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Sample records for carcinoembryonic antigen families

  1. Identification of a Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Kodelja, Vitam; Lucas, Kurt; Barnert, Sabine; Kleist, Sabine von; Thompson, John A.; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    The existence of a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like gene family in rat has been demonstrated through isolation and sequencing of the N- terminal domain exons of presumably five discrete genes (rnCGM1-5). This finding will allow for the first time the study of functional and clinical aspects of the tumor marker CEA and related antigens in an animal model. Sequence comparison with the corresponding regions of members of the human CEA gene family revealed a relatively low similarity at the am...

  2. Carcino-Embryonic Antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour marker analysis has increased our understanding of the presence of tumours in the body. Carcino-embryonic antigen, CEA, is one of the best studied tumour markers and has proved an ideal diagnostic adjuvant. It has helped in quantifying the amount of disease present in a patient and thence to make accurate prognosis on the various diagnosed ailments. At UCH, it is observed that there is an increase in cancer related ailments and therefore the need for early diagnosis is more compelling in our environment to mitigate future cost of managing advanced manifestation

  3. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  4. cDNA Cloning Demonstrates the Expression of Pregnancy-Specific Glycoprotein Genes, a Subgroup of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family, in Fetal Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Weiss, Martina; Thompson, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG) genes constitute a subgroup of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family. Here we report the cloning of four cDNAs coding for different members of the PSG family from a human fetal liver cDNA library. They are derived from three closely related genes (PSG1, PSG4 and PSG6). Two of the cDNA clones represent splice variants of PSG1 (PSG1a, PSG1d) differing in their C-terminal domain and 3′-untranslated regions. All encoded proteins show the same dom...

  5. A Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Secreting Adenocarcinoma Arising in Tailgut Cyst : Clinical Implications of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Byoung Chul; Kim, Nam Kyu; Lim, Beom Jin; Kang, Sang Ook; Sohn, Ju Hyuk; Roh, Jae Kyung; Choi, Sang Tae; Kim, Sung Ai; Park, Se Eun

    2005-01-01

    Tailgut cysts (TGCs) are rare congenital cysts that occur in the retrorectal or presacral spaces. Although most tailgut cysts have been reported as benign, there have been at least 9 cases associated with malignant change. We report herein on an unusual case of a 40-year-old woman with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing adenocarcinoma arising within a TGC who underwent surgical resection and local radiation therapy. Despite the complete resection, metastatic adenocarcinoma developed f...

  6. Combination of cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen can improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease.......The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease....

  7. A carcinoembryonic antigen-secreting adenocarcinoma arising in tailgut cyst: clinical implications of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byoung Chul; Kim, Nam Kyu; Lim, Beom Jin; Kang, Sang Ook; Sohn, Ju Hyuk; Roh, Jae Kyung; Choi, Sang Tae; Kim, Sung Ai; Park, Se Eun

    2005-08-31

    Tailgut cysts (TGCs) are rare congenital cysts that occur in the retrorectal or presacral spaces. Although most tailgut cysts have been reported as benign, there have been at least 9 cases associated with malignant change. We report herein on an unusual case of a 40-year-old woman with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing adenocarcinoma arising within a TGC who underwent surgical resection and local radiation therapy. Despite the complete resection, metastatic adenocarcinoma developed five months after surgery. CEA-producing adenocarcinoma from a TGC is extremely rare and only two cases, including this case, have been reported in the English medical literature. Besides CEA, the serum levels of CA 19-9 became markedly elevated in this patient. Given that the serum CEA level decreased to the normal range after complete resection of tumor and that the tumor recurrence was associated with a rebound of the CEA serum level, our case shows that serial measurements of serum CEA can be used for treatment planning and for assessing the patient's treatment response for this rare disease. PMID:16127782

  8. Prognostic Effect of Pretreatment Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Kim, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many studies have reported the prognostic value of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (pre-CEA) levels on colorectal cancer outcomes. However, controversy remains concerning the significance of pre-CEA levels in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Our aim in this study was to investigate the prognostic role of the pre-CEA level in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal exc...

  9. Reagents for radioimmunological determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work was undertaken to prepare the reagents for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) radioimmunoassay with double antibody method. The CEA standard of high immunoreactivity was prepared and purified. The purified CEA was used for immunozation of goats. The goat anti - CEA sera were received. IgG fraction from normal goat serum was purified and used for the production of horse anti-goat IgG serum which was then used in the radioimmunoassay of CEA. The labelling of CEA with iodine-125 has been carried out be means of the enzymatic method.(Z.R.)

  10. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) dynamics in stomach cancer patients receiving cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunologic assays of blood serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level were conducted at major stages of treatment of gastric cancer by subtotal stomach resection and gastrectomy with preliminary cryotreatment and thawing of tumor. A short-term rise in CEA level occurred in 53.9 % of cases 3-4 days after combined therapy. A decrease in CEA concentration at discharge from hospital as compared with preoperative level and that registered 3-4 days after operation was observed in 50 and 75 % of cases of combined therapy, respectively, and 47.5 and 37.5 % of controls (surgery without cryotreatment). There was nocorrelation between cryotreatment and changes in CEA level in gastric ulcer patients

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen continuous epitopes determined by the spot method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solassol, I; Granier, C; Pèlegrin, A

    2001-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a heavily glycosylated tumor-associated protein with an N-A1-B1-A2-B2-A3-B3 domain structure. Circulating CEA immunoassays are used for monitoring digestive cancer patients, and radiolabeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (MAb) are used for the diagnosis and therapy of CEA-positive tumors. The five major nonoverlapping epitopes (Gold 1-5) have been broadly correlated with the domain organization, but there is no precise localization of the epitopes at the sequence level. In an attempt to identify the peptide sequences corresponding to the five Gold epitopes on the CEA molecule, we prepared a set of 227 overlapping fifteen-mer peptides corresponding to the complete CEA sequence with the SPOT method. Using five high affinity MAbs directed against the five CEA Gold epitopes, we demonstrated that none of these epitopes could be mimicked by a fifteen-mer peptide sequence. However, using rabbit and goat anti-CEA sera, we identified six major continuous antigenic regions. All are included in the Ig-like domains of the CEA: two in the A1 domain (residues 120-134 and 153-164), one each in the A2 (329-337) and A3 domains (508-513), one at the junction between the A3 and B3 domains (553-561) and one in the B3 domain (565-573). A very homologous sequence (common residues VSPRL) was mapped in each of the three A domains. Thus, in terms of occurrence of continuous epitopes, the Ig-like domains A1, A2, A3 and B3 seem to be the most antigenic parts of CEA. These peptide sequences should be good candidates for the future development of site-specific anti-CEA MAbs. PMID:11275797

  12. Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigens Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichiro Nishimura

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA is an oncofoetal cell-surface glycoprotein that serves as an important tumor marker for colorectal and some other carcinomas. In this work, a CEA immunoassay using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor has been developed. SPR could provide label-free, real-time detection with high sensitivity, though its ability to detect CEA in human serum was highly dependent on the analytical conditions employed. We investigated the influences of various analytical conditions including immobilization methods for anti-CEA antibody and composition of sensor surface on the selective and sensitive detection of CEA. The results show that anti-CEA antibody immobilized via Protein A or Protein G caused a large increase in the resonance signal upon injection of human serum due to the interactions with IgGs in serum, while direct covalent immobilization of anti-CEA antibody could substantially reduce it. An optimized protocol based on further kinetic analysis and the use of 2nd and 3rd antibodies for the sandwich assay allowed detecting spiked CEA in human serum as low as 25 ng/mL. Furthermore, a self-assembled monolayer of mixed ethylene-glycol terminated alkanethiols on gold was found to have a comparable ability in detecting CEA as CM5 with thick dextran matrix and C1 with short flat layer on gold.

  13. Recombinant carcinoembryonic antigen as a reporter gene for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenanova, Vania; Barat, Bhaswati; Olafsen, Tove; Chatziioannou, Arion; Herschman, Harvey R.; Wu, Anna M. [David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Braun, Jonathan [David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Reporter genes can provide a way of noninvasively assessing gene activity in vivo. However, current reporter gene strategies may be limited by the immunogenicity of foreign reporter proteins, endogenous expression, or unwanted biological activity. We have developed a reporter gene based on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a human protein with limited normal tissue expression. To construct a CEA reporter gene for PET, a CEA minigene (N-A3) was fused to the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human Fc{gamma}RIIb receptor. The NA3-Fc{gamma}RIIb recombinant gene, driven by a CMV promoter, was transfected in Jurkat (human T cell leukemia) cells. Expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and microPET imaging. Flow cytometry identified Jurkat clones stably expressing NA3-Fc{gamma}RIIb at low, medium, and high levels. High and medium NA3-Fc{gamma}RIIb expression could also be detected by Western blot. Reporter gene positive and negative Jurkat cells were used to establish xenografts in athymic mice. IHC showed staining of the tumor with high reporter gene expression; medium and low N-A3 expression was not detected. MicroPET imaging, using an anti-CEA {sup 124}I-labeled single-chain Fv-Fc antibody fragment, demonstrated that only high N-A3 expression could be detected. Specific accumulation of activity was visualized at the N-A3 positive tumor as early as 4 h. MicroPET image quantitation showed tumor activity of 1.8 {+-} 0.2, 15.2 {+-} 1.3, and 4.6 {+-} 1.2 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 4, 20, and 48 h, respectively. Biodistribution at 48 h demonstrated tumor uptake of 4.8 {+-} 0.8%ID/g. The CEA N-A3 minigene has the potential to be used as a reporter gene for imaging cells in vivo. (orig.)

  14. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET] have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”.

  15. CD66 carcinoembryonic antigens mediate interactions between Opa-expressing Neisseria gonorrhoeae and human polymorphonuclear phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Owen, S D; Dehio, C; Haude, A; Grunert, F; Meyer, T F

    1997-06-16

    Colonization of urogenital tissues by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae is characteristically associated with purulent exudates of polymorphonuclear phagocytes (PMNs) containing apparently viable bacteria. Distinct variant forms of the phase-variable opacity-associated (Opa) outer membrane proteins mediate the non-opsonized binding and internalization of N. gonorrhoeae by human PMNs. Using overlay assays and an affinity isolation technique, we demonstrate the direct interaction between Opa52-expressing gonococci and members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family which express the CD66 epitope. Gonococci and recombinant Escherichia coli strains synthesizing Opa52 showed specific binding and internalization by transfected HeLa cell lines expressing the CD66 family members BGP (CD66a), NCA (CD66c), CGM1 (CD66d) and CEA (CD66e), but not that expressing CGM6 (CD66b). Bacterial strains expressing either no opacity protein or the epithelial cell invasion-associated Opa50 do not bind these CEA family members. Consistent with their different receptor specificities, Opa52-mediated interactions could be inhibited by polyclonal anti-CEA sera, while Opa50 binding was instead inhibited by heparin. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we observed a marked recruitment of CD66 antigen by Opa52-expressing gonococci on both the transfected cell lines and infected PMNs. These data indicate that members of the CEA family constitute the cellular receptors for the interaction with, and internalization of, N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:9218786

  16. A rapid radioimmunoassay for determination of tumor antigens with reference to carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel experimental procedure for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by a solid phase microradioimmunoassay has been developed. Goat anti-CEA antibodies were immobilized by coupling to cyanogen bromide activated filter paper discs. The inhibition of binding of radioiodinated CEA to the discs was proportional to the amount of unlabelled CEA present in the test sample. The experimental procedure involved two steps: (i) the test material containing unlabelled CEA was allowed to react with the antibody coated discs at 37 deg C for 2 hrs., and (ii) a standard amount of 125I-CEA was added to the reaction mixture and incubated for 24 hours at 37 deg C or room temperature. The discs were then washed 4 times and the radioactivity of each disc was determined. The sensitivity of the test in its present state of development was 2.5 ng/ml. (author)

  17. Levels of estrogen, carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen of breast in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted during the period from february 2004 to July 2004; with the objective of measuring the levels of estrogen (E2), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen of breast (CA-15.3) so as to facilitate the early diagnosis of breast cancer and determine the involvement of these parameters as risk factors for breast cancer. Ninety blood samples were collected from Sudanese females, divided into two groups; control group and patient groups. The patients group was sixty Sudanese females visiting the Radio Isotope Center, Khartoum (RICK) and they were confirmed as breast cancer patient by histopathology. The levels of the above mentioned parameters were determined by using radioimmunoassay technique. The results showed that, no significant (p=0.05) difference between the levels of the estrogen in patients compared to the control, on the other hand there was non significant (p>0.05) elevation in CEA levels in the patients with breast cancer compared to the control. The level of CA15.3 was significantly (p<0.0001) higher in the breast cancer patients compared to the control.(Author)

  18. Diagnostic Value of Cerebrospinal Fluid Level of Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Patients with Leptomeningeal Carcinomatous Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Sung Jin; Kim, Kwang Soo; Ha, Yoon Suk; Huh, So Young; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jong Kuk; Kim, Min Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multifocal seeding of the leptomeninges by malignant cells, which is usually referred to as leptomeningeal carcinomatous metastasis, produces substantial morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis is usually established by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) investigation, including cytology, cell counts, protein, glucose, and a tumor marker such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This study examined the diagnostic value of CEA in the CSF. Methods We meas...

  19. Release of carcinoembryonic antigen from human colon cancer cells by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    OpenAIRE

    Sack, T L; Gum, J R; Low, M G; Y. S. Kim

    1988-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is released from colon cancer cells into the circulation where it is monitored clinically as an indicator of the recurrence or progression of cancer. We have studied the mechanism of CEA membrane attachment and release using the human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line LS-174T, specimens of human colon cancers, and serum from colon cancer patients. CEA release by cells in vitro and in vivo is associated with the conversion of CEA from a membrane-bound, hydrophobic...

  20. Serum and pancreatic juice carcinoembryonic antigen in pancreatic and biliary disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Carr-Locke, D L

    1980-01-01

    Serum and pancreatic juice carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentrations were studied in a group of 144 patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a variety of benign and malignant pancreatic and biliary diseases. Serum CEA was found to be a poor diagnostic and discriminating marker for pancreatic disorders and was raised in obstructive jaundice from various causes correlating with serum alkaline phosphatase. A pancreatic juice CEA concentration of greater ...

  1. Design and cancer-targeting potential of antibody-based molecules directed against carcinoembryonic antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Huhalov, A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis examines the use of protein engineering to create antibody-based molecules for cancer treatment. The targeting unit used for these molecules was the single chain Fv antibody fragment MFE-23, which is directed against the tumour-associated marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). It was hypothesised that implementation of molecular design features such as humanisation, high affinity, multivalency and mannose glycosylation to accelerate systemic clearance would result in the favourabl...

  2. An Ultrasensitive Chemiluminescence Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Autocatalytic Enlargement of Immunogold Nanoprobes

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence assay for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) detection based on signal amplification with gold nanoparticles (NPs) is reported in the present work. The sandwich system of CEA/anti-CEA/goat-anti-mouse IgG functionalized Au nanoparticles was used as the sensing platform. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a further gold enlargement step was developed based on the autocatalytic Au deposition of gold nanoprobes via the reduction of AuCl4 − to Au0 o...

  3. Use of radiolabeled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen for the detection and localization of diverse cancers by external photoscanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether tumors containing carcinoembryonic antigen could be detected by administration of a radiolabeled, affinity-purified, goat IgG having 70% immunoreactivity against carcinoembryonic antigen, 18 patients with a history of cancer of diverse histopathology received an average total dose of 1.0 mCi of 131I-labeled IgG. Total-body photoscans were performed with a gamma scintillation camera at various intervals after administration of the radioactive antibody. Ordinary photoscans proved difficult to interpret because of blood-pool background radioactivity, thus necessitating the computer subtraction of radioactive blood-pool agents from the antibody's 131I activity. Tumor location could be demonstrated at 48 hours after injection in almost all cases studied. The scans were negative in patients without demonstrable tumors or with tumors apparently devoid of carcinoembryonic antigen. Circulating antigen levels of up to 350 ng per milliliter did not prevent successful tumor imaging after injection of the radioantibody

  4. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  5. Critical study and applications of the radioimmunological determination of carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines our research on the development of a radioimmunological method to determine the carcinoembryonic antigen of the digestive system (ACE). The carcinoembryonic antigen is defined and situated in the framework of antigens associated with human tumours. The general principles of the radioimmunological determination are then reviewed. A detailed technical study is devoted to each of the elements involved in the reaction and to the working conditions of each method tried. A labelling procedure and a radioactive protein separation method have been worked out, guaranteeing a high specific radioactivity consistent with a good immunoreactivity. The period of effectiveness of this protein has also been determined, taking account of its deiodination. The antiserum is a very important factor in the sensitivity of the measurement. A ewe antiserum of good antibody content and volume yield was chosen, its disadvantage being the length of the determination imposed by the 48 hour preincubation time. Ammonium sulphate precipitation and double antibody techniques were used for the labelled antigen-antibody separation. In seric solution the ammonium sulphate precipitation carries down non-specifically, in the standards, a large amount of labelled antigen. This disadvantage has been offset by a method of calculation which shows the actual contribution of the labelled complex. The double antibody technique requires a special adjustment to balance quantity of second antiserum and precipitation time. The system sometimes needs an addition of serum from the animal donor of the first antibody in order to obtain an adequate separation. Where techniques are concerned, although the macro-method is suitable for determinations on perchloric extract and is still in common use we prefer to use the one described here under the name of micro-method. Finally the results obtained in experimental and clinical applications are presented

  6. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy

  7. Immunoradiometric assay for carcinoembryonic antigen using avidin-biotin separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive, specific, noncompetitive, sandwich-type radioimmunoassay for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been developed in authors' laboratory, which can be performed conveniently. The assay involves two monoclonal antibodies, selected for high affinity and specificity and also for reaction against antigenic sites on CEA that are distal from each other. One of these antibodies was labelled with 125I and the other was conjugated covalently to biotin. Polystyrene tubes were conjugated covalently to avidin. These tubes represent a rapid, simple method for separating the CEA-bound antibody from the free antibody. The biotin-antibody-CEA-12'5I-labelled antibody complexes bind to the tubes and CEA concentration is directly related to counts per minute. This assay can detect the CEA at a concentration of 0.22 μg/L in serum

  8. Development of a PMMA Electrochemical Microfluidic Device for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Trung, Hoang; Tien, Bui Quang; Binh, Nguyen Hai; Ha, Cao Hong; Le Huy, Nguyen; Loc, Nguyen Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device fabricated by an inexpensive CO2 laser etching system was developed for detection of carcino-embryonic antigens (CEA). The device was capable of working in continuous mode and was designed with the aid of numerical simulation. The detection of target CEA was based on immuno-assay via magnetic particles and electrochemical sensing. The as-prepared microfluidic can be used to detect CEA at the relatively low concentration of 150 pg mL-1. The device could be reused many times, since the capture and removal of magnetic particles in the assay could be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The proposed approach appears to be suitable for high-throughput and automated analysis of large biomolecules such as tumor markers and pathogens.

  9. Selection of DMA aptamer that specific binding human carcinoembryonic antigen in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To select the specific aptamer of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), one of the most attractive molecule for cancer target therapy and imaging. Methods: Seven rounds in vitro selection were performed against the purified CEA protein. Ligand-mediated target purification and Co-immunoprecipitation were adopted to verify the specific binding of the aptamer to the purified and native protein separately. Results:The CEA-specific aptamer which can bind both the purified and native protein with the high specificity was obtained. Conclusion:This is the first time the CEA specific apatmer was produced. The results in this study provides the preliminary evidence for further investigation and application of CEA-aptamer in the future.

  10. Graphene oxide supported rhombic dodecahedral Cu2O nanocrystals for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Taotao; Chen, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xiuwen; Sun, Zhao; Wang, Haining; Qi, Yu; Hong, Chenglin

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a simple electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on rhombic dodecahedral Cu2O nanocrystals-graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles (rCu2O-GO-AuNPs). GO as the template and surfactant resulting in rCu2O exhibit improved rhombic dodecahedral structure uniformity and excellent electrochemical performance. Moreover, GO was found to be able to effectively improve the long stability of rCu2O on the electrode response. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a low limit of detection (0.004 ng ml(-1)) and a large linear range (0.01-120 ng ml(-1)). This work presents a potential alternative for the diagnostic applications of GO-supported special morphology materials in biomedicine and biosensors. PMID:26596552

  11. Development of solid phase immunoradiometric assay for determination of carcinoembryonic antigen as a tumor marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of solid phase coated tube immunoradiometric assay for estimation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was the aim of the present study. Labeling of CEA was carried out using Ch-T and iodogen as oxidizing agents and 125I. The tracers were used to test the presence of antibodies produced by immunization. Production of polyclonal antibody was carried out through immunization of four mice. After purification step, the tubes were coated by purified polyclonal antibodies. Immunoradiometric that system was performed using the commercial IZOTOP 125I-anti hCEA tracer then the validity studies were carried out. The results show that the local coated tubes made the assay is more than sufficient to fulfill the clinical requirement of CEA as a tumor marker. (author)

  12. A prospective study of serum tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigens 50 and 242, tissue polypeptide antigen and tissue polypeptide specific antigen in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with special reference to multivariate diagnostic score.

    OpenAIRE

    Pasanen, P. A.; Eskelinen, M.; Partanen, K.; Pikkarainen, P; Penttilä, I.; Alhava, E

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess by a stepwise multivariate discriminant analysis the value of four current serum tumour markers - carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA) 50 and CA 242 and tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) - and a new serum tumour marker, tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The serum values were measured in a prospective series of patients with jaundice, with unjaundiced cholestasis and with a suspicion of chro...

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY CL58 AGAINST CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN (CEA) AND STUDY OF ITS BIODISTRIBUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振甫; 杨志; 张宏; 顾晋

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the preparation and characterization of monoclonal antibody (McAb) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Methods: CEA antigen was extracted from metastasized liver of patients with colorectal cancer and used for the preparation of McAb against CEA by hybridoma technique. Immunoreactivity of McAb to CEA antigen was evaluated using ELISA. Mouse ascites was purified by two steps, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using protein A and high performance hydroxylapatite (HPHT). Normal adult tissues and tumor specimen were used for immunohistochemical evaluation of the McAb. Isotope 99mTc labeled CEA McAb was used for biodistribution in tumor-bearing mouse. Results: Purified CEA antigen was a glycoprotein of 180 kD. Anti-CEA McAb affinity constant was 7.4x109/M. The McAb showed positive staining in 54-88% of colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and lung cancer, while negative for normal tissues. 24 hours after injection of 99mTc labeled McAb, tumor ID%/g was higher than 15% and tumor/blood, tumor/kidney and tumor/liver were 1.82, 1.51 and 2.92 respectively. T/NT ratios of other viscera were over 3.0. Conclusion: Purified CEA antigen had very good immunogenicity. The anti-CEA McAb was highly specific. 99mTc labeled McAb was stabled both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo distribution result was satisfactory. McAb CL58 may be useful for RII and RIGS.

  14. Micro-plate magnetic chemiluminescence immunoassay and its applications in carcinoembryonic antigen analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A micro-plate magnetic chemiluminescence immunoassay was developed for rapid and high throughput detection of carcinoembryonic antigens (CEA) in human sera. This method was based on a sandwich immunoreaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled anti-CEA antibodies, CEA antigens, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-CEA antibodies in mi- cro-plate. The immunomagnetic particles coated with anti-FITC antibodies were used as the solid phase for the immunoassay. The separation procedure was carried out by a magnetic plate adaptor and the luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-HRP system was employed for the chemiluminescence detection. The proposed method combined the advantages of the micro-plate reactor and magnetic particle separation technology with the linear range of 5-250 ng mL·1. The detection limit of CEA was 0.61 ng mL·1. The coefficient of the variation was less than 7% and 13% for intra-assay and inter-assay precision, respectively. Compared with the commercial micro-plate chemiluminescent kit, the proposed method showed a good correlation.

  15. [Optical Analysis of the Interaction of Mercaptan Derivatives of Nanogold Particles with Carcinoembryonic Antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hong-juan; Zhao, Ran-lin; Wang, De-shun; Li, Cai-xia; Liu, Yi-yao

    2016-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been the subject of intense research for use in biomedicine over the past couple of decades. AuNPs, also referred to as colloidal gold, possess some astounding optical and physical properties that have earned them a prime spot among the new promising tools for medical applications. Today, AuNPs are offered to provide the clinical laboratory with more sensitive, faster, and simpler assays, which are also cost-effective. AuNPs can be used to develop point-of- care tests and novel testing strategies such as in drug targeting, disease detection, molecular recognition, and biological labels. The typical structure of AuNPs is spherical nano-sized gold particles, but they can also be composed of a thin gold shell surrounding a dielectric core, such as silica (gold nanoshells). their size range from 0.8 to 250 nm and are characterized by high absorption coefficients. AuNPs have some unique optical properties, such as enhanced absorption and scattering, where the absorption cross-section of AuNPs is 4~5 orders of magnitude greater than that of rhodamine 6G. When AuNPs aggregate, interaction of locally adjacent AuNPs (plasmon-plasmon interaction) shifts their color to blue. Thus, the binding of AuNP-labeled entities to their respective target would lead to aggregation of the nanoparticles and a detectable shift in the optical signal. The strong absorption of AuNPs can also be used in colorimetric detection of analytes by measuring changes in the refractive index of the AuNP's environment caused by adsorption of the target analytes. However, a large number of surface atoms of nanoparticles have huge surplus bonding ability, because of surface effect of gold nanoparticles, result in reuniting and sinking among the nanoparticles which make them unstable. In order to detect traces of carcinoembryonic antigen, one of the tumor targets, a new kind of gold nanoparticle with hyperchormic effect and fluorescence sensitization effect material needs to

  16. Carcinoembryonic antigen is anchored to membranes by covalent attachment to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol moiety: identification of the ethanolamine linkage site.

    OpenAIRE

    Hefta, S A; Hefta, L J; Lee, T.D. (Taunia D.); Paxton, R J; Shively, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The COOH-terminal amino acid of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is shown to covalently link with ethanolamine, evidence consistent with the anchorage of CEA to the plasma membrane through a phosphatidylinositol-glycan tail. Purified CEA was digested with trypsin, and the resulting peptides were isolated by reverse-phase HPLC. Tryptic hexapeptide T12, terminating atypically with alanine, corresponded in sequence (Ser-Ile-Thr-Val-Ser-Ala) with the last six residues (637-642) of the third repeati...

  17. Mesothelioma: profile of keratin proteins and carcinoembryonic antigen: an immunoperoxidase study of 20 cases and comparison with pulmonary adenocarcinomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Corson, J M; Pinkus, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of keratin proteins and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in 20 diffuse pleural malignant mesotheliomas and 20 adenocarcinomas of the lung was determined with the use of an indirect immunoperoxidase method. Keratin proteins were identified in all of the mesotheliomas, with strong staining observed in 17 of the cases. Tumor cells of various histologic types (tubular, papillary, solid, and spindle) revealed staining for keratin proteins. A variety of staining patterns were observe...

  18. Aptasensor based on tripetalous cadmium sulfide-graphene electrochemiluminescence for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Gui-Fang; Cao, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Huang, Ke-Jing; Liu, Yan-Ming; Chen, Yong-Hong; Ren, Shu-Wei

    2014-11-21

    A facile label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor, based on the ECL of cadmium sulfide-graphene (CdS-GR) nanocomposites with peroxydisulfate as the coreactant, was designed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Tripetalous CdS-GR nanocomposites were synthesized through a simple onepot solvothermal method and immobilized on the glassy carbon electrode surface. L-Cystine (L-cys) could largely promote the electron transfer and enhance the ECL intensity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were assembled onto the L-cys film modified electrode for aptamer immobilization and ECL signal amplification. The aptamer modified with thiol was adsorbed onto the surface of the AuNPs through a Au-S bond. Upon hybridization of the aptamer with the target protein, the sequence could conjugate CEA to form a Y architecture. With CEA as a model analyte, the decreased ECL intensity is proportional to the CEA concentration in the range of 0.01-10.0 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 3.8 pg mL(-1) (S/N = 3). The prepared aptasensor was applied to the determination of CEA in human serum samples. The recoveries of CEA in the human serum samples were between 85.0% and 109.5%, and the RSD values were no more than 3.4%. PMID:25209409

  19. Construction, Expression and Characterization of a Chimeric Protein Targeting Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang; HUA Shu-cheng; MA Cheng-yuan; YU Zhen-xiang; XU Li-jun; LI Dan; SUN Li-li; LI Xiao; PENG Li-ping

    2011-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA) is an oncofetal glycoprotein known as an important clinical tumor marker and is overexpressed in several types of tumors, including colorectal and lung carcinomas. We constructed a chimeric protein that exhibits both specific binding and immune stimulating activities, by fusing staphylococcal enterotoxin A(SEA) to the C-terminus of an anti-CEA single-chain disulfide-stabilized Fv(scdsFv) antibody (single-chain-C-terminus/SEA, SC-C/SEA). The SC-C/SEA protein was expressed in Escherichia coli(E. coli), refolded, and purified on an immobilized Ni2+ affinity chromatography column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis reveal that the target protein was expressed sufficiently. We used immunofluorescence assays to demonstrate that SC-C/SEA could bind specifically to human lung carcinoma cells(A549), but almost human uterine cervix cells(HeLa). We also used the L-lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) release assay to show that SC-C/SEA elicits a strong A549 tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte(CTL) response in vitro. The results suggest that SC-C/SEA shows specific activity against CEA-positive cells and has potential application in CEA-targeted cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Normal carcinoembryonic antigen indicates benefit from perioperative chemotherapy to gastric carcinoma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Chen; Ying-Bo Chen; Yuan-Fang Li; Xing-Yu Feng; Zhi-Wei Zhou; Xiu-Hong Yuan; Chao-Nan Qian

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a predictor of survival for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer receiving perioperative chemotherapy.METHODS:We retrospectively studied a cohort of 228gastric cancer patients who underwent D2 gastrectomy combined with chemotherapy at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between January 2005 and December 2009.Among them,168 patients received 6-12 cycles of oxaliplatin-based adjuvant (post-operative) chemotherapy,while 60 received perioperative chemotherapy (2 cycles of FOLFOX6 or XELOX before surgery and 4-10 cycles after surgery).Serum CEA was measured using an enzyme immunoassay.The followup lasted until December 2010.RESULTS:In the group that had elevated serum CEA,the difference in survival time between patients receiving perioperative chemotherapy and those receiving adjuvant chemotherapy had no statistical significance (P >0.05).However,in the group that had normal serum CEA,patients receiving perioperative chemotherapy had a longer survival time.In multivariate analysis,T staging and lymph node metastatic rate were independent prognostic factors for the patients.Perioperative chemotherapy improved the overall survival of patients who had a normal pretreatment CEA level (P =0.070).CONCLUSION:Normal pretreatment serum CEA is a predictor of survival for patients receiving perioperative chemotherapy.

  1. Carcinoembryonic antigen-producing adrenal adenoma resected using combined lateral and anterior transperitoneal laparoscopic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman presented with symptoms consistent with hyperadrenocorticism and hyperca techolaminism. She had a cushingoid appearance and her cortisol level was elevated. Herserum dopamine and noradrenalin levels were also elevated.Computed tomography detected a left adrenal mass measuring 3.5 cm × 3.0 cm in diameter. Metaiodobenzylguanidine cintigraphy was negative. Unexpectedly, the serum Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level was elevated.Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed increased uptake in the adrenal tumor only, with a maximum standardized uptake value of 2.8. Selective venography and blood sampling revealed that the concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines and CEA were significantly elevated in the vein draining the tumor. A diagnosis of CEA-produdng benign adenoma was made. After preoperative management, we performed a combined lateral and anterior transperitoneal laparoscopic adrenectomy. Her vital signs remained stable during surgery. Histopathological examination revealed a benign adenoma. Her cortisol, catecholamine and CEA levels normalized immediately after surgery. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of CEA-roducin gadrenal adenoma, along with a review of the relevant literature, and discuss our laparoscopic surgery techniques.

  2. Association between high serum carcinoembryonic antigen and clinical state of male anorexia nervosa: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Shinichiro; Shimizu, Hideaki; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex psychiatric disorder, which is not yet fully understood. Several studies reported that AN was associated with disruption of cytokine network. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a glycoprotein related to its network, used as a tumor marker of adenocarcinoma, and suggested to stimulate monocytes and macrophages to release proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we report a 41-year-old male suffering from AN who was suspected of having a malignant tumor due to markedly elevated serum CEA levels. However, on further examinations, he was discovered to have no malignant tumors, and, interestingly, his CEA levels actually decreased as his clinical state of AN improved. Furthermore, it was found that his CEA levels were elevated proportionally to his clinical state of AN and that his body mass index was significantly correlated with serum CEA levels. Therefore, it is suggested that inflammatory responses may be associated with the clinical state of AN. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:428-431). PMID:27015461

  3. Transcription Activity of Ectogenic Human Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells A549

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Weining; FANG Huijuan; XU Yongjian; XIONG Shendao; CAO Yong; SONG Qingfeng; ZENG Daxiong; ZHANG Huilan

    2006-01-01

    The transcription activity of ectogenic human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) promoter in lung adenocarcinoma cells A549 was investigated for the further gene-targeting therapy. The reporter gene green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by CEA promoter and human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were relatively constructed and named plasmid pCEA-EGFP and pCMV-GFP respectively. The intensity of fluorescence was detected by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry analysis after the pCEA-GFP and pSNAV-GFP plasmids were transfected into A549 cells through liposome respectively. The results showed (4.08±0.63) % of the A549 cells transfected with pCEA-AFP plasmid expressed, significantly lower than that of the A549 cells transfected with pCMV-GFP [(43.27±3.54) %]. It was suggested that ectogenic human CEA promoter in lung adenocarcinoma cells A549 was weakly expressed. The distinct specificity of CEA promoter in CEA high expression cells was regarded as a tool in selective gene therapy, but the transcription activity of ectogenic human CEA promoter was needed to increase in the future.

  4. Targeted sonodynamic therapy of cancer using a photosensitizer conjugated with antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hironori; Kuroki, Motomu; Tachibana, Katsuro; Li, Tieli; Awasthi, Aradhana; Ueno, Aruto; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Imakiire, Takayuki; Yamauchi, Yasushi; Yamada, Hiromi; Ariyoshi, Asami; Kuroki, Masahide

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a strategy for the selective destruction of cancer cells by ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of an antibody-conjugated photosensitizer. To this end, a photoimmunoconjugate (PIC) was prepared between ATX-70, a photosensitizer of a gallium-porphyrin analogue, and F11-39, a high affinity monoclonal antibody (MAb) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which is often overexpressed in various carcinoma cells. This conjugate, designated F39/ATX-70, retained immunoreactivity against purified CEA and CEA-expressing cells as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of F39/ATX-70 against CEA-expressing human gastric carcinoma cells in vitro was found to be greater than that of ATX-70 when applied in combination with ultrasound irradiation. When in vivo anti-tumor effects in a mouse xenograft model were assessed, intravenous administration of F39/ATX-70 followed by ultrasonic irradiation produced a marked growth inhibition of tumor compared with irradiation alone or irradiation after administration of ATX-70. These results suggest that the PIC between anti-CEA MAb and ATX-70 may have applications in sonodynamic therapy where destruction of CEA-expressing tumor is required. PMID:12168839

  5. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad-Ur-Rahman, Fnu; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  6. Synuclein gamma predicts poor clinical outcome in colon cancer with normal levels of carcinoembryonic antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Xiaofang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synuclein gamma (SNCG, initially identified as a breast cancer specific gene, is aberrantly expressed in many different malignant tumors but rarely expressed in matched nonneoplastic adjacent tissues. In this study, we investigated the prognostic potential of SNCG in colon cancer particularly in the patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels. Methods SNCG levels were assessed immunohistochemically in cancer tissues from 229 colon adenocarcinoma patients with a mean follow-up of 44 months. Correlations between SNCG levels and clinicopathologic features, preoperative serum CEA level, and clinical outcome were analyzed statistically using SPSS. Results SNCG levels in colon adenocarcinoma were closely associated with intravascular embolus and tumor recurrence but independent of preoperative serum CEA levels. SNCG expression was an independent prognostic factor of a shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS (P P = 0.001, P = 0.001, 0.002 for 97 patients with normal preoperative serum CEA level. Conclusions Our results suggest for the first time that SNCG is a new independent predicator for poor prognosis in patients with colon adenocarcinoma, including those with normal CEA levels. Combination of CEA with SNCG improves prognostic evaluation for patients with colon adenocarcinoma.

  7. Tumor localization of radiolabeled antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen in patients with carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified, [131I]-labeled goat antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen, which have been shown to localize in human carcinoma in nude mice, were injected into 27 patients with carcinoma. Patients were scanned with a scintillation camera at various intervals. In 11 patients, radioactivity was detectable in the tumor 48 h after injection. Computerized subtraction of blood-pool radioactivity provided clearer pictures in positive cases, but in 16 patients the scans remained doubtful or negative. To study the specificity of [131]-antibody localization, we gave some patients simultaneous injections of [125]-labeled normal IgG. Both isotopes were measured by means of scintillation counting in tumors and normal tissues recovered after surgery. The results demonstrated that only the anti-CEA antibodies localized in tumors. However, the total antibody-derived radioactivity in the tumor was only about 0.001 of the injected dose. We conclude that, despite the present demonstration of specificity, this method of tumor detection is not yet clinically useful

  8. An ultrasensitive chemiluminescence biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen based on autocatalytic enlargement of immunogold nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Minjia; Ma, Zhanfang

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence assay for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) detection based on signal amplification with gold nanoparticles (NPs) is reported in the present work. The sandwich system of CEA/anti-CEA/goat-anti-mouse IgG functionalized Au nanoparticles was used as the sensing platform. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a further gold enlargement step was developed based on the autocatalytic Au deposition of gold nanoprobes via the reduction of AuCl(4)- to Au0 on their surface in the presence of NH(2)OH·HCl. AuCl(4)-, which is a soluble product of gold nanoprobes, served as an analyte in the CL reaction for the indirect measurement of CEA. Under optimized conditions, the CL intensity of the system was linearly related to the logarithm of CEA concentration in the range of 100 pg∙mL-1 to 1,000 ng∙mL-1, with a detection limit of 20 pg∙mL-1. PMID:23443399

  9. An Ultrasensitive Chemiluminescence Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Autocatalytic Enlargement of Immunogold Nanoprobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjia Hao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence assay for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA detection based on signal amplification with gold nanoparticles (NPs is reported in the present work. The sandwich system of CEA/anti-CEA/goat-anti-mouse IgG functionalized Au nanoparticles was used as the sensing platform. In order to improve detection sensitivity, a further gold enlargement step was developed based on the autocatalytic Au deposition of gold nanoprobes via the reduction of AuCl4− to Au0 on their surface in the presence of NH2OH·HCl. AuCl4−, which is a soluble product of gold nanoprobes, served as an analyte in the CL reaction for the indirect measurement of CEA. Under optimized conditions, the CL intensity of the system was linearly related to the logarithm of CEA concentration in the range of 100 pg∙mL−1 to 1,000 ng∙mL−1, with a detection limit of 20 pg∙mL−1.

  10. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  11. Biliary carcinoembryonic antigen levels in diagnosis of occult hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaques Waisberg; Rog(e)rio T. Palma; Lu(i)s Contim Neto; Lourdes C. Martins; Maur(i)cio S. L. Oliveira; Carlos A. Nagashima; Antonio C. Godoy; Fabio S. Goffi

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively explore the role of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in gallbladder bile in patients with colorectal carcinoma and the morphological and clinical features of neoplasia and the occurrence of hepatic metastases.METHODS: CEA levels in the gallbladder and peripheral blood were studied in 44 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 10 patients with uncomplicated cholelithiasis. CEA samples were collected from the gallbladder bile and peripheral blood during the operation, immediately before extirpating the colorectal neoplasia or cholecystectomy.Values of up to 5 ng/ml were considered normal for bile and serum CEA.RESULTS: In the 44 patients with colorectal carcinoma who underwent operation with curative intent, the average level of serum CEA was 8.5 ng/ml (range: 0.1 to 111.0 ng/ml) and for bile CEA it was 74.5 ng/ml (range: 0.2 to 571.0ng/ml). In the patients with uncomplicated cholelithiasis who underwent cholecystectomy, the average level of serum CEA was 1.9 ng/ml (range: 1.0 to 3.5 ng/ml) and for bile CEA it was 1.2 ng/ml (range: 0.3 to 2.9 ng/ml).The average duration of follow-up time was 16.5 months (range: 6 to 48 months). Four patients who underwent extirpation of the colorectal carcinoma without evidence of hepatic metastasis and with an average bile CEA value of 213.2 ng/ml presented hepatic metastases between three and seventeen months after removal of the primary colorectal neoplasia. Three of them successfully underwent extirpation of the hepatic lesions.CONCLUSION: High CEA levels in gallbladders of patients undergoing curative operation for colorectal carcinoma may indicate the presence of hepatic metastases. Such patients must be followed up with special attention to the diagnosis of such lesions.

  12. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  13. Luminol/antibody labeled gold nanoparticles for chemiluminescence immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile strategy by loading luminol and secondary antibody on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) was described in the present work. The as-prepared luminol/antibody labeled Au NPs conjugates (LAAu NPs) were used as the chemiluminescent probe for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum. The LAAu NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrophotometry (UV-vis), and chemiluminescent method. Stable and efficient chemiluminescence (CL) was obtained when luminol molecules and secondary antibodies were coimmobilized on the Au NPs by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an oxidant, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a catalyst, and 4-(4'-iodo)phenylphenol (IPP) as an enhancer. The LAAu NPs were further evaluated via a sandwich-type CL immunoassay of CEA in serum. In this protocol, the CEA analyte was captured by the primary antibody immobilized on the surface of magnetic beads, and then was sandwiched by the secondary antibody loaded on luminol-labeled Au NPs. The chemiluminescent intensity was proportional to the concentration of CEA over the range of 5.0 x 10-10 to 5.0 x 10-8 g mL-1 and 5.0 x 10-9 to 2.0 x 10-8 g mL-1 by using HRP and Co2+ as catalysts, respectively. The present chemiluminescent immunoassay based on the luminol/antibody labeled Au NPs conjugates has offered great promise for simple, highly biocompatible, and cost-effective analysis of biological samples.

