in Malaysia were 0.064, 0.183 and 0.736 pg WHO05-TEQ kg(-1) bw day(-1), respectively. However, the exposure was higher in seafood and seafood products (0.415 pg WHO05-TEQ kg(-1) bw day(-1)) and meat and meat products (0.317 pg WHO05-TEQ kg(-1) bw day(-1)) when the data were estimated using the Malaysian food consumption statistics. The lower exposure was observed in dairy products with an estimation of 0.365 pg WHO05-TEQ kg(-1) bw day(-1). Overall, these dietary exposure estimates were much lower than the tolerable daily intake (TDI) as recommended by WHO. Thus, it is suggested that the dietary exposure to PCDD/F does not represent a risk for human health in Malaysia.

  8. Single aflatoxin contaminated corn kernel analysis with fluorescence hyperspectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin levels in food and feed are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food and 100 ppb in feed for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests including thin-layer chromatography (TCL) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These analytical tests require the destruction of samples, and are costly and time consuming. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, nondestructive way is crucial to the grain industry, particularly to corn industry. Hyperspectral imaging technology offers a non-invasive approach toward screening for food safety inspection and quality control based on its spectral signature. The focus of this paper is to classify aflatoxin contaminated single corn kernels using fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Field inoculated corn kernels were used in the study. Contaminated and control kernels under long wavelength ultraviolet excitation were imaged using a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral camera. The imaged kernels were chemically analyzed to provide reference information for image analysis. This paper describes a procedure to process corn kernels located in different images for statistical training and classification. Two classification algorithms, Maximum Likelihood and Binary Encoding, were used to classify each corn kernel into "control" or "contaminated" through pixel classification. The Binary Encoding approach had a slightly better performance with accuracy equals to 87% or 88% when 20 ppb or 100 ppb was used as classification threshold, respectively.

  9. Endocrine disruptors found in food contaminants enhance allergic sensitization through an oxidative stress that promotes the development of allergic airway inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takuma, E-mail: katotaku@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Tada-Oikawa, Saeko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Wang, Linan [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Murata, Mariko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kuribayashi, Kagemasa [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    In the past few decades, there has been a significant increase in incidence of allergic diseases. The hygiene hypothesis may provide some clues to explain this rising trend, but it may also be attributable to other environmental factors that exert a proallergic adjuvant effects. However, there is limited information on the risks of developing allergic asthma and related diseases through the ingestion of environmental chemicals found in food contaminants. In the present study, we have shown that oral administration of tributyltin, used as a model environmental chemical, induced oxidative-stress status in the bronchial lymph node, mesenteric lymph node and spleen, but not in the lung, where the initial step of allergic asthma pathogenesis takes place. Mice exposed to tributyltin exhibited heightened Th2 immunity to the allergen with more severe airway inflammation. Tributyltin also induced Treg cells apoptosis preferentially over non-Treg cells. All these effects of tributyltin exposure were canceled by the administration of glutathione monoethyl ester. Meanwhile, tributyltin did not affect airway inflammation of mice transferred with allergen-specific Th2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that tributyltin exerts its pathological effect during the sensitization phase through oxidative stress that enhances the development of allergic diseases. The current study dissects the pathogenic role of oxidative stress induced by oral exposure to an environmental chemical during the sensitization phase of allergic airway inflammation and would be important for developing therapeutics for prevention of allergic diseases. - Highlights: • Oral exposure to TBT exacerbates airway inflammation. • TBT induces oxidative stress in secondary lymphoid organs, but not in the lung. • TBT preferentially induces regulatory T cell apoptosis over non-Treg cells. • TBT does not enhance pre-existing airway inflammation in sensitized mice. • Chemicals in food contaminants

  10. Transfer of radiocaesium from contaminated bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chains in post-Fukushima and post-Chernobyl periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2016-05-01

    ) is close to the observed decrease constant in sediments (0.44 yr-1). These results strongly indicate that the gradual decrease of activity in demersal fish (decrease constant is 0.46 yr-1) is caused by the transfer of activity from organic matter deposited in bottom sediment through the deposit-feeding invertebrates. The estimated model transfer coefficient from bulk sediment to demersal fish in the model for 2012-2020 (0.13) is larger than that to the deposit-feeding invertebrates (0.07). In addition, the transfer of 137Cs through food webs for the period of 1945-2020 has been modelled for the Baltic Sea contaminated due to global fallout and from the Chernobyl accident. The model simulation results obtained with generic parameters are also in good agreement with available measurements in the Baltic Sea. Unlike the open coastal system where the FDNPP is located, the dynamics of radionuclide transfer in the Baltic Sea reach a quasi-steady state due to the slow rate in water mass exchange in this semi-enclosed basin. Obtained results indicate a substantial contribution of the benthic food chain in the long-term transfer of 137Cs from contaminated bottom sediments to marine organisms and the potential application of a generic model in different regions of the world's oceans.

  11. It is time to regulate carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines in cigarette tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-07-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act gives the U.S. Food and Drug Administration power to regulate tobacco products. This commentary calls for immediate regulation of the carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) in cigarette tobacco as a logical path to cancer prevention. NNK and NNN, powerful carcinogens in laboratory animals, have been evaluated as "carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. NNK and NNN are present in the tobacco of virtually all marketed cigarettes; levels in cigarette smoke are directly proportional to the amounts in tobacco. The NNK metabolite NNAL, itself a strong carcinogen, is present in the urine of smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke. Some of the highest levels of NNK and NNN are found in U.S. products. It is well established that factors such as choice of tobacco blend, agricultural conditions, and processing methods influence levels of NNK and NNN in cigarette tobacco and cigarette smoke. Therefore, it is time to control these factors and produce cigarettes with 100 ppb or less each of NNK and NNN in tobacco, which would result in an approximate 15- to 20-fold reduction of these carcinogens in the mainstream smoke of popular cigarettes sold in the United States.

  12. The breast cancer resistance protein BCRP (ABCG2) concentrates drugs and carcinogenic xenotoxins into milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Johan W; Merino, Gracia; Musters, Sandra; van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Bolscher, Ellen; Wagenaar, Els; Mesman, Elly; Dale, Trevor C; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2005-02-01

    Contamination of milk with drugs, pesticides and other xenotoxins can pose a major health risk to breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. Here we show that the multidrug transporter BCRP (encoded by ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland of mice, cows and humans during lactation and that it is responsible for the active secretion of clinically and toxicologically important substrates such as the dietary carcinogen PhIP, the anticancer drug topotecan and the antiulcerative cimetidine into mouse milk.

  13. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kim,Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinoge...

  14. Evidence supporting product standards for carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Stepanov, Irina; Severson, Herb; Jensen, Joni A; Lindgren, Bruce R; Horn, Kimberly; Khariwala, Samir S; Martin, Julia; Carmella, Steven G; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco products sold in the United States vary significantly in yields of nicotine and tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA). With the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, the Food and Drug Administration now has the authority to establish product standards. However, limited data exist determining the relative roles of pattern of smokeless tobacco use versus constituent levels in the smokeless tobacco product in exposure of users to carcinogens. In this study, smokeless tobacco users of brands varying in nicotine and TSNA content were recruited from three different regions in the U.S. Participants underwent two assessment sessions. During these sessions, demographic and smokeless tobacco use history information along with urine samples to assess biomarkers of exposure and effect were collected. During the time between data collection, smokeless tobacco users recorded the amount and duration of smokeless tobacco use on a daily basis using their diary cards. Results showed that independent of pattern of smokeless tobacco use and nicotine yields, levels of TSNA in smokeless tobacco products played a significant role in carcinogen exposure levels. Product standards for reducing levels of TSNA in smokeless tobacco products are necessary to decrease exposure to these toxicants and potentially to reduce risk for cancer.

  15. Biotic interactions in temporal trends (1992–2010) of organochlorine contaminants in the aquatic food web of Lake Laberge, Yukon Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, M.J. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Freshwater Institute, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N6 (Canada); University of Manitoba, Dept. of Soil Science, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Stern, G.A., E-mail: gary.stern@dfo-mpo.gc.ca [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Freshwater Institute, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N6 (Canada); Kidd, K.A. [University of New Brunswick, Canadian Rivers Institute and Department of Biology, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada E2L 4E5 (Canada); Croft, M.V. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Freshwater Institute, 501 University Crescent, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N6 (Canada); Gewurtz, S.; Diamond, M. [University of Toronto, Department of Geography, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G3 (Canada); Kinnear, L. [Northern Climate Exchange, Yukon Research Center, Yukon College, Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada Y1A 5K4 (Canada); Roach, P. [Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Rm 415C - 300 Main St., Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada Y1A 2B5 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Declines in 6 organochlorine (OC) contaminant groups; chlordane (CHL), DDT, HCH, toxaphene (CHB), PCB and chlorinated benzenes (CBz) were measured in biota of a sub-Arctic lake (Lake Laberge, YT) following the closure of a commercial fishery in 1991. This study examined morphological (length, weight, age), biochemical (lipid content, δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 15}N), population and OC data for 9 fishes and zooplankton between 1993 and 2003 (2010 for lake trout) to investigate causes for the OC declines. Growth dilution was a major factor influencing the decrease of OCs in lake trout, round whitefish and possibly zooplankton most notably in the early 2000s. A decline in lipids of most fish species also contributed to OC declines, although no such change was evident for zooplankton. It is suspected that increases in fish populations or climate variations over the 1990s, may have contributed towards a shift in plankton community composition. From 1991 to 1999, CPUE increased for 7 of the fish species and declined for 2 others. Concurrently, the zooplankton community shifted from an abundance of C. scutifer in 1993 to dominance by D. pribilofensis in 2001. Nitrogen and carbon stable isotope data suggested that food web interactions for most fish species have not changed over time. Although concentrations of OCs have declined in many fishes, the “rate” of OC transfer (using slopes of log OC vs. nitrogen isotope ratios) through the food web was greater in 2001 than in 1993. Overall, the declines in OC concentrations in the fish from Lake Laberge occurred concurrently with changes in their growth, lipid, and abundance, suggesting that ecosystem responses to the closure of the fishery were in part responsible for the lower contaminants in these fishes. As a result of this study, the Yukon government rescinded the health advisory for limiting the consumption of fish from Lake Laberge. - Highlights: ► Organochlorine contaminants in a sub-Arctic lake were monitored post

  16. Recent Advances and Future Challenges in Modified Mycotoxin Analysis: Why HRMS Has Become a Key Instrument in Food Contaminant Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Righetti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic fungi in crops worldwide. These compounds can undergo modification in plants, leading to the formation of a large number of possible modified forms, whose toxicological relevance and occurrence in food and feed is still largely unexplored. The analysis of modified mycotoxins by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry remains a challenge because of their chemical diversity, the large number of isomeric forms, and the lack of analytical standards. Here, the potential benefits of high-resolution and ion mobility mass spectrometry as a tool for separation and structure confirmation of modified mycotoxins have been investigated/reviewed.

  17. Evaluation of sub-critical water as an extraction fluid for model contaminants from recycled PET for reuse as food packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Amélia S F; Agnelli, José A M; Manrich, Sati

    2010-04-01

    Recycling of plastics for food-contact packaging is an important issue and research into meaningful and cost-effective solutions is in progress. In this paper, the use of sub-critical water was evaluated as an alternative way of purifying poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) flakes for direct food contact applications. The effects of temperature, pressure and flow rate were assessed on the extraction efficiency of two of the most challenging classes of contaminants (toluene and benzophenone) from PET by sub-critical water using a first-order fractional experimental design. Extraction yield was quantified using GC/FID. The most important parameter was flow rate, indicating that the decrease in sub-critical water polarity with temperature was insufficient to eliminate partition effects. Temperature was also important, but only for the optimization of toluene extraction. These results may be explained by the poor solubility of higher molar mass compounds in sub-critical water compared to lower molar mass compounds under the same conditions, and the small decrease in dielectric constant with temperature under the experimental conditions evaluated. As cleaning efficiency is low and PET is very susceptible to hydrolysis, which limits the use of higher temperatures vis-à-vis physical recycling, the proposed extraction is unsuitable for a standalone super-clean process but may be a step in the process.

  18. Essential oil of Aegle marmelos as a safe plant-based antimicrobial against postharvest microbial infestations and aflatoxin contamination of food commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Kumar, Ashok; Dubey, Nawal K; Gupta, Rajesh

    2009-08-01

    The essential oil of Aegle marmelos L. Correa (Rutaceae) showed strong fungitoxicity against some storage fungi-causing contamination of foodstuffs. The oil also showed efficacy as aflatoxin suppressor at 500 microL/L as it completely arrested the aflatoxin B(1) production by the toxigenic strains (Navjot 4NSt and Saktiman 3NSt) of Aspergillus flavus Link. Keeping in view the side effects of synthetic fungicides, A. marmelos oil may be recommended as an antimicrobial of plant origin to enhance the shelf life of stored food commodities by controlling the fungal growth as well as aflatoxin secretion. This is the 1st report on aflatoxin B(1) inhibitory nature of this oil. A. marmelos oil may be recommended as a novel plant-based antimicrobial in food protection over synthetic preservatives, most of which are reported to incite environmental problems because of their nonbiodegradable nature and side effects on mammals. The LD(50) of Aegle oil was found to be 23659.93 mg/kg body weight in mice (Mus musculus L.) when administered for acute oral toxicity showing nonmammalian toxicity of the oil. GC-MS analysis of the oil found DL-Limonene to be major component.

  19. Probabilistic risk assessment of dietary exposure to single and multiple pesticide residues or contaminants: summary of the work performed within the SAFE FOODS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Klaveren, Jacob D; Boon, Polly E

    2009-12-01

    This introduction to the journal's supplement on probabilistic risk assessment of single and multiple exposure to pesticide residues or contaminants summarizes the objectives and results of the work performed in work package 3 of the EU-funded project SAFE FOODS. Within this work package, we developed an electronic platform of food consumption and chemical concentration databases harmonised at raw agricultural commodity level. In this platform the databases are connected to probabilistic software to allow probabilistic modelling of dietary exposure in a standardised way. The usefulness of this platform is demonstrated in two papers, which describe the exposure to pesticides and glycoalkaloids in several European countries. Furthermore, an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model was developed: a new tool to integrate exposure and effect modelling, including uncertainty analyses. The use of this model was shown in a paper on the cumulative exposure to anti-androgen pesticides. Combined with a health impact prioritization system, developed within this work package to compare heath risks between chemicals, the IPRA tool can also be used to compare health risks between multiple chemicals in complex risk assessment situation such as risk-benefit and risk trade-off analyses. Both the electronic platform of databases as the IPRA model may proof to be powerful tools to tackle the challenges risk managers are or will be faced with in the future.

  20. Propriedade antibacteriana de óleos essenciais de especiarias sobre bactérias contaminantes de alimentos Antibacterial property of spice essential oils on food contaminating bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Nogueira Trajano

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available As especiarias são conhecidas por exercerem uma estabilidade frente à ação de microrganismos, estando inseridas no grupo dos alimentos estáveis. Esta propriedade conservante das especiarias está relacionada com a presença de compostos antibacterianos na sua composição. Tais compostos podem ser usados no combate a bactérias deteriorantes de alimentos, por esse motivo, este trabalho visa à investigação da propriedade antimicrobiana dos óleos essenciais de Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume, Coriandrum sativum L., Cuminum cyminum L., Mentha. piperita L., Ocimum basilicum L., Origanum majorana L., Pimpinella anisum L., Piper nigrum L., Rosmarinus officinalis L. e Zingiber officinalis Rosc. frente a bactérias contaminantes de alimentos. Para esse estudo, foram selecionadas 10 cepas bacterianas deteriorantes de alimentos. Para a realização dos ensaios antibacterianos, foi utilizado o método de difusão em meio sólido. Os resultados mostram que os óleos essenciais das folhas do E. caryophyllata e da C. zeylanicum mostraram uma eficiência na inibição de todas as cepas bacterianas ensaiadas. Os outros óleos produziram atividade antibacteriana, porém com menor espectro de ação. A pesquisa de tais produtos mostra-se bastante promissora, sendo essa uma boa alternativa para a substituição de aditivos químicos em alimentos.Spices are known for their stability against microbial action; that being so, they are included in the group of stable foods. This preservative property of spices is related to the presence of antibacterial compounds in their composition. Such compounds could be used to control the food contaminating bacteria. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial property of the essential oils from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume, Coriandrum sativum L., Cuminum cyminum L., Mentha. piperita L., Ocimum basilicum L., Origanum majorana L., Pimpinella anisum L., Piper nigrum L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Zingiber officinalis Rosc

  1. 40 CFR 799.9420 - TSCA carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true TSCA carcinogenicity. 799.9420 Section 799.9420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... their selection. (ii) Age/weight. (A) Testing shall be started with young healthy animals as soon...

  2. THE ROLE OF POSTHARVEST MACHINERIES AND PACKAGING IN MINIMIZING AFLATOXIN CONTAMINATION IN PEANUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Paramawati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As a tropical country with relatively high humidity and temperature, Indonesia is struggling with aflatoxin which frequently contaminates peanut. Aflatoxin is a carcinogenic toxic substance that could cause liver cancer. Due to the increasing concern on food safety, the Indonesian Drugs and Foods Agency specifies the maximum aflatoxin allowed in peanut as much as 20 ppb. However, researches showed that aflatoxin contamination in peanut in Indonesia is much higher than the threshold. The study was carried out to observe the effect of using postharvest machineries and packaging  treatments on aflatoxin contamination in peanut. Reduction of postharvest processes was conducted by using series of machineries, e.g. thresher, dryer, and sheller. Packaging treatments, e.g. vacuum plastic pack, hermetic glass chamber, and polyethylene (PE plastic wrap were carried out during storage at ambient temperature (25-27°C. The results showed that using machineries in postharvest handling produced peanut free from aflatoxin contamination. However, without effective packaging, the aflatoxin level would increase during storage. Hermetic packaging could protect peanut from the mold as indicated by low level of aflatoxin contamination.

  3. Mycotoxin Determination in Foods Using Advanced Sensors Based on Antibodies or Aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhaowei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Peiwu

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxin contamination threatens health and life of humans and animals throughout the food supply chains. Many of the mycotoxins have been proven to be carcinogens, teratogens and mutagens. The reliable and sensitive sensing methods are requested to monitor mycotoxin contamination. Advanced sensors based on antibodies or aptamers boast the advantages of high sensitivity and rapidity, and have been used in the mycotoxin sensing. These sensors are miniaturized, thereby lowering costs, and are applicable to high-throughput modes. In this work, the latest developments in sensing strategies for mycotoxin determination were critically discussed. Optical and electrochemical sensing modes were compared. The sensing methods for single mycotoxin or multiple mycotoxins in food samples were reviewed, along with the challenges and the future of antibody or aptamer-based sensors. This work might promote academic studies and industrial applications for mycotoxin sensing. PMID:27529281

  4. Mycotoxin Determination in Foods Using Advanced Sensors Based on Antibodies or Aptamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxin contamination threatens health and life of humans and animals throughout the food supply chains. Many of the mycotoxins have been proven to be carcinogens, teratogens and mutagens. The reliable and sensitive sensing methods are requested to monitor mycotoxin contamination. Advanced sensors based on antibodies or aptamers boast the advantages of high sensitivity and rapidity, and have been used in the mycotoxin sensing. These sensors are miniaturized, thereby lowering costs, and are applicable to high-throughput modes. In this work, the latest developments in sensing strategies for mycotoxin determination were critically discussed. Optical and electrochemical sensing modes were compared. The sensing methods for single mycotoxin or multiple mycotoxins in food samples were reviewed, along with the challenges and the future of antibody or aptamer-based sensors. This work might promote academic studies and industrial applications for mycotoxin sensing.

