WorldWideScience

Sample records for carburetted water gas

  1. Designing a Prototype LPG Injection Electronic Control Unit for a Carburetted Gasoline Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış ERKUŞ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the originally carburetted gasoline engine was converted to gas-phase liquefied petroleum gas (LPG injection engine by using an after market LPG conversion kit's components except the electronic control unit (ECU. Instead of after market LPG injection ECU, the ECU which was designed considering the effects of  electromagnetic interference (EMI, was used for controlling injection. The designed ECU was tested in terms of EMI while the engine was being run and it was detected that the EMI noises could be suppressed as possible by taken measures. Designed ECU was used in performance tests at different engine conditions and the results obtained with LPG injection were compared with the results obtained with LPG carburetion. According to the performance test results, LPG injection ECU designed in this study could help to achieve low exhaust emissions and high engine performance.  

  2. Engine Tune-Up Service. Unit 5: Fuel and Carburetion Systems. Student Guide. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ludy

    This student guide is for Unit 5, Fuel and Carburetion Systems, in the Engine Tune-Up Service portion of the Automotive Mechanics Curriculum. It deals with inspecting and servicing the fuel and carburetion systems. A companion review exercise book and posttests are available separately as CE 031 218-219. An introduction tells how this unit fits…

  3. Gasoline-related organics in Lake Tahoe before and after prohibition of carbureted two-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lico, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    On June 1, 1999, carbureted two-stroke engines were banned on waters within the Lake Tahoe Basin of California and Nevada. The main gasoline components MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) were present at detectable concentrations in all samples taken from Lake Tahoe during 1997-98 prior to the ban. Samples taken from 1999 through 2001 after the ban contained between 10 and 60 percent of the pre-ban concentrations of these compounds, with MTBE exhibiting the most dramatic change (a 90 percent decrease). MTBE and BTEX concentrations in water samples from Lake Tahoe and Lower Echo Lake were related to the amount of boat use at the sampling sites. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds are produced by high-temperature pyrolytic reactions. They were sampled using semipermeable membrane sampling devices in Lake Tahoe and nearby Donner Lake, where carbureted two-stroke engines are legal. PAHs were detected in all samples taken from Lake Tahoe and Donner Lake. The number of PAH compounds and their concentrations are related to boat use. The highest concentrations of PAH were detected in samples from two heavily used boating areas, Tahoe Keys Marina and Donner Lake boat ramp. Other sources of PAH, such as atmospheric deposition, wood smoke, tributary streams, and automobile exhaust do not contribute large amounts of PAH to Lake Tahoe. Similar numbers of PAH compounds and concentrations were found in Lake Tahoe before and after the ban of carbureted two-stroke engines. ?? by the North American Lake Management Society 2004.

  4. Carburetant and its Selection%增碳剂及其选用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠国栋; 许翔; 张潇; 马斌悍; 邵亮峰; 王利民

    2016-01-01

    增碳剂在铸造时使用,可大幅度增加废钢用量,减少生铁用量或不用生铁。目前绝大多数增碳剂都适用于电炉熔炼,也有少部分吸收速度特别快的增碳剂用于冲天炉。电炉熔炼的投料方式,应将增碳剂随废钢等炉料一起投放,小剂量的添加可以选择加在铁水表面。但是要避免大批量往铁水里投料,以防止氧化过多而出现增碳效果不明显和铸件碳含量不够的情况。增碳剂的加入量根据其他原材料的配比和含碳量决定。不同种类的铸件,根据需要选择不同型号的增碳剂。增碳剂本身选择纯净的含碳石墨化物质,可降低生铁里过多的杂质,增碳剂选择合适可降低铸件生产成本。目前,国内外对增碳剂及其选用的系统性研究报道比较少,本文对增碳剂和增碳剂的选用进行系统性研究。%Carburetant could significantly increase the amount of scrap during casting, reduce the amount of pig iron or no iron. At present, most carburetant were suitable for smelting furnace, a small number of carburetant with particularly fast absorption rate was fit for the cupola. The feeding mode of furnace was carbon agent added together with the scrap charge. To the small dosage, the adding mode of carburetant was added in the surface. The adding of large quantities of iron into the hot metal should be avoid in order to prevent the occurs of carbon ineffective and the deficiency of casting carbon content. The adding amount of carburetant was based on the ratio of carbon content to other raw materials. The selection of carburetant depended on casting need, the suitable choose could reduce the cost of casting production. The carburetant and its selection were reviewed in this paper.

  5. PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION STUDIES ON DI-DIESEL ENGINE FUELED WITH PONGAMIA METHYL ESTER INJECTION AND METHANOL CARBURETION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARIBABU, N.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The target of the present study is to clarify ignition characteristics, combustion process and knock limit of methanol premixture in a dual fuel diesel engine, and also to improve the trade-off between NOx and smoke markedly without deteriorating the high engine performance. Experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of direct injection diesel engine operating in duel fuel mode using Pongamia methyl ester injection and methanol carburetion. Methanol is introduced into the engine at different throttle openings along with intake air stream by a carburetor which is arranged at bifurcated air inlet. Pongamia methyl ester fuel was supplied to the engine by conventional fuel injection. The experimental results show that exhaust gas temperatures are moderate and there is better reduction of NOx, HC, CO and CO2 at methanol mass flow rate of 16.2 mg/s. Smoke level was observed to be low and comparable. Improved thermal efficiency of the engine was observed.

  6. Comparative Studies on Exhaust Emissions from a Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engine with Carbureted Methanol and Jatropha Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. R. Seshagiri Rao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out to control the exhaust emissions from different versions of low heat rejection (LHR diesel engine- LHR-1 engine, LHR-2 engine and LHR-3 with carbureted methanol and crude jatropha oil (CJO. Exhaust emissions of smoke, oxides of nitrogen (NOx and aldehydes from different configurations of the LHR engines were determined at peak load operation of the engine with test fuels with varied injection pressure and compared with pure diesel operation on conventional engine (CE. LHR-1 engine contained a ceramic coated cylinder head engine, LHR-2 engine- Air gap insulated piston with 3-mm air gap with superni (an alloy of nickel crown and air gap insulated liner with superni insert, and LHR-3 engine- ceramic coated cylinder head, air gap insulated piston and air gap insulated liner. Smoke and NOx were measured at peak load operation by AVL Smoke meter and Netel Chromatograph NOx analyzer respectively. Aldehydes which include formaldehyde and acetaldehyde at peak load operation were measured by dinitrophenyle (DNPH method. LHR-3 version of the engine decreased exhaust emissions considerably with carbureted methanol. Smoke emissions decreased by 58�20while NOx emissions decreased by 12�0with LHR-3 engine in comparison with CE with pure diesel operation. The emissions decreased further with increase of injection pressure in different versions of the engine.

  7. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  8. Panorama 2011: Unconventional gas and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a number of years now, the rapid development of unconventional gas use in North America has been revolutionising the natural gas market. This generic term refers to several production types, such as tight gas, shale gas and coal bed methane. What they have in common is that the rock needs to be 'stimulated' in order to extract gas from it that can be commercially produced. These methods (horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing) all involve sensible management of the water needed for gas production. (author)

  9. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  10. Study of liquid fuel transport in a small carburetted engine in the context of cold-start HC emission control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumit Tewari; T N C Anand; M P Nishikant; R V Ravikrishna

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, a detailed visualization of the transport of fuel film has been performed in a small carburetted engine with a transparent manifold at the exit of the carburettor. The presence of fuel film is observed significantly on the lower half of the manifold at idling, while at load conditions, the film is found to be distributed all throughout the manifold walls. Quantitative measurement of the fuel film in a specially-designed manifold of square cross section has also been performed using the planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. The measured fuel film thickness is observed to be of the order of 1 mm at idling, and in the range of 0.1 to 0.4 mm over the range of load and speed studied. These engine studies are complemented by experiments conducted in a carburettor rig to study the state of the fuel exiting the carburettor. Laser-based Particle/Droplet Image Analysis (PDIA) technique is used to identify fuel droplets and ligaments and estimate droplet diameters. At a throttle position corresponding to idling, the fuel exiting the carburettor is found to consist of very fine droplets of size less than 15 m and large fuel ligaments associated with length scales of the order of 500 m and higher. For a constant pressure difference across the carburettor, the fuel consists of droplets with an SMD of the order of 30 m. Also, the effect of liquid fuel film on the cold start HC emissions is studied. Based on the understanding obtained from these studies, strategies such as manifold heating and varying carburettor main jet nozzle diameter are implemented. These are observed to reduce emissions under both idling and varying load conditions.

  11. Gas and Water Permeability of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Gutierrez-Rodirgo, V.; Barcala, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The gas pressure of concrete samples was measured in an unsteady-state equipment working under low injection pressures and in a newly fine tuned steady-state setup working under different pressures. These measurements allowed the estimation of the intrinsic and relative gas permeability of the concrete and of the effect of boundary conditions on them. Permeability decreased with water content, but it was also greatly affected by the hydraulic history of concrete, i.e. if it had been previously dried or wetted. In particular, and for a given degree of saturation, the gas permeability of concrete previously saturated was lower than if the concrete had been just air dried or saturated after air drying. In any case, the gas permeability was about two orders of magnitude higher than the liquid water permeability (10-16 vs. 10-18 m2), probably due to the chemical reactions taking place during saturation (carbonation). The relative gas permeability of concrete increased sharply for water degrees of saturation smaller than 50%. The boundary conditions also affected the gas permeability, which seemed to be mostly conditioned by the back pressure and the confining pressure, increasing as the former increased and decreasing as the latter increased, i.e. decreasing as the effective pressure increased. Overall the increase of pressure head or injection pressure implied a decrease in gas permeability. External,microcracking during air-drying could not be ruled out as responsible for the decrease of permeability with confining pressure. The apparent permeability obtained applying the Klinkenberg method for a given effective pressure was only slightly smaller than the average of all the values measured for the same confining pressure range. For this reason it is considered that the Klinkenberg effect was not relevant in the range of pressures applied. (Author) 37 refs.

  12. Treatment of Oil & Gas Produced Water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, Brian P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Production of oil and gas reserves in the New Mexico Four Corners Region results in large volumes of "produced water". The common method for handling the produced water from well production is re-injection in regulatory permitted salt water disposal wells. This is expensive (%7E $5/bbl.) and does not recycle water, an ever increasingly valuable commodity. Previously, Sandia National Laboratories and several NM small business tested pressure driven membrane-filtration techniques to remove the high TDS (total dissolved solids) from a Four Corners Coal Bed Methane produced water. Treatment effectiveness was less than optimal due to problems with pre-treatment. Inadequate pre-treatment allowed hydrocarbons, wax and biological growth to foul the membranes. Recently, an innovative pre-treatment scheme using ozone and hydrogen peroxide was pilot tested. Results showed complete removal of hydrocarbons and the majority of organic constituents from a gas well production water. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report was made possible through funding from the New Mexico Small Business Administration (NMSBA) Program at Sandia National Laboratories. Special thanks to Juan Martinez and Genaro Montoya for guidance and support from project inception to completion. Also, special thanks to Frank McDonald, the small businesses team POC, for laying the ground work for the entire project; Teresa McCown, the gas well owner and very knowledgeable- fantastic site host; Lea and Tim Phillips for their tremendous knowledge and passion in the oil & gas industry.; and Frank Miller and Steve Addleman for providing a pilot scale version of their proprietary process to facilitate the pilot testing.

  13. Detritiation of Tritiated Effluent Gas and Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Paek, Seung Woo; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung Hong Suk

    2007-06-15

    In a demonstration scale equipment for treatment of tritium in off-gas, Pt/SDBC as oxidation catalyst and Zeolite 13X as adsorbent was charged in the beds, respectively. It was confirmed from the performance test that decontamination factor of the equipment showed more than 100 under the flow rate of off-gas of 90 l/hr and at the temperature of 65 {approx} 80 .deg. C. A small scale CECE process has been developed combining LPCE catalytic column with SPE (solid polymer electrolyte) electrolysis. The catalytic column was a trickle-bed type packed with the mixture of 1 wt% Pt/SDBC catalyst and 4 mm Dixon wire-mesh ring. The experimental results of the CECE process proved that the decontamination factor of 13 {approx} 20 under the operating conditions of the water of the 4 l/day and the effluent hydrogen gas of 16.2 mol/h. A design code of CECE process also developed which will be applied the tritium industry. An experimental method for the reduction of tritiated organic waste by using catalytic oxidation was tested in a heated catalytic reactor of 0.5 wt% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The simulated organic liquid was converted to water over 99%. A gas chromatographic column material was developed for the separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes. 17 wt% Pd-Pt on alumina showed 90% separation efficiency at 77 % yield for the separation of 29.2 % D{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture.

  14. Improving the Gas Instantaneous Water Heaters Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Kloub

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a study of a theoretical and practical investigation of the gas Instantaneous (Tankless water Heaters performance. The results allow us to obtain realistic values of the control system in the various capacities gaseous flowing water heaters. The objective of this work is to study the operation of the plans in the field of controlling and checking low capacity gaseous flowing water in order to choose the proper plan of the logical values and measures for these equipments that may be used in industrial conditions. Also results of the work proved to be accurate. A design of the control system was made. The results of the practical experiment of the control system were similar to the arithmetic results.

  15. 3D modeling of gas/water distribution in water-bearing carbonate gas reservoirs: the Longwangmiao gas field, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chenghua; Li, ChaoChun; Ma, Zhonggao

    2016-10-01

    A water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir is an important natural gas resource being developed worldwide. Due to the long-term water/rock/gas interaction during geological evolution, complex gas/water distribution has formed under the superposed effect of sedimentary facies, reservoir space facies and gravity difference of fluid facies. In view of these challenges, on the basis of the conventional three-stage modeling method, this paper presents a modelling method controlled by four-stage facies to develop 3D model of a water-bearing carbonate gas reservoir. Key to this method is the reservoir property modelling controlled by two-stage facies, and the fluid property modelling controlled by another two-stage facies. The prerequisite of this method is a reliable database obtained from solid geological investigation. On the basis of illustrating the principles of the modelling method controlled by four-stage facies, this paper further implements systematically modeling of the heterogeneous gas/water distribution of the Longwangmiao carbonate formation in the Moxi-Gaoshiti area, Sichuan basin, China.

  16. Geochemical evidence of water-soluble gas accumulation in the Weiyuan gas field, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengfei Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there are several different opinions on the formation process of the Weiyuan gas field in the Sichuan Basin and the source of its natural gas. In view of the fact that the methane carbon isotope of the natural gas in the Weiyuan gas field is abnormally heavy, the geologic characteristics of gas reservoirs and the geochemical characteristics of natural gas were first analyzed. In the Weiyuan gas field, the principal gas reservoirs belong to Sinian Dengying Fm. The natural gas is mainly composed of methane, with slight ethane and trace propane. The gas reservoirs are higher in water saturation, with well preserved primary water. Then, it was discriminated from the relationship of H2S content vs. methane carbon isotope that the heavier methane carbon isotope of natural gas in this area is not caused by thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR. Based on the comparison of methane carbon isotope in this area with that in adjacent areas, and combined with the tectonic evolution background, it is regarded that the natural gas in the Weiyuan gas field is mainly derived from water-soluble gas rather than be migrated laterally from adjacent areas. Some conclusions are made. First, since methane released from water is carbon isotopically heavier, the water-soluble gas accumulation after degasification results in the heavy methane carbon isotope of the gas produced from Weiyuan gas field. Second, along with Himalayan movement, great uplift occurred in the Weiyuan area and structural traps were formed. Under high temperature and high pressure, the gas dissolved in water experienced decompression precipitation, and the released natural gas accumulated in traps, consequently leading to the formation of Weiyuan gas field. Third, based on calculation, the amount of natural gas released from water which is entrapped in the Weiyuan gas field after the tectonic uplift is basically equal to the proved reserves of this field, confirming the opinion of water

  17. Water vapor and gas transport through PEO PBT block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.; Potreck, J.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction At the bore well natural gas is saturated with water. Downstream the presence of water may cause: formation of methane hydrates (blocking eventually the pipeline), condensation of water in the pipeline and corrosion effects. A process used for the dehydration of natural gas is glycol ab

  18. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level Sw. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten–Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  19. Experimental study of water effects on gas desorption during high-pressure water injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-hua; LIU Xian-xin; BI Ye-wu; PU Wen-long

    2011-01-01

    For the question of applying high-pressure water injection to increase gas extraction efficiency by increasing the permeability of water to drive gas action,an independently designed gas desorption experimental measuring device was used under the condition of external solution invasion.The law of water effect on gas desorption was obtained after water invasion through experiment for the first time.The results show that water's later invasion not only can make the quantity of gas desorption greatly reduced,but also can make gas desorption end early.Therefore,when evaluating the applications of high-pressure water injection to increase gas extraction efficiency,we should take water damaging effects on gas desorption into account.

  20. On the Law Right of the Gas Water of Water Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shujun

    2007-01-01

    With the development of science and technology,there searches and application of water resources including the gas water have been constantly developed.Through an analysis on the flaws of the water right theory,and by executing reconstruction and renewal of the theory and system of water fight in modern society,the water right position of the gas water will be established,leading to the maturity of the whole law effectiveness and substantial results of water right.