  14. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein

  15. Protein expression levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in Danish ovarian cancer patients: from the Danish 'MALOVA'ovarian cancer study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogdall, E.V.; Christensen, L.; Blaakaer, J.; Jarle, Christensen,I; Gayther, S.; Jacobs, I.J.; Hogdall, C.K.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2008-01-01

    from 189 women diagnosed with low malignant potential ovarian tumours (LMP, borderline ovarian tumours) and 571 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer (OC). RESULTS: Using 30% as the cut-off level for CEA over-expression, 18% of LMPs and 4% of OCs were positive. A higher proportion of mucinous tumours......AIMS: To determine the variation in expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in 760 epithelial ovarian tumours from Denmark, and to correlate expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis for the disease. METHODS: Using tissue arrays (TA), we analysed CEA expression in tissues...

  16. High expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 and 8 in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Jensen, Morten; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A

    2011-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is characterized by leukoerythroblastic anemia with circulating immature myeloid cells, including CD34+ cells, progressive splenomegaly and accumulation of connective tissue and neoangiogenesis in the bone marrow. Altered bone marrow stroma and cell adherence account for...... the egress of CD34+ cells from the bone marrow. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 has been implicated in cell adhesion, cellular invasiveness, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which are all key processes in the pathophysiology of PMF. Accordingly, CEACAMs may play an...

  17. Evaluation of tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 19 fragment and cancer-associated antigen 72-4 in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    L.V Teixeira; T.A. Guerra; F.O. Conrado; S.R. Terra; D.G. Gerardi; González, F.H.D.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of tumor markers in body fluids can be used for diagnosis and prognosis of patients. This study aimed to investigate the performance of tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1), cancer-associated antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions. In thirty-two neoplastic (n=16) and non-neoplastic (n=16) samples of canine thoracic or abdominal effusions, tumor markers were measured. Significant statistica...

  18. Independent prognostic value of preoperative serum markers CA 242, specific tissue polypeptide antigen and human chorionic gonadotrophin beta, but not of carcinoembryonic antigen or tissue polypeptide antigen in colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Carpelan-Holmström, M; Haglund, C.; Lundin, J; Alfthan, H.; Stenman, U H; Roberts, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The prognostic value of preoperative serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA 242, tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA), specific tissue polypeptide antigen (TPS) and human chorionic gonadotrophin beta (hCG beta) in 251 patients with colorectal cancer (39 Dukes' A, 98 Dukes' B, 56 Dukes' C and 58 Dukes' D) was investigated. When using the cut-off levels recommended for diagnostic purposes, there was a significantly longer overall survival in patients with low tumour marker level...

  19. A Sandwich Electrochemical Immunosensor Using Magnetic DNA Nanoprobes for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel magnetic nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA was designed as a model using CEA antibody-functionalized magnetic beads [DNA/Fe3O4/ZrO2; Fe3O4 (core/ZrO2 (shell nano particles (ZMPs] as immunosensing probes. To design the immunoassay, the CEA antibody and O-phenylenediamine (OPD were initially immobilized on a chitosan/nano gold composite membrane on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE/CS-nano Au, which was used for CEA recognition. Then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP-labeled anti-CEA antibodies (HRP-CEA Ab2 were bound to the surface of the synthesized magnetic ZMP nanoparticles as signal tag. Thus, the sandwich-type immune complex could be formed between secondary antibody (Ab2 modified DNA/ZMPs nanochains tagged by HRP and GCE/CS-nano Au. Unlike conventional nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassays, the recognition elements of this immunoassay included both electron mediators and enzyme labels, which obviously simplifies the electrochemical measurement process. The sandwich-type immunoassay format was used for online formation of the immunocomplex of CEA captured in the detection cell with an external magnet. The electrochemical signals derived from HRP during the reduction of H2O2 with OPD as electron mediator were measured. The method displayed a high sensitivity for CEA detection in the range of 0.008–200 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 5 pg/mL (estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The precision, reproducibility, and stability of the immunoassay were good. The use of the assay was evaluated with clinical serum samples, and the results were in excellent accordance with those obtained using the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. Thus, the magnetic nanoparticle-based assay format is a promising approach for clinical applications, and it could be further developed for the detection of other biomarkers in cancer diagnosis.

  20. Cytokeratins and carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luís C. Fernandes; Su B. Kim; Delcio Matos

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the serum levels of cytokeratins and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in diagnosis, staging and prognosis of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma.METHODS: The sample consisted of 169 patients. One hundred blood donors formed the control group. Radical surgery was performed on 120 patients, with an average follow-up duration of 22.3 mo. Relapses occurred in 23individuals after an average of 18.09 mo. CEA was assayed via the Delfia(R) method with a limit of 5 ng/mL. Cytokeratins were assayed via the LIA-mat(R) TPA-M Prolifigen(R) method with a limit of 72 U/L.RESULTS: In the diagnosis of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma, CEA showed a sensitivity of 56%, a specificity of 95%, a positive predictive value of 94%, a negative predictive value of 50% and an accuracy of 76.8%.TPA-M had a sensitivity of 70%, a specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 97%, a negative predictive value of 66% and an accuracy of 93.6%. The elevation of one of the markers was shown to have a sensitivity of 76.9%, a specificity of 91%, a positive predictive value of 93.5%, a negative predictive value of 70% and an accuracy of 83.6%.There was no variation in the levels of the markers according to the degree of cell differentiation while there was an elevation in their concentrations in accordance with the increase in neoplastic dissemination. There was a statistically significant difference between the patients with stage Ⅳ lesions and those with stages Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ tumors.With regard to CEA, the averagelevel was 14.2 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅰ lesions, 8.5 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅱ lesions, 8.0 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅲ lesions and 87.7 ng/mL in patients with stage Ⅳ lesions. In relation to TPA-M, the levels were 153.1 U/L in patients with stage Ⅰtumors, 106.5 U/L in patients with stage Ⅱ tumors, 136.3 U/L in patients with stage Ⅲ tumors and 464.3 U/L in patients with stage Ⅳ tumors. There was a statistical difference in

  1. Diagnostic role of fluorine-18 (18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography in detecting recurrent disease in patients with colorectal cancer and elevated carcinoembryonic antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matovina Emil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Early detection of recurrence is an important factor for long term survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Measurement of serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen has been commonly used in the postoperative surveillance of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of positron emission tomography-computed tomography to detect pathological substrate of elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen in patients with colorectal cancer. Material and Methods. The patients with colorectal cancer who underwent curative surgical resection and/ or chemotherapy, who were found in our database, were analyzed retrospectively. Forty-eight 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography studies including 45 patients (14 women, 31 men; mean age: 62.93 years with elevated serum, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, which had been performed between January 2011 and January 2014, were evaluated. Serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen were measured within 3 months after positron emission tomography-computed tomography examination. Final diagnosis of recurrence was made by histopathological findings, radiology studies or clinical follow-up. Results. Recurrences were diagnosed in 37 patients, the prevalence being 77.1%. Liver metastases were found in 18 patients, abdominal, pelvic and/or mediastinal lymph nodes were positive in 19 patients, 11 patients had loco regional recurrences and 4 patients had pulmonary metastasis, and bone metastases were found in one patient. One patient was diagnosed with metastasis in scar tissue. The overall sensitivity and specificity of positron emission tomography-computed tomography was 90.24% and 71.42%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 94.87% and 55.56%, respectively. Conclusion. 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a powerful tool that could be used in determining colorectal cancer recurrence in

  2. A novel label-free microfluidic paper-based immunosensor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Huiren; Luo, Jinping; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Li; Fan, Yan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a highly sensitive label-free paper-based electrochemical immunosensor employing screen-printed working electrode (SPWE) for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was fabricated. In order to raise the detection sensitivity and immobilize anti-CEA, amino functional graphene (NH2-G)/thionine (Thi)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposites were synthesized and coated on SPWE. The principle of the immunosensor determination was based on the fact that the decreased response currents of Thi were proportional to the concentrations of corresponding antigens due to the formation of antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Experimental results revealed that the immunoassay enabled the determination of standard CEA solutions with linear working ranges of 50pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1), the limit of detections for CEA is 10pgmL(-1) (S/N=3) and its corresponding correlation coefficients were 0.996. Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor could be used for the determination of clinical serum samples. A large number of clinical serum samples were detected and the relative errors between measured values and reference concentrations were calculated. Results showed that this novel paper-based electrochemical immunosensor could provide a new platform for low cost, sensitive, specific, and point-of-care diagnosis in cancer detection. PMID:27132007

  3. A network signal amplification strategy of ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical immunosensing carcinoembryonic antigen based on CdSe/melamine network as label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Yong; Kuang, Xuan; Wang, Zhiling; Wei, Qin

    2016-11-15

    Taking advantage of CdSe/melamine network as label and Au-TiO2 as substrate, this work developed a novel kind of signal amplification strategy for fabricating photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay. The melamine, a star-shaped triamino molecule, was firstly used for readily capturing CdSe QDs and forming a CdSe/melamine network, which was formed through strong interactions between the carboxyl groups of TGA-stabilized CdSe QDs and the three amino groups of each melamine molecule. In this strategy, the primary antibody (Ab1) was immobilized onto Au-TiO2 substrate, which made the photoelectric conversion efficiency increase significantly. After the formed Ab2-CdSe/melamine network labels were captured onto the electrode surface via the specific antibody-antigen interaction, the photoelectric activity could be further enhanced via the interaction between the Au-TiO2 substrate and CdSe/melamine network. Due to this amplification of PEC signals and the special structure of the label, the fabricated PEC immunosensor was applied for sensitive and specific detection of cancer biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and displayed a wide linear range (0.005-1000ngmL(-1)) and low detection limit (5pgmL(-1)). In addition, the immunosensor was performed with good stability and reproducibility, and the results to analyze human serum samples were satisfactory. PMID:27281106

  4. The Granulocyte Receptor Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 3 (CEACAM3) Directly Associates with Vav to Promote Phagocytosis of Human Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R.

    2007-01-01

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negativ...

  5. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen mRNA in peritoneal washes from gastric cancer patients and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Song Zhang; Jun Xu; Guang-Hua Luo; Rong-Chao Wang; Jiang Zhu; Xiao-Ying Zhang; Peter Nilsson-Ehle; Ning Xu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more sensitive method for detection of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes from gastric cancer patients during surgery and to evaluate its clinical significance.METHODS: The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA levels in peritoneal washes from 65 cases of gastric cancer were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Peritoneal lavage cytology (PLC) was applied simultaneously to detection of free cancer cells. Negative controls included peritoneal washes from 5 cases of benign gastric disease and blood samples from 5 adult healthy volunteers.RESULTS: There was no CEA mRNA in peritoneal washes from benign gastric disease patients and in blood of adult healthy volunteers. The positive percentage of free cancer cells detected by real-time RT-PCR was 47.7% and only 12.3% by PLC. The positive rate of CEA mRNA was significantly related with serosa invasion between peritoneal metastasis and stage of gastric cancer.CONCLUSION: Real-time RT-PCR is a sensitive and rapid method for the detection of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes. The presence of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes is related to the pathologic stage of gastric cancer.

  6. Early postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels in patients operated for colorectal carcinoma. A new method for following-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The only method of treatment offering a favourable prognosis for colorectal carcinoma is radical resection of the part of the colon or rectum including the pertaining lymph nodes and eventual radical removal of metastases. But even such presumably curative surgery does not warrant full recovery of all operated patients as recurrences are frequent and according to most analyses 5-year survival is lower than 50%. Therefore, additional treatment is attempted in some patients. Various prognostic factors of disease recurrence are helpful. One such prognostic sign is serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level measured soon after surgery. Conclusions. All patients with radical R0 resection, according to their postoperative serum CEA levels and the CEA half-life fall into three groups: CEAR0, CEAR1 and CEAR2 resected patients. A statistically significant difference regarding survival and number of recurrences was noted among patients categorized by the stage of disease, particularly between the three groups of patients and the group having been undergone presumably curative surgery. (author)

  7. Immune-scintigraphy of recurrent colorectal tumors with Tc-99m-marked monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After surgery in 24 patients aged 39-80 years with colorectal tumors, immune-scintigraphic examinations with Tc-99m carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) MAb were carried out. Prior to scintigraphy, the levels of CEA and Ca 19-9 tumor markers were determined. In the majority of cases there was firm clinical evidence of local recurrence or metastases. Twenty-two of the 24 cases were scintigraphically positive. Local recurrence and metastases of the liver were correctly identified in 12 and four cases, respectively. It was difficult to detect widespread metastases of the peritoneum or a growth at the helum of the lung. In three cases, metastases of lymph nodes were confirmed by both surgery and scintigraphy, although the computed tomographic (CT) examinations were negative. In 20 patients, CT and immune-scintigraphic findings correlated. Most positive scans were confirmed surgically and at biopsy. In two patients, none of the diagnostic procedures showed positive results, despite clinical grounds for suspecting a further spread of the disease. A false-positive immune-scintigram was observed in a histologically confirmed case of inflammation of the mucous membrane. In several cases Tc-99m enhancement was detected in almost all parts of the colon. This could be due to the antibody metabolism or to the deposit of free technetium in the bowel. There was no correlation between CEA serum levels and a positive immune-scan

  8. Regulation by gut commensal bacteria of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yasuaki; Murata, Yoji; Park, Jung-Ha; Kotani, Takenori; Imada, Shinya; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okazawa, Hideki; Azuma, Takeshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 1 and CEACAM20, immunoglobulin superfamily members, are predominantly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and co-localized at the apical surface of these cells. We here showed that the expression of mouse CEACAM1 and CEACAM20 at both mRNA and protein levels was markedly reduced in IECs of the small intestine by the treatment of mice with antibiotics against Gram-positive bacteria. The expression of both proteins was also decreased in IECs of the small intestine from germ-free mice, compared with that from control specific-pathogen-free mice. Exposure of intestinal organoids to IFN-γ markedly increased the expression of either CEACAM1 or CEACAM20, whereas the exposure to TNF-α increased the expression of the former protein, but not that of the latter. In contrast, the expression of CEACAM20, but not of CEACAM1, in intestinal organoids was markedly increased by exposure to butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced by bacterial fermentation in the intestine. Collectively, our results suggest that Gram-positive bacteria promote the mRNA expression of CEACAM1 or CEACAM20 in the small intestine. Inflammatory cytokines or butyrate likely participates in such effects of commensal bacteria. PMID:25908210

  9. Simultaneous determination of carcinoembryonic antigen and α-fetoprotein using an ITO immunoelectrode modified with gold nanoparticles and mesoporous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on an electrochemical immunoassay for simultaneous detection of the tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and α-fetoprotein (AFP). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized inside the internal pore walls of mesoporous silica (MPS). Then, Methylene blue (MB) and 6-ferrocenylhexanethiol (FeC), which act as electrochemical substrates, were incorporated into the channels via the formation of Au-S bonds. Finally, monoclonal antibodies against CEA (anti-CEA) and AFP (anti-AFP) were immobilized in the channels of MB-AuNPs-MPS and FeC-AuNPs-MPS, respectively. Suspensions of anti-CEA/MB-AuNPs-MPS and of anti-AFP/FeC-AuNPs-MPS were deposited on two different sites of the ITO electrode. When incubated with samples containing the two analytes, the formation of electrically nonconductive immunoconjugates blocks electron transfer. Simultaneous detection of CEA and AFP was accomplished by monitoring the current change before and after an immunoreaction has occurred. The AuNPs confined inside the channels are promoting the electron transport and thus improve detection limits. The immunoelectrode responds to CEA in the 0.5–50 ng mL−1 concentration range, and to AFP in concentrations between 0.5 and 100 ng mL−1. The detection limits (at an S/N of 3) are 0.1 ng mL−1 in both cases. (author)

  10. Ultrasensitive non-enzymatic immunosensor for carcino-embryonic antigen based on palladium hybrid vanadium pentoxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Jiang, Liping; Li, Faying; Wang, Ping; Liu, Qing; Dong, Yunhui; Li, Yueyun; Wei, Qin

    2016-03-15

    A novel and sensitive sandwich-type non-enzymatic electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated for quantitative monitoring of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). Nanocomposite of stannic oxide/reduced graphene oxide was used as substrate material to increase the specific surface area and enhance the conductivity of the glassy carbon electrode. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were introduced to link substrate materials and primary antibodies (Ab1) and accelerate the electron transfer in this system. At the same time, the palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs)-vanadium pentoxide (V2O5)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the label of secondary antibodies (Ab2). This composite label has shown excellent catalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2. The nanomaterial-based signal amplification can improve the sensitivity and lower the limit of detection. The proposed immunosensor showed wide linear range from 0.5 pgmL(-1) to 25 ngmL(-1) with limit of detection of 0.17 pgmL(-1). This novel immunosensor was used to analyze serum sample. The results indicated that this immunosensor may find huge potential application for quantitative detection of CEA in the clinical diagnosis. PMID:26562331

  11. Localization of 131Ilabeled goat and primate anti-carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA) antibodies in patients with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty patients with anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing cancers of the colon, breast, or thyroid were intected with 1 to 2 mCi of Iodine-131 (131I)-labeled, affinity-purified, goat or baboon anti-CEA antibodies. Images were obtained daily for four days. Computerized background subtraction using technetium 99m (99mTC)-labeled compounds was used. Images obtained with and without background subtraction were correlated with other evidence of disease. Activity levels in plasma, urine, and thyroid gland were monitored. Significant deiodination of antibody occurred within the first 24 hours. The mean plasma half-disappearance-time of baboon antibody was significantly longer than the mean half-disappearance-time of goat antibody. With exogenous blockade, total thyroid uptake was less than 0.1% of the injected dose. Without background subtraction, scintigraphic localization of known tumor was possible in one of two patients with colon carcinoma, in three of 20 patients with breast cancer, and in one of five patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. With background subtraction, potential false-positive results could be generated for every patients, depending on the normalization site chosen and the degree of subtraction used. In contrast to results of previous reports, CEA-producing tumor was found to be infrequently localized using highly purified goat or primate radiolabeled anti-CEA. Furthermore, the subtraction technique described by previous investigators may lead to a high false-positive rate

  12. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound, cytology and fluid carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 19-9 levels in pancreatic cystic lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), fluid tumor markers and cytology in distinguishing benign from (pre)malignant pancreatic cystic lesions.METHODS: 46 consecutive patients, referred to a gastroenterologist and surgeon for a symptomatic or incidental pancreatic cyst, were reviewed. EUS, cytology,and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) levels were compared with the final diagnosis, based on surgical pathology and/or imaging follow-up of at least 12 mo. Cysts were classified as benign (pseudocyst, serous cystadenoma) or malignant/pre-malignant (mucinous cystic neoplasm). Receiveroperator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed.RESULTS: The mean age was 56 years; 29% were male and median cyst diameter was 3 cm. Final outcome was obtained in 41 (89%) patients. Twenty-three (56%) of these 41 had surgical pathology. Twenty-three (56%)had benign lesions and 18 (44%) had malignant/premalignant lesions. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive value of EUS alone to distinguish benign from malignant/premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions were 50%, 56%, 36% and 54% and for cytology were 71%, 96%, 92% and 85%, respectively. The corresponding values for the ROC-derived ideal cutoffs were 75%, 90%, 75%, 90% for CA 19-9 (> 37 U/mL)and 70%, 85%, 79% and 78% for CEA (> 3.1 ng/mL).Subgroup analysis of those with surgical pathology yielded almost identical performance and cutoffs.CONCLUSION: Cytology and cyst fluid tumor marker analysis is a very useful tool in distinguishing benign from (pre)malignant pancreatic cystic lesions.

  13. Evaluation of tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 19 fragment and cancer-associated antigen 72-4 in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of tumor markers in body fluids can be used for diagnosis and prognosis of patients. This study aimed to investigate the performance of tumor markers cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1, cancer-associated antigen 72-4 (CA 72-4 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA in the neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine effusions. In thirty-two neoplastic (n=16 and non-neoplastic (n=16 samples of canine thoracic or abdominal effusions, tumor markers were measured. Significant statistical difference was found only for the CYFRA 21-1 marker. The levels were significantly higher for the neoplastic group. The lack of significance between groups for markers CA 72-4 and CEA can be explained by the presence of other diseases in the non-neoplastic group, causing elevated levels of these markers. This study concludes that CYFRA 21-1 performed well, showing good sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the diagnosis of neoplastic effusions in dogs. However, further investigations are necessary in patients with malignancy as those with benign effusions.

  14. Leptin Resistance Contributes to Obesity in Mice with Null Mutation of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Garrett; Russo, Lucia; Castaneda, Tamara R; Pfeiffer, Verena; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Wu, Jieshen; Faulkner, Latrice D; Ergün, Süleyman; McInerney, Marcia F; Hill, Jennifer W; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-05-20

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes hepatic insulin clearance. Consistently, mice with null mutation of Ceacam1 (Cc1(-/-)) exhibit impaired insulin clearance with increased lipid production in liver and redistribution to white adipose tissue, leading to visceral obesity at 2 months of age. When the mutation is propagated on the C57/BL6J genetic background, total fat mass rises significantly with age, and glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance develop at 6 months of age. This study was carried out to determine the mechanisms underlying the marked increase in total fat mass in 6-month-old mutants. Indirect calorimetry analysis showed that Cc1(-/-) mice develop hyperphagia and a significant reduction in physical activity, in particular in the early hours of the dark cycle, during which energy expenditure is only slightly lower than in wild-type mice. They also exhibit increased triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle, due in part to incomplete fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, hypothalamic leptin signaling is reduced, as demonstrated by blunted STAT3 phosphorylation in coronal sections in response to an intracerebral ventricular injection of leptin. Hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity is also elevated in the mutants. Together, the data show that the increase in total fat mass in Cc1(-/-) mice is mainly attributed to hyperphagia and reduced spontaneous physical activity. Although the contribution of the loss of CEACAM1 from anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus is unclear, leptin resistance and elevated hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity could underlie altered energy balance in these mice. PMID:27002145

  15. Relationship between CT features and high preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess the relationship between thin-section computed tomography (CT) features of primary tumour and high preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels that reportedly suggest poor prognoses in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: Two hundred and seventy-five consecutive patients who underwent resection of pathological stage I (T1–2aN0M0) adenocarcinomas with a maximum diameter of ≤3 cm (144 men, 131 women; mean age 67.8 years) were enrolled. CT features of the primary tumours and clinical characteristics of these patients were statistically evaluated to identify the factors associated with high serum CEA levels (>5 ng/ml). Results: Eighty-one patients (29.5%) had high serum CEA levels. In univariate analysis, lower ground-glass opacity ratio (p < 0.001), lower tumour shadow disappearance rate (TDR: the ratio of tumour area in mediastinal window to that of lung window, p < 0.001), presence of notch (p = 0.015), and coexistence with bullae or honeycomb cysts (p < 0.001) were observed more frequently in the group with high serum CEA levels than that of the group with normal levels. TDR [odds ratio (OR) 0.984; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.976–0.993; p < 0.001] and coexistence with bullae or honeycomb cysts (OR = 3.08; 95% CI: 1.55–6.12; p = 0.001) remained significant, even after adjusting patients' age, gender, and smoking status. Conclusions: Adenocarcinomas with lower TDR and coexisting with bullae or honeycomb cysts are associated with high preoperative serum CEA levels. Although some CEA elevations may be due to benign pulmonary diseases, such tumours are suspected to have poor prognoses, even for early-stage diseases

  16. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Robert M Hoffman; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); ...

  17. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, CEA ratio, and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiation and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Between 2000 and 2009, 138 patients with advanced rectal cancer receiving CRT before surgery at our hospital were retrospectively classified into 3 groups: pre-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group L; n = 87); pre-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml and post-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group H-L; n = 32); and both pre- and post-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml (group H-H; n = 19). CEA ratio (defined as post-CRT CEA divided by pre-CRT CEA), post-CRT CEA level and other factors were reviewed for prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was better in groups L (69.0%) and H-L (74.5%) than in group H-H (44.9%) (p = 0.024). Pathologic complete response was observed in 19.5%, 21.9% and 5.3% of groups L, H-L and H-H respectively (p = 0.281). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage and pCR were independent prognostic factors for DFS and that post-CRT CEA level was independently predictive of pCR. As a whole, post-CRT CEA <2.61 ng/ml predicted pCR (sensitivity 76.0%; specificity 58.4%). For those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml, post-CRT CEA and CEA ratio both predicted pCR (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 76.7%). In patients with pre-CRT serum CEA ≥6 ng/ml, those with “normalized” CEA levels after CRT may have similar DFS to those with “normal” (<6 ng/ml) pre-CRT values. Post-CRT CEA level is a predictor for pCR, especially in those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml

  18. Sorafenib Decreases Tumor Exposure to an Anti-carcinoembryonic Antigen Monoclonal Antibody in a Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veena A; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    In this investigation, we test the hypothesis that treatment with sorafenib, an anti-angiogenic agent, decreases tumor vascularization and, consequently, hinders the delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to xenograft tumors. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expressing tumor xenografts were divided into control and sorafenib-treated groups. Sorafenib was administered to the latter group at 50 mg/kg IP every 48 h, starting 4 days post-tumor implantation. When tumors attained a size of 200-300 mm(3), mice were evaluated for (a) tumor microvessel density (using immunohistochemical analysis), (b) tumor macromolecular extravasation (using Evans Blue Dye (EBD)), (c) pharmacokinetics of an anti-CEA mAb, T84.66, following an intravenous dose of 10 mg/kg, and (d) intra-tumoral spatial distribution of T84.66 (using autoradiography). Sorafenib treatment resulted in a substantial reduction in tumor growth rate, a visible reduction in tumor microvessel density, and in a 46.4% decrease in EBD extravasation in tumor tissue (p area under the mAb plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-7d): 1.67 × 10(3) ± 1.28 × 10(2) vs. 1.76 × 10(3) ± 1.75 × 10(2) nM × day, p = 0.51). However, tumor AUC(0-7d) was reduced by 40.8% in sorafenib-treated mice relative to that observed in control mice (5.61 × 10(2) ± 4.27 × 10(1) vs. 9.48 × 10(2) ± 5.61 × 10(1) nM × day, p < 0.001). Sorafenib therapy was also found to markedly alter mAb tumor spatial distribution. The results collectively suggest that sorafenib treatment causes a significant reduction in mAb delivery to, and distribution within, solid tumors. PMID:27029796

  19. Second antibody clearance of /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen for improved tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated the use of a second antibody (SA) directed against the radiolabeled primary anti-tumor antibody (PA) to enhance the clearance rate of the PA from the circulation and nontarget tissues. Administration of 50 or 250 μg of anti-goat IgG (SA) hr after the administration of 10 μg of /sup 131/I-goat anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody (PA) to hamsters bearing human colonic tumor xenografts resulted in a 5-fold reduction in the level of circulating PA after 4 hr in comparison to the control group only given /sup 131/I-PA. The percentage of PA in the blood decreased rapidly over 72 hr in animals given 250 μg of the SA, but at 50 μg of SA the level of activity in the blood after 24 hr was similar to the control. Tumor accretion was identical after 4 hr, but after 24 hr the animals given 250 μg of SA had 2-3 fold less PA in the tumor than either the control group or the 50 μg dose of SA. Tumor/nontumor ratios for all major organs but the spleen improved 6-8 fold within 48 hr after injection of 250 μg of the SA with tumor/blood ratios as high as 40:1. A SA dose of 50 μg resulted in a significantly higher tumor/blood ratio after only 4 hr; tumor/nontumor ratios at later times were similar to the control group. Tumors located in the hind legs were visible in all groups by imaging 24 hr after injection of the SA, but only the 250 μg dose of SA showed a significant reduction in total body activity. These results suggest that the SA approach may be used to reduce the total background radioactivity while maintaining tumor accretion of /sup 131/I-PA to allow for selective tumor imaging

  20. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also be used as a marker for medullary thyroid cancer and cancers of the rectum, lung , ... ulcerative colitis , rectal polyps , emphysema , and benign breast disease. ^ Back to top Proudly sponsored by ... Learn more ...

  1. A robust electrochemiluminescence immunoassay for carcinoembryonic antigen detection based on a microtiter plate as a bridge and Au@Pd nanorods as a peroxidase mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Pang, Xuehui; Wu, Dan; Ma, Hongmin; Yan, Zhaoqing; Zhang, Jiatao; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The common drawbacks of most traditional electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassays are the strict storage conditions for the ECL electrode and the steric hindrance caused by bovine serum albumin and antigen. The strict storage conditions require that the modified electrode must be stored at 4 °C before measurement, which may cause the degradation of protein molecules and low reproducibility as the time goes by. The steric hindrance can hinder electron transfer between the electrode and the electrochemical active substance unable to transmit proteins on the electrode surface. The current study takes a 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) as a bridge for analyte pre-treatment and Au@Pd nanorods as a peroxidase mimic to assemble a simple and robust ECL immunoassay. Advantages of such assay include not only high sensitivity but also robust detection circumstance. We demonstrated the method by detecting carcinoembryonic antigen from human serum and obtained a good detection limit of 3 fg mL(-1). PMID:26609799

  2. Utility of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, Cyfra 21-1 and neuron specific enolase in lung cancer diagnosis: a prospective study from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Wei-an; LIU Xi; TIAN Xiao-dong; WANG Wei; LIANG Chao-yang; ZHANG Tao; GUO Jun-tang; PENG Yang-hong; ZHOU Nai-kang

    2011-01-01

    Background Early detection and diagnosis is urgent for the sake of effective treatment strategy for lung cancer.However,a convenient,economical and relatively precise method is not available.We here report a prospective study to find the possible value of the combined use of four popular tumor markers in the early diagnosis of lung cancer among patients with suspicious nodules in the lung.Methods Six hundred and sixty inpatients with suspicious nodules in the lung were divided into a lung cancer group and a benign pulmonary tumor group according to post-operative histological examinations.Serum levels of four tumor markers including squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC),carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA),Cyfra 21-1 and neuron specific enolase (NSE) were assayed for each patient.Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for each tumor marker.The power of lung cancer diagnosis of each tumor marker,as well as a combination of them were analyzed and compared.Results The serum levels (median,range) of SCC,CEA,Cyfra 21-1 and NSE were 0.44 (0.01-35.70) ng/ml,2.49(0.30-26.78) ng/ml,2.30 (0.82-73.33) ng/ml and 10.54 (0.10-56.41) ng/ml respectively in lung cancer group,and were 0.32 (0.01-0.90) ng/ml,1.60 (0.20-8.93) ng/ml,1.41 (0.72-4.82) ng/ml and 9.36 (6.56-24.24) ng/ml respectively in the benign pulmonary tumor group.The difference in each tumor marker between the two groups was significant (P <0.05).The ROCs of SCC,CEA,Cyfra 21-1 and NSE were 0.702 (95% CI,0.654-0.751),0.611 (95% CI,0.563-0.659),0.650(95% CI,0.601-0.700) and 0.598 (95% CI,0.542-0.654) respectively,indicating very low power of these four tumor markers.When a combination of SCC,CEA,Cyfra 21-1 and NSE were employed,the diagnosis power was strengthened.Conclusion SCC,CEA,Cyfra 21-1 and NSE are valuable in the early diagnosis of lung cancer among suspicious nodules in the lung,especially when they were assayed together for one patient.

  3. Increased basolateral sorting of carcinoembryonic antigen in a polarized colon carcinoma cell line after cholesterol depletion-Implications for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Ehehalt; Markus Krautter; Martin Zorn; Richard Sparla; Joachim Fūllekrug; Hasan Kulaksiz; Wolfgang Stremmel

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate a possible increase of basolateral expression of carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA)by interfering with the apical transport machinery,we studied the effect of cholesterol depletion on CEA sorting and secretion.METHODS:Cholesterol depletion was performed in polarized Caco-2 cells using Iovastatin and methyl-βcyclodextrin.RESULTS:We show that CEA is predominantly expressed and secreted at the apical surface.Reduction of the cholesterol level of the cell by 40%-50% with Iovastatin and methyl-β-cyclodextrin led to a significant change of the apical-to-basolateral transport ratio towards the basolateral membrane.CONCLUSION:As basolateral expression of CEA has been suggested to have anti-inflamatory properties,Cholesterol depletion of enterocytes might be a potential approach to influence the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. The value of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in asymptomatic examinees with unexplained elevated blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenfeng [The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Laboratory for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Institutes of Translational Medicine, Wenzhou (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wenzhou (China); Yin, Weiwei [The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Division of PET/CT, Department of Radiology, Wenzhou (China); Ou, Rongying [The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Laboratory for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Institutes of Translational Medicine, Wenzhou (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Wenzhou (China); Chen, Ting; Xiong, Lingling; Xu, Yunsheng [The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Laboratory for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Institutes of Translational Medicine, Wenzhou (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Dermatovenereology, Wenzhou (China); Cheng, Dezhi; Xie, Deyao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Laboratory for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Institutes of Translational Medicine, Wenzhou (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Wenzhou (China); Zheng, Xiangwu; Zhao, Liang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Laboratory for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, Institutes of Translational Medicine, Wenzhou (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Division of PET/CT, Department of Radiology, Wenzhou (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Institutes of Intelligent and Molecular Imaging, Wenzhou (China)

    2016-04-15

    Cancer is still a clinical challenge, with many efforts invested in order to achieve timely detection. Unexplained elevated blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels are occasionally observed in an asymptomatic population and considered as a risk factor of cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) for detecting cancer in an asymptomatic population with an unexplained elevation in blood carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. This retrospective study included a total of 1920 asymptomatic examinees conducted from August 2011 through September 2013. The participants underwent CEA assay and conventional medical imaging (CEA-conventional), or CEA assay and F-18 FDG-PET/CT (CEA-PET/CT). The validity of conventional medical imaging and CEA-PET/CT scanning for detecting cancer and early-stage cancer in an asymptomatic population with an unexplained elevation in blood CEA levels were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, cancer detection rate, missed cancer detection rate, early-stage cancer detection rate, and early-stage cancer ratio using the CEA-PET/CT scanning were 96.6 %, 100 %, 10.4 %, 0.4 %, 3.7 %, and 34.5 %, respectively. In contrast, the corresponding values obtained using the conventional medical imaging were 50.6 % (P < 0.0001), 100 % (P > 0.9999), 50.6 % (P < 0.0001), 99.9 % (P = 0.055), 2.6 % (P < 0.0001), 2.5 % (P = 0.04), 0.7 % (P = 0.0004), and 14.5 % (P = 0.002), respectively. The F-18 FDG-PET/CT scanning significantly improved the validity of the cancer detection program in the asymptomatic population with an unexplained elevation in CEA levels. (orig.)

  5. The value of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in asymptomatic examinees with unexplained elevated blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is still a clinical challenge, with many efforts invested in order to achieve timely detection. Unexplained elevated blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels are occasionally observed in an asymptomatic population and considered as a risk factor of cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) for detecting cancer in an asymptomatic population with an unexplained elevation in blood carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. This retrospective study included a total of 1920 asymptomatic examinees conducted from August 2011 through September 2013. The participants underwent CEA assay and conventional medical imaging (CEA-conventional), or CEA assay and F-18 FDG-PET/CT (CEA-PET/CT). The validity of conventional medical imaging and CEA-PET/CT scanning for detecting cancer and early-stage cancer in an asymptomatic population with an unexplained elevation in blood CEA levels were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, cancer detection rate, missed cancer detection rate, early-stage cancer detection rate, and early-stage cancer ratio using the CEA-PET/CT scanning were 96.6 %, 100 %, 10.4 %, 0.4 %, 3.7 %, and 34.5 %, respectively. In contrast, the corresponding values obtained using the conventional medical imaging were 50.6 % (P < 0.0001), 100 % (P > 0.9999), 50.6 % (P < 0.0001), 99.9 % (P = 0.055), 2.6 % (P < 0.0001), 2.5 % (P = 0.04), 0.7 % (P = 0.0004), and 14.5 % (P = 0.002), respectively. The F-18 FDG-PET/CT scanning significantly improved the validity of the cancer detection program in the asymptomatic population with an unexplained elevation in CEA levels. (orig.)

  6. Determination of carcinoembryonic antigen using a novel amperometric enzyme-electrode based on layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and thionine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Ruo; ZHUO Ying; CHAI YaQin; ZHANG Ying; SUN AiLi

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical sensing of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on a gold electrode modified by the sequential incorporation of the mediator, thionine (Thi), and gold nanoparticles (nano-Au), through covalent linkage and electrostatic interactions onto a self-assembled monolayer configuration is described in this paper. The enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was employed to block the possible remaining active sites of the nano-Au monolayer, avoid the non-specific adsorption, instead of bovine serum albumin (BSA), and amplify the response of the antigen-antibody reaction. Electrochemical experiments indicated highly efficient electron transfer by the imbedded Thi mediator and adsorbed nano-Au. The HRP kept its activity after immobilization, and the studied electrode showed sensitive response to CEA and high stability during a long period of storage. The working range for the system was 2.5 to 80.0 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.90 ng/mL. The model membrane system in this work is a potential biosensor for mimicking the other immunosensor and enzyme sensor.

  7. Determination of carcinoembryonic antigen using a novel amperometric enzyme-electrode based on layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and thionine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical sensing of carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA)on a gold electrode modified by the se- quential incorporation of the mediator,thionine(Thi),and gold nanoparticles(nano-Au),through co- valent linkage and electrostatic interactions onto a self-assembled monolayer configuration is de- scribed in this paper.The enzyme,horseradish peroxidase(HRP),was employed to block the possible remaining active sites of the nano-Au monolayer,avoid the non-specific adsorption,instead of bovine serum albumin(BSA),and amplify the response of the antigen-antibody reaction.Electrochemical ex- periments indicated highly efficient electron transfer by the imbedded Thi mediator and adsorbed nano-Au.The HRP kept its activity after immobilization,and the studied electrode showed sensitive response to CEA and high stability during a long period of storage.The working range for the system was 2.5 to 80.0 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.90 ng/mL.The model membrane system in this work is a potential biosensor for mimicking the other immunosensor and enzyme sensor.

  8. Poly(o-phenylenediamine) nanosphere-conjugated capture antibody immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode for electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a new electrochemical immunosensor for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; a model analyte). First, poly(o-phenylenediamine) nanospheres (PPDNSs) were synthesized by using a wet-chemistry method. The nanospheres were utilized as the support for immobilizing horseradish peroxidase-labeled polyclonal rabbit anti-human CEA antibody (HRP-anti-CEA) on a pretreated glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker. In the presence of target CEA, an antigen-antibody immunocomplex formed on the electrode. This results in a partial inhibition of the active center of HRP and decreases the activity of HRP in terms of H2O2 reduction. The performance and factors influencing the performance of the immunoelectrode were studied. Under optimal conditions, the reduction current obtained from the anti-CEA-conjugated HRP (best at a working voltage of −265 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) is proportional to the CEA concentration in the 0.01 to 60 ng mL−1 range, with a detection limit of 3.2 pg mL−1. Non-specific adsorption was not observed. Relative standard deviations for intra-assay and inter-assay are <8.3 % and <9.7 %, respectively. The method was applied to the analysis of nine human serum samples, and a good relationship was found between the electrochemical immunoassay and the commercialized ELISA kit for human CEA. (author)

  9. Relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations with the influence on the prognosis of non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai ZX

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zuxun Cai Department of Thoracic Surgery, Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Zhengzhou City, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA level and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and to analyze the influence of CEA level on postoperative survival time in lung cancer patients. Methods: A total of 296 patients who were treated in Thoracic Surgery Department of Henan Provincial Chest Hospital from September 2011 to September 2013 were recruited. The level of tumor markers, such as CEA, was determined before the surgery, and EGFR gene mutations were detected after surgery. Thereby, the relationship between tumor makers, including CEA, and EGFR mutation and its influence on prognosis could be investigated. Results: Among 296 patients, the positive rate of EGFR gene mutation was 37.84% (112/296; the mutation occurred more frequently in nonsmokers, adenocarcinoma patients, women, and patients aged <60 years (P<0.05. Both tumor markers and chemosensitivity indicators were related to the profile of EGFR mutations. Elevated squamous cell carcinoma and Cyfra21-1 as well as positively expressed ERCC1 were more common in patients with wild-type EGFR (P<0.05, whereas increased CEA level was observed more frequently in patients with EGFR gene mutation (P=0.012. The positive rate of EGFR gene mutations was higher as the serum CEA level increased, that is, the positive rate in patients with serum CEA level <5, 5–20, and >20 µg/L was 39.81%, 45.32%, and 65.47%, respectively (P=0.004. Logistic regression analysis showed that CEA level was an independent factor in predicting EGFR gene mutations, and serum CEA level was also an independent factor in affecting the prognosis of NSCLC patients, as the overall 2-year survival rate was 73.86% in elevated CEA group and 86.43% in normal group (P<0.01. Conclusion: The prognosis of

  10. Immunohistochemical expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules 5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5: Do they aid in predicting the response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Anju Bansal; Mukesh Garg; Chintamani Chintamani; Sunita Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Context: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has become an integral part of multimodality treatment for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) worldwide. Predictors of therapeutic response to NACT are lacking. Whether carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) like CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 can act as a predictor of response to therapy is unclear. SLC7A5 gene in humans encodes a large neutral amino acid transporter protein, which has an essential role in tumor cell growth and su...

  11. Comparing Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) with the oncofetal proteins Glypican-3, Alpha feto protein and Carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma among Egyptian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Iman A. Abd El Gawad; Mossallam, Ghada I.; Noha H. Radwan; Elzawahry, Heba M; Niveen M. Elhifnawy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually asymptomatic in the early stage and does not show elevated alpha-feto protein (AFP). AFP shows 60–80% sensitivity in diagnosing HCC. Glypican3 (GPC-3) is an oncofetal protein that is only detected in HCC cells but not in benign liver tissues, while Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in various neoplasms including HCC. Although, it is not specific for HCC. Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal ...

  12. Combined effects of 5-Fluorouracil, Folinic acid and Oxaliplatin on the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen in human colon cancer cells: pharmacological basis to develop an active antitumor immunochemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Vecchis Liana

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Five-fluorouracil (FU, mainly associated with leucovorin (L, plays an essential role in chemotherapy of colorectal carcinoma. Moreover, FU ± L has been found to increase the expression of tumor-associated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, that may be an important target in therapeutic protocols of active specific immunotherapy. FU + L (FUL are frequently combined with oxaliplatin (OXA in advanced colon cancer patients. Thus, we investigated whether FUL in combination with OXA according to 2 different schedules may influence CEA expression in human colon cancer cells in vitro. Methods CEA protein expression was evaluated by cytofluorimetric and western blot analysis. Relative quantification of CEA mRNA was assessed by real time RT-PCR analysis. Results Levels of CEA protein and transcript were found to be higher in FUL-treated cells than in controls. However, when target cells were exposed to OXA before but not after FUL treatment, the up-regulation of CEA was partially inhibited. Conclusion These results suggest that target cells must be exposed to OXA after but not before treatment with the fluoropyrimidine in order to exploit drug-induced up-regulation of CEA. This finding appears to provide useful information to design chemo-immunotherapy protocols based on FUL + OXA, combined with host's immunity against CEA directed cancer vaccines.