  5. Review on Health Impact Contamination of Mycotoxin and Control of for Food Industry%真菌毒素在食品工业中的危害与控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春玲; 戚飞; 李颂

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxin contamination is a worldwide concern of food safety. This article reviews the history of food safety accidents caused by myeotoxin contamination, and the threats of mycotoxin contamination to human health. Popular technologies and methodologies used to prevent and remove mycotoxin are also re- viewed. It is suggested that food industry should give priority to mycotoxin prevention contamination through the entire process of food supply chain.%真菌毒素污染是当前国际食品安全问题的一个重要议题,简要回顾了人类历史上由真菌毒素污染产生的食品安全事件,介绍了真菌毒素污染对于人类健康的危害;并对真菌毒素防毒去毒技术现状进行介绍,概述食品产业各环节应对真菌毒素污染的基本方案.

  6. Automated mini-column solid-phase extraction cleanup for high-throughput analysis of chemical contaminants in foods by low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrated the application of an automated high-throughput mini-cartridge solid-phase extraction (mini-SPE) cleanup for the rapid low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS) analysis of pesticides and environmental contaminants in QuEChERS extracts of foods. ...

  7. EFSA CONTAM Panel (EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain), 2015. Scientific Opinion on the risks to animal and public health and the environment related to the presence of nickel in feed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annette

    Following a request from the European Commission, the risks to animal and human health and the environment related to the presence of nickel (Ni) in feed were assessed by the EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel). The presence of Ni in feed can arise from both natural...... to the age class ‘Other children’. Regarding acute dietary exposure, the CONTAM Panel concluded that Ni-sensitized individuals are also at risk of developing eczematous flare-up skin reactions through the consumption of food of animal origin. The contribution of food of animal origin to human dietary...

  8. Carcinogenicity, allergenicity, and lupus-inducibility of arylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King-Thom

    2016-01-01

    Arylamines are widely used in food, drugs, and cosmetics as well as other industries. These chemicals are present ubiquitously in cigarette smoke, smoke emitted from cooking fume hoods as well as are generated by diverse industries. Arylamines can be generated by cleavage of azo dyes by intestinal and skin microbiota. Some arylamines are used as drugs while others are constituents of human metabolism. Many of the arylamines are mutagenic and carcinogenic. They are generally recognized as the major cause of human bladder cancer, but arylamines can induce cancers of other organs in humans and animals. Some arylamines are allergenic, causing lupus like syndrome, or other maladies. In view of their unbiquitious nature and the diseases they cause, arylamines are probably the most important chemicals causing health problems.

  9. The study of synthetic food dyes by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    By method of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), substances are food dyes were studied: E-102 (Tartrazine), E-124 (Ponso 4R), E 132 (Indigo carmine), E-133 (Brilliant Blue), E-151 (Black Shiny). They are examined for the presence of carcinogenic properties. The difference between dyes having explicit carcinogenic properties and mutagenic properties (non-explicit carcinogens) is established.

  10. Influence of different sanitizers on food contaminant bacteria: effect of exposure temperature, contact time, and product concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar Augusto Beltrame

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of four Sanitizers - peracetic acid, chlorhexidine, quaternary ammonium, and organic acids - was tested in this work using different bacteria recognized as a problem to meat industry, Salmonella sp., S. aureus, E. coli and L. monocytogenes. The effects of sanitizer concentration (0.2, 0.5, 0.6, 1.0, 1.1 and 1.4%, at different temperatures (10 and 45 °C and contact time (2, 10, 15, 18 and 25 minutes were evaluated. Tests in an industrial plant were also carried out considering previously obtained results. In a general way, peracetic acid presented higher efficiencies using low concentration (0.2% and contact time (2 minutes at 10 °C. The tests performed in industrial scale showed that peracetic acid presented a good performance in concentration and contact time lower than that suggested by the suppliers. The use of chlorhexidine and quaternary ammonium led to reasonable results at the indicated conditions, and organic acids were ineffective under concentration and contact time higher than those indicated by the suppliers in relation to Staphylococcus aureus. The results, in general, show that the choice for the most adequate sanitizer depends on the microorganism contaminant, the time available for sanitizer application, and also on the process cost.

  11. Aspergillus steynii and Aspergillus westerdijkiae as potential risk of OTA contamination in food products in warm climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Serna, Jessica; Patiño, Belén; Cortes, Laura; Gonzalez-Jaen, Maria Teresa; Vazquez, Covadonga

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus steynii and Aspergillus westerdijkiae are the main ochratoxin A (OTA) producing species of Aspergillus section Circumdati. Due to its recent description, few data are available about the influence of ecophysiological factors on their growth and OTA production profiles. In this work, the effect of temperature (20, 24 and 28 °C) and water activity (aw) (0.928, 0.964 and 0.995) on growth, sporulation and OTA production by these fungi was examined in CYA and media prepared from paprika, green coffee, anise, grapes, maize and barley. Growth was positively affected by the highest temperature and aw values indicating that both species might be expected in warm climates or storage conditions. However, optimal growth conditions showed differences depending on the medium. OTA production was markedly affected by substrate and showed qualitative and quantitative differences. Both species, especially A. steynii, represent a great potential risk of OTA contamination due to their high production in a variety of conditions and substrates, in particular in barley and paprika-based media. Additionally, neither growth nor sporulation did result good indicators of OTA production by A. steynii or A. westerdijkiae; therefore, specific and highly-sensitive detection methods become essential tools for control strategies to reduce OTA risk by these species.

  12. EROD activity and stable isotopes in seabirds to disentangle marine food web contamination after the Prestige oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velando, Alberto, E-mail: avelando@uvigo.e [Departamento de Ecoloxia e Bioloxia Animal, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, Campus As Lagoas, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Munilla, Ignacio [Departamento de Botanica, Facultade de Farmacia, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lopez-Alonso, Marta [Departamento de Patoloxia Animal, Facultade de Veterinaria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Lugo (Spain); Freire, Juan [Grupo de Recursos Marinos y Pesquerias Universidade da Coruna, A Coruna (Spain); Perez, Cristobal [Departamento de Ecoloxia e Bioloxia Animal, Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo, Campus As Lagoas, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    In this study, we measured via surgical sampling hepatic EROD activity in yellow-legged gulls from oiled and unoiled colonies, 17 months after the Prestige oil spill. We also analyzed stable isotope composition in feathers of the biopsied gulls, in an attempt to monitor oil incorporation into marine food web. We found that yellow-legged gulls in oiled colonies were being exposed to remnant oil as shown by hepatic EROD activity levels. EROD activity was related to feeding habits of individual gulls with apparent consequences on delayed lethality. Capture-recapture analysis of biopsied gulls suggests that the surgery technique did not affect gull survival, giving support to this technique as a monitoring tool for oil exposure assessment. Our study highlights the combination of different veterinary, toxicological and ecological methodologies as a useful approach for the monitoring of exposure to remnant oil after a large oil spill. - Two years after Prestige oil spill, seabirds were exposed to remnant oil related to their feeding habits with consequences on delayed lethality.

  13. Analysis on contamination monitoring result of market food in Zhangjiagang in 2010%张家港市2010年市售食品污染物监测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓飞; 于颖慧; 张频

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To find out the current situation of market food contaminations in Zhangjiagang.METHODS 514 items from 25 kinds of market food samples were collected from 10 monitoring spots in Zhangjiagang.More than 20 items were examined including metal contamination,food additives,fungus toxins and microorganism.RESULTS Chemical contamination such as cadmium,mercury,arsenic,chromium in foods was not higher than standard limits.The main contamination issue at the present time included lead in vegetables (over standard rate was 5.84%),sulfur dioxide in edible fungi (over standard rate was 9.52%),sulfur dioxide and cyclamate in preserved fruits (over standard rate was both of 5.88%),and total numbers of colony in aquatic products (over standard rate was 29.63%).CONCLUSION The overall level of contaminations in market food is low,but some foods are still contaminated.Pertinent measures should be taken to reduce the contaminations.%目的 了解张家港市市售食品的污染状况.方法 在全市10个监测点抽检25类食品514份样品,开展有害元素、食品添加剂、真菌毒素、微生物指标等20多项污染物的监测.结果 抽检食品中镉、汞、砷、铬都没有超标,而蔬菜中的铅(超标率为5.84%)、食用菌中的二氧化硫(超标率为9.52%)、蜜饯中的二氧化硫和甜蜜素(超标率均为5.88%),以及鱼糜制品中的菌落总数(超标率为29.63%)超标较多.结论 市售食品污染水平总体较低,但仍存在食品污染隐患,应采取针对措施,提高食品的安全性.

  14. 食物链中副溶血性弧菌污染状况研究%Study on Vibrio parahaemolyticus contamination in the food chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕志刚; 解伟伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To study the Vibrio parahaemolyticus contamination situation in the food chain,and the carrying status oftdh and trh gene in isolated bacterial strains.Methods:In accordance with the national standard GB/T 4789.7-2008,Vibrio parahaemolyticus were Isolated and identified for determination oftdh andtrh gene by PCR.Results:Totally 348 Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from 872 samples,including 84 strains with tdh gene,5 strains with trh gene.Conclusion:The detection rate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in freshwater products of the food chain further confirmed the ability of survival and propagation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus had changed.%目的:研究食物链中副溶血性弧菌污染状况,和分离菌株的tdh及trh基因的携带状况.方法:国家标准方法GB/T 4789.7-2008方法进行分离与鉴定,PCR法测定tdh和trh基因.结果:872份样品中共分离出348株副溶血性弧菌.其中有84株拥有tdh基因,5株菌拥有trh基因.结论:食物链中淡水产品的副溶血弧菌高检出率进一步证实副溶血性弧菌的生存与传播能力已发生了较大的变化.

  15. One- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy enabling the detection of localized aflatoxin contamination in individual maize kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, L.; Meulebroeck, W.; Raeymaekers, S.; Thienpont, H.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of carcinogenic aflatoxins in food and feed products is a major worldwide problem. To date, the aflatoxin contamination can only be detected by the use of destructive sample-based chemical analyses. Therefore, we developed an optical setup able to detect the localized aflatoxin contamination in individual maize kernels, on the basis of one- and two- photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Our developed optical configuration comprises a tunable titanium-sapphire laser (710nm-830nm) in combination with second harmonic wavelength generation (355nm-415nm), enabling the measurement of both one- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectra. Moreover, an accurate scanning of the kernel's surface was induced by the use of automated translation stages, allowing to study the localized maize contamination. First, the operation of the setup is validated by the characterization of pure aflatoxin B1 powder. Second, the fluorescence spectra of healthy (maize kernels (>70ppb aflatoxin B1) were measured, after excitation with 365nm, 730nm, 750nm and 780nm. For both the one- and two- photon induced fluorescence processes, the presence of the aflatoxin inside the contaminated maize kernels influenced the intrinsic fluorescence signals. Based on the fluorescence spectrum between 400nm and 550nm, we defined a detection criterion to identify the contaminated maize kernels. Furthermore, we demonstrate the sensing of the localized contamination level, indicating both contaminated maize kernels with a high contamination level in a limited surface area (as small as 1mm2) as with a lower contamination spread over a large surface area (up to 20mm2). As a result, our developed measurement methodology allows the identification of the localized aflatoxin contamination, paving the way to the non-destructive, real-time and high-sensitive industrial scanning-based detection of aflatoxins in food products.

  16. International Conference on Harmonisation; proposed change to rodent carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals; request for comments. Notice; request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is considering a proposed change to the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) Sl guidance on rodent carcinogenicity testing. The goal of this potential change is to introduce a more comprehensive and integrated approach to address the risk of human carcinogenicity of small molecule pharmaceuticals, and to define conditions under which 2-year rodent carcinogenicity studies add value to that assessment. The basis of this proposed change is the retrospective analyses of several datasets that reflect three decades of experience with such studies. The datasets suggest that knowledge of certain pharmacologic and toxicologic data can sometimes provide sufficient information to anticipate the outcome of 2-year rodent studies and their potential value in predicting the risk of human carcinogenicity of a given pharmaceutical. FDA is requesting public comment regarding a proposed change in approach to carcinogenicity assessment, on the prospective evaluation period intended to test this new approach, and on the proposed weight-of-evidence factors for carcinogenicity assessment.

  17. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  18. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  19. Report on carcinogens monograph on 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program conducted a cancer evaluation on 1 bromopropane for possible listing in the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). The cancer evaluation is captured in the RoC monograph, which was peer reviewed in a public forum. The monograph consists of two components: (Part 1) the cancer evaluation, which reviews the relevant scientific information, assesses its quality, applies the RoC listing criteria to the scientific information, and provides the NTP recommendation for listing status for 1 bromopropane in the RoC, and (Part 2) the substance profile proposed for the RoC, containing the NTP's listing status recommendation, a summary of the scientific evidence considered key to reaching that decision, and data on properties, use, production, exposure, and Federal regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure to 1-bromopropane. This monograph provides an assessment of the available scientific information on 1 bromopropane, including human exposure and properties, disposition and toxicokinetics, cancer studies in experimental animals, and studies of mechanisms and other related effects, including relevant toxicological effects, genetic toxicology, and mechanisms of carcinogenicity. From this assessment, the NTP recommended that 1 bromopropane be listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the RoC based on sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals, which found inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane caused skin tumors in male rats, large intestine tumors in female and male rats, and lung tumors in female mice. Also noted was that 1 bromopropane, either directly or via reactive metabolites, caused molecular alterations that typically are associated with carcinogenesis, including genotoxicity, oxidative stress, and glutathione depletion. These alterations, observed in mainly in vitro and toxicity studies in rodents, are relevant to possible mechanisms of human carcinogenicity and support the relevance of the cancer studies in

  20. [Carcinogenic activity of the pesticide propoxur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylev, L N; Vasil'eva, L A; Smirnova, O V; Khrustalev, S A; Trukhina, G M

    2010-01-01

    Wistar rats were fed propoxur in their diet at 0, 500, 3000, and 8000 ppm during throughout their life. The number of tumors was equal in the control and experimental groups. These were hemoblastoses and breast and uterine tumors. All tumors occurred spontaneously in the rats. A few experimental animals were found to have bladder epithelial hyperplasia that might be pretumorous; however, no bladder tumors were detected. It is concluded that the investigations revealed no carcinogenic activity of propoxur.

  1. The food contaminant semicarbazide acts as an endocrine disrupter: Evidence from an integrated in vivo/in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranghi, Francesca; Tassinari, Roberta; Marcoccia, Daniele; Altieri, Ilaria; Catone, Tiziana; De Angelis, Giovanna; Testai, Emanuela; Mastrangelo, Sabina; Evandri, Maria Grazia; Bolle, Paola; Lorenzetti, Stefano

    2010-01-05

    Semicarbazide (SEM) is a by-product of the blowing agent azodicarbonamide, present in glass jar-sealed foodstuffs mainly baby foods. The pleiotropic in vivo SEM toxicological effects suggested to explore its possible role as endocrine modulator. Endocrine effects of SEM were assessed in vivo in male and female rats after oral administration for 28 days at 0, 40, 75, 140mg/kg bw pro die during the juvenile period. Vaginal opening and preputial separation were recorded. Concentration of sex steroid in blood, the ex vivo hepatic aromatase activity and testosterone catabolism were detected. The in vitro approach to test SEM role as (anti)estrogen or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs)-(anti)agonist included different assays: yeast estrogenicity, MCF-7 proliferation, stimulation of the alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells and LNCaP-based NMDAR interference assay. In vivo SEM-treated female rats showed delayed vaginal opening at all tested doses, whereas in males preputial separation was anticipated at SEM 40 and 75mg/kg and delayed at 140mg/kg, the latter effect probably due to the significantly decreased body weight gain seen at the higher dose in both sexes. Serum estrogen levels were dose-dependently reduced in treated females, whereas dehydrotestosterone serum levels were also decreased but a clear dose-response was not evidenced. Testosterone catabolism was altered in a gender-related way, aromatase activity was increased in treated males at 75 and 140mg/kg and in females in all dose groups. In the three estradiol-competitive assays, SEM showed a weak anti-estrogenic activity, whereas in the LNCaP-based NMDAR interference assay SEM activity resembled MK-801 antagonist effect. SEM appeared to act as an endocrine disrupter showing multiple and gender specific mechanisms of action(s). A possible cascade-mechanism of SEM on reproductive signalling pathways may be hypothesized. Such in vivo-in vitro approach appeared to be an useful tool to highlight SEM

  2. The evolving definition of carcinogenic human papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castle Philip E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thirteen human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes have been judged to be carcinogenic or probably carcinogenic, and the cause of virtually all cervical cancer worldwide. Other HPV genotypes could possibly be involved. Although the inclusion of possibly carcinogenic HPV genotypes may hurt test specificity, it may indirectly increase the reassurance following a negative HPV test (i.e. the negative predictive value of an HPV test for cervical precancer and cancer. The future of cervical cancer screening in low-resource setting, however, may include once-in-a-lifetime, low-cost and rapid HPV testing. However, the tradeoff of more false positives for greater reassurance may not be acceptable if the local infrastructure cannot manage the screen positives. Now is the time for the community of scientists, doctors, and public health advocates to use the data presented at the 100th International Agency for Research on Cancer monograph meeting to rationally decide the target HPV genotypes for the next generation of HPV tests for use in high-resource and low-resource settings. The implications of including possibly HPV genotypes on HPV test performance, also for guidance on the use of these tests for cervical cancer prevention programs, are discussed.

  3. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  4. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in food and feed on the Belgian market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Bart; Callebaut, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are widely distributed plant toxins with species dependent hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, genotoxic and pneumotoxic risks. In a recent European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) opinion, only two data sets from one European country were received for honey, while one feed data set was included. No data are available for food or feed samples from the Belgian market. We developed an LC-MS/MS method, which allowed the detection and quantification of 16 PAs in a broad range of matrices in the sub ng g(-1) range. The method was validated in milk, honey and hay and applied to honey, tea (Camellia sinensis), scented tea, herbal tea, milk and feed samples bought on the Belgian market. The results confirmed that tea, scented tea, herbal tea and honey are important food sources of pyrrolizidine alkaloid contamination in Belgium. Furthermore, we detected PAs in 4 of 63 commercial milk samples. A high incidence rate of PAs in lucerne (alfalfa)-based horse feed and in rabbit feed was detected, while bird feed samples were less contaminated. We report for the first time the presence of monocrotaline, intermedine, lycopsamine, heliotrine and echimidine in cat food.

  5. 3-MCPD: A Worldwide Problem of Food Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jędrkiewicz, Renata; Kupska, Magdalena; Głowacz, Agnieszka; Gromadzka, Justyna; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-10-25

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is a heat-induced food contaminant that has been widely investigated for decades. This paper presents an overview of current knowledge about 3-MCPD, including its formation routes, occurrence in various foodstuffs, analytical approach, toxicological aspects, and future research perspectives. So far, 3-MCPD was determined in its free and bound form in thermally treated foods, edible oils and fats, and infant foods including human breast milk. Contaminants in infant foods and human breast milk were highlighted in this paper as a serious problem as they can pose a potential hazard for infants. The analytical approach of 3-MCPD determination has been modified for over a decade. Nowadays, the method based on determining the derivative of this compound by using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is widely used. However, there is still a big need for developing new methods that would produce repeatable results. Some of the toxicologic aspects associated with 3-MCPD still remain unknown. A number of studies on the carcinogenicity and genotoxicity of 3-MCPD were carried out on rodents; however, no clinical studies on humans have been reported so far. Moreover, both detrimental effect on kidneys and antifertility activity have been widely reported. The knowledge of 3-MCPD absorption into body fluids and tissues and its metabolic pathways is based on sometimes conflicting data derived from different studies. In conclusion, although a lot of research has been carried out on 3-MCPD, there is still a need for further research in this area.