  1. WATER BREAKTHROUGH SIMULATION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED GAS RESERVOIRS WITH WATER DRIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lie-hui; FENG Guo-qing; LI xiao-ping; LI Yun

    2005-01-01

    In the fractured water drive reservoirs of China, because of the complex geological conditions, almost all the active water invasions appear to be water breakthrough along fractures, especially along macrofractures. These seal the path of gas flow, thus the remaining gas in the pores mixes into water, and leads to gas-water interactive distribution in the fractured gas reservoir. These complicated fractured systems usually generate some abnormal flowing phenomena such as the crestal well produces water while the downdip well in the same gas reservoir produces gas, or the same gas well produces water intermittently. It is very difficult to explain these phenomena using existing fracture models because of their simple handling macrofractures without considering nonlinear flowing in the macrofractures and the low permeability matrix. Therefore, a nonlinear combined-flowing multimedia simulation model was successfully developed in this paper by introducing the equations of macrofractures and considering nonlinear flow in the macrofractures and the matrix. This model was then applied to actual fractured bottom water gas fields. Sensitivity studies of gas production by water drainage in fractured gas reservoirs were completed and the effect of different water drainage intensity and ways on actual gas production using this model were calculated. This model has been extensively used to predict the production performance in various fractured gas fields and proven to be reliable.

  2. Water Availability for Shale Gas Development in Sichuan Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengjun; Weinthal, Erika; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia; Deshusses, Marc A; Zou, Caineng; Ni, Yunyan; Vengosh, Avner

    2016-03-15

    Unconventional shale gas development holds promise for reducing the predominant consumption of coal and increasing the utilization of natural gas in China. While China possesses some of the most abundant technically recoverable shale gas resources in the world, water availability could still be a limiting factor for hydraulic fracturing operations, in addition to geological, infrastructural, and technological barriers. Here, we project the baseline water availability for the next 15 years in Sichuan Basin, one of the most promising shale gas basins in China. Our projection shows that continued water demand for the domestic sector in Sichuan Basin could result in high to extremely high water stress in certain areas. By simulating shale gas development and using information from current water use for hydraulic fracturing in Sichuan Basin (20,000-30,000 m(3) per well), we project that during the next decade water use for shale gas development could reach 20-30 million m(3)/year, when shale gas well development is projected to be most active. While this volume is negligible relative to the projected overall domestic water use of ∼36 billion m(3)/year, we posit that intensification of hydraulic fracturing and water use might compete with other water utilization in local water-stress areas in Sichuan Basin. PMID:26881457

  3. Visualization of the underexpanded gas jet into water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a heat exchanger in a Fast Breeder Reactor cracks, a sodium-water reaction occurs. Highly pressurized water or steam escapes into the surrounding liquid sodium from the crack. The release of steam into the liquid sodium media is a two-phase flow with an underexpansion. Several studies have examined only the underexpansion of the gas-gas phase. However, there are few reports on the underexpansion of the gas-liquid phase. In this study quantitative measurement was carried out for the purpose of revealing the flow with the underexpanded gas jet injected into water. The gas jet distance L and the expansion angle θ were then obtained from averaged images of a high-speed camera. L and θ increased approximately linearly with increasing pressure. The entrainment velocity and the velocity of entrained water droplets into the gas jet were obtained by PIV. (author)

  4. Water vapor and gas transport through polymeric membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor transport through polymeric materials plays an important role in a large number of applications such as: food packaging, breathable clothing, roofing membranes, diapers, and the removal of water vapor from gas streams (e.g. dehydration of natural gas or the drying of compressed air). Dep

  5. Electrochemical Cell with Improved Water or Gas Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William F. (Inventor); McElroy, James F. (Inventor); LaGrange, Jay W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a water/gas porous separator prepared from a polymeric material and one or more conductive cell components that pass through, or are located in close proximity to, the water/gas porous separator, is provided. The inventive cell provides a high level of in-cell electrical conductivity.

  6. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  7. Safety distance between underground natural gas and water pipeline facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A leaking water pipe bursting high pressure water jet in the soil will create slurry erosion which will eventually erode the adjacent natural gas pipe, thus causing its failure. The standard 300 mm safety distance used to place natural gas pipe away from water pipeline facilities needs to be reviewed to consider accidental damage and provide safety cushion to the natural gas pipe. This paper presents a study on underground natural gas pipeline safety distance via experimental and numerical approaches. The pressure–distance characteristic curve obtained from this experimental study showed that the pressure was inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance. Experimental testing using water-to-water pipeline system environment was used to represent the worst case environment, and could be used as a guide to estimate appropriate safety distance. Dynamic pressures obtained from the experimental measurement and simulation prediction mutually agreed along the high-pressure water jetting path. From the experimental and simulation exercises, zero effect distance for water-to-water medium was obtained at an estimated horizontal distance at a minimum of 1500 mm, while for the water-to-sand medium, the distance was estimated at a minimum of 1200 mm. - Highlights: • Safe separation distance of underground natural gas pipes was determined. • Pressure curve is inversely proportional to separation distance. • Water-to-water system represents the worst case environment. • Measured dynamic pressures mutually agreed with simulation results. • Safe separation distance of more than 1200 mm should be applied

  8. Water condensation in Gas Diffusion Layers of PEM Fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Straubhaar, Benjamin; Pauchet, Joël; Prat, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of water transport in PEMFCs is still a major challenge in direct relation with the water management issue, i.e., the ability to maintain a good dynamic balance of water in the membrane-electrode assembly during operation. In the present effort we concentrate on the water transfer mechanisms occurring in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) on the cathode side. In – situ visualizations of liquid water in GDL [1] and evaluations of temperature variations across the GDL [...

  9. Produced water management - clean and safe oil and gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference contains 22 presentations on topics within pollution sources and abatement, discharge reductions, water analysis and monitoring, water production, treatment and injection, enhanced recovery, condensate water, produced water markets, separation technologies for oil/gas/condensate and water, oil removal from solids, environmental risks of oil and gas production and environmental impacts on ecosystems and fisheries. Some oil field case histories are presented. The main focus is on the northern areas such as the North Sea, the north Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and technological aspects (tk)

  10. Application of various water soluble polymers in gas hydrate inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Sultan, Abdullah S.;

    2016-01-01

    Formation of hydrates in gas transmission lines due to high pressures and low temperatures is a serious problem in the oil and gas industry with potential hazards and/or economic losses. Kinetic hydrate inhibitors are water soluble polymeric compounds that prevent or delay hydrate formation. This...

  11. Equilibrium water content measurements for acid gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, R.A.; Fitzpatrick, E.; Bernard, F.; Wan, H.H.; Lesage, K.L.; Davis, P.M.; Clark, P.D. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    An accurate understanding of acid gas and water equilibrium is needed in order to design safe acid gas injection facilities. This paper described a joint industry project conducted to measure the water content of acid gas mixtures under moderate pressures and temperatures. The study has accumulated over 160 data points. Techniques used to obtain the measurements have included visual dew point determination for liquid acid gas and hydrates; the equilibration of samples in stirred autoclaves; basic static equilibration cells; and an isolated floating piston with a micro-sampler used to inject gaseous and liquid acid gas phases. As a result of the project, a high pressure micro-sampling technique has been developed to pressure limits of 1000 bar. 33 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  12. Water coning mechanism in Tarim fractured sandstone gas reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈伟军; 刘晓华; 李熙喆; 陆家亮

    2015-01-01

    The problem of water coning into the Tarim fractured sandstone gas reservoirs becomes one of the major concerns in terms of productivity, increased operating costs and environmental effects. Water coning is a phenomenon caused by the imbalance between gravity and viscous forces around the completion interval. There are several controllable and uncontrollable parameters influencing this problem. In order to simulate the key parameters affecting the water coning phenomenon, a model was developed to represent a single well with an underlying aquifer using the fractured sandstone gas reservoir data of the A-Well in Dina gas fields. The parametric study was performed by varying six properties individually over a representative range. The results show that matrix permeability, well penetration (especially fracture permeability), vertical-to-horizontal permeability ratio, aquifer size and gas production rate have considerable effect on water coning in the fractured gas reservoirs. Thus, investigation of the effective parameters is necessary to understand the mechanism of water coning phenomenon. Simulation of the problem helps to optimize the conditions in which the breakthrough of water coning is delayed.

  13. Analysis of technician-economic viability of vehicles conversion to bio combustible, natural gas -gasoline systems for the Colombian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows from an economical and technical point of view the conversion to bi fuel systems for operation with natural gas. The cost benefits obtained is near 49%. The return internal rate analysis is around 12 months and it is function of distance and vehicles efficiency for carbureted spark ignition engines the loss of power and torque is around 25-30%, which affects vehicle velocity in 15-25%

  14. Water block effects in low permeability gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, N. G. [Core Laboratories Canada Ltd, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1996-09-01

    The mechanism of permeability reduction as a result of extraneous fluid invasion was studied. Laboratory data showed that for water-wet reservoirs, areas of porosity where bound water exists, contribute little to permeability. Even in extremely low permeability cores, the effect of irreducible water saturation on gas permeability was only a 20 per cent reduction. These results led to the conclusion that permeability damage is only slightly worse in dessicated gas reservoirs than in gas reservoirs controlled by capillary pressure. Similarly, it was concluded that the primary mechanism of permeability loss due to water block is the blocking of macro pores; microporosity contributes little if any to permeability. 11 refs., 1 tab., 12 figs.

  15. Impact of shale gas development on regional water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, R D; Brantley, S L; Vandenbossche, J M; Yoxtheimer, D; Abad, J D

    2013-05-17

    Unconventional natural gas resources offer an opportunity to access a relatively clean fossil fuel that could potentially lead to energy independence for some countries. Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing make the extraction of tightly bound natural gas from shale formations economically feasible. These technologies are not free from environmental risks, however, especially those related to regional water quality, such as gas migration, contaminant transport through induced and natural fractures, wastewater discharge, and accidental spills. We review the current understanding of environmental issues associated with unconventional gas extraction. Improved understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants of concern and increased long-term monitoring and data dissemination will help manage these water-quality risks today and in the future.

  16. Thermodynamic Modeling of Natural Gas Systems Containing Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakatsani, Eirini K.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2013-01-01

    with a heavy phase were previously obtained using cubic plus association (CPA) coupled with a solid phase model in the case of hydrates, for the binary systems of water–methane and water–nitrogen and a few natural gas mixtures. In this work, CPA is being validated against new experimental data, both water......As the need for dew point specifications remains very urgent in the natural gas industry, the development of accurate thermodynamic models, which will match experimental data and will allow reliable extrapolations, is needed. Accurate predictions of the gas phase water content in equilibrium...... content and phase equilibrium data, and solid model parameters are being estimated for four natural gas main components (methane, ethane, propane, and carbon dioxide). Different tests for the solid model parameters are reported, including vapor-hydrate-equilibria (VHE) and liquid-hydrate-equilibria (LHE...

  17. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make

  18. Gas exchange under water : acclimation of terrestrial plants to submergence

    OpenAIRE

    Mommer, Liesje

    2005-01-01

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be prolonged photosynthesis under water, but this has received only little attention. This thesis, therefore, aims to investigate in depth the effects of acclimation to submergence on underwater gas exchange capacity of terrestrial plants. It elucidates the beneficial effects ...

  19. Effect of a gas dissolved in water on burnout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the gas content distribution over the steam generating channel cross-section on the burnout in water with the various content of dissolved gas was studied experimentally in a high-pressure stand. Distilled water containing dissolved nitrogen was used as a coolant. A vertical smooth tube of Kh18N10T steel (12 mm in dia., 1.5 mm wall thickness, 880 mm long), heated by the electric current, served as the operating section. The instant of the burnout initiation was registered by four chromel-kopel thermocouples. The main expreriments were carried out with the parameter ranging as follows: 10-18 MPa pressure, 1000-3000 kg/(m2xs) mass rate, 0-3.5 MW/m2 thermal flow, 0.2-0.4 steam content, 30-1700 Nxcm3N2/KgH2O the total gas content. It is stated experimentally that the values of critical heat flux practically coincide at the gas content change from 30 to 1700 Nxcm3N2/KgH2O independently of the methods of gas dissolution in water and the methods of measurements of the gas concentration and steam content x in the critical region

  20. Organic compounds in produced waters from shale gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire-Boyle, Samuel J; Barron, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    A detailed analysis is reported of the organic composition of produced water samples from typical shale gas wells in the Marcellus (PA), Eagle Ford (TX), and Barnett (NM) formations. The quality of shale gas produced (and frac flowback) waters is a current environmental concern and disposal problem for producers. Re-use of produced water for hydraulic fracturing is being encouraged; however, knowledge of the organic impurities is important in determining the method of treatment. The metal content was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Mineral elements are expected depending on the reservoir geology and salts used in hydraulic fracturing; however, significant levels of other transition metals and heavier main group elements are observed. The presence of scaling elements (Ca and Ba) is related to the pH of the water rather than total dissolved solids (TDS). Using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of the chloroform extracts of the produced water samples, a plethora of organic compounds were identified. In each water sample, the majority of organics are saturated (aliphatic), and only a small fraction comes under aromatic, resin, and asphaltene categories. Unlike coalbed methane produced water it appears that shale oil/gas produced water does not contain significant quantities of polyaromatic hydrocarbons reducing the potential health hazard. Marcellus and Barnett produced waters contain predominantly C6-C16 hydrocarbons, while the Eagle Ford produced water shows the highest concentration in the C17-C30 range. The structures of the saturated hydrocarbons identified generally follows the trend of linear > branched > cyclic. Heterocyclic compounds are identified with the largest fraction being fatty alcohols, esters, and ethers. However, the presence of various fatty acid phthalate esters in the Barnett and Marcellus produced waters can be related to their use in drilling fluids and breaker additives

  1. Energy Factor Analysis for Gas Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluesenkamp, Kyle R [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Gas heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) can improve water heating efficiency with zero GWP and zero ODP working fluids. The energy factor (EF) of a gas HPWH is sensitive to several factors. In this work, expressions are derived for EF of gas HPWHs, as a function of heat pump cycle COP, tank heat losses, burner efficiency, electrical draw, and effectiveness of supplemental heat exchangers. The expressions are used to investigate the sensitivity of EF to each parameter. EF is evaluated on a site energy basis (as used by the US DOE for rating water heater EF), and a primary energy-basis energy factor (PEF) is also defined and included. Typical ranges of values for the six parameters are given. For gas HPWHs, using typical ranges for component performance, EF will be 59 80% of the heat pump cycle thermal COP (for example, a COP of 1.60 may result in an EF of 0.94 1.28). Most of the reduction in COP is due to burner efficiency and tank heat losses. Gas-fired HPWHs are theoretically be capable of an EF of up to 1.7 (PEF of 1.6); while an EF of 1.1 1.3 (PEF of 1.0 1.1) is expected from an early market entry.

  2. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  3. Gas exchange under water : acclimation of terrestrial plants to submergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommer, Liesje

    2005-01-01

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be prolonged photosynthesis under water, but this has received only little atten

  4. Electricity, Gas and Water Supply. Industry Training Monograph No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbrell, Tom

    Australia's electricity, gas, and water supply industry employs only 0.8% of the nation's workers and employment in the industry has declined by nearly 39% in the last decade. This industry is substantially more dependent on the vocational education and training (VET) sector for skilled graduates than is the total Australian labor market. Despite…

  5. Boiling water reactor off-gas systems evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation of the off-gas systems for all 25 operating Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) was made to determine the adequacy of their design and operating procedures to reduce the probability of off-gas detonations. The results of the evaluations are that, of the 25 operable units, 13 meet all the acceptance criteria. The other 12 units do not have the features needed to meet the criteria, but have been judged to have, or are committed to provide, features which give reasonable assurance that the potential for external off-gas detonations is minimized. The 12 units which did not originally meet the criteria are aware of the potential hazards associated with off-gas detonations and have agreed to take action to minimize the probability of future detonations

  6. Methane gas seepage - Disregard of significant water column filter processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Schmale, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Marine methane seepage represents a potential contributor for greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and is discussed as a driver for climate change. The ultimate question is how much methane is released from the seafloor on a global scale and what fraction may reach the atmosphere? Dissolved fluxes from methane seepage sites on the seabed were found to be very efficiently reduced by benthic microbial oxidation, whereas transport of free gas bubbles from the seabed is considered to bypass the effective benthic methane filter. Numerical models are available today to predict the fate of such methane gas bubble release to the water column in regard to gas exchange with the ambient water column, respective bubble lifetime and rise height. However, the fate of rising gas bubbles and dissolved methane in the water column is not only governed by dissolution, but is also affected by lateral oceanographic currents and vertical bubble-induced upwelling, microbial oxidation, and physico-chemical processes that remain poorly understood so far. According to this gap of knowledge we present data from two study sites - the anthropogenic North Sea 22/4b Blowout and the natural Coal Oil point seeps - to shed light into two new processes gathered with hydro-acoustic multibeam water column imaging and microbial investigations. The newly discovered processes are hereafter termed Spiral Vortex and Bubble Transport Mechanism. Spiral Vortex describes the evolution of a complex vortical fluid motion of a bubble plume in the wake of an intense gas release site (Blowout, North Sea). It appears very likely that it dramatically changes the dissolution kinetics of the seep gas bubbles. Bubble Transport Mechanism prescribes the transport of sediment-hosted bacteria into the water column via rising gas bubbles. Both processes act as filter mechanisms in regard to vertical transport of seep related methane, but have not been considered before. Spiral Vortex and Bubble Transport Mechanism represent the

  7. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or

  8. Partitioning Gas Tracer Technology for Measuring Water in Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briening, M. L.; Jakubowitch, A.; Imhoff, P. T.; Chiu, P. C.; Tittlebaum, M. E.