  13. The granulocyte receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 3 (CEACAM3) directly associates with Vav to promote phagocytosis of human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, Tim; Pils, Stefan; Sakk, Vadim; Frank, Ronald; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Hauck, Christof R

    2007-03-15

    The human granulocyte-specific receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)3 is critically involved in the opsonin-independent recognition of several bacterial pathogens. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis depends on the integrity of an ITAM-like sequence within the cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM3 and is characterized by rapid stimulation of the GTPase Rac. By performing a functional screen with CEACAM3-expressing cells, we found that overexpression of a dominant-negative form of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav, but not the dominant-negative versions SWAP70, Dock2, or ELMO1 interfered with CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Vav reduced uptake and abrogated the stimulation of Rac in response to bacterial CEACAM3 engagement. In Vav1/Vav2-deficient cells, CEACAM3-mediated internalization was only observed after re-expression of Vav. Vav colocalized with CEACAM3 upon bacterial infection, coimmunoprecipitated in a complex with CEACAM3, and the Vav Src homology 2 domain directly associated with phosphorylated Tyr(230) of CEACAM3. In primary human granulocytes, TAT-mediated transduction of dominant-negative Vav, but not SWAP70, severely impaired the uptake of CEACAM3-binding bacteria. These data support the view that, different from canonical ITAM signaling, the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence short-wires bacterial recognition and Rac stimulation via a direct association with Vav to promote rapid phagocytosis and elimination of CEACAM-binding human pathogens. PMID:17339478

  14. Evaluation of the use of decision-support software in carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA-based follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verberne Charlotte J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present paper is a first evaluation of the use of "CEAwatch", a clinical support software system for surgeons for the follow-up of colorectal cancer (CRC patients. This system gathers Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA values and automatically returns a recommendation based on the latest values. Methods Consecutive patients receiving follow-up care for CRC fulfilling our in- and exclusion criteria were identified to participate in this study. From August 2008, when the software was introduced, patients were asked to undergo the software-supported follow-up. Safety of the follow-up, experiences of working with the software, and technical issues were analyzed. Results 245 patients were identified. The software-supported group contained 184 patients; the control group contained 61 patients. The software was safe in finding the same amount of recurrent disease with fewer outpatient visits, and revealed few technical problems. Clinicians experienced a decrease in follow-up workload of up to 50% with high adherence to the follow-up scheme. Conclusion CEAwatch is an efficient software tool helping clinicians working with large numbers of follow-up patients. The number of outpatient visits can safely be reduced, thus significantly decreasing workload for clinicians.

  15. Cerium oxide-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Sandwich-type immunoassay using ICP-MS and nanoparticles to determine biomarkers. • CeO2-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a probe. • Ratiometric measurement significantly improved the calibration linearity. • Excellent detection limit was achieved by signal amplification. - Abstract: CeO2-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a probe to determine carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The prepared mesoporous nanoparticles were modified and tagged to the target for sandwich-type immunoassay. Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were also synthesized and immobilized with antibody to extract the target biomarker. The calibration curve of the synthesized CeO2-deposited silica nanoparticles, which was plotted by the signal ratio of 140Ce/57Fe measured by ICP-MS vs. the concentration of CEA, showed excellent linearity and sensitivity owing to the signal amplification and low spectral interference. Under optimal conditions, the sandwich-type analytical method was applied to determine CEA in serum spiked in the range of 0.001–5 ng mL−1 and showed a limit of detection of 0.36 ng mL−1. Since the deposited CeO2 in the mesoporous silica layer can be substituted by other metal compounds, various kinds of metal-deposited nanoparticles can be prepared as probe materials for multiplex detection in bioanalysis

  16. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  17. Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres as an electrochemical interface for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in real sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Xie, Hangqing; Liu, Yuhong; Ren, Hang; Zhao, Wenbo; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based signal-amplification strategies hold a great promise in realizing sensitive biological detection. A simple label-free electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed by immobilizing anti-CEA antibodies onto the Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres modified glassy carbon electrode (Au-F127/GCE). The Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres offered a large surface and multifunctional substrate for the effective immobilization of anti-CEA and the existence of Au could accelerate electron transfer and make the electrochemical signal amplified. The Au-F127 nanocomposites and anti-CEA were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), polycrystalline electron diffraction ring pattern, ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were employed to verify the stepwise assembly of the immunosensor and evaluated the analytical performance of the fabricated immunosensor, respectively. The immunosensor showed a wide liner response range between 0.01 and 80 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.24 pg mL(-1) at a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 3. Additionally, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine CEA in human serum samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26452840

  18. Label-Free Electrochemiluminescent Immunosensor for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Nanocomposites of GO/MWCNTs-COOH/Au@CeO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xuehui; Li, Jianxiu; Zhao, Yongbei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yong; Du, Bin; Ma, Hongmin; Wei, Qin

    2015-09-01

    A high-sensitivity electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor was conducted to detect carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Nanocomposites of graphene oxide/carboxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes/gold/cerium oxide nanoparticles (GO/MWCNTs-COOH/Au@CeO2) were used as antibody carriers and sensing platforms to modify on glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). CeO2 nanoparticles were first exploited as an ECL luminescent material and the possible ECL mechanism was proposed in this work. GO/MWCNTs-COOH was used as a loading matrix for CeO2 nanoparticles because of the superior conductivity and large specific surface area. Au nanoparticles were further deposited on this matrix to attach anti-CEA and enhance the sensitivity of immunosensor. The proposed sensing platform showed excellent cathodic ECL performance and sensitive response to CEA. The effects of experimental conditions on the ECL performance were investigated. The proposed immunosensor showed the broad linear range (0.05-100 ng/mL) and the low detection limit (LOD, 0.02 ng/mL, signal-to-noise ratio = 3) according to the selected experimental conditions. The excellent analysis performance for determination of CEA in the human serum samples simplied this immunosensor displayed high sensitivity and excellent repeatability. More importantly, this conducted immunosensor broadens the use scope of CeO2 nanoparticles. PMID:26271682

  19. A Label-Free Microelectrode Array Based on One-Step Synthesis of Chitosan–Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Thionine for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiren Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA has been an extensively used tumor marker responsible for clinical early diagnosis of cervical carcinomas, and pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and lung cancer. Combined with micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS technology, it is important to develop a novel immune microelectrode array (MEA not only for rapid analysis of serum samples, but also for cell detection in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we depict a simple approach to modify chitosan–multi-walled carbon nanotubes–thionine (CS–MWCNTs–THI hybrid film through one-step electrochemical deposition and the CS-MWCNTs-THI hybrid films are successfully employed to immobilize anti-CEA for fabricating simple, label-free, and highly sensitive electro-chemical immune MEAs. The detection principle of immune MEA was based on the fact that the increasing formation of the antigen-antibody immunocomplex resulted in the decreased response currents and the relationship between the current reductions with the corresponding CEA concentrations was directly proportional. Experimental results indicated that the label-free MEA had good selectivity and the limit of detection for CEA is 0.5 pg/mL signal to noise ratio (SNR = 3. A linear calibration plot for the detection of CEA was obtained in a wide concentration range from 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL (r = 0.996. This novel MEA has potential applications for detecting CEA for the research on cancer cells and cancer tissue slices as well as for effective early diagnosis.

  20. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L−1 and 0.054 μg L−1 with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L−1) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2–50 μg L−1. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications. - Highlights: • 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared and characterized. • ICP-MS based magnetic immunoassay approach was developed for quantification of glycoproteins. • AFP and CEA were quantified simultaneously with Au and Ag NPs as element tags. • The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for target glycoproteins

  1. Expression of human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 and alveolar progenitor cells in normal and injured lungs of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-E; Barrette, Anne Marie; Chapin, Cheryl; Gonzales, Linda W; Gonzalez, Robert F; Dobbs, Leland G; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is expressed in the epithelium of various primate tissues, including lung airway and alveoli. In human lung, CEACAM6 is developmentally and hormonally regulated, protects surfactant function, has anti-apoptotic activity and is dysregulated in cancers. We hypothesized that alveolar CEACAM6 expression increases in lung injury and promotes cell proliferation during repair. Studies were performed in CEABAC transgenic mice-containing human CEACAM genes. The level of CEACAM6 in adult CEABAC lung was comparable to that in human infants; expression occurred in epithelium of airways and of some alveoli but rarely co-localized with markers of type I or type II cells. Ten days after bleomycin instillation, both the number of CEACAM6(+) cells and immunostaining intensity were elevated in injured lung areas, and there was increased co-localization with type I and II cell markers. To specifically address type II cells, we crossed CEABAC mice with animals expressing EGFP driven by the SP-C promoter. After bleomycin injury, partially flattened, elongated epithelial cells were observed that expressed type I cell markers and were primarily either EGFP(+) or CEACAM6(+). In cell cycle studies, mitosis was greater in CEACAM6(+) non-type II cells versus CEACAM6(+)/EGFP(+) cells. CEACAM6 epithelial expression was also increased after hyperoxic exposure and LPS instillation, suggesting a generalized response to acute lung injuries. We conclude that CEACAM6 expression is comparable in human lung and the CEABAC mouse. CEACAM6 in this model appears to be a marker of a progenitor cell population that contributes to alveolar epithelial cell replenishment after lung injury. PMID:26702074

  2. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen messenger RNA in blood using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to predict recurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhi-qiang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in peripheral blood as an indicator of tumor recurrence has not been clearly established, particularly for gastric cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the relationship between CTCs in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis and clinicopathologic findings in patients with gastric carcinoma. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 123 gastric carcinoma patients at initial diagnosis. mRNA was extracted and amplified for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA mRNA detection using real-time RT-PCR. Periodic 3-month follow-up examinations included serum CEA measurements and imaging. Results The minimum threshold for corrected CEA mRNA score [(CEA mRNA/GAPDH mRNA × 106] was set at 100. Forty-five of 123 patients (36.6% were positive for CEA mRNA expression. CEA mRNA expression significantly correlated with T stage and postoperative recurrence status (P = 0.001. Recurrent disease was found in 44 of 123 cases (35.8%, and 25 of these (56.8% were positive for CEA mRNA. Of these patients, CEA mRNA was more sensitive than serum CEA in indicating recurrence. Three-year disease-free survival of patients positive for CEA mRNA was significantly poorer than of patients negative for CEA mRNA (P Conclusions CEA mRNA copy number in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Real-time RT-PCR detection of CEA mRNA levels at initial diagnosis appears to be a promising predictor for disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients.

  3. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yiwen; Xiao, Guangyang; Hu, Bin, E-mail: binhu@whu.edu.cn

    2015-04-01

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L{sup −1} and 0.054 μg L{sup −1} with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L{sup −1}) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2–50 μg L{sup −1}. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications. - Highlights: • 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared and characterized. • ICP-MS based magnetic immunoassay approach was developed for quantification of glycoproteins. • AFP and CEA were quantified simultaneously with Au and Ag NPs as element tags. • The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for target glycoproteins.

  4. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay for carcinoembryonic antigen based on three-dimensional macroporous gold nanoparticles/graphene composite platform and multienzyme functionalized nanoporous silver label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Three-dimensional macroporous AuNPs/graphene complex (3D-AuNPs/GN) and functionalized NPS were prepared to immobilize Ab1 and Ab2 respectively and combined to fabricate a sandwich-type ultrasensitive electro-chemical immunosensor for detecting CEA. -- Highlights: •Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay for detecting CEA was developed. •3D-AuNPs/GN was employed as the carrier of primary antibodies. •Multienzyme functionalized nanoporous silver was used as signal enhancer. -- Abstract: Three-dimensional macroporous gold nanoparticles/graphene composites (3D-AuNPs/GN) were synthesized through a simple two-step process, and were used to modify working electrode sensing platform, based on which a facile electrochemical immunoassay for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum was developed. In the proposed 3D-AuNPs/GN, AuNPs were distributed not just on the surface, but also on the inside of graphene. And this distribution property increased the area of sensing surface, resulting in capturing more primary antibodies as well as improving the electronic transmission rate. In the presence of CEA, a sandwich-type immune composite was formed on the sensing platform, and the horseradish peroxidase-labeled anti-CEA antibody (HRP-Ab2)/thionine/nanoporous silver (HRP-Ab2/TH/NPS) signal label was captured. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor exhibited excellent analytical performance: the detection range of CEA is from 0.001 to 10 ng mL−1 with low detection limit of 0.35 pg mL−1 and low limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 0.85 pg mL−1. The electrochemical immunosensor showed good precision, acceptable stability and reproducibility, and could be used for the detection of CEA in real samples. The proposed method provides a promising platform of clinical immunoassay for other biomolecules

  5. Increased electrocatalyzed performance through hairpin oligonucleotide aptamer-functionalized gold nanorods labels and graphene-streptavidin nanomatrix: Highly selective and sensitive electrochemical biosensor of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wei; Huang, Jing-Yi; Bao, Ting; Zhou, Jun; Xia, Hong-Xing; Zhang, Xiu-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Fu; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2016-09-15

    We report a triplex signal amplification strategy for sensitive biosensing of cancer biomarker by taking advantage of hairpin-shaped oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanorods (HO-GNRs), graphene and the avidin-biotin reation. The strategy expands electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by using an aptamer as biosensor's recognition element and HO-GNRs as signal enhancer. To construct this biosensor, the GNR was used as a carrier of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and HO aptamer with a biotin at the 3'-end and a thiol at the 5'-end, which amplified the electrochemical response because of a large molar ratio of HRP to HO. In the presence of target CEA, the binding reactions of CEA with the loop portions of the HOs caused HOs' loop-stem structure opened and exposed the biotins, and then HRP-GNRs-HO conjugates were captured on graphene and streptavidin modified electrodes via the reaction between the exposed biotins and preimmobilized streptavidins. The accumulation of HRP effectively catalyzed the hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidation of o-phenylenediamine to generate an electrochemical reduction current for CEA detection. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical biosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 5pgmL(-1) and 50ngmL(-1) toward CEA standards with a low detection limit of 1.5pgmL(-1) (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The proposed biosensor accurately detected CEA concentration in 8 human serum samples from patients with lung diseases, showing excellent correlations with standard chemiluminescence immunoassay. Furthermore, these results of target DNA detection made it abundantly clear that the proposed strategy can also be extended for detection of other relative biomarkers using different functional DNA structures, which shows great prospects in single-nucleotide polymorphisms analysis, biomedical sensing and application for accurate clinical diseases diagnostic. PMID:27111123

  6. Major Protein of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family - CD66c, A Novel Marker in Colon Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Suma M; Prema, Chaitra Linganna; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbanna; Shivalingaiah, Sheeladevi Chandakavadi; Sundaram, Shivakumar; Kumar, Anjali Pradeep; Math, Ananda Kuruvatti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In view of rising trend of the incidence of colorectal carcinoma in the Indian population due to adoption of western lifestyles and behaviours, we investigated the expression of the new emerging stem cell biomarker, CD66c in colorectal carcinoma of Indian origin. Aim To study the expression of CD66c in human colorectal carcinoma and to correlate level of marker expression with tumour staging. Materials and Methods This hospital based prospective study was conducted on 26 colorectal carcinoma patients in the age group of 20 years to 70 years. Surgically resected tumour specimens along with adjacent normal tissue were collected taking necessary precautions, paraffin embedded sections were prepared and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis of CD66c. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistical measures like mean, standard deviation, percentage was applied. Other inferential statistical tests like Chi-square, Fisher’s-exact test and one-way ANOVA was applied to find out the association of CD66c with different stages. The difference were interpreted as statistically significant when p <0.05. Results CD66c showed differential expression with membrane positivity in normal colorectal epithelial cells and cytoplasmic expression in tumour cells. There was significant correlation between CD66c expression and tumour site (p=0.02) with colon carcinoma showing positive expression compared to the rectal carcinoma. There was no significant correlation between CD66c staining and tumour stage (p=0.947). No significant relationship was observed between CD66c expression and other clinicopathologic variables studied such as sex (p=0.552), age (p=0.713) and tumour grade (p=0.263). Conclusion CD66c can be specifically used for colon carcinoma and may be a novel marker in colon carcinoma stem cell isolation. The quantification of CD66c can be further verified by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Further studies can be carried out using CD66c alone or in combination with other markers to develop cancer stem cell directed therapy. PMID:27042567

  7. Label-free electrochemical immunosensor for the carcinoembryonic antigen using a glassy carbon electrode modified with electrodeposited Prussian Blue, a graphene and carbon nanotube assembly and an antibody immobilized on gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We described a sensitive, label-free electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen. It is based on the use of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a multi-layer films made from Prussian Blue (PB), graphene and carbon nanotubes by electrodeposition and assembling techniques. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically absorbed on the surface of the film and used for the immobilization of antibody, while PB acts as signaling molecule. The stepwise assembly process was investigated by differential pulse voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the formation of antibody-antigen complexes partially inhibits the electron transfer of PB and decreased its peak current. Under the optimal conditions, the decrease of intensity of the peak current of PB is linearly related to the concentration of carcinoembryonic antigen in two ranges (0.2–1.0, and 1.0–40.0 ng·mL−1), with a detection limit of 60 pg·mL−1 (S/N = 3). The immunosensor was applied to analyze five clinical samples, and the results obtained were in agreement with clinical data. In addition, the immunosensor exhibited good precision, acceptable stability and reproducibility. (author)

  8. Clinical and experimental studies regarding the expression and diagnostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is a multifunctional Ig-like cell adhesion molecule that has a wide range of biological functions. According to previous reports, serum CEACAM1 is dysregulated in different malignant tumours and associated with tumour progression. However, the serum CEACAM1 expression in non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) is unclear. The different expression ratio of CEACAM1-S and CEACAM1-L isoform has seldom been investigated in NSCLC. This research is intended to study the serum CEACAM1 and the ratio of CEACAM1-S/L isoforms in NSCLC. The expression of the serum CEACAM1 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The protein expression and the location of CEACAM1 in tumours were observed by immunohistochemical staining. The CEACAM1 mRNA levels in tumour and normal adjacent tissues were measured using quantitative real-time PCR, and the expression patterns and the rate of CEACAM1-S and CEACAM1-L were analysed by reverse transcription-PCR. Serum CEACAM1 levels were significantly higher in NSCLC patients compared with that from normal healthy controls (P <0.0001). 17 patients (81%) among 21 showed high expression of CEACAM1 by immunohistochemical staining. Although no significant differences were found between tumour and normal tissues on mRNA expression levels of CEACAM1 (P >0.05), the CEACAM1-S and the CEACAM1-S/L (S: L) ratios were significantly higher in tumour than normal tissues (P <0.05). Our data indicated that the serum levels of CEACAM1 could discriminate lung cancer patients from health donors and that CEACAM1 might be a useful marker in early diagnosis of NSCLC. Moreover, our results showed that the expression patterns of CEACAM1 isoforms could be changed during oncogenesis, even when total CEACAM1 in tumour tissues did not show significant changes. Our study suggested that the expression ratios of CEACAM1-S/CEACAM1-L might be a better diagnostic indicator in NSCLC than the quantitative

  9. Fully human IgG and IgM antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) Gold 4 epitope and designed for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are needed for colon cancer radioimmunotherapy (RIT) to allow for repeated injections. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) being the reference antigen for immunotargeting of these tumors, we developed human anti-CEA MAbs. XenoMouse®-G2 animals were immunized with CEA. Among all the antibodies produced, two of them, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM, were selected for characterization in vitro in comparison with the human-mouse chimeric anti-CEA MAb X4 using flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and binding to radiolabeled soluble CEA and in vivo in human colon carcinoma LS174T bearing nude mice. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated binding of MAbs on CEA-expressing cells without any binding on NCA-expressing human granulocytes. In a competitive binding assay using five reference MAbs, directed against the five Gold CEA epitopes, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were shown to be directed against the Gold 4 epitope. The affinities of purified VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were determined to be 0.19 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1 and 1.30 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1, respectively, as compared with 0.61 ± 0.05 × 108 M-1 for the reference MAb X4. In a soluble phase assay, the binding capacities of VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM to soluble CEA were clearly lower than that of the control chimeric MAb X4. A human MAb concentration of about 10-7 M was needed to precipitate approximatively 1 ng 125I-rhCEA as compared with 10-9 M for MAb X4, suggesting a preferential binding of the human MAbs to solid phase CEA. In vivo, 24 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ demonstrated a high tumor uptake (25.4 ± 7.3%ID/g), close to that of 131I-X4 (21.7 ± 7.2%ID/g). At 72 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ was still concentrated in the tumor (28.4 ± 11.0%ID/g) whereas the tumor concentration of 131I-X4 was significantly reduced (12.5 ± 4.8%ID/g). At no time after injection was there any accumulation of the radiolabeled MAbs in normal tissues. A pertinent analysis of VG-IgM biodistribution was not possible in this

  10. Prognostic Value of Pretreatment Carcinoembryonic Antigen After Definitive Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate whether pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels have a prognostic role in patients after definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 550 patients was performed. The SCC antigen (SCC-Ag) and CEA levels were regarded as elevated when they were ≥2 and ≥5 ng/mL, respectively. A total of 208 patients underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the distant metastasis (DM), local failure (LF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. The hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was evaluated for the risk of a poor prognosis. Results: Compared with the patients with normal CEA/SCC-Ag levels, CEA levels ≥10 ng/mL but without elevated SCC-Ag levels was an independent factor for LF (HR, 51.81; 95% CI, 11.51–233.23; p < .001), DM (HR, 6.04; 95% CI, 1.58–23.01; p = .008), DFS (HR, 10.17; 95% CI, 3.18–32.56; p < .001), and OS (HR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.82–18.18; p = .003) after RT alone. However, no significant role for CEA was noted in patients with SCC-Ag levels ≥2 ng/mL. In patients undergoing CCRT, a CEA level ≥10 ng/mL was an independent factor for LF (HR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.01–6.21; p = .047), DM (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.56–7.46; p = .002), DFS (HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.39–5.36; p = .003), and OS (HR, 3.93; 95% CI 1.99–7.75; p < .001). A SCC-Ag level of ≥40 ng/mL was another prognostic factor for DM, DFS, and OS in patients undergoing not only CCRT, but also RT alone. The 5-year OS rate for CCRT patients with CEA <10 ng/mL and ≥10 ng/mL was 75.3% and 35.8%, respectively (p < .001). CCRT was an independent factor for better OS (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50–0.97; p = .034). Conclusion: Pretreatment CEA levels in patients with SCC of the uterine cervix provide complementary information for

  11. Fully human IgG and IgM antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA Gold 4 epitope and designed for radioimmunotherapy (RIT of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugnière Martine

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs are needed for colon cancer radioimmunotherapy (RIT to allow for repeated injections. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA being the reference antigen for immunotargeting of these tumors, we developed human anti-CEA MAbs. Methods XenoMouse®-G2 animals were immunized with CEA. Among all the antibodies produced, two of them, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM, were selected for characterization in vitro in comparison with the human-mouse chimeric anti-CEA MAb X4 using flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and binding to radiolabeled soluble CEA and in vivo in human colon carcinoma LS174T bearing nude mice. Results Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated binding of MAbs on CEA-expressing cells without any binding on NCA-expressing human granulocytes. In a competitive binding assay using five reference MAbs, directed against the five Gold CEA epitopes, VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were shown to be directed against the Gold 4 epitope. The affinities of purified VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM were determined to be 0.19 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1 and 1.30 ± 0.06 × 108 M-1, respectively, as compared with 0.61 ± 0.05 × 108 M-1 for the reference MAb X4. In a soluble phase assay, the binding capacities of VG-IgG2κ and VG-IgM to soluble CEA were clearly lower than that of the control chimeric MAb X4. A human MAb concentration of about 10-7 M was needed to precipitate approximatively 1 ng 125I-rhCEA as compared with 10-9 M for MAb X4, suggesting a preferential binding of the human MAbs to solid phase CEA. In vivo, 24 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ demonstrated a high tumor uptake (25.4 ± 7.3%ID/g, close to that of 131I-X4 (21.7 ± 7.2%ID/g. At 72 h post-injection, 125I-VG-IgG2κ was still concentrated in the tumor (28.4 ± 11.0%ID/g whereas the tumor concentration of 131I-X4 was significantly reduced (12.5 ± 4.8%ID/g. At no time after injection was there any accumulation of the radiolabeled MAbs in normal tissues. A pertinent analysis of

  12. A prospective study of 2-[F-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose/positron emission tomography scan, Tc-99m-labeled arcitumomab (CEA-scan), and blind second-look laparotomy for detecting colon cancer recurrence in patients with increasing carcinoembryonic antigen levels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Libutti, S. K.; Alexander, HR.; Choyke, P.; Bartlett, DL.; Bacharach, SL.; Whatley, M.; Jousse, F.; Eckelman, WC.; Kranda, Karel; Neumann, RD.; Carrasquillo, JA.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2001), s. 779-786. ISSN 1068-9265 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : carcinoembryonic antigen * positron emission tomography * FDG Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.308, year: 2001

  13. Duodenal Duplication Cyst with Profound Elevation of Intracystic Carbohydrate Antigen (CA 19-9 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA: A Rare but Important Differential in the Diagnosis of Cystic Tumours of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kant J Shah

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of cystic tumours of the pancreas can be difficult. The principal effort is directed towards distinguishing benign post-inflammatory pseudocysts from true cystic tumours [1, 2]. Pointers that may help to identify a cystic tumour include the presence of a thick or irregular lining with septae on cross-sectional imaging [2]. Further, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS with linear EUS-guided aspiration can aid this process of differentiation as cyst fluid can be analysed for tumour markers, amylase and cytology [3, 4]. Elevated levels of intra-cyst tumour markers favour the diagnosis of a true cystic lesion [5]. It is important to make the distinction between post-inflammatory pseudocysts and cystic tumours as the natural history of these conditions is different and this is reflected in their different optimal management. Cystic lesions carry a varying risk of malignant transformation and most require resection [2]. Further, mistaking a cystic tumour for a pseudocyst can have disastrous consequences and lead to inappropriate drainage surgery [6]. In practice, cystic tumours and pseudocysts are the principal differential diagnoses to be assessed in a patient with a pancreatic cystic lesion; however a third rare possible differential is that of duplication cyst. These are rare congenital abnormalities of the gut characterized by the presence of smooth muscle in the wall and can be lined with gastrointestinal mucosa [7]. Little is known of the natural history and malignant potential of these lesions and as a result of their rarity, knowledge of their presentation accrues principally through single case studies. This paper reports a patient presenting with a pancreatic cystic lesion who underwent resection on the grounds of having a complex cyst with a profoundly elevated intra-cystic carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9 level together with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. Final histology revealed a duodenal duplication cyst without malignancy. To the

  14. Pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level is a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node recurrence in addition to squamous cell carcinoma antigen following definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels as a risk factor for para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer. From March 1995 to January 2008, 188 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix were analyzed retrospectively. No patient received PALN irradiation as the initial treatment. CEA and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) were measured before and after radiotherapy. PALN recurrence was detected by computer tomography (CT) scans. We analyzed the actuarial rates of PALN recurrence by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate analyses were carried out with Cox regression models. We stratified the risk groups based on the hazard ratios (HR). Both pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL and SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 8.838), SCC-Ag levels ≥ 40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 12.551), and SCC-Ag levels of 10-40 ng/mL (p < 0.001, HR = 4.2464) were significant factors for PALN recurrence. The corresponding 5-year PALN recurrence rates were 51.5%, 84.8%, and 27.5%, respectively. The 5-year PALN recurrence rate for patients with both low (< 10 ng/mL) SCC and CEA was only 9.6%. CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL or SCC-Ag levels ≥ 10 ng/mL at PALN recurrence were associated with overall survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Pretreatment CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL were also associated with survival after an isolated PALN recurrence. Pretreatment CEA ≥ 10 ng/mL is an additional risk factor of PALN relapse following definitive CCRT for SCC of the uterine cervix in patients with pretreatment SCC-Ag levels < 10 ng/mL. More comprehensive examinations before CCRT and intensive follow-up schedules are suggested for early detection and salvage in patients with SCC-Ag or CEA levels ≥ 10 ng/mL

  15. Pericyte antigens in angiomyolipoma and PEComa family tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Asatrian, Greg; Barnhill, Raymond; Lugassy, Claire; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2015-08-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are an uncommon family of soft tissue tumors with dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. Although PEComa family tumors commonly demonstrate a perivascular growth pattern, pericyte antigen expression has not yet been examined among this unique tumor group. Previously, we demonstrated that a subset of perivascular soft tissue tumors exhibit a striking pericytic immunophenotype, with diffuse expression of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Here, we describe the presence of pericyte antigens across a diverse group of PEComa family tumors (n = 19 specimens). Results showed that pericyte antigens differed extensively by histological appearance. Typical angiomyolipoma (AML) specimens showed variable expression of pericyte antigens among both perivascular and myoid-appearing cells. In contrast, AML specimens with a predominant spindled morphology showed diffuse expression of pericyte markers, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. AML samples with predominant epithelioid morphology showed a marked reduction in or the absence of immunoreactivity for pericyte markers. Lymphangiomyoma samples showed more variable and partial pericyte marker expression. In summary, pericyte antigen expression is variable among PEComa family tumors and largely varies by tumor morphology. Pericytic marker expression in PEComa may represent a true pericytic cell of origin, or alternatively aberrant pericyte marker adoption. Markers of pericytic differentiation may be of future diagnostic utility for the evaluation of mesenchymal tumors, or identify actionable signaling pathways for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26123600

  16. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and ppancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (p<0.001 for the 650 dyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  17. Comparing Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) with the oncofetal proteins Glypican-3, Alpha feto protein and Carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma among Egyptian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually asymptomatic in the early stage and does not show elevated alpha-feto protein (AFP). AFP shows 60-80% sensitivity in diagnosing HCC. Glypican3 (GPC-3) is an oncofetal protein that is only detected in HCC cells but not in benign liver tissues, while Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in various neoplasms including HCC. Although, it is not specific for HCC. Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal prothrombin protein that is increased in the serum of HCC patients. It has higher sensitivity and specificity compared to AFP. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical utility of PIVKA-II with GPC-3, AFP and CEA in diagnosing HCC. Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II Patients and methods: This study included 40 patients with HCC, 10 patients with cirrhosis as a benign control group, and 10 apparently healthy volunteers as normal controls. Serum samples were subjected to routine laboratory investigations, measurement of CEA, AFP using MEIA technique (Axsym), glypican3, and PIVKA-II using ELISA technique in the sera of all patients and controls. Results: All markers showed the highest results in the HCC group. Higher concentrations of PIVKA- II were detected in patients with splenomegaly, and in tumors with size (>3 cm). Combination of Glypican-3 and PIVKA-II showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone and combination of GPC-3 and AFP showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis and normal controls. GPC-3, PIVKAII, and combination of both showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis. Conclusion: Glypican-3 is the only oncofetal antigen that showed comparable high diagnostic accuracy as PIVKA-II in diagnosing HCC among Egyptian patients.

  18. Family distances and human-lymphocyte antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, M J; van Treuren, R; ten Kate, L P; te Meerman, G J; D'Amaro, J

    1987-01-01

    We compared family distances of homozygotes and heterozygotes for HLA-A and -B. When matched on number of inhabitants per birthplace, no significant differences were found. However, when homozygotes were compared with heterozygotes from larger birthplaces, homozygotes showed significantly smaller fa

  19. Distribution of HLA antigens in families of patients with leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since the discovery of major histocompatihility complex influence on manse leukaemia in 1964, an HLA association with leukaemia in humans has been considered as a possible genetic risk factor that contributes to development of leukaemia. In addition to associations of several IILA antigens with leukaemias, it has been observed that patients with leukaemia have an increase in the frequency of HLA identical siblings, higher degree of HLA compatibility with their parents as well as higher parental HLA sharing rate in comparison to the families without patients suffering from leukaemia. Material and methods. To test hypothesis that susceptibility to leukaemia can be caused bv influence of a recessive genes associated with the major histocompatibilily complex in man, we analyzed the distribution of I class HLA antigens in 77 families of patients suffering from different types of leukaemia. In the affected families and in 72 families of healthy controls, we investigated HLA identical sibling frequency, parental sharing of one, two or three HLA antigens and degree of compatibility of parents and off springs: existence of haploidentity, compatibility in l' and 4/4 HLA antigens of A and B loci. Results We have found that in families with affected persons there is a statistically significant difference in number of HLA identical siblings in comparison to the group of healthy controls (t=2,63. Also the results have shown that among the parents of affected persons there is a statistically significant difference in mutual compatibility in one (t=3,012 and two ft= 2,4 HLA antigens. In addition, we observed an increase in the frequency of higher rate of compatibility between patients and their parents (t=3,88 in l' HLA antigens, to their mothers (t=2,83 and to their fathers (t=2,55, respectively, in comparison to the healthy control group. Conclusion The results of this study show that in families with persons suffering from leukaemia there are

  20. Paper-based colorimetric immunosensor for visual detection of carcinoembryonic antigen based on the high peroxidase-like catalytic performance of ZnFe2O4-multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiyan; Yang, Hongmei; Ding, Yanan; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2014-01-01

    A new paper-based colorimetric immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed based on the intrinsic peroxidase activity of ZnFe2O4-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ZnFe2O4@MWNTs). The immunosensor platform was prepared by depositing chitosan and porous gold onto filter paper and entrapping the primary antibodies (Ab1) onto the layers. Secondary antibodies (Ab2) were assembled on the surface of the functionalized ZnFe2O4@MWNTs. The immunosensor response was quantified as a color change resulting from ZnFe2O4@MWNTs catalyzing the oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine in the presence of H2O2. The catalytic performance of ZnFe2O4@MWNTs was higher than ZnFe2O4 due to the high electrical conductance of MWNTs, moreover, the electron communications between ZnFe2O4@MWNTs and substrates are electrically "wired". Detection was achieved by measuring the color change when the concentrations of CEA were different. The color change can be quantified with the naked eye but a digitalized picture can also be used to provide more sensitive comparison to a calibrated color scheme. This method was simple for CEA detection with a linear range from 0.005 to 30 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 2.6 pg mL(-1). Such an equipment-free immunoassay has great potential in resource-limited environments. PMID:24205509

  1. Immunohistochemical expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules 5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5: Do they aid in predicting the response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT has become an integral part of multimodality treatment for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC worldwide. Predictors of therapeutic response to NACT are lacking. Whether carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs like CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 can act as a predictor of response to therapy is unclear. SLC7A5 gene in humans encodes a large neutral amino acid transporter protein, which has an essential role in tumor cell growth and survival. Materials and Methods: Thirty histopathologically proven cases of LABC, being given NACT, were included in the study. Immunohistochemical examination of the tumor sections was performed for CEACAM5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5. Response to chemotherapy was assessed using "Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors" (RECIST 1.1 criteria. A total of three cycles were given at 3 weekly intervals. After 3 weeks of the last cycle of NACT, the patients were taken up for modified radical mastectomy. The specimen was subjected to histopathological examination. The immunohistochemical results were correlated with response to NACT based on RECIST criteria and histopathology. Results: 12/30 (40% of the patients had objective clinical response of which 4 (13.33% patients had pathological complete response. The relationship between CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 and response to NACT was found to be statistically significant, P = 0.004 and P = 0.020, respectively. Furthermore, relationship between response to NACT and node-positive tumors with SLC7A5 immunoreactivity was found to be highly significant (P = 0.009. Conclusion: Biomarkers (CEACAM5, CEACAM6, and SLC7A5 showed promise as predictors of poor response to NACT and can help plan an alternative regime in likely nonresponders to prevent the toxicity of chemotherapy and also in tailoring the therapy in a patient with LABC.

  2. Randomised Phase I/II trial assessing the safety and efficacy of radiolabelled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen I131 KAb201 antibodies given intra-arterially or intravenously in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, and the current standard of care (gemcitabine based chemotherapy) provides a small survival advantage. However the drawback is the accompanying systemic toxicity, which targeted treatments may overcome. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of KAb201, an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody, labelled with I131 in pancreatic cancer (ISRCTN 16857581). Patients with histological/cytological proven inoperable adenocarcinoma of the head of pancreas were randomised to receive KAb 201 via either the intra-arterial or intravenous delivery route. The dose limiting toxicities within each group were determined. Patients were assessed for safety and efficacy and followed up until death. Between February 2003 and July 2005, 25 patients were enrolled. Nineteen patients were randomised, 9 to the intravenous and 10 to the intra-arterial arms. In the intra-arterial arm, dose limiting toxicity was seen in 2/6 (33%) patients at 50 mCi whereas in the intravenous arm, dose limiting toxicity was noted in 1/6 patients at 50 mCi, but did not occur at 75 mCi (0/3). The overall response rate was 6% (1/18). Median overall survival was 5.2 months (95% confidence interval = 3.3 to 9 months), with no significant difference between the intravenous and intra-arterial arms (log rank test p = 0.79). One patient was still alive at the time of this analysis. Dose limiting toxicity for KAb201 with I131 by the intra-arterial route was 50 mCi, while dose limiting toxicity was not reached in the intravenous arm

  3. 硫醇衍生化的纳米金与癌胚抗原相互作用的光学分析%Optical Analysis of the Interaction of Mercaptan Derivatives of Nanogold Particles with Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾红娟; 赵然琳; 王德舜; 李彩霞; 刘贻尧

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been the subject of intense research for use in biomedicine over the past couple of decades .AuNPs ,also referred to as colloidal gold ,possess some astounding optical and physical properties that have earned them a prime spot among the new promising tools for medical applications .Today ,AuNPs are offered to provide the clinical la-boratory with more sensitive ,faster ,and simpler assays ,which are also cost-effective .AuNPs can be used to develop point-of-care tests and novel testing strategies such as in drug targeting ,disease detection ,molecular recognition ,and biological labels . The typical structure of AuNPs is spherical nano-sized gold particles ,but they can also be composed of a thin gold shell sur-rounding a dielectric core ,such as silica (gold nanoshells) .their size range from 0.8 to 250 nm and are characterized by high ab-sorption coefficients .AuNPs have some unique optical properties ,such as enhanced absorption and scattering ,where the ab-sorption cross-section of AuNPs is 4~5 orders of magnitude greater than that of rhodamine 6G .When AuNPs aggregate ,inter-action of locally adjacent AuNPs (plasmon-plasmon interaction) shifts their color to blue .Thus ,the binding of AuNP-labeled entities to their respective target would lead to aggregation of the nanoparticles and a detectable shift in the optical signal .The strong absorption of AuNPs can also be used in colorimetric detection of analytes by measuring changes in the refractive index of the AuNP's environment caused by adsorption of the target analytes .However ,a large number of surface atoms of nanoparticles have huge surplus bonding ability ,because of surface effect of gold nanoparticles ,result in reuniting and sinking among the nan-oparticles which make them unstable .In order to detect traces of carcinoembryonic antigen ,one of the tumor targets ,a new kind of gold nanoparticle with hyperchormic effect and fluorescence sensitization effect material

  4. Establishment of Immunoradiometric Assay for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies are used, one is coated on the microtiter plate, the other is labeled to make 125I-CEAMcAb. The one-step assay is established based on immunoradiometric assay(IRMA). The sensitivity of the assay is 0.5 μ g/L. The intra-assay CVs and the inter-assay CVs are lower than 10.0% and 15.0%, respectively. The analytical recoveries are ranged from 97.4% to 107.8%. The reference cut-out value of 35 normal serum is lower than

  5. 一种新型免疫传感器阵列检测癌胚抗原和糖类抗原199技术%A New Type of Sensor Array Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Carbohydrate Antigen 199 Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周靖; 胡富陶; 余红卫

    2015-01-01

    制备了一种新型的含2个包覆分子印迹聚合物的丝网印刷碳工作电极的电化学发光夹心免疫传感器阵列,通过该阵列实现了肿瘤标志物癌胚抗原(CEA)和糖类抗原199(CA199)的近同时免疫分析。该新型的电化学发光免疫方法将空间分辨技术与分子印迹技术相结合,为 CEA 和CA199的复合免疫分析提供了一条简单、低成本、快速和灵敏的途径。该方法对临床实验中多种蛋白质的近同时测定也显示了较大的潜力。%In this study, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor array is engineered consisting of two screen-printed carbon working electrodes coated with molecular imprinting polymer (MIPs). The array is formed to perform multiplexed immunoassay of tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen-199 (CA199)). Based on spatial-resolved technique, and coupled with molecularly imprinted technique, this novel ECL strategy provides a simple, low-cost, fast and sensitive approach for multiplexed immunoassay of CEA and CA199. This approach may render promising potential for protein detection in the circumstances of clinical laboratory setting.

  6. Research on immunosensor for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen and its application%免疫传感器在癌胚抗原检测中的构建与应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马霄; 莫利明; 虞成; 逯岭松; 杨攀

    2014-01-01

    目的:设计一种新型的基于丝网印刷技术的癌胚抗原(CEA)免疫传感器,用于癌胚抗原浓度的床边检测。方法:在丝网印刷电极(SPE)上层层修饰上多壁碳纳米管(MWNTs)N,N-二甲基甲酰胺(DMF)分散液与壳聚糖纳米二氧化铈(Chitosan-Nano CeO2)溶液两种纳米材料,利用纳米铈固载癌胚抗原抗体(anti-CEA),最后用牛血清白蛋白(BSA)封闭纳米铈上非特异位点,构建一种新型的癌胚抗原免疫传感器。采用透射电镜(TEM)及循环伏安法(CV)对修饰过程进行表征。结果:探讨不同pH、孵育温度及孵育时间对该免疫传感器性能的影响,该传感器在最适条件下对CEA响应良好,其线性范围为0~80 ng/ml,线性相关系数r=0.99825,检出限为0.08 ng/ml。结论:CEA免疫传感器具有稳定性好、灵敏度高、特异性好、结果准确可靠和可再生等优点,可应用于临床检测。%Objective: To design immunosensor for the determination of Carcinoembryonic Antigen(CEA) and be used in the piont-of-care test of the concentration of CEA. Methods:The immunosensor was developed by modifying multi-wall carbon nanotubes(MWNTs)which dispersed in N, N-dimethyl-formamide(DMF)on the Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE), then Chitosan-NanoCeO2 were immobilized self-assembly. And then the antibody of CEA (anti-CEA) was absorbed on the surface of NanoCeO2 monolayer. Finally, Albumin from bovine serum (BSA) blocked the non-specific adsorption site.The modification process was characterized by transmisCeOn electronmicroscope(TEM)and cyclic voltammetry(CV). The factors possibly influenced the performance of the proposed immunosensor were studied in detail. Results:Under optimal conditions,the obtained immunosensor exhibited good electrochemical behavior to CEA in a linear range of 0 to 80 ng/ml (r=0.99825), with a detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml. Conclusion: The immunosensor prepared using this method has advantages of good

  7. Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  8. Immunoradiometric assay for carcinoembryonic antigenusing avidin-biotin separation technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive, specific, noncompetitive, sandwich-typeradioimmunoassay for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been developedin our laboratory, which can be performedconveniently. The assay involves two monoclonal antibodies, selected for highaffinity and specificity and also for reaction against antigenic sites on CEA that aredistal from each other. One of these antibodies was labeled with125I and the other wasconjugated covalently to biotin. Polystyrene tubes were conjugated covalently toavidin. These tubes represent a rapid, simple method for separating the CEA-boundantibody from the free antibody. The biotin-antibody-CEA-125I-labeled antibodycomplexes bind to the tubes and CEA concentration is directly related to counts perminute. This assay can detect the CEA at a concentration of 0.22 μg/L in serum.