  6. Reclamation of zinc-contaminated soil using a dissolved organic carbon solution prepared using liquid fertilizer from food-waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Tong, Ou-Yang; Chiou, Chyow-San; Lin, Yu-An; Wang, Ming-Kuang; Liu, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-15

    A liquid fertilizer obtained through food-waste composting can be used for the preparation of a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) solution. In this study, we used the DOC solutions for the remediation of a Zn-contaminated soil (with Zn concentrations up to 992 and 757 mg kg(-1) in topsoil and subsoil, respectively). We then determined the factors that affect Zn removal, such as pH, initial concentration of DOC solution, and washing frequency. Measurements using a Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) revealed that carboxyl and amide were the major functional groups in the DOC solution obtained from the liquid fertilizer. Two soil washes using 1,500 mg L(-1) DOC solution with a of pH 2.0 at 25°C removed about 43% and 21% of the initial Zn from the topsoil and subsoil, respectively. Following this treatment, the pH of the soil declined from 5.4 to 4.1; organic matter content slightly increased from 6.2 to 6.5%; available ammonium (NH4(+)-N) content increased to 2.4 times the original level; and in the topsoil, the available phosphorus content and the exchangeable potassium content increased by 1.65 and 2.53 times their initial levels, respectively.

  7. Simultaneous testing of multiclass organic contaminants in food and environment by liquid chromatography/dielectric barrier discharge ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Meyer, Cordula; Michels, Antje; Franzke, Joachim; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-11-21

    A Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization (DBDI) LC/MS interface is based on the use of a low-temperature helium plasma, which features the possibility of simultaneous ionization of species with a wide variety of physicochemical properties. In this work, the performance of LC/DBDI-MS for trace analysis of highly relevant species in food and environment has been examined. Over 75 relevant species including multiclass priority organic contaminants and residues such as pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine species, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and drugs of abuse were tested. LC/DBDI-MS performance for this application was assessed and compared with standard LC/MS sources (electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)). The used benchtop Orbitrap mass spectrometer features a 10 Hz polarity switching mode, so that both positive and negative ion mode acquisitions are possible with acquisition cycles matching the requirements of fast liquid chromatography. Both polar and nonpolar species (including those typically analyzed by GC/electron ionization-MS) can be tested in a single run using polarity switching mode. The methodology was found to be effective in detecting a wide array of organic compounds at concentration levels in the low ng L(-1) to μg kg(-1) range in wastewater and food matrices, respectively. The linearity was evaluated in an olive oil extract, obtaining good correlation coefficients in the studied range. Additionally, minor matrix effects (≤15% of signal suppression or enhancement) were observed for most of the studied analytes in this complex fatty matrix. The results obtained were compared with data from both ESI and APCI sources, obtaining a merged coverage between ESI and APCI in terms of analyte ionization and higher overall sensitivity for the proposed ion source based on the DBD principle. The use of this approach further extends the coverage of current LC/MS methods towards

  8. Improving Food Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The government takes a tougher stance on processors and producers violating food safety standards Awave of recent contaminated food incidents,exemplified by an E.coli outbreak in Germany and the discovery of industrial plasticizers in

  9. Food poisoning (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food contaminated with organisms is ingested. The bacteria Staphylococcus aureus can commonly be found on people, but when allowed to grow in food this bacteria can produce a toxin that causes illness such as vomiting and diarrhea. ...

  10. Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and teratogenicity of acrylonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Gerber, G B; Stecca, C; Rueff, J; Borba, H; Farmer, P B; Sram, R J; Czeizel, A E; Kalina, I

    1999-05-01

    Acrylonitrile (AN) is an important intermediary for the synthesis of a variety of organic products, such as artificial fibres, household articles and resins. Although acute effects are the primary concern for an exposure to AN, potential genotoxic, carcinogenic and teratogenic risks of AN have to be taken seriously in view of the large number of workers employed in such industries and the world-wide population using products containing and possibly liberating AN. An understanding of the effect of acrylonitrile must be based on a characterization of its metabolism as well as of the resulting products and their genotoxic properties. Tests for mutagenicity in bacteria have in general been positive, those in plants and on unscheduled DNA synthesis doubtful, and those on chromosome aberrations in vivo negative. Wherever positive results had been obtained, metabolic activation of AN appeared to be a prerequisite. The extent to which such mutagenic effects are significant in man depends, however, also on the conditions of exposure. It appears from the limited data that the ultimate mutagenic factor(s), such as 2-cyanoethylene oxide, may have little opportunity to act under conditions where people are exposed because it is formed only in small amounts and is rapidly degraded. The carcinogenic action of AN has been evaluated by various agencies and ranged from 'reasonably be anticipated to be a human carcinogen' to 'cannot be excluded', the most recent evaluation being 'possibly carcinogenic to humans'. Animal data that confirm the carcinogenic potential of AN have certain limitations with respect to the choice of species, type of tumors and length of follow up. Epidemiological studies which sometimes, but not always, yielded positive results, encounter the usual difficulties of confounding factors in chemical industries. Exposure of workers to AN should continue to be carefully monitored, but AN would not have to be considered a cancer risk to the population provided

  11. Automatic detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels using dual-band imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ononye, Ambrose E.; Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2009-05-01

    Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin predominantly produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasitiucus fungi that grow naturally in corn, peanuts and in a wide variety of other grain products. Corn, like other grains is used as food for human and feed for animal consumption. It is known that aflatoxin is carcinogenic; therefore, ingestion of corn infected with the toxin can lead to very serious health problems such as liver damage if the level of the contamination is high. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has strict guidelines for permissible levels in the grain products for both humans and animals. The conventional approach used to determine these contamination levels is one of the destructive and invasive methods that require corn kernels to be ground and then chemically analyzed. Unfortunately, each of the analytical methods can take several hours depending on the quantity, to yield a result. The development of high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sensors has created an opportunity for hyperspectral image analysis to be employed for aflatoxin detection. However, this brings about a high dimensionality problem as a setback. In this paper, we propose a technique that automatically detects aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels by using dual-band imagery. The method exploits the fluorescence emission spectra from corn kernels captured under 365 nm ultra-violet light excitation. Our approach could lead to a non-destructive and non-invasive way of quantifying the levels of aflatoxin contamination. The preliminary results shown here, demonstrate the potential of our technique for aflatoxin detection.

  12. A compilation of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity data on aromatic aminosulphonic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, R; Steinle, D; Anliker, R

    1992-07-01

    A review is presented to evaluate existing information on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity testing of various aromatic aminosulphonic acids (AASAs). A great variety of water-soluble azo dyes can form aromatic phenyl- or naphthyl-aminosulphonic acids by chemical and enzymatic reduction. AASAs are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of azo dyes and azo pigments and can arise as contaminants in the final products. Comparisons have been made with the data available on the corresponding unsulphonated analogues, some of which are known to be genotoxic and/or carcinogenic. The vast majority of the AASAs were conclusively non-mutagenic in the Ames test. In most cases the absence of genotoxicity was also demonstrated with a variety of other test systems in vitro and in vivo. It is concluded that AASAs, in contrast with some of their unsulphonated analogues, generally have no or very low genotoxic and tumorigenic potential.

  13. Mycotic and aflatoxin contamination in Myristica fragrans seeds (nutmeg) and Capsicum annum (chilli), packaged in Italy and commercialized worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, G; Ostuni, M; Calonico, C; Rossi, S; Capei, R; Lo Nostro, A

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites of moulds known to be carcinogenic for humans, and therefore should not be ingested in high doses. This study aimed to determine the level of mould and aflatoxin contamination in dehydrated chilli and nutmeg imported from India and Indonesia, respectively, packaged in Italy, and commercialized worldwide. We tested 63 samples of chilli (22 sanitized through heat treatment and 41 not heat-treated) and 52 samples of nutmeg (22 heat-treated and 30 not heat-treated) for aflatoxin, moulds and moisture content. Heat-treated samples were less contaminated than untreated samples. Spices in powder form (both chilli and nutmeg) were more contaminated than whole ones. In untreated spices, we observed a positive correlation between mould and moisture content. Of the powdered nutmeg and chilli samples, 72.5% and 50% tested positive for aflatoxin contamination, with a range of 0-17.2 μg kg(-1) and 0-10.3 μg kg(-1), respectively. The steam treatment of spices would be useful in reducing the initial amount of moulds. Although the risk from the consumption of spices contaminated with aflatoxins is minimal, owing to the small amount used in food, preventive screening of the whole food chain is very important, especially because the most frequently identified toxin was B1, which is the most dangerous of the four toxins (B1, B2, G1, G2).

  14. Report on carcinogens monograph on cumene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program conducted a cancer evaluation on cumene for possible listing in the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). The cancer evaluation is captured in the RoC monograph, which was peer reviewed in a public forum. The monograph consists of two components: (Part 1) the cancer evaluation, which reviews the relevant scientific information, assesses its quality, applies the RoC listing criteria to the scientific information, and provides the NTP recommendation for listing status for cumene in the RoC, and (Part 2) the substance profile proposed for the RoC, containing the NTP's listing status recommendation, a summary of the scientific evidence considered key to reaching that decision, and data on properties, use, production, exposure, and Federal regulations and guidelines to reduce exposure to cumene. This monograph provides an assessment of the available scientific information on cumene, including human exposure and properties, disposition and toxicokinetics, cancer studies in experimental animals, and studies of mechanisms and other related effects, including relevant toxicological effects, genetic toxicology, and mechanisms of carcinogenicity. From this assessment, the NTP recommended that cumene be listed as reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen in the RoC based on sufficient evidence from studies in experimental animals, which found that cumene exposure caused lung tumors in male and female mice and liver tumors in female mice. Several proposed mechanisms of carcinogenesis support the relevance to humans of the lung and liver tumors observed in experimental animals. Specifically, there is evidence that humans and experimental animals metabolize cumene through similar metabolic pathways. In addition, mutations of the K-ras oncogene and p53 tumor-suppressor gene observed in cumene-induced lung tumors in mice, along with altered expression of many other genes, resemble molecular alterations found in human lung and other cancers.

  15. Environmental Contaminants in Foodstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Túri-Szerletics

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Consumers have specific concerns about food contaminants but often lack themeans to make appropriate judgements on what is high risk and what is not. Contaminantsin foods can be grouped according to their origin and nature. Environmental contaminantsof food-safety concern includes toxic metals and elements, organometallic compounds,agricultural chemicals and persistent organic pollutants such as halogenated hydrocarbonpesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons,phthalates, nirates, nitrites. These contaminants may present a potential hazard for humanhealth if exposure exceeds tolerable levels. This article shows the characteristics and thedietary intake of these elements and compounds. Further works need to concentrate onmechanism of different contaminants toxicity and metabolism, reevaluation of acceptablelimits, and their control in foods and in the environment.

  16. Food safety aspects on ethnic foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusco, Vincenzina; Besten, den H.M.W.; Logrieco, Antonio F.; Rodriguez, Fernando Perez; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.; Stessl, Beatrix; Teixeira, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic foods are becoming popular worldwide. Nevertheless, foodborne outbreaks and food recalls due to the contamination of these foods with pathogenic agents, toxins, undeclared allergens and hazardous chemical compounds are increasing in recent years together with their growing popularity. In t

  17. Implementation in laboratories of Latin America of procedures of harmonized essay for the determination of the radioactive contamination of food; Implementacion en laboratorios de Latinoamerica de procedimientos de ensayo armonizados para la determinacion de la contaminacion radiactiva de alimentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez G, I.M. [CPHR (Cuba); Iglicki, F.A. [CNEA (Argentina); Aguirre G, J. [CNSNS, (Mexico); Melo F, A.C. de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (Brazil); Tomicic M, I.J. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, (Chile); Loria M, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas Nucleares y Moleculares, (Costa Rica); Diodati, J.M. [ARN, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires (1429), (Argentina); Vasquez B, L.R. [Comision Ecuatoriana de Energia Atomica, (Ecuador); Alarcon S, F.A. [Centro de Investigaciones y Aplicaciones Nucleares, El Salvador (El Salvador); Civil, M. [Laboratoire Veterinaire et de Controle de Qualite des Aliments, (Haiti); Naut M, B.C. [Universidad Autonoma de Santo Domingo, Republica Dominicana (Dominican Republic); Odino M, M.R. [Direccion Nacional de Energia y Tecnologia Nuclear (Uruguay); Flores M, Y.R. [Direccion General de Energia Atomica, (Venezuela); Rossbach, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, (Austria)]. e-mail: isis@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    In Latin America, nowadays, it is not had harmonized essay procedures for the determination of radioactive contaminants in foods. Equally, the great diversity of institutions that in each country are devoted to carry out this control and the difference in the level that its possess the same ones in quality matter, its impose the necessity to implant a Quality Management System on the base of harmonized technical criteria that its help to obtain reliable analytical results. With this end, it was proposed and it was approved the ARCAL LXXIX regional project: 'Harmonization of the technical and specific requirements of quality for the control of the radioactive contamination of foods'. In this work the aspects more significant of the design and content of the Manual of technical procedures for the determination of radioactive contaminants in foods, elaborated in the marks of the one referred project are presented. The same one includes eight procedures for the previous treatment of the samples, the spectrometric determination of gamma emitters radionuclides, the determination of the alpha activity indexes and total beta, of {sup 131} I, {sup 89,90} Sr, {sup 226} Ra, {sup 238,} {sup 239} Pu and {sup 3} H, using different methodologies validated in the region. The actions carried out to implement this Manual are also exposed. (Author)

  18. Survey of aflatoxins in Kashkineh: A traditional Iranian food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M; Rezapour, S; Rezapour, P

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus that can contaminate human and animal foods, including corn, wheat, rice, peanuts, and many other crops resulting in the illness or death of human and animal consumers. The aim of this study was to detect aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, G2 and total aflatoxin in Kashkineh, a traditional Iranian food. Materials and Methods This survey was conducted to detect aflatoxins on 41 samples of Kashkineh. The samples were randomly collected from traditional bazaars and supermarkets of Khorramabad city of Iran. The presence and quantity of aflatoxins was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results The average concentrations of AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2 in all samples and in a mixed sample of all samples were not detectable (ND). The only sample that showed aflatoxin contamination was sample number 29 of which the AFB1 concentration was 0.64 ng/g. Conclusion Although some people believe Kashkineh is carcinogenic due to toxins, this study showed kashkineh is not contaminated with aflatoxins. PMID:22347598

  19. Survey of Aflatoxins in Kashkineh: A traditional Iranian Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rezapour

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus that can contaminate human and animal foods, including corn, wheat, rice, peanuts, and many other crops resulting in the illness or death of human and animal consumers. The aim of this study was to detect aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, G2 and total aflatoxin in Kashkineh, a traditional Iranian food.Materials and Methods: This survey was conducted to detect aflatoxins on 41 samples of Kashkineh. The samples were randomly collected from traditional bazaars and supermarkets of Khorramabad city of Iran. The presence and quantity of aflatoxins was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC.Results: The average concentrations of AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2 in all samples and in a mixed sample of all samples were not detectable (ND. The only sample that showed aflatoxin contamination was sample number 29 of which the AFB1 concentration was 0.64 ng/g.Conclusion: Although some people believe Kashkineh is carcinogenic due to toxins, this study showed kashkineh is not contaminated with aflatoxins.

  20. Comparison of rat olfactory mucosal responses to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genter, M.B.; Warner, B.M.; Medvedovic, M.; Sartor, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Alachlor and butachlor are chloracetanilide herbicides that induce olfactory tumors in rats, whereas propachlor does not. The mechanism by which alachlor induces tumors is distinct from many other nasal carcinogens, in that alachlor induces a gradual de-differentiation of the olfactory mucosa (OM) to a more respiratory-like epithelium, in contrast to other agents that induce cytotoxicity, followed by an aberrant regenerative response. We studied biochemical and genomic effects of these compounds to identify processes that occur in common between alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats. Because we have previously shown that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) is activated in OM by alachlor, in the present studies we evaluated both MMP2 activation and changes in OM gene expression in response to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilide treatments. All three chloracetanilides activated MMP2, and > 300 genes were significantly up- or downregulated between control and alachlor-treated rats. The most significantly regulated gene was vomeromodulin, which was dramatically upregulated by alachlor and butachlor treatment (>60-fold), but not by propachlor treatment. Except for similar gene responses in alachlor- and butachlor-treated rats, we did not identify clear-cut differences that would predict OM carcinogenicity in this study. PMID:19425180

  1. Tobacco carcinogens, their biomarkers and tobacco-induced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S

    2003-10-01

    The devastating link between tobacco products and human cancers results from a powerful alliance of two factors - nicotine and carcinogens. Without either one of these, tobacco would be just another commodity, instead of being the single greatest cause of death due to preventable cancer. Nicotine is addictive and toxic, but it is not carcinogenic. This addiction, however, causes people to use tobacco products continually, and these products contain many carcinogens. What are the mechanisms by which this deadly combination leads to 30% of cancer-related deaths in developed countries, and how can carcinogen biomarkers help to reveal these mechanisms?

  2. Investigation on contamination of major foodborne pathogens in food in a city%某市主要食源性致病菌污染现状调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡卓; 石文松; 钟艳; 方英; 杨林飞

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解某市流通、消费环节主要食源性致病菌的分布特征.方法 采取分层随机抽样法对某市辖区内大型农贸市场、超市及餐馆的食品采样监测,按GB4789进行沙门氏菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、单增李斯特菌等9种食源性致病菌分离鉴定.结果 总致病菌检出率为11.78%;3类采样场所致病菌检出率总体上存在统计学差异(x2=16.50,P<0.05);多种类样品存在致病菌污染,其中水产品(生食)(31.82%)、生畜(禽)肉(31.25%)、鲜榨果汁(28.57%)污染率较高;检出副溶血性弧菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、沙门氏菌与单增生李斯特菌4类致病菌且其食品污染率存在统计学差异(x2=27.08,P<0.05);水产品(生食)的副溶血性弧菌检出率高于水产品(鲜冻)(P(f)(i)(c)(h)(e)(r')s Exact Test<0.05).结论 应加强食品各环节卫生监管及完善食品卫生的标准.%Objective To study the distributional of major fbodborne pathogens in food when circulated or consumpted in a city. Methods A stratified random sampling method was adopted to sample the food from large free market of agricultural products, supermarket and restaurant. A total of 9 species food borne pathogens, such as Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, listeria monocytogenes etc, from the food were isolated and identifi-cated according to GB4789. Results The total contamination rate of food borne pathogens was 11.78%. There was significant difference of the contamination rates in 3 sampling sites(χ2=16.50, P<0.05). Many kinds of samples were contaminated by food borne pathogens.The contaminated rate of aquatic food (omophagia) was 31.82%, livestock (poultry) meat was 31.25%, and fresh squeezed juice was 28.57%. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes were found, and contamination rate had significant difference (χ2=27.08, P<0.05). The Vibrio parahaemolyticus contamination rate in aquatic products (o-mophagja) was higher

  3. Carcinogenicity study of cochineal in B6C3F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H; Iwata, H; Tanaka, T; Morishita, Y; Mori, Y; Kojima, T; Okumura, A

    1991-09-01

    The carcinogenicity of cochineal, a red colouring used in food and other products, was studied in a 2-yr bioassay in B6C3F1 mice. Groups of 50-55 mice of each sex were given 0, 3 or 6% cochineal in the diet for 2 yr. Mice of all groups developed tumours including hepatocellular adenomas or carcinomas, pulmonary adenomas or adenocarcinomas and lymphomas or lymphatic leukaemias, and the incidences of these tumours were not significantly different in treated and control groups. The results indicate that cochineal lacks carcinogenicity in mice and are consistent with those of in vitro short-term assays of cochineal and of carminic acid, an active principle of cochineal.