    2002-12-01

    Unstable landfills can result in significant environmental contamination and can become a risk to public health. To reduce this risk, water may be added to landfills to ensure that enough moisture exists for biodegradation of organic wastes. In this case risks associated with future breaks in the landfill cap are significantly reduced because organic material is degraded more rapidly. To modify moisture conditions and enhance biodegradation, leachate is typically collected from the bottom of the landfill and then recirculated near the top. It is difficult, though, to know how much leachate to add and where to add it to achieve uniform moisture conditions. This situation is exacerbated by the heterogeneous nature of landfill materials, which is known to cause short circuiting of infiltrating water, a process that has been virtually impossible to measure or model. Accurate methods for measuring the amount of water in landfills would be valuable aids for implementing leachate recirculation systems. Current methods for measuring water are inadequate, though, since they provide point measurements and are frequently affected by heterogeneity of the solid waste composition and solid waste compaction. The value of point measurements is significantly reduced in systems where water flows preferentially, such as in landfills. Here, spatially integrated measurements might be of greater value. In this research we are evaluating a promising technology, the partitioning gas tracer test, to measure the water saturation within landfills, the amount of free water in solid waste divided by the volume of the voids. The partitioning gas tracer test was recently developed by researchers working in the vadose zone. In this methodology two gas tracers are injected into a landfill. One tracer is non-reactive with landfill materials, while the second partitions into and out of free water trapped within the pore space of the solid waste. Chromatographic separation of the tracers occurs

  9. Interfacial Characterisation of Gas-Liquid Interfaces Related to Gas Flotation in Offshore Produced Water Treatment - Dynamic Adsorption of Heteroatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Produced water is the largest waste stream produced in the recovery of oil and gas. The processing of produced water occurs in several stages including gas flotation. Gas flotation is separation by gravity and the effectiveness of gas flotation is dependant on the size of the gas bubble, the distribution of bubbles and the degree of dispersion. The concentration of oil and the chemical content of the produced water play a role, a long with the pH, viscosity and the interfacial properties betw...

  10. Kinetics of gas hydrate formation in a water-oil-gas system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talatori, S.; Barth, T. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry; Fotland, P. [StatoilHydro Research and Development Centre, Sandsli (Norway)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds consisting of polyhedral water cavities which enclathrate small gas molecules. They are formed at certain pressure-temperature conditions where gas and water are present. Gas hydrate formation is of significant importance for flow assurance in oil pipelines at high pressures and/or low temperatures. It is therefore necessary to understand the kinetics of gas hydrate formation for the kinetic inhibition of the hydrates. This paper presented a kinetic model for the growth of gas hydrates and tested it against experimental hydrate kinetic data. The model was based on the Kolmogorov Johnson Mehl Avrami (KJMA) formula employed for a polynuclear mechanism and was found to fit the experimental data. A method was developed in which the mass of formed hydrates was calculated at different stirring rates from the experimental pressure and temperature recorded during the hydrate formation. The gas compositions predicted by the method were verified by comparison with the real compositions as obtained by analysis using a Hewlett Packard HP 6890 Series GC Plus. The paper described the experimental materials, procedures, and methods. It was concluded that linearization of the model specified the type of the nucleation and growth for all the kinetic data at each stirring rate. The effect of stirring rate on the kinetics of hydrate formation for the three stirring rates in the system showed acceleration of the hydrate formation when increasing the stirring rate from 300 to 600 rpm. More hydrates nucleated as stirring rates increased. It was recommended that in order to reach more definite conclusions, it would be necessary to repeat the measurements as well as conduct testing of other oils. 11 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Interlaboratory validation of PrEN 12673: Water quality - Gas Chromatographic determination of some selected chlorophenols in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge R; Ramlal MR; Stil GH; Gort SM; Heusinkveld HAG; van der Velde EG; van Zoonen P; LOC

    1997-01-01

    Een interlaboratorium vergelijkingsonderzoek is georganiseerd ten behoeve van de validatie van de voorlopige standaard methode PrEN 12673 Water quality - Gas Chromatographic determination of some selected chlorophenols in water. Deze vergelijking is uitgevoerd op drie typen water, namelijk drinkwat

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Original Water Saturation and Mobile Water Saturation in Low Permeability Sandstone Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shu-Sheng; YE Li-You; XIONG Wei; GUO He-Kun; HU Zhi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ We use nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR)and centrifugation to measure the original water saturation and mobile water saturation of cores from the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas reservoir,and compare the NMR results with the corresponding field data.It is shown that the NMR water saturation after 300 psi centrifugation effectively represents the original water saturation measured by weighing fresh cores.There is a good correlation between mobile water saturation and the water production performance of the corresponding gas wells.The critical mobile water saturation whether reservoir produces water of the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas is 6%.The higher the mobile water saturation,the greater the water production rate of gas well.This indicates that well's water production performance can be forecasted by mobile water saturation of cores.

  13. Hydrogeochemistry of saline fluids and associated water and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Anna Melick

    1997-10-01

    This dissertation integrates elemental and isotopic analyses of saline formation waters and associated natural gas in sedimentary basins to provide constraints on their origin and geochemical evolution. The Michigan Basin and a modern evaporite environment, the Salina Ometepec, Baja California, were examined as analogs to assess the importance of early versus later diagenetic alteration of minerals and organic matter. The Devonian Antrim Shale, an economic natural gas deposit in the Michigan Basin, produces methane that is dominantly of microbial origin. Microbial methanogenesis was identified by H-isotope analysis of gas and co-produced water. Microbial activity was further established by extremely high deltasp{13}C values for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and for gaseous COsb2. Stable isotopic compositions of Hsb2O, sp3H determinations and sp{14}C dating of DIC in the formation waters, suggest the presence of Pleistocene-age groundwaters, modern groundwaters and basinal brines. Major solutes in formation waters are derived from halite dissolution, clay-mineral cation exchange, and basinal CaClsb2-type brines in subjacent strata. Localized microbial activity within gas productive reservoirs further modify concentrations of COsb2 and CHsb4 gases and dissolved sulfate, acetate and bicarbonate. Chemical heterogeneity of formation waters is even more pronounced from the perspective of the many reservoir rock systems in the basin. Each main aquifer has a distinct suite of chemical properties, which requires not only different solute sources but hydrologic compartmentalization within the basin itself. Formation waters from the Michigan Basin commonly have equimolar concentrations of Casp{2+} and Nasp+. This relation has been observed in many sedimentary basins and has been explained by Nasp+ replacement of Casp{2+}-feldspar. However, Sr isotopic composition and Brsp- concentrations in formation waters from the Michigan Basin coupled with its tectonic setting suggest

  14. The mechanism of the flowing ground water impacting on coalbed gas content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Shengfei; SONG Yan; TANG Xiuyi; FU Guoyou

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogeological condition affects the coalbed gas storage dramatically. In an area of stronger hydrodynamics, the coal has a lower gas content, while a higher gas content exists in an area of weaker hydrodynamics. Obviously, the flowing groundwater is harmful to coalbed gas preservation. But few researches focus on the mechanism of how the flowing water diminishes the coalbed gas content.Based on the phenomenon that the flowing groundwater not only makes coalbed gas content lower, but also fractionates the carbon isotope, this research puts forward an idea that it is the water solution that diminishes the coalbed gas content,rather than the water-driven action or the gas dissipation through cap rocks. Only water-soluble action can both fractionate the carbon isotope and lessen the coalbed gas content,and it is an efficient way to take gas away and affect the gas content.

  15. Reducing water usage with rotary regenerative gas/gas heat exchangers in natural gas-fired power plants with post-combustion carbon capture

    OpenAIRE

    Herraiz, Laura; Hogg, Dougal; Cooper, Jim; Gibbins, Jon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    It is possible to greatly mitigate the increase of water usage associated with the addition of carbon capture to fossil fuel power generation. This article presents a first-of-a-kind feasibility study of a series of technology options with rotary regenerative gas/gas heat exchangers for the management of the water balance around post-combustion carbon capture process integrated with Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) plants with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Hybrid cooling confi...

  16. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  17. Determination of Water Content of Water-soluble Paints by Gas Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾润南; 钦维民; 肖舸

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the determination of water content of water-soluble paints by gas chromatography. The water in paints is extracted by dimethyl formamide (DMF) as a solvent.Isopropanol is used as an internal standard. The mixture is separated by low-speed centrifugation.Then a 1-uL sample of the supernatant from the prepared solution is injected into the gas chromatograph. The water content is determined by internal standard calibration curve. The rate of recovery of added standard of this method is more than 98%. Relative mean deviation is less than 3‰.The linearity of calibration curve is good and relativity coefficient is higher than 0.998.

  18. Air-water gas exchange by waving vegetation stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster-Martinez, M. R.; Variano, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    Exchange between wetland surface water and the atmosphere is driven by a variety of motions, ranging from rainfall impact to thermal convection and animal locomotion. Here we examine the effect of wind-driven vegetation movement. Wind causes the stems of emergent vegetation to wave back and forth, stirring the water column and facilitating air-water exchange. To understand the magnitude of this effect, a gas transfer velocity (k600 value) was measured via laboratory experiments. Vegetation waving was studied in isolation by mechanically forcing a model canopy to oscillate at a range of frequencies and amplitudes matching those found in the field. The results show that stirring due to vegetation waving produces k600 values from 0.55 cm/h to 1.60 cm/h. The dependence of k600 on waving amplitude and frequency are evident from the laboratory data. These results indicate that vegetation waving has a nonnegligible effect on gas transport; thus, it can contribute to a mechanistic understanding of the fluxes underpinning biogeochemical processes.

  19. Gas and water recycling system for IOC vivarium experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, K.; Otsubo, K.

    1986-01-01

    Water and gas recycling units designed as one of the common experiment support system for the life science experiment facilities used in the Japanese Experiment Module are discussed. These units will save transportation and operation costs for the life science experiments in the space station. These units are also designed to have interfaces so simple that the connection to another life science experiment facilities such as the Research Animal Holding Facility developed by the Rockheed Missiles and Space Company can be easily done with small modification.

  20. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  1. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  2. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  3. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certificati...

  4. Are shale gas exploitation and water resources security compatible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shale gas- or more precisely gas from source rock- is a potential resource, diffused and largely distributed. The exploitation of non-conventional hydrocarbons raises issues even if most techniques are well known and properly controlled: drilling, casing cementing, the development of natural rock discontinuities for gas or oil production. The most worrying repercussions will be on the surface: multiple boreholes, usage conflicts, linear production infrastructures, access paths and safety of aging constructions. The potential impacts on groundwater at the depth it is traditionally exploited are more indirect than direct. The impacts in depth will be presumably less threatening due to a lack of elements at stake. The cost of projects at such a depth will impose to combine exploration and experimentation in real size. The potential resource is only known through the American administration's indirect and approximate assessment: France would appear to be the second country (after Poland) with the largest quantity in Europe. France must engage in producing its own assessment. The 'code for mines' yet referred to is no more adapted for non-conventional resources, thus minimizing the WFD objectives, the French law on water and the code for the environment, without involving the stake holders. Recently, the administration decided to ban the hydraulic fracturing technique, though in practice since a long time, thus penalizing a professional branch. Policies, regulation, communication, decision process, validation of techniques and security checks on works should be improved. (author)

  5. EFFECT OF SURFACTANT ON TWO-PHASE FLOW PATTERNS OF WATER-GAS IN CAPILLARY TUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Flow patterns of liquid-gas two-phase flow were experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in both vertical and horizontal capillary tubes having inner diameters of 1.60 mm. The working liquid was the mixture of water and Sodium Dodecyl Benzoyl Sulfate (SDBS). The working gas was Nitrogen. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the vertical capillary tube, flow-pattern transitions occurred at lower flow velocities than those for the water-gas flow in the same tube. For the water/SDBS mixture-gas flow in the horizontal capillary tube, surface tension had little effect on the bubbly-intermittent transition and had only slight effect on the plug-slug and slug-annular transitions. However, surface tension had significant effect on the wavy stratified flow regime. The wavy stratified flow regime of water/SDBS mixture-gas flow expanded compared with that of water-gas.

  6. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

    2004-02-01

    This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space

  7. Gas phase water in the surface layer of protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Dominik, C; Hollenbach, D; Kaufman, M

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations of the ground state transition of HDO at 464 GHz towards the protoplanetary disk of DM Tau have detected the presence of water vapor in the regions just above the outer disk midplane (Ceccarelli et al 2005). In the absence of non-thermal desorption processes, water should be almost entirely frozen onto the grain mantles and HDO undetectable. In this Letter we present a chemical model that explores the possibility that the icy mantles are photo-desorbed by FUV (6eV < h nu < 13.6eV) photons. We show that the average Interstellar FUV field is enough to create a layer of water vapor above the disk midplane over the entire disk. Assuming a photo-desorption yield of 10^{-3}, the water abundance in this layer is predicted to be ~ 3 x 10^{-7} and the average H2O column density is ~ 1.6x 10^{15} cm^{-2}. The predictions are very weakly dependent on the details of the model, like the incident FUV radiation field, and the gas density in the disk. Based on this model, we predict a gaseous HDO/H2...

  8. Produced water from off-shore oil and gas production, a new challenge in marine pollution monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced water consists of water naturally present in the oil and gas reservoir (formation water), flood water previously injected into the formation, and/or, in the case of some gas production, condensed water. Produced water is part of the well stream together with oil and/or gas

  9. Essentials of water systems design in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Alireza; Boyd, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Essentials of Water Systems Design in the Oil, Gas and Chemical Processing Industries provides valuable insight for decision makers by outlining key technical considerations and requirements of four critical systems in industrial processing plants—water treatment systems, raw water and plant water systems, cooling water distribution and return systems, and fire water distribution and storage facilities. The authors identify the key technical issues and minimum requirements related to the process design and selection of various water supply systems used in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries. This book is an ideal, multidisciplinary work for mechanical engineers, environmental scientists, and oil and gas process engineers.

  10. Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

    2014-01-14

    A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

  11. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  12. 78 FR 64905 - Carriage of Conditionally Permitted Shale Gas Extraction Waste Water in Bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... Waste Water in Bulk AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for comments... shale gas extraction waste water in bulk via barge, and invites public comment. The policy letter... endorsement or letter allowing the barge to transport shale gas extraction waste water in bulk. The...

  13. Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, Stephen G.; Vengosh, Avner; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Jackson, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dramatically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of northeastern Pennsylvania and upstate New York, we document systematic evidence for methane contamination of drinking water associated with shale-gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells within 1 km), average and maximum methane concentrations in drinking-water wells increased with proximit...

  14. Reducing produced water leaks and spills by improving industry compliance in British Columbia's natural gas sector

    OpenAIRE

    Notte, Chelsea Althea

    2014-01-01

    The International Energy Association asserts that natural gas is poised to enter a golden age. This is particularly true for British Columbia, which possesses world-class shale gas reserves. Produced water – the water emanating from fracturing shale - is the largest waste stream associated with oil and gas activities. Wastewater associated with natural gas extraction is highly toxic and has serious implications for environmental and human health if spilled or leaked. Because of the corrosive ...

  15. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

    2002-12-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate

  16. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  17. Suppression of formation of dioxins in combustion gas of municipal waste incinerators by spray water injection.

    OpenAIRE

    Kubota, Eiji; Shigechi, Toru; Takemasa, Takehiro; Momoki, Satoru; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Dioxins in the combustion gas of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) are resynthesized when the combustion gas passes from the outlet exaust gas boiler to the outlet gas duct. The objective of the study was to estimate if the suppression of the formation of dioxins depends on the inlet gas temperature and diameter and/or temperature of droplet spray water using an actual incinerator operation data. The dioxin formation and/or the quenching temperature is revealed using the Altwicker th...

  18. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique

  19. Produced water discharges from gas/condensate platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij B.V. (NAM) is the largest gas producer in the Netherlands. The company operates a number of gas/condensate platforms on the Dutch continental shelf in the North Sea. From 8 of these platforms produced water is discharged directly into the sea. This paper reports on an extensive sampling, analysis and testing campaign that was carried out in 1989 to characterize physical, chemical and ecotoxicological properties of these streams. The total volume of water discharged from the NAM platforms was about 210,000 m3 in 1989. The average volume per platform was relatively small (about 70 m3 per day), certainly when compared to oil producing platforms. The total volume of oil discharged was about 160 x 103 kg, 50-70% thereof being present in the form of dispersed oil. The total volume of all organic substances, including polar compounds, was about 400 x 103 kg. The complex mixture of organic and inorganic components and their concentrations in the effluents indicate, with effluent EC/LC50 values between 1 and 420 ml/l, an acute toxic hazard to organisms directly exposed to the discharges. Acute toxic effects are, however, not expected beyond a distance of 50 m from the discharge point. A risk of sublethal effects cannot be excluded within distances of several hundred meters to a few kilometers from the discharge points. The dissolved organic components are most probably the prime cause of the acute toxicity, of which the volatile aromatic hydrocarbons are the most significant. These compounds were observed at concentrations of up to 480 mg/1. Relatively high concentrations of metals were observed in the effluents. However, these metals did not contribute significantly to the acute toxicity of the streams. This suggests that metals were not present in a bioavailable form

  20. Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Prodip K.; Grippin, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-07-01

    A critical issue for optimal water management in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells at lower temperatures is the removal of liquid water from the cell. This pathway is intimately linked with the phenomena of liquid-water droplet removal from surface of the gas-diffusion layer and into the flow channel. Thus, a good understanding of liquid-water transport and droplet growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layer is critical. In this study, liquid-water droplet growth and detachment on the gas-diffusion layer surfaces are investigated experimentally to improve the understating of water transport through and removal from gas-diffusion layers. An experiment using a sliding-angle measurement is designed and used to quantify and directly measure the adhesion force for liquid-water droplets, and to understand the droplets? growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layers.

  1. Risks to Water Resources from Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel; Darrah, Thomas H.; Kondash, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded oil and gas exploration in the USA. The rapid rate of shale gas exploration has triggered an intense public debate regarding the potential environmental and human health effects. A review of the updated literature has identified four potential risks for impacts on water resources: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow aquifers near shale gas sites; (2) contamination of surface water and shallow groundwater from spills, leaks, and disposal of inadequately treated wastewater or hydraulic fracturing fluids; (3) accumulation of toxic and radioactive residues in soil or stream sediments near disposal or spill sites; and (4) over-extraction of water resources for drilling and hydraulic fracturing that could induce water shortages and conflicts with other water users, particularly in water-scarce areas. As part of a long-term research on the potential water contamination associated with shale gas development, new geochemical and isotopic techniques have been developed for delineating the origin of gases and contaminants in water resource. In particular, multiple geochemical and isotopic (carbon isotopes in hydrocarbons, noble gas, strontium, boron, radium isotopes) tracers have been utilized to distinguish between naturally occurring dissolved gas and salts in water and contamination directly induced from shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations.