  9. Antigenic cross-reactivity between Treponema pallidum and other pathogenic members of the family Spirochaetaceae.

    OpenAIRE

    Baker-Zander, S A; Lukehart, S A

    1984-01-01

    The antigenic cross-reactivity between Treponema pallidum and several pathogenic members of the family Spirochaetaceae was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting techniques. Blots of T. pallidum antigens were incubated with antiserum from rabbits infected or immunized with T. pallidum, Treponema paraluiscuniculi, Treponema hyodysenteriae (strains B204 and T22), Borrelia hermsii serotype 7, or Leptopsira interrogans serogroup Canicola. T. pal...

  10. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti......, spontaneous cellular immune responses against the Bcl-2 family proteins have been identified as frequent features in cancer patients underscoring that these proteins are natural targets for the immune system. Thus, Bcl-2 family may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti......-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies, alone or in the combination with conventional therapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of Bcl-2 family proteins as T-cell antigens, which has set the stage for the first explorative trial using these antigens in therapeutic vaccinations against cancer, and discuss future...

  11. Evolutionary origin and human-specific expansion of a cancer/testis antigen gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2014-09-01

    Cancer/testis (CT) antigens are encoded by germline genes and are aberrantly expressed in a number of human cancers. Interestingly, CT antigens are frequently involved in gene families that are highly expressed in germ cells. Here, we presented an evolutionary analysis of the CTAGE (cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma-associated antigen) gene family to delineate its molecular history and functional significance during primate evolution. Comparisons among human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, macaque, marmoset, and other mammals show a rapid and primate specific expansion of CTAGE family, which starts with an ancestral retroposition in the haplorhini ancestor. Subsequent DNA-based duplications lead to the prosperity of single-exon CTAGE copies in catarrhines, especially in humans. Positive selection was identified on the single-exon copies in comparison with functional constraint on the multiexon copies. Further sequence analysis suggests that the newly derived CTAGE genes may obtain regulatory elements from long terminal repeats. Our result indicates the dynamic evolution of primate genomes, and the recent expansion of this CT antigen family in humans may confer advantageous phenotypic traits during early human evolution. PMID:24916032

  12. The serum carbohydrate antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen comparsion for the han and uyghur patients of terminal gallbladder cancer in xinjiang uygur autonomous region%新疆地区汉族与维吾尔族晚期胆囊癌患者血清糖类抗原125、癌胚抗原水平比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛拉艾沙·买买提; 薛峰; 依马木买买提江·阿不拉

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较新疆地区汉族与维吾尔族晚期胆囊癌患者血清糖类抗原125(CA125)、癌胚抗原(CEA)水平是否存在差异.方法 原发性晚期胆囊癌患者80例,其中维吾尔族40例,汉族40例;随机选取同期住院的胆囊炎患者60例作为对照组,其中维吾尔族34例,汉族26例;均进行血清CA125、CEA检测.结果 胆囊癌组的汉族、维吾尔族患者与对照组同民族患者CA125、CEA水平差异均有统计学意义(t=27.01、28.06、10.68、11.25,均P<0.05);而两组内汉族、维吾尔族患者间的CA125、CEA水平差异均无统计学意义(t=0.47、0.34、0.11、1.23,均P>0.05);胆囊癌Ⅳ期汉族、维吾尔族患者与Ⅴ期同民族患者CA125、CEA水平差异均有统计学意义(t=26.92、25.01、16.58、14.54,均P<0.05);汉族、维吾尔族的胆囊癌Ⅳ期患者之间、Ⅴ期患者之间的CA125、CEA水平差异均无统计学意义(t=1.13、0.11、0.38、0.07,均P>0.05).结论 新疆地区汉族与维吾尔族晚期胆囊癌患者血清CA125、CEA水平无差异,晚期胆囊癌患者进行CA125、CEA检测有助于病情诊断.%Objective To compare the differences on the serum carbohydrate antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen for the Han and Uyghur patients of terminal gallbladder cancer in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.Methods 80 cases of patients with primary advanced gallbladder,including 40 cases of Uighur,Han 40 cases,The cholecystitis patients randomly selected from the same period of hospitalization of 60 cases as the control group.Including 34 cases of Uighur and Han 26 cases,Levels of serum CA125,CEA were detected.Results The gallbladder group of Han,Uygur patients and the control group with ethnic patients CA125,CEA level differences were statistically significant(t =27.01,28.06,10.68,11.25,all P < 0.05) ; CA125,CEA level differences between the two groups within the Han,Uygur patients were not statistically significant(t =0.47,0.34,0.1 l,1.23,all P > 0

  13. Proposta para estadiamento do câncer colorretal baseada em critérios morfofuncionais: correlação com níveis séricos do antígeno carcinoembrionário Proposal for colorectal cancer stages based on morphofunctional criteria: correlation with carcinoembryonic antigen levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Gonçalves Priolli

    2007-12-01

    tempo de sobrevida, a classificação morfofuncional e o nível sérico de antígeno carcinoembrionário. CONCLUSÃO: O estadiamento morfofuncional é válido para a avaliação prognóstica dos pacientes com adenocarcinoma colorretal, e relaciona-se com os níveis séricos do CEA.The analysis of morphofunctions characteristics can be useful in the colorectal cancer evolution, especially if related to the serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. The research of chromosomes and genes instability, as well as the alterations of tissue protein codified, makes attractive the possibility to use potentially valid functional factors as variables for the understanding of colorectal carcinoma prognosis. OBJECTIVE: To consider classes based on morphologic and functional colorectal carcinoma characteristics, valuing serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels prognostic power. METHOD: Third-five patients in different stages of colorectal carcinoma underwent operations from 2001 to 2007. Serum CEA levels, histological grade, tissue CEA cell polarization capacity were analyzed. Colorectal carcinoma was classified according to TNM stages. The morphofunctional classification was determined by the combination between histological grade and antigen polarization, morphofunctional stages have been based in association between morphofunctional classification and stages TNM, by punctuation attributed to each one classification. The results had been analyzed by variance analysis, correlation test and survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier and Cox Model Regression, adopting p<0.05. RESULTS: Morphofunctional stages survival curve resulted similar to the joined ones in stages TNM. It had relation between new classification proposed and patient survival time. They had observed relation among survival time, morphofunctional classification and serum carcinoembryonic antigen. CONCLUSION: Morphofunctional classification is valid for colorectal cancer patient's prognostic evaluation and is related with the serum CEA

  14. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  15. Identification of a novel SEREX antigen family, ECSA, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Akihiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC may improve with early diagnosis. Currently it is difficult to diagnose SCC in the early stage because there is a limited number of tumor markers available. Results Fifty-two esophageal SCC SEREX antigens were identified by SEREX (serological identification of antigens by recombinant cDNA expression cloning using a cDNA phage library and sera of patients with esophageal SCC. Sequence analysis revealed that three of these antigens were similar in amino acid sequences, and they were designated as ECSA (esophageal carcinoma SEREX antigen-1, -2 and -3. The ECSA family was also similar to an EST clone, hepatocellular carcinoma-associated antigen 25a (HCA25a. Serum antibody levels to ECSA-1, -2 and -3 were significantly higher in patients with esophageal SCC than in healthy donors. Based on the conserved amino acid sequences, three peptides were synthesized and used for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. The serum antibody levels against one of these peptides were significantly higher in patients with esophageal SCC. This peptide sequence was also conserved in FAM119A, GOSR1 and BBS5, suggesting that these are also ECSA family members. Reverse transcription followed by quantitative PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression levels of ECSA-1, -2 and -3 and FAM119A but not of HCA25a, GOSR1 and BBS5 were frequently elevated in esophageal SCC tissues. Conclusions We have identified a new gene family designated ECSA. Serum antibodies against the conserved domain of the ECSA family may be a promising tumor marker for esophageal SCC.

  16. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mie Grunnet; Sorensen, J B

    2012-01-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic...... significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those...... relevant for the present study. Four of these included both Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) patients, and 31 dealt solely with NSCLC patients. Regarding SCLC no studies showed that serum level of CEA was a prognostic marker for overall survival (OS). The use of CEA...

  17. The DnaJ domain of polyomavirus large T antigen is required to regulate Rb family tumor suppressor function.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Q.; Denis, D; Ratnofsky, M; Roberts, T.M.; DeCaprio, J A; Schaffhausen, B

    1997-01-01

    Tumor suppressors of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene family regulate cell growth and differentiation. Polyomavirus large T antigens (large T) bind Rb family members and block their function. Mutations of large T sequences conserved with the DnaJ family affect large T binding to a cellular DnaK, heat shock protein 70. The same mutations abolish large T activation of E2F-containing promoters and Rb binding-dependent large T activation of cell cycle progression. Cotransfection of a cellul...

  18. Sarcocystis neurona Merozoites Express a Family of Immunogenic Surface Antigens That Are Orthologues of the Toxoplasma gondii Surface Antigens (SAGs) and SAG-Related Sequences†

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, Daniel K.; Rajshekhar Y Gaji; Mroz-Barrett, Meaghan; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Striepen, Boris; Stamper, Shelby

    2005-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the Apicomplexa that causes myelitis and encephalitis in horses but normally cycles between the opossum and small mammals. Analysis of an S. neurona expressed sequence tag (EST) database revealed four paralogous proteins that exhibit clear homology to the family of surface antigens (SAGs) and SAG-related sequences of Toxoplasma gondii. The primary peptide sequences of the S. neurona proteins are consistent with the two-domain structure that has been describe...

  19. A New Gene Family (ariel) Encodes Asparagine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Antigens, Which Resemble the Amebic Vaccine Candidate Serine-Rich E. histolytica Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Zhiming; Samuelson, John

    1998-01-01

    A family of genes, called ariel, are named for and encode asparagine-rich Entamoeba histolytica antigens containing 2 to 16 octapeptide repeats. Ariel proteins, which are constitutively expressed by trophozoites, belong to a large antigen family that includes the serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP), an amebic vaccine candidate.

  20. Mitotic evolution of Plasmodium falciparum shows a stable core genome but recombination in antigen families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina E R Bopp

    Full Text Available Malaria parasites elude eradication attempts both within the human host and across nations. At the individual level, parasites evade the host immune responses through antigenic variation. At the global level, parasites escape drug pressure through single nucleotide variants and gene copy amplification events conferring drug resistance. Despite their importance to global health, the rates at which these genomic alterations emerge have not been determined. We studied the complete genomes of different Plasmodium falciparum clones that had been propagated asexually over one year in the presence and absence of drug pressure. A combination of whole-genome microarray analysis and next-generation deep resequencing (totaling 14 terabases revealed a stable core genome with only 38 novel single nucleotide variants appearing in seventeen evolved clones (avg. 5.4 per clone. In clones exposed to atovaquone, we found cytochrome b mutations as well as an amplification event encompassing the P. falciparum multidrug resistance associated protein (mrp1 on chromosome 1. We observed 18 large-scale (>1 kb on average deletions of telomere-proximal regions encoding multigene families, involved in immune evasion (9.5×10(-6 structural variants per base pair per generation. Six of these deletions were associated with chromosomal crossovers generated during mitosis. We found only minor differences in rates between genetically distinct strains and between parasites cultured in the presence or absence of drug. Using these derived mutation rates for P. falciparum (1.0-9.7×10(-9 mutations per base pair per generation, we can now model the frequency at which drug or immune resistance alleles will emerge under a well-defined set of assumptions. Further, the detection of mitotic recombination events in var gene families illustrates how multigene families can arise and change over time in P. falciparum. These results will help improve our understanding of how P. falciparum

  1. 晚期非小细胞肺癌患者血清癌胚抗原水平和全身转移能力的风险评估%Serum Level of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Whole-body Metastasis Ability Risk Assessment in Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李捷; 李付广; 常保萍; 焦江琴

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen and whole-body metastasis ability risk in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer,and provide the reference for clinical.Method: 160 patients with stage IV NSCLC in our hospital from March 2012 to January 2014 were selected. Research indicators included age, height,weight,age,sex,histological classification,tumor differentiation ,CEA level,smoking status,bone metastases,lymphatic metastasis,obstinate/transfer, transfer, soft tissue of neck metastases, brain metastases, systemic metastasis score and systemic metastasis LN-adjustment score, and the statistical analysis was performed.Result: The sex,bone metastases,histological classification lymph node metastasis and brain metastasis of different CEA level patients had statistical significance (P0.05).Serum CEA level increased from 2.7 ng/mL in LN-adjusted whole-body metastatic score 1 to 374.1 ng/mL in LN-adjusted whole-body metastatic score 7,the difference was statistically significant (P=0.003).Similarly, the low LN-adjusted whole-body metastatic score (rating 1-3) showed CEA level significantly reduced when compared with adjustment of high LN-adjusted whole-body metastatic score (rating 4-7),the difference was statistically significant(P0.05)。血清CEA水平从LN-调整全身转移得分1分中的2.7 ng/mL上升至LN-调整全身转移得分7分中的374.1 ng/mL(P=0.003)。低LN-调整全身转移得分(评分1~3分)与高LN-调整全身转移得分(评分4~7分)比较表现出CEA水平显著降低,两组比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.001)。血清高CEA水平的比例从全身转移得分1分中占37.5%(15/40)上升至全身转移得分6中的100%(1/1),两组比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.001)。血清高CEA水平的比例从LN-调整全身转移得分1分中占25.0%(2/8)上升至LN-调整全身转移得分7分中的100%(1/1)(P<0.001)。单因素分析结果表明,

  2. Identification of a novel SEREX antigen family, ECSA, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami Akihiro; Hachiya Takahisa; Kurei Shunsuke; Nishimori Takanori; Yasuraoka Mari; Nakashima-Fujita Kazue; Kuboshima Mari; Shiratori Tooru; Shimada Hideaki; Kagaya Akiko; Tamura Yutaka; Nomura Fumio; Ochiai Takenori; Matsubara Hisahiro; Takiguchi Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) may improve with early diagnosis. Currently it is difficult to diagnose SCC in the early stage because there is a limited number of tumor markers available. Results Fifty-two esophageal SCC SEREX antigens were identified by SEREX (serological identification of antigens by recombinant cDNA expression cloning) using a cDNA phage library and sera of patients with esophageal SCC. Sequence analysis revealed that three of the...

  3. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A. J.; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous ...

  4. Familial occurrence of subacute thyroiditis associated with human leukocyte antigen-B35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, AB; Roozendaal, C; Dullaart, RPF

    2004-01-01

    Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is a spontaneously remitting inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B35, and may be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. A 57-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as enlarg

  5. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj;

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium ...

  6. Rapid determination of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in drinking water by an immunological assay using a monoclonal antibody against enterobacterial common antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner, I; Steinmetz, I.; Obst, U.; Giebel, D; Bitter-Suermann, D

    1992-01-01

    An immunological method for the detection of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in drinking water was developed. The method was based on a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G2a 898 against enterobacterial common antigen. The enterobacterial common antigen sandwich ELISA combined with selective preenrichment culture could be performed in only 24 h. Six hundred sixty-eight water samples from a variety of German public water supplies...

  7. Aguacate virus, a new antigenic complex of the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Gustavo; da Rosa, Amelia Travassos; Savji, Nazir; Sze, Wilson; Wick, Ivan; Guzman, Hilda; Hutchison, Stephen; Tesh, Robert; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-06-01

    Genomic and antigenic characterization of Aguacate virus, a tentative species of the genus Phlebovirus, and three other unclassified viruses, Armero virus, Durania virus and Ixcanal virus, demonstrate a close relationship to one another. They are distinct from the other nine recognized species within the genus Phlebovirus. We propose to designate them as a new (tenth) serogroup or species (Aguacate virus) within the genus. The four viruses were all isolated from phlebotomine sandflies (Lutzomyia sp.) collected in Central and South America. Aguacate virus appears to be a natural reassortant and serves as one more example of the high frequency of reassortment in this genus. PMID:21325481

  8. Identification of distant co-evolving residues in antigen 85C from Mycobacterium tuberculosis using statistical coupling analysis of the esterase family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baths, Veeky; Roy, Utpal

    2011-05-01

    A fundamental goal in cellular signaling is to understand allosteric communication, the process by which signals originating at one site in a protein propagate reliably to affect distant functional sites. The general principles of protein structure that underlie this process remain unknown. Statistical coupling analysis (SCA) is a statistical technique that uses evolutionary data of a protein family to measure correlation between distant functional sites and suggests allosteric communication. In proteins, very distant and small interactions between collections of amino acids provide the communication which can be important for signaling process. In this paper, we present the SCA of protein alignment of the esterase family (pfam ID: PF00756) containing the sequence of antigen 85C secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to identify a subset of interacting residues. Clustering analysis of the pairwise correlation highlighted seven important residue positions in the esterase family alignments. These residues were then mapped on the crystal structure of antigen 85C (PDB ID: 1DQZ). The mapping revealed correlation between 3 distant residues (Asp38, Leu123 and Met125) and suggests allosteric communication between them. This information can be used for a new drug against this fatal disease. PMID:23554685

  9. Hookah smoking and cancer: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in exclusive/ever hookah smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Chaouachi Kamal; Sajid Khan; Mahmood Rubaida

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background We have recently published some work on CEA levels in hookah (also called narghile, shisha elsewhere) and cigarette smokers. Hookah smokers had higher levels of CEA than non-smokers although mean levels were low compared to cigarette smokers. However some of them were also users of other tobacco products (cigarettes, bidis, etc.). Objectives To find serum CEA levels in ever/exclusive hookah smokers, i.e. those who smoked only hookah (no cigarettes, bidis, etc.), prepared b...

  10. Hookah smoking and cancer: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels in exclusive/ever hookah smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouachi Kamal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently published some work on CEA levels in hookah (also called narghile, shisha elsewhere and cigarette smokers. Hookah smokers had higher levels of CEA than non-smokers although mean levels were low compared to cigarette smokers. However some of them were also users of other tobacco products (cigarettes, bidis, etc.. Objectives To find serum CEA levels in ever/exclusive hookah smokers, i.e. those who smoked only hookah (no cigarettes, bidis, etc., prepared between 1 and 4 times a day with a quantity of up to 120 g of a tobacco-molasses mixture each (i.e. the tobacco weight equivalent of up to 60 cigarettes of 1 g each and consumed in 1 to 8 sessions. Methods Enhanced chemiluminescent immunometric technique was applied to measure CEA levels in serum samples from 59 exclusive male smokers with age ranging from 20–80 years (mean = 58.8 ± 14.7 years and 8–65 years of smoking (mean = 37.7 ± 16.8. 36 non-smokers served as controls. Subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the number of preparations; the number of sessions and the total daily smoking time: Light (1; 1; ≤ 20 minutes; Medium (1–3; 1–3; >20 min to ≤ 2 hrs and Heavy smokers (2–4; 3–8; >2 hrs to ≤ 6 hrs. Because of the nature of distribution of CEA levels among our individuals, Wilcoxon's rank sum two-sample test was applied to compare the variables. Results The overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers (mean: 3.58 ± 2.61 ng/ml; n = 59 were not significantly different (p ≤ 0.0937 from the levels in non-smokers (2.35 ± 0.71 ng/ml. Mean levels in light, medium and heavy smokers were: 1.06 ± 0.492 ng/ml (n = 5; 2.52 ± 1.15 ng/ml (n = 28 and 5.11 ± 3.08 ng/ml (n = 26 respectively. The levels in medium smokers and non-smokers were also not significantly different (p ≤ 0.9138. In heavy smokers, the CEA levels were significantly higher than in non-smokers (p ≤ 0.0001567. Conclusion Overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers were low compared to cigarette smokers. However, heavy hookah smoking substantially raises CEA levels. Low-nitrosamines smokeless tobacco of the SNUS Swedish type could be envisaged as an alternative to smoking for this category of users and also, in a broad harm reduction perspective, to the prevalent low-quality moist snuff called naswar.

  11. The Establishment of an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies are used, one is coated on the microtiter plate, the other is labeled with horseradish peroxidase(HRP). The two-step assay is established based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA). TMB-H2O2 solution is used as the substrate of HRP. The sensitivity of the assay is 0.4 μ g/L. The intra-assay CVs and the inter-assay CVs are lower than 10.0% and 15.0%, respectively. The analytical recoveries are ranged from 99.4% to 108.7%. The reference cut-off value of normal serum (n= 100 ) is 10.0 ng/L.

  12. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I; Ravn, P; Brock, I; Jacobsen, S; Andersen, P

    2000-01-01

    tested in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from human tuberculosis (TB) patients, Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated donors, and nonvaccinated donors. The two ESAT-6 family members, TB10.4 and CFP10, were very strongly recognized and induced gamma interferon release at the same level (CFP10......) as or at an even higher level (TB10.4) than ESAT-6. The non-ESAT-6 family member, TB7.3, for comparison, was recognized at a much lower level. CFP10 was found to distinguish TB patients from BCG-vaccinated donors and is, together with ESAT-6, an interesting candidate for the diagnosis of TB. The......Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate...

  13. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, Rikke L. V.; Oettinger, Thomas; Rosenkrands, Ida; Ravn, Pernille; Brock, Inger; Andersen, Peter; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    tested in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from human tuberculosis (TB) patients, Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated donors, and nonvaccinated donors. The two ESAT-6 family members, TB10.4 and CFP10, were very strongly recognized and induced gamma interferon release at the same level (CFP10......) as or at an even higher level (TB10.4) than ESAT-6, The non-ESAT-6 family member, TB7.3, for comparison, was recognized at a much lower level, CFP10 tvas found to distinguish TB patients from BCG-vaccinated donors and is, together with ESAT-6 an interesting candidate for the diagnosis of TB. The......Culture filtrate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains protective antigens of relevance for the generation of a new antituberculosis vaccine. We have identified two previously uncharacterized M. tuberculosis proteins (TB7.3 and TB10.4) from the highly active low-mass fraction of culture filtrate...

  14. Utility of a stool antigen test to detect the incidence of helicobacter pylori infection and familial and community enviromental risk factors for this infection in pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sabbi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: helicobacter pylori (hp infection is mainly acquired during childhood; it is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer and it has been classified as a group A carcinogen by World health organization. the exact mode of transmission is as yet, not known. Aim of our study has been to identify risk factors associated with helicobacter pylori infection in a preschool and school population and to confirm if hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening in epidemiological studies. Methods: We interviewed, with questionnaire, 400 children (203 male; age range 3-10 years; mean age 6 years of 3 different schools and stool samples were collected of all children too. 35 of 400 (8% children underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of a suspect of upper gastrointestinal disease. Results: stool were collected from 400 school children and 35 of them shown positivity of hp antigen test. A questionnaire about presence of nausea, vomit, recurrent abdominal pain, family size, parent’s occupations and education, use of antibiotics, country of birth of child and parents, personal hygiene, breast feeding, presence of the animals was completed. 35 children with positive hp stool antigen test and a suspicious of upper gastrointestinal disease (recurrent abdominal pain, diurnal or nocturnal abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, iron deficiency underwent to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (egdS that demonstrated antral gastritis and positive histology and urease rapid test. Conclusions: the results of this study suggest that risk factors for hp infection are low socioeconomics factors, hygiene and living conditions and that hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening test.

  15. The J Domain of Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen Is Required To Functionally Inactivate RB Family Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zalvide, Juan; Stubdal, Hilde; DeCaprio, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Transformation by simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg) is dependent on the inactivation of cellular tumor suppressors. Transformation minimally requires the following three domains: (i) a C-terminal domain that mediates binding to p53; (ii) the LXCXE domain (residues 103 to 107), necessary for binding to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, pRB, and the related p107 and p130; and (iii) an N-terminal domain that is homologous to the J domain of DnaJ molecular chaperone proteins. We ha...

  16. Antigenicity and protective efficacy of a Leishmania amastigote-specific protein, member of the super-oxygenase family, against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian T Martins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to evaluate a hypothetical Leishmania amastigote-specific protein (LiHyp1, previously identified by an immunoproteomic approach performed in Leishmania infantum, which showed homology to the super-oxygenase gene family, attempting to select a new candidate antigen for specific serodiagnosis, as well as to compose a vaccine against VL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The LiHyp1 DNA sequence was cloned; the recombinant protein (rLiHyp1 was purified and evaluated for its antigenicity and immunogenicity. The rLiHyp1 protein was recognized by antibodies from sera of asymptomatic and symptomatic animals with canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL, but presented no cross-reactivity with sera of dogs vaccinated with Leish-Tec, a Brazilian commercial vaccine; with Chagas' disease or healthy animals. In addition, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rLiHyp1 plus saponin was evaluated in BALB/c mice challenged subcutaneously with virulent L. infantum promastigotes. rLiHyp1 plus saponin vaccinated mice showed a high and specific production of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF after in vitro stimulation with the recombinant protein. Immunized and infected mice, as compared to the control groups (saline and saponin, showed significant reductions in the number of parasites found in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and in the paws' draining lymph nodes. Protection was associated with an IL-12-dependent production of IFN-γ, produced mainly by CD4 T cells. In these mice, a decrease in the parasite-mediated IL-4 and IL-10 response could also be observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study showed that this Leishmania oxygenase amastigote-specific protein can be used for a more sensitive and specific serodiagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic CVL and, when combined with a Th1-type adjuvant, can also be employ as a candidate antigen to develop vaccines against VL.

  17. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer (Springe); (Hannover-MED); (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide

  18. Nonredundant roles of Src-family kinases and Syk in the initiation of B-cell antigen receptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánek, Ondřej; Dráber, Peter; Drobek, Aleš; Hořejší, Václav; Brdička, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 190, č. 4 (2013), s. 1807-1818. ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR GAP302/12/1712 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : BCR signaling * Src family kinases * Syk Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.362, year: 2013

  19. A novel transgenic mouse model for immunological evaluation of carcinoembryonic antigen–based DNA minigene vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, He; Luo, Yunping; Mizutani, Masato; Mizutani, Noriko; Becker, Jürgen C; Primus, F. James; Xiang, Rong; Reisfeld, Ralph A.

    2004-01-01

    A lack of relevant animal models has hampered preclinical screening and critical evaluation of the efficacy of human vaccines in vivo. Carcinoembryonic antigen–A2Kb (CEA–A2Kb) double transgenic mice provide a biologically relevant model for preclinical screening and critical evaluation of human CEA vaccine efficacy in vivo, particularly because such animals are peripherally tolerant of CEA. We established the utility of this model by demonstrating that an oral DNA minigene vaccine induces eff...

  20. Distribution and surfactant association of carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 in human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Chapin, Cheryl; Bailey, Nicole A.; Gonzales, Linda W.; Lee, Jae-Woo; Gonzalez, Robert F.; Ballard, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is a glycosylated, glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expressed in epithelial cells of various primate tissues. It binds gram-negative bacteria and is overexpressed in human cancers. CEACAM6 is associated with lamellar bodies of cultured type II cells of human fetal lung and protects surfactant function in vitro. In this study, we characterized CEACAM6 expression in vivo in human lung. CEACAM6 was present in lung lavage of premature ...

  1. Identification of antigens specific to non-tuberculous mycobacteria: the Mce family of proteins as a target of T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Checkley

    Full Text Available The lack of an effective TB vaccine hinders current efforts in combating the TB pandemic. One theory as to why BCG is less protective in tropical countries is that exposure to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM reduces BCG efficacy. There are currently several new TB vaccines in clinical trials, and NTM exposure may also be relevant in this context. NTM exposure cannot be accurately evaluated in the absence of specific antigens; those which are known to be present in NTM and absent from M. tuberculosis and BCG. We therefore used a bioinformatic pipeline to define proteins which are present in common NTM and absent from the M. tuberculosis complex, using protein BLAST, TBLASTN and a short sequence protein BLAST to ensure the specificity of this process. We then assessed immune responses to these proteins, in healthy South Africans and in patients from the United Kingdom and United States with documented exposure to NTM. Low level responses were detected to a cluster of proteins from the mammalian cell entry family, and to a cluster of hypothetical proteins, using ex vivo ELISpot and a 6 day proliferation assay. These early findings may provide a basis for characterising exposure to NTM at a population level, which has applications in the field of TB vaccine design as well as in the development of diagnostic tests.

  2. Physical and functional association of the cbl protooncogen product with an src-family protein tyrosine kinase, p53/56lyn, in the B cell antigen receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, T; Umemori, H; Fusaki, N; Yagi, T; Takata, M; Kurosaki, T; Yamamoto, T

    1996-02-01

    To identify novel signal transducers involved in signaling mediated by the Src-family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), we used a yeast two-hybrid system with a probe corresponding to the regulatory region of p56lyn, a member of Src-family PTKs. One of the isolated clones contained the COOH-terminal 470 amino acid residues of p120c-cbl, the product of the cellular homologue of the v-cbl retroviral oncogene. p120c-cbl is a cytoplasmic protein with nuclear protein-like motifs. Here we show in vivo association of p120c-cbl with p53/56lyn. After stimulation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), p120c-cbl was rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated. Studies with lyn- or syk-negative chicken B cells demonstrated that p53/56lyn, but not p72syk, was crucial for tyrosine phosphorylation of p120c-cbl upon stimulation of the BCR. We also show the importance of p59fyn in tyrosine phosphorylation of p120c-cbl in the T-cell receptor-mediated signaling using fyn-overexpressing T cell hybridomas and splenic T cells from fyn-deficient mice. These results suggest that p120c-cbl is an important substrate of Src-family PTKs in the intracellular signaling mediated by the antigen receptors PMID:8627181

  3. Combination of Circulating Tumor Cells with Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Enhances Clinical Prediction of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Xu Wang; Hua He; Ziling Liu; Ji-Fan Hu; Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and surveillance of lung cancer. However, CTC detection is not only costly, but its sensitivity is also low, thus limiting its usage and the collection of robust data regarding the significance of CTCs in lung cancer. We aimed to seek clinical variables that enhance the prediction of CTCs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical samples and pathological data were c...

  4. P48 Major Surface Antigen of Mycoplasma agalactiae Is Homologous to a malp Product of Mycoplasma fermentans and Belongs to a Selected Family of Bacterial Lipoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Rosati, Sergio; Pozzi, Sarah; Robino, Patrizia; Montinaro, Barbara; Conti, Amedeo; Fadda, Manlio; Pittau, Marco

    1999-01-01

    A major surface antigenic lipoprotein of Mycoplasma agalactiae, promptly recognized by the host's immune system, was characterized. The mature product, P48, showed significant similarity and shared conserved amino acid motifs with lipoproteins or predicted lipoproteins from Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, relapsing fever Borrelia spp., Bacillus subtilis, and Treponema pallidum.

  5. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    purified complexes of tumour-derived HSPs linked to tumour antigen peptides. When these HSPPC are readministered to a patient following surgery or biopsy of the tumour, the antigenic tumour peptides are expressed on the surface of potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. This stimulates a much more powerful anti-tumour immune response than that generated by expression of the same antigens by the tumour cell. Thus, Antigenics autologous HSP technology is attractive because it is highly specific for individual patients and circumvents the need for identification of specific antigens for individual cancers (i.e. it does not require definition of the antigenic epitopes on cancer cells) and it overcomes the immune tolerance associated with various tumours. Oncophage is manufactured in a 10-hour process from surgically resected autologous tumour. A minimum of 1-3g of tumour tissue is required to produce enough Oncophage for a course of treatment. The major limiting factor for producing Oncophage from a particular cancer is the ability to purify HSP from that cancer. From clinical studies to date, Antigenics has been able to produce HSP from 100, 98, 90, 71 and 30% of colorectal carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, gastric cancer and pancreatic cancer tumours, respectively. The low success rate with pancreatic cancers is because of the high concentration of proteases in that tissue type. HSPs are a family of highly conserved proteins present in the cells of all organisms. They function as molecular chaperones, assisting the correct folding of polypeptides and aiding intracellular protein transport. In addition, HSPs associate with a broad range of peptides derived from intracellular protein degradation, including antigenic peptides produced in tumour cells. Antigenics has exclusively licensed worldwide rights to its HSP immunotherapeutic complexes from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Fordham University in the USA. On

  6. Comparative evaluation of low-molecular-mass proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies members of the ESAT-6 family as immunodominant T-cell antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt, R L; Oettinger, T; Rosenkrands, I; Ravn, P; Brock, I; Jacobsen, S; Andersen, P

    2000-01-01

    tested in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from human tuberculosis (TB) patients, Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated donors, and nonvaccinated donors. The two ESAT-6 family members, TB10.4 and CFP10, were very strongly recognized and induced gamma interferon release at the same level (CFP10......) as or at an even higher level (TB10.4) than ESAT-6. The non-ESAT-6 family member, TB7.3, for comparison, was recognized at a much lower level. CFP10 was found to distinguish TB patients from BCG-vaccinated donors and is, together with ESAT-6, an interesting candidate for the diagnosis of TB. The...

  7. Identification of distant co-evolving residues in antigen 85C from Mycobacterium tuberculosis using statistical coupling analysis of the esterase family proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Baths, Veeky; Roy, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental goal in cellular signaling is to understand allosteric communication, the process by which signals originating at one site in a protein propagate reliably to affect distant functional sites. The general principles of protein structure that underlie this process remain unknown. Statistical coupling analysis (SCA) is a statistical technique that uses evolutionary data of a protein family to measure correlation between distant functional sites and suggests allosteric communication....

  8. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  9. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  10. Study of the structure and impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G-A, HLA-G-B, and HLA-G-DRB1 haplotypes in families with recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Steffensen, Rudi Nora; Nielsen, Henriette S;

    2010-01-01

    siblings suffering unexplained RM. Strong positive LD was detected between the G14bp ins and HLA-A*01, -A*11, -A*31, -B*08, and DRB1*03, whereas strong negative LD was found between G14bp ins and HLA-A*02, -A*03, and -A*24. The frequency of haplotypes with HLA-G14bp ins inherited from the mother was......A 14-base pair (bp) long insertion (ins)/deletion (del) polymorphism in exon 8 in the 3'-untranslated region of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene is suggested to affect transcription of the gene. Carriage of the G14bp ins is associated with low levels of soluble HLA-G and increases the risk...... of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Due to existence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the HLA region, the primary susceptibility genes for RM in the HLA-G region have not yet been identified. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, and -G14bp polymorphisms were investigated in 29 Caucasian families with two or more...

  11. Study of the structure and impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G-A, HLA-G-B, and HLA-G-DRB1 haplotypes in families with recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Steffensen, Rudi Nora; Nielsen, Henriette S;

    2010-01-01

    A 14-base pair (bp) long insertion (ins)/deletion (del) polymorphism in exon 8 in the 3'-untranslated region of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene is suggested to affect transcription of the gene. Carriage of the G14bp ins is associated with low levels of soluble HLA-G and increases the risk...... of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Due to existence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the HLA region, the primary susceptibility genes for RM in the HLA-G region have not yet been identified. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, and -G14bp polymorphisms were investigated in 29 Caucasian families with two or more...... siblings suffering unexplained RM. Strong positive LD was detected between the G14bp ins and HLA-A*01, -A*11, -A*31, -B*08, and DRB1*03, whereas strong negative LD was found between G14bp ins and HLA-A*02, -A*03, and -A*24. The frequency of haplotypes with HLA-G14bp ins inherited from the mother was...

  12. Histocompatibility antigen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common in certain autoimmune diseases . For example, HLA-B27 antigen is found in many people (but not ... More Ankylosing spondylitis Autoimmune disorders Bone marrow transplant HLA-B27 antigen Kidney transplant Reactive arthritis Update Date 2/ ...

  13. Characterization of Ewing sarcoma associated cancer/testis antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlendorf, Dorothea E.; Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from tumors of the Ewing family (EFT) is still poor. Immunotherapy strategies are pursued and EFT-specific antigens have to be identified as targets for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Due to the lack of expression of cancer/testis antigens (CTA) in normal tissues, these antigens are partially able to induce immune responses in cancer patients. Therefore, they are promising targets for immunotherapy. EFT are characterized by chromosomal rearrangements involv...

  14. Diagnostic utility of serum and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratin 19 fragments in patients with effusion from nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Kumar Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess the diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 (cytokeratin 19 fragments in serum and pleural fluid in non small cell lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion (MPE. Settings and Design: Two subsets of patients were recruited with lymphocytic exudative effusion, one subset constituted diagnosed patients of NSCLC with malignant pleural effusion and the other subset of constituted with Tubercular pleural effusion. Methods and Material : CYFRA 21-1 and CEA levels were measured using Electrochemilumiscence Immunoassay (ECLIA. The test principle used the Sandwich method. For both the tests, results are determined via a calibration curve which is instrument specifically generated by 2 - point calibration and a master curve provided via reagent barcode. Statistical Analysis Used: All data are expressed as means ± SD and percentage. All the parametric variables were analysed by student-t test where as non parametric variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U-test Statistical significance was accepted for P values < 0.05. Software used were SPSS 11.5, and MS excel 2007. In order to compare the performance of the tumor markers, receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were constructed and compared with area under the curve (AUC. The threshold for each marker was selected based on the best diagnostic efficacy having achieved equilibrium between sensitivity and specificity. Results: In cases serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 34.1 ± 29.9 with a range of 1.6-128.3 where as in controls serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.0 with a range of 0.5-4.7. In cases serum CEA levels had mean value of 24.9 ± 47.3 with a range of 1.0, 267.9 where as in controls serum CEA levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.4 with a range of 0.2-6.8. The difference in the means of serum CYFRA 21-l (P = 0.000 and CEA (P = 0.046 were statistically significant. In cases pleural fluid CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 160.1 ± 177.1 with a range of 5.4-517.2 where as in controls pleural fluid CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 15.9 ± 5.7 with a range of 7.2-29.6. In cases CEA pleural fluid levels had mean value of 89.8 ± 207.4 with a range of 1.0-861.2 where as in controls CEA levels had mean value of 2.5 ± 2.3 with a range of 1-8.9. The difference in the means of CYERA 21-1 (P = 0.001 between cases and controls is statistically significant. Conclusions: CYFRA21-1 (serum - pleural fluid is a sensitive marker for NSCLC with sensitivity of 96.7%, highest of any combination [Serum (CYFRA 21-1 - CEA. CEA (Serum + Pleural Fluid, Pleural Fluid (CYFRA 21-1 + CEA] and specificity of 77.8%. Levels of CYFRA21-l (serum + pleural fluid are increased in malignant pleural effusion, so it is better to be used in suspicious malignant pleural effusion showing negative cytology, particularly in the absence of a visible tumor and or unsuitability for invasive procedure.

  15. Antígeno carcinoembrionário no diagnóstico diferencial dos derrames pleurais Carcinoembryonic antigen in differential diagnosis of pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angelo Martins de Castro Junior

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a sensibilidade e a especificidade da dosagem do CEA no diagnóstico diferencial do derrame pleural de pacientes portadores de doenças benígnas e malígnas. MÉTODO: Estudo contemporâneo de série de casos, realizado do Serviço de Cirurgia Torácica do Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul. Entre julho de 2000 e julho de 2001, 64 pacientes foram submetidos à investigação etiológica de efusão pleural,e submetidos aos seguintes exames: pH, LDH, dosagem protêica, densidade, glicose, citologia diferencial, pesquisa de fungos e BAAR, gram e cultura com antibiograma, citopatologia, dosagem de CEA e biópsia pleural. RESULTADOS: Pacientes com derrames de etiologia maligna (n=26 tiveram resultado do CEA variando de zero a 5000ng/ml, enquanto nos de etiologia benígna os valores variaram de zero a 4,8ng/ml. Nível médio de CEA na efusão carcinomatosa foi de 431 ± 1237 ng/ml (média ± desvio padrão, significativamente maior que nos benignos (1,1 ± 1,0 ng/ml; pBACKGROUND: To analyze patients with diagnosis of benign or malignant diseases, in whose evolution develop pleural effusion, in which CEA measurement was questioned in relation to sensitivity and specificity in the differentiation of these two groups. METHODS: Prospective consecutive case series of the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Conceição Hospital, Porto Alegre, Brazil. From July 2000 to December 2001, 64 patients were subjected to clinical investigation in search for a pleural effusion aetiology. All patients underwent the following laboratory evaluation of pleural fluid: pH, LDH, proteins, density, glucose, differential cytology, bacterial culture, search for fungus and acid-fast bacilli, cytology, CEA determination and pleural biopsy. RESULTS: Patients with malignant etiologic diagnosis (n=26, had CEA results ranging from zero to 5000 ng/ ml, while benign cases results were from zero to 4.8 ng/ml. CEA level in malignant fluids was of 431 ± 1237 ng/ml (mean ± SE, significantly higher than benign fluids (1.1 ± 1.0 ng/ml; p< 0.001. Sensitivity, for a cut-off of 5 ng/ml, was 61.5% and specificity of 100%. CONCLUSION: We conclude that for patients with pleural effusion, CEA concentrations may represent an useful criteria to diagnosis.