  4. It is safe from O-157 and salmonellae. Food hygiene and food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    Despite the improvement of the systems of food hygiene and food distribution on the markets compared with old times, food-borne diseases are increasing and spreading in the world. Food-borne diseases by pathogenic Escherichia coli O-157:H7 are also increasing seriously. Japan has been importing the large amount of foodstuffs which sometimes contaminating with pathogens or parasites. Many types of food-borne diseases have been caused by non-spore forming bacteria such as salmonellae, V. parahaemolyticus, pathogenic E. coli, Campylobacter and Staphylococcus aureus, and these bacteria can inactivate at dose in the range of 1 - 3 kGy in chilled meat. These pathogenic bacteria can also inactivate in the range of 2 - 5 kGy in frozen condition of meat. For the inactivation of Bacillus cereus or Clostridium botulinum, necessary doses should be more than 10 kGy, however, a dose of 3 kGy is also effective to control the growth at storage below 10degC. Food-borne diseases have been caused also by mycotoxins of fungi in Japan. Aflatoxins and sterigmatocystin are carcinogens and are stable to radiation. However, many fungi for responsible to produce mycotoxins are radiation sensitive and should be easily inactivated in the range of 3 - 5 kGy. If moisture content is controlled below 15%, low dose irradiation is also effective in the range of 0.2 - 0.5 kGy to control the growth of fungi and pests in grain or other dried foods. (author)

  5. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a group of organic contaminants known for their prevalence and persistence in petroleum-impacted environment such as groundwater, soils and sediments. Many high molecular weight PAHs are suspected carcinogens and the existence of...

  6. Acrylamide exposure from foods of the Dutch population and an assessment of the consequent risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, E.J.M.; Baars, A.J.; Klaveren, van J.D.; Spanjer, M.C.; Rensen, P.M.; Hiemstra, M.; Kooij, van J.A.; Peters, P.W.J.

    2003-01-01

    At the end of April 2002, the Swedish Food Administration reported the presence of acrylamide in heat treated food products. Acrylamide has been shown to be toxic and carcinogenic in animals, and has been classified by the WHO/IARC among others as `probably carcinogenic for humans¿. The purposes of

  7. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of food compounds : Application of a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, Cyrille Anna Maria

    2001-01-01

    Exposure of humans to potential mutagenic and carcinogenic food compounds through the diet is unavoidable. On the other hand, there is epidemiological evidence for antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties of food as well (such as vegetables and fruit). The assessment of carcinogenic and cancer

  8. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  9. Natural pesticides and bioactive components in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, R C

    1990-01-01

    In this review, some common food plants and their toxic or otherwise bioactive components and mycotoxin contaminants have been considered. Crucifers contain naturally occurring components that are goitrogenic, resulting from the combined action of allyl isothiocyanate, goitrin, and thiocyanate. Although crucifers may provide some protection from cancer when taken prior to a carcinogen, when taken after a carcinogen they act as promoters of carcinogenesis. The acid-condensed mixture of indole-3-carbinol (a component of crucifers) binds to the TCDD receptor and causes responses similar to those of TCDD. Herbs contain many biologically active components, with more than 20% of the commercially prepared human drugs coming from these plants. Onion and garlic juices can help to prevent the rise of serum cholesterol. Most herbs used in treatments may have many natural constituents that act oppositely from their intended use. Some herbs like Bishop's week seed contain carcinogens, and many contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids that can cause cirrhosis of the liver. The general phytoalexin response in plants (including potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, celery, and sweet potatoes) induced by external stimuli can increase the concentrations of toxic chemical constituents in those plants. In potatoes, two major indigenous compounds are alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, which are human plasma cholinesterase inhibitors and teratogens in animals. Because of its toxicity, the potato variety Lenape was withdrawn from the market. Celery, parsley, and parsnips contain the linear furanocoumarin phytoalexins psoralen, bergapten, and xanthotoxin that can cause photosensitization and also are photomutagenic and photocarcinogenic. Celery field workers and handlers continually have photosensitization problems as a result of these indigenous celery furanocoumarins. A new celery cultivar (a result of plant breeding to produce a more pest-resistant variety) was responsible for significant

  10. Emissions and air exposure of carcinogens and co-carcinogens in four Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Ketzel, Matthias;

    . A list of carcinogenic andco-carcinogenic pollutants (particles, heavy metals and organic compounds) emittedfrom energy production, industrial activities, road transport, navigation, agriculture, residential heating and product use was compiled. Pollutant emissions levels for 2010and trends for 1990......This project (KoL 12-08) was performed for the Climate and Air Quality Group (KlimaogLuftgruppen, KoL), Nordic Council of Ministers by atmospheric emission, exposureand epidemiology experts from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Emission inventory methods and exposure models were presented...... to 2010 were compiled and discussed, and modelled andmeasured atmospheric concentrations for 2010 were compiled on regional, urbanand local scales. Nordic maps of emissions and air concentrations of PM2.5, PM10, NOx,NMVOC, benzene, BaP, dioxin, cadmium and nickel were compiled for allaggregated main...

  11. 76 FR 52664 - Request for Information: Announcement of Carcinogen and Recommended Exposure Limit (REL) Policy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Carcinogen and Recommended Exposure Limit (REL) Policy Assessment AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational... review its approach to classifying carcinogens and establishing recommended exposure limits (RELs) for... recommended exposure limit (REL) for carcinogens or should lower targets be considered? (4) In...

  12. 宁夏回族自治区食品中铅、镉、汞、铜、铝污染状况分析%Analysis of food contamination by lead, cadmium, mercury, copper and aluminum in Ningxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏秋宁; 晋博烜; 丁亚磊; 陈涛

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the situation of food contamination by lead,cadmium,mercury,copper and aluminum in Ningxia Region.Methods Ten categories of food samples up to 712 copies including dairy,edible mushrooms,eggs,preserved egg,meat,organs,aquatic products,vegetables,grains and pasta from supermarkets of five administrative cities of Ningxia Autonomous Region were selected in 2010.The contents of lead,cadmium and mercury in food were detected in 646 samples of 9 categories of food,and copper content of the 30 meat samples were detected.Aluminum content in 66 samples of flour food was tested.According to the methods of national food safety standards (GB 5009.12-2010) and national food hygiene standards (GB/T 5009.13-2003,GB/ T 5009.15-2003 and GB/T 5009.17-2003),lead,copper,cadmium and mercury in various foods were tested.Aluminum was determined using the method for determination of spectrophotometry.Results The detection rates of lead,cadmium,mercury in the nine categories of food were 52.8% (341/646),62.1% (401/646),51.7% (334/646);the detection rates of copper in the meat was 90.0% (27/30);the aluminum in flour food was 84.8% (56/66),respectively.Compared with the national standards,the eligible rates of lead,cadmium,mercury,copper and aluminum were 97.1% (627/646),98.2% (539/549),100.0% (646/646),100.0% (30/30) and 75.8% (50/66),respectively.Food contaminated by lead and cadmium were mainly distributed in preserved egg [lead detection rate 9.5% (2/21)],organs [lead detection rate 6.7% (2/30),cadmium detection rate 30.0% (9/30)],vegetables [lead detection rate 9.9% (8/90)] and a small amount of food products [lead detection rate 4.7% (7/150)].The levels of lead in fried flour food and fine dried noodles were higher [40.9% (9/22),36.4% (4/11)].Conclusions Food contamination by lead,cadmium,mercury and copper is not serious in Ningxia.The monitoring results of lead,cadmium,mercury and copper in food are satisfying in Ningxia

  13. Nanosensors for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixiong; Sheng, Chenxing

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent research and development of nanosensors applied to the food safety. Since the food safety is directly related to the people's health and life, the food detection has received considerable attentions. However, this food security has emerged in China as a severe problem in recent years. Food safety problems frequently compromised due to formaldehyde, poison vegetables, excessive pesticide residues, etc. These kinds of food contaminations could not be detected efficiently by traditional methods. Applying nanotechnology and nanominerals, various food contaminations can be identified accurately. Therefore nanosensors have been widely used in the food detection. We introduce current research on nanosensors followed by the industrial application of nanosensors. Finally, the challenges for the future food safety using nanosensors are discussed.

  14. A common carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene causes neuronal death in mouse via microglial activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallol Dutta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P belongs to a class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that serve as micropollutants in the environment. B[a]P has been reported as a probable carcinogen in humans. Exposure to B[a]P can take place by ingestion of contaminated (especially grilled, roasted or smoked food or water, or inhalation of polluted air. There are reports available that also suggests neurotoxicity as a result of B[a]P exposure, but the exact mechanism of action is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using neuroblastoma cell line and primary cortical neuron culture, we demonstrated that B[a]P has no direct neurotoxic effect. We utilized both in vivo and in vitro systems to demonstrate that B[a]P causes microglial activation. Using microglial cell line and primary microglial culture, we showed for the first time that B[a]P administration results in elevation of reactive oxygen species within the microglia thereby causing depression of antioxidant protein levels; enhanced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, that results in increased production of NO from the cells. Synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines were also elevated within the microglia, possibly via the p38MAP kinase pathway. All these factors contributed to bystander death of neurons, in vitro. When administered to animals, B[a]P was found to cause microglial activation and astrogliosis in the brain with subsequent increase in proinflammatory cytokine levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Contrary to earlier published reports we found that B[a]P has no direct neurotoxic activity. However, it kills neurons in a bystander mechanism by activating the immune cells of the brain viz the microglia. For the first time, we have provided conclusive evidence regarding the mechanism by which the micropollutant B[a]P may actually cause damage to the central nervous system. In today's perspective, where rising pollution levels globally are a matter of grave concern, our

  15. Contaminação ambiental por Bacillus cereus em unidade de alimentação e nutrição Food service environmental contamination by Bacillus cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Aparecida Mendes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado em uma Unidade de Alimentação e Nutrição de uma universidade pública, em Viçosa, MG, tendo como objetivo contribuir para a avaliação de riscos a que se expõem os usuários de cozinhas institucionais semelhantes, por meio da avaliação do potencial que superfícies de bancadas de aço inox representam como fontes de contaminação dos alimentos por Bacillus cereus. A presença do microorganismo em superfícies de 24 bancadas que eventualmente entram em contato com alimentos crus e cozidos foi analisada em duas ocasiões distintas, por meio da técnica do swab e semeadura em placas contendo meio MYP. A presença do microorganismo não foi detectada em 73% das amostras. Entre aquelas a partir das quais o patógeno foi recuperado, foram observadas contagens de até 60 UFC/cm², valor registrado no setor de prépreparo de vegetais. A simples presença do patógeno reforça a necessidade de higienização adequada, especialmente em locais onde a contaminação pode atingir alimentos prontos para consumo, de forma a prevenir a ocorrência de surtos de doenças de origem alimentar devidas a esse microorganismo.This study reports an evaluation performed at Food Service Federal University Viçosa in Southeast Brazil, as a contribution to estimate the risks that users of similar public food services are exposed to, by identifying environmental surface areas from which Bacillus cereus may be transferred to food. Samples have been collected in order to evaluate the environmental contamination, using the "swab" technique and surface platting in MYP agar, for expressing the number of CFU/cm² in 24 stainless steel tables that may have contact with raw or cooked foods. Each table was analyzed twice. Although some samples did not exhibit contamination (73%, counts up to 60 CFU/cm² were found, with the higher values being obtained from the vegetable pre-preparation section samples. The presence of this pathogen reinforces

  16. Two-year carcinogenicity study of acrylamide in Wistar Han rats with in utero exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronpot, R R; Thoolen, R J M M; Hansen, B

    2015-02-01

    Acrylamide is an important chemical with widespread industrial and other uses in addition to generalized population exposure from certain cooked foods. Previous rat studies to assess the carcinogenic potential of acrylamide have been carried out exclusively in the Fischer 344 rat with identification of a number of tumors amongst which mesotheliomas of the tunica vaginalis is an important tumor endpoint in the classification of acrylamide as a 'probably human carcinogen. In a rat carcinogenicity study to determine the human relevance of mesotheliomas Wistar Han rats were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, or 3.0mg acrylamide/kg body weight/day in drinking water starting at gestation day 6. At the end of two years, mammary gland fibroadenomas in females and thyroid follicular cell tumors in both sexes were the only tumors increased in acrylamide treated rats. These tumor endpoints have rat-specific modes of action suggesting less likelihood of human cancer risk than previously estimated. This study demonstrates that tunica vaginalis mesotheliomas are strain specific and not likely of genotoxic origin.

  17. Impact of Environmental Exposures on the Mutagenicity/Carcinogenicity of Heterocyclic Amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Bennett, L M; Malfatti, M A; Colvin, M E; Kulp, K S

    2003-12-19

    Carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from overcooked foods and are highly mutagenic in most short-term test systems. One of the most abundant of these amines, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), induces breast, colon and prostate tumors in rats. Human dietary epidemiology studies suggest a strong correlation between either meat consumption or well-done muscle meat consumption and cancers of the colon, breast, stomach, lung and esophagus. For over 20 years our laboratory has helped define the human exposure to these dietary carcinogens. In this report we describe how various environmental exposures may modulate the risk from exposure to heterocyclic amines, especially PhIP. To assess the impact of foods on PhIP metabolism in humans, we developed an LC/MS/MS method to analyze the four major PhIP urinary metabolites following the consumption of a single portion of grilled chicken. Adding broccoli to the volunteers' diet altered the kinetics of PhIP metabolism. At the cellular level we have found that PhIP itself stimulates a significant estrogenic response in MCF-7 cells, but even more interestingly, co-incubation of the cells with herbal teas appear to enhance the response. Numerous environmental chemicals found in food or the atmosphere can impact the exposure, metabolism, and cell proliferation response of heterocyclic amines.

  18. Potential health risks related to carcinogens in the atmospheric environment in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, B R; Mohan, M; Sidhu, K S

    1996-10-01

    In India, rapid urbanization and industrialization have contributed positively toward meeting the materialistic needs of the citizens, but have also resulted in contamination of the atmospheric environment. This paper deals with the assessment of potential health risks posed by carcinogenic substances, namely cadmium, chromium, and nickel, present in certain atmospheric environments in India. Average air concentrations of these carcinogenic metals have been assessed for different states and regions of India (C. R. Krishnamurti and P. Vishwanathan, Toxic Metals in the Indian Environment, Tata/McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1991). Based on these assessments, both individual and societal risks have been estimated in different states of the country, and comparisons were made. Reported concentration, release sources, potential health risks including cancer risk estimates, and ambient air interim guidelines are discussed. The reported environmental releases and cancer risk from cadmium are minimal. There is a potential for increased respiratory cancer risk from exposure to chromium and nickel in some northern Indian states. These metals are irritants to nasal passages and the respiratory tract. Chromium is also corrosive to mucus membranes. They have the potential to cause chronic respiratory problems. Since it appears that these metals may cause some adverse health effects in humans, exposure to these ambient air pollutants should be minimized by managing the release of these contaminants to the environment. There is a need for the development and strict enforcement of national and state regulatory standards.

  19. Towards incorporating epigenetic mechanisms into carcinogen identification and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zdenko; Lambert, Marie-Pierre; van Veldhoven, Karin; Demetriou, Christiana; Vineis, Paolo; Smith, Martyn T; Straif, Kurt; Wild, Christopher P

    2013-09-01

    Remarkable progress in the field of epigenetics has turned academic, medical and public attention to the potential applications of these new advances in medicine and various fields of biomedical research. The result is a broader appreciation of epigenetic phenomena in the a etiology of common human diseases, most notably cancer. These advances also represent an exciting opportunity to incorporate epigenetics and epigenomics into carcinogen identification and safety assessment. Current epigenetic studies, including major international sequencing projects, are expected to generate information for establishing the 'normal' epigenome of tissues and cell types as well as the physiological variability of the epigenome against which carcinogen exposure can be assessed. Recently, epigenetic events have emerged as key mechanisms in cancer development, and while our search of the Monograph Volume 100 revealed that epigenetics have played a modest role in evaluating human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs so far, epigenetic data might play a pivotal role in the future. Here, we review (i) the current status of incorporation of epigenetics in carcinogen evaluation in the IARC Monographs Programme, (ii) potential modes of action for epigenetic carcinogens, (iii) current in vivo and in vitro technologies to detect epigenetic carcinogens, (iv) genomic regions and epigenetic modifications and their biological consequences and (v) critical technological and biological issues in assessment of epigenetic carcinogens. We also discuss the issues related to opportunities and challenges in the application of epigenetic testing in carcinogen identification and evaluation. Although the application of epigenetic assays in carcinogen evaluation is still in its infancy, important data are being generated and valuable scientific resources are being established that should catalyse future applications of epigenetic testing.

  20. The use of food waste-based diets and Napier grass to culture grass carp: growth performance and contaminants contained in cultured fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhang; Mo, Wing-Yin; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Li, Kai-Bing; Choi, Wai-Ming; Man, Yu-Bon; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-04-01

    The present study used commercial feeds, food waste feeds, Napier grass, and mixed feeds (food waste feed to Napier grass ratio, 1:10) to feed grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). The results indicated that grass carp fed with food waste feeds and mix feeds achieved growth performance (based on specific growth rate and feed conversion ratio) that was similar to commercial feeds (p > 0.05). Concentrations of metalloid/metals in food waste feeds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Napier grass were relatively higher than other types of fish feeds (p  0.05). These findings show that food waste feeds are suitable for using in the production of fish feed and Napier grass can be served as supplemental feeds for grass carp, and hence reducing the production cost.

  1. Relationship between Structures and Carcinogenicities of Heterocyclic Amines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Xue-hai; DAI Qian-huan; CHEN Sha; WANG Wen-jun

    2004-01-01

    Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations were performed on heterocyclic aromatic amines(HCAs). The relationship between the structures and the carcinogenicities can be rationally elucidated by the models based on the metabolism of HCAs and the Di-region theory. The degree of easiness for the formation of Di-region electrophilic centers determines the carcinogenic activity. There is a good linear relationship between the observed carcinogenicities and the PM3 calculated parameters, with r=0.973 and F=29.8>(F*0.*01).