  2. A review of water and greenhouse gas impacts of unconventional natural gas development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arent, Doug; Logan, Jeff; Macknick, Jordan; Boyd, William; Medlock , Kenneth; O' Sullivan, Francis; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Huntington, Hill; Heath, Garvin; Statwick, Patricia M.; Bazilian, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in the production and use of unconventional natural gas in the United States with a focus on water and greenhouse gas emission implications. If unconventional natural gas in the U.S. is produced responsibly, transported and distributed with little leakage, and incorporated into integrated energy systems that are designed for future resiliency, it could play a significant role in realizing a more sustainable energy future; however, the increased use of natural gas as a substitute for more carbon intensive fuels will alone not substantially alter world carbon dioxide concentration projections.

  3. Impact of Shale Gas Development on Water Resource in Fuling, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Huang, Xianjin; Yang, Qinyuan; Tu, Jianjun

    2015-04-01

    As a low-carbon energy, shale gas rapidly developed in U.S. in last years due to the innovation of the technique of hydraulic fracture, or fracking. Shale gas boom produces more gas with low price and reduced the reliance on fuel import. To follow the American shale gas success, China made an ambitious plan of shale gas extraction, 6.5 billion m3 by 2015. To extract shale gas, huge amount water is needed to inject into each gas well. This will intensify the competition of water use between industry, agricultural and domestic sectors. It may finally exacerbate the water scarcity in China. After the extraction, some water was returned to the ground. Without adequate treatment, the flowback water can introduce heavy metal, acids, pesticides, and other toxic material into water and land. This may inevitably worsen the water and land contamination. This study analysed the potential water consumption and wastewater generation in shale gas development in Fuling, Southwest China. The survey found the average water consumption is 30,000 cubic meter for one well, higher than shale well in U.S. Some 2%-20% water flowed back to the ground. The water quality monitoring showed the Total Suspended Solid (TSS) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) were the main factors above those specified by China's water regulation. Shale gas is a lower-carbon energy, but it is important to recognize the water consuming and environmental pollution during the fracking. Strict monitoring and good coordination during the shale gas exploitation is urgently needed for the balance of economic development, energy demand and environmental protection.

  4. Paleo-oil-Water Contact and Present-Day Gas-Water Contact:Implication for Evolution History of Puguang Gas Field,Sichuan Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Pingping; Zou Huayao; Zhang Yuanchun; Wang Cunwu; Zhang Xuefeng

    2008-01-01

    The Puguang (普光) gas field is the largest gas field found in marine carbonate in China.The Puguang gas field experienced complicated evolution history from paleo-oil pool to gas pool.The purpose of this article is to reveal the evolution history of Puguang gas field through systematic study on the relationship between paleo-oil-water contact (POWC) and present-day gas-water contact (PGWC).POWC was recognized by observing the change of relative content of residual solid bitumen in the cores,and PGWC was observed using log and drilling stem test data.Two types of relationship between POWC and PGWC were observed in the Puguang gas field:POWC is above PGWC,and POWC is below PGWC.The former is normal as oil cracking may cause gas-water contact to move downward.The latter can be interpreted by lateral gas re-migration and re-accumulation caused by changes in structural configuration.The relationship between POWC and PGWC suggests that during oil charge,the southwestern and northwestern parts of the Puguang gas field were structurally lower than the northeastern and southeastern parts.Thrusting from Xuefengshan (雪峰山) since Yanshanian movement and from Dabashan (大巴山) since Himalayan movement resulted in the relative uplift of the southwestern and northwestern parts of the Puguang structure,which significantly changed the structural configuration.Based on the paleo-structure discussed in this article,the most probable migration directions of paleo-oil were from the northwest to the southeast and from the southwest to the northeast.Consequently,the evolution history of the Puguang gas field can be divided into three stages,namely,oil charging (200-170 Ma),cracking oil to gas (155-120 Ma),and gas pool adjustment (1200-0Ma).

  5. Interlaboratory validation of PrEN 12673: Water quality - Gas Chromatographic determination of some selected chlorophenols in water

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogerbrugge R; Ramlal MR; Stil GH; Gort SM; Heusinkveld HAG; Velde EG van der; van Zoonen P; LOC

    1997-01-01

    Een interlaboratorium vergelijkingsonderzoek is georganiseerd ten behoeve van de validatie van de voorlopige standaard methode PrEN 12673 Water quality - Gas Chromatographic determination of some selected chlorophenols in water. Deze vergelijking is uitgevoerd op drie typen water, namelijk drinkwater, oppervlaktewater en afvalwater. Voor ieder van de drie typen zijn weer drie monsters gemaakt, het originele water en het water waaraan telkens 10-12 chloorfenolen in respectievelijk een hoge en ...

  6. Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-07-30

    Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

  7. Water use for Shale-gas production in Texas, U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Scanlon, Bridget R

    2012-03-20

    Shale-gas production using hydraulic fracturing of mostly horizontal wells has led to considerable controversy over water-resource and environmental impacts. The study objective was to quantify net water use for shale-gas production using data from Texas, which is the dominant producer of shale gas in the U.S. with a focus on three major plays: the Barnett Shale (~15,000 wells, mid-2011), Texas-Haynesville Shale (390 wells), and Eagle Ford Shale (1040 wells). Past water use was estimated from well-completion data, and future water use was extrapolated from past water use constrained by shale-gas resources. Cumulative water use in the Barnett totaled 145 Mm(3) (2000-mid-2011). Annual water use represents ~9% of water use in Dallas (population 1.3 million). Water use in younger (2008-mid-2011) plays, although less (6.5 Mm(3) Texas-Haynesville, 18 Mm(3) Eagle Ford), is increasing rapidly. Water use for shale gas is water withdrawals; however, local impacts vary with water availability and competing demands. Projections of cumulative net water use during the next 50 years in all shale plays total ~4350 Mm(3), peaking at 145 Mm(3) in the mid-2020s and decreasing to 23 Mm(3) in 2060. Current freshwater use may shift to brackish water to reduce competition with other users.

  8. The Value of Water in Extraction of Natural Gas from the Marcellus Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimsaite, R.; Abdalla, C.; Collins, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of shale has increased the demand for the essential input of water in natural gas production. Increased utilization of water by the shale gas industry, and the development of water transport and storage related infrastructure suggest that the value of water is increasing where hydraulic fracturing is occurring. Few studies on the value of water in industrial uses exist and, to our knowledge, no studies of water's value in extracting natural gas from shale have been published. Our research aims to fill this knowledge gap by exploring several key dimensions of the value of water used in shale gas development. Our primary focus was to document the costs associated with water acquisition for shale gas extraction in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, two states located in the gas-rich Marcellus shale formation with active drilling and extraction underway. This research involved a) gathering data on the sources of and costs associated with water acquisition for shale gas extraction b) comparing unit costs with prices and costs paid by the gas industry users of water; c) determining factors that potentially impact total and per unit costs of water acquisition for the shale gas industry; and d) identifying lessons learned for water managers and policy-makers. The population of interest was all private and public entities selling water to the shale gas industry in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Primary data were collected from phone interviews with water sellers and secondary data were gathered from state regulatory agencies. Contact information was obtained for 40 water sellers in the two states. Considering both states, the average response rate was 49%. Relatively small amounts of water, approximately 11% in West Virginia and 29% in Pennsylvania, were purchased from public water suppliers by the shale gas industry. The price of water reveals information about the value of water. The average price charged to gas companies was 6.00/1000 gallons and 7

  9. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  10. Measurements of gas hydrate formation probability distributions on a quasi-free water droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Nobuo

    2014-06-01

    A High Pressure Automated Lag Time Apparatus (HP-ALTA) can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions from water in a glass sample cell. In an HP-ALTA gas hydrate formation originates near the edges of the sample cell and gas hydrate films subsequently grow across the water-guest gas interface. It would ideally be desirable to be able to measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a single water droplet or mist that is freely levitating in a guest gas, but this is technically challenging. The next best option is to let a water droplet sit on top of a denser, immiscible, inert, and wall-wetting hydrophobic liquid to avoid contact of a water droplet with the solid walls. Here we report the development of a second generation HP-ALTA which can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a water droplet which sits on a perfluorocarbon oil in a container that is coated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-Perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane. It was found that the gas hydrate formation probability distributions of such a quasi-free water droplet were significantly lower than those of water in a glass sample cell.

  11. Numerical simulation on submerged gas jet scouring pit morphology in impingement water bath dust removers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Huijie; WU Xuan; ZHAO Yuxiang; WU Wenfei; LI Baowei

    2014-01-01

    The VOF interface tracking method was adopted to simulate the two-dimensional submerged gas jet scouring pit morphology in an impingement water bath dust remover.The interaction of gas/liquid two-phase was obtained by force balance and momentum exchange.On the self-designed impingement water bath dust remover test bench,the submerged gas jet flushing with different gas velocities was simulated. The results show that,the gas inlet velocity is one of the main factors affecting the submerged gas jet scou-ring pit characteristics.The unique nature of gas/liquid two-phase determines their unique way of move-ment,thus affects the morphological character of the scouring pit in the expansion lag phase.Within the study range,the characteristic radius and impact depth of the scouring pit increases with the gas velocity, and so are their growth rates.

  12. Flared natural gas-based onsite atmospheric water harvesting (AWH) for oilfield operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikramanayake, Enakshi D.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-03-01

    Natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars is flared annually, which leads to resource waste and environmental issues. This work introduces and analyzes a novel concept for flared gas utilization, wherein the gas that would have been flared is instead used to condense atmospheric moisture. Natural gas, which is currently being flared, can alternatively power refrigeration systems to generate the cooling capacity for large scale atmospheric water harvesting (AWH). This approach solves two pressing issues faced by the oil-gas industry, namely gas flaring, and sourcing water for oilfield operations like hydraulic fracturing, drilling and water flooding. Multiple technical pathways to harvest atmospheric moisture by using the energy of natural gas are analyzed. A modeling framework is developed to quantify the dependence of water harvest rates on flared gas volumes and ambient weather. Flaring patterns in the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Bakken Shale in North Dakota are analyzed to quantify the benefits of AWH. Overall, the gas currently flared annually in Texas and North Dakota can harvest enough water to meet 11% and 65% of the water consumption in the Eagle Ford and the Bakken, respectively. Daily harvests of upto 30 000 and 18 000 gallons water can be achieved using the gas currently flared per well in Texas and North Dakota, respectively. In fifty Bakken sites, the water required for fracturing or drilling a new well can be met via onsite flared gas-based AWH in only 3 weeks, and 3 days, respectively. The benefits of this concept are quantified for the Eagle Ford and Bakken Shales. Assessments of the global potential of this concept are presented using data from countries with high flaring activity. It is seen that this waste-to-value conversion concept offers significant economic benefits while addressing critical environmental issues pertaining to oil-gas production.

  13. Hazard-Specific Vulnerability Mapping for Water Security in a Shale Gas Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D. M.; Holding, S.; McKoen, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Northeast British Columbia (NEBC) is estimated to hold large reserves of unconventional natural gas and has experienced rapid growth in shale gas development activities over recent decades. Shale gas development has the potential to impact the quality and quantity of surface and ground water. Robust policies and sound water management are required to protect water security in relation to the water-energy nexus surrounding shale gas development. In this study, hazard-specific vulnerability mapping was conducted across NEBC to identify areas most vulnerable to water quality and quantity deterioration due to shale gas development. Vulnerability represents the combination of a specific hazard threat and the susceptibility of the water system to that threat. Hazard threats (i.e. potential contamination sources and water abstraction) were mapped spatially across the region. The shallow aquifer susceptibility to contamination was characterised using the DRASTIC aquifer vulnerability approach, while the aquifer susceptibility to abstraction was mapped according to aquifer productivity. Surface water susceptibility to contamination was characterised on a watershed basis to describe the propensity for overland flow (i.e. contaminant transport), while watershed discharge estimates were used to assess surface water susceptibility to water abstractions. The spatial distribution of hazard threats and susceptibility were combined to form hazard-specific vulnerability maps for groundwater quality, groundwater quantity, surface water quality and surface water quantity. The vulnerability maps identify priority areas for further research, monitoring and policy development. Priority areas regarding water quality occur where hazard threat (contamination potential) coincide with high aquifer susceptibility or high overland flow potential. Priority areas regarding water quantity occur where demand is estimated to represent a significant proportion of estimated supply. The identification

  14. Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed,which can overcome the deficiency of single production method.Based on the combination production method,the physical and mathematical models are developed to simulate the hydrate dissociation.The mathematical model can be used to analyze the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,the convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production.The mechanism of gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is revealed by the numerical simulation.The evolutions of such physical variables as pressure,temperature,saturations and gas and water rates are analyzed.Numerical results show that under certain conditions the combination method has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single producing method.

  15. Simulation bidimensional of water and gas alternative injection; Simulacao bidimensional de injecao alternada de agua e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Ana Paula Silva C. de

    1999-07-01

    This dissertation presents a study of the unidimensional of water and gas alternate injection (WAG) using the stream line theory. It is considered incompressible fluid., unit mobility ratio, negligible capillary and gravitational effects, homogeneous and isotropic reservoir, isothermal flow two phases, oil and water, and three components, oil, water and gas. In the stream line theory, the following injection schemes are considered: staggered line five-spot, direct line and seven-spot. It is also considered that there is no flow among the streams. In the WAG calculations it is used the fractional flow theory and the method of characteristics, which consists of shock waves and rarefactions. The composition of these waves is said compatible if it satisfies the entropy condition. The solution goes through a certain path from the left to the right side constrained by the initial and boundary conditions. The gas injection is at a high pressure to ensure miscible displacement. It is considered first injection of a water bank and then, injection of a gas bank. We concluded that the gas injection at a high pressure recoveries all residual oil and the water saturation remains is greater than initial saturation. (author)

  16. Studies on reservoir mechanics: Gas and water flow in gas reservoirs. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czolbe, P.; Kretzschmar, H.J.; Kuehnel, G.

    1982-01-01

    Economically interesting amounts of gas in aquiferous gas reservoirs become ineffectively during the exploitation of the reservoir because of pressure-dynamic reasons. These reasons are studied under laboratory conditions by measurements of sorptions and phase permeability. Measuring equipment, the measurement itself and the results are outlined. The laboratory results in the form of sorption isothermes and phase functions confirm the gas binding.

  17. Containment for Heavy-Water Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety principles applicable to heavy-water, gas-cooled reactors are outlined, with a view to establishing containment specifications adapted to the sites available in Switzerland for the construction of nuclear plants. These specifications are derived from dose rates considered acceptable, in the event of a serious reactor accident, for persons living near the plant, and are based on-meteorological and demographic conditions representative of the majority of the country's sites. The authors consider various designs for the containment shell, taking into account the conditions which would exist in the shell after the maximum credible accident. The following types of shell are studied: pre-stressed concrete; pre-stressed concrete with steel dome; pre-stressed concrete with inner, leakproof steel lining; steel with concrete side shield to protect against radiation; double shell. The degree of leak proofing of the shells studied is regarded as a feature of the particular design and not as a fixed constructional specification. The authors assess the leak proofing properties of each type of shell and establish building costs for each of them on the basis of precise plans, with the collaboration of various specialized firms. They estimate the effectiveness of the various shells from a safety standpoint, in relation to different emergency procedures, in particular release into the atmosphere through appropriate filters and decontamination of the air within the shell by recycling through batteries of filters. The paper contains a very detailed comparison of about 10 cases corresponding to various combinations of design and emergency procedure; the comparison was made using a computer programme specially established for the purpose. The results are compared with those for a reactor of the same type and power, but assembled together with the heat exchangers in a pre-stressed concrete shell. (author)

  18. Data and prediction of water content of high pressure nitrogen, methane and natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Froyna, E.W.; Lovland, J.;

    2007-01-01

    New data for the equilibrium water content of nitrogen, methane and one natural gas mixture are presented. The new binary data and existing binary sets were compared to calculated values of dew point temperature using both the CPA (Cubic-Plus-Association) EoS and the GERG-water EoS. CPA is purely...... predictive (i.e. all binary interaction parameters are set equal to 0), while GERG-water uses a temperature dependent interaction parameter fitted to published data. The GERG-water model is proposed as an ISO standard for determining the water content of natural gas. The data sets for nitrogen cover...... conclusion is that GERG-water must be used with caution outside its specified working range. For some selected natural gas mixtures the two models also perform very much alike. The water content of the mixtures decreases with increasing amount of heavier components, and it seems that both models slightly...

  19. An evaluation of water quality in private drinking water wells near natural gas extraction sites in the Barnett Shale formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Brian E; Hunt, Laura R; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Oka, Hyppolite; Walton, Jayme L; Hopkins, Dan; Osorio, Alexandra; Bjorndal, Bryan; Hu, Qinhong H; Schug, Kevin A

    2013-09-01

    Natural gas has become a leading source of alternative energy with the advent of techniques to economically extract gas reserves from deep shale formations. Here, we present an assessment of private well water quality in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale formation of North Texas. We evaluated samples from 100 private drinking water wells using analytical chemistry techniques. Analyses revealed that arsenic, selenium, strontium and total dissolved solids (TDS) exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) in some samples from private water wells located within 3 km of active natural gas wells. Lower levels of arsenic, selenium, strontium, and barium were detected at reference sites outside the Barnett Shale region as well as sites within the Barnett Shale region located more than 3 km from active natural gas wells. Methanol and ethanol were also detected in 29% of samples. Samples exceeding MCL levels were randomly distributed within areas of active natural gas extraction, and the spatial patterns in our data suggest that elevated constituent levels could be due to a variety of factors including mobilization of natural constituents, hydrogeochemical changes from lowering of the water table, or industrial accidents such as faulty gas well casings.