  16. Diagnostic utility of pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen and CYFRA 21-1 in patients with pleural effusion: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Objective: To assess and compare the overall value of pleural fluid CEA and CYFRA 21-1 in differential diagnosis of pleural effusions with a meta-analysis. Methods: All the English and Chinese published studies for differential diagnosis of pleural effusions by pleural fluid CEA and CYFRA 21-1 were collected. Methodological quality of the included studies was then evaluated. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were calculated, the threshold effect and the possible sources of heterogeneity were also analyzed. SROC (summary receiver operating characteristic) was used to compare the differential diagnostic ability of pleural fluid CEA and CYFRA 21-1. Results: 19 studies were included in the meta-analysis, with a total of 3228 subjects. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 were 45.9%(43.2%- 48.5%),97.0%(96.0%-97.8%) and 47.3%(44.0%- 50.6%),91.8%(89.5%-93.7), respectively. Both CEA and CYFRA 21-1 have a threshold effect, the main source of heterogeneity was from variable assay methods. AUC (area under the curve) of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 were 0.7691 and 0.8213, respectively. There was no statistical significance between the AUC of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 (p>0.05). Conclusion: Both CEA and CYFRA 21-1 have good performance at differential diagnosis of pleural effusion, while compared with CEA, CYFRA 21-1 has no advantage. (author)

  17. Diagnostic utility of serum and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratin 19 fragments in patients with effusion from nonsmall cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sushil Kumar Sharma; Sanjay Bhat; Vikas Chandel; Mayank Sharma; Pulkit Sharma; Sakul Gupta; Sashank Sharma; Aijaz Ahmed Bhat

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To assess the diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 (cytokeratin 19 fragments) in serum and pleural fluid in non small cell lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Settings and Design: Two subsets of patients were recruited with lymphocytic exudative effusion, one subset constituted diagnosed patients of NSCLC with malignant pleural effusion and the other subset of constituted with Tubercular pleural effusion. Methods and Material : CYFRA 21-1 and CEA levels were measured us...

  18. Comparison of a new tumour marker CA 242 with CA 19-9, CA 50 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in digestive tract diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuusela, P.; Haglund, C.; Roberts, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    The levels of CA 242, a new tumour marker of carbohydrate nature, were measured in sera of 185 patients with malignancies of the digestive tract and of 123 patients with benign digestive tract diseases. High percentages of elevated CA 242 levels (greater than 20 U ml-1) were recorded in patients with pancreatic and biliary cancers (68%). The sensitivity was somewhat lower than that of CA 19-9 (76%) and CA 50 (73%). On the other hand, in benign pancreatic and biliary tract diseases the CA 242 ...

  19. Development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for detecting ovarian tumor-associated antigen fraction OCA in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian tumor-associated antigen isolated from human tumor tissue was shown to have a different mobility from that of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both acrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis in agarose. The ovarian tumor antigen is composed of six species with different electrophoretic mobility in acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three of these species were detected in Sephadex G-100 ovarian fraction OCA (from the void volume peak) and the other three species of lower apparent molecular weight were detected in fraction OCD (from the second peak). Fractions OCA and OCD did not share common antigenic determinants as determined by immunodiffusion. CEA was shown to share antigenic determinants with both OCA and OCD. A double-antibody radioimmunoassay capable of detecting nanogram quantities of plasma OCA was developed. In a preliminary study of ovarian cancer patients, OCA appeared to be a more sensitive marker for ovarian cancer than CEA. There was virtually no correlation (r2 = 0.1) between OCA and CEA levels in these patients, as determined by radioimmunoassay

  20. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Compte, Marta; Cuesta, Angel M; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Navarro, Rocio; Muñoz-Briones, Clara; Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Mølgaard, Kasper; Oliva, Baldo; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIE(XVIII)) we produced monospecific trimerbodies that were efficiently secreted as soluble functional proteins by mammalian cells. The purified VHH-TIE(XVIII) trimerbodies were trimeric in solution and exhibited excellent antigen binding capacity. Furthermore, by connecting with two additional glycine-serine-based linkers three VHH-TIE(XVIII) modules on a single polypeptide chain, we present an approach for the rational design of multispecific tandem trimerbodies with defined stoichiometry and controlled orientation. Using this technology we report here the construction and characterization of a tandem VHH-based trimerbody capable of simultaneously binding to three different antigens: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Multispecific tandem VHH-based trimerbodies were well expressed in mammalian cells, had good biophysical properties and were capable of simultaneously binding their targeted antigens. Importantly, these antibodies were very effective in inhibiting the proliferation of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Multispecific VHH-based trimerbodies are therefore ideal candidates for future applications in various therapeutic areas. PMID:27345490

  1. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. (Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  2. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins

  3. Intestinal Dysplasia Induced by Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Is Independent of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovics, Jennifer A.; Carroll, Patrick A.; Robles, M. Teresa Sáenz; Pope, Hannah; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Pipas, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing simian virus 40 large T antigen in enterocytes develop intestinal hyperplasia that progresses to dysplasia with age. Hyperplasia is dependent on T antigen binding to the retinoblastoma (pRb) family of tumor suppressor proteins. Mice expressing a truncated T antigen that inactivates the pRb-family, but is defective for binding p53, exhibit hyperplasia but do not progress to dysplasia. We hypothesized that the inhibition of the pRb family leads to entry of enterocytes into the cell cycle, resulting in hyperplasia, while inactivation of p53 is required for progression to dysplasia. Therefore, we examined T antigen/p53 complexes from the intestines of transgenic mice. We found that T antigen did not induce p53 stabilization, and we could not detect T antigen/p53 complexes in villus enterocytes. In contrast, T antigen expression led to a large increase in the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Furthermore, mice in which pRb was inactivated by a truncated T antigen in a p53 null background exhibited intestinal hyperplasia but no progression to dysplasia. These data indicate that loss of p53 function does not play a role in T antigen-induced dysplasia in the intestine. Rather, some unknown function of T antigen is essential for progression beyond hyperplasia. PMID:15919904

  4. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. PMID:24922567

  5. Antigen detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  6. Aspergillus antigen skin test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aspergillus antigen skin test determines whether or not a person has been exposed to the mold aspergillus. It is performed by injecting an aspergillus antigen under the skin with a needle. After 48 ...

  7. Immunoliposome-PCR: a generic ultrasensitive quantitative antigen detection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Junkun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accurate quantification of antigens at low concentrations over a wide dynamic range is needed for identifying biomarkers associated with disease and detecting protein interactions in high-throughput microarrays used in proteomics. Here we report the development of an ultrasensitive quantitative assay format called immunoliposome polymerase chain reaction (ILPCR that fulfills these requirements. This method uses a liposome, with reporter DNA encapsulated inside and biotin-labeled polyethylene glycol (PEG phospholipid conjugates incorporated into the outer surface of the liposome, as a detection reagent. The antigenic target is immobilized in the well of a microplate by a capture antibody and the liposome detection reagent is then coupled to a biotin-labeled second antibody through a NeutrAvidin bridge. The liposome is ruptured to release the reporter DNA, which serves as a surrogate to quantify the protein target using real-time PCR. Results A liposome detection reagent was prepared, which consisted of a population of liposomes ~120 nm in diameter with each liposome possessing ~800 accessible biotin receptors and ~220 encapsulated reporters. This liposome detection reagent was used in an assay to quantify the concentration of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA in human serum. This ILPCR assay exhibited a linear dose–response curve from 10-10 M to 10-16 M CEA. Within this range the assay coefficient of variance was Conclusions The ILPCR assay has several advantages over other immuno-PCR methods. The reporter DNA and biotin-labeled PEG phospholipids spontaneously incorporate into the liposomes as they form, simplifying preparation of the detection reagent. Encapsulation of the reporter inside the liposomes allows nonspecific DNA in the assay medium to be degraded with DNase I prior to quantification of the encapsulated reporter by PCR, which reduces false-positive results and improves quantitative accuracy. The ability to

  8. Physical and functional association of the cbl protooncogen product with an src-family protein tyrosine kinase, p53/56lyn, in the B cell antigen receptor-mediated signaling

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    To identify novel signal transducers involved in signaling mediated by the Src-family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), we used a yeast two- hybrid system with a probe corresponding to the regulatory region of p56lyn, a member of Src-family PTKs. One of the isolated clones contained the COOH-terminal 470 amino acid residues of p120c-cbl, the product of the cellular homologue of the v-cbl retroviral oncogene. p120c-cbl is a cytoplasmic protein with nuclear protein-like motifs. Here we show in v...

  9. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All About Food Allergies Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size What's in ... sample is used to determine if H. pylori antigens are present in your child's gastrointestinal (GI) system. ...

  10. The effects of Nigella sativa (Ns), Anthemis hyalina (Ah) and Citrus sinensis (Cs) extracts on the replication of coronavirus and the expression of TRP genes family

    OpenAIRE

    Ulasli, Mustafa; Gurses, Serdar A.; Bayraktar, Recep; Yumrutas, Onder; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Igci, Mehri; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Arslan, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Extracts of Anthemis hyalina (Ah), Nigella sativa (Ns) and peels of Citrus sinensis (Cs) have been used as folk medicine to fight antimicrobial diseases. To evaluate the effect of extracts of Ah, Ns and Cs on the replication of coronavirus (CoV) and on the expression of TRP genes during coronavirus infection, HeLa-CEACAM1a (HeLa-epithelial carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a) cells were inoculated with MHV-A59 (mouse hepatitis virus–A59) at moi of 30. 1/50 dilution of t...

  11. Immunoassay of antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described of immunoassay of an antigen in a liquid sample wherein a complex is formed between antigen contained in the said sample and two or more antibody reagents, and the said complex is bound to a solid support by non-covalent bonding as defined herein: and the amount of complex becoming bound to the support is determined; the process employing at least one monoclonal antibody reagent. Labelling methods including radioactive, fluorimetric and enzyme labelling may be used to effect determination of the binding ofthe complex to the solid support. The solid support may take the form of particles, beads, wall-coatings on the reaction vessel or an insert of large surface area. The method is particularly applicable to the assay of TSH, CEA, HCG, alphafeto protein, immunoglobulins, viruses, allergens, bacteria, toxins, drugs and vitamins. Use of monoclonal reagents improves the specificity of the process, and also decreases non-specific binding

  12. Mapping of B-Cell Epitopes on a Novel 11.5-Kilodalton Fasciola hepatica-Schistosoma mansoni Cross-Reactive Antigen Belonging to a Member of the F. hepatica Saposin-Like Protein Family

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Daricel; Espino, Ana M.

    2006-01-01

    FhSAP-2 is a novel member of the Fasciola hepatica saposin-like protein family that induces protection in rabbits against a challenge infection. We investigated the presence of lineal B-cell epitopes within this protein using a set of overlapping synthetic peptides. Peptides were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays against sera from rabbits infected with F. hepatica. Two dominant epitopes were identified, which were also highly reactive with sera from mice infected with Schistosoma m...

  13. A "new" primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) defined DP-antigen associated with a private HLA--DR antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Jakobsen, B K; Platz, P;

    1980-01-01

    We have recently described a "new" private HLA-DR antigen, DR"LTM", which has a frequency of approximately 0.6% in Danes. Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells directed towards DR"LTM"-associated determinants were generated in vitro by haplotype primings in two unrelated families with DR...... total agreement between the results obtained by HLA-DR typing with the antiserum "LTM" and by PLT-typing with these two haplotype primed PLT-cells. None of the DP"LTM"-positive individuals carried more than one of the antigens HLA-Dw/-DRw/DP1-8 and the local specificity D/DP"H". Accordingly, this "new......" PLT-defined antigen, DP"LTM", most probably belongs to the series of HLA-D/DR-associated DP-antigens previously described....

  14. Application of In Vivo Induced Antigen Technology (IVIAT) to Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Peppercorn, Amanda; Young, John S; Drysdale, Melissa; Baresch, Andrea; Bikowski, Margaret V.; Ashford, David A.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D.; Lyons, C. Rick; Koehler, Theresa M.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Rollins, Sean McKenzie; Calderwood, Stephen Beaven; Ryan, Edward Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase Nar...

  15. Human leucocyte antigens in tympanosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, G; Acar, A; Turgay, M; Calgüner, M

    1997-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between certain HLA antigens and tympanosclerosis. The serum concentrations of HLA antigens were measured by a microlymphocytotoxicity technique in patients with tympanosclerosis and compared with a healthy control group. The serum levels of HLA-B35 and -DR3 were significantly higher in the patients with tympanosclerosis. This result suggests that certain types of HLA antigens may play an important role as an indicator or mediator in the pathogenesis of tympanosclerosis. PMID:9088683

  16. Antigenic variants of rabies virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wiktor, TJ; Koprowski, H

    1980-01-01

    Antigenic variants of CVS-11 strain of rabies virus were selected after treatment of virus populations with monoclonal antibodies directed against the glycoprotein antigen of the virus. These variants resisted neutralization by the hybridoma antibody used for their selection. Two independently mutating antigenic sites could be distinguished when five variants were tested with nine hybridoma antibodies. The frequency of single epitope variants in a cloned rabies virus seed was approximately 1:...

  17. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pullorum antigen. 113.407 Section 113... and Reagents § 113.407 Pullorum antigen. Pullorum Antigen shall be produced from a culture of... standard for stained antigen K's and 50 ±10 times McFarland No. 1 standard for tube antigen....

  18. Myeloid antigens in childhood lymphoblastic leukemia:clinical data point to regulation of CD66c distinct from other myeloid antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madzo Jozef

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant expression of myeloid antigens (MyAgs on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells is a well-documented phenomenon, although its regulating mechanisms are unclear. MyAgs in ALL are interpreted e.g. as hallmarks of early differentiation stage and/or lineage indecisiveness. Granulocytic marker CD66c – Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 is aberrantly expressed on ALL with strong correlation to genotype (negative in TEL/AML1 and MLL/AF4, positive in BCR/ABL and hyperdiploid cases. Methods In a cohort of 365 consecutively diagnosed Czech B-precursor ALL patients, we analyze distribution of MyAg+ cases and mutual relationship among CD13, CD15, CD33, CD65 and CD66c. The most frequent MyAg (CD66c is studied further regarding its stability from diagnosis to relapse, prognostic significance and regulation of surface expression. For the latter, flow cytometry, Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR on sorted cells is used. Results We show CD66c is expressed in 43% patients, which is more frequent than other MyAgs studied. In addition, CD66c expression negatively correlates with CD13 (p Conclusion In contrast to general notion we show that different MyAgs in lymphoblastic leukemia represent different biological circumstances. We chose the most frequent and tightly genotype-associated MyAg CD66c to show its stabile expression in patients from diagnosis to relapse, which differs from what is known on the other MyAgs. Surface expression of CD66c is regulated at the gene transcription level, in contrast to previous reports.

  19. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T.; Tokunaga, K.; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H.; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M.

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decrease...

  20. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi: circulating antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bongertz

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating antigens were detected in sera of mice experimentally infected with a high close of Trypanosoma cruzi by reaction with sera from chronically infected mice. The immunodiffusion reaction between homologous acute and chronic sera produced four precipitation lines. By reaction with chronic mouse serum, circulating antingens were detected in sera from heavily infected hamsters, dogs, rabbits and in sera from chagasic patients. A reaction was also found in urine from acutely infected mice and dogs. Trypanosoma cruzi exoantigen was detected in trypanosome culture medium and in the supernatant of infected cell cultures. Attempts to isolate the antigens are described.Antígenos circulantes foram detectados em soros de camundongos infectados experimentalmente com elevadas doses de Trypanosoma cruzi pela reação com soros obtidos de camundongos em fase crônica de infecção. A reação de imunodifusão entre soros homólogos agudo e crônico produziu quatro linhas de precipitação. Por reação com soro crônico de camundongo antígenos circulantes foram detectados em soros de crícetos, cães e coelhos infectados com doses elevadas de Trypanosoma cruzi e em soros de pacientes chagásicos. Uma reação foi também observada com urina de camundongos e cães infectados de forma aguda. Exoantígeno de Trypanosoma cruzi foi detectado em meio de cultura de tripanosomas e em sobrenadantes de culturas de células infectadas. Tentativas de isolamento dos antigenos são descritas.

  2. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review addresses recently reported progress in cancer antigen 125 as a prognostic marker in patients with ovarian cancer. RECENT FINDINGS: Serum cancer antigen 125 levels measured preoperatively in both early and late stage ovarian cancer may be of prognostic value. Before...... cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value....... Furthermore, recent studies have shown that the level of expression of cancer antigen 125 in tissue may be an independent prognostic indicator in late stage ovarian cancer. SUMMARY: Prognostic markers may potentially help to individualize treatment within subgroups of patients. In a recent study the level of...

  3. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  4. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  5. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...

  6. Natural Selection Promotes Antigenic Evolvability

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P. D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed ‘cassettes...

  7. Anvendelse af prostataspecifikt antigen. En oversigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Skaarup, P; Roosen, Jens Ulrik; Iversen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Since it was first introduced, measurement of prostate specific antigen has gained increasing interest, and prostate specific antigen is regarded as being the best tumour marker available. The antigen lacks cancer specificity, limiting the usefulness in early diagnosis, The use of prostate specific...... antigen in early diagnosis, staging, and in monitoring patients with prostate cancer is reviewed....

  8. Structure and antigenicity of the phosphorylated lipopolysaccharide antigens from the leprosy and tubercle bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, S W; Gaylord, H; Brennan, P J

    1986-09-15

    A family of major arabinose- and mannose-containing phosphorylated lipopolysaccharides was isolated from Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The only antigenic member of the family, lipoarabinomannan (LAM)-B, was purified by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography in detergent and recovered in large quantities (15 mg/g of bacteria). It yielded a broad diffuse band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis but appeared homogeneous by this criterion and gel filtration. Besides arabinose and mannose, it contained glycerol and a polyol phosphate and was acylated by lactate, succinate, palmitate, and 10-methyloctadecanoate. The phosphate was released by alkalinolysis and identified by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as myoinositol 1-phosphate. Thus, the group-specific "arabinomannan" of the genus Mycobacterium in the native state is acylated, contains the substituents of phosphatidylinositol, and is apparently membrane associated. LAM-B is one of the dominant immunogens of the leprosy bacillus reacting readily with antibodies from lepromatous leprosy patients and monoclonal antibodies in plate and nitrocellulose enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and on electrophoretic immunoblots. It is immunologically cross-reactive with a like product from M. tuberculosis. LAM-B is clearly the pervasive "glycoprotein" antigen of the leprosy bacillus and may be the long sought lipoteichoic acid-like polymer of Mycobacterium with a role in cell wall physiology, macrophage recognition, and perhaps an involvement in cross-protective immunity. PMID:3091602

  9. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 07/ ... treatment become as overwhelming for others in your life as they are for you. Understanding the potential ...

  10. Family Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Disruptions Page Content Article Body No matter how ...

  11. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  12. Family Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  13. Family Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Family Meals KidsHealth > For Parents > Family Meals Print A ... even more important as kids get older. Making Family Meals Happen It can be a big challenge ...

  14. Familial hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000397.htm Familial hypertriglyceridemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a common disorder passed down through families. ...

  15. Shark Variable New Antigen Receptor (VNAR) Single Domain Antibody Fragments: Stability and Diagnostic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart Nuttall; Perugini, Matthew A.; Iveth González; Casey, Joanne L.; Abdulmonem Sanalla; Miles Barraclough; Con Dogovski; Julie Angerosa; Kathy Parisi; Olan Dolezal; Katherine Griffiths; Michael Foley

    2013-01-01

    The single variable new antigen receptor domain antibody fragments (VNARs) derived from shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor antibodies (IgNARs) represent some of the smallest known immunoglobulin-based protein scaffolds. As single domains, they demonstrate favorable size and cryptic epitope recognition properties, making them attractive in diagnosis and therapy of numerous disease states. Here, we examine the stability of VNAR domains with a focus on a family of VNARs specific for apica...

  16. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. PMID:22477566

  17. Localization of tumors by radiolabelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of utilizing radiolabelled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigens for determining the site of tumors which produce or are associated with carcinoembryonic antigen is disclosed. 3 claims, no drawings

  18. Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  19. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  20. Common Ewing sarcoma-associated antigens fail to induce natural T cell responses in both patients and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altvater, Bianca; Kailayangiri, Sareetha; Theimann, Nadine; Ahlmann, Martina; Farwick, Nicole; Chen, Christiane; Pscherer, Sibylle; Neumann, Ilka; Mrachatz, Gabriele; Hansmeier, Anna; Hardes, Jendrik; Gosheger, Georg; Juergens, Heribert; Rossig, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    Disseminated or relapsed Ewing sarcoma (EwS) has remained fatal in the majority of patients. A promising approach to preventing relapse after conventional therapy is to establish tumor antigen-specific immune control. Efficient and specific T cell memory against the tumor depends on the expansion of rare T cells with native specificity against target antigens overexpressed by the tumor. Candidate antigens in EwS include six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate-1 (STEAP1), and the human cancer/testis antigens X-antigen family member 1 (XAGE1) and preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME). Here, we screened normal donors and EwS patients for the presence of circulating T cells reactive with overlapping peptide libraries of these antigens by IFN-γ Elispot analysis. The majority of 22 healthy donors lacked detectable memory T cell responses against STEAP1, XAGE1 and PRAME. Moreover, ex vivo detection of T cells specific for these antigens in both blood and bone marrow were limited to a minority of EwS patients and required nonspecific T cell prestimulation. Cytotoxic T cells specific for the tumor-associated antigens were efficiently and reliably generated by in vitro priming using professional antigen-presenting cells and optimized cytokine stimulation; however, these T cells failed to interact with native antigen processed by target cells and with EwS cells expressing the antigen. We conclude that EwS-associated antigens fail to induce efficient T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated antitumor immune responses even under optimized conditions. Strategies based on TCR engineering could provide a more effective means to manipulating T cell immunity toward targeted elimination of tumor cells. PMID:24973179

  1. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hála, K.; Plachý, Jiří; Kaufman, J.

    New York : Academic Press, 1998 - (Pastoret, P.; Griebel, P.; Bazin, H.; Govaerts, A.), s. 92-95 ISBN 0-12-546401-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/96/0670 Keywords : chicken MHC * histocompatibility antigens * disease resistance Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Genome Scale Identification of Treponema pallidum Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    McKevitt, Matthew; Brinkman, Mary Beth; McLoughlin, Melanie; Perez, Carla; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Weinstock, George M.; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Antibody responses for 882 of the 1,039 proteins in the proteome of Treponema pallidum were examined. Sera collected from infected rabbits were used to systematically identify 106 antigenic proteins, including 22 previously identified antigens and 84 novel antigens. Additionally, sera collected from rabbits throughout the course of infection demonstrated a progression in the breadth and intensity of humoral immunoreactivity against a representative panel of T. pallidum antigens.

  3. Electrochemiluminescence immunosensing strategy based on the use of Au-Ag nanorods as a peroxidase mimic and NH4CoPO4 as a supercapacitive supporter: Application to the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The luminol-H2O2 system is widely applied in electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assays but has limited stability. We are presenting an alternative immunosensing strategy by making use of Au-Ag nanorods that mimic the enzyme peroxidase. It also makes use of the supercapacitive supporter NH4CoPO4 as a supporter substrate that facilitates ion movement due to its many nanogaps between the assembled nanoplates. It also plays a vital role for stabilizing the ECL signal of luminol. The immunosensor was constructed by first placing a chitosan film containing NH4CoPO4, Au-Ag and luminol on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and the immobilizing anti-CEA on its surface. ECL is generated via electrochemical reaction of luminol on the surface of the Au-Ag-luminol film in the presence of H2O2. The assay was evaluated with respect to effects of pH value, time and temperature of incubation, specificity, reproducibility, and stability in a lab setting. A linear relationship between ECL intensity and CEA concentration is found for the 0.1 pg · mL−1 to 380 ng · mL−1 range, and the lower detection limit is as low as 30 fg · mL−1. In our perception, this immunoassay has a large scope in that numerous other immunoassays will become feasible by using other antibodies and, possibly, aptamers. (author)

  4. Carcinoembryonal antigen (CEA): A comparison of the radio- and enzyme immunological determination with special consideration of the problem of a method-caused dependence of tumour localisations and CEA-values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the following questions: sensitivity and margin of measurement, preciseness, reference region, and practicability of the EIA. The comparability of the measured results of RIA and EIA was investigated on 1010 plasma specimens. Another goal was to find out if differing results measured in identical specimens are due to dependencies among the individual diagnosis groups. (orig./MG)

  5. Detection of O antigens in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipopolysaccharide on the surface of Escherichia coli constitute the O antigens, which are important virulence factors that are targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system and play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. O antigens that are responsible for antigenic specificity of the ...

  6. Plague virulence antigens from Yersinia enterocolitica.

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, P B; Zahorchak, R J; Brubaker, R R

    1980-01-01

    The virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica, biotype 2, serotype O:8, in mice is related to its ability to produce plague V and W antigens. V and W antigens in Y. enterocolitica are shown to be immunologically identical to the previously described V and W antigens of Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

  7. Molecular characterization of common treponemal antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanff, P A; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1983-01-01

    A molecular characterization of cross-reactive antigens of Treponema pallidum Nichols and Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter that are reactive with normal and syphilitic human sera is described. At least 8 common polypeptides, 14 T. pallidum-specific antigens, and 2 T. phagedenis biotype Reiter-specific antigens were identified.

  8. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid

  9. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000392.htm Familial hypercholesterolemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial hypercholesterolemia is a disorder that is passed down through ...

  10. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  11. Familial gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W. de Herder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial GH-secreting tumors are seen in association with three separate hereditary clinical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, Carney complex, and familial isolated pituitary adenomas.

  12. Radioprotective activity of shigella antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using experimental microbe antigenous preparation out of Flexner and Zonne shigellas as a protector and a remedy in the case of gamma irradiation, is investigated. The experiments are carried out on mice of both sexes immunized before or after irradiation by two methods: subcutaneously and enerally. It is found that in most cases investigated, the introduction of the experimental preparation 3, 5, 7 and 10 days before irradiation increases the survivability of animals

  13. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Juan [China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Shixia [China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States); Gan, Weihua [Department of Pediatrics, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Zhang, Wenhong [Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University (China); Ju, Liwen [School of Public Health, Fudan University (China); Huang, Zuhu [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Lu, Shan, E-mail: shan.lu@umassmed.edu [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  14. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. ► Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. ► Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. ► DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. ► Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  15. Cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 as an independent predictor for definitive chemoradiotherapy sensitivity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong-jiang; WANG Ren-ben; ZHU Kun-li; JIANG Shu-mei; ZHAO Wei; XU Xiao-qing; FENG Rui

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) seem to have a disparity in therapeutic response.The identification of CRT sensitivity-related clinicopathological factors would be helpful for selecting patients most likely to benefit from CRT.Cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA21-1) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been reported as useful tumor markers for esophageal cancer.The aim of this study was to examine the predictive value of CYFRA21-1 in comparison with CEA and other clinicopathological factors in patients with ESCC treated with definitive CRT.Methods Pretreatment serum CYFRA21-1 and CEA levels were measured by immunoradiometric assays.The relationships between pretreatment clinicopathological factors and the efficacy of CRT were analyzed.Overall survival (OS) was estimated by univariate and multivariate analysis.Results The results from a univariate analysis indicated that the efficacy of CRT was significantly associated with the serum levels of CYFRA21-1 and CEA before treatment (P=0.001 and P=0.023,respectively).It also indicated that the efficacy of CRT was significantly associated with the pretreatment tumor location (P=0.041).By Logistic regression analysis,the independent predictive factor associated with efficacy of CRT was CYFRA21-1 (P=0.002).The OS of the patients with high CYFRA 21-1 levels was worse than that of those with low CYFRA21-1 levels (P=0.001).In multivariate analysis,a low level of CYFRA21-1 was the most significant independent predictor of good OS (P=0.007).Conclusions CEA and tumor location may be useful in predicting the sensitivity of ESCC to CRT.CYFRA21-1 may be an independent predictor for definitive CRT sensitivity in ESCC.

  16. ANTIGENICITY OF COW'S MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Neyestani

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenicity of cow's milk proteins in two animal models and to recommend the more sensitivie one, as an evaluation tool, to assess the antigenicity of a poteintial hypoallergenic formula. A crude extract of cow's milk was injected either to young male rabbits or BALB/C mice in four doses. Pure standard proteins of cow's milk were also injected to separate groups of animals to use their anti sera in later stages. The polyclonal pooled serum was then used to evaluate the antigenicity of the extract by indirect enzyme-linked immunossorbeni assay (LEISA. and Western blotting. Both the rabbit and BALB/C murine mode! demonstrated strong ELISA titres against casein and BSA proteins. However, the rabbit model also had a high antibody response against beta-lactoglobulin (/Mg. The lowest antibody response was found against alpha-kictalbumin («-la in both animal models and no response against immunoglobulins (Igs in either model. In Western blotting, rabbit antiserum showed four bands («-la, /Mg, caseins and BSA compared to two bands (caseins and BSA for mouse antiserum. Considering the allergenicity of these proteins in genetically prone subjects, it may be wise to exclude food sources of caseins as well as major whey proteins (BSA, from the diet of infants with a family history of atopy during the first year of life. The rabbit hyperimmunization model was more sensitive than the murine mode! in detecting antibodies against milk proteins. Thus, the rabbii model should be employed when

  17. Family therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Altamash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Another major force not letting us succeed in the treatment of diabetes remains right inside the patients home, their family members. Hence, it is important to know the perception of the close family members about this simple and strong tool in diabetes, ′insulin′. The drug is nearing its century, it has not fully being accepted gracefully even in todays electronic savvy society. So, we need to strongly discover the reason for its non-acceptance, while trials are out inventing new drugs. One vital thing that can change this attitude is increasing the understanding of this drug, insulin in depth to close people around the patient, the ′family′. Underestimating family′s perception about disease and treatment for diabetes is detrimental to both diseased and the doctor. This consists of a biopsychosocial model; biological, psychological and social factors. Family forms the most important part of it. The strategies in family therapy include psychodynamic, structural, strategic, and cognitive-behavioral component. Diabetes has and will continue to rise, so will be the treatment options. From the clinicians side its to fix fasting first but from patients its fix family first. Family therapy demonstrates the importance of insulin initiation and maintenance in insulin naive patients, and continuation for others. The specific needs of such patients and their impact on family life are met with family therapy. Who needs family therapy? Benefits of family therapy and a case based approach is covered.

  18. Screening and characterization of early diagnostic antigens in excretory-secretory proteins from Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae by immunoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruo Dan; Jiang, Peng; Wen, Hui; Duan, Jiang Yang; Wang, Li Ang; Li, Jie Feng; Liu, Chun Ying; Sun, Ge Ge; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but specific IgG antibodies were not detected in early stage of infection. The aim of this study was to identify early diagnostic antigens from ES proteins of intestinal infective larvae (IIL), the first invasive stage of T. spiralis. Six bands (92, 52, 45, 35, 32, and 29 kDa) of IIL ES proteins were recognized by infection sera in Western blotting as early as 10 days post infection. Total of 54 T. spiralis proteins in six bands were identified by shotgun LC-MS/MS, 30 proteins were annotated, and 27 had hydrolase activity. Several proteins (serine protease, putative trypsin, deoxyribonuclease II family protein, etc.) could be considered as the potential early diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis. Our study provides new insights for screening early diagnostic antigens from intestinal worms of T. spiralis. PMID:26468148

  19. Family Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Kobrak

    2008-01-01

    As Mira Wilkins has argued, there is a curious disconnect between business and financial history. (Wilkins, 2003) Whereas business history literature has rediscovered the importance of family business in many countries and in many sectors of contemporary commercial life, for example, little has been written about family banking as an alternative to joint-stock, management-run financial institutions. This lacuna is odd for many reasons. First, family banking is one of the best-known examples o...

  20. My Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Everyone has a family.We live in it and feel very warm.There are three persons in my family,my mother,father and I.We live together very happily and there are many interesting stories about my family. My father is a hard-working man.He works as a doctor.He always tries his best to help every,patient and make patients comfortable.But sonetimes he works so hard

  1. Family Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    safety and flexibility at the level of multi-object systems. We are granted the flexibility of using different families of kinds of objects, and we are guaranteed the safety of the combination. This paper highlights the inability of traditional polymorphism to handle multiple objects, and presents family...... polymorphism as a way to overcome this problem. Family polymorphism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta, a generalized version of Beta, and the source code of this implementation is available under GPL....

  2. Family literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikke...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  3. Histocompatibility antigens on astrocytoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschberg, H.; Endresen, L I; Wikeby, P

    1982-01-01

    Biopsies tumour cells from astrocytoma-bearing patients were grown in primary culture for 3-5 days. Both low and high grade tumours were represented in the study. The cultured cells could be shown to express the HLA-A and -B antigens using a multispecific allo-antiserum and a rabbit anti-beta-2 microglobulin antibody. The tumour cells were negative for the HLA-DR determinants when tested with either rabbit anti-Ia-like antisera or specific anti-HLA-DR allo-antisera. They also failed to stimul...

  4. Merozoite Surface Antigen 2 Proteins of Babesia bovis Vaccine Breakthrough Isolates Contain a Unique Hypervariable Region Composed of Degenerate Repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Berens, Shawn J.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Molloy, John B.; Bock, Russell E.; Lew, Ala E.; McElwain, Terry F.

    2005-01-01

    The merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA-2) proteins of Babesia bovis are members of the variable merozoite surface antigen (VMSA) family that have been implicated in erythrocyte invasion and are important targets for antibody-mediated blocking of invasion. Extensive sequence variation in another VMSA member, MSA-1, has been shown in all vaccine breakthrough isolates. To test the hypothesis that the msa-2 genes of vaccine breakthrough isolates would also encode a diverse set of proteins, the comp...

  5. The antigenic properties of human prolactin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antigenic properties of human prolactin (HPr) were studied using various methods of radio-immuno assay. The homologous system, the difficulty of which resides in the preparation of the tracer, easily permits measurement of physiological levels. In this system, blood prolactin in the monkey has an antigenicity comparable with that of human prolactin, whereas growth hormone and human chorionic somatotropin have feeble or nil antigenic relationship with HPr. Human, sheep and pig prolactins have variable antigenic cross-reactions depending on the immune serum used. These antigenic cross reactions may be applied to the isolation of amniotic prolactin. Human blood prolactin has several components of different molecular weight, but antigenicity comparable with that of pituitary HPr

  6. The antigenicity of tobacco mosaic virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1999-01-01

    The antigenic properties of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been studied extensively for more than 50 years. Distinct antigenic determinants called neotopes and cryptotopes have been identified at the surface of intact virions and dissociated coat protein subunits, respectively, indicating that the quaternary structure of the virus influences the antigenic properties. A correlation has been found to exist between the location of seven to ten residue-long continuous epitopes in the TMV coa...

  7. Histocompatibility antigens in coal miners with pneumoconiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Soutar, C A; Coutts, I.; Parkes, W R; Dodi, I. A.; Gauld, S; Castro, J E; Turner-Warwick, M

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five histocompatibility antigens have been measured in 100 coal miners with pneumoconiosis attending a pneumoconiosis medical panel and the results compared with a panel of 200 normal volunteers not exposed to dust. Chest radiographs were read independently by three readers according to the ILO U/C classification. On a combined score, 40 men were thought to have simple pneumoconiosis and 60 men complicated pneumoconiosis. The number of antigens tested and associations between antigens ...

  8. Isolation of Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillyer, G. V.

    1980-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens were isolated from intact worms in the cold by using Nonidet P-40. Proof of the tegumental nature of the antigens was shown by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical technique at the light microscope level. The potential of F. hepatica tegument antigens for the immunodiagnosis of rabbit and human fascioliasis was shown by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion, although cross-reactivity was evident in one of six serum samples from patients infected with Schi...

  9. Antigenic contents of Treponema pallidum preparations.

    OpenAIRE

    Wos, S M; Wicher, K

    1986-01-01

    In investigations of syphilis various Treponema pallidum antigens are used to study the immune responses of naturally or experimentally infected hosts. In the past these antigen preparations have rarely been examined for their antigenic contents and activity. In the present study, supernatant, sediment, and solubilised preparations of T pallidum Nichols strain (20 X 10(9) organisms/ml) and T phagedenis biotype Reiter were examined by modified counterimmunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting fo...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0564 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available olecule 4 precursor [Homo sapiens] sp|O75871|CEAM4_HUMAN RecName: Full=Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell...055.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 4, isoform CRA_b [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI72306.1| Carcinoembryonic antige...CBRC-GGOR-01-0564 ref|NP_001808.2| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion m... adhesion molecule 4; AltName: Full=Carcinoembryonic antigen CGM7; AltName: Full=Non-specific cross-reacting antigen... W236; Flags: Precursor gb|AAC72273.1| CGM7_HUMAN [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW57

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-0669 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available olecule 8 precursor [Homo sapiens] sp|P31997|CEAM8_HUMAN RecName: Full=Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell...ecursor gb|AAC13659.1| CGM6_HUMAN [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH26263.1| Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesi...truct] gb|ABG46943.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 8 [Homo sapiens...] gb|EAW57144.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 8 [Homo sapiens...on molecule 8 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAX42540.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 8 [synthetic cons

  12. Family Potyviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  13. Familial Endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtblau, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Although it has been suspected that endometriosis has familial tendencies, systemic studies have not been conducted until relatively recently. The inheritence is not a monogenic, but rather a polygenic multi-factorial process. A case is presented and the clinical significance of the familial endometriosis is discussed.

  14. Urinary IgG antibody against mixed heat-killed coliform antigen and lipopolysaccharide core antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, A P; Edmond, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether antibody to lipopolysaccharide-core (LPS-core) antigen is an important component of the antibody, detected by mixed heat-killed coliform antigen, in urine from patients with suspected urinary tract infection. METHODS: LPS-core antigen and mixed heat-killed coliform antigen were used in an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure IgG antibody in midstream urine samples. Seventy two samples from students attending their general practitioner with symptoms s...

  15. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  16. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of two antigenically distinct O antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism pathogens use to avoid immune-mediated competition between closely related strains. Here, we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2 respectively). When 18 additional B. b...

  17. Association of Alport's syndrome with HLA-DR2 antigen in a group of unrelated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Donadi

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A few family studies have evaluated HLA antigens in Alport's syndrome; however, there are no large population studies. In the present report, we studied 40 unrelated white patients with Alport's syndrome seen at the Unit of Renal Transplantation, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were typed using a complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxicity assay. A control white population (N = 403 from the same geographical area was also typed for HLA antigens. Although the frequencies of HLA-A and -B antigens of patients were not statistically different from controls, the frequency of HLA-DR2 antigen observed in patients (65% was significantly increased in relation to controls (26%; P<0.001. The relative risk and etiologic fraction for HLA-DR2 antigen were 5.2 and 0.525, respectively. Although few immunological abnormalities have been shown in Alport's syndrome, in this report we emphasize the association of HLA molecules and Alport's syndrome. Besides the well-known inherited molecular defects encoded by type IV collagen genes in Alport's syndrome, the major histocompatibility alleles may be in linkage disequilibrium with these defective collagen genes

  18. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T; Tokunaga, K; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decreased as the age of onset increased, and no significant association was observed in adult-onset MG. No patients had B8, DR3, and DQw2. The relative risk was higher for the DR9/DRw13 heterozygotes (37.4) than for DR9 (16.4) or DRw13 (7.1) in the childhood-onset MG. Statistical analysis suggested that DR9 and DRw13 (or DQw1 and DQw3) act synergistically in the disease development. Family study revealed diverse DR9 haplotypes. The most frequent DRw13 haplotype was Bw44-BFF-C4A3B1-DRw13-DQw1, which may be evolutionarily related to the caucasian B8-DR3-DQw2 haplotype. These results showed that MG in early childhood in Japanese individuals is genetically different from that in adulthood and that in caucasians. Images PMID:1974553

  19. Taking advantage of the polymorphism of the MSA-2 family for Babesia bovis strain characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Merozoite Surface Antigen-2 (MSA-2) family of Babesia bovis is a group of variable genes which share conserved 5' and 3' conserved ends. These genes encode membrane anchored glycoproteins, named MSA-2a1, a2, b and c, which are immunodominant antigens located on the surface of sporozoites and mer...

  20. Editing of CD1d-Bound Lipid Antigens by Endosomal Lipid Transfer Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Dapeng; Cantu, Carlos; Sagiv, Yuval; Schrantz, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Qi, Xiaoyang; Mahuran, Don J.; Carlos R Morales; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Benlagha, Kamel; Savage, Paul; Bendelac, Albert; Teyton, Luc

    2003-01-01

    It is now established that CD1 molecules present lipid antigens to T cells, although it is not clear how the exchange of lipids between membrane compartments and the CD1 binding groove is assisted. We report that mice deficient in prosaposin, the precursor to a family of endosomal lipid transfer proteins (LTP), exhibit specific defects in CD1d-mediated antigen presentation and lack Vα14 NKT cells. In vitro, saposins extracted monomeric lipids from membranes and from CD1, thereby promoting the...

  1. FAMILY RHAGIONIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Charles Morphy D; Carmo, Daniel D D

    2016-01-01

    The family Rhagionidae is one of the oldest Brachyeran lineages. Its monophyly is still uncertain. There are four rhagionid genera distributed in Neotropical Region but only three species of Chrysopilus are found in Colombia. PMID:27395270

  2. Family matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Teasdale, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To relate illness and family factors to emotional and behavioural problems in school-age children (7–14 years old) of parents with acquired brain injury and their healthy spouses. PARTICIPANTS, MATERIALS/METHODS: Members of 35 families in which a parent had been diagnosed with acquired...... brain injury participated. Family and brain injury characteristics were reported by the ill and healthy parents. Children self-reported post-traumatic stress symptoms (PSS) using the Child Impact of Events revised (CRIES). Emotional and behavioural problems among the children were also identified by the...... parents using the Achenbach’s Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL). RESULTS: The family stress variables relating to the healthy spouse in all six comparisons were significant (p< = 0.05) or nearly so (p = 0.07) in each case showing higher scores for spouses to be associated with higher CRIES and CBCL total...