  2. Toxicity and Carcinogenicity of Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Takanori; Takeda, Makio; Kojima, Sayuri; Tomiyama, Naruto

    2016-01-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is still used in certain areas of tropics and subtropics to control malaria and other insect-transmitted diseases. DDT and its metabolites have been extensively studied for their toxicity and carcinogenicity in animals and humans and shown to have an endocrine disrupting potential affecting reproductive system although the effects may vary among animal species in correlation with exposure levels. Epidemiologic studies revealed either positive or negative associations between exposure to DDT and tumor development, but there has been no clear evidence that DDT causes cancer in humans. In experimental animals, tumor induction by DDT has been shown in the liver, lung, and adrenals. The mechanisms of hepatic tumor development by DDT have been studied in rats and mice. DDT is known as a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen and has been shown to induce microsomal enzymes through activation of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and to inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the rodent liver. The results from our previously conducted 4-week and 2-year feeding studies of p,p′-DDT in F344 rats indicate that DDT may induce hepatocellular eosinophilic foci as a result of oxidative DNA damage and leads them to hepatic neoplasia in combination with its mitogenic activity and inhibitory effect on GJIC. Oxidative stress could be a key factor in hepatocarcinogenesis by DDT. PMID:26977256

  3. 韶关市市售食品中食源性致病菌污染监测结果分析%Analysis on monitoring data of pathogenic bacteria contamination in food from Shaoguan markets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓俊兴; 徐子强; 唐建红; 钟启丽; 邓华美

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解韶关市市售食品中食源性致病菌的污染现状,为食品安全风险评估及有效控制食源性疾病的发生提供科学依据。方法:按照《2012广东省食品安全风险监测实施方案》的要求对韶关市5个点采集5类食品,用国标方法检测沙门菌、大肠埃希氏菌O157、单核细胞增生李斯特菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、志贺氏菌、副溶血性弧菌、创伤弧菌、阪崎肠杆菌、蜡样芽孢杆菌9种食源性致病菌。结果:在监测的5类276份食品中,共分离出37株食源性致病菌,总检出率为13.41%。其中熟肉制品检出率为21.88%(14/64),生食动物性水产品检出率为17.50%(14/80),焙烤食品检出率为11.67%(7/60)、婴幼儿食品检出率为8.33%(2/24)、凉拌菜未检出食源性致病菌。不同销售点熟肉制品中食源性致菌检出率差异有统计学意义(P <0.05);不同区域、不同种类、不同检测时间食品中食源性致菌检出率差异无统计学意义(P >0.05)。结论:韶关市市售食品中已不同程度受到4种食源性致病菌污染,主要的污染食品为熟肉制品、生食动物水产品;提出了区域间的食品安全风险评估与控制源于客观可行的食品安全风险监测,必须遵循具有代表性、可比性、可靠性的统计学设计原则,尽可能减少随机误差和选择性偏倚和信息偏倚。%Objective:Understand the pol ution status quo of shaoguan city to sel foodborne pathogenic bacteria in food,Control of potential y contaminated food varieties,For food safety risk assessment and provide a scientific basis for effectively control the occurrence of foodborne il ness.Methods:In accordance with the"implementation of the 2012 Guangdong Province of food safety risk monitoring plan" requirements, 5 points of a col ection of 5 categories of food in Shaoguan City,With the national standard method for detection of Salmonel a

  4. Avoiding Gluten Cross-Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avoiding Gluten Cross-Contamination Reviewed by Sharon Denny, MS, RDN Published April 22, 2014 Print Email You might not think twice about the pot you use to boil water, the plate you put your food on or even the ...

  5. Family Resemblance in Attitudes to Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, Paul; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compares young adults with their parents and explores food preferences and attitudes to food, especially sensitivity to cleanliness and contamination of foods. Results indicate small positive parent-child correlations for food preferences but larger correlations for contamination sensitivity. (Author/AS)

  6. Total mesophilic counts underestimate in many cases the contamination levels of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in chilled-stored food products at the end of their shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Samapundo, Simbarashe; Devlieghere, Frank

    2012-12-01

    The major objective of this study was to determine the role of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in spoilage-associated phenomena at the end of the shelf-life of 86 various packaged (air, vacuum, modified-atmosphere) chilled-stored retail food products. The current microbiological standards, which are largely based on the total viable mesophilic counts lack discriminatory capacity to detect psychrotrophic LAB. A comparison between the total viable counts on plates incubated at 30 °C (representing the mesophiles) and at 22 °C (indicating the psychrotrophs) for 86 food samples covering a wide range - ready-to-eat vegetable salads, fresh raw meat, cooked meat products and composite food - showed that a consistent underestimation of the microbial load occurs when the total aerobic mesophilic counts are used as a shelf-life parameter. In 38% of the samples, the psychrotrophic counts had significantly higher values (+0.5-3 log CFU/g) than the corresponding total aerobic mesophilic counts. A total of 154 lactic acid bacteria, which were unable to proliferate at 30 °C were isolated. In addition, a further 43 with a poor recovery at this temperature were also isolated. This study highlights the potential fallacy of the total aerobic mesophilic count as a reference shelf-life parameter for chilled food products as it can often underestimate the contamination levels at the end of the shelf-life.

  7. On-line coupled high performance liquid chromatography-gas chromatography for the analysis of contamination by mineral oil. Part 2: migration from paperboard into dry foods: interpretation of chromatograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni

    2012-09-14

    Mineral oil hydrocarbons are complex as well as varying mixtures and produce correspondingly complex chromatograms (on-line HPLC-GC-FID as described in Part 1): mostly humps of unresolved components are obtained, sometimes with sharp peaks on top. Chromatograms may also contain peaks of hydrocarbons from other sources which need to be subtracted from the mineral oil components. The review focuses on the interpretation and integration of chromatograms related to food contamination by mineral oil from paperboard boxes (off-set printing inks and recycled fibers), if possible distinguishing between various sources of mineral oil. Typical chromatograms are shown for relevant components and interferences as well as food samples encountered on the market. Details are pointed out which may provide relevant information. Integration is shown for examples of paperboard packaging materials as well as various foods. Finally the uncertainty of the analysis and limit of quantitation are discussed for specific examples. They primarily result from the interpretation of the chromatogram, manually placing the baseline and cuts for taking off extraneous components. Without previous enrichment, the limit of quantitation is between around 0.1 mg/kg for foods with a low fat content and 2.5 mg/kg for fats and oils. The measurement uncertainty can be kept clearly below 20% for most samples.

  8. Tobacco carcinogen NNK-induced lung cancer animal models and associated carcinogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guang-Zhe; Xu, Tian-Rui; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-07-01

    Tobacco usage is a major risk factor in the development, progression, and outcomes for lung cancer. Of the carcinogens associated with lung cancer, tobacco-specific nitrosamines 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is among the most potent ones. The oncogenic mechanisms of NNK are not entirely understood, hindering the development of effective strategies for preventing and treating smoking-associated lung cancers. Here, we introduce the NNK-induced lung cancer animal models in different species and its potential mechanisms. Finally, we summarize several chemopreventive agents developed from these animal models.

  9. 2010年-2012年包头市食品中化学污染物监测结果分析%Analysis on chemical contaminant monitoring result of food in Baotou city from 2010 to 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志红; 要媛; 贺敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To understand the pollution of chemical contamination in food in Baotou. Methods: According to "Food safety risk monitoring plan of Inner Mongolia" , different kinds of food were collected to monitor and analyze some heavy metals, food additives, pesticide residues and other chemical contaminants in Baotou urban and two counties from 2010 to 2012. Results: As to metals pollution, the over - limit rate was 3.75% (12/320) for lead, 2.50% (6/240) for cadmium, 31.00% (31/3100) for aluminum. While the over -limit rate of food additives was 4.52% (14/310), including nitrite(5.00% ) , sodium saccharin( 15.56% ) , benzoic acid and sorbic acid (6. 67% ). The over - limit rate of vegetable residues was 5. 00% and methamidophos was not detected. In addition, the prohibited additives and mycotoxins were found in the limited range. Conclusion: The overall level of chemical contaminations in market food was low, but there are still contamination in some food, more attention should be paid to take specific measures to strengthen supervision to ensure public health.%目的:了解包头市市售食品的污染状况.方法:按《内蒙古自治区食品安全风险监测方案》的要求,2010年-2012年在包头市区及2个旗县区采集各类食品进行部分重金属、食品添加剂、农药残留等化学污染物的监测分析.结果:金属污染情况:铅超标率3.75% (12/320),镉超标率2.50% (6/240),铝超标率31.00% (31/100).食品添加剂污染情况:食品添加剂超标率4.52% (14/310),其中亚硝酸盐超标率5.00%,糖精钠超标率15.56%,苯甲酸、山梨酸超标率6.67%.蔬菜农药残留超标率5.00%(甲胺磷不得检出).违禁添加物、真菌毒素监测项目未有超标.结论:包头市售食品污染总体水平较低,但部分食品仍存在污染,应引起重视,采取针对性措施,加强监管力度,保证大众健康.

  10. 2010年上海市市售食品中食源性致病菌监测结果分析%Analysis on monitoring data of pathogenic bacteria contamination in food from Shanghai markets in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雷军; 王颖; 彭少杰; 田明胜; 王李伟; 徐晨

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the contaminating characteristics of pathogenic bacteria in food from Shanghai markets. Methods To get the food samples in Shanghai food monitoring points randomly in 2010 and detect 11 pathogenic bacteria including Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and so on. Results The total positive ratio of pathogenic bacteria in food samples account for 7.6%. The mainly food categories polluted by pathogenic bacteria are left-over rice food (25.0% ) , raw poultry meat (21.7% ) , raw livestock meat ( 19.0% ) , raw seafood ( 14.4% ) , ready-to-eat food (4.5%) and quick-frozen boiled food made of glour (1.7%). In addition, Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood (21.0% ) , Lister monocytogene in raw pourtry meat (19. 8% ) and Salmonella in raw pork (11. 6% ) are the mainly pathogenic bacteria combinations which may cause food-borne diseases, and cooket meat, milk products, raw eggs, ready-to-eat vegetable without cooking, frozen drinks, pastry and non-fermented bean products were negative in detecting pathogenic bacteria in 2010. Conclusion Some food, especially some raw products in Shanghai markets can be polluted by pathogenic bacteria. Thoroughly cooking and preventing cross-contamination need to be done to improve food safety.%目的 掌握上海市市售食品中食源性致病菌污染状况.方法 在全市监测网点抽检各类食品,开展沙门茵等11种食源性致病菌的监测.结果 各类食品中食源性致病菌总体检出率为7.6%,检出食源性致病菌的食品包括剩饭(25.0%)、生禽肉(21.7%)、生畜肉(19.0%)、水产品(14.4%)、餐饮即食食品(4.5%)和速冻熟制米面制品(1.7%).其中,海产品中的副溶血性弧茵、生禽肉中单增李斯特茵、生猪产品中的沙门菌的检出率分别为21.0%,19.8%和11.6%,是本市食源性致病菌风险来源的主要食品品种和项目.熟食卤味、乳制品、鸡蛋、生食蔬菜、冷饮饮料、糕点、非发酵豆制品等食品均

  11. Generation of in vitro data to model dose dependent in vivo DNA binding of genotoxic carcinogens and its consequences: the case of estragole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paini, A.

    2012-01-01

    Our food contains several compounds which, when tested in isolated form at high doses in animal experiments, have been shown to be genotoxic and carcinogenic. At the present state-of-the-art there is no scientific consensus on how to perform the risk assessment of these compounds when present at low

  12. Environmental carcinogens and mutational pathways in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliero, A; Godschalk, R; Andreassi, M G; Curfs, D; Van Schooten, F J; Izzotti, A

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with DNA damage in both circulating and vessel-wall cells and DNA adducts derived from exposure to environmental mutagens are abundant in atherosclerotic vessels. Environmental chemical carcinogens identified as risk factor for atherosclerosis include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, beta-naphthoflavone, pyrene, 3-methylcolanthrene), arsenic, cadmium, 1,3-butadiene, cigarette smoke. Accordingly, polymorphisms of genes encoding for phase I/II metabolic reaction and DNA repair are risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although their role is negligible as compared to other risk factors. The pathogenic relevance of mutation-related molecular damage in atherosclerosis has been demonstrated in experimental animal models involving the exposure to chemical mutagens. The relevance of mutation-related events in worsening atherosclerosis prognosis has been demonstrated in human clinical studies mainly as referred to mitochondrial DNA damage. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the occurrence of high level of oxidative damage in blood vessel resulting from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mitochondrial damage is a main endogenous source of oxidative stress whose accumulation causes activation of intrinsic apoptosis through BIRC2 inhibition and cell loss contributing to plaque development and instability. Environmental physical mutagens, including ionizing radiation, are a risk factor for atherosclerosis even at the low exposure dose occurring in case of occupational exposure or the high exposure doses occurring during radiotherapy. Conversely, the role of exciting UV radiation in atherosclerosis is still uncertain. This review summarizes the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the pathogenic role of mutation-related pathway in atherosclerosis examining the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  13. Evaluation of a recent product to remove lipids and other matrix co-extractives in the analysis of pesticide residues and environmental contaminants in foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrates the application of a novel lipid removal product to the residue analysis of 65 pesticides and 52 environmental contaminants in kale, pork, salmon, and avocado by fast, low pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS). Sample preparation involves QuEChE...

  14. Evaluation of a new carbon/zirconia-based sorbent for cleanup of food extracts in multiclass analysis of pesticides and environmental contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel carbon/zirconia based material, SupelTM QuE Verde (Verde), was evaluated in a filter-vial dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) cleanup of QuEChERS extracts of pork, salmon, kale, and avocado for residual analysis of pesticides and environmental contaminants. Low pressure (LP) GC-MS/MS w...

  15. Analysis of food-borne pathogen contamination situation in retailed food in Guangzhou in 2010%2010年广州市市售食品中食源性致病菌污染情况检测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈佳璇; 夏丹; 林云万; 侯水平; 张健

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解广州市区主要消费食品中食源性致病菌的污染状况,寻找本市引起食源性疾病的重点食品,对可能发生的食源性疾病进行预测和预报.方法:按照“全国食源性致病菌监测计划”检验技术要求提出的检测方法,采集七类食品,检测沙门菌、单核细胞增生李斯特菌、副溶血性弧菌等项目.结果:264份样品中检出致病菌64份,平均检出率为24.24%;副溶血性弧菌检出率为37.50% (24/64);单增李斯特菌检出率为5.91% (14/237);沙门菌检出率为12.12% (32/264).结论:广州市市售食品中食源性致病菌污染较为严重,应加强细菌性食源性疾病的研究分析,做好食品安全预警预报工作.%Objective:To understand the contamination status of food - borne pathogenic bacteria in main food in Guangzhou, find out the pathogen source and predict the food - borne disease. Methods: Based on the standard operation procedures in the handbook of National Surveillance on Food - borne Pathogenic Bacteria, seven kinds of food samples were collected for detection of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Results: 264 samples were detected, 64 strains of pathogens were detected with an overall positive rate of 24. 24% . Vibrio parahaemolyticus had the highest positive rate of 37. 50% (24/64) , Listeria monocytogenes had the positive rate of 5.91% (14/237) , the positive rate of Salmonella was 12.12% (32/264). Conclusion: The contamination status of food - borne pathogenic bacteria in main consumption of food in Guangzhou was serious. The study on risk factors of food - borne disease and the predictive warning on food safety should be enforced.

  16. Food irradiation and sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  17. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample.

  18. Carcinogenicity and co-carcinogenicity studies on propoxur in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Y; Baqar, S M; Mehrotra, N K

    1998-12-01

    Propoxur (2-isopropoxyphenyl methylcarbamate) is a widely used broad spectrum carbamate insecticide mainly used to control household pests. Propoxur exposure is reported to inhibit cholinesterase activity in rodents. Apart from other toxic effects, propoxur was found to possess tumorigenic activity in rats after oral administration. Propoxur does not produce tumours in mice or hamsters, or bladder hyperplasia in dogs and monkeys following oral feeding. In this set of investigations the complete carcinogenic, tumour initiating and promoting potential of propoxur was evaluated in male and female Swiss albino mice, since no information was available following dermal exposure of propoxur. The animals were exposed to propoxur through topical painting on the interscapular region at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. The results revealed that propoxur has tumour promoting potential on mouse skin following a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, but it failed to induce the tumour(s) at a significant level, when tested for tumour initiating and complete carcinogenic property.

  19. Regulatory corpus related to the contamination of food products by radionuclides. Application in France and comparative study with Belgium, United-Kingdom, Switzerland and Norway. Report nr 298; Corpus reglementaires relatifs a la contamination des denrees alimentaires par les radionucleides. Application en France et etude comparative avec la Belgique, Le Royaume-Uni, la Suisse et la Norvege. Rapport no. 298

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, C.; Crouail, P.

    2006-07-15

    The first part of this report gives an overview of the international legal context: arrangements of the Codex Alimentarius, standards established by the Codex Alimentarius Committee on food additives and contaminants, recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, role of the IAEA. The second part presents European regulations: those adopted after the Chernobyl accident, those to be applied in case of a radiological accident. A synthesis of international and European regulations is proposed. The regulations applicable in France are presented (protection of population against hazards of ionizing radiations, application modalities). The other parts of the report present the legal framework, the modalities of food product control, and the post-Chernobyl peculiarities for Belgium, the United Kingdom, Switzerland and Norway. The author finally proposes a synthesis and a comparative analysis

  20. Investigation on Situation of Food Contaminated with Heavy Metals in Xiamen During the Period of 2008 - 2011%2008-2011年厦门市食品中重金属污染状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周娜; 白艳艳; 王文伟; 贾玉珠

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the contamination status of heavy metals in various types of food in Xiamen, and to provide the scientific evidence for strengthening supervision of food safety. Methods Samples of foodstuff were randomly collected from supermarkets and fairs in Xiamen from 2008 to 2011. Heavy metals such as plumbum, cadmium and hydrargyrum in food samples were tested by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrom-etry, and were evaluated according to Maximum Levels of Contaminants in Food (GB2762 - 2005), Hygienic Standard for Marine Algae and Algae Products (GB19643 - 2005) and Maximum Levels of Heavy Metals in Food in EU ((EC) No. 629/2008). Results Totally 19 types of food samples were tested, and the total eligible rate of 320 samples tested was 88.7%, in which the rice had the lowest eligible rate, only 64.7%. The passing rates of edible mushrooms, algae and leafy vegetables were all below 80%. Conclusions The contamination levels of heavy metals in different types of food are unlike. More attention should be paid to health supervision and management of rice, algae and vegetables so as to improve the food safety.%目的 了解和掌握厦门市各类食品的重金属污染状况,为政府部门加强食品安全监管提供科学依据.方法 2008 -2011年从厦门市超市和农贸市场随机抽取各类食品样品,采用石墨炉原子吸收光谱法和荧光光谱法检测食品样品中的铅、镉、汞含量,依据GB2762 - 2005《食品中污染物限量》、GB19643 - 2005《藻类制品卫生标准》和(EC)NO629/2008《欧盟食品中重金属限量标准》进行评价.结果 共检测19类食品320份,总合格率为88.7%,各类食品中大米的合格率最低,仅为64.7%,其次是食用菌、藻类、叶菜类蔬菜合格率都在80%以下.结论 不同种类食品受重金属污染程度不同,应重点加强对大米、藻类、蔬菜的卫生监督管理,以提高食品安全性.

  1. Best practices for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie K; Hall, Robert L; O'Brien, Peter; Strauss, Volker; Vahle, John L

    2011-02-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASCVP) convened a Clinical Pathology in Carcinogenicity Studies Working Group to recommend best practices for inclusion of clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. Regulatory guidance documents and literature were reviewed, and veterinary pathologists from North America, Japan, and Europe were surveyed regarding current practices, perceived value, and recommendations for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. For two-year rodent carcinogenicity studies, the Working Group recommends that clinical pathology testing be limited to collection of blood smears at scheduled and unscheduled sacrifices to be examined only if indicated to aid in the diagnosis of possible hematopoietic neoplasia following histopathologic evaluation. Additional clinical pathology testing is most appropriately used to address specific issues from prior toxicity studies or known test article-related class effects. Inadequate data were available to make a recommendation concerning clinical pathology testing for alternative six-month carcinogenicity assays using genetically modified mice, although the Working Group suggests that it may be appropriate to use the same approach as for two-year carcinogenicity studies since the study goal is the same.