  20. Simultaneous stack-gas scrubbing and waste water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poradek, J. C.; Collins, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Simultaneous treatment of wastewater and S02-laden stack gas make both treatments more efficient and economical. According to results of preliminary tests, solution generated by stack gas scrubbing cycle reduces bacterial content of wastewater. Both processess benefit by sharing concentrations of iron.

  1. Development of the air jet curtain covering surface with gas phase under the water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welding of structures such as pressure vessels is carried out for maintenance of nuclear power plants. For shortening the work process and reducing exposure radiation, development of a technique to weld is carried out without discharging the water from the pressure vessel. However, the welding must be done in an inert gas condition, and therefore it is necessary to remote the water around the welding point. We developed the air jet curtain technology which made possible the removal of water by feeding gas to keep the welding point in the gas phase. (author)

  2. Interfacial nanobubbles are leaky: permeability of the gas/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Sean R; Wu, Xi; An, Hongjie; Craig, Vincent S J; Mega, Tony L; Zhang, Xuehua

    2014-06-24

    Currently there is no widespread agreement on an explanation for the stability of surface nanobubbles. One means by which several explanations can be differentiated is through the predictions they make about the degree of permeability of the gas-solution interface. Here we test the hypothesis that the gas-solution interface of surface nanobubbles is permeable by experimental measurements of the exchange of carbon dioxide. We present measurements by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), demonstrating that the gas inside surface nanobubbles is not sealed inside the bubbles, but rather exchanges with the dissolved gas in the liquid phase. Such gas transfer is measurable by using the infrared active gas CO2. We find that bubbles formed in air-saturated water that is then perfused with CO2-saturated water give rise to distinctive gaseous CO2 signals in ATR-FTIR measurements. Also the CO2 gas inside nanobubbles quickly dissolves into the surrounding air-saturated water. AFM images before and after fluid exchange show that CO2 bubbles shrink upon exposure to air-equilibrated liquid but remain stable for hours. Also air bubbles in contact with CO2-saturated water increase in size and Ostwald ripening occurs more rapidly due to the relatively high gas solubility of CO2 in water. PMID:24863586

  3. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  4. Bio-conversion of water hyacinths into methane gas, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.; Gordon, J.

    1974-01-01

    Bio-gas and methane production from the microbial anaerobic decomposition of water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) (Mart) Solms was investigated. These experiments demonstrated the ability of water hyacinths to produce an average of 13.9 ml of methane gas per gram of wet plant weight. This study revealed that sample preparation had no significant effect on bio-gas and/or methane production. Pollution of water hyacinths by two toxic heavy materials, nickel and cadmium, increased the rate of methane production from 51.8 ml/day for non-contaminated plants incubated at 36 C to 81.0 ml/day for Ni-Cd contaminated plants incubated at the same temperature. The methane content of bio-gas evolved from the anaerobic decomposition of Ni-Cd contaminated plants was 91.1 percent as compared to 69.2 percent methane content of bio-gas collected from the fermentation of non-contaminated plants.

  5. Greenhouse-gas emissions from energy use in the water sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothausen, Sabrina G. S. A.; Conway, Declan

    2011-07-01

    Water management faces great challenges over the coming decades. Pressures include stricter water-quality standards, increasing demand for water and the need to adapt to climate change, while reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. The processes of abstraction, conveyance and treatment of fresh water and wastewater all demand energy. Energy use in the water sector is growing, yet its importance is under-recognized, and gaps remain in our knowledge. Here we define the need to integrate energy use further into water resource management and identify opportunities for the water sector to understand and describe more effectively its role in greenhouse-gas emissions.

  6. An overview of oil-water separation using gas flotation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saththasivam, Jayaprakash; Loganathan, Kavithaa; Sarp, Sarper

    2016-02-01

    Oil concentration levels in municipal waste water effluent streams are stringently regulated in most parts of the world. Apart from municipal waste, stricter oil/grease discharge limits are also enforced in oil and gas sectors as large volumes of produced water is being discharged to open ocean. One of the feasible, practical and established methods to remove oil substances from waste water sources is by gas flotation. In this overview, gas flotation technologies, namely dissolved and induced flotation systems, are discussed. Physico-chemical interaction between oil-water-gas during flotation is also summarized. In addition to a brief review on design advancements in flotation systems, enhancement of flotation efficiency by using pre-treatment methods, particularly coagulation-flocculation, is also presented.

  7. An overview of oil-water separation using gas flotation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saththasivam, Jayaprakash; Loganathan, Kavithaa; Sarp, Sarper

    2016-02-01

    Oil concentration levels in municipal waste water effluent streams are stringently regulated in most parts of the world. Apart from municipal waste, stricter oil/grease discharge limits are also enforced in oil and gas sectors as large volumes of produced water is being discharged to open ocean. One of the feasible, practical and established methods to remove oil substances from waste water sources is by gas flotation. In this overview, gas flotation technologies, namely dissolved and induced flotation systems, are discussed. Physico-chemical interaction between oil-water-gas during flotation is also summarized. In addition to a brief review on design advancements in flotation systems, enhancement of flotation efficiency by using pre-treatment methods, particularly coagulation-flocculation, is also presented. PMID:26408973

  8. Evaluation of Heat Transfer Coefficients During the Water Vapor Condensation Contained in the Flue Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Bespalov Victor; Bespalov Vladimir; Melnikov Denis

    2016-01-01

    Is shown the influence of the heat transfer coefficient from the wet flue gas to the heat exchange surface on the overall heat transfer coefficient in the gas-air heat exchanger with the water vapor condensation. Experimental data are compared with calculations based on the mathematical model of the condensing heat exchanger.

  9. Water Vapor Interference Correction in a Non Dispersive Infrared Multi-Gas Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN You-Wen; LIU Wen-Qing; ZENG Yi; WANG Shi-Mei; HUANG Shu-Hua; XIE Pin-Hua; YU Xiao-Man

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an effective method to eliminate the interfering effect of water vapor in a non-dispersive infrared multi-gas analyzer.The response coefficients of water vapor at each filter channel are measured from the humidity of the ambient air.Based on the proposed method,the water vapor interference is corrected with the measured response coefficients.By deducting the absorbance of each filter channel related to water vapor,the measuring precision of the analyzer is improved significantly and the concentration retrieval correlation accuracy of each target gas is more than 99%.

  10. Simulation of Water Level Fluctuations in a Hydraulic System Using a Coupled Liquid-Gas Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for simulating vertical water level fluctuations with coupled liquid and gas phases is presented. The Preissmann implicit scheme is used to linearize the governing equations for one-dimensional transient flow for both liquid and gas phases, and the linear system is solved using the chasing method. Some classical cases for single liquid and gas phase transients in pipelines and networks are studied to verify that the proposed methods are accurate and reliable. The implicit scheme is extended using a dynamic mesh to simulate the water level fluctuations in a U-tube and an open surge tank without consideration of the gas phase. Methods of coupling liquid and gas phases are presented and used for studying the transient process and interaction between the phases, for gas phase limited in a chamber and gas phase transported in a pipeline. In particular, two other simplified models, one neglecting the effect of the gas phase on the liquid phase and the other one coupling the liquid and gas phases asynchronously, are proposed. The numerical results indicate that the asynchronous model performs better, and are finally applied to a hydropower station with surge tanks and air shafts to simulate the water level fluctuations and air speed.

  11. A capillary network model for coupled gas and water flow in engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional capillary network model for gas migration through a water-saturated medium is presented. The model is an extension of previously developed capillary bundle models, and provides a discrete alternative to classical continuum Darcy models. The need for such an alternative has become apparent from recent experimental results that suggest gas migrates through low permeability water-saturated media via a small number of preferential pathways

  12. Experimental study of flow patterns and pressure drops of heavy oil-water-gas vertical flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-mao; ZHONG Hai-quan; LI Ying-chuan; LIU Zhong-neng; WANG Qi

    2014-01-01

    A stainless steel apparatus of 18.5 m high and 0.05 m in inner diameter is developed, with the heavy oil from Lukeqin Xinjiang oil field as the test medium, to carry out the orthogonal experiments for the interactions between heavy oil-water and heavy oil-water-gas. With the aid of observation windows, the pressure drop signal can be collected and the general multiple flow patterns of heavy oil-water-gas can be observed, including the bubble, slug, churn and annular ones. Compared with the conventional oil, the bubble flows are identified in three specific flow patterns which are the dispersed bubble (DB), the bubble gas-bubble heavy oil go(B-B), and the bubble gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(B-I). The slug flows are identified in two specific flow patterns which are the intermittent gas-bubble heavy oilgo(I-B)and the intermittent gas-intermittent heavy oilgo(I-I). Compared with the observa- tions in the heavy oil-water experiment, it is found that the conventional models can not accurately predict the pressure gradient. And it is not water but heavy oil and water mixed phase that is in contact with the tube wall. So, based on the principle of the energy con- servation and the kinematic wave theory, a new method is proposed to calculate the frictional pressure gradient. Furthermore, with the new friction gradient calculation method and a due consideration of the flow characteristics of the heavy oil-water-gas high speed flow, a new model is built to predict the heavy oil-water-gas pressure gradient. The predictions are compared with the experiment data and the field data. The accuracy of the predictions shows the rationality and the applicability of the new model.

  13. Investigation of Methanol Oxidation on Polycrystalline Pt: Importance of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    TAPAN, Niyazi Alper

    2005-01-01

    A water-gas shift reaction model was proposed for methanol oxidation on polycrystalline platinum. To see if the model proposed can explain methanol oxidation on platinum metal, a polycrystalline platinum electrode was used and simulations were compared with the chronoamperometric experiments at different applied potentials, E < 0.6 V. The pseudo steady state hypothesis model shows that at E < 0.6 V the water gas shift reaction can explain the methanol oxidation. After 0.45 V th...

  14. Influence of Gas Components on the Formation of Carbonyl Sulfide over Water-Gas Shift Catalyst B303Q

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Water-gas shift reaction catalyst at lower temperature (200-400 ℃) may improve the conversion of carbon monoxide. But carbonyl sulfide was found to be present over the sulfided cobaltmolybdenum/alumina catalyst for water-gas shift reaction. The influences of temperature, space velocity,and gas components on the formation of carbonyl sulfide over sulfided cobalt-molybdenum/alumina catalyst B303Q at 200-400 ℃ were studied in a tubular fixed-bed quartz-glass reactor under simulated water-gas shift conditions. The experimental results showed that the yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst reached a maximum at 220 ℃ with the increase in temperature, sharply decreased with the increase in space velocity and the content of water vapor, increased with the increase in the content of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, and its yield increased and then reached a stable value with the increase in the content of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The formation mechanism of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was discussed on the basis of how these factors influence the formation of COS. The yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was the combined result of two reactions, that is, COS was first produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen sulfide,and then the as-produced COS was converted to hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide by hydrolysis. The mechanism of COS formation is assumed as follows: sulfur atoms in the Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3 crystal lattice were easily removed and formed carbonyl sulfide with CO, and then hydrogen sulfide in the water-gas shift gas reacted with the crystal lattice oxygen atoms in CoO-MoO3/Al2O3 to form Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3.This mechanism for the formation of COS over water-gas shift catalyst B303Q is in accordance with the Mars-Van Krevelen's redox mechanism over metal sulfide.

  15. The Effect of Water Spray upon Incineration Flue Gas Clean—up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HaigangWang; BinLi; 等

    2000-01-01

    The existence of liquid water was found very important in incineration flue gas clean-up systems for enhancing the absorption of acid components contained.In a newly developed incineration flue gas clean-up tower,which works in a semi-dry mode,the water is injected in the form of spray to maximum its contact surface with the gas.The criteria for the design of the water nozzles would be high water concentration but no liquid impinging on the solid wall and complete evaporation inside the tower,In order to optimize the atomizer design,the effects of the spray type (hollow or solid cone),their initial droplet size distribution and water flow rate on the performance of the acid gas absorption were investigated.The liquid behaviour was studied with a fluid dynamic simulation code,and the overall performance was checked experimentally.This paper presents the use of a commercial CFD code,FLUENT,and some modifications made during such investigation.The modification includes the viscosity of the flue gas defined as a function of the temperature,and the initial mass fraction of different droplet size group described with an exponential distribution formula of Rosin-Rammler.The investigation results (the optimal spray parameters)were used to guide the water nozzle design.The general performance of the flue gas clean-up system measured during the plant operation complied with the design criteria.

  16. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-10-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  17. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-01-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  18. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Bischoff, Brian L.; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2016-07-19

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  19. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  20. Analisa Pengaruh Water Wash Terhadap Performansi Turbin Gas Pada PLTG Unit 7 Paya Pasir PT.PLN Sektor Pembangkitan Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Perangin Angin, Febri Dwi Senjaya

    2015-01-01

    Turbin gas adalah mesin Pembakaran luar (eksternal Combustion Engine) dimana energi kinetik dari gas panas memutar sudu – sudu turbin menjadi energi mekanik. Pada saat ini instalasi turbin gas ditambah dengan cara baru yang disebut Water Wash. Water Wash adalah suatu cara yang digunakan untuk membersihkan kompresor sehingga daya keluaran turbin gas lebih besar. Proses penggunaan Water Wash beroperasi menggunakan pola semprotan air dari nozzle yang sangat dirancang untuk benar-benar masuk ...

  1. Effect of liquid distribution on gas-water phase mass transfer in an unsaturated sand during infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, Paul T.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1994-09-01

    Gas-water phase mass transfer was examined in a homogeneous sand with both the gas and water phase mobile: water was infiltrated from the top of the sand column while benzene-laden air flowed upward from the bottom. Mass-transfer limitations for this situation may be important for applications of bioventing, where water and nutrients are added at the ground surface simultaneously with induced air movement to carry oxygen and volatile organics to microbial populations. Gas- and water-phase samples indicate that gas-water phase mass transfer was sufficiently fast that equilibrium between gas and water phases was achieved at all sampling locations within the porous medium. Lower-bound estimates for the gas-water mass-transfer rate coefficient show that mass transfer was at least 10-40 times larger than predictions made from an empirical model developed for gas-water phase mass transfer in an identical porous medium. A water-phase tracer test demonstrates that water flow was much more uniform in this study than in those earlier experiments, which is a likely explanation for the differing rates of gas-water phase mass transfer. It is hypothesized that the liquid distribution in previous laboratory experiments was less uniform because of preferential flow paths due to wetting front instabilities. Gas-water phase mass-transfer rate coefficients reported in this investigation are for an ideal situation of uniform water infiltration: mass-transfer rates in field soils are expected to be significantly smaller.

  2. Water-Stable Anionic Metal-Organic Framework for Highly Selective Separation of Methane from Natural Gas and Pyrolysis Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Wang, Xusheng; Liang, Jun; Huang, Yuanbiao; Li, Hongfang; Lin, Zujin; Cao, Rong

    2016-04-20

    A 3D water-stable anionic metal-organic framework [Zn4(hpdia)2]·[NH2(CH3)2]·3DMF·4H2O (FJI-C4) was constructed based on an elaborate phosphorus-containing ligand 5,5'-(hydroxyphosphoryl)diisophthalic acid (H5hpdia). FJI-C4 with narrow one-dimensional (1D) pore channels exhibits high selectivity of C3H8/CH4 and C2H2/CH4. It is the first time for the MOF which contains phosphorus for selective separation of methane from natural gas and pyrolysis gas.

  3. An investigation into gas transfer from bubbles into water

    OpenAIRE

    Nock, William James

    2015-01-01

    The current design of mass transfer systems for gas bubbles absorbing into a liquid is mainly restricted to the use of empirical relations which involve a high level of uncertainty. This is due to a lack of understanding of the interactions of gas bubbles and the liquid phase, and of how this affects the mass transfer. This work set out to enhance our understanding of the mass transfer of CO2 from concentrated sources such as flue gases into the aqueous phase, for use in applications such as ...

  4. A second-order Godunov method for wave problems in coupled solid-water-gas systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H.S.; Sotiropoulos, F. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1999-05-20

    Wave problems in solid-water-gas systems with distinct phase interfaces are commonly encountered in practice, such as in water entry of a recovered body, reservoir-dam interaction during earthquakes, and spallation of steel plates caused by blast waves. Here, the authors present a second-order Godunov method for computing unsteady, one-dimensional wave problems with a fracture and cavitation in coupled solid-water-gas systems. The method employs a hydro-elasto-plastic body, the Tait equation, and the ideal gas law for solid, water, and gaseous phases, respectively, and models both fractures and cavities as vacuum zones with distinct borders. The numerical approach utilizes a Lagrangian formulation in conjunction with local solid-water-gas-vacuum Riemann problems, which have unique solutions and can be solved efficiently. The various phases are treated in a unified manner and no supplementary interface conditions are necessary for tracking material boundaries. Calculations are carried out for Riemann problems, wave propagation and reflection in a water-rock-air system, and spallation and cavitation in an explosion-steel-water-gas system. It is shown that the Godunov method has high resolution for shocks and phase interfaces, clearly resolves elastic and plastic waves, and successfully describes onset and propagation of fracture and cavitation zones.