  3. CTdatabase: a knowledge-base of high-throughput and curated data on cancer-testis antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga; Sakabe, Noboru J; deOliveira, Alice R; Silva, Maria Cristina C; Mundstein, Alex S; Cohen, Tzeela; Chen, Yao-Tseng; Chua, Ramon; Gurung, Sita; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jungbluth, Achim A; Caballero, Otávia L; Bairoch, Amos; Kiesler, Eva; White, Sarah L; Simpson, Andrew J G; Old, Lloyd J; Camargo, Anamaria A; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R

    2009-01-01

    The potency of the immune response has still to be harnessed effectively to combat human cancers. However, the discovery of T-cell targets in melanomas and other tumors has raised the possibility that cancer vaccines can be used to induce a therapeutically effective immune response against cancer. The targets, cancer-testis (CT) antigens, are immunogenic proteins preferentially expressed in normal gametogenic tissues and different histological types of tumors. Therapeutic cancer vaccines directed against CT antigens are currently in late-stage clinical trials testing whether they can delay or prevent recurrence of lung cancer and melanoma following surgical removal of primary tumors. CT antigens constitute a large, but ill-defined, family of proteins that exhibit a remarkably restricted expression. Currently, there is a considerable amount of information about these proteins, but the data are scattered through the literature and in several bioinformatic databases. The database presented here, CTdatabase (http://www.cta.lncc.br), unifies this knowledge to facilitate both the mining of the existing deluge of data, and the identification of proteins alleged to be CT antigens, but that do not have their characteristic restricted expression pattern. CTdatabase is more than a repository of CT antigen data, since all the available information was carefully curated and annotated with most data being specifically processed for CT antigens and stored locally. Starting from a compilation of known CT antigens, CTdatabase provides basic information including gene names and aliases, RefSeq accession numbers, genomic location, known splicing variants, gene duplications and additional family members. Gene expression at the mRNA level in normal and tumor tissues has been collated from publicly available data obtained by several different technologies. Manually curated data related to mRNA and protein expression, and antigen-specific immune responses in cancer patients are also

  4. Review of Mycobacteriumavium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen candidates with diagnostic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    development of antibodies and shedding of detectable amounts of MAP. At present, available diagnostic assays are limited by the lack of MAP specific antigens included in these assays resulting in poor specificity. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic overview of diagnostic MAP antigen...... candidates described to date with special emphasis on antigen candidates tested for CMI responses. Relevant information on 115 different MAP antigens was systematically extracted from literature and summarized in 6 tables of CMI antigens, secreted antigens, cell wall and membrane antigens, lipoprotein...... antigens, heat shock antigens and hypothetical antigens. Strategies for evaluation of novel antigen candidates are discussed critically. Relatively few of the described antigens were evaluated for their use in CMI based diagnostic assays and so far, no obvious candidate has been identified for this...

  5. Further characterization of filarial antigens by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Dissanayake, S.; Galahitiyawa, S. C.; Ismail, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of an antigen isolated from sera of Wuchereria bancrofti-infected patients and Setaria digitata antigen SD2-4 is reported. Both antigens showed carbohydrate (glycoprotein) staining. The W. bancrofti antigen had an apparent relative molecular mass of 35 000 while the S. digitata antigen SD2-4 migrated at the marker dye position on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. SDS treatment of these antigens did not abolish the precipita...

  6. Family welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, N K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1901-1921, India gained 12.9 million people because mortality remained high. The death rate fell between 1921-1951, but birth rates remained the same. Therefore 110 million people were added--2 times the population increase between 1891-1921. Between 1951-1981, the population increased to 324 million. Socioeconomic development was responsible for most of the downward trend in the birth rate during the 20th century. Even though large families were the norm in early India, religious leaders encouraged small family size. The 1st government family planning clinics in the world opened in Mysore and Bangalore in 1930. Right before Independence, the Bhore Committee made recommendations to reduce population growth such as increasing the age of marriage for girls. Since 1951 there has been a change in measures and policies geared towards population growth with each of the 7 5-Year Plans because policy makers applied what they learned from each previous plan. The 1st 5-Year Plan emphasized the need to understand what factors contribute to population growth. It also integrated family planning services into health services of hospitals and health centers. The government was over zealous in its implementation of the sterilization program (2nd 5-Year Plan, 1956-1961), however, which hurt family planning programs for many years. As of early 1992, sterilization, especially tubectomy, remained the most popular family planning method, however. The 7th 5-Year Plan changed its target of reaching a Net Reproductive Rate of 1 by 2001 to 2006-2011. It set a goal of 100% immunization coverage by 1990 but it did not occur. In 1986, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare planned to make free contraceptives available in urban and rural areas and to involve voluntary organizations. The government needs to instill measures to increase women's status, women's literacy, and age of marriage as well as to eliminate poverty, ensure old age security, and ensure child survival and

  7. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A.; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Crispe, I. Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nano-scale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The con...

  8. Barriers to antigenic escape by pathogens: trade-off between reproductive rate and antigenic mutability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bush Robin M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single measles vaccination provides lifelong protection. No antigenic variants that escape immunity have been observed. By contrast, influenza continually evolves new antigenic variants, and the vaccine has to be updated frequently with new strains. Both measles and influenza are RNA viruses with high mutation rates, so the mutation rate alone cannot explain the differences in antigenic variability. Results We develop a new hypothesis to explain antigenic stasis versus change. We first note that the antigenically static viruses tend to have high reproductive rates and to concentrate infection in children, whereas antigenically variable viruses such as influenza tend to spread more widely across age classes. We argue that, for pathogens in a naive host population that spread more rapidly in younger individuals than in older individuals, natural selection weights more heavily a rise in reproductive rate. By contrast, pathogens that spread more readily among older individuals gain more by antigenic escape, so natural selection weights more heavily antigenic mutability. Conclusion These divergent selective pressures on reproductive rate and antigenic mutability may explain some of the observed differences between pathogens in age-class bias, reproductive rate, and antigenic variation.

  9. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens

  10. Family therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh Altamash

    1987-01-01

    Another major force not letting us succeed in the treatment of diabetes remains right inside the patients home, their family members. Hence, it is important to know the perception of the close family members about this simple and strong tool in diabetes, ′insulin′. The drug is nearing its century, it has not fully being accepted gracefully even in todays electronic savvy society. So, we need to strongly discover the reason for its non-acceptance, while trials are out inventing new drugs. One ...

  11. Family business

    OpenAIRE

    KLUZÁKOVÁ, Lucie

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on family business companies and above all on their problem of succession planning. For the purposes of this work, I have chosen a family business company that is owned by two shareholders. Both shareholders are going to leave the company within next 5 to 10 years. The thesis deals with the succession plan of both shareholders and this concerning the rate of preparedness as well as the rate of coordination of both plans. Prior to the research, two hypotheses were fixed. Th...

  12. Plasmodium falciparum variant STEVOR antigens are expressed in merozoites and possibly associated with erythrocyte invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petter Michaela

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum STEVOR proteins, encoded by the multicopy stevor gene family have no known biological functions. Their expression and unique locations in different parasite life cycle stages evoke multiple functionalities. Their abundance and hypervariability support a role in antigenic variation. Methods Immunoblotting of total parasite proteins with an anti-STEVOR antibody was used to identify variant antigens of this gene family and to follow changes in STEVOR expression in parasite populations panned on CSA or CD36 receptors. Immunofluorescence assays and immunoelectron microscopy were performed to study the subcellular localization of STEVOR proteins in different parasite stages. The capacity of the antibody to inhibit merozoite invasion of erythrocytes was assessed to determine whether STEVOR variants were involved in the invasion process. Results Antigenic variation of STEVORs at the protein level was observed in blood stage parasites. STEVOR variants were found to be present on the merozoite surface and in rhoptries. An insight into a participation in erythrocyte invasion was gained through an immunofluorescence analysis of a sequence of thin slides representing progressive steps in erythrocyte invasion. An interesting feature of the staining pattern was what appeared to be the release of STEVORs around the invading merozoites. Because the anti-STEVOR antibody did not inhibit invasion, the role of STEVORs in this process remains unknown. Conclusion The localization of STEVOR proteins to the merozoite surface and the rhoptries together with its prevalence as a released component in the invading merozoite suggest a role of these antigens in adhesion and/or immune evasion in the erythrocyte invasion process. These observations would also justify STEVORs for undergoing antigenic variation. Even though a role in erythrocyte invasion remains speculative, an association of members of the STEVOR protein family with

  13. Familial hyperaldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowasser, M; Gordon, R D

    2001-09-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PAL) may be as much as ten times more common than has been traditionally thought, with most patients normokalemic. The study of familial varieties has facilitated a fuller appreciation of the nature and diversity of its clinical, biochemical, morphological and molecular aspects. In familial hyperaldosteronism type I (FH-I), glucocorticoid-remediable PAL is caused by inheritance of an ACTH-regulated, hybrid CYP11B1/CYP11B2 gene. Genetic testing has greatly facilitated diagnosis. Hypertension severity varies widely, demonstrating relationships with gender, affected parent's gender, urinary kallikrein level, degree of biochemical disturbance and hybrid gene crossover point position. Analyses of aldosterone/PRA/cortisol 'day-curves' have revealed that (1) the hybrid gene dominates over wild type CYP11B2 in terms of aldosterone regulation and (2) correction of hypertension in FH-I requires only partial suppression of ACTH, and much smaller glucocorticoid doses than those previously recommended. Familial hyperaldosteronism type II is not glucocorticoid-remediable, and is clinically, biochemically and morphologically indistinguishable from apparently sporadic PAL. In one informative family available for linkage analysis, FH-II does not segregate with either the CYP11B2, AT1 or MEN1 genes, but a genome-wide search has revealed linkage with a locus in chromosome 7. As has already occurred in FH-I, elucidation of causative mutations is likely to facilitate earlier detection of PAL and other curable or specifically treatable forms of hypertension. PMID:11595502

  14. Familial hyperamylasemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koda Yu Kar Ling

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family members were normal in his father and maternal grandmother but elevated in his mother, sister, maternal aunt, and uncle, all of whom asymptomatic. Macroamylasemia was excluded in the child and in the mother. The finding of persistently elevated amylasemia in the child and in the other family members spanning 3 generations, and the exclusion of diseases that lead to hyperamilasemia are consistent with the diagnosis of familial hyperamylasemia. Until now, only 1 similar case has been reported. Familial hyperamylasemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemias in childhood.

  15. Familial hyperamylasemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Yu Kar Ling; Vidolin, Eliana

    2002-01-01

    A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family members were normal in his father and maternal grandmother but elevated in his mother, sister, maternal aunt, and uncle, all of whom asymptomatic. Macroamylasemia was excluded in the child and in the mother. The finding of persistently elevated amylasemia in the child and in the other family members spanning 3 generations, and the exclusion of diseases that lead to hyperamilasemia are consistent with the diagnosis of familial hyperamylasemia. Until now, only 1 similar case has been reported. Familial hyperamylasemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemias in childhood. PMID:11981589

  16. Family Genericity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Type abstraction in object-oriented languages embody two techniques, each with its own strenghts and weaknesses. The first technique is extension, yielding abstraction mechanisms with good support for gradual specification. The prime example is inheritance. The second technique is functional abst...... designate the result as family genericity. The presented language design has been implemented....

  17. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risky behaviors (such as smoking) and increasing healthy behaviors (such as regular exercise). Learn more about heart attacts. Q: How can knowing my family health history help lower my risk of disease? A: You ... you can change behaviors that affect your health, such as smoking, inactivity ...

  18. Family Hypnotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  19. Family Circle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Foster care is conducive to giving orphaned children a better life For most children living in orphanages, having a real home is just a pipe dream. Although they may be well looked after, receive a good education and proper nutrition, the love and care that come from being part of a real family just aren't there.

  20. Antigen delivery to macrophages using liposomal nanoparticles targeting sialoadhesin/CD169.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihsu C Chen

    Full Text Available Sialoadhesin (Sn, Siglec-1, CD169 is a member of the sialic acid binding Ig-like lectin (siglec family expressed on macrophages. Its macrophage specific expression makes it an attractive target for delivering antigens to tissue macrophages via Sn-mediated endocytosis. Here we describe a novel approach for delivering antigens to macrophages using liposomal nanoparticles displaying high affinity glycan ligands of Sn. The Sn-targeted liposomes selectively bind to and are internalized by Sn-expressing cells, and accumulate intracellularly over time. Our results show that ligand decorated liposomes are specific for Sn, since they are taken up by bone marrow derived macrophages that are derived from wild type but not Sn(-/- mice. Importantly, the Sn-targeted liposomes dramatically enhance the delivery of antigens to macrophages for presentation to and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells. Together, these data provide insights into the potential of cell-specific targeting and delivery of antigens to intracellular organelles of macrophages using Sn-ligand decorated liposomal nanoparticles.

  1. Usefulness of cancer-testis antigens as biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frezza Eldo E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite advances in our cellular and molecular knowledge, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains one of the major public health problems throughout the world. It is now known to be highly heterogeneous: it encompasses various pathological entities and a wide range of clinical behaviors, and is underpinned by a complex array of gene alterations that affect supra-molecular processes. Four families of HCC tumour markers have been recently proposed: a onco-fetal and glycoprotein antigens; b enzymes and iso-enzymes; c cytokines and d genes. A category of tumour-associated antigens called cancer-testis (CT antigens has been identified and their encoding genes have been extensively investigated. CT antigens are expressed in a limited number of normal tissues as well as in malignant tumors of unrelated histological origin, including the liver. Given that cancers are being recognized as increasingly complex, we here review the role of CT antigens as liver tumour biomarkers and their validation process, and discuss why they may improve the effectiveness of screening HCC patients and help in determining the risk of developing HCC.

  2. The use of a synthetic antigen for the serological diagnosis of human trichinellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruschi F.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Hosts infected with Trichinella produce antibodies specific for an epitope common to the TSL-1 family antigens. This epitope contained uncommon terminal 3, 6-dideoxy-D-arabinohexose (so called tyvelose residues. The disaccharide moiety was synthesized and an immunodiagnostic assay was developed, which was specific and sensitive in swine trichinellosis. We aimed to verify the specificity and sensitivity of this immunodiagnostic test in human trichinellosis. 15 sera from normal subjects, 12 from patients with other parasitic diseases and 50 from trichinellosis patients were tested. Indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for specific IgG and an amplified ELISA for specific IgE were performed using β-tyvelose-GalNAc-bovine serum albumin (BSA disaccharide conjugate or T. spiralis muscle larvae excretory/secretory (E/S products, as antigens. Neither control sera nor other parasitic infection sera resulted positive both for IgG and IgE when synthetic or E/S antigens were used. In trichinellosis patient sera, specific IgG were present in 100 % of cases, irrespective of the antigen used, but whereas specific IgE were detected in 78 % using E/S antigens, a 100% positivity rate was obtained, using the β-tyvelose- BSA conjugate.

  3. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  4. MYELIN ANTIGEN LOAD INFLUENCES ANTIGEN PRESENTATION AND SEVERITY OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AUTOIMMUNITY

    OpenAIRE

    Jaini, Ritika; Popescu, Daniela C.; Flask, Chris A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to understand the impact of self-antigen load on manifestation of organ specific autoimmunity. Using a transgenic mouse model characterized by CNS hypermyelination, we show that larger myelin content results in greater severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis attributable to an increased number of microglia within the hypermyelinated brain. We conclude that a larger self-antigen load affects an increase in number of tissue resident antigen presenting cells...

  5. MYCN: From Oncoprotein To Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePistoia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor and small cell lung cancer. In the case of neuroblastoma (NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is CMYC that show a high degree of homology. Downregulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets.Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, i expression should be tumor-restricted, ii the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells and iii protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to MHC molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and upregulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or –A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB.Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and will be here discussed are the following, i the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA- class I molecules, the lack of costimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and ii the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the strategy used to generate

  6. Pregnancy-specific glycoprotein function, conservation and receptor investigation

    OpenAIRE

    O'Riordan, Ronan T

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are highly glycosylated secreted proteins encoded by multi-gene families in some placental mammals. They are carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family and immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily members. PSGs are immunomodulatory, and have been demonstrated to possess antiplatelet and pro-angiogenic properties. Low serum levels of these proteins have been correlated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Objectives: Main research goals of this thesis were: 1). To attempt...

  7. Structure and evolution of the mouse pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) gene locus

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura Katsuzumi; Ball Melanie; Wynne Freda; Hori Tomomi; Dveksler Gabriela; Fischer Beate; McLellan Andrew S; Moore Tom; Zimmermann Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) genes encode proteins of unknown function, and are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (Cea) gene family, which is a member of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig) superfamily. In rodents and primates, but not in artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates / hoofed mammals), there have been independent expansions of the Psg gene family, with all members expressed exclusively in placental trophoblast cells. For the mouse Psg genes, we sought to d...

  8. Murine Pregnancy-Specific Glycoprotein 23 Induces the Proangiogenic Factors Transforming-Growth Factor Beta 1 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A in Cell Types Involved in Vascular Remodeling in Pregnancy1

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Julie A.; Johnson, Briana L.; Chen, Yongqing; Ha, Cam T.; Dveksler, Gabriela S.

    2008-01-01

    Haemochorial placentation is a unique physiological process in which the fetal trophoblast cells remodel the maternal decidual spiral arteries to establish the fetoplacental blood supply. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family. PSGs are produced by the placenta of rodents and primates and are secreted into the bloodstream. PSG23 is one of 17 members of the murine PSG family (designated PSG16 to PSG32). Previous studies determined that PSGs h...

  9. Tales of Antigen Evasion from CAR Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Both T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors and tumor-specific antibodies can successfully target some malignancies, but antigen escape can lead to relapse. Two articles in this issue of Cancer Immunology Research explore what effective countermeasures may prevent it. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 473-473. ©2016 AACRSee articles by Zah et al., p. 498, and Rufener et al., p. 509. PMID:27252092

  10. Antigen detection for human immunodeficiency virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Harry, D J; Jennings, M B; Yee, J.; Carlson, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of enzyme immunoassay procedures for the direct determination of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens has been of significant benefit in both clinical and research applications. The historical development of HIV antigen assays as well as their current and future applications for use in the clinical microbiology laboratory are reviewed. A detailed description of selected commercially available assays is presented, and a comparison is made of various parameters, in...

  11. Characterization of an antigenically distinct porcine rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, J C; Clarke, I. N.; McCrae, M A

    1982-01-01

    A porcine virus with rotavirus morphology, which was antigenically unrelated to previously described rotaviruses, is described. Particles with an outer capsid layer measured 75 nm and those lacking the outer layer were 63 nm in diameter. Particles which resembled cores were also identified. The virus was shown to be antigenically distinct from other rotaviruses as judged by immunofluorescence and immune electron microscopy, and it failed to protect piglets from challenge with porcine rotaviru...

  12. Antigenic variation in vector-borne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, A. G.; Restrepo, B I

    2000-01-01

    Several pathogens of humans and domestic animals depend on hematophagous arthropods to transmit them from one vertebrate reservoir host to another and maintain them in an environment. These pathogens use antigenic variation to prolong their circulation in the blood and thus increase the likelihood of transmission. By convergent evolution, bacterial and protozoal vector-borne pathogens have acquired similar genetic mechanisms for successful antigenic variation. Borrelia spp. and Anaplasma marg...

  13. Qualitative and quantitative determination of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) with monoclonal antibodies: expression of ECA by two Actinobacillus species.

    OpenAIRE

    Böttger, E C; Jürs, M; Barrett, T; Wachsmuth, K; Metzger, S.; Bitter-Suermann, D

    1987-01-01

    The presence and quantity of the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) in several species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae as well as to other gram-negative families were determined by a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system and Western blotting by using mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for ECA. Except for Erwinia chrysanthemi, previously known to be an exception, all species known or presumed to belong to Enterobacteriaceae produced ECA (89 of 90 species). Most sp...

  14. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic -cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, A;

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis and the...

  15. Architecture of the DNA polymerase B-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-DNA ternary complex

    OpenAIRE

    Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Nishida, Hirokazu; Saito, Mihoko; Kohda, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication in archaea and eukaryotes is executed by family B DNA polymerases, which exhibit full activity when complexed with the DNA clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). This replication enzyme consists of the polymerase and exonuclease moieties responsible for DNA synthesis and editing (proofreading), respectively. Because of the editing activity, this enzyme ensures the high fidelity of DNA replication. However, it remains unclear how the PCNA-complexed enzyme temporally ...

  16. Antigen detection of rabies virus in brain smear using direct Rapid Immunohistochemistry Test

    OpenAIRE

    Damayanti R; Rahmadani I; Fitria Y

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is zoonotic disease caused by a fatal, neurotropic virus. Rabies virus is classified into the Genus of Lyssavirus under the yang family of Rhabdoviridae. Rabies affecting hot- blooded animals, as well as human. Dogs, cats, monkeys are the vectors or reservoirs for rabies and the virus was transmitted through the saliva after infected animal’s bites. The aim of this study was to conduct rapid diagnosis to detect rabies viral antigen in brain smear using immunohistochemical (IHC) method ...

  17. FAMILY BOMBYLIIDAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Carlos José Einicker; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    Bombyliidae is one of the largest Diptera families with more than 4,500 recognized species worldwide. Their species vary from robust to thin, and may be small to large (2-20mm) and looks like bees or wasps. They also present great variation in color. Adults can often be seen either resting and sunning themselves on trails, rocks or twigs or feeding on flowering plants as they are nectar feeders. All reared bee flies are predators or parasitoids of arthropods. The Colombian fauna of bombyliids comprises at the moment 22 species, and 12 genera, of which, six are endemic species. Nonetheless, this number may be much higher, as Colombia is a megadiverse country and there are not many specimens of this family deposited in collections all over the world. PMID:27395279

  18. Familial paragangliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lips CJM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Paragangliomas are rare tumours of the autonomic nervous system and occur in sporadic and hereditary forms. They are usually benign and have a low mortality. However, they cause significant morbidity related to their mass effect. Genetic predisposition can occur within the familial tumour syndromes multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1, or be due to mutations in genes specific to the development of paraganglioma only. Compared to sporadic forms, familial paragangliomas tend to present at a younger age and at multiple sites. Tumours should be diagnosed and resected as early as possible, as it has been shown that morbidity is related to tumour size. This article gives an overview of the current literature on the origin of the different forms of paragangliomas, DNA diagnosis, as well as biochemical and radiological screening guidelines.

  19. Familial hyperamylasemia

    OpenAIRE

    Koda Yu Kar Ling; Vidolin Eliana

    2002-01-01

    A 7-year-old white boy was referred to us with a history of 3 attacks of hypogastric pain over the previous 2 years and persistently elevated serum amylase concentrations. At physical examination, he was well with no evidence of clinical abnormalities. His weight and height were normal. Laboratory diagnostic investigations were all normal except for the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides in the feces and persistently elevated serum amylase levels. Serum amylase determinations in the family memb...

  20. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lahiri Koushik; Lahiri Bhabesh Chandra

    2001-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in...

  1. Antigenic scheme for Citrobacter koseri (syn. C. diversus, Levinea malonatica); three new antigens recognized in strains from Israel.

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, R. J.; Rowe, B; Sechter, I; Cahan, D.; Altman, G.

    1981-01-01

    An antigenic scheme for Citrobacter koseri was described previously and consisted of 14 'O' antigens. Three additional antigens are now added to the scheme and type strains for these antigens are designated. Their origins and their biochemical and serological reactions are described.

  2. Impact of antigenic diversity on laboratory diagnosis of Avian bornavirus infections in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Vanessa; Rinder, Monika; Kaspers, Bernd; Staeheli, Peter; Rubbenstroth, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    Avian bornaviruses (ABVs) are a group of genetically diverse viruses within the Bornaviridae family that can infect numerous avian species and represent the causative agents of proventricular dilatation disease, an often fatal disease that is widely distributed in captive populations of parrots and related species. The current study was designed to assess the antigenic variability of the family Bornaviridae and to determine its impact on ABV diagnosis by employing fluorescent antibody assays. It was shown that polyclonal rabbit sera directed against recombinant bornavirus nucleoprotein, X protein, phosphoprotein, and matrix protein provided sufficient cross-reactivity for the detection of viral antigen from a broad range of bornavirus genotypes grown in cell culture. In contrast, a rabbit anti-glycoprotein serum and 2 monoclonal antibodies directed against nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein proteins reacted more specifically. Antibodies were readily detected in sera from avian patients infected with known ABV genotypes if cells persistently infected with a variety of different bornavirus genotypes were used for analysis. For all sera, calculated antibody titers were highest when the homologous or a closely related target virus was used for the assay. Cross-reactivity with more distantly related genotypes of other phylogenetic groups was usually reduced, resulting in titer reduction of up to 3 log units. The presented results contribute to a better understanding of the antigenic diversity of family Bornaviridae and further emphasize the importance of choosing appropriate diagnostic tools for sensitive detection of ABV infections. PMID:25135010

  3. Development of tools to target antigen through mannose receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Zaigham

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are unique antigen presenting cells which play a major role in antigen presentation and initiation of the immune response by regulating B- and T- cell activation. Antigen targeting to DC receptors is an effective, safe and specific method for vaccine development. The mannose receptor (MR) is an endocytic receptor expressed by subpopulations of DC and antigen targeting through MR leads to enhanced antigen uptake and presentation to T -cells. This makes MR a favourite recep...

  4. PLAP efficiently generates mature antigenic peptides in vitro but in patterns distinct from ERAP11

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiadou, Dimitra; Hearn, Arron; Evnouchidou, Irini; Chroni, Angeliki; Leondiadis, Leondios; Ian A York; Rock, Kenneth L.; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2010-01-01

    All three members of the oxytocinase sub-family of M1 aminopeptidases, ERAP1 (ERAAP), ERAP2 and PLAP (IRAP), have been implicated in the generation of MHC class I-presented peptides. ERAP1 and 2 trim peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum for direct presentation whereas PLAP has been recently implicated in cross presentation. The best characterized member of the family, ERAP1, has unique enzymatic properties that fit well with its role in antigen processing. ERAP1 can trim a large variety of l...

  5. Characteristics of family firms with family management

    OpenAIRE

    Søndergaard, Kathrine Lærke; Almli, Line Floan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine what characterizes family firms’ decisions when it comes to having a family member being the CEO or the chairman of the board of the company. We define this as family management, which is the dependent variable in our research. This variable has four non-ordered mutually exclusive values; family CEO, family chairman of the board, family CEO and family chairman of the board, and neither family CEO nor family chairman of the board. Using data from the Center for Corpora...

  6. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines. PMID:26928033

  7. Use of novel recombinant antigens in the interferon gamma assay for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, C.; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    of the study were to evaluate immunogenicity and specificity of 14 novel recombinant antigens for use in the IFN-¿ assay and to assess the consistency of IFN-¿ responses with repeated samplings. The antigens used were 4 ESAT-6 family members, 4 latency proteins, 4 secreted proteins including Ag85B, 3...... were positive to PPDj were non-cases and one case was negative to PPDj but positive to all other tested antigens. Furthermore, PPDj produced elevated IFN-¿ responses in both the infected and non-infected herds and showed low consistency. Immunogenicity was highest for the group of latency proteins (0...

  8. Antigen sampling in the fish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løkka, Guro; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Antigen uptake in the gastrointestinal tract may induce tolerance, lead to an immune response and also to infection. In mammals, most pathogens gain access to the host though the gastrointestinal tract, and in fish as well, this route seems to be of significant importance. The epithelial surface faces a considerable challenge, functioning both as a barrier towards the external milieu but simultaneously being the site of absorption of nutrients and fluids. The mechanisms allowing antigen uptake over the epithelial barrier play a central role for maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and regulate appropriate immune responses. Such uptake has been widely studied in mammals, but also in fish, a number of experiments have been reported, seeking to reveal cells and mechanisms involved in antigen sampling. In this paper, we review these studies in addition to addressing our current knowledge of the intestinal barrier in fish and its anatomical construction. PMID:26872546

  9. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs

  10. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  11. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  12. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  13. Identification and Analysis of Immunodominant Antigens for ELISA-Based Detection of Theileria annulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakırcı, Serkan; Tait, Andrew; Kinnaird, Jane; Eren, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Tropical or Mediterranean theileriosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, remains an economically important bovine disease in North Africa, Southern Europe, India, the Middle East and Asia. The disease affects mainly exotic cattle and imposes serious constraints upon livestock production and breed improvement programmes. While microscopic and molecular methods exist which are capable of detecting T. annulata during acute infection, the identification of animals in the carrier state is more challenging. Serological tests, which detect antibodies that react against parasite-encoded antigens, should ideally have the potential to identify carrier animals with very high levels of sensitivity and specificity. However, assays developed to date have suffered from a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity and it is, therefore, necessary to identify novel parasite antigens, which can be developed for this purpose. In the present study, genes encoding predicted antigens were bioinformatically identified in the T. annulata genome. These proteins, together with a panel of previously described antigens, were assessed by western blot analysis for immunoreactivity, and this revealed that four novel candidates and five previously described antigens were recognised by immune bovine serum. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrophotometric analysis, an immunodominant protein (encoded by TA15705) was identified as Ta9, a previously defined T cell antigen. Western blotting revealed another of the five proteins in the Ta9 family, TA15710, also to be an immunodominant protein. However, validation by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated that due to either allelic polymorphism or differential immune responses of individual hosts, none of the novel candidates can be considered ideal for routine detection of T. annulata-infected/carrier animals. PMID:27270235

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF ACROSOME AS THE MAIN ANTIGEN OF THE SPERM CELLS PROVOKING AUTOANTIBODIES IN VASECTOMIZED IRANIAN MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Nowroozi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nVasectomy is one of the extensively used methods of contraception in family planning programs. Antisperm antibodies (ASA develop after vasectomy which can result in auto-immune male infertility. The precise sperm antigens involved in the autoimmune response are still poorly defined, therefore we determined the circulating ASA and identified relevant sperm antigens based on localization of binding sites of ASA to sperm cell antigens, using a rapid, inexpensive and clinically relevant assay in vasectomized men. Results showed that 2.5% of men had ASA at the time of vasectomy, whereas 53.5% of the study population subsequently developed ASA. The numbers of men with circulating ASA increased significantly for the first three months after vasectomy. These antibodies were distinguishable into three groups based on their bindings to different sites of sperm cell antigens including against acrosome and tail in 67.56% and 10.8%, respectively; 21.6% of subjects had antibody to the other parts of the sperm cell antigens. The results of this study are discussed in terms of an autoimmune response against sperm antigens and development of ASA.

  15. Roles within the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Text Size Email Print Share Roles Within the Family Page Content Article Body Families are not democracies. ...

  16. Cytostructural Localization of a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Donald R.; Batsakis, John G.

    1980-10-01

    Tumor cell membrane glycoproteins may be involved in the induction of tumor immunity or in the escape of tumors from immunologic defense mechanisms. Forty-four benign and malignant breast lesions were examined for the presence of a carbohydrate precursor antigen (T antigen) of the human blood group system MN. T antigen was demonstrated by means of an immunohistochemical technique to detect tissue binding of peanut agglutinin, a plant lectin, with affinity for T antigen. Malignant breast lesions showed a pattern of T antigen expression different from that of benign breast tissues. A possible role for T antigen in the modulation of the immune response to breast carcinoma is suggested.

  17. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs

  18. Reclaiming Family Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, John

    2012-01-01

    The pull for family is strong, almost primeval, most likely it is evolutionary, and for those lacking the benefit of family or Family Privilege, the loss of family is painful and profoundly sad. Young people who struggle to cope without stable family connections are profoundly aware of their lack of "Family Privilege." In this article, the author…

  19. Credentialing Caregivers. Families Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Christiana

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  20. Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family…

  1. Family Law and Family Studies: Professor's Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Mary W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of family studies faculty concerning the inclusion of family law topics in family studies courses are discussed. The professor's needs for training and resources in the area of family and the law are identified and recommendations for meeting these needs are suggested. (Author)

  2. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  3. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  4. [Immunodiffusion analysis of plasma proteins in the canine family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, O K; Iurishina, N A; Savina, M A

    1976-01-01

    Immunodiffusion studies have been made on the plasma of 9 species (Vulpes vulpes, V. corsak, Alopex lagopus, Canis aureus, C. lupus, C. familiaris, C. dingo, Nyctereutes procynoides, Fennecus zerde) from the family of Canidae using milk antisera. Unlike rabbit antisera used earlier, milk antisera make it possible to detect more significant antigenic divergency with respect to 5 alpha- and beta-globulins. These globulins seem to have a higher evolution rate of antigenic mosaics as compared to other plasma proteins in the family investigated. The family Canidae serologically may be divided into two main groups: 1) the genus Canis which includes the wolf, domestic dog, dingo, jackal and 2) species which significantly differ from the former (the fox, polar fox, dog fox, fennec). In relation to these two groups, the raccoon dog occupies special position. PMID:62473

  5. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ngoepe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5% and Mokola virus (0.5%. Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones.

  6. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  7. Antigen expression on recurrent meningioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meningiomas are intracranial brain tumours that frequently recur. Recurrence rates up to 20% in 20 years for benign meningiomas, up to 80% for atypical meningiomas and up to 100% for malignant meningiomas, have been reported. The most important prognostic factors for meningioma recurrence are meningioma grade, meningioma invasiveness and radicality of neurosurgical resection. The aim of our study was to evaluate the differences in antigenic expression on the surface of meningioma cells between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas. 19 recurrent meningiomas and 35 non-recurrent meningiomas were compared regarding the expression of MIB-1 antigen, progesterone receptors, cathepsin B and cathepsin L, using immunohistochemistry. MIB-1 antigen expression was higher in the recurrent meningioma group (p=0.001). No difference in progesterone receptor status between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas was confirmed. Immunohistochemical intensity scores for cathepsin B (p= 0.007) and cathepsin L (p<0.001) were both higher in the recurrent than in the non-recurrent meningioma group. MIB-1 antigen expression is higher in recurrent compared to non-recurrent meningiomas. There is no difference in expression of progesterone receptors between recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas. Cathepsins B and L are expressed more in recurrent meningiomas

  8. Wegener's granulomatosis and autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens

    OpenAIRE

    McCluskey, D R; Maxwell, A. P.; Watt, L

    1988-01-01

    We report five cases of Wegener's granulomatosis all of whom had clinical and histological evidence of disease activity at presentation and in whom autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens were detected. This test may prove useful for the diagnosis of this serious condition and help to monitor disease activity during treatment.

  9. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with 125I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with 125I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with 125I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined

  10. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  11. Characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines established from CEA424/SV40 T antigen-transgenic mice with or without a human CEA transgene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the most frequent cancers worldwide. Patients with gastric cancer at an advanced disease stage have a poor prognosis, due to the limited efficacy of available therapies. Therefore, the development of new therapies, like immunotherapy for the treatment of gastric cancer is of utmost importance. Since the usability of existing preclinical models for the evaluation of immunotherapies for gastric adenocarcinomas is limited, the goal of the present study was to establish murine in vivo models which allow the stepwise improvement of immunotherapies for gastric cancer. Since no murine gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines are available we established four cell lines (424GC, mGC3, mGC5, mGC8) from spontaneously developing tumors of CEA424/SV40 T antigen (CEA424/Tag) mice and three cell lines derived from double-transgenic offsprings of CEA424/Tag mice mated with human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-transgenic (CEA424/Tag-CEA) mice (mGC2CEA, mGC4CEA, mGC11CEA). CEA424/Tag is a transgenic C57BL/6 mouse strain harboring the Tag under the control of a -424/-8 bp CEA gene promoter which leads to the development of invasive adenocarcinoma in the glandular stomach. Tumor cell lines established from CEA424/Tag-CEA mice express the well defined tumor antigen CEA under the control of its natural regulatory elements. The epithelial origin of the tumor cells was proven by morphological criteria including the presence of mucin within the cells and the expression of the cell adhesion molecules EpCAM and CEACAM1. All cell lines consistently express the transgenes CEA and/or Tag and MHC class I molecules leading to their susceptibility to lysis by Tag-specific CTL in vitro. Despite the presentation of CTL-epitopes derived from the transgene products the tumor cell lines were tumorigenic when grafted into C57BL/6, CEA424/Tag or CEA424/Tag-CEA-transgenic hosts and no significant differences in tumor take and tumor growth were observed in the different hosts. Although

  12. Multiple antigen glycopeptides (MAGs) with Tn tumour antigens and incorporated adjuvant: synthesis and immunobiological activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; Kelkar, Shripad; Vepřek, Pavel; Hajdůch, M.; Sejbal, J.; Trnka, T.

    Napoli : Edizioni Ziino, 2002 - (Benedetti, E.; Pedone, C.), s. 524-525 ISBN 88-900948-1-8. [Peptides 2002. European Peptide Symposium /27./. Sorrento (IT), 31.08.2002-06.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/01/0690 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : Tn antigen * multiple antigen glycopeptide * synthetic vaccine Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  13. [Identification of serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuegui; He, Lifang; Yuan, Shishan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To isolate and identify serological antigens in the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by the combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technology. Methods The serum IgG of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Muscle larvaes were isolated from the infected muscle, and then purified and cultured to collect excretory-secretory antigens. Serological antigens in excretory-secretory antigens were isolated by co-immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE, and analyzed by Western blotting. Moreover, the protein bands in New Zealand rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis were identified by mass spectrometric technology. Results Indirect ELISA showed that the titer of serum antibody of New Zealand rabbits infected with Trichinella spiralis was 1:6400. The rabbit serum IgG was effectively isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. A total of four clear protein bands of the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis were obtained by electrophoresis. Among them, three clear protein bands with relative molecular mass (Mr) being 40 kDa, 50 kDa and 83 kDa were recognized by the rabbit sera infected with Trichinella spiralis but not recognized by the normal rabbit sera. The obtained four protein molecules were confirmed as serine protease, specific serine protease of muscle larvae, 43 kDa secreted glycoprotein and 53 kDa excretory-secretory antigen. Conclusion Four proteins were obtained from the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae by combination of co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric technique analysis, which provided new sources and insights for the diagnosis and vaccine candidates of Trichinellosis. PMID:27126943

  14. Identification of antigenically related polypeptides at centrioles and basal bodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, W.; Fung, B.; Shyamala, M; Kasamatsu, H

    1981-01-01

    An antigen localized at the centriolar region has been identified by indirect immunofluorescence studies in African green monkey kidney, human, hamster, rat, and mouse cells. The antigen consists of two polypeptides of 14,000 and 17,000 daltons. A related antigen is also present at the basal body region in ciliated cells from chicken, cat, mouse, pig, steer, and rabbit trachea and from rabbit fimbria. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the immunoreactive antigen is indeed located in the reg...

  15. Single-Antigen Serological Testing for Bovine Tuberculosis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Lawrence R.; Jones, Cynthia C.; Sherwood, Anne L.; Garkavi, Inna V.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Thacker, Tyler C.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Waters, W. Ray; Rathe, Chris V.

    2009-01-01

    Antibody responses are useful indicators of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle. Tests for such responses often use multiple M. bovis antigens as detection probes. This is recommended because responses to single antigens may be too variable for consistent diagnosis. However, the use of multiple antigens increases costs and the risk of false-positive results. As an alternative, the SeraLyte-Mbv system detects responses to a single M. bovis antigen, MPB83, by using a chemiluminescent testin...

  16. Pneumocystis carinii from pigs and humans are antigenically distinct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C B; Settnes, Osvald Peter; Bille-Hansen, Vivi; Jorsal, Sven Erik Lind; Henriksen, S A; Lundgren, B

    1996-01-01

    The antigens of Pneumocystis carinii cysts isolated from pigs and humans were compared by the Western immunoblotting technique. Convalescent pig serum reacted with two antigens (approximately 78 kDa and 32.5 kDa) of porcine P. carinii cysts, whereas convalescent serum from humans did not react with...... porcine P. carinii cyst antigens. The results indicate that porcine and human P. carinii cysts are antigenically distinct....

  17. Characterization of antigens of the dog major histocompatibility complex

    OpenAIRE

    Feltz, Machteld

    1983-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis, an immunochemical analysis of dog Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) antigens, also called DLA antigens, is described. MHC antigens play a prominent role in the immune system, particularly in the recognition of foreign material. They can be divided into four classes. As only DLA class I antigens have been defined by well characterized reagents (antisera), they were chosen as the object of the investigation

  18. Detection of antigens in urine during acute toxoplasmosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Huskinson, J; Stepick-Biek, P; Remington, J S

    1989-01-01

    Toxoplasma antigens were detected in sera and urine of mice acutely infected with Toxoplasma gondii. The concentrations of antigens in the urine samples measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were similar to those detected in the sera of the corresponding mice. The major antigens were not dialyzable and were largely destroyed by treatment with trichloroacetic acid and heat (100 degrees C for 1 h). Toxoplasma antigens were demonstrable on Western blots (immunoblots) of the urine samples.

  19. Analysis of subtelomeric virulence gene families in Plasmodium falciparum by comparative transcriptional profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Witmer, Kathrin; Schmid, Christoph D.; Brancucci, Nicolas M. B.; Luah, Yen-Hoon; Preiser, Peter R.; Bozdech, Zbynek; Voss, Till S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Plasmodium falciparum genome is equipped with several subtelomeric gene families that are implicated in parasite virulence and immune evasion. Members of these families are uniformly positioned within heterochromatic domains and are thus subject to variegated expression. The best-studied example is that of the var family encoding the major parasite virulence factor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). PfEMP1 undergoes antigenic variation through switches in mutua...

  20. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  1. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia and antigen on antigen-presenting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) bind and present antigens to immunocompetent T lymphocytes in the context of Ia molecules: however, the molecular nature of the immunogenic complexes on the surface of these cells is unknown. They have used radioiodinated photoreactive Beef insulin (BI) derivatized in the B29 position with (n-[4-(4'-azido-3'-[125]iodophenylazo)benzoyl]-3-aminopropyl-n-oxy-succinimide) (B29-AZAP) as antigen to examine the nature of these molecular complexes. The probe was reacted with either of two B hybridoma APCs, TA3 (Ia/sup k/d/) and LB(Ia/sup d/b/) which present insulin on I-A/sup d/ and I-A/sub b/ respectively, to appropriately restricted, BI specific T helper lymphocytes (T/sub H/). Samples were photolyzed, solubilized and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Two protein bands of 36-kDa and 27-kDa were specifically labeled on TA3 and LB cells. Treatment of these bands with dithiothreitol or endo-N-β-glycosidase F demonstrates that each is composed of a single glycoprotein. These bands are immunoprecipitable with haplotype specific but not control anti-Ia antibodies. This identifies the labeled bands as the α- and β- subunits of class II MHC antigens. They conclude that a molecular complex may form between Ia and antigen on APCs and that formation of this complex does not require the presence of an antigen specific T/sub H/ cell receptor

  2. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866... Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. (a) Identification. A Plasmodium species antigen detection assay... malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum,...

  3. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... with 9 CFR 114.8. If phenol is used, a direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Avian mycoplasma antigen. 113.408... Diagnostics and Reagents § 113.408 Avian mycoplasma antigen. Mycoplasma antigens shall be prepared...

  4. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-06-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to -lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with -lactamase in Freund's adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund's adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. backbone flexibility | Freund's adjuvant | conformational epitope | antisera

  5. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  6. Detection of Mycobacterial Antigens in Leprosy Serum Immune Complex

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The antigens from immune complexes of sera from patients with mycobacterial diseases were released by sodium dodecyl sulfate. The antigenic activity of the released proteins was tested by agar gel diffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. This simple method provided direct evidence for the presence of mycobacterial antigens in the immune complexes of sera from patients with leprosy and tuberculosis.