  2. Does the term carcinogen send the wrong message?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, W G; Hughes, D

    1997-08-19

    The term carcinogen has been used by scientists and health regulatory officials for decades. During the last 20 years there have been attempts to redefine the term to make it more rigorous. But, as predicted two decades ago by a benchmark-setting subcommittee of the National Cancer Advisory Board, advances in scientific understanding have brought about dramatic changes in the way we are able to view the term carcinogen. These changes, their scientific bases and their effect on defining the term carcinogen are described. An alternative to the use of the term carcinogen is suggested by the recently proposed US Environmental Agency's guidelines for cancer risk assessment which appear to be in accord with current scientific understanding and the importance of considering the factors affecting the term carcinogen. The guidelines set forth four questions, the answers to which could, in our judgment, replace the need to define or use the term carcinogen which, in light of new scientific knowledge, has become more misleading than useful.

  3. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  4. Plant Food Supplements with Antioxidant Properties for the Treatment of Chronic and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Benefits or Risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemontese, Luca

    2017-07-04

    Wine by-products, in particular grape pomace, can be an important source of polyphenols and dietary fibers and are increasingly being used as a starting material in the industrial production of plant food supplements, such as other matrices containing biomolecules, with antioxidant properties. The risk associated with the consumption of these products was recently analyzed through a study of potential genotoxic and carcinogenic compounds that can be found in the marketed products. In particular, occurrence data about contamination with the mycotoxin ochratoxin A were also reported. This short review aims at giving an overview about the quality and benefits of these kinds of food supplements, and also about risks of incorrect use, focusing on the emerging need for stricter European regulations.

  5. Effects of chemical carcinogens and physicochemical factors on the UV spectrophotometric determination of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Sik; Byun, Soo Hyun; Lee, Byung Mu

    2005-12-10

    The ultraviolet (UV) absorbance ratio of 260/280 nm has been used as an indicator of DNA purity. However, the A260/A280 ratio may be beyond the normal range (1.8-1.9) due to physicochemical alterations produced by pH and temperature, and carcinogenic chemical modification. When the pH of the DNA solution buffer increased from 3 to 11, the A260/A280 ratio changed significantly from 1.5 to 2.2 in mixtures of DNA bases [A:T:C:G = 28.5:28.5: 21.5:21.5, i.e., (A + T)/(all four bases) = 57%, expressed as mole percent], of deoxyribonucleosides (adenosine:thymidine:cytidine:guanosine= 28.5:28.5:21.5:21.5, as mole percent), or of deoxyribonucleotides (dAMP:dTMP:dGMP:dCMP = 28.5:28.5:21.5:21.5, as mole percent) examined. The A260/A280 ratio increased with RNA contamination and exceeded 1.9 when RNA concentration was >30%, as mole percent. In contrast, the A260/A280 ratio was linearly reduced by increasing the protein concentration. Phenol (>0.02%) contamination also reduced the A260/A280 ratio to below 1.8. Benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE), a reactive carcinogen metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), decreased the A260/A280 ratio correlated with the degree to which it modified the DNA. These results suggest that the UV A260/A280 ratio is significantly affected by pH and the presence of contaminating species of macromolecules and chemicals.

  6. Aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 contamination in ground red peppers commercialized in Sanliurfa, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaaslan, Mehmet; Arslanğray, Yusuf

    2015-04-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are hepatogenic, teratogenic, imunosuppressive, and carcinogenic fungal metabolites found in feeds, nuts, wine-grapes, spices, and other grain crops. Humans are exposed to AFs via consumption of mycotoxin-contaminated foods. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of AF contamination in powdered red peppers sold in Sanliurfa. A total of 42 samples were randomly collected from retail shops, supermarkets, open bazaars, and apiaries and examined for the occurrence and levels of AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2 toxins. AFs were determined by using an HPLC system after pre-separation utilizing immunoaffinity columns. AFs levels were below 2.5 μg/kg in 16 samples, between 2.5 and 10 μg/kg in 13 samples while 13 samples had AFs higher than the tolerable limit (10 μg/kg) according to the regulations of Turkish Food Codex and European Commission. The occurrence of AF fractions during powdered red pepper processing steps was also evaluated. According to the results obtained in this study, it was found that the highest AF accumulations in powdered red peppers start during perspiration and final drying of the products processed on soil contacted surfaces while there was no limit exceeding aflatoxin contamination in the samples produced on concrete surfaces.

  7. 2011年-2013年泰安市婴幼儿食品食源性致病菌污染状况调查%Investigation on contamination of food borne pathogens in infants foods of Tai'an from 2011 to 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑金华; 张新峰; 陆娟娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the contamination of food borne pathogens from infants foods in Tai'an,so as to provide some scientific basis for early warning ofinfants food borne disease and control of food safety management.Methods According to GB4789-2010 and GB/T4789-2003 standard method,we performed iaolatioin,biochemical identification and serological identification of Bacillus cereus,Enterobacter sakazakii,Staphylococcus aureus,in four kinds of infants foods samples,including milk powder,ground rice,nutrient biscuit and flour products.Results We had checked up 220 samples from 2011 to 2013,as a result,there were 34 pathogenic bacteria to be found,(total detection rate was 15.5 %,34/220),involved 27 Bacillus cereus (with detection rate 12.3%,27/220),5 Enterobacter sakazakii (with detection rate 2.3%,5/220),2 Staphylococcus aureus(with detection rate 0.9%,2/220).There was significant difference of the contamination rates in 3 pathogenic bac.teria(x2 =34.668,P <0.001).The contamination rate detected in milk powder was 22.9% (16/70),ground rice 14.3% (8/56),nutrient biscuit 10.5% (6/57),flour products 10.8% (4/37).Conclusion Food borne pathogens contamination existed in infants food in Tai'an,and milk powder is the main contamination food,while the main pathogenic is bacteria Bacillus cereus.%目的 了解泰安市要幼儿食品食源性致病菌污染状况,为要幼儿食源性疾病预警及食品安全管理提供科学依据.方法 依据GB4789-2010及GB/T4789-2003检测程序对婴幼儿食品(包括奶粉、米粉、营养饼干、面制品4类)进行腊样芽孢杆菌、阪崎肠杆菌、金黄色葡萄球菌的分离培养及鉴定.结果 2011年-2013年220份样品中共检出致病菌34株,总检出率为15.5% (34/220).其中腊样芽孢杆菌检出27株,检出率为12.3% (27/220);阪崎肠杆菌检出5株,检出率为2.3% (5/220);金黄色葡萄球菌检出2株,检出率为0.9% (2/220),不同致病菌检出

  8. 2010年成都市食品中食源性致病菌污染状况监测%Results of monitoring food contamination with foodborne pathogenic bacterium in Chengdu city in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎明; 杨洋; 苗艳芳; 李涛; 王瑶; 曹晋源

    2011-01-01

    目的:了解成都市食品中食源性致病菌的污染状况,初步确定可能被污染的食品,为食源性疾病控制提供科学依据.方法:按四川省监测网工作计划要求对成都市5区设点采集10类食品,根据国标方法进行沙门菌、单核细胞增生李斯特菌、肠出血性大肠杆菌0157:H7、副溶血性弧菌、创伤弧菌、空肠弯曲菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、阪崎肠杆菌8种食源性致病菌检测.结果:在监测的10类1119份食品中,共分离出6种21株食源性致病菌,总检出率为1.88%.结论:成都市食品已不同程度受到多种食源性致病菌污染,水产品、豆制品、餐饮食品(鲜榨果蔬汁、沙拉)和生禽肉为主要受污染食品,提示应加强市售食品监督管理,以减少可能引起食源性疾病的危险因素.%Objective: To survey the status of food contamination with foodborne pathogens in Chengdu and preliminarily determine the food in potential pollution, which aims to provide scientific basis for disease control. Methods: Food of 10 types in 5 districts were collected in Chengdu according to the requirements of Sichuan monitoring net. 8 kinds of foodborne pathogenic bacterium, such as salmonella, lysteria monocytogenes, EHEC O157;H7, V. parahemolyticus, vibrio vulnficus, CJ, staphylococcus aureus and enterobacter sakazakii were detected according to the international method. Results: A total of 21 foodborne pathogens in 6 types were isolated from 1119 samples with relevance ratio of 1.88%. Conclusion: The food including the aquatic food; bean products, juice, salad and raw poultry in Chengdu were contaminated by several foodborne pathogens in various extent. It is suggested that proper control measures should be taken to get rid of the risk factors asssociated with foodborne diseases.

  9. EHEC O104:H4 in Germany 2011: Large outbreak of bloody diarrhea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome by shiga toxin-producing E. coli via contaminated food

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 2011 Germany experienced one of the largest outbreaks of a food-borne infection caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) with the serotype O104:H4. A large number of cases with bloody diarrhea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) occurred. Never before was such a high rate of HUS cases observed in an outbreak caused by a food-borne pathogen. The events in Germany caused by EHEC O104:H4 in the summer of 2011 show dramatically how rapidly an infectious agent ...

  10. [Fungal spoilage of foods and its risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udagawa, Shun-ichi

    2005-01-01

    From the second half of the 1990s, an increased regard has been given to the fungal spoilage of foods as follows: 1) post-harvest diseases and losses of fruits and vegetables, 2) deterioration of low water activity foods by xerophilic fungi, 3) contamination of psychrotolerant or psychrophilic fungi on foodstuffs and processed foods during storage and distribution at low temperature, and 4) spoilage of heat processed foods and soft drinks by heat-resistant fungi. In accordance with an international concern about food safety, mycotoxin contamination of foods has gained much global attention in recent times owing to its potential health hazards. The evaluation of mycotoxin hazards is principally based on the determination of a no-observed effect level (NOEL) in long-term toxicological studies, and the application of a safety factor (usually 100). In addition to hazard assessment, data on the natural occurrence of mycotoxins in various commodities and food intake data are needed to enable exposure assessment. Thus risk assessment of mycotoxins is, in fact, the product of hazard assessment and exposure assessment. In 1997, the FAO/WHO Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) considered estimates of the carcinogenic potency of aflatoxins and the potential risks associated with their intake. Recently the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex) has established standards for aflatoxin M1 in milk and for patulin in apple juice. The Codex is an international organization, supported by FAO/WHO, aiming at facilitating world trade and protecting the health of the consumer by developing international standards for food and feeds. Apart from aflatoxins, the JECFA has measured a provisional tolerable daily intake (TDI) for ochratoxin A, patulin, deoxynivalenol, T-2/HT-2 toxins, zearalenone and fumonisins. In 2001, the mycotoxins evaluated or re-evaluated at the JECFA meeting included ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, T-2/HT-2 toxins, fumonisins, and aflatoxin M1. In Japan

  11. Role of Disinfection in Food Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G Sansebastiano; R Zoni; R Zanelli; L Bigliardi

    2006-01-01

    At present microbiological risk are still the most frequent in the food industry and the disinfection is one of the procedures that can be carried out in the general prevention of foodborne infectious diseases. In the industrial process of food transformation the cleaning and disinfection procedures of surfaces and machinery have to be considered an integrate system with food production, a technological aspect that surely affects the finished product quality and safety. First of all to carry out properly these operations it is necessary that the factory and the equipment have been designed and constructed with high standard of hygiene to reduce the risk of contamination and to facilitate the sanitation. The procedures involve several stages which generally include pre-washing with water, cleaning, real disinfection, and a final rinsing with water. In order to assure a right disinfections of surfaces areas and of processing equipment the choice of disinfectant takes on particular importance. Some of the most widely used disinfectants include the hypochlorous acid, the chlorine dioxide and the peroxides like peracetic acid; the latter is widely used in soft drink and mineral water industries. The efficiency of these chemical agents depends on various factors as pH, temperature and the presence of organic substances with which the disinfectants can react to give by-products which can reduce the activity and can present toxicity. The use of hypochlorite may led to the formation of carcinogenic substance such as trialomethanes (THM) while the use of chlorine dioxide may lead to the formation of chlorites and chiorates. The peracetic acid is a good alternative compounds and it doesn't lead to the formation of carcinogenic by-products. In our researches we evaluated the effectiveness of peracetic acid to inactivate some resistant micro-organism like hepatitis A virus; our results show that in practical application in CIP (cleaning in place) it's necessary to use

  12. AFM₁ in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-10-23

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB₁ is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM₁, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM₁ has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM₁ in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM₁ content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB₁ contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM₁ mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue.

  13. Towards SERS based applications in food analytics: Lipophilic sensor layers for the detection of Sudan III in food matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, Martin; Patze, Sophie [Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Bocklitz, Thomas [Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany); Weber, Karina [Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Cialla-May, Dana, E-mail: dana.cialla-may@uni-jena.de [Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, Helmholtzweg 4, 07743 Jena (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • A lipophilic sensor layer was applied to enzymatically grown SERS substrates. • Sudan III molecules could be detected in presence of water-insoluble competitors. • The carcinogenic food dye Sudan III was detected in a relevant concentration range. • Multivariate statistics allows quantitative measurements of Sudan III. • Sudan III contaminations were successfully detected out of spiked paprika powder. - Abstract: Food safety is a topic of great importance for our society which places high demands on analytical methods. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) meets the requirements for a rapid, sensitive and specific detection technique. The fact that metallic colloids, one of the most often used SERS substrates, are usually prepared in aqueous solution makes the detection of water-insoluble substances challenging. In this paper we present a SERS based approach for the detection of water-insoluble molecules by applying a hydrophobic surface modification onto the surface of enzymatic generated silver nanoparticles. By this approach the detection of the illegal water-insoluble food dyes, such as Sudan III in presence of riboflavin, as water-soluble competitor, is possible. Moreover, we demonstrate the usability of this kind of SERS substrates for determination of Sudan III out of spiked paprika extracts.

  14. 抚宁县抽检食品中铅、砷污染状况分析%SITUATION ANALYSIS OF LEAD,ARSENIC CONTAMINATION IN SAMPLING FOOD IN FUNING COUNTY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖

    2011-01-01

    [目的]检测抚宁县16类抽检食品的铅、砷含量,以分析它们的污染状况.[方法]按照国家标准GB/T5009.12-2003和GB/T5009.11-2003进行,采用石墨炉原子吸收光谱法和原子荧光光度法检测食品中的铅、砷含量.[结果]在检测的16类110份样品中,32份铅含量高于限值,超标率为29.1%;8份砷含量高于限值,超标率为7.3%.[结论]本地这几类食品中铅污染不严重,但由于在多种食品中都有检出,说明存在不同程度的积累,仍对身体健康存在潜在的威胁.砷污染率较低.%[Objective] To determine the contents of lead, arsenic in different food from Funing county, and understand contamination situation of lead, arsenic in food. [ Methods ] Lead and arsenic contents in foods were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and atomic fluorescence spectrophotometry according to the national standard method.[Results] A total of 110 samples of 16 kinds of foods were determined. the contents of lead of 32 foods were over standard , the exceeding rate was 29.1%; the contents of arsenic of 8 foods were over standard, and the exceeding rate was 7.3%. [Conclusion] The pollution of lead in Funingxian is not very serious. However, the lead detected in many kinnds of food stuffs means that there is accumulation and potential harmful impact on human health. The pollution rate of arsenic is low.

  15. Macroscopic and microscopic spatially-resolved analysis of food contaminants and constituents using laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Beek, van T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) does not require very flat surfaces, high-precision sample preparation, or the addition of matrix. Because of these features, LAESI-MSI may be the method of choice for spatially-resolved food analysis. In this work, LAESI

  16. 21 CFR 211.176 - Penicillin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin contamination. 211.176 Section 211.176... Penicillin contamination. If a reasonable possibility exists that a non-penicillin drug product has been exposed to cross-contamination with penicillin, the non-penicillin drug product shall be tested for...

  17. Food chemistry and U.S. food regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David J

    2009-09-23

    The Agriculture and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) was founded in 1908 shortly after passage of the first U.S. food regulations in 1906. Modern food regulations started with the passage of the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act in 1938. This Act has been amended several times to keep pace with developments in food chemistry. In 1958 the Food Additives Amendment was enacted to control substances added to food. Since 1958 scientific techniques have been developed to evaluate the safety and carcinogenicity of substances in the food supply. In the 1970s and 1980s AGFD symposia and books addressed compounds of concern in foods. In the 1990s food safety and nutrition regulations followed new developments in food and nutrition chemistry. Recently, the well-studied toxin acrylamide was discovered in food and presented regulators with new questions on safety and control in the food supply. Discoveries and developments in chemistry such as those in nanotechnology will continue to present challenges to food regulators.

  18. Biodegradation of carcinogenic textile azo dyes using bacterial isolates of mangrove sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guru Prasad Srinivasan; Asnar Sikkanthar; Anandajothi Elamaran; Caroline R Delma; Kumaran Subramaniyan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the biodegrading property against carcinogenic azo dyes using bacterial isolates of mangrove sediment. Methods: The bacterial isolates were subjected to submerged fermentation and their growth kinetics were studied. The potential strain was characterized using 16S rDNA sequencing. Results:In the present study, dye degrading bacterial colonies were isolated from the mangrove sediment samples of Parangipettai estuarine area, Tamil Nadu. Of the 30 morphologically different strains isolated, 5 showed antagonistic property. The growth kinetics of the two strains, P1 and G1, which showed potent activity were calculated. One particular isolate (P1) showing promising dye degrading potential in the submerged fermentation was further characterized. The strain was identified as Paenibacillus sp. by 16S rDNA sequencing. Conclusions:This study reveals the less explored microflora of mangrove sediments. The novel strain may further be analyzed and used in the treatment of effluent from dye industry so as to reduce the impact of carcinogenic contaminants.

  19. Biodegradation of carcinogenic textile azo dyes using bacterial isolates of mangrove sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guru Prasad Srinivasan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the biodegrading property against carcinogenic azo dyes using bacterial isolates of mangrove sediment. Methods: The bacterial isolates were subjected to submerged fermentation and their growth kinetics were studied. The potential strain was characterized using 16S rDNA sequencing. Results: In the present study, dye degrading bacterial colonies were isolated from the mangrove sediment samples of Parangipettai estuarine area, Tamil Nadu. Of the 30 morphologically different strains isolated, 5 showed antagonistic property. The growth kinetics of the two strains, P1 and G1, which showed potent activity were calculated. One particular isolate (P1 showing promising dye degrading potential in the submerged fermentation was further characterized. The strain was identified as Paenibacillus sp. by 16S rDNA sequencing. Conclusions: This study reveals the less explored microflora of mangrove sediments. The novel strain may further be analyzed and used in the treatment of effluent from dye industry so as to reduce the impact of carcinogenic contaminants.