  5. The adsorption behavior of octafluoropropane at the water/gas interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the adsorption behavior of the gas octafluoropropane at the water/gas interface as a function of different pressures. In a custom-made measurement cell, the gas pressure was varied in a range between 1 bar and close to the condensation pressure of octafluoropropane. The electron density profiles of the adsorption layers show that the layer thickness increases with pressure. The evolution of the layer electron density indicates that the bulk electron density is reached if a layer consisting of more than one monolayer of octafluoropropane is adsorbed on the water surface

  6. Water removal characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells using a dry gas purging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Uk; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyun; Oh, In-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ae; Hong, Seong-Ahn; Ko, Jaejun; Lim, Tae-Won; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lim, Tae-Hoon

    Water removal from proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is of great importance to improve start-up ability and mitigate cell degradation when the fuel cell operates at subfreezing temperatures. In this study, we report water removal characteristics under various shut down conditions including a dry gas-purging step. In order to estimate the dehydration level of the electrolyte membrane, the high frequency resistance of the fuel cell stack was observed. Also, a novel method for measuring the amount of residual water in the fuel cell was developed to determine the amount of water removal. The method used the phase change of liquid water and was successfully applied to examine the water removal characteristics. Based on these works, the effects of several parameters such as purging time, flow rate of purging gas, operation current, and stack temperature on the amount of residual water were investigated.

  7. Desalination and reuse of high-salinity shale gas produced water: drivers, technologies, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Devin L; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Ben-Sasson, Moshe; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Yip, Ngai Yin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-01

    In the rapidly developing shale gas industry, managing produced water is a major challenge for maintaining the profitability of shale gas extraction while protecting public health and the environment. We review the current state of practice for produced water management across the United States and discuss the interrelated regulatory, infrastructure, and economic drivers for produced water reuse. Within this framework, we examine the Marcellus shale play, a region in the eastern United States where produced water is currently reused without desalination. In the Marcellus region, and in other shale plays worldwide with similar constraints, contraction of current reuse opportunities within the shale gas industry and growing restrictions on produced water disposal will provide strong incentives for produced water desalination for reuse outside the industry. The most challenging scenarios for the selection of desalination for reuse over other management strategies will be those involving high-salinity produced water, which must be desalinated with thermal separation processes. We explore desalination technologies for treatment of high-salinity shale gas produced water, and we critically review mechanical vapor compression (MVC), membrane distillation (MD), and forward osmosis (FO) as the technologies best suited for desalination of high-salinity produced water for reuse outside the shale gas industry. The advantages and challenges of applying MVC, MD, and FO technologies to produced water desalination are discussed, and directions for future research and development are identified. We find that desalination for reuse of produced water is technically feasible and can be economically relevant. However, because produced water management is primarily an economic decision, expanding desalination for reuse is dependent on process and material improvements to reduce capital and operating costs.

  8. Developing Water Resource Security in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained Context - A Case Study in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarroja, B.; Aghakouchak, A.; Samuelsen, S.

    2015-12-01

    The onset of drought conditions in regions such as California due to shortfalls in precipitation has brought refreshed attention to the vulnerability of our water supply paradigm to changes in climate patterns. In the face of a changing climate which can exacerbate drought conditions in already dry areas, building resiliency into our water supply infrastructure requires some decoupling of water supply availability from climate behavior through conservation, efficiency, and alternative water supply measures such as desalination and water reuse. The installation of these measures requires varying degrees of direct energy inputs and/or impacts the energy usage of the water supply infrastructure (conveyance, treatment, distribution, wastewater treatment). These impacts have implications for greenhouse gas emissions from direct fuel usage or impacts on the emissions from the electric grid. At the scale that these measures may need to be deployed to secure water supply availability, especially under climate change impacted hydrology, they can potentially pose obstacles for meeting greenhouse gas emissions reduction and renewable utilization goals. Therefore, the portfolio of these measures must be such that detrimental impacts on greenhouse gas emissions are minimized. This study combines climate data with a water reservoir network model and an electric grid dispatch model for the water-energy system of California to evaluate 1) the different pathways and scale of alternative water resource measures needed to secure water supply availability and 2) the impacts of following these pathways on the ability to meet greenhouse gas and renewable utilization goals. It was discovered that depending on the water supply measure portfolio implemented, impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and renewable utilization can either be beneficial or detrimental, and optimizing the portfolio is more important under climate change conditions due to the scale of measures required.

  9. Pore network simulation of water condensation in Gas Diffusion Layers of PEM Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Straubhaar, Benjamin; Pauchet, Joël; Prat, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental understanding of water transport in PEMFCs is still a major challenge in direct relation with the water management issue, i.e., the ability to maintain a good dynamic balance of water in the membrane-electrode assembly during operation. We concentrate on the water transfer mechanisms occurring in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) on the cathode side. Recent works, e.g. [1], suggest that water condensation plays a major role in the water transfer and the flooding of GDL. In the p...

  10. Best practices for the management of CBM/NGC shale gas produced water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water produced from conventional oil and gas wells is traditionally re-injected to the subsurface. This presentation discussed best practices for the disposal of water produced during shale gas and coalbed methane (CBM) production. Issues related to subsurface and surface disposal were evaluated. Provincial rules and regulations were reviewed. Issues related to proving disposal capacity were discussed. Water resource impacts from produced water withdrawal were reviewed. Formation water disposal practices included deep well injection; shallow injection; surface discharge; atomization; evaporation and infiltration; treatment; and irrigation. Water formation characteristics were reviewed for various plays in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). In Alberta, saline waters must be re-injected into the subsurface. Non-saline water must have a preliminary groundwater assessment in order to be disposed of above-ground. Technical reports must be prepared by groundwater specialists. Hydrogeological information required during subsurface disposal includes details of drilling programs, testing of aquifer parameters, produced water quality and gas characteristics; and monitoring to identify unexpected impacts of withdrawal. Injection well testing and observation well data is used to identify suitable disposal sites. Potential water resource impacts were identified from produced water withdrawal. Surface discharge is considered when salinity is less than 4000 mg per litre, and is non-toxic to aquatic life. Toxicity is assessment under laboratory conditions. Regulations and guidelines for surface disposal were provided for both Alberta and British Columbia. refs., tabs., figs

  11. A water column study of methane around gas flares located at the West Spitsbergen continental margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentz, Torben; Damm, Ellen; von Deimling, Jens Schneider;

    2014-01-01

    In the Arctic Seas, the West Spitsbergen continental margin represents a prominent methane seep area. In this area, free gas formation and gas ebullition as a consequence of hydrate dissociation due to global warming are currently under debate. Recent studies revealed shallow gas accumulation and...... of the bottom water enriched in methane may be vertically mixed and thus be potentially an additional source for atmospheric methane.......In the Arctic Seas, the West Spitsbergen continental margin represents a prominent methane seep area. In this area, free gas formation and gas ebullition as a consequence of hydrate dissociation due to global warming are currently under debate. Recent studies revealed shallow gas accumulation...... and ebullition of methane into the water column at more than 250 sites in an area of 665 km2. We conducted a detailed study of a subregion of this area, which covers an active gas ebullition area of 175 km2 characterized by 10 gas flares reaching from the seafloor at ∼245 m up to 50 m water depth to identify...

  12. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of Water Dissolved Heavy Metal Ions Using Hydrogen Sulfide Gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Tarazi, Mousa

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and te

  13. Measurements of radon concentrations in waters and soil gas of Zonguldak, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koray, Abdullah; Akkaya, Gizem; Kahraman, Ayşegül; Kaynak, Gökay

    2014-12-01

    The radon concentrations in soil-gas and water samples (in the form of springs, catchment, tap, thermal) used as drinking water or thermal were measured using a professional radon monitor AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO. The measured radon concentrations in water samples ranged from 0.32 to 88.22 Bq l(-1). Most of radon levels in potable water samples are below the maximum contaminant level of 11 Bq l(-1) recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The calculated annual effective doses due to radon intake through water consumption varied from 0.07 to 18.53 µSv y(-1). The radon concentrations in soil gas varied from 295.67 to 70 852.92 Bq m(-3). The radon level in soil gas was found to be higher in the area close to the formation boundary thrust and faults. No correlation was observed between radon concentrations in groundwater and soil gas. Also, no significant correlation was observed between soil-gas radon and temperature, pressure and humidity. The emanation of radon from groundwater and soil gas is controlled by the geological formation and by the tectonic structure of the area. PMID:24287600

  14. Tomographic Imaging of Water Injection and Withdrawal in PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill U; Gostick, J. T.; Gunterman, H. P.; Weber, A. Z.; Newman, J. S.; Kienitz, B. L.; MacDowell, A. A.

    2010-06-25

    X-ray computed tomography was used to visualize the water configurations inside gas diffusion layers for various applied capillary pressures, corresponding to both water invasion and withdrawal. A specialized sample holder was developed to allow capillary pressure control on the small-scale samples required. Tests were performed on GDL specimens with and without hydrophobic treatments.

  15. Effect of water content on transient nonequilibrium NAPL-gas mass transfer during soil vapor extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Kim, Joong Hoon; Liljestrand, Howard M; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2002-01-01

    The effect of water content on the volatilization of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in unsaturated soils was characterized by one-dimensional venting experiments conducted to evaluate the lumped mass transfer coefficient. An empirical correlation based upon the modified Sherwood number, Peclet number, and normalized mean grain size was used to estimate initial lumped mass transfer coefficients over a range of water content. The effects of water content on the soil vapor extraction SVE process have been investigated through experimentation and mathematical modeling. The experimental results indicated that a rate-limited NAPL-gas mass transfer occurred in water-wet soils. A severe mass transfer limitation was observed at 61.0% water saturation where the normalized effluent gas concentrations fell below 1.0 almost immediately, declined exponentially from the initiation of venting, and showed long tailing. This result was attributed to the reduction of interfacial area between the NAPL and mobile gas phases due to the increased water content. A transient mathematical model describing the change of the lumped mass transfer coefficient was used. Simulations showed that the nonequilibrium mass transfer process could be characterized by the exponent beta, a parameter which described the reduction of the specific area available for NAPL volatilization. The nonequilibrium mass transfer limitations were controlled by the soil mean grain size and pore gas velocity, were well described by beta values below 1.0 at low water saturation, and were well predicted with beta values greater than 1.0 at high water saturation. PMID:11848263

  16. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in

  17. Local Fission Gas Release and Swelling in Water Reactor Fuel during Slow Power Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Walker, C.T.; Ray, I.L.F.;

    1985-01-01

    Gas release and fuel swelling caused by a power increase in a water reactor fuel (burn-up 2.7–4.5% FIMA) is described. At a bump terminal level of about 400 W/cm (local value) gas release was 25–40%. The formation of gas bubbles on grain boundaries and their degree of interlinkage are the two...... factors that determine the level of fission gas release during a power bump. Release begins when gas bubbles on grain boundaries start o interlink. This occurred at r/r0 ~ 0.75. Release tunnels were fully developed at r/r0 ~ 0.55 with the result that gas release was 60–70% at this position....

  18. The water-induced linear reduction gas diffusivity model extended to three pore regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; De Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken;

    2015-01-01

    An existing gas diffusivity model developed originally for sieved, repacked soils was extended to characterize gas diffusion in differently structured soils and functional pore networks. A gas diffusivity-derived pore connectivity index was used as a measure of soil structure development....... Characterization of soil functional pore structure is an essential prerequisite to understand key gas transport processes in variably saturated soils in relation to soil ecosystems, climate, and environmental services. In this study, the water-induced linear reduction (WLR) soil gas diffusivity model originally...... developed for sieved, repacked soil was extended to two simple, linear regions to characterize gas diffusion and functional pore-network structure also in intact, structured soil systems. Based on the measurements in soils with markedly different pore regions, we showed that the two linear regions can...

  19. Operation, Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Reverse Water Gas Shift process is a candidate technology for water and oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production project. This report focuses on the operation and analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process, which has been constructed at Kennedy Space Center. A summary of results from the initial operation of the RWGS, process along with an analysis of these results is included in this report. In addition an evaluation of a material balance model developed from the work performed previously under the summer program is included along with recommendations for further experimental work.

  20. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water andd air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainity of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of bethic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water inteface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2--6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models

  1. Water and dissolved gas geochemistry of the monomictic Paterno sinkhole (central Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Matteo Nocentini; Marco Quartararo; Franco Tassi; Orlando Vaselli; Francesco Capecchiacci; Massimiliano Marcelli; Roberto Palozzi; Dmitri Rouwet; Jacopo Cabassi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the chemical and isotope features of water and dissolved gases from lake Paterno (max. depth 54 m), a sinkhole located in the NE sector of the S. Vittorino plain (Rieti, Central Italy), where evidences of past and present hydrothermal activity exists. In winter (February 2011) lake Paterno waters were almost completely mixed, whereas in summer time (July 2011) thermal and chemical stratifications established. During the stratification period, water and dissolved gas chemi...

  2. The relationship between leaf water status, gas exchange, and spectral reflectance in cotton leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of leaf spectral reflectance, the components of water potential, and leaf gas exchanges as a function of leaf water content were made to evaluate the use of NIR reflectance as an indicator of plant water status. Significant correlations were determined between spectral reflectance at 810 nm, 1665 nm, and 2210 nm and leaf relative water content, total water potential, and turgor pressure. However, the slopes of these relationships were relatively shallow and, when evaluated over the range of leaf water contents in which physiological activity occurs (e.g., photosynthesis), had lower r-squared values, and some relationships were not statistically significant. NIR reflectance varied primarily as a function of leaf water content, and not independently as a function of turgor pressure, which is a sensitive indicator of leaf water status. The limitations of this approach to measuring plant water stress are discussed.

  3. Representativity of gas samples taken with the pressurized water sampling system (PAVE) 1995-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of the pressurized water down-borehole sampling system (PAVE) for the sampling of dissolved gases was initiated in 1993. The first test runs with PAVE were performed at Olkiluoto in 1995. From the 1995 to February 2004, a total of 174 samples were taken. PAVE sampling is continuing at Olkiluoto. During the pre-pumping period and when groundwater sampling, the water flows directly to the surface past the PAVE pressure vessels. During gas sampling, the water flows to the pressure vessels by opening the pressure valve. Argon or nitrogen gas was used as back-pressure gas in the pressure vessel to maintain pressure in the vessel when filling with sample. In the PAVE-sampling system there can be one to three pressure vessels in sequence (currently always three). Dissolved gas samples in pressure vessels have also been taken from groundwater pumped to the surface. In this report, all gas samples taken with the PAVE sampling system by the end of February 2004 are discussed. Samples are from Olkiluoto, Haestholmen, Kivetty and Romuvaara. Mainly the samples having at least two pressure vessels analysed from the same sampling point are discussed. The aim of this report is to determine if there is any systematic behaviour in the amount of water filling the pressure vessels, the extent of argon, nitrogen or air contamination, the possibility of water leaks, or other problems. Understanding these problems will help the development work of the PAVE equipment. In addition the measuring uncertainty of the gas results is evaluated. The most representative gas results are selected for all Olkiluoto PAVE samplings. All gas results are classified in four categories where success of the sampling and analysis has been taken into account. (orig.)

  4. Study of Plasma Treatment of Produced Water from Oil and Gas Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kamau

    Unconventional gas and hydraulic fracturing is helping to increase natural gas production, which is widely viewed in the U.S. as a key asset to bolstering a clean and energy-independent future. Safe and economical management and treatment of water produced during such processes remain of key importance. With the increase of hydrocarbon production and national shale gas production expected to increase threefold and account for nearly half of all natural gas produced by 2035, advanced water treatment and management processes must be investigated, to ensure water conservation and associated economic prudence. The state of the art of produced water treatment technologies is described including the efficacy of plasma to modulate the contents of such aqueous solutions, meeting target parameters and potentially enabling the operation of other treatment technologies. Among other effects, progress is presented on the enhancement of an arc-in-water system to remove bicarbonate ions and prevent the mineral fouling ability of water which causes formation of CaCO3 in heat exchangers and distillation units. Qualitative and quantitative treatment targets of produced water treatment are discussed. Experimental work is conducted to test theories and identify and reproduce favorable effects useful to treating wastewaters. Plasma arc-in-water systems demonstrated capability of producing bicarbonate-depleted wastewaters, with experiments with gas-field produced waters indicating that generation of H+ ions plays a greater role in bicarbonate ion removal than local heating. Tests showed abatement of bicarbonate ions from a range of 684--778 mg/L down to zero. Subsequent scaling/fouling tests with waters ranging from 0 to 500 mg/L bicarbonate ions, in the presence of high calcium ion concentrations, showed that scale thickness, as well as mass on a 1-kW heating element was an order of magnitude less for process water containing 100 mg/L bicarbonate ions compared to process water with 500

  5. SHALE GAS EXTRACTION AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN NORTH CAROLINA: A PRIMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K. Jha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available About 25,000 acres of area underlying the Deep and Dan River Basins in North Carolina has been identified to contain large shale gas reservoirs that could be used for the natural gas production. This study attempted to quantify the impact of potential hydraulic fracturing (or fracking activities in the existing water resources of North Carolina. Supply and demand analysis was conducted using a water balance approach. Availability of surface water resources was quantified using the streamflow monitoring data of the surrounding area. A general assessment of the water demand for fracking was done using existing literature data and assumptions. Finally, a comparison was made between the water demand due to fracking and the water availability from nearby water sources. The preliminary analysis concluded that the surface water resources of North Caroline will not be affected at all as far as water quantity is concerned. However, whether extracting the shale gas of North Carolina is a good decision or not depends on the complete evaluation of the shale reservoirs and how well environmental impacts can be addressed.

  6. Gas engine bottoming cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, M.; Thorin, E.; Svedberg, G.

    1999-07-01

    Gas engines and diesel engines can be used for power generation in small-scale industrial and utility power plants. A bottoming cycle recovering heat from the exhaust gas, charge air, jacket water and lubrication oil can increase the power output of a gas or diesel engine power plant. The current study investigates ammonia-water power cycles as bottoming cycles to natural gas fired gas engines. The engines used in the calculations are 16V25SG and 18V34SG from Wartsila NSD. The configurations of the bottoming processes have been changed in order to achieve better temperature matching in the heat exchangers. The ammonia-water cycles have been compared to a simple Rankine steam cycle. All cycles have been optimized to give maximum power output. The ammonia-water bottoming cycles generate 18--54% more power than a simple Rankine steam cycle. An economic estimation of the bottoming cycles shows that the extra equipment needed for an ammonia-water cycle may be justified by the extra amount of power generated.