  7. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy

  8. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L. E-mail: christian.villiers@cea.fr

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Opinions of Family Physicians about Family Counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Taştan1

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As of mission, Family physician is responsible for all the health problems of the family members. In this sense, it is necessary to counsel individuals and families in need. In this study, it is aimed to evaluate the knowledge and thoughts of family physicians about family counseling in Turkey. Methods: The Research was conducted among the family physicians working in Turkey in 2013. In order to get demographic characteristics, opinions and suggestions of the family physicians about family counseling, a questionnaire was developed by the researchers. The survey was administered to the participants via the internet. Data from 421 participants were evaluated. Results: The mean age of participants was 41.7 ± 7.2 years. 67.1% of them were male and 32.9% female. Of the participants, while 11.3% stated that they received training in family counseling, 88.7% stated not received. When the frequency of family counseling need was questioned, 3.4% of the participants pointed out that they have never needed, 44% is rarely needed, 39.9% frequently needed, 12.7% very frequently needed. Of the family physicians, while 21.7% was thinking that they are competent about solving family problems, 78.3% was not competent. Meanwhile, 76.3% of family physicians wanted to have training on the family counseling, while 23.7% stated that they do not want. Conclusion: It was found that there is a shortage of training of the family physicians on the subject of family counseling. In order to compensate this shortage, it would be beneficial to include the subject of family counseling in the curriculum of medical faculty and arrange in-service training to the family doctors working in the primary care.

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-0816 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-0816 gb|AAH34671.1| Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 [Homo sapiens...] gb|ABM81766.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 [synthetic cons...truct] gb|ABM87752.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 [synthetic construct] AAH34671.1 4e-51 38% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-0669 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-0669 gb|AAH34671.1| Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 [Homo sapiens...] gb|ABM81766.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 [synthetic cons...truct] gb|ABM87752.1| carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 [synthetic construct] AAH34671.1 8e-24 46% ...

  12. Overlapping antigenic repertoires of variant antigens expressed on the surface of erythrocytes infected by Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D; Elhassan, I M; Roper, C; Satti, G M; Arnot, D E; Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    antibodies to some combinations of variant antigens but not to others. These results indicate that (1) a single infection will induce the production of antibodies recognizing several variants of surface-expressed antigens, (2) the repertoire of variable antigens expressed by different parasites is...

  13. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Histo-blood group ABH (O) antigens are major alloantigens in humans. These antigens are widely distributed in human tissues and undergo changes in expression during cellular differentiation and malignant development. The ABH antigens have been characterized as terminal disaccharide determinants...... healing show similarly decreased expression of A/B antigens on migrating epithelial cells. Some studies suggest that the relationship between expression of blood group antigens and cell motility can be explained by different degrees of glycosylation of integrins. Changes in ABO expression in tumours have...

  14. A competitive-inhibiton radioimmunoassay for influenza virus envelope antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double-antibody competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay for influenza virus envelope antigens is described. A viral antigen preparation from influenza A virus recombinant MRC11 [antigenically identical to A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2)] consisting of haemagglutinin and neuraminidase was labelled with radioiodine. Rabbit antisera were allowed to react with the labelled antigen and the resultant antigen-antibody complexes were precipitated with the appropriate antiglobulin. The competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay very sensitively elucidated differences even among closely related influenza virus strains. Attempts have been made to eliminate neuraminidase from radioimmunoprecipitation to obtain a competitive-inhibition radioimmunoassay system for haemagglutinin alone. (author)

  15. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However, the...... barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce this...... complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  16. Radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of tests using radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological surveys was studied, with particular attention to the likely availability of facilities and personnel in the tropics and arctics, where measurements may be disturbed by climatic influences. The methodology required was to be simple, rapid and suitable for examining large numbers of sera, as for epidemological surveys. In the introduction, limitations of labelled antigen tests are discussed, the choice of radionuclide and measurement methods, test procedures and evaluation of results. Collection, preservation and shipment of speciments (serum, faeces, cerebrospinal fluid, sputum, etc.) are described. Experiments with bacteria and bacterial toxins (Enterobacteriaceae, vibrios, staphylococci, meningococci, etc.), with protozoa and metazoa (Entamoeba hystolytica, Schistosoma mansoni, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodia and other parasites), with viruses (vaccinia, adeno-, polio-, and influenza viruses, etc.), and with fungi are discussed

  17. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ernest Ngoepe; Christine Fehlner-Gardiner; Alex Wandeler; Claude Sabeta

    2014-01-01

    There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus anti...

  18. Antigenicity of low molecular weight surfactant species.

    OpenAIRE

    Strayer, D. S.; Merritt, T A; Makunike, C.; Hallman, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors tested the antigenicity of human lung surfactant isolated from amniotic fluid. Mice and rabbits were immunized. Rabbit polyclonal antisera to these surfactant preparations were absorbed with normal human plasma proteins. Polyclonal antisera reacted with both high molecular weight (35 kd) surfactant apoprotein and to lower molecular weight species, both 18 kd and 9 kd. Mice were used to generate monoclonal antibodies to surfactant. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay was used to iden...

  19. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  20. Yeast retrotransposon particles as antigen delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsman, A J; Burns, N R; Layton, G T; Adams, S E

    1995-05-31

    The development of technologies to produce recombinant proteins for use in the pharmaceutical industry has made substantial advances, in particular in the area of generating antigens containing multiple copies of important immunological regions. One such antigen-carrier system is based on the ability of a protein encoded by the yeast retrotransposon, Ty, to self-assemble into virus-like particles. Ty-fusion proteins retain this ability to form particles, and a range of hybrid VLPs carrying a variety of heterologous antigens have been produced and shown to induce potent immune responses. In particular, hybrid VLPs carrying the core protein p24 of HIV (p24-VLPs) have been shown to induce antibody and T-cell proliferative responses in both experimental animals and human volunteers, and immunization of rabbits with VLPs carrying the principal neutralizing determinant of HIV (V3-VLPs) resulted in the induction of neutralizing antibody responses and T-cell proliferation. Further studies with V3-VLPs have shown that this particulate antigen stimulates enhanced V3-specific lymphoproliferative responses as compared to whole recombinant gp120 or to V3 peptide conjugated to albumin. The V3-VLPs also induce potent CTL responses following immunization of mice in the absence of adjuvant. These responses are MHC class I restricted and are mediated by CD8-positive cells. These observations therefore demonstrate that hybrid Ty-VLPs induce both humoral and cellular immune responses against HIV and suggest that these immunogens may be important in combatting AIDS and other infections. PMID:7625653

  1. Rationalisation of Legionella Urinary Antigen Testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Breda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Legionnaires’ is a severe pneumonia, the diagnosis of which can be confirmed by a positive Legionella Urinary Antigen (LUA) test. The British Thoracic Society has specific guidelines for its use. Incorrect LUA test requests can result in false-positive results while accumulating costs. Aims and Objectives: The aim is the rationalisation of LUA testing. The first objective is to educate clinicians on indications for testing reducing unnecessary orders. The second is to develop...

  2. The role of antigen in the development of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogeboom, R.

    2013-01-01

    These studies strongly suggest that MALT-lymphomas and M-CLL in majority are highly selected for single extrinsic antigens and that these antigens can be both self-antigens and exo-antigens. Our finding that primary CLL cells are responsive to stimulation with their cognate antigen suggests that antigen-dependent BCR signaling may drive CLL expansion in vivo.

  3. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective:to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infection.Methods:Serum soluble antigen of H.pylori was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H.pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test(RUT).histologic examination and serology,Results:The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46% ,91.07%,91.67% and 76.12%,respectively.The prevalence rate of werum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergong endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT methods(P>0.05).Conclusions:The detection of serum H.pylori soluble antigen(HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate,and convenient,not affected by the memorizing raction of serum antibody;is more sensitive,more specific and suitable for dinical diagriosis,and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H.pylori as well as for detection in children and pregnant women.

  4. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobac ter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. Methods: Serum soluble antigen of H. p ylor i was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H. pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test ( RUT ), histo logi c examination and serology. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive pred ictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46%, 91.07%, 91.67% a nd 76.12 %, respectively. The prevalence rate of serum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergoing endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT met hods ( P>0.05 ). Conclusions: The detection of serum H. pylori solub le antigen( HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate, and convenie nt, not affected by the memorizing reaction of serum antibody; is more sensitive , m ore specific and suitable for clinical diagnosis, and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H. pylori as well as for detection in children and pre gnant women.

  5. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  6. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay for Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Serum Based on Antibody Labeled Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as Capture Probes and Graphene/CdTe Quantum Dot Bionanoconjugates as Signal Amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The CdTe quantum dots (QDs, graphene nanocomposite (CdTe-G and dextran–Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for developing an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL immunoassay for Carcinoembryonic antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9 in serums. Firstly, the capture probes (CA 19-9 Ab1/Fe3O4 for enriching CA 19-9 were synthesized by immobilizing the CA 19-9’s first antibody (CA 19-9 Ab1 on magnetic nanoparticles (dextran-Fe3O4. Secondly, the signal probes (CA 19-9 Ab2/CdTe-G, which can emit an ECL signal, were formed by attaching the secondary CA 19-9 antibody (CA 19-9 Ab2 to the surface of the CdTe-G. Thirdly, the above two probes were used for conjugating with a serial of CA 19-9 concentrations. Graphene can immobilize dozens of CdTe QDs on their surface, which can emit stronger ECL intensity than CdTe QDs. Based on the amplified signal, ultrasensitive antigen detection can be realized. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL signal depended linearly on the logarithm of CA 19-9 concentration from 0.005 to 100 pg/mL, and the detection limit was 0.002 pg/mL. Finally, five samples of human serum were tested, and the results were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence assay (TRFA. The novel immunoassay provides a stable, specific and highly sensitive immunoassay protocol for tumor marker detection at very low levels, which can be applied in early diagnosis of tumor.

  7. Elderly-onset familial myasthenia gravis in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirunagi, Tomoki; Tsujikawa, Koyo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Mano, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa

    2016-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) occasionally occurs in a family, but elderly-onset (≥65 years) familial MG has been rarely reported. We here report the case of two siblings with elderly-onset MG (mean onset age: 72.5 years) and present the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles (HLA-A, -B, -DR) of their family. Both patients developed generalized MG with elevated serum acetylcholine receptor antibody titers at their seventies. Of six siblings, the two patients and one unaffected sibling shared the same HLA haplotypes. Our study indicates that elderly-onset MG can occur in a family and that familial occurrence of MG may be related to certain HLA alleles. PMID:27132121

  8. Family Activities for Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  9. Family Reunion Health Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can post this message as a note on Facebook, tagging family members and loved ones. You also may include ... gov . Planning Tip 2. | Develop a Family Reunion Facebook page and help family members stay in touch throughout the year. Share ...

  10. Learning about Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Familial Hypercholesterolemia What is familial hypercholesterolemia? What are the symptoms ... Hypercholesterolemia Additional Resources About Familial Hypercholesterolemia What is ... hypercholesterolemia is an inherited condition that causes ...

  11. Normal Functioning Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  12. Family Adjustment to Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Family Adjustment to Aphasia Richard S. was a senior manager ... It also presents a great challenge to the family. There may be tension among family members and ...

  13. PSYCHOLOGY OF FAMILY BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Taylyakova, Feruzahon

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the basic psychological characteristics of family businesses. The author describes the psychological properties that contribute to improve individual and family businesses. The article also discusses mental properties adversely affect the development of a family business.

  14. Epigenetic modulation of cancer-germline antigen gene expression in tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells: implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Burns, Jorge S; Nielsen, Ole; Kassem, Moustapha; Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-07-01

    Cancer-germline antigens are promising targets for cancer immunotherapy, but whether such therapies will also eliminate the primary tumor stem cell population remains undetermined. We previously showed that long-term cultures of telomerized adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can spontaneously evolve into tumor-initiating, mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT20), which have characteristics of clinical sarcoma cells. In this study, we used the hMSC-TERT20 tumor stem cell model to investigate the potential of cancer-germline antigens to serve as tumor stem cell targets. We found that tumorigenic transformation of hMSC-TERT20 cells induced the expression of members of several cancer-germline antigen gene families (ie, GAGE, MAGE-A, and XAGE-1), with promoter hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the corresponding genes. Both in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts derived from tumorigenic hMSC-TERT20 single cell subclones exhibited heterogeneous expression of both GAGE and MAGE-A proteins, and similar patterns of expression were observed in clinical sarcomas. Importantly, histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors were able to induce more ubiquitous expression levels of cancer-germline antigens in hMSC-TERT20 cells, while their expression levels in primary human mesenchymal stem cells remained unaffected. The expression pattern of cancer-germline antigens in tumorigenic mesenchymal stem cells and sarcomas, plus their susceptibility to enhancement by epigenetic modulators, makes them promising targets for immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment. PMID:19498007

  15. Typing of HLA class II and class I antigens using PHA-activated, IL-2-propagated T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, B; Cohen, I; Sherman, L; Brautbar, C; Kedar, E

    1988-06-28

    We describe here a simple procedure, by which HLA class II antigens can be accurately and reliably identified in those patients where there is minimal or absent expression of HLA-DR,DQw antigens on B cells, or when the total number of leukocytes recovered from the patients do not permit reliable typing. Ficoll-Hypaque-separated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes, fresh or cryopreserved, were activated by PHA and then propagated in IL-2-containing medium until enough cells for typing were obtained (usually 7-14 days). At this stage, the cultured cells were shown to be primarily T cells (greater than 90% CD3+). Since the activated T cells propagate in the presence of IL-2, even a small number (10(4] of fresh or cryopreserved patients' cells suffice for this protocol. To date we have been able to successfully HLA-DR,DQw type 34/34 bone marrow transplantation candidates and 12/12 long-term dialysis patients, who were untypable using fresh cells. HLA-DR,DQw antigens on activated T cells from normal individuals were identical to those found on their uncultured B cells. In addition, class I antigens that were undetectable on the uncultured cells of one patient could be identified on activated T cells. The HLA antigens identified on the patients' activated T cells were confirmed by phenotypic analysis of cells from family members. PMID:3260612

  16. Identification of Mycoplasma suis antigens and development of a multiplex microbead immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Ana M S; Santos, Andrea P; Timenetsky, Jorge; Bower, Leslie P; Strait, Erin; Messick, Joanne B

    2014-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to identify Mycoplasma suis antigens and develop a multiplex microbead immunoassay (MIA). A M. suis-expression library was screened for immunogens using sera from infected pigs. Based on bioinformatics, putative antigens were identified within positive inserts; gene fragments were expressed and purified as polyhistidine fusion proteins, and immunoreactivity was confirmed by Western blot. Selected antigens were used to develop a MIA. Sera from noninfected and infected pigs were used to set the median fluorescent intensity (MFI) cutoffs and as positive controls, respectively. Assay specificity was tested using sera from pigs seropositive for other pathogens (2 different pigs seropositive for each pathogen). Samples from 51 field pigs and 2 pigs during the course of acute (pig 1) and chronic (pig 2) infections were tested using MIA, indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA), and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Sixteen reactive plaques (52 genes) were detected. A heat-shock protein (GrpE), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN), and 4 proteins from paralogous gene families (PGFs) were identified as antigens by Western blot. While GrpE, GAPN, and 1 PGF protein were strong antigens, the others were not suitable as MIA targets. A MIA using GrpE, GAPN, and the strongly reactive PGF protein was developed. Cross-reactivity with sera from pigs infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Porcine circovirus-2, Porcine parvovirus, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Porcine respiratory coronavirus with this MIA was not observed. Pig 2 was consistently positive by MIA and qPCR, whereas pig 1, initially negative, seroconverted before becoming qPCR positive. Only 2 samples (from pig 1) were IHA positive. Five (9.8%) field samples were qPCR positive and 40 (78.43%) were positive for all 3 MIA antigens; however, all were IHA negative. In summary, the MIA is specific

  17. Surface antigen expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clustering analysis, interrelationships and effects of chromosomal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulkkonen, J; Vilpo, L; Hurme, M; Vilpo, J

    2002-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a phenotypically distinguishable form of B-lymphoid leukemias. The regularity of surface membrane antigen expression patterns, their interrelationships as well as the effects of the three frequent chromosomal aberrations, ie 11q deletion, 13q deletion and trisomy 12, were investigated in 35 classic CLL cases by flow cytometry. The two-way cluster analysis of 31 individual antigens revealed three expression patterns: (1) most cells in most cases positive (CD5, CD19, CD20, CD23, CD27, CD40, CD45, CD45RA); (2) most cells in most cases negative (CD10, CD14, CD34, CD122, CD154, mIgG); and (3) a mixed pattern with a variable number of positive cases and a variable percentage of positive cells in individual cases (CD11c, CD21, CD22, CD25, CD38, CD45RO, CD79b, CD80, CD95, CD124, CD126, CD130, FMC7, mIgD, mIgkappa, mIglambda, mIgM). The expressions of several antigens were strongly interdependent, even when antigens belonged to entirely different gene families. Such antigen pairs were: CD11c/CD21; CD19/CD45; CD19/CD79b; CD22/CD45RA; CD23/Igkappa; CD25/mIgM; CD27/CD45; CD45/CD79b; CD45RA/Igkappa. In contrast, the expression of some antigens was mutually exclusive, the best examples being CD45RA/CD45RO, CD38/CD80 and CD45RA/CD80. Deletion of chromosome arm 11q attenuated expression of splicing variant CD45RA, but enhanced CD45RO expression. In contrast, cases of trisomy 12 were associated with enhanced CD45RA and attenuated CD45RO expression. Similarly, trisomy 12 was associated with enhanced CD27 and mIgkappa expression. The variable levels of signaling surface membrane antigens, their interactions and interference by genetic aberrations are likely to affect the clinical progression and drug response of CLL. PMID:11840283

  18. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  19. Entrepreneurial Families : From a Family Enterprise to an Entrepreneurial Family

    OpenAIRE

    Sieger, Philipp; Zellweger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    How do family firms succeed from generation to generation? While this is likely the most important question for the members of a family business, little is known about the central success factors in creating value across the generations. For this reason, our study aims to explore the secrets of family firms with a long, successful track record and to expand the current state of knowledge. In so doing, we want to look not only at «the family firm» but also broaden our scope to the entire entre...

  20. Families and family therapy in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Samson; Ng, Roger M K; Tonsing, Kareen N; Ran, Maosheng

    2012-04-01

    Family therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population - all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families. PMID:22515459

  1. A family outbreak of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, K; Frew, C E; Carrington, D

    1992-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae, a newly described Chlamydia species, has been shown to be a cause of acute respiratory tract infection in both adults and children, but its role in human infection is still under investigation. Here we present a family outbreak of C. pneumoniae infection where three members of a family presented with a 'flu-like illness' and acute upper respiratory tract infection which did not improve despite penicillin or septrin therapy. No history of exposure to birds, pets or animals was obtained. As C. pneumoniae isolation from respiratory secretions is not without difficulty, diagnosis usually relies currently on serum-based tests. In this study C. pneumoniae specific IgM determined by the micro-immunofluorescence test was detected in the three clinical cases. All three cases had an elevated complement-fixing antibody titre to Psittacosis-LGV antigen, which may have suggested psittacosis, if type-specific tests had not been performed. In addition, three other members of the family had C. pneumoniae-specific IgG antibody although specific IgM was absent. These three younger members of the family had been symptomatic in the month preceding symptoms in their older sibling and their parents. All the symptomatic members of the family made a complete recovery on tetracycline therapy. PMID:1522345

  2. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis. PMID:26342828

  3. Delta-like 1/fetal antigen-1 (Dlk1/FA1) is a novel regulator of chondrogenic cell differentiation via inhibition of the Akt kinase-dependent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Qanie, Diyako; Jafari, Abbas; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Jensen, Charlotte H; Säämänen, Anna-Marja; Sanz, Maria Luisa Nueda; Laborda, Jorge; Abdallah, Basem M; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1, also known as fetal antigen-1, FA1) is a member of Notch/Delta family that inhibits adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation; however, its role in chondrogenesis is still not clear. Thus, we overexpressed Dlk1/FA1 in mouse embryonic ATDC5 cells and tested its effects on...

  4. Chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G antigens are found on many cell types that are important for the immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Dunon, D; Skjødt, K; Thorpe, D; Vainio, O; Kaufman, J

    1991-01-01

    B-G antigens are a polymorphic multigene family of cell surface molecules encoded by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). They have previously been described only on cells of the erythroid lineage. By using flow cytometry, section staining, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal a...

  5. Family doctors' involvement with families in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lember Margus

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family doctors should care for individuals in the context of their family. Family has a powerful influence on health and illness and family interventions have been shown to improve health outcomes for a variety of health problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the Estonian family doctors' (FD attitudes to the patients' family-related issues in their work: to explore the degree of FDs involvement in family matters, their preparedness for management of family-related issues and their self-assessment of the ability to manage different family-related problems. Methods A random sample (n = 236 of all FDs in Estonia was investigated using a postal questionnaire. Altogether 151 FDs responded to the questionnaire (response rate 64%, while five of them were excluded as they did not actually work as FDs. Results Of the respondents, 90% thought that in managing the health problems of patients FDs should communicate and cooperate with family members. Although most of the family doctors agreed that modifying of the health damaging risk factors (smoking, alcohol and drug abuse of their patients and families is their task, one third of them felt that dealing with these problems is ineffective, or perceived themselves as poorly prepared or having too little time for such activities. Of the respondents, 58% (n = 83 were of the opinion that they could modify also relationship problems. Conclusions Estonian family doctors are favourably disposed to involvement in family-related problems, however, they need some additional training, especially in the field of relationship management.

  6. Cord blood lymphocyte responses to food antigens for the prediction of allergic disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shinoda, S; Kasahara, K.; Kameyama, T; Iwasa, S; Orii, T.

    1992-01-01

    Proliferative responses of cord blood lymphocytes (CBLs) to food antigens and cord blood IgE concentrations were measured in 37 full term newborn infants for the prediction of allergic disorders. In these 37 infants who were followed up for two years, allergic history of the family was found in four (sensitivity 57.1%) and cord blood IgE concentrations were greater than 0.5 IU/ml in three (sensitivity 42.9%) of seven infants who developed allergic disorders. When CBLs were stimulated twice by...

  7. Activation/Inhibition of mast cells by supra-optimal antigen concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident cells of hemopoietic origin and are critically involved in allergic diseases. MCs bind IgE by means of their high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI). The FcεRI belongs to a family of multi-chain immune recognition receptors and is activated by cross-linking in response to multivalent antigens (Ags)/allergens. Activation of the FcεRI results in immediate release of preformed granular substances (e.g. histamine, heparin, and proteases), generation of arachido...

  8. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans. PMID:21670078

  9. Genetic diversity and antigenicity variation of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Takemae, Hitoshi; Simking, Pacharathon; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe clinical disease in cattle worldwide. The genetic diversity of parasite antigens often results in different immune profiles in infected animals, hindering efforts to develop immune control methodologies against the B. bovis infection. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the merozoite surface antigen-1 (msa-1) gene using 162 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from cattle populations reared in different geographical regions of Thailand. The identity scores shared among 93 msa-1 gene sequences isolated by PCR amplification were 43.5-100%, and the similarity values among the translated amino acid sequences were 42.8-100%. Of 23 total clades detected in our phylogenetic analysis, Thai msa-1 gene sequences occurred in 18 clades; seven among them were composed of sequences exclusively from Thailand. To investigate differential antigenicity of isolated MSA-1 proteins, we expressed and purified eight recombinant MSA-1 (rMSA-1) proteins, including an rMSA-1 from B. bovis Texas (T2Bo) strain and seven rMSA-1 proteins based on the Thai msa-1 sequences. When these antigens were analyzed in a western blot assay, anti-T2Bo cattle serum strongly reacted with the rMSA-1 from T2Bo, as well as with three other rMSA-1 proteins that shared 54.9-68.4% sequence similarity with T2Bo MSA-1. In contrast, no or weak reactivity was observed for the remaining rMSA-1 proteins, which shared low sequence similarity (35.0-39.7%) with T2Bo MSA-1. While demonstrating the high genetic diversity of the B. bovis msa-1 gene in Thailand, the present findings suggest that the genetic diversity results in antigenicity variations among the MSA-1 antigens of B. bovis in Thailand. PMID:27101782

  10. The pericyte antigen RGS5 in perivascular soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear lineage of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from or differentiate to pericytes or a modified perivascular cell. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation--although little bona fide evidence of pericytic differentiation exists. Likewise the perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) family shares a perivascular growth pattern, but with distinctive dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. RGS5, regulator of G-protein signaling 5, is a novel pericyte antigen with increasing use in animal models. Here, we describe the immunohistochemical expression patterns of RGS5 across perivascular soft tissue tumors, including glomus tumor (n = 6), malignant glomus tumor (n = 4), myopericytoma (n = 3), angioleiomyoma (n = 9), myofibroma (n = 4), solitary fibrous tumor (n = 10), and PEComa (n = 19). Immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantification was performed, and compared to αSMA (smooth muscle actin) expression. Results showed that glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma shared a similar diffuse immunoreactivity for RGS5 and αSMA across all tumors examined. In contrast, myofibroma, solitary fibrous tumor and PEComa showed predominantly focal to absent RGS5 immunoreactivity. These findings further support a common pericytic lineage of differentiation in glomus tumors, myopericytoma and angioleiomyoma. The pericyte marker RGS5 may be of future clinical utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26558691

  11. Antigenic characterization of dimorphic surface protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Takashi; Siddiqi, Umme Ruman; Hattori, Toshio; Nakajima, Chie; Fujii, Jun; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0679c protein is a surface protein that contributes to host cell invasion. We previously showed that a single nucleotide transition of the Rv0679c gene leads to a single amino acid substitution from asparagine to lysine at codon 142 in the Beijing genotype family. In this study, we examined the immunological effect of this substitution. Several recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis and characterized with antisera and two monoclonal antibodies named 5D4-C2 and 8G10-H2. A significant reduction of antibody binding was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot analysis in the Lys142-type protein. This reduction of 8G10-H2 binding was more significant, with the disappearance of a signal in the proteins expressed by recombinant mycobacteria in western blot analysis. In addition, epitope mapping analysis of the recombinant proteins showed a linear epitope by 5D4-C2 and a discontinuous epitope by 8G10-H2. The antibody recognizing the conformational epitope detected only mycobacterial Asn142-type recombinant protein. Our results suggest that a single amino acid substitution of Rv0679c has potency for antigenic change in Beijing genotype strains. PMID:27190237

  12. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is associated with up regulation, down regulation of normal antigens or abnormal antigens. These antigens are very useful candidates as targets for the different breast cancer therapies and for vaccination trials. This study was done to characterize abnormal antigens, extract one of them and to produce monoclonal antibodies against the extracted antigen. One hundred and twenty Sudanese female patients were included in this study after informed consent. The mean age was 47. 2 years (16-80). Two tissue samples were obtained from each patient and they were confirmed as normal and cancerous breast tissues microscopically. 2D PAGE was used to analyze the protein content of samples. LC/MS and nr. fast a database search were used for separation and indentification of the abnormal proteins. Three different patterns of 2D Page results were obtained, the first pattern involved detection of four abnormal proteins in 26.7% of the patient cancerous tissues while they were undetected in the normal tissues of the same patients. In the second 2D PAGE result pattern the cancerous and the normal tissues of 67.5% patients were identical and they did not contain the four abnormal proteins while the third 2D PAGE pattern involved the presence of two abnormal antigens (from the four) in the cancerous tissues of 5.8% of the patients and they were absent from the normal tissues of the same patients. The four abnormal proteins were identified as, human Thioredoxin (D60nmutant), x-ray crystal structure of human galectin-1, retrocopy of tropomyosin 3(rc TPM3) and beta-tropomyosin (isoform 2). The primary and the secondary structures were obtained from the SWISSPROT and the PDB databases. Beta tropomyosin spot was extracted and used as antigen for monoclonal antibody production. Monoclonal antibody against beta- tropomyosin with a concentration of 0.35 mg/ml and a G11 anti beta-tropomyosin hybridoma cell line were produced. The monoclonal antibody was with single bad and

  13. Photoaffinity labeling demonstrates binding between Ia molecules and nominal antigen on antigen-presenting cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, M L; Yip, C C; Shevach, E M; Delovitch, T L

    1986-01-01

    We have used radioiodinated photoreactive bovine insulin as antigen to examine the molecular nature of immunogenic complexes that form on antigen-presenting cells. The probe was allowed to bind to either insulin-presenting B-hybridoma cells, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated blasts, or bovine insulin-specific helper-T-hybridoma cells in the dark. Samples were then exposed to light to induce crosslinkage, solubilized, and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Two protein bands at about 36 kDa and 27 kD...

  14. Seroreactivity of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen in comparison with lipopolysaccharide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Lind, Peter; Bell, M.M.; Thorns, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The IgG seroreaction of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen (SEF14) was compared with that against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sera from 23 dairy herds (n = 205) from an island with no occurrence of salmonellosis, four herds (n = 303) with recent outbreaks of S....... dublin and four herds (n = 168) with recent outbreaks of S. typhimurium, were tested in a SEF14-ELISA, S. dublin LPS (0:1, 9, 12) ELISA and S. typhimurium LPS (0:1, 4, 5; 12) ELISA. At a cut-off OD of 0.5, only one of the animals tested from the salmonellosis-free island showed significant seroreaction...

  15. Human leukocyte antigen-DO regulates surface presentation of human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted antigens on B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, A.N.; Meijden, E.D. van der; Honders, M.W.; Pont, M.J.; Goeman, J.J.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Griffioen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Hematological malignancies often express surface HLA class II, making them attractive targets for CD4+ T cell therapy. We previously demonstrated that HLA class II ligands can be divided into DM-resistant and DM-sensitive antigens. In contrast to presentation of DM-resistant antigens, presentation o

  16. Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen's Association with the CUL7 SCF Complex Contributes to Cellular Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Kasper, Jocelyn S.; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Arai, Takehiro; Ali, Syed Hamid; DeCaprio, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large T antigen (T Ag) is capable of immortalizing and transforming rodent cells. The transforming activity of T Ag is due in large part to perturbation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and the retinoblastoma (pRB) family members. Inactivation of these tumor suppressors may not be sufficient for T Ag-mediated cellular transformation. It has been shown that T Ag associates with an SCF-like complex that contains a member of the cullin family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, CUL7, as...

  17. Families in Transition .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  18. [Teaching about Family Law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John Paul, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Focus on Law Studies""contains a special emphasis on teaching about law and the family", in the form of the following three articles: "Teaching Family Law: Growing Pains and All" (Susan Frelich Appleton); "The Family Goes to Court: Including Law in a Sociological Perspective on the Family" (Mary Ann Lamanna); and Michael Grossberg's…

  19. Pure γ-families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this work are pure gamma families consisting of the gamma quanta produced in the early stages of cosmic cascades. The criteria of selecting these families from the all measured families are presented. The characteristics of these families are given and some conclusions about the mechanism of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascades are extracted. (S.B.)

  20. Antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized with mouse antiserum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurose,Masao

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Marked IgE-mediated histamine release from rat mast cells sensitized in vitro with mouse antiserum occurs in the presence of added Ca++ and phosphatidylserine (PS, although a considerable degree of antigen-induced histamine release which may utilize intracellular or cell-bound calcium is also observed. The decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ of the sensitized cells stimulated by antigen in Ca++-free medium in the presence of PS is relatively slow, and maximum release is produced by Ca++ added 1 min after antigen. Histamine release also occurs when Ca++ is added after PS in the absence of antigen to the sensitized cells suspended in Ca++-free medium. Unlike the antigen-induced release, the intensity of this non-antigen-induced release varies depending on both mast-cell and antiserum pools. A heat-labile factor(s, which is different from antigen-specific IgE antibody and is also contained in normal mouse serum, is involved in this reaction. In the antigen-nondependent (PS + Ca++-induced release, no decay in the responsiveness to Ca++ is observed after PS addition. Both the antigen-induced and non-antigen-induced release are completed fairly rapidly and are dependent of temperature, pH and energy.

  1. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Crispe, I Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nanoscale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The conjugation of fluoresceinated ovalbumin (FLUO-OVA) and lactobionic acid with LDL resulted in a substantially increased uptake of FLUO-OVA by murine macrophage-like ANA1 cells in preference to NIH3T3 cells, and by primary peritoneal macrophages in preference to primary hepatic stellate cells. Such preferential uptake led to enhanced proliferation of OVA specific T cells, showing that the galactosylated LDL nanoscale platform is a successful antigen carrier, targeting antigen to macrophages but not to all categories of antigen presenting cells. This system will allow targeted delivery of antigen to macrophages in the liver and elsewhere, addressing the question of the role of Kupffer cells in liver immunology. It may also be an effective way of delivering drugs or vaccines directly at macrophages. PMID:19637876

  2. How to Make a Non-Antigenic Protein (Auto) Antigenic: Molecular Complementarity Alters Antigen Processing and Activates Adaptive-Innate Immunity Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that complementary proteins and peptides form complexes with increased antigenicity and/or autoimmunogenicity. Five case studies are highlighted: 1) diphtheria toxin-antitoxin (antibody), which induces immunity to the normally non-antigenic toxin, and autoimmune neuritis; 2) tryptophan peptide of myelin basic protein and muramyl dipeptide ("adjuvant peptide"), which form a complex that induces experimental allergic encephalomyelitis; 3) an insulin and glucagon complex that is far more antigenic than either component individually; 4) various causes of experimental autoimmune myocarditis such as C protein in combination with its antibody, or coxsackie B virus in combination with the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor; 5) influenza A virus haemagglutinin with the outer membrane protein of the Haemophilus influenzae, which increases antigenicity. Several mechanisms cooperate to alter immunogenicity. Complexation alters antigen processing, protecting the components against proteolysis, altering fragmentation and presenting novel antigens to the immune system. Complementary antigens induce complementary adaptive immune responses (complementary antibodies and/or T cell receptors) that produce circulating immune complexes (CIC). CIC stimulate innate immunity. Concurrently, complementary antigens stimulate multiple Toll-like receptors that synergize to over-produce cytokines, which further stimulate adaptive immunity. Thus innate and adaptive immunity form a positive feedback loop. If components of the complex mimic a host protein, then autoimmunity may result. Enhanced antigenicity for production of improved vaccines and/or therapeutic autoimmunity (e.g., against cancer cells) might be achieved by using information from antibody or TCR recognition sites to complement an antigen; by panning for complements in randomized peptide libraries; or using antisense peptide strategies to design complements. PMID:26179268

  3. Enhancing the recognition of tumor associated antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Irvine, Kari R.; Minev, Boris R.; Taggarse, Akash S.; McFariand, Barbra J.; Wang, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Activated CD8+ T cells (TCD8+) can directly recognize malignant cells because processed fragments of tumor associated antigens (TAA), 8-10 amino acids in length and complexed with MHC class I molecules, are displayed on tumor cell surfaces. Tumor cells have been genetically modified in a variety of ways in efforts to enhance the immune recognition of TAA. An alternative strategy is the expression of TAA in recombinant or synthetic form. This has been made possible by the recent cloning of TAA...

  4. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...... carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue...

  5. Sera of chagasic patients react with antigens from the tomato parasite Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça-de Souza, Viviane K; Monteiro-Góes, Viviane; Manque, Patrício; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Corrêa, Paulo R C; Buck, Gregory A; Ávila, Andréa R; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Goldenberg, Samuel; Krieger, Marco A; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F

    2010-01-01

    The genus Phytomonas comprises trypanosomatids that can parasitize a broad range of plant species. These flagellates can cause diseases in some plant families with a wide geographic distribution, which can result in great economic losses. We have demonstrated previously that Phytomonas serpens 15T, a tomato trypanosomatid, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of human Chagas disease. Herein, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to identify proteins of P. serpens 15T that are recognized by sera from patients with Chagas disease. After 2D-electrophoresis of whole-cell lysates, 31 peptides were selected and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight polypeptides were identified, resulting in 22 different putative proteins. The identified proteins were classified into 8 groups according to biological process, most of which were clustered into a cellular metabolic process category. These results generated a collection of proteins that can provide a starting point to obtain insights into antigenic cross reactivity among trypanosomatids and to explore P. serpens antigens as candidates for vaccine and immunologic diagnosis studies. PMID:21031268

  6. Identification and characterization of profilin antigen among Babesia species as a common vaccine candidate against babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Ueno, Akio; Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-07-01

    We have characterized a member of the profilin (PROF) family protein as a common antigen in three pathogens-Babesia bovis (B. bovis), Babesia bigemina (B. bigemina), and Babesia microti (B. microti)-and evaluated its immunogenic and cross-protective properties against a challenge infection with B. microti in BALB/c mice. The recombinant PROF proteins of B. bovis, B. bigemina, and B. microti were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) as soluble GST fusion proteins (rBboPROF, rBbigPROF, and rBmPROF, respectively), and they were found to be antigenic. On probing with mouse anti-rPROF serum, green fluorescence was observed on the parasites' cytosols by confocal laser microscopy. Immunization regimes in BALB/c mice using rPROFs induced cross-protective immunity against B. microti infection based on high levels of cytokines and immunoglobulin (IgG) titers, a reduction in peak parasitemia levels, and earlier clearance of the parasite as compared with control mice. The findings of the present study indicate that PROF is a common antigen among bovine and murine Babesia parasites, and it might be used as a common vaccine candidate against babesiosis. PMID:27003460

  7. Shark Variable New Antigen Receptor (VNAR Single Domain Antibody Fragments: Stability and Diagnostic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Nuttall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The single variable new antigen receptor domain antibody fragments (VNARs derived from shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor antibodies (IgNARs represent some of the smallest known immunoglobulin-based protein scaffolds. As single domains, they demonstrate favorable size and cryptic epitope recognition properties, making them attractive in diagnosis and therapy of numerous disease states. Here, we examine the stability of VNAR domains with a focus on a family of VNARs specific for apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1 from Plasmodium falciparum. The VNARs are compared to traditional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs in liquid, lyophilized and immobilized nitrocellulose formats. When maintained in various formats at 45 °C, VNARs have improved stability compared to mAbs for periods of up to four weeks. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy we demonstrate that VNAR domains are able to refold following heating to 80 °C. We also demonstrate that VNAR domains are stable during incubation under potential in vivo conditions such as stomach acid, but not to the protease rich environment of murine stomach scrapings. Taken together, our results demonstrate the suitability of shark VNAR domains for various diagnostic platforms and related applications.

  8. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of crustacean proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen from Litopenaeus vannamei was recombinantly expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were obtained and processed to 3 Å. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, interacts specifically with DNA replication and repair proteins through a small peptide motif called the PCNA-interacting protein or PIP box. PCNA is recognized as one of the key proteins involved in DNA metabolism. In the present study, the recombinant PCNA from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPCNA) was heterologously overexpressed and purified using metal ion-affinity chromatography. Crystals suitable for diffraction grew overnight using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. LvPCNA crystals belong to space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 144.6, b = 83.4, c = 74.3 Å, β = 117.6°. One data set was processed to 3 Å resolution, with an overall Rmeas of 0.09 and a completeness of 93.3%. Initial phases were obtained by molecular replacement using a homology model of LvPCNA as the search model. Refinement and structural analysis are underway. This report is the first successful crystallographic analysis of a marine crustacean decapod shrimp (L. vannamei) proliferating cell nuclear antigen

  9. Inside the Family Firm

    OpenAIRE

    Bennedsen, Morten; Nielsen, Kasper; Pérez-González, Francisco; Wolfenzon, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This paper uses a unique dataset from Denmark to investigate (1) the role of family characteristics in corporate decision making, and (2) the consequences of these decisions on firm performance. We focus on the decision to appoint either a family or an external chief executive officer (CEO). We show that a departing CEO’s family characteristics have a strong predictive power in explaining CEO succession decisions: family CEOs are more frequently selected the larger the size of the family, the...

  10. Families and health interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Lepièce, Brice; Tordeurs, David; Jacques, Denis; Janne, Pascal; Reynaert, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background: In recent years, psychologists of health have attempted to understand the relations between family dynamics and health. The aim of our study is not only to study relations inside families and couples (relations between family of origin, nuclear and ideal family, current and ideal couple) but also outside between families and couples and different health indicator (physical and mental health, consumption of medications, and frequency of medical consultations). Subjects and methods:...

  11. Familial breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Phipps, R. F.; Perry, P M

    1988-01-01

    Familial breast cancer is important because of all the known risk factors associated with developing the disease. The one with the most predictability is a positive family history. It is also important because a family history causes anxiety in the families concerned, and young women will often ask their chance of developing the disease. This form of breast cancer accounts for 10% of causes and has factors that distinguish it from the sporadic variety. Relatives of familial breast cancer pati...

  12. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    OpenAIRE

    Craig T. Vollert; Moree, Wilna J; Steven Gregory; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more...

  13. Novel selective inhibitors of aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Saveanu, Loredana; Stratikos, Efstratios; Vourloumis, Dionisios

    2013-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases, ERAP1 and ERAP2, as well as Insulin regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) play key roles in antigen processing, and have recently emerged as biologically important targets for manipulation of antigen presentation. Taking advantage of the available structural and substrate-selectivity data for these enzymes, we have rationally designed a new series of inhibitors that display low micromolar activity. The selectivity profile for these three highly homologous aminopeptidases provides a promising avenue for modulating intracellular antigen processing. PMID:23916253

  14. T-cell recognition of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in erythrocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii: inhibition of parasitemia by this antigen(s).

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, B.; Engels, A; Camus, D; Haque, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the presence of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in the erythrocyte stage from Plasmodium yoelii (265 BY strain) and Plasmodium falciparum through recognition by T cells primed in vivo with antigens from each of these parasites. BALB/c mice are naturally resistant to P. falciparum but are susceptible to P. yoelii infection. Mice that had recovered from P. yoelii primary infection became resistant to a second infection. A higher in vitro proliferative response ...

  15. Pneumocystis carinii antigen detection in rat serum and lung lavage.

    OpenAIRE

    McNabb, S J; Graves, D C; Kosanke, S.D.; Moyer, M J; Ivey, M H

    1988-01-01

    We developed a modified double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detected relatively low concentrations of known Pneumocystis carinii antigen added to buffer or rat sera. Artificial immunization-derived polyclonal rabbit anti-P. carinii antibody was used on the solid phase to capture the antigen. Infection-derived (after P. carinii pneumonia) polyclonal rat anti-P. carinii antibody or a mixture of five murine monoclonal antibodies was used as the antigen detecto...