  20. REVIEW ON AFLATOXIN IN INDONESIAN FOOD- AND FEEDSTUFFS AND THEIR PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OKKY SETYAWATI DHARMAPUTRA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin is a human carcinogen that could contaminate food- and feedstuffs, and hence is a major food qua lity problem throughout the world. Afiatoxi n is produced by certain strains of AspergillusJlavus and //. parasiticus. A number of studies have been carried out in Indonesia on atlatoxin contamination in Indonesian food- and feedstuffs and their products from 1990 up to present. They were maize, maize product, peanuts, soybean and soybean meal, black and white pepper, feed ingredients; chicken and duck feeds. Samples were collected from farmers, traders (middlemen, retailers (markets, supermarkets, exporters; poultry and duck community-based farms; and feed mi ll industries. High levels of aflatoxins were often found in maize, peanuts, chicken feed derived from markets, and duck feed. Low levels of aflatoxins were found in soybean meal and chicken feedstuff. Aflatoxins were not detected in soybean, black and white pepper. Other studies have also been carried out on the effect of carbondioxide (CO2, phosphine, black pepper extract and antagonistic fungi on aflatoxin production of A. flavus in vitro and the effect of airtight storage, phosphine, ammonium hydroxide, fermentation process, bag types, and phosphine in combination with different bag types on atlatoxin contents of maize, peanuts and soybean meal. Some of these methods reduced aflatoxin contents significantly

  1. Aflatoxin Contamination Detected in Nutrient and Anti-Oxidant Rich Edible Stink Bug Stored in Recycled Grain Containers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Musundire

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been multi-agency promotion of entomophagy as an environmentally-friendly source of food for the ever increasing human population especially in the developing countries. However, food quality and safety concerns must first be addressed in this context. We addressed these concerns in the present study using the edible stink bug Encosternum delegorguei, which is widely consumed in southern Africa. We analysed for mycotoxins, and health beneficials including antioxidants, amino acids and essential fatty acids using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-Qtof-MS and coupled gas chromatography (GC-MS. We also performed proximate analysis to determine nutritional components. We identified the human carcinogen mycotoxin (aflatoxin B1 at low levels in edible stink bugs that were stored in traditonally woven wooden dung smeared baskets and gunny bags previously used to store cereals. However, it was absent in insects stored in clean zip lock bags. On the other hand, we identified 10 fatty acids, of which 7 are considered essential fatty acids for human nutrition and health; 4 flavonoids and 12 amino acids of which two are considered the most limiting amino acids in cereal based diets. The edible stink bug also contained high crude protein and fats but was a poor source of minerals, except for phosphorus which was found in relatively high levels. Our results show that the edible stink bug is a nutrient- and antioxidant-rich source of food and health benefits for human consumption. As such, use of better handling and storage methods can help eliminate contamination of the edible stink bug with the carcinogen aflatoxin and ensure its safety as human food.

  2. Aflatoxin Contamination Detected in Nutrient and Anti-Oxidant Rich Edible Stink Bug Stored in Recycled Grain Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musundire, Robert; Osuga, Isaac M; Cheseto, Xavier; Irungu, Janet; Torto, Baldwyn

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been multi-agency promotion of entomophagy as an environmentally-friendly source of food for the ever increasing human population especially in the developing countries. However, food quality and safety concerns must first be addressed in this context. We addressed these concerns in the present study using the edible stink bug Encosternum delegorguei, which is widely consumed in southern Africa. We analysed for mycotoxins, and health beneficials including antioxidants, amino acids and essential fatty acids using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-Qtof-MS) and coupled gas chromatography (GC)-MS. We also performed proximate analysis to determine nutritional components. We identified the human carcinogen mycotoxin (aflatoxin B1) at low levels in edible stink bugs that were stored in traditonally woven wooden dung smeared baskets and gunny bags previously used to store cereals. However, it was absent in insects stored in clean zip lock bags. On the other hand, we identified 10 fatty acids, of which 7 are considered essential fatty acids for human nutrition and health; 4 flavonoids and 12 amino acids of which two are considered the most limiting amino acids in cereal based diets. The edible stink bug also contained high crude protein and fats but was a poor source of minerals, except for phosphorus which was found in relatively high levels. Our results show that the edible stink bug is a nutrient- and antioxidant-rich source of food and health benefits for human consumption. As such, use of better handling and storage methods can help eliminate contamination of the edible stink bug with the carcinogen aflatoxin and ensure its safety as human food.

  3. 湖南省即食食品中食源性致病菌污染状况及耐药性研究%Contamination Status of Food Borne Pathogenic Bacteria in Instant Food in Hunan and Their Antibiotic Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾华云; 王岚; 胡旃; 刘建琪; 张林青; 张红

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解湖南地区即食食品中食源性致病菌的污染状况和耐药性,为预防和控制食源性疾病提供科学依据. 方法 从湖南地区的农贸市场、超市和餐饮单位采集即食食品(凉拌菜和熟肉制品),依据GB 4789-2010和GB/T 4789-2008方法,对样品进行沙门菌等4种食源性致病菌检测,分离菌株使用微量肉汤稀释法进行药敏试验. 结果 991份样品共检出食源性致病菌92株,检出率为9.28%,其中检出金黄色葡萄球菌68株,检出率为6.86%,检出沙门菌和单增李斯特菌各12株,检出率为1.21%,未检出大肠埃希菌O157.药敏结果显示金黄色葡萄球菌和沙门菌均具有一定的耐药性,其中金黄色葡萄球菌对苯唑西林的耐药率高达61.76%,而且多重耐药明显. 结论 湖南地区即食食品存在一定的食源性致病菌污染,应加大卫生监督力度,防止食源性疾病的暴发流行;同时应控制动物饲料中抗生素的添加使用,加强抗生素的管理和耐药性监测.%Objective To investigate the contamination status of food borne pathogenic bacteria in instant food in Hunan and to test their antibiotic resistance, so as to provide evidence for the prevention and control of food borne diseases. Methods Salad and cooked meat were collected in food produce markets, supermarkets and catering units in Hunan province. Four food borne pathogenic bacteria including Salmonella in food were identified in accordance with GB 4789 - 2010 and GB/T 4789 -2008. The bacteria were isolated by broth dilution technique to test their drug sensitivity. Results Totally, 92 strains of food borne pathogenic bacteria were identified in 991 food samples, with an incidence of 9.28% . The detection rate of Staphylococcus aureus was 6.86% (68/991). The detection rates of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes were both 1.21% (12/991). Es-cherichia coli O157 was not detected. The drug sensitivity test indicated that Staphylococcus aureus and

  4. Management options for food production systems affected by a nuclear accident. Task 2 options for minimising the production of contaminated milk

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, J G; Mercer, J A; Nisbet, A F; Wilkins, B T

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of three possible means by which the production of waste milk could be reduced following a nuclear accident. The three options studied are the reduction of contaminated pasture in the diet, the drying off of lactating dairy cattle and the slaughter of dairy cattle. The practicability of each of these is considered using criteria such as technical feasibility, capacity, cost, impact and acceptability, where appropriate. In theory reductions in waste milk arisings can be achieved with each option, however, there are a number of limitations associated with their practical application.

  5. Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to problems of food safety: detection of fecal contamination and of the presence of central nervous system tissue and diagnosis of neurological disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Bose, Sayantan; Casey, Thomas A.; Gapsch, Al; Rasmussen, Mark A.; Petrich, Jacob W.

    2010-02-01

    Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy that enable the real-time or rapid detection of fecal contamination on beef carcasses and the presence of central nervous system tissue in meat products are discussed. The former is achieved by employing spectroscopic signatures of chlorophyll metabolites; the latter, by exploiting the characteristic structure and intensity of lipofuscin in central nervous system tissue. The success of these techniques has led us to investigate the possibility of diagnosing scrapie in sheep by obtaining fluorescence spectra of the retina. Crucial to this diagnosis is the ability to obtain baseline correlations of lipofuscin fluorescence with age. A murine model was employed as a proof of principle of this correlation.

  6. Macroscopic and microscopic spatially-resolved analysis of food contaminants and constituents using laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nielen, Michel W.F.; VAN BEEK, TERIS A.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) does not require very flat surfaces, high-precision sample preparation, or the addition of matrix. Because of these features, LAESI-MSI may be the method of choice for spatially-resolved food analysis. In this work, LAESI time-of-flight MSI was investigated for macroscopic and microscopic imaging of pesticides, mycotoxins, and plant metabolites on rose leaves, orange and lemon fruit, ergot bodies, cherry tomatoes, ...

  7. Food Safety-Related Aspects of Parasites in Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watthanakulpanich, Dorn

    2015-01-01

    As natural foods derive from soil or water environments, they may contain the infective stages of parasites endemic to these environments. Infective stages may enter the human food supply via infected animal hosts so there is a need for increased awareness of the impact of parasites on the food supply. Safe handling of food and good kitchen hygiene can prevent or reduce the risk posed by contaminated foodstuffs. In addition, parasites cannot cause a health problem in any thoroughly cooked foods.

  8. Chlorophyll catalyse the photo-transformation of carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lijuan; Lai, Xueying; Chen, Baowei; Lin, Li; Fang, Ling; Tam, Nora F Y; Luan, Tiangang

    2015-08-04

    Algal blooms cause great damage to water quality and aquaculture. However, this study showed that dead algal cells and chlorophyll could accelerate the photo-transformation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant with potently mutagenic and carcinogenic toxicities, under visible light irradiation. Chlorophyll was found to be the major active substance in dead algal cells, and generated a high level of singlet oxygen to catalyse the photo-transformation of BaP. According to various BaP metabolites formed, the degradation mechanism was proposed as that chlorophyll in dead algal cells photo-oxidized BaP to quinones via photocatalytic generation of singlet oxygen. The results provided a good insight into the role of chlorophyll in the photo-transformation of organic contaminants and could be a possible remediation strategy of organic pollutants in natural environment.

  9. Investigations of residue of veterinary medicines and environmental contaminants during production cycle of Petrovska klobasa as part of compulsory parameters for food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant factor in the protection of consumer health is the systematic and constant implementation of control for the presence of residue of biologically active substances and their metabolites in raw materials and in primary products of animal origin. As regards meat, an essential aspect of security is definitely the control of possible residue of veterinary medicines and environmental contaminants. In that respect, the objective of the national project entitled „Development of technology for drying and fermentation of the sausage petrovačka kobasica (Petrovská klobása - registered geographic origin under controlled conditions“, Number TR - 20037, was to protect the product petrovačka kobasica (Petrovská klobása with the appropriate appellation. A part of the compulsory investigations also included the establishing of the presence of residue of veterinary medicines and environmental contaminants in raw materials and in the finished product, which was also the aim of this work. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-20037: Petrovská klobása - oznaka geografskog porekla u kontrolisanim uslovima

  10. Seasonal Variation in the Accumulation of Trace Elements and Contaminants in Five Shrimp Species from Iskenderun Bay and Their Consumibility as Human Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymacı, Sevtap; Altun, Beyza Ersoy

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal accumulation of trace elements and contaminants in the muscle tissue of five shrimp species; Speckled Shrimp, Deepwater Rose Shrimp, Red Shrimp, Grooved Shrimp and Green Tiger Shrimp, from Iskenderun Bay of Eastern Mediterranean Sea were investigated. It was observed the period of year for the accumulation of such elements is important. Results indicate that peaks are generally reached in autumn and in spring. The levels of Zn, Fe, Cu and Ni were the highest in autumn whereas the maximum Sn and Cr concentrations were obtained in spring. The levels of Cu and Zn were found to be within the permissible limits for human consumption. Contaminants were accumulated at the highest levels in autumn. Attention has to be drawn that Cd values were above permissible limits for deepwater pink shrimp caught in autumn and winter, and for green tiger shrimp caught in autumn. Besides, the accumulation of high level of Pb in the tissue of all species except grooved shrimp whose value was low in spring should also be considered as a warning signal.

  11. Studies in vitro to discern the structural requirements for carcinogenicity in analogues of the carcinogen 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (butter yellow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, J; Styles, J A; Paton, D

    1980-01-01

    4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (butter yellow, DAB), is the parent member of a large family of 'azo-carcinogens'. Experiments have been conducted in vitro to determine the key structural requirements for carcinogenic activity in this chemical class, and it is suggested, based on the activity observed for 4-cyano-N,N-dimethylaniline, that the 4-phenylazo group of DAB is not an essential structural feature per se. The N-oxide derivative of DAB has been evaluated in vitro and the positive response observed related to its metabolic activation. It is concluded that cyclic amines, such as pyrrolidine, can replace the N-dimethyl group of DAB with a retention of biological activity. The confusion that exists in the literature concerning the chemical identity and carcinogenic status of 2-dimethylaminobenzo[c]cinnoline has been investigated, and it is concluded that it is a potential animal carcinogen. This observation also indicates that the phenylazo group of DAB can be incorporated within an aromatic ring system with a retention of biological activity. As observed earlier with a mixture of azobenzene and DAB, azobenzene also potentiates the cell transforming properties of the above cinnoline derivative in vitro. Two charts are presented. The first attempts to integrate DAB within a much larger family of carcinogens, and the second illustrates the usefulness of structure-activity studies in general.

  12. Biological control of aflatoxin contamination of crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-ni YIN; Lei-yan YAN; Jin-hua JIANG; Zhong-hua MA

    2008-01-01

    Aflatoxins produced primarily by two closely related fungi, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, are mutagenic and carcinogenic in animals and humans. Of many approaches investigated to manage aflatoxin contamination, biological control method has shown great promise. Numerous organisms, including bacteria, yeasts and nontoxigenic fungal strains of A.flavus and A. parasiticus, have been tested for their ability in controlling aflatoxin contamination. Great successes in reducing aflatoxin contamination have been achieved by application of nontoxigenic strains of A. flavus and A. parasiticus in fields of cotton, peanut, maize and pistachio. The nontoxigenic strains applied to soil occupy the same niches as the natural occurring toxigenic strains. They, therefore, are capable of competing and displacing toxigenic strains. In this paper, we review recent development in biological control of aflatoxin contamination.

  13. Arsenic (As Contamination in Different Food and Dietary Samples from Several Districts of Bangladesh and Arsenic (As Detection, Mitigation and Toxicity Measurement and impact of Dietary Arsenic Exposure on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Awal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the level of arsenic concentration in vegetables and other food categories in three selected areas of Pabna district and to estimate quantitatively the dietary arsenic exposure in one of the arsenic contaminated areas of Bangladesh.Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in CharRuppur, Char mirkamari and Lakshmikunda village of IshwardiUpzila in Pabna district. Ishwardi (Town consists of 12 wardsand 37 mahallas. Arsenic was detected in the ADM Lab,Department of Pharmacology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh with Hydride Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (HG-AAS; PG-990, PG Instruments Ltd. UK. Arsenic was detected by forming AsH3 at below pH 1.0 after the reaction of As with a solution of sodiumborohydride (NaBH4, sodium hydroxide (NaOH, M=40,000g/mol, and 10% HCl. In this test, standard was maintained asAsV ranging from 0 to 12.5 μg/L.Results: A total of 120 vegetable samples, 15 rice samples and15 fish samples were collected from five different markets ofthree different villages of Pabna district and were tested forarsenic concentration. Findings demonstrated that the mean concentration of As in leafy vegetables (0.52 μg g-1 was significantly higher compared to those found in fruity (0.422μg g-1 and root & tuber vegetables (0.486 μg g-1.Conclusion: Underground Contaminated water was the major source for the As contamination of various products in Pabna.The arsenic levels were found higher among the leafy vegetables samples in comparison to fruit and root & tuber vegetables. Further studies will be conducted to search the genetic risk factors of arsenic toxicity in the population of the mostly affected people.

  14. Use of Biopolymers in Antimicrobial Food Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illness and food recalls continue to push for innovative ways to inhibit microbial growth in foods. As an additional hurdle to food processes, antimicrobial food packaging can play an important role in reducing the risk of pathogen contamination of processed foods. In...

  15. Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melamede Robert

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract More people are using the cannabis plant as modern basic and clinical science reaffirms and extends its medicinal uses. Concomitantly, concern and opposition to smoked medicine has occurred, in part due to the known carcinogenic consequences of smoking tobacco. Are these reactions justified? While chemically very similar, there are fundamental differences in the pharmacological properties between cannabis and tobacco smoke. Cannabis smoke contains cannabinoids whereas tobacco smoke contains nicotine. Available scientific data, that examines the carcinogenic properties of inhaling smoke and its biological consequences, suggests reasons why tobacco smoke, but not cannabis smoke, may result in lung cancer.

  16. Aflatoxin M1 contamination of human breast milk in Isfahan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Pourradi, Nasibeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: During the last decades there has been great attention paid to aflatoxins. They are highly toxic, immunosuppressive, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic compounds. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a hydroxylated metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), is formed in the liver and excreted into the breast milk. It is considered to cause certain hygienic risks for infant health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of the AFM1 in the breast milk using AFM1 in milk as a biomarker for exposure to aflatoxin B1 and determine the level of AFM1 contamination in the lactating mothers in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 80 lactating women randomly selected from two urban health centers. Mother's milk samples and information on food intake were collected from the participants using structured food-frequency questionnaire. Breast milk samples were tested for AFM1 by a competitive ELISA technique. Results: Our findings showed that only one sample was contaminated with AFM1 with concentrations of 6.8 ng/L. However, the AFM1 level in this sample was lower than the maximum tolerable limit (25 ng/L) accepted by the European Communities and Codex Alimentarius. Conclusion: Although the concentration of AFM1 in none of the samples was higher than the acceptable level, the presence of AFM1 in only one of them confirms the need for developing strategies to reduce exposure to aflatoxin in foods and to carry out biological monitoring of aflatoxins as a food quality control measure routinely. PMID:24524032

  17. Assessment of Enterotoxin Production and Cross-Contamination of Staphylococcus aureus between Food Processing Materials and Ready-To-Eat Cooked Fish Paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Hong, Sung-Sam; Wang, Jun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated Staphylococcus aureus growth and subsequent staphylococcal enterotoxin A production in tryptone soy broth and on ready-to-eat cooked fish paste at 12 to 37 °C, as well as cross-contamination between stainless steel, polyethylene, and latex glove at room temperature. A model was developed using Barany and Roberts's growth model, which satisfactorily described the suitable growth of S. aureus with R(2)-adj from 0.94 to 0.99. Except at 12 °C, S. aureus cells in TSB presented a lag time lower (14.64 to 1.65 h), grew faster (0.08 to 0.31 log CFU/h) and produced SEA at lower cell density levels (5.65 to 6.44 log CFU/mL) compare to those inoculated on cooked fish paste with data of 16.920 to 1.985 h, 0.02 to 0.23 log CFU/h, and 6.19 to 7.11 log CFU/g, respectively. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) visual immunoassay test showed that primary SEA detection varied considerably among different storage temperature degrees and media. For example, it occurred only during exponential phase at 30 and 37 °C in TSB, but in cooked fish paste it took place at late exponential phase of S. aureus growth at 20 and 25 °C. The SEA detection test was negative on presence of S. aureus on cooked fish paste stored at 12 and 15 °C, although cell density reached level of 6.12 log CFU/g at 15 °C. Cross-contamination expressed as transfer rate of S. aureus from polyethylene surface to cooked fish paste surface was slower than that observed with steel surface to cooked fish paste under same conditions. These results provide helpful information for controlling S. aureus growth, SEA production and cross-contamination during processing of cooked fish paste.

  18. Macroscopic and microscopic spatially-resolved analysis of food contaminants and constituents using laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielen, Michel W F; van Beek, Teris A

    2014-11-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) does not require very flat surfaces, high-precision sample preparation, or the addition of matrix. Because of these features, LAESI-MSI may be the method of choice for spatially-resolved food analysis. In this work, LAESI time-of-flight MSI was investigated for macroscopic and microscopic imaging of pesticides, mycotoxins, and plant metabolites on rose leaves, orange and lemon fruit, ergot bodies, cherry tomatoes, and maize kernels. Accurate mass ion-map data were acquired at sampling locations with an x-y center-to-center distance of 0.2-1.0 mm and were superimposed onto co-registered optical images. The spatially-resolved ion maps of pesticides on rose leaves suggest co-application of registered and banned pesticides. Ion maps of the fungicide imazalil reveal that this compound is only localized on the peel of citrus fruit. However, according to three-dimensional LAESI-MSI the penetration depth of imazalil into the peel has significant local variation. Ion maps of different plant alkaloids on ergot bodies from rye reveal co-localization in accordance with expectations. The feasibility of using untargeted MSI for food analysis was revealed by ion maps of plant metabolites in cherry tomatoes and maize-kernel slices. For tomatoes, traveling-wave ion mobility (TWIM) was used to discriminate between different lycoperoside glycoalkaloid isomers; for maize quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) was successfully used to elucidate the structure of a localized unknown. It is envisaged that LAESI-MSI will contribute to future research in food science, agriforensics, and plant metabolomics.