  7. Gas Bubbles Investigation in Contaminated Water Using Optical Tomography Based on Independent Component Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Taufiq Mohd Khairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of concentration profiles for gas bubble flow in a vertical pipeline containing contaminated water using an optical tomography system. The concentration profiles for the bubble flow quantities are investigated under five different flows conditions, a single bubble, double bubbles, 25% of air opening, 50% of air opening, and 100% of air opening flow rates where a valve is used to control the gas flow in the vertical pipeline. The system is aided by the independent component analysis (ICA algorithm to reconstruct the concentration profiles of the liquid-gas flow. The behaviour of the gas bubbles was investigated in contaminated water in which the water sample was prepared by adding 25 mL of colour ingredients to 3 liters of pure water. The result shows that the application of ICA has enabled the system to detect the presence of gas bubbles in contaminated water. This information provides vital information on the flow inside the pipe and hence could be very significant in increasing the efficiency of the process industries.

  8. Flash Atomization: A New Concept to Control Combustion Instability in Water-Injected Gas Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwas Iyengar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to explore methods to reduce combustor rumble in a water-injected gas turbine. Attempts to use water injection as a means to reduce NOX emissions in gas turbines have been largely unsuccessful because of increased combustion instability levels. This pulsation causes chronic fretting, wear, and fatigue that damages combustor components. Of greater concern is that liberated fragments could cause extensive damage to the turbine section. Combustion instability can be tied to the insufficient atomization of injected water; large water droplets evaporate non-uniformly that lead to energy absorption in chaotic pulses. Added pulsation is amplified by the combustion process and acoustic resonance. Effervescent atomization, where gas bubbles are injected, is beneficial by producing finely atomized droplets; the gas bubbles burst as they exit the nozzles creating additional energy to disperse the liquid. A new concept for effervescent atomization dubbed “flash atomization” is presented where water is heated to just below its boiling point in the supply line so that some of it will flash to steam as it leaves the nozzle. An advantage of flash atomization is that available heat energy can be used rather than mechanical energy to compress injection gas for conventional effervescent atomization.

  9. Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative water supply processes in southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2012-12-01

    Burgeoning population centers and declining hydrological resources have encouraged the development of alternative water treatment systems, including desalination and wastewater recycling. These processes currently provide potable water for millions of people and assist in satisfying agricultural and landscaping irrigation demands. There are a variety of alternative water production methods in place, and while they help to reduce the demands placed on aquifers, during their operation they are also significant sources of greenhouse gases. The environmental advantages of these alternative water production methods need to be carefully weighed against their energy footprints and greenhouse gas emissions profiles. This study measured the greenhouse gas emissions of a wastewater treatment and recycling facility in Orange County, California to get a more complete picture of the carbon footprint of the plant. We measured atmospheric emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O throughout the water recycling process and at various times of the day and week. This allowed us to assemble a thorough, cross-sectional profile of greenhouse gas emissions from the facility. We then compared the measured emissions of the treatment plant to the modeled emissions of desalination plants in order to assess the relative carbon footprints of the two water production methods. Other water supply alternatives, including regional water importation, were also included in the comparison in order to provide a more complete understanding of the potential greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, we assessed the significance of wastewater treatment as an urban greenhouse gas source when compared to other known emissions in the region. This research offers a valuable tool for sustainable urban and regional development by providing planners with a quantified comparison of the carbon footprints of several water production options.

  10. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  11. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  12. Experimental Study on Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Half Water Gas%半水煤气全组份气相色谱分析试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周杰; 郝建慧; 周莉

    2016-01-01

    半水煤气,是一种将水和煤作为气化物料进行气化的一种燃气,将空气和蒸汽与煤气混合,在发生炉中与无烟煤和焦炭发生作用,从而形成煤气。这种煤气是水煤气和发生炉煤气的混合,在煤化工行业有着广泛的应用。本文针对于半水煤气进行了分析,通过全组份气相色谱仪,对水煤气进行了分析,希望能够对相关工作者提供帮助。%semi water gas is a kind of gas, which can be used to make water and coal gasiifcation as the gasiifcation material. The mixture of air and steam and gas can be used to produce coal gas with the occurrence of anthracite and coke. This kind of gas is a mixture of water gas and producer gas, which is widely used in the coal chemical industry. In this paper, the semi water gas was analyzed, and the water gas was analyzed by using the whole set of gas chromatograph.

  13. Cavitation Rates in Water with Dissolved Gas and Other Impurities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrik Zima; Frantisek Marsík; Milan Sedlár

    2003-01-01

    Our objective is a better understanding of the role of physical properties of real fluids in the thermodynamics of cavitation in impure water. An extension to the classical homogenous nucleation theory suitable for mixtures is presented in attempt to address the discrepancy between the theoretical predictions and practical observations of cavitation rates in water at normal temperatures.The extension takes into account the non—equilibrium (dissipative) effects involved in nuclei formation through a substance dependent correction coefficient to be determined experimentally.The theory of thermodynamic fluctuations is applied to derive the work of formation of a bubble nucleus.The value of the correction coefficient is estimated using preliminary experimental data from a convergent-divergent nozzle. An application of the results to the numerical prediction of the cavitation zones in a radial-flow water pump is shown.

  14. An investigation of Water-gas interface migration of the upper Paleozoic gas pool of the Ordos Basin using reservoir fluid inclusion information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Jingkui; XIAO Xianming; LIU Dehan; LI Xianqing; SHEN Jiagui

    2004-01-01

    There is a particular characteristic in the for-mation of the Upper Paleozoic gas pool in the Ordos Basin that is its water-gas interface migrated regional during geological history.However,there has been lack of detailed research on this paper,the formation time of hte fluid inclusions formed in the water-gas transition zone of the gas pool was deduced using their trapping temperatures and combining of the burial with geothermal history of the basin.On the basis of this,the isochrone of water-gas interface migration for the gas pool was mapped .The result shows that the gas pool began to form around the yanan Area at about 165Ma,and then developed and enlarged toward the north direction.The gas pool finally formed at about 129 Ma.Since the basin uplifted from the late Cretaceous and gas supply decreased,the water-gas interface of the gas pool migratec back to the present position.

  15. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass

  16. Estimating national water use associated with unconventional oil and gas development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Janet M.; Macek-Rowland, Kathleen M.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Delzer, Gregory C.

    2016-05-18

    The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Water Availability and Use Science Program (WAUSP) goals are to provide a more accurate assessment of the status of the water resources of the United States and assist in the determination of the quantity and quality of water that is available for beneficial uses. These assessments would identify long-term trends or changes in water availability since the 1950s in the United States and help to develop the basis for an improved ability to forecast water avail- ability for future economic, energy-production, and environmental uses. The National Water Census (http://water.usgs.gov/watercensus/), a research program of the WAUSP, supports studies to develop new water accounting tools and assess water availability at the regional and national scales. Studies supported by this program target focus areas with identified water availability concerns and topical science themes related to the use of water within a specific type of environmental setting. The topical study described in this fact sheet will focus on understanding the relation between production of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) for energy and the water needed to produce and sustain this type of energy development. This relation applies to the life-cycle of renewable and nonrenewable forms of UOG energy and includes extraction, production, refinement, delivery, and disposal of waste byproducts. Water-use data and models derived from this topical study will be applied to other similar oil and gas plays within the United States to help resource managers assess and account for water used or needed in these areas. Additionally, the results from this topical study will be used to further refine the methods used in compiling water-use data for selected categories (for example, mining, domestic self-supplied, public supply, and wastewater) in the USGS’s 5-year national water-use estimates reports (http://water.usgs.gov/watuse/).

  17. Effect and mechanism of coking residual ammonia water treating by flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of coking residual ammonia water has been a bigdifficult problem at home and abroad, and there is no breakthrough research achievement in the past. The invention patent "The method of treating all coking wastewater or treating coking residual ammonia water by flue gas" has been successfully used in Huaian Steel Works for high concentration and organic industry wastewater treatment. Not only can it realize the wastewater zero discharge, but also the wastewater treatment has an effect of de-sulfur and de-nitrogen for flue gas. So that the flue gas exhaustcan meet the requirement of emission standard. The mass transfer and heat transfer, fly ash absorption and coagulation, acid and alkali neutralization reaction, catalysis oxidation and reduction reaction in flue gas would be the major factors.

  18. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  19. Estimating greenhouse gas fluxes from constructed wetlands used for water quality improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Sukanda Chuersuwan; Pongthep Suwanwaree; Nares Chuersuwan

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4 ), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2 ) fluxes were evaluated from constructed wetlands (CWs) used to improve domestic wastewater quality. Experiments employed subsurface flow (SF) and free water surface flow (FWS) CWs planted with Cyperus spp. Results showed seasonal fluctuations of greenhouse gas fluxes. Greenhouse gas fluxes from SF-CWs and FWS-CWS were significantly different (p

  20. Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

    2013-01-21

    For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

  1. Risk analysis for a radiolysis gas detonation in an in-pile loop with supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SCWR (supercritical water reactor) -FQT project is a cooperation between European and Chinese partners aimed to test the fuel SCWR elements under reactor conditions. In the frame of this work the risk of radiolysis gas production in the active range of the test track was assessed. The radiolysis gas could accumulate in an emergency cooling system with stagnating coolant. The ignition of this radiolysis gas could cause pressure peaks that are able to damage the primary coolant circuit. Pressure increase and deformations in case of ignition of accumulated gas were investigated. As piping material the Ti stabilized austenitic steel 08Ch18N10T was assumed, the simulation was performed using the ANSYS code. The results show that pipes without significant wall thickness enhancement cannot withstand the radiolysis gas detonation.

  2. Simultaneous removal of water and BTEX from feed gas for a cryogenic plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.; Lee, S.; Evans, M.; Chen, R.

    1999-07-01

    The removal of water and benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene (BTEX) from the feed gas of a cryogenic plant is critical in order to avoid precipitation of these components in the cold section of the plant. The design of the Hannibal Gas Plant in Sfax, Tunisia, accomplishes the removal of water and BTEX simultaneously. The plant receives 7.1 million Nm{sub 3}/day of feed gas and produces high heating value pipeline quality sales gas by removing nitrogen in the cold box. A methyl diethanol amine (MDEA) treating system at the front end of the plant is designed to remove carbon dioxide. The glycol system takes the saturated gas from the MDEA contactor and reduces the water content to 7 lb/MMscf. The glycol system is also designed to remove more than half of the BTEX from the feed gas so that these aromatic components will not precipitate in the cold section of the plant. GPA experimental data were used to fit the interaction parameters for the computer simulator used to design the glycol system. The results of the plant performance test verify the validity of the design.

  3. Experimental study on hydrodynamic behaviors of high-speed gas jets in still water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenqing Dai; Boyi Wang; Longxi Qi; Honghui Shi

    2006-01-01

    The present paper describes experimental investigation on the flow pattern and hydrodynamic effect of underwater gas jets from supersonic and sonic nozzles operated in correct- and imperfect expansion conditions. The flow visualizations show that jetting is the flow regime for the submerged gas injection at a high speed in the parameter range under consideration. The obtained results indicate that high-speed gas jets in still water induce large pressure pulsations upstream of the nozzle exit and the presence of shock-cell structure in the over-and under-expanded jets leads to an increase in the intensity of the jet-induced hydrodynamic pressure.

  4. Oil and gas company policy regarding the concept of sustainable development (water resources)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyugina, E. G.; Pogharnitskaya, O. V.; Grinkevich, L. S.; Belozerova, D. S.; Strelnikova, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    The paper considers oil and gas companies implementing the strategy of sustainable development. Being vital to the national economy, oil and gas companies have a significant impact on the environment. Having analyzed the statistical data, the authors state that the leading Russian oil and gas companies contribute to the industry dynamics and conduct eco-friendly production practices. The environmental component is reported to be integrated in production, HR, information and other company policies, which results in “greening” both economic cooperation and place of production. The authors report the inverse relation between production dynamics and significance of the impact on water resources.

  5. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This study estimates the life cycle water consumption and wastewater generation impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well from its construction to end of life. Direct water consumption at the well site was assessed by analysis of data from approximately 500 individual well completion reports collected in 2010 by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Indirect water consumption for supply chain production at each life cycle stage of the well was estimated using the economic input–output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) method. Life cycle direct and indirect water quality pollution impacts were assessed and compared using the tool for the reduction and assessment of chemical and other environmental impacts (TRACI). Wastewater treatment cost was proposed as an additional indicator for water quality pollution impacts from shale gas well wastewater. Four water management scenarios for Marcellus shale well wastewater were assessed: current conditions in Pennsylvania; complete discharge; direct reuse and desalination; and complete desalination. The results show that under the current conditions, an average Marcellus shale gas well consumes 20 000 m3 (with a range from 6700 to 33 000 m3) of freshwater per well over its life cycle excluding final gas utilization, with 65% direct water consumption at the well site and 35% indirect water consumption across the supply chain production. If all flowback and produced water is released into the environment without treatment, direct wastewater from a Marcellus shale gas well is estimated to have 300–3000 kg N-eq eutrophication potential, 900–23 000 kg 2,4D-eq freshwater ecotoxicity potential, 0–370 kg benzene-eq carcinogenic potential, and 2800–71 000 MT toluene-eq noncarcinogenic potential. The potential toxicity of the chemicals in the wastewater from the well site exceeds those associated with supply chain production, except for carcinogenic effects. If all the Marcellus shale well

  6. Impact of Shale Gas Development on Water Resources: A Case Study in Northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, Ine; Marí Rivero, Inés; Sala, Serenella; Baranzelli, Claudia; Barranco, Ricardo; Batelaan, Okke; Lavalle, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Shale gas is currently being explored in Europe as an alternative energy source to conventional oil and gas. There is, however, increasing concern about the potential environmental impacts of shale gas extraction by hydraulic fracturing (fracking). In this study, we focussed on the potential impacts on regional water resources within the Baltic Basin in Poland, both in terms of quantity and quality. The future development of the shale play was modeled for the time period 2015-2030 using the LUISA modeling framework. We formulated two scenarios which took into account the large range in technology and resource requirements, as well as two additional scenarios based on the current legislation and the potential restrictions which could be put in place. According to these scenarios, between 0.03 and 0.86 % of the total water withdrawals for all sectors could be attributed to shale gas exploitation within the study area. A screening-level assessment of the potential impact of the chemicals commonly used in fracking was carried out and showed that due to their wide range of physicochemical properties, these chemicals may pose additional pressure on freshwater ecosystems. The legislation put in place also influenced the resulting environmental impacts of shale gas extraction. Especially important are the protection of vulnerable ground and surface water resources and the promotion of more water-efficient technologies.

  7. Concentration of saline produced water from coalbed methane gas wells in multiple-effect evaporator using waste heat from the gas compressor and compressor drive engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of heat of compression from the gas compressor and waste heat from the diesel compressor drive engine in a triple-effect feed forward evaporator was studied as a means of concentrating saline produced water to facilitate its disposal. The saline water, trapped in deeply buried coal seams, must be continuously pumped from coalbed natural gas wells so that the gas can desorb from the coal and make its way to the wellbore. Unlike conventional natural gas which is associated with petroleum and usually reaches the wellhead at high pressure, coalbed natural gas reaches the wellhead at low pressure, usually around 101 kPa (1 atm), and must be compressed near the well site for injection into gas transmission pipelines. The water concentration process was simulated for a typical 3.93 m3/s (500 MCF/h), at standard conditions (101 kPa, 289K), at the gas production field in the Warrior Coal Basin of Alabama, but has application to the coalbed gas fields being brought into production throughout the world. It was demonstrated that this process can be considered for concentrating saline water produced with natural gas in cases where the gas must be compressed near the wellhead for transportation to market. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  8. Treatment of waste water from flue gas cleaning; Behandlung von Abwasser der Rauchgasreinigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiermann, Klaus; Meyerhoff, Thomas [Berkefeld - VWS Deutschland GmbH, Celle (Germany); Hagen, Klaus [Berkefeld - VWS Deutschland GmbH, Bayreuth (Germany); Basabe, Juan Luis [HPD Process Engineering S.A., Bilbao (Spain); Vendrup, Michael [Krueger A/S, Soeborg (Denmark)

    2012-11-01

    Strict limits must be adhered to for treating waste water incurred during flue gas desulphurisation (FGD). One and two-stage precipitation processes have proven themselves in FGD waste water treatment. Metals can be removed with the MetClean {sup registered} process. Another option is evaporation. Waste water ZLD systems (Zero Liquid Discharge) recover, via a falling film evaporator with subsequent crystallisation, more than 98 % of the water and produce, aside from the condensate, only solid material that can be disposed of in landfill. A further development, named ZLD CoLD trademark, significantly reduces the investment and operating costs of this solution. (orig.)

  9. Managing produced water from coal seam gas projects: implications for an emerging industry in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Peter J; Gore, Damian B; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews the environmental problems, impacts and risks associated with the generation and disposal of produced water by the emerging coal seam gas (CSG) industry and how it may be relevant to Australia and similar physical settings. With only limited independent research on the potential environmental impacts of produced water, is it necessary for industry and government policy makers and regulators to draw upon the experiences of related endeavours such as mining and groundwater extraction accepting that the conclusions may not always be directly transferrable. CSG is widely touted in Australia as having the potential to provide significant economic and energy security benefits, yet the environmental and health policies and the planning and regulatory setting are yet to mature and are continuing to evolve amidst ongoing social and environmental concerns and political indecision. In this review, produced water has been defined as water that is brought to the land surface during the process of recovering methane gas from coal seams and includes water sourced from CSG wells as well as flowback water associated with drilling, hydraulic fracturing and gas extraction. A brief overview of produced water generation, its characteristics and environmental issues is provided. A review of past lessons and identification of potential risks, including disposal options, is included to assist in planning and management of this industry. PMID:25783163

  10. Tritium removal by hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water on hydrophobic catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many kinds of the hydrophobic catalysts for hydrogen isotopic exchange between hydrogen gas and water have been prepared. The carriers are the hydrophobic organic materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), monofluorocarbon-PTFE mixture(PTFE-FC), and styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer(SDB). 0.1 to 2 wt % Pt is deposited on the carriers. The Pt/SDB catalyst has much higher activity than the Pt/PTFE catalyst and the Pt/PTFE-FC catalyst shows the intermediate value of catalytic activity. The observation of electron microscope shows that the degrees of dispersion of Pt particles on the hydrophobic carriers result in the difference of catalytic activities. A gas-liquid separated type column containing ten stages is constructed. Each stage is composed of both the hydrophobic catalyst bed for the hydrogen gas/water vapor isotopic exchange and the packed column type bed for the water vapor/liquid water isotopic exchange. In the column hydrogen gas and water flow countercurrently and hydrogen isotopes are separated

  11. The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

    2013-01-01

    Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

  12. Accurate determination of fiber water-retaining capability at process conditions by headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; He, Liang

    2016-09-16

    This work reports on a method for the accurate determination of fiber water-retaining capability at process conditions by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method. The method was based the HS-GC measurement of water vapor on a set closed vials containing in a given amount pulp with different amounts of water addition, from under-saturation to over-saturation. By plotting the equilibrated water vapor signal vs. the amount of water added in pulp, two different trend lines can be observed, in which the transition of the lines corresponds to fiber water-retaining capability. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good measurement precision (much better than the reference method) and good accuracy. The present method can be also used for determining pulp fiber water-retaining capability at the process temperatures in both laboratory research and mill applications. PMID:27554029

  13. Life-cycle comparison of greenhouse gas emissions and water consumption for coal and shale gas fired power generation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China has the world's largest shale gas reserves, which might enable it to pursue a new pathway for electricity generation. This study employed hybrid LCI (life cycle inventory) models to quantify the ETW (extraction-to-wire) GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions and water consumption per kWh of coal- and shale gas-fired electricity in China. Results suggest that a coal-to-shale gas shift and upgrading coal-fired power generation technologies could provide pathways to less GHG and water intensive power in China. Compared to different coal-fired generation technologies, the ETW GHG emissions intensity of gas-fired CC (combined cycle) technology is 530 g CO2e/kWh, which is 38–45% less than China's present coal-fired electricity. Gas-fired CT (combustion turbine) technology has the lowest ETW water consumption intensity at 960 g/kWh, which is 34–60% lower than China's present coal-fired electricity. The GHG-water tradeoff of the two gas-fired power generation technologies suggests that gas-fired power generation technologies should be selected based on regional-specific water resource availabilities and electricity demand fluctuations in China. However, the low price of coal-fired electricity, high cost of shale gas production, insufficient pipeline infrastructures, and multiple consumers of shale gas resources may serve as barriers to a coal-to-shale gas shift in China's power sector in the near term. - Highlights: • The GHG and water footprints of coal- and shale gas-fired electricity are estimated. • A coal-to-shale gas shift can enable less GHG and water intensive power in China. • The GHG emissions of shale gas-fired combined cycle technology is 530 g CO2e/kWh. • The water consumption of shale gas-fired combustion turbine technology is 960 g/kWh. • Shale gas-fired power generation technologies selection should be regional-specific

  14. Hydrogen production by absorption enhanced water gas shift (AEWGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo Bretado, Miguel A. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Ave. Veterinaria s/n, Circuito Universitario, Durango 34120 (Mexico); Departamento de Quimica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico); Delgado Vigil, Manuel D.; Gutierrez, Jesus Salinas; Lopez Ortiz, Alejandro; Collins-Martinez, Virginia [Departamento de Quimica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    AEWGS is a reaction that combines the WGS reaction and CO{sub 2} capture by a solid absorbent to produce high purity H{sub 2} from synthesis gas in one single step at 600-800 C. This reactor system, if homogeneous, would not require a catalyst. However, previous research on this concept was not conclusive, since a steel reactor was used and reactor walls were suspected to act as catalyst. Therefore, there is a need to address this issue and to select and evaluate suitable CO{sub 2} absorbents for this concept. AEWGS was studied using a quartz-made fixed-bed reactor at; SV = 3000 h{sup -1}, feed; 5% CO, 15% H{sub 2}O, balance He-N{sub 2} at 600 C, 1 atm. CO{sub 2} absorbents tested were CaO*MgO, and Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Empty quartz-reactor tests leaded to conclude that a catalyst is needed for the WGS at temperatures of interest. A 97% H{sub 2} product was obtained with calcined dolomite suggesting this last to act as a WGS catalyst. (author)

  15. Water, gas and solute movement through argillaceous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was commissioned by a consortium of companies and organisations with a common concern: the capacity of clay-rich media to act as barriers to the movement of radionuclides. Since the migration of such contaminants occurs primarily in aqueous solutions, considerable emphasis is placed on the motion of groundwater in the subsurface environment and on the advective and diffusive transport of solutes within this water. This report examines clay systems at a very wide range of scales, from the molecular-scale interactions between water molecules and clay surfaces, through to large-scale processes such as the movement of fluids in sedimentary basins. Its goal is to study the links between the colloidal interactions between clay mineral particles, the mechanical responses of the system and the movement of fluids. The Darcy's or Fick's laws were adopted as a basis for the phenomenological mass transfer calculations, and a very idealized porous medium having clearly identifiable characteristics and properties was considered to replace the inordinately complex and highly-variable geologic medium. It is also assumed that geological processes, other than transport processes, either cease to operate over the time-scale of interest or can have no secondary effect on mass transport. (J.S.). 737 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs., 2 appends

  16. Removal of adhesive dusts from flue gas using corona discharges with spraying water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Effective removal of adhesive and fine dusts from flue gas is very difficult. A new method of electrostatic precipitation of the coronadischarges with spraying water(CDSW) was introduced. A new electrode configuration and the circulation spraying of water were employed inthe method. The efficient electrostatic precipitation for adhesive and fine dusts can be accomplished without any drain water during a longoperating period. The fundamental structure, discharge characteristics, mechanism of spraying and precipitation principle of the electrostaticprecipitation using CDSW were described and analyzed. The V-I characteristics, spraying state, supplying water quantity, influence oftemperature and clean of the electrodes were researched in series experiments. The treating effects of circulating spraying using the coronaplasma at the same time of electrostatic precipitation were investigated. The fundamental theories and experimental data were proposed, in orderto effectively remove the adhesive dusts from flue gas using CDSW in practice.

  17. Hydrogen gas evolution from water included in a silica gel cavity and on metal oxides with γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas evolution from water induced with γ-ray irradiation of silica gels and metal oxides dispersed in water is studied by examining the hydrogen gas evolved. Hydrogen gas is detected by gas chromatography after 60Co γ-ray irradiation of the sample solution in a closed vial at room temperature. Water adsorbed on the surface of metal oxides shows more evolution of hydrogen gas than pure water. Hydrogen gas evolution is maximized in the silica gels when the size of a silica gel cavity is about 2 nm, being on the order of spur size. The most active surface toward the decomposition of water upon γ-ray irradiation is that of SiO2 dried at 100degC after sample preparation. (author)

  18. Information meeting: construction of gas and water pipelines; Informationsveranstaltung: Bau von Gas- und Wasserrohrleitungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Already published journal articles added in a conference proceeding on following topics: Regulatories, construction regulations, fittings, quality requirements and corrosion protection. Water pipes and pressure testing and desinfection.(GL) [German] Teilweise bereits veroeffentlichte Zeitschriftenartikel nochmals in einem Konferenzband zusammengefuegt zu folgenden Themen: Regelwerke, Baurichtlinien, Anschluesse, Qualitaetsanforderungen und Korrosonsschutz. Wasserrohrleitungen und deren Druckpruefung und Desinfektion.(GL)

  19. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h-1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m-2 d-1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  20. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  1. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  2. Standard for baseline water-well testing for coalbed methane/natural gas in coal operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in developing coalbed methane (CBM) is increasing with the decline of conventional natural gas reserves. In Alberta, where CBM is in the early stages of development, the drilling, production and operational rules for CBM are the same as those that apply to natural gas. The government of Alberta is presently examining the rules and regulations that apply to CBM to determine if they are appropriate for responsible development and balanced with environmental protection. CBM development has the potential to affect water aquifers and water supply. As such, a new standard has been developed by Alberta Environment in collaboration with the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board which requires that companies involved in the development of shallow CBM must offer to test rural Albertan's water wells prior to drilling. The companies will submit baseline groundwater data to both Alberta Environment and the landowner. The broader application of groundwater testing will also support Alberta Environment's objective of mapping all groundwater resources in the province. This new standard will help achieve continued protection of provincial groundwater resources and Albertan's groundwater supplies. It will also facilitate responsible CBM development and the government's Water for Life strategy. This document explained the protocols for testing, sampling and analyzing groundwater. The standard provides scientific information to support achievement of the outcomes as well as a regulatory basis for water well testing and baseline data collection prior to CBM development. If a landowner registers a complaint regarding a perceived change in well water quantity and quality after CBM development, then the developers must retest the water well to address the landowner's concerns. The tests evaluate water well capacity, water quality, routine potability and analysis for water quality parameters, including major ionic constituents, bacteriological analysis and presence or absence of gas

  3. Shale gas produced water treatment using innovative microbial capacitive desalination cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, Zachary A. [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Forrestal, Casey [University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ren, Zhiyong Jason, E-mail: jason.ren@colorado.edu [University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Xu, Pei, E-mail: wxpei@hotmail.com [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Actual shale gas produced water was treated with no external energy input. • Biodegradation of organics generated stable voltages for desalination. • On average, 36 mg TDS per g activated carbon was removed in 1 h. • A maximum organic removal rate of 6.4 mg DOC per hour was achieved in the reactor. - Abstract: The rapid development of unconventional oil and gas production has generated large amounts of wastewater for disposal, raising significant environmental and public health concerns. Treatment and beneficial use of produced water presents many challenges due to its high concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons and salinity. The objectives of this study were to investigate the feasibility of treating actual shale gas produced water using a bioelectrochemical system integrated with capacitive deionization—a microbial capacitive desalination cell (MCDC). Microbial degradation of organic compounds in the anode generated an electric potential that drove the desalination of produced water. Sorption and biodegradation resulted in a combined organic removal rate of 6.4 mg dissolved organic carbon per hour in the reactor, and the MCDC removed 36 mg salt per gram of carbon electrode per hour from produced water. This study is a proof-of-concept that the MCDC can be used to combine organic degradation with desalination of contaminated water without external energy input.

  4. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§

    2012-02-24

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ∼375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (εSr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where εSr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  5. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2012-03-20

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ε{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  6. Shale gas produced water treatment using innovative microbial capacitive desalination cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Actual shale gas produced water was treated with no external energy input. • Biodegradation of organics generated stable voltages for desalination. • On average, 36 mg TDS per g activated carbon was removed in 1 h. • A maximum organic removal rate of 6.4 mg DOC per hour was achieved in the reactor. - Abstract: The rapid development of unconventional oil and gas production has generated large amounts of wastewater for disposal, raising significant environmental and public health concerns. Treatment and beneficial use of produced water presents many challenges due to its high concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons and salinity. The objectives of this study were to investigate the feasibility of treating actual shale gas produced water using a bioelectrochemical system integrated with capacitive deionization—a microbial capacitive desalination cell (MCDC). Microbial degradation of organic compounds in the anode generated an electric potential that drove the desalination of produced water. Sorption and biodegradation resulted in a combined organic removal rate of 6.4 mg dissolved organic carbon per hour in the reactor, and the MCDC removed 36 mg salt per gram of carbon electrode per hour from produced water. This study is a proof-of-concept that the MCDC can be used to combine organic degradation with desalination of contaminated water without external energy input

  7. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  8. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. PMID:26939033

  9. A simple technique for continuous measurement of time-variable gas transfer in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, C.R.; Böhlke, J.K.; Harvey, J.W.; Busenberg, E.

    2009-01-01

    Mass balance models of dissolved gases in streams, lakes, and rivers serve as the basis for estimating wholeecosystem rates for various biogeochemical processes. Rates of gas exchange between water and the atmosphere are important and error-prone components of these models. Here we present a simple and efficient modification of the SF6 gas tracer approach that can be used concurrently while collecting other dissolved gas samples for dissolved gas mass balance studies in streams. It consists of continuously metering SF 6-saturated water directly into the stream at a low rate of flow. This approach has advantages over pulse injection of aqueous solutions or bubbling large amounts of SF6 into the stream. By adding the SF 6 as a saturated solution, we minimize the possibility that other dissolved gas measurements are affected by sparging and/or bubble injecta. Because the SF6 is added continuously we have a record of changing gas transfer velocity (GTV) that is contemporaneous with the sampling of other nonconservative ambient dissolved gases. Over a single diel period, a 30% variation in GTV was observed in a second-order stream (Sugar Creek, Indiana, USA). The changing GTV could be attributed in part to changes in temperature and windspeed that occurred on hourly to diel timescales.

  10. The Features of Condensate Water and Its Guide on Gas Proudction in upper Triassic Gas Reservoir of Western Sichuan Depression, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, C.; Lou, Z.

    2012-12-01

    In upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation of western Sichuan depression, China, there developed ultrathight sandstones reservoirs, of which the mean porosity is 4.02% and the permeability mode is less than 0.1×10-3μm2. Because of the ultrathight sandstones, thick gaseous- liquid phase transition develops in the upper Trassic Xujiahe Formation. The absolute quantity of gaseous water is lager. Due to the change of temperature and pressure at the wellhead, the gaseous water in gas reservoir becomes condensate water. Therefore, the condensate water of low salinity can be widely found at the original productive process in the Xujiahe Formation reservoir, such as wells named Lian 150, Xin 851, Xin 853, Xin 856, Dayi 101, Dayi 103. The main cations are K++Na+, while the anions are HCO3- and Cl-. The main water type is CaCl2, followed by NaHCO3, Na2SO4 and MgCl2. The PH of condensate water is 5.28-8.20 with mean value 6.40. The salinity of condensate water is lower than that of formation water. The milligram equivalent (mEq) percent of ion is used to study the features of condensate water. The anions (mEq) distribution of condensate water are scattered in ternary diagram, while that of formation water concentrate upon the SO42- and Cl- endpoints. The percent of HCO3-(mEq) in condensate water is higher than that of formation water. There is no obvious difference of cations mEq percent between condensate water and formation water, which indicates that condensate water strongly affected by formation water. Through this study, condensate water may originate from formation water and then be affected by complicated physical and chemical interactions. The condensate water is affected by gas and formation water. The relationship between condensate water and gas yield is very close. The variations of water yield, salinity and ions composition can reflect the change of gas yield. Taking well Xin 856 for example, which is located in Xinchang gas felid, there exist a relationship between

  11. Peach water relations, gas exchange, growth and shoot mortality under water deficit in semi-arid weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Mitra; Davarynejad, Gholam Hossein; Génard, Michel; Bannayan, Mohammad; Azizi, Majid; Vercambre, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    In this study the sensitivity of peach tree (Prunus persica L.) to three water stress levels from mid-pit hardening until harvest was assessed. Seasonal patterns of shoot and fruit growth, gas exchange (leaf photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration) as well as carbon (C) storage/mobilization were evaluated in relation to plant water status. A simple C balance model was also developed to investigate sink-source relationship in relation to plant water status at the tree level. The C source was estimated through the leaf area dynamics and leaf photosynthesis rate along the season. The C sink was estimated for maintenance respiration and growth of shoots and fruits. Water stress significantly reduced gas exchange, and fruit, and shoot growth, but increased fruit dry matter concentration. Growth was more affected by water deficit than photosynthesis, and shoot growth was more sensitive to water deficit than fruit growth. Reduction of shoot growth was associated with a decrease of shoot elongation, emergence, and high shoot mortality. Water scarcity affected tree C assimilation due to two interacting factors: (i) reduction in leaf photosynthesis (-23% and -50% under moderate (MS) and severe (SS) water stress compared to low (LS) stress during growth season) and (ii) reduction in total leaf area (-57% and -79% under MS and SS compared to LS at harvest). Our field data analysis suggested a Ψstem threshold of -1.5 MPa below which daily net C gain became negative, i.e. C assimilation became lower than C needed for respiration and growth. Negative C balance under MS and SS associated with decline of trunk carbohydrate reserves--may have led to drought-induced vegetative mortality.

  12. Striking the balance between nutrient removal, greenhouse gas emissions, receiving water quality, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Michael W; Reardon, David J; Neethling, J B; Clark, David L; Pramanik, Amit

    2013-12-01

    This Water Environment Research Foundation study considered the relationship between varying nutrient-removal levels at wastewater treatment plants, greenhouse gas emissions, receiving water quality (measured by potential algal production), and costs. The effluent nutrient concentrations required by some U.S. permits are very low, approaching the technology-best-achievable performance. This study evaluated five different treatment levels at a nominal 40 ML/d (10 mgd) flow. Greenhouse gas emissions and costs increase gradually up to the technologies' best-achievable performance, after which they increase exponentially. The gradual increase is attributed to additional biological treatment facilities, increased energy and chemical use, and additional tertiary nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes. Within the limited focus of this study, the evaluation shows that a point of diminishing return is reached as nutrient-removal objectives