  16. Cancer-germline antigen vaccines and epigenetic enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Burns, Jorge; Ditzel, Henrik Jorn

    2010-01-01

    can be achieved using epigenetic modifiers. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: We provide an overview of the potential of CG antigens as targets for cancer immunotherapy, including advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the current state of development of CG antigen vaccines, and the potential...... synergistic effect of combining CG antigen immunotherapeutic strategies with epigenetic modifiers. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: The reader will gain an overview of the past, present and future role of CG antigens in cancer immunotherapy. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Chemoimmunotherapy using epigenetic drugs and CG...

  17. V-antigen homologs in pathogenic gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Teiji; Katoh, Hideya; Yasumoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria cause many types of infections in animals from fish and shrimps to humans. Bacteria use Type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to translocate their toxins directly into eukaryotic cells. The V-antigen is a multifunctional protein required for the TTSS in Yersinia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. V-antigen vaccines and anti-V-antigen antisera confer protection against Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections in animal models. The V-antigen forms a pentameric cap structure at the tip of the Type III secretory needle; this structure, which has evolved from the bacterial flagellar cap structure, is indispensable for toxin translocation. Various pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. encode homologs of the V-antigen. Because the V-antigens of pathogenic gram-negative bacteria play a key role in toxin translocation, they are potential therapeutic targets for combatting bacterial virulence. In the USA and Europe, these vaccines and specific antibodies against V-antigens are in clinical trials investigating the treatment of Yersinia or P. aeruginosa infections. Pathogenic gram-negative bacteria are of great interest because of their ability to infect fish and shrimp farms, their potential for exploitation in biological terrorism attacks, and their ability to cause opportunistic infections in humans. Thus, elucidation of the roles of the V-antigen in the TTSS and mechanisms by which these functions can be blocked is critical to facilitating the development of improved anti-V-antigen strategies. PMID:24641673

  18. ANTIGENICITY OF COW'S MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    T.R. Neyestani; M. Djalali M. I'ezeshki

    2000-01-01

    Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenicity of cow'...

  19. Antigenic composition of single nano-sized extracellular blood vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Anush; Ivanova, Oxana; Vasilieva, Elena; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important in normal physiology and are altered in various pathologies. EVs produced by different cells are antigenically different. Since the majority of EVs are too small for routine flow cytometry, EV composition is studied predominantly in bulk, thus not addressing their antigenic heterogeneity. Here, we describe a nanoparticle-based technique for analyzing antigens on single nano-sized EVs. The technique consists of immuno-capturing of EVs with 15-nm magnetic nanoparticles, staining captured EVs with antibodies against their antigens, and separating them from unbound EVs and free antibodies in a magnetic field, followed by flow analysis. This technique allows us to characterize EVs populations according to their antigenic distribution, including minor EV fractions. We demonstrated that the individual blood EVs carry different sets of antigens, none being ubiquitous, and quantified their distribution. The physiological significance of antigenically different EVs and their correlation with different pathologies can now be directly addressed. From the clinical editor: This study reports a nanoparticle-based technique for analyzing antigens on single nano-sized extracellular vehicles (EV). The technique consists of immuno-capturing of EVs with 15-nm magnetic nanoparticles, followed by staining the captured EVs with antibodies and separating them via a magnetic field, followed by flow analysis. This technique enables studies of antigenic properties of individual EVs that conventionally can only be studied in bulk. PMID:25481806

  20. Antigen-Specific versus Non-Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold Thölking

    Full Text Available ABO-incompatible (ABOi renal transplantation (RTx from living donors is an established procedure to expand the donor pool for patients with end stage renal disease. Immunoadsorption (IA is a standard procedure for the removal of preformed antibodies against the allograft. In this study, antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific IA in ABOi RTx were compared.10 patients underwent antigen-specific IA (Glycosorb group and 13 patients non-antigen-specific IA (Immunosorba group. The effects of both procedures regarding antibody reduction, number of treatments, complications, costs, as well as the allograft function and patient survival were compared between both groups.Although the IgG levels were reduced equally by both procedures (p=0.82, the reduction of the IgM level was more effective in the Glycosorb group (p=0.0172. Patients in both groups required a median number of 6 IA before ABOi RTx. Allograft function at one year after AB0i RTx was similar in both groups (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 66 vs. 64 ml/min/1.73m² respectively, with a death-censored graft survival of 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. Complication rates did not differ between procedures. Due to the reuse of non-antigen-specific Immunosorba columns, costs were considerably lower in this group; however, the use of the Immunosorba-based IA was less time-efficient.Considering upcoming alternatives as simultaneous performance of dialysis and IA or a possible reuse of Glycosorb columns, this might become less relevant in the future.

  1. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats. PMID:18182256

  2. Familial aggregation in inflammatory bowel disease: Is it genes or environment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiago Nunes; Gionata Fiorino; Silvio Danese; Miquel Sans

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develops in genetically susceptible individuals due to the influence of environmental factors, leading to an abnormal recognition of microbiota antigens by the innate immune system which triggers an exaggerated immune response and subsequent bowel tissue damage. IBD has been more frequently found in families, an observation that could be due to either genetic, environmental or both types of factors present in these families. In addition to expanding our knowledge on IBD pathogenesis, defining the specific contribution to familial IBD of each one of these factors might have also clinical usefulness. We review the available evidence on familial IBD pathogenesis.

  3. Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Recognize Epitopes of Protective Antigen following Vaccination with an Anthrax Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Laughlin, Elsa M.; Miller, Joseph D.; James, Eddie; Fillos, Dimitri; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Mittler, Robert S.; Akondy, Rama; Kwok, William; Ahmed, Rafi; Nepom, Gerald,

    2007-01-01

    Detection of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is facilitated by the use of fluorescently labeled soluble peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) multimers which mirror the antigen specificity of T-cell receptor recognition. We have used soluble peptide-MHC class II tetramers containing peptides from the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis to detect circulating T cells in peripheral blood of subjects vaccinated with an anthrax vaccine. PA-specific HLA class II-restricted T lympho...

  4. Antineutrophil antibodies associated with ulcerative colitis interact with the antigen(s) during the process of apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mallolas, J; Esteve, M; Rius, E; Cabre, E; Gassull, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cell death by apoptosis seems to be an important mechanism for translocation to the cell surface of a variety of intracellular components capable of inducing autoantibody production.
AIMS—To identify the cellular location of antigen (Ag)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in non-apoptotic human neutrophils, and to assess if ANCA associated with ulcerative colitis reacts with neutrophil antigen(s) during neutrophil apoptosis. The cellular distribution of Ag-ANCA in apoptot...

  5. Immunochemical properties of antigen-specific monkey T-cell suppressor factor induced with a Streptococcus mutans antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, J R; Zanders, E D; Kontiainen, S; Lehner, T.

    1980-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor factor could be released from monkey suppressor T cells induced in vitro with a protein antigen isolated from the carcinogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. The suppressor activity was due to the factor itself and not to carryover of free antigen. Characterization of the monkey factor revealed it to have a molecular weight of ca. 70,000, and to contain a constant region and determinants encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The presence of immunoglobul...

  6. Presensitization to Ascaris antigens promotes induction of mite-specific IgE upon mite antigen inhalation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mayu Suzuki; Mutsuko Hara; Saori Ichikawa; Seiji Kamijo; Takuya Nakazawa; Hideki Hatanaka; Kazuo Akiyama; Hideoki Ogawa; Ko Okumura; Toshiro Takai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with house dust mite (HDM) allergy or Ascariasis produce serum IgE specific to the antigens of HDM or nematode Ascaris, respectively. Although human IgE cross-reactivity has been reported between HDM and Ascaris antigens, it remains unclear whether it contributes to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. We herein investigated the induction of cross-reactive antibodies and T cells in mice and effects of airway exposure to HDM antigens after preimmunization with Ascaris an...

  7. Wd(a+) red blood cells in two sisters of a Hei//om Khoisan family in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, P; Smart, E; Marks, M; Botha, M C

    1990-01-01

    Two sisters in a Hei//om family of the southern African Khoisan race in Namibia were found to have Wd(a+) red blood cells. Wda is a low-frequency antigen identified so far only in a European family in Canada and a family in Holland. The Wda gene may have had an independent origin in the Khoisan. Alternatively, the Hei//om population may have acquired it through miscegenation. PMID:2265851

  8. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  9. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  10. CD133 antigen expression in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much attention has been recently focused on the role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and progression of solid malignancies. Since CSCs are able to proliferate and self-renew extensively, thus sustaining tumor growth, the identification of CSCs through their antigenic profile might have relevant clinical implications. In this context, CD133 antigen has proved to be a marker of tumor cells with stemness features in several human malignancies. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical role of the immunohistochemically assessed expression of CD133 in a large single Institution series of ovarian cancer patients. The study included 160 cases admitted to the Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University of Campobasso and Rome. CD133 antigen was identified by the monoclonal mouse anti-CD133-1 antibody (clone CD133 Miltenyi biotec). In the overall series CD133 positive tumor cells were observed in 50/160 (31.2%) cases. A diffuse cytoplasmic pattern was identified in 30/50 (60.0%), while an apical cytoplasmic pattern was found in 20/50 (40.0%) of CD133 positive tumors. As of September 2008, the median follow up was 37 months (range: 2–112). During the follow up period, progression and death of disease were observed in 123 (76.9%), and 88 (55.0%) cases, respectively. There was no difference in TTP between cases with negative (median TTP = 23 months) versus positive CD133 expression (median TTP = 24 months) (p value = 0.3). Similar results were obtained for OS. When considering the TTP and OS curves according to the pattern of CD133 expression, a trend to a worse prognosis for cases with diffuse cytoplasmic versus the apical cytoplasmic pattern was documented, although the statistical significance was not reached. The immunohistochemical assessment of CD133 expression seems not to provide additional prognostic information in ovarian cancer patients. The role of the different pattern of CD133 immunoreaction deserves further investigation in a larger

  11. Family Theory and Family Health Research: Understanding the family health and illness cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Different family theories can be applied to different aspects of how families experience health and illness. The family health and illness cycle describes the phases of a family's experience, beginning with health promotion and risk reduction, then family vulnerability and disease onset or relapse, family illness appraisal, family acute response, and finally family adaptation to illness and recovery. For each phase, specific family theories that are most appropriate for guiding family and hea...

  12. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, 32P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed

  13. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  14. Single-Antigen Serological Testing for Bovine Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody responses are useful indicators of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle. Tests for serological responses often use panels of multiple M. bovis antigens as detection probes. This is recommended because responses to single antigens may be too variable for consistent diagnosis. However, the...

  15. Protein antigen adsorption to the DDA/TDB liposomal adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamborg, Mette; Jorgensen, Lene; Bojsen, Anders Riber; Christensen, Dennis; Foged, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of adjuvant-antigen interactions is important for the future design of efficient and safe subunit vaccines, but remains an analytical challenge. We studied the interactions between three model protein antigens and the clinically tested cationic liposomal adjuvant composed...

  16. Expression of Treponema pallidum Antigens in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfield, Alan M.; Hanff, Philip A.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1982-04-01

    Treponema pallidum DNA was cloned in a bacteriophage. Clones were screened for expression of Treponema pallidum antigens by an in situ radio-immunoassay on nitrocellulose, with the use of subsequent reactions with syphilitic serum and radioiodinated Staphylococcus aureus protein A. One clone, which gave a strong signal, codes for at least seven antigens that react specifically with human antibodies to Treponema pallidum.

  17. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  18. Antigen handling in antigen-induced arthritis in mice: an autoradiographic and immunofluorescence study using whole joint sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antigen localization after intraarticular antigen injection was studied in immune and nonimmune mice using autoradiographic and immunofluorescence techniques on whole joint sections. After intraarticular injection of radiolabeled methylated bovine serum albumin (125I-mBSA) in immune mice, labeling in the synovium and synovial exudate diminished rapidly, apart from some deposits in fibrinlike material present in the joint cavity. Long-term antigen retention was found in avascular and hypovascular structures lining the joint cavity, albeit not along the whole surface; eg, labeling remained present at the edges of the femoral condyle hyaline cartilage but not at the central weight-bearing region; long-term retention at ligaments was only found at the insertion sites. Immunofluorescence data in immune animals showed antigen retention together with the presence of immunoglobulins and complement, indicating that antigen is retained at least in part in the form of immune complexes. Nonimmune mice showed even higher long-term antigen retention than immune animals, probably related to physico-chemical properties of the antigen enabling nonimmune binding to articular structures, but also indicating that the presence of joint inflammation in the immune animals enhances antigen clearance. Histologic examination of the ligaments and patellar cartilage of immune mice did reveal that long-term antigen retention was not anatomically related to nearby inflammation or to local tissue damage. The importance of long-term antigen retention for the chronicity of arthritis may lie in the leakage of small amounts of this antigen to joint compartments where it does behave as an inflammatory stimulus; it may further be that it renders the joint a specifically hypersensitive area

  19. Expression and immunoactivity of chimeric particulate antigens of receptor binding site-core antigen of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jie Yang; Ning-Shao Xia; Min Chen; Tong Cheng; Shui-Zhen He; Shao-Wei Li; Bao-Quan Guan; Zi-Heng Zhu; Ying Gu; Jun Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To improve the immunogenicity of receptor binding site of hepatitis B virus (HBV) on preS1 antigen using HBV core antigen as an immuno-carrier.METHODS: One to 6 tandem copies of HBV preS1 (21-47)fragment were inserted into HBcAg at the sites of aa 78 and 82, and expressed in E. coli. ELISA, Western blot and animal immunization were used to analyze the antigenicity and immmunogenicity of purified particulate antigens. The ability to capture HBV by antibodies elicited by chimeric partides was detected with immuno-capture PCR.RESULTS: Recombinant antigens CⅠ, CⅡ, CⅢ carrying 1-3 copies of HBV preS1 (21-47) individually could form viruslike particles (VLPs), similar to HBcAg in morphology. But recombinant antigens carrying 4-6 copies of HBV preS1 (21-47) were poorly expressed in E.coli. Chimeric antigens were lacking of immunoreactivity with anti-HBc monoclonal antibodies (McAbs), but still reserved good immunoreactivity with anti-HBe McAbs. CⅠ, CⅡ, CⅢ could strongly react with anti-preS1 McAb, suggesting that preS1 (21-47) fragment was well exposed on the surface of chimeric VLPs. Three chimeric VLP antigens (CⅠ, CⅡ and CⅢ) could stimulate mice to produce high-level antibody responses, and their immunogenicity was stronger than non-particulate antigen 21-47*6, containing 6 copies of preS1 (21-47). Mouse antibodies to CⅠ, CⅡ and CⅢ were able to capture HBV virions in immuno-capture PCR assay in vitro.CONCLUSION: Chimeric particulate antigens of receptor binding site-core antigen of HBV can elicit strong antibody responses to preS1. They have a potential to be developed into prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines against HBV infection.

  20. Inside the Family Firm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Morten; Nielsen, Kasper; Pérez-González, Francisco;

    2005-01-01

    -child family firms are more likely to pass on control to a family CEO than female first-child firms, but the gender of the first child is unlikely to affect firms' performance. We find that family successions have a dramatic negative causal impact on firm performance: profitability on assets falls by at least......This paper uses a unique dataset from Denmark to investigate (1) the role of family characteristics in corporate decision making, and (2) the consequences of these decisions on firm performance. We focus on the decision to appoint either a family or an external chief executive officer (CEO). We...... show that a departing CEO's family characteristics have a strong predictive power in explaining CEO succession decisions: family CEOs are more frequently selected the larger the size of the family, the higher the ratio of male children and when the departing CEOs had only had one spouse. We then...

  1. Xeroderma Pigmentosum - A Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg Anush

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A family of xeroderma pigmentosum is reported. Four children of different ages were afflicted with varying clinical presentation. Sequential development and progression of the disease from freckling to malignancy within the family are discussed.

  2. Xeroderma Pigmentosum - A Family

    OpenAIRE

    Garg Anush; Singhi M.K

    2000-01-01

    A family of xeroderma pigmentosum is reported. Four children of different ages were afflicted with varying clinical presentation. Sequential development and progression of the disease from freckling to malignancy within the family are discussed.

  3. Importance of Family Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share The Importance of Family Routines Page Content ​Every family needs ... child to sleep. These rituals can include storytelling, reading aloud, conversation, and songs. Try to avoid exciting ...

  4. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    Families of mutually dependent classes that may be accessed polymor- phically provide an advanced tool for separation of concerns, in that it enables client code to use a group of instances of related classes safely without depending on the exact classes involved. However, class families which are...... expressed using virtual classes seem to be very tightly coupled internally. While clients have achieved the freedom to dynamically use one or the other family, it seems that any given family contains a xed set of classes and we will need to create an entire family of its own just in order to replace one of...... the members with another class. This paper shows how to express class families in such a manner that the classes in these families can be used in many dierent combinations, still enabling family polymorphism and ensuring type safety....

  5. Family Patterns in Dogmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Harvey; Steininger, Marion

    1975-01-01

    Explored Rokeach's theory that dogmatism develops within the family. Subjects were college students and their parents who took the 40-item Dogmatism Scale. Results indicated that family experiences are one source of children's dogmatism but not the only source. (SDH)

  6. National Military Family Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 931.6632 info@MilitaryFamily.org © 2016 - National Military Family Association Twitter Facebook Pinterest Instagram Charity Navigator Four Star Charity GuideStar Exchange Better Business Bureau Charity Watch Independent Charity of America nonprofit ...

  7. Familial combined hyperlipidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000396.htm Familial combined hyperlipidemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial combined hyperlipidemia is a disorder that is passed down ...

  8. Resilience of refugee families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batić Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to find a correlation between the trauma of family members of war and exile, and the characteristics of family functioning and lasted from 1992-1995. The term “family resilience” refers to the processes of adaptation and coping in the family as a functional unit. This paper presents a study of refugee families from Bosnia, who lived in refugee camps in Macedonia during the war of 1992- 1995. Data were obtained by interviews, observations, and a number of psychological instruments especially for children and parents, which measured the effects of psychological stress and family relationships. Based on the results obtained by quantitative and qualitative analysis, and application of theoretical models of systemic theory and family therapy, existence for four types of refugee families has been found and described, depending on the structure and the level of functionality.

  9. Family Caregiver Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... path forward. Discover ways to survive, post-caregiving. >> FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... our Advanced Search FCA Blog A Complex Web: Family Caregiving and Healthcare [Editor's note: This blog was ...

  10. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic disorders ...

  11. Family Policy in France

    OpenAIRE

    Fagnani, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    Over the last two decades, contrary to the pension system, the family policy branch of the Social security system has been immune to cutbacks in provision and no retrenchment measures have been implemented. This mirrors the salience of family-related issues in the social and political agenda. This also reflects the fact that the family branch and its large network of Local Allowance Funds (CAFs) are responsible for the management of welfare state provisions. The family branch is a transfer-he...

  12. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky;

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled...... with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic...... potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds...

  13. Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens in major salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, M H; Mandel, U; Thorn, J; Christensen, M; Dabelsteen, Erik

    1994-01-01

    Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens Tn, sialosyl-Tn and T are often markers of neoplastic transformation and have very limited expression in normal tissues. We performed an immunohistological study of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, including H and A variants, with well-defined monoc......Simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens Tn, sialosyl-Tn and T are often markers of neoplastic transformation and have very limited expression in normal tissues. We performed an immunohistological study of simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens, including H and A variants, with well...... were predominantly observed in the cell cytoplasm, most often in the supranuclear area, suggesting localization to the Golgi region, whereas ductal contents were unstained. Mucous acinar cells expressed Tn, sialosyl-Tn, and H and A antigens, regardless of glandular location. Serous acinar cells, on the...

  14. [HLA and keloids: antigenic frequency and therapeutic response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A; Bozzi, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty keloid subjects were typed for class 1 (HLA-A, B and C) and class 2 (HLA-DR and DQ) histocompatibility antigens. Their frequencies were compared to those found in control populations. Of all the antigens belonging to class 1, B 21 was more prevalent in patients. The findings regarding class 2 antigens were noteworthy: in keloid patients there was a significant prevalence of DR 5 (RR = 3.54 and 7.93 respectively for the two control groups) and DQw 3 (RR = 16.8). The patients typed for HLA-antigens were treated with corticosteroid infiltrations. The responses to the treatments were no related to the histocompatibility antigens. PMID:2628278

  15. Methods for examination of antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To choose and establish the methods for examination of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin in order to offer the reference for evaluating the antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin against human. Methods: Antigenicity of heterogeneous polymerized hemoglobin was examined for hypersensitivity, cell-mediated immunity reaction, humoral immunity reaction and cross-reaction of antigen. Results: The rabbit and guinea pig did not give rise to hypersensitivity. In immunized rabbits, the level of serum total IgG was normal, but the level of serum specific IgG was high. The examination of B lymphocytes showed that there was no significant difference (P>0.05) in comparison with control. Cross-reaction of antigen proved that bovine hemoglobin had cross-reaction with human hemoglobin. Suggesting that they may be homologous, the level of the serum specific antibody is high in the immunized animal. According to the immunology theories, the polymerized hemoglobin has antigenicity. (authors)

  16. Localization of Enterobacterial Common Antigen: Immunogenic and Nonimmunogenic Enterobacterial Common Antigen-Containing Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Rinno, J.; Golecki, J R; Mayer, H

    1980-01-01

    In rabbits immunized with intact bacteria, the immune response to the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) predominantly consists of the production of immunoglobulin M antibodies. This is not dependent on whether the animals are immunized for a short (2 weeks) or a long (3 months) period of time. The highest ECA-specific immunoglobulin G titers were observed after a short immunization with living bacteria. ECA-specific antisera were obtained by absorption with appropriate ECA-negative mutants...

  17. Molecular identification and antigenic characterization of a merozoite surface antigen and a secreted antigen of Babesia canis (BcMSA1 and BcSA1)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Mo; Cao, Shinuo; Luo, Yuzi; Liu, Mingming; Wang, Guanbo; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; IGUCHI, Aiko; Vudriko, Patrick; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Löwenstein, Mario; Kern, Angela; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Babesia canis is an apicomplexan tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan responsible for causing canine babesiosis in Europe and west Asia. Despite its importance, there is no known rapid diagnostic kit detection of B. canis infection in dogs. The present study identified two novel antigens of B. canis and used the recombinant antigens to establish a rapid, specific and sensitive serodiagnostic technique for detection of B. canis infection. Methods A complementary DNA (cDNA) expression libr...

  18. A family with extrinsic allergic alveolitis caused by wild city pigeons: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. du Marchie Sarvaas; P.J.F.M. Merkus (Peter); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe describe a family in which the mother died of unresolved lung disease and whose 5 children, some of whom had previous signs of asthma, were subsequently affected by extrinsic allergic alveolitis caused by contact with wild city pigeon antigens. The children received

  19. Family systems and fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moenkediek, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies the role of regional family organization principles, so called family systems, for explaining fertility behaviours in different parts of Europe. Studying family systems and its impact on fertility is important, because many aspects of societal life, such as the organization of we

  20. Family Customs and Traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  1. Genetics of familial melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Wadt, Karin A W; Pritchard, Antonia L;

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the first familial melanoma susceptibility gene, CDKN2A, was identified. Two years later, another high-penetrance gene, CDK4, was found to be responsible for melanoma development in some families. Progress in identifying new familial melanoma genes was subsequently slow; however...

  2. Single Mothers "Do" Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Margaret K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores how single mothers both incorporate others into family life (e.g., when they ask others to care for their children) and simultaneously "do families" in a manner that holds out a vision of a "traditional" family structure. Drawing on research with White, rural single mothers, the author explores the manner in which these women…

  3. Strengthening America's Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Rose; Kumpfer, Karol

    2000-01-01

    Improving parenting practices and the family environment is the most effective, enduring strategy for combating juvenile delinquency. Describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Strengthening America's Families Initiative. Highlights several family-focused prevention programs identified as exemplary, explaining how they…

  4. Family Reunion Health Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HEALTH GUIDE CONTENTS 19 of 23 Planning Tips Planning Tip 1. | Create a family history health chart. A Web-based tool for ... portrait can be found at familyhistory. hhs. gov . Planning Tip 2. | Develop a Family Reunion Facebook page and help family members stay ...

  5. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  6. The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host-parasite interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Jackson, Andrew P.

    2014-05-05

    Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5? ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct. 2014 The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Case of rhesus antigen weak D type 4.2. (DAR category detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Golovkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serological methods of Rhesus antigens identification in humans cannot identify D-antigen variants. In this article the serological characteristics of Rhesus antigen D weak type 4.2. (Category DAR are described.

  8. Nomenclature for clusters of differentiation (CD) of antigens defined on human leukocyte populations*

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Evaluation of 139 monoclonal antibodies detecting human leukocyte differentiation antigens during the First International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens in 1982 permitted the designation of a nomenclature for the Clusters of Differentiation of antigens defined on human leukocyte populations.

  9. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M;

    1987-01-01

    ), when labeled erythrocytes were the antigen source, or trimers (130 kd), when B-G was purified and precipitated from CEM. The B-G antigen was unglycosylated as studied by in vitro synthesis in the presence or absence of tunicamycin, binding experiments with lectin from Phaseolus limensis, and treatment...

  10. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for prostate cancer, such as ethnicity and family history Men at high risk may need to have more tests. These may include: Repeating your PSA test, most often sometime within 3 months A prostate biopsy A follow-up test called a free PSA ( ...

  11. Expression of an antigen homologous to the human CO17-1A/GA733 colon cancer antigen in animal tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaloudik, J; Basak, S.; Nesbit, M.; Speicher, D W; Wunner, W H; Miller, E.; Ernst-Grotkowski, C.; Kennedy, R; Bergsagel, L. P.; Koido, T.; Herlyn, D

    1997-01-01

    The CO17-1A/GA733 antigen is associated with human carcinomas and some normal epithelial tissues. This antigen has shown promise as a target in approaches to passive and active immunotherapy of colorectal cancer. The relevance of animal models for studies of immunotherapy targeting this antigen in patients is dependent on the expression of the antigen on normal animal tissues. Immunohistoperoxidase staining with polyclonal rabbit antibodies to the human antigen revealed the human homologue on...

  12. Comparison of antigen-specific T-cell responses of tuberculosis patients using complex or single antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, A S; Amoudy, H A; Wiker, H G; Abal, A T; Ravn, P; Oftung, F; Andersen, P

    1998-01-01

    GroES, rPstS, rGroEL and rDnaK) antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The responses of PBMC to these defined antigens were compared with the corresponding results obtained with complex antigens, such as whole-cell M. tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis culture filtrate (MT-CF) and cell wall antigens, as well......-induced proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion showed that the most frequently recognized antigen was ESAT-6, followed by MPT59, GroES, MPB70, MPT64, DnaK, GroEL and PstS. The frequency of ESAT-6 responders, as measured both by proliferation (18/19) and secretion of IFN-gamma (16/19) was comparable to the results...

  13. Family traditions and generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderman, Gerald; Barrera, Maru

    2009-01-01

    Currently, traditional family values that have been passed down through generations appear to be at risk. This has significant implications for the stability and health of individuals, families, and communities. This article explores selected issues related to intergenerational transmission of family values and cultural beliefs, with particular reference to Western culture and values that are rooted in Jewish and Christian traditions. It also examines family values and parenting styles as they influence the developing perspective of children and the family's adaptation to a changing world. PMID:19752638

  14. [Family policy in Belgium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumon, W

    1987-01-01

    The development of family policy in Belgium since the end of World War I is described. Three periods are identified. The original objectives were to provide a basic income level for all families and to promote fertility. After World War II, measures were introduced to foster the physical and psychological health of the family, including the protection of women's rights. More recent policy trends have concentrated on family income and providing services at the family rather than the institutional level. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) PMID:12280764

  15. Mucin associated Tn and sialosyl-Tn antigen expression in colorectal polyps.

    OpenAIRE

    Itzkowitz, S. H.; Bloom, E J; Lau, T. S.; Kim, Y. S.

    1992-01-01

    Sialosyl-Tn antigen and its immediate precursor, Tn antigen, are carbohydrate structures associated with the earliest steps of mucin O-linked glycosylation. Both antigens have been shown previously to be highly sensitive and specific markers of colorectal cancer. One hundred and three colorectal polyps (79 adenomatous; 24 hyperplastic) were examined for expression of Tn antigen using vicia villosa isolectin B4, and for sialosyl-Tn antigen by monoclonal antibody TKH2. Tn antigen was expressed ...

  16. Microglial MHC antigen expression after ischemic and kainic acid lesions of the adult rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finsen, B.R.; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Diemer, Nils Henrik;

    1993-01-01

    Leukocyte common antigen, macrophages, blood-brain barrier, neural degeneration, fascia dentata, neuropathology......Leukocyte common antigen, macrophages, blood-brain barrier, neural degeneration, fascia dentata, neuropathology...

  17. NKT cell stimulation with glycolipid antigen in vivo: co-stimulation-dependent expansion, Bim-dependent contraction, and hypo-responsiveness to further antigenic challenge1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyparissoudis, Konstantinos; Pellicci, Daniel G.; Zhan, Yifan; Lew, Andrew M.; Bouillet, Philippe; Strasser, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J.; Godfrey, Dale I.

    2005-01-01

    Activation of NKT cells using the glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer4) has availed many investigations into their immunoregulatory and therapeutic potential. However, it remains unclear how NKT cells respond to stimulation in vivo, which co-stimulatory pathways are important, and what factors (eg. antigen availability and activation-induced cell death) limit their response. We have explored these questions in the context of anin vivo model of NKT cell dynamics spanning activation, population expansion and subsequent contraction. Neither the B7/CD28 nor the CD40/CD40-L co-stimulatory pathways were necessary for cytokine production by activated NKT cells, either early (2 hours) or late (3 days) following initial stimulation, but both pathways were necessary for normal proliferative expansion of NKT cells in vivo. The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bim was necessary for normal contraction of the NKT cell population between days 3-9 after stimulation, suggesting the pool size is regulated by apoptotic cell death in a manner similar to that of conventional T cells. Antigen availability was not the limiting factor for NKT cell expansion in vivo, and a second injection of α-GalCer induced a very blunted response, whereby cytokine production was reduced and further expansion did not occur. This appeared to be a form of anergy that was intrinsic to the NKT cells and not associated with up-regulation of inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A or Ly49 family members. Furthermore, NKT cells from mice pre-challenged with α-GalCer in vivoshowed little cytokine production and reduced proliferation in vitro. In summary, this study significantly enhances our understanding of how NKT cells respond to α-GalCer in vivo, revealing that the full primary response depends on costimulation via the CD28 and CD40 pathways, with subsequent Bim-dependent contraction. After contraction, the NKT cells are hypo-responsive to further antigenic induced expansion. PMID:16116198

  18. Antigenic variation with a twist--the Borrelia story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Steven J

    2006-06-01

    A common mechanism of immune evasion in pathogenic bacteria and protozoa is antigenic variation, in which genetic or epigenetic changes result in rapid, sequential shifts in a surface-exposed antigen. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Dai et al. provide the most complete description to date of the vlp/vsp antigenic variation system of the relapsing fever spirochaete, Borrelia hermsii. This elaborate, plasmid-encoded system involves an expression site that can acquire either variable large protein (vlp) or variable small protein (vsp) surface lipoprotein genes from 59 different archival copies. The archival vlp and vsp genes are arranged in clusters on at least five different plasmids. Gene conversion occurs through recombination events at upstream homology sequences (UHS) found in each gene copy, and at downstream homology sequences (DHS) found periodically among the vlp/vsp archival genes. Previous studies have shown that antigenic variation in relapsing fever Borrelia not only permits the evasion of host antibody responses, but can also result in changes in neurotropism and other pathogenic properties. The vlsE antigenic variation locus of Lyme disease spirochaetes, although similar in sequence to the relapsing fever vlp genes, has evolved a completely different antigenic variation mechanism involving segmental recombination from a contiguous array of vls silent cassettes. These two systems thus appear to represent divergence from a common precursor followed by functional convergence to create two distinct antigenic variation processes. PMID:16796669

  19. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  20. A 2-Step Laemmli and Antigen Retrieval Method Improves Immunodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalia, Carla R; Gendusa, Rossella; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Detection by immunohistochemistry of antigens relies on reproducibly optimal preanalytical and analytical variables such as fixation conditions, antigen retrieval (AR), and the resolutive power of the detection system. There is a need to improve immunodetection on routinely fixed and embedded material, particularly for scarcely represented but relevant antigens. We devised a 2-step method and applied it to a panel of antigens of common use for diagnosis, prognosis, individualized therapy use, or research. The first step consists of a 10 minutes. Incubation at 95°C with a modified Laemmli extraction buffer. This was followed by a traditional AR method. Detection of the vast majority of antigens was improved over a simple AR with preservation of tissue integrity, as shown by quantitative image analysis. The mechanism underlying the improved detection may be controlled denaturation followed by heat-mediated retrieval, a method we dubbed "antigen relaxing" and which will improve routine detection of scarce antigens in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. PMID:26067142

  1. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H Steven

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to the modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in the expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and that are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum, and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (such as Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  2. H-Y antigen expression in different tissues from transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoljar, M; Eicher, W; Eiermann, W; Cleve, H

    1981-01-01

    H-Y-antigen expression was analyzed in patients with transsexuality. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and various tissues were examined using the cytotoxicity assay of Goldberg et al. (1971). Peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy male and female subjects were used as controls as well as tissues from non-transsexual individuals and from male and female C57B1/6J mice. In three female-to-male transsexuals the peripheral blood lymphocytes were H-Y antigen positive. In these patients also their ovaries, uterus, and mammae were found to be H-Y antigen positive. Three male-to-female transsexuals were examined. The peripheral blood lymphocytes in two of these patients were found to be H-Y antigen negative. Their testes were also H-Y antigen negative, as well as the epididymus, the corpus cavernosum penis, and the cremaster muscle which was analyzed in one of them. One male-to-female transsexual had peripheral blood lymphocytes which were H-Y antigen positive; this patient had testis and corpus cavernosum penis which were also H-Y-antigen positive. PMID:7262869

  3. Does antibody binding to diverse antigens predict future infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, J P; Waite, J L; Holden, K Z; Clayton, D H

    2014-11-01

    We studied diverse antigen binding in hosts and the outcome of parasitism. We used captive-bred F1 descendants of feral rock pigeons (Columba livia) challenged with blood-feeding flies (Hippoboscidae) and a protozoan parasite (Haemoproteus). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunoblots were used to test (i) whether pre-infection IgY antigen binding predicts parasite fitness and (ii) whether antigen binding changes after infection. Assays used extracts from three pigeon parasites (northern fowl mite, Salmonella bacteria and avian pox virus), as well as nonparasitic molecules from cattle, chicken and keyhole limpet. Binding to hippoboscid and S. enterica extracts were predictive of hippoboscid fly fitness. Binding to extracts from hippoboscids, pox virus and nonparasitic organisms was predictive of Haemoproteus infection levels. Antigen binding to all extracts increased after parasite challenge, despite the fact that birds were only exposed to flies and Haemoproteus. Immunoblots suggested innate Ig binding to parasite-associated molecular markers and revealed that new antigens were bound in extracts after infection. These data suggest that host antibody binding to diverse antigens predicts parasite fitness even when the antigens are not related to the infecting parasite. We discuss the implications of these data for the study of host-parasite immunological interaction. PMID:25313676

  4. Screening for familial and hereditary prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Leslie, Stephen W; Rendell, Marc; Shaw, Trudy; Snyder, Carrie; D'Amico, Anthony V; Buxbaum, Sarah; Isaacs, William B; Loeb, Stacy; Moul, Judd W; Powell, Isaac

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) has the highest degree of genetic transmission of any form of malignancy. In some families, the hereditary pattern is so strong as to mimic an autosomal dominance trait. We reviewed the known predisposing genetic markers to assess possible strategies for screening of families at risk. We carried out a systematic literature search using the Pubmed service of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and several gene libraries, including the NCBI SNP Library, the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man® Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders (OMIM) and SNPedia to obtain known gene loci, SNPs and satellite markers associated with PC. We further cross referenced information on identified loci comparing data from different articles and gene reference sites. Whenever possible, we recorded the odds ratio (OR) for the allele associated with PC. In multiple different linkage studies, many independent PC associated loci have been identified on separate chromosomes. Genome-wide association studies have added many more markers to the set derived from linkage investigations. A subset of the alleles is associated with early onset and aggressive cancer. Due to the great heterogeneity, the OR for any one allele predicting future development of this malignancy is low. The strongest predictors are the BRCA2 mutations, and the highly penetrant G84E mutation in HOXB13. The presence of multiple risk alleles is more highly predictive than a single allele. Technical limitations on screening large panels of alleles are being overcome. It is appropriate to begin supplementing prostate specific antigen testing with alleles, such as BRCA2 and HOXB13, disclosed by targeted genomic analysis in families with an unfavorable family cancer history. Future population studies of PC should include genomic sequencing protocols, particularly in families with a history of PC and other malignancies. PMID:26638190

  5. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  6. Family governance practices and teambuilding : Paradox of the enterprising family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berent-Braun, M.M.; Uhlaner, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between family governance practices and financial performance of the business and family assets of business-owning families. A business-owning family that shares a focus on preserving and growing wealth as a family is defined as the enterprising family. Results o

  7. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  8. Myth of the Perfect Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... together fulfill the multiple responsibilities of family life. MYTH: The "Nuclear Family" Is A Universal Phenomenon The ... members and in progressive fragmentation of the family. MYTH: Family Harmony Is The Rule, Not The Exception ...

  9. Detection of hepatitis A viral antigen by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With coded samples, the effectiveness and specificity of a micro-SPIRA procedure for rapidly and quantitatively detecting type A hepatitis-associated antigen in large numbers of specimens from infected liver, stool, or serum has been demonstrated. Samples which were judged to be negative by IEM were found to contain significant levels of HAV antigen by this immunoradiometric technique. The detection of significant levels of HAV antigen in infected chimpanzees supports epidemiologic evidence of viremia during the acute stage of the disease. The results of this study suggest that the diagnosis of type A hepatitis by a convention serologic procedure may now be at hand. (auth)

  10. ANTIGENICITY OF COWS MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    Djalali, M; T.R. Neyestani; M. Iezeshki

    2000-01-01

    Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenici...

  11. The use of high-throughput DNA sequencing in the investigation of antigenic variation: application to Neisseria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Davies

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3' end of the silent loci (copy 1 as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11 are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species.

  12. Immunofluorescence antigen mapping for hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa (EB is a group of inherited, mechanobullous disorders that are caused by mutations in the structural proteins in the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction. Characteristic clinical picture is the presence of blisters at trauma prone areas of the body, which develops at or soon after birth. Availability of specific monoclonal antibodies against the target proteins together with advances in the molecular genetics have led to the revision in the classification of EB. Now four major types of EB are recognized depending upon the level of blister and the location of target protein: EB simplex (epidermolytic, junctional EB (lucidolytic, dystrophic EB (dermolytic and Kindler′s syndrome (mixed cleavage plane. The laboratory tests not only help to confirm the diagnosis of EB but are also an important tool to classify (and subtype EB. These include immunofluorescence antigen mapping (IFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and mutation analysis. IFM is the most preferred method for final diagnosis of EB worldwide. It is relatively easy to perform and results can be obtained rapidly. This article describes the technicalities and significance of IFM in various types of EB.

  13. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  14. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J; Beeson, James G; Plowe, Christopher V

    2015-12-22

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines. PMID:26475447

  15. Pericyte Antigens in Perivascular Soft Tissue Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Asatrian, Greg; Mravic, Marco; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Dry, Sarah M.; Peault, Bruno; James, Aaron W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear line of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from pericytes or modified perivascular cells. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor (previously termed hemangiopericytoma) was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation. Methods Here, we systematically examine pericyte immunohistochemical markers among glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, angioleiomyoma, and solitary fibrous tumor. Immunohistochemical staining and semiquantification was performed using well-defined pericyte antigens, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Results Glomus tumor and myopericytoma demonstrate diffuse staining for all pericyte markers, including immunohistochemical reactivity for αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Malignant glomus tumors all showed some degree of pericyte marker immunoreactivity, although it was significantly reduced. Angioleiomyoma shared a similar αSMA + CD146 + PDGFRβ+ immunophenotype; however, this was predominantly seen in the areas of perivascular tumor growth. Solitary fibrous tumors showed patchy PDGFRβ immunoreactivity only. Discussion In summary, pericyte marker expression is a ubiquitous finding in glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma. Malignant glomus tumor shows a comparative reduction in pericyte marker expression, which may represent partial loss of pericytic differentiation. Pericyte markers are essentially not seen in solitary fibrous tumor. The combination of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ immunohistochemical stainings may be of utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26085647

  16. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  17. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species, the...... longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  18. Familial germ cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanju Cyriac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial testicular germ cell tumors are well known in literature. Only few cases are reported where both brother and sister of the same family suffered from germ cell malignancies. We present a family where the proband is a survivor of ovarian dysgerminoma stage IA. Her elder male sibling became acutely ill and was detected to have disseminated testicular malignancy with grossly elevated markers and vegetations in the mitral valve leaflets. Despite all measures he could not be saved. Presence of germ cell malignancies in the siblings of different sex in the same family points toward a genetic susceptibility. Literature review revealed only six similar cases. A discussion regarding the rare occurrence of familial germ cell malignancies with the affected family members may be worthwhile.

  19. Radiolabelled parasite antigens as tools for diagnosis and identification of protective antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabelling specific compartments and molecules of parasites provides a valuable tool for establishing parasite antigen-host response systems with utility and/or importance in protection, diagnosis and pathology. The combined immunological, biochemical and molecular biological expertise currently available forms a sufficient basis for a relatively logical and effective programme directed towards the ultimate eradication of tropical diseases. The organization of carefully selected and clinically well characterized sera and patients, representing the range of commonly occurring parasitic infections, would be of great practical value in the pursuance of this goal. (author)

  20. Gender and family stability

    OpenAIRE

    Livia Sz. Oláh

    2001-01-01

    The increasing trend of partnership disruption among families with children in recent decades has been accompanied by substantial changes in traditional gender roles in industrialized countries. Yet, relatively little is known about the effects of changing gender relations on family stability in the European context. In this paper, we study such gender influences at the familial and societal level in Sweden and Hungary between the mid-1960s and the early 1990s. We focus on the disruption of t...