  19. Treatment of mice with the Ah receptor agonist and human carcinogen dioxin results in altered numbers and function of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Kameshwar P.; Wyman, Amber; Casado, Fanny L.; Garrett, Russell W.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the carcinogenicity of a family of environmental contaminants, the most potent being 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Increased incidence of lymphoma and leukemia in humans is associated with TCDD exposure. Although AhR activation by TCDD has profound effects on the immune system, precise cellular and molecular mechanisms have yet to be determined. These studies tested the hypothesis that alteration of marrow populations following treatm...

  20. [Food contamination by pathogens of acute intestinal infections and survival of microorganisms in them under some variants of thermal processing and storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergevnin, V I

    2013-01-01

    The contamination of the surface of vegetables and fruits with conditionally pathogenic enterobacteria, intestinal protozoa and enteric viruses has been revealed. The experiment showed an opportunity of penetration of enteric viruses inside of vegetables and fruits with intact (without visible damages) surface. S. enteritidis survive on the shells of the eggs 4 months in the refrigerator, in the albumen and yolk--more than 5 months and in the long storage (more than one month) of chicken eggs in the refrigerator S. enteritidis could penetrate into the egg through the intact shell and multiply in the yolk. It was shown in the experiment on the condition laying of chicken eggs of room temperature in cold water and their subsequent cooking S. enteritidis full destruction of pathogens comes on the 5 minute of heat processing, when the temperature inside the eggs reaches more than 80 degrees C. In mayonnaise at the temperature of the refrigerator S. enteritidis reproduce, but remain viable for 13 days. In the egg powder at the room temperature noted smooth death of S. enteritidis, term viability of microorganisms is 5 months. Addition 10% acetic acid to egg powder in the ratio 1:2 provides for the death of S. enteritidis for a minute. In experimental conditions was established that the processing of chicken on the grill in the process of cooking "Shaverma" provides exemption meat from Salmonella only in the thickness of a piece of up to 2 centimeters. The deeper layers of meat and meat juice which accumulates on the pallet grill, throughout the duration of thermal processing may remain contaminated Salmonella.

  1. Bacillus cereus contamination of rice caused by the investigation and analysis of food poisoning%蜡样芽胞杆菌污染米饭引起食物中毒的调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓红; 严军; 陈秀兰; 姜洁

    2013-01-01

    Objectiveanalysis the reason of poisoning by through the epidemiological investigation and laboratory test results.Methods epidemiological investigation at the scene、Manifestations in clinical and laboratory testing.Results etiology inspection results for bacillus cereus,the number of bacillus cereus in rice 1.8×106cfU/g.Conclusion Bacillus cereus to grow in the appropriate temperature, contaminated food, produce toxins that cause food poisoning.%目的:根据流行病学调查及实验室检验结果分析中毒原因。方法现场流行病学调查、临床表现及实验室检验。结果病原学检验结果为蜡样芽胞杆菌,米饭中的蜡样芽胞杆菌菌数1.8×106cfU/g。结论蜡样芽胞杆菌在适宜的温度下生长繁殖,污染食品,产生毒素,引起食物中毒。

  2. Ferns and lycopods--a potential treasury of anticancer agents but also a carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomšík, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Many species of seedless vascular plants-ferns and lycopods-have been used as food and folk medicine since ancient times. Some of them have become the focus of intensive research concerning their anticancer properties. Studies on the anticancer effect of crude extracts are being increasingly replaced by bioactivity-guided fractionation, as well as detailed assessment of the mechanism of action. Numerous compounds-especially flavonoids such as amentoflavone and protoapigenone, and also simpler phenolic compounds, steroids, alkaloids and terpenoids-were isolated and found to be cytotoxic, particularly pro-apoptotic, or to induce cell cycle arrest in cancer cell lines in vitro. In in vivo experiments, some fern-derived compounds inhibited tumour growth with little toxicity. On the other hand, many ferns-not only the well-known Bracken (Pteridium)-may pose a significant hazard to human health due to the fact that they contain carcinogenic sesquiterpenoids and their analogues. The objective of this review is to summarise the recent state of research on the anticancer properties of ferns and lycopods, with a focus on their characteristic bioactive constituents. The carcinogenic hazard posed by ferns is also mentioned.

  3. Studies on Mechanisms and Blockade of Carcinogenic Action of Female Sex Hormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高凤鸣; 蒋涵英; 余璐; 李新兰; 王文惠; 段云波; 周红宁

    1994-01-01

    Tumours of mice are induced by administration of Inj. Hydroxyprogesteroni Caproatis Co. (EP) in a practical subthreshold dose of carcinogenesis or 2. 5-5 times the human contraceptive dose (simply referred to as 2. 5- to 5-fold dose) combined with whole-body 0. 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiation. Malignant transformation of Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells is also induced by 5-fold dose of EP combined with 0. 3 Gy gamma-ray irradiation in vitro, thereby indicating that synergistic carcinogenesis can be obtained by combined use of physical and chemical carcinogens.The mechanisms of synergistic carcinogenesis have been further explained by cytogenetics, damage extent of the target cell DNA and production of free radicals. The Chinese traditional medicine with antioxidat-ing effect (Sulekang Capsule, SC), food additive--butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and green tea can effectively inhibit the carcinogenic effect of EP or EP combined with gamma rays in mice. They all have marked ability to scavenge or remove

  4. 北京市东城区2010年食品微生物污染状况分析%Analysis on Contamination Status of Food with Microorganism in Dongcheng District of Beijing City in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪静; 孙志峰; 段旭; 邱传营

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the microbial contamination in the food of Dongcheng District by continuous and dynamic monitoring in 2010, and to provide the evidence for food safety surveillance. Methods We sampled 11 kinds of food (including 282 samples) in catering units and the circulation field in 2010. Results Among the 282 pieces of food, 142 pieces of food were from catering units. Coliform group was positive in 17 pieces of food collected from catering units, with the positive rate of 11.97%. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 2 pieces of food in catering units, with the detective rate of 1.4%. 140 pieces of food were from circulation field, coliform group was positive in 1 piece of food in circulation field. From food categories, the detective rate of cooked bean products was the highest (27.5%), followed by bulk ice cream (20.0%), bulk cooked meat products (11.4%), Chinese cold dishes (2.5%), and the difference was statistically significant (x2 = 9.513, P<0.05). From the season, the positive rate of coliform group in summer was the highest, and the difference was statistically significant (x2 = 7.106, P<0.05). As for the grade of restaurant, coliform positive rates of grade A, grade B and grade C restaurants increased in turn, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusions The food hygiene in circulation field is better than that in catering units. The food products which are easy to cause foodborne diseases are cooked bean products, bulk ice cream, bulk cooked meat products and Chinese cold dishes. The food hygiene in summer is more likely to cause food- borne diseases, but food- borne diseases in fall should not be overlooked. The results suggest that the law enforcement agencies strengthen health supervision about key food so as to reduce the risk of foodborne diseases.%目的 通过长期连续、动态的监测,掌握2010年东城区各种食品中微生物的污染状况,为食品安全监管提供依据.方法 对2010年抽

  5. Survey of contamination status of market foods with pathogenic bacteria in Mian-yang.%绵阳市市售食品病原菌污染状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周良君; 陈果; 王学军

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解病原菌在绵阳市市售食品中的污染状况,为进行食品风险评估和制定食品安全风险管理决策提供技术依据.方法 按照《2010年四川省食源性疾病监测工作手册》提供的微生物检验标准操作程序对2010年8~12月采集的9大类15种食品共计249个样品按要求进行沙门菌、单增李斯特菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、副溶血弧菌、创伤弧菌、空肠弯曲菌、大肠杆菌O157:H7、阪崎肠杆菌8种致病菌的分离鉴定.结果 249份样品中共检出致病菌28株,总检出率为11.2 %(28/249),其中沙门菌检出12株,检出率为5.0%(12/240),单增李斯特菌检出11株,检出率9.7%(11/114),金黄色葡萄球菌检出3株,检出率为3.0%(3/99),副溶血弧菌检出1株,检出率2.8%(1/36),创伤弧菌检出1株,检出率为2.8%(1/36),未检出空肠弯曲菌、大肠杆菌O157:H7、阪崎肠杆菌.结论 绵阳市2010年食品受到一定程度的污染,存在发生食源性疾病的风险.生肉类、动物性水产品、沙拉是我市食品安全风险的高危食品;单增李斯特菌、沙门菌、金黄色葡萄球菌是引起食源性疾病的潜在高危致病菌.%Objictive To understand the contamination status of pathogenic bacteria in market foods in Mian-yang City,So as to provide the technical support of the food safety assessment. Methods according to the method from Sichuan Provincial Food-borne Pathogen Monitor Protocol- 2010), Salmonellae ,Listeria monocytogenes ,Staphylococcus aureus,Vibrio pamhaemolyticus,Vibrio vulnijicus ,Campylobacter jejuni,Excherichia coli O157-.H7,Enterobacter sakazakii from August to December in 2010 were isolated and identified. From 249 food samples of 15 kinds in categories. Results There 28 pathogenic bacteria (11.2% 28/249) were identified including 12 Salmonella (5.0% 12/240), 11 Listeria monocytogenes, (9.7% 11/114),3 Staphylococcus aureus (3.0% 3/99),1 Vibrio parakaemolyticus (2.8% 1/36),1 Vibrio vulnificus

  6. 2010年北京市通州区食品污染物监测结果分析%Analysis on monitoring results of food contaminants in Tongzhou district of Beijing in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高静

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To understand the situation of food contaminants level in Tongzhou district of Beijing and provide basic data for the determination of the national food contaminant level. Methods: In strict accordance with the sampling method provided by the monitoring program, a total of 383 samples were collected. Results: In 148 samples monitored for foodborne pathogens, 6 samples were positive, all of which were from fishes. 115 samples were monitored for heavy metals and the results showed that lead content was highest in vegetables and cadmium content was highest in dry edible mushrooms,mercury content was highest in pigs kidney samples. 60 samples were monitored for pesticide residues, the highest positive rate was found in the detection of py-rethroid pesticides. 10 pieces of pork sample were monitored for copper content, all detection results were within the national hygienic standards. 50 food samples were monitored for benzoic acid, all the detection results were within national hygienic standards, but the benzoic acid in sauce salted vegetables is close to national hygienic standards. Conclusion: The contamination of foodborne pathogens in aquatic products and the contamination of heavy metals in vegetables, dry mushroom, pig kidneys should be paid attentions. For the first time in this year, it was found that pesticide residues was serious in dry mushrooms and the risk of excessive use of benzoic acid was found in sauce salted vegetables.%目的:了解目前北京市通州区食品污染状况,为确定国家食品污染物水平提供基础数据.方法:严格按照食品污染物监测方案获得样品,共计383件.结果:食源性致病菌监侧148件样品,检出致病菌6株,均在水产品中检出.115件样品监测重金属,铅含量的检出值以蔬菜为最高;\t镉含量的检出值以干食用菌为最高;汞含量的检出值以猪肾为最高.农药残留监测60件样品,以拟除虫菊酯类农药检出率最高.10件猪肉样品监测铜

  7. Application of single-stage Orbitrap mass spectrometry and differential analysis software to nontargeted analysis of contaminants in dog food: detection, identification, and quantification of glycoalkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohne, Jack J; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Andersen, Wendy C; Storey, Joseph; Madson, Mark R

    2015-05-20

    The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary investigation of the nontargeted search and quantitative capabilities of a single-stage Exactive High-Resolution Mass Spectrometer (HRMS). To do this, the instrument and its associated software performed a non-targeted search for deleterious substances in a dog food sample suspected of causing gastrointestinal problems in dogs. A single-stage Orbitrap/high-performance liquid chromatography method and differential expression analysis software (Sieve) was used to detect and identify, and subsequently quantify, nontargeted compounds occurring only in the suspect dog food sample. When combined with an online database (ChemSpider), a preliminary identification of one of the nontargeted compounds was determined to be potato glycoalkaloids. The diagnostic product ion ratios and quantitative data accuracy generated by the single-stage Orbitrap MS were shown to be similar to results obtained using a triple quadrupole LC-MS/MS. Additionally, the ability of the single-stage Orbitrap instrument to provide precursor and product ion accurate masses and isotope patterns was also investigated.

  8. [New aspects of safety assessment and food contamination with antibiotics of tetracycline group in the light of harmonization of hygienic standards in Russia and Customs Union with the international standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G G; Sheveleva, S A; Khotimchenko, S A

    2012-01-01

    To address the issue of harmonization of Russian MRLs for tetracycline in food and on the basis of the tasks of preserving the value of hygienic standard for the more restrictive level than similar standards of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in this survey we analyzed the evidences of the negative effects of subingibitory amounts of these antibiotics (lying below the MIC for clinically relevant microorganisms). The inadequacy of the microbiological JECFA ADI and the necessity of using of methodology of analyzing the effects of biological active substances in small doses for assessing the risk of food contamination of tetracycline subingibitory concentrations were demonstrated. Current scientific information on the functions of antibiotics as signaling molecules in the microbial world and the role of tetracycline as a leading factor in the regulation of transcription in microorganisms and activation of the horizontal transfer of resistance genes transferred to the family of conjugative transposons Tn916-Tn1545 also was reviewed in paper. Evidence-based data regarding the basic contribution of subingibitory concentrations of tetracycline in the spread of worst transmissible type of antibiotic resistance and the formation of new pathogens, associated with it, are represented. To reduce the risk of direct adverse effects on microbial ecosystem in the human body and its habitat, and to minimize the indirect risk of new infections, the necessity of saving the current Russian level residues of tetracycline (< or = 0.01 mg/kg of product), which is low by contrast to the Codex MRLs (< or = 0.1-1.2 mg/kg), was proved. Tetracycline concentrations in food, regulated in Russian Federation, below 0.1 MIC for clinically significant microorganisms which aren't capable to initiation of the above described negative changes.

  9. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil E; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier A; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Kristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela C; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Seniori Constantini, Adele; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silvermann, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups' fa

  10. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein...

  11. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studie

  12. An Interdisciplinary and Alternative Approach to Assess Carcinogenicity of Chlorobenzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    carcinogenic activity of 1,4-di-, 1,2,4,5-tetra-, penta-, and hexa - chlorobenzenes in the Ito’s "Medium-Term Bioassay System" using partially...GST-P positive foci and related morphometric analyses, gene expressions of CYP1 A2, c-fos, c-jun, GSH/GSSG ratio, tissue porphyrin levels, DNA damage

  13. 18. Adduct detection in human monitoring for carcinogen exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Determination of the covalently bound products (adducts) of carcinogens with DNA or proteins may be used for the monitoring of exposure to these compounds. Protein adducts are generally stable and are not enzymatically repaired, and the use of these for cxposure monitoring is normally carried out with globin or albumin, because

  14. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  15. Flavonoids and alkenylbenzenes: mechanisms of mutagenic action and carcinogenic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Woude, van der H.; Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Schutte, M.E.; Alink, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mechanisms of mutagenic action and the carcinogenic risk of two categories of botanical ingredients, namely the flavonoids with quercetin as an important bioactive representative, and the alkenylbenzenes, namely safrole, methyleugenol and estragole. For quercetin a

  16. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, Detmar [University of Bremen (Germany). Biochemistry, Department of Biology and Chemistry; Hartwig, Andrea [Technical University of Berlin (Germany). Institute of Food Technology and Food Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases. (orig.)

  17. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  18. Non-targeted screening for contaminants in paper and board food-contact materials using effect-directed analysis and accurate mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtström, Linda; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Trier, Xenia

    2016-01-01

    Due to large knowledge gaps in chemical composition and toxicological data for substances involved, paper and board food-contact materials (P&B FCM) have been emerging as a FCM type of particular concern for consumer safety. This study describes the development of a step-by-step strategy, including...... extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, tentative identification of relevant substances and in vitro testing of selected tentatively identified substances. As a case study, we used two fractions from a recycled pizza box sample which exhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah......R) activity. These fractions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers (QTOF MS) in order tentatively to identify substances. The elemental composition was determined for peaks above a threshold, and compared with entries...

  19. [REDUCTION OF THE CONTENT OF AFLATOXIN-FORMING FUNGI IN CONTAMINATED GRAINS BY METHODS OF HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shentsova, E S; Lytkina, L I; Shevtsov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic fungi affecting grain and products of its processing, under certain conditions, are capable of producing over 100 mycotoxins, some of which are carcinogenic. Mycotoxins are falled to the most dangerous contaminants of food and compound animal feedstuff, they possess toxicity, mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The most toxic and dangerous carcinogens are aflatoxins which affect on virtually all cells of the body of the human and agricultural animals, provoking the occurrence of diseases--aflatoxicoses. Aflatoxins give rise to encephalopathy and fatty degeneration of internal organs. The World Health Organization mentions aflatoxins as a cause of the origin of cancer. Currently in Russia there is a real danger of the negative impact of mycotoxins on farm animals in feeding grain affected by aflatoxins. The gain in the number of aflatoxicoses is a serious hygienic problem. This is related with the wide spread of producers of aflatoxins in nature and also with the intensive trade of grain and products of its processing between countries, a lack of control over their content. Detoxification of the affected products is an actual task, because its use causes irreparable harm to human health andfarm animals. Currently there are known several ways of inactivation of aflatoxins in the grain, based on the use of hydrothermal treatment. IR heat treatment, ultraviolet irradiation and extrusion were established to be the most rational approaches, providing the reduction offungi in the grain of aflatoxin-forming fungi by 80 ... 100%, aflatoxin B1--by the 76... 100% and a decrease in the degree of toxicity by 2.3 times. There are presented experimental data of various ways of disinfecting grain and appropriateness of their application in practice.

  20. Distinction of clenbuterol intake from drug or contaminated food of animal origin in a controlled administration trial - the potential of enantiomeric separation for doping control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Maria Kristina; Blokland, Marco H; Liebetrau, Franz; Schmidt, Alexander H; Meijer, Thijs; Stanic, Mijo; Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Waraksa, Emilia; Sterk, Saskia S

    2017-04-01

    The differentiation of clenbuterol abuse and unintentional ingestion from contaminated meat is crucial with respect to the valuation of an adverse analytical finding in human sports doping control. The proportion of the two enantiomers of clenbuterol may serve as potential discriminating parameter. For the determination of the individual enantiomers, specific methods were developed and validated for the different matrices under investigation based on chiral chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Data are presented from the administration to humans of clenbuterol from a pharmaceutical preparation, and from cattle meat and liver containing residues. A shift in the proportion of the enantiomers in cattle meat is detected and this signature is also found in human urine after ingestion. Thus, an altered enantiomeric composition of clenbuterol may be used to substantiate athletes' claims following adverse analytical findings in doping control. However, in meat, the enantiomeric composition was found to be highly variable. Species as well as tissue dependent variances need to be considered in interpreting enantiomer discrimination. Analysis of post administration urines from a controlled experiment comparing the administration of racemic clenbuterol from a registered pharmaceutical preparation and the administration of residue-containing meat and liver (nonracemic mixture) from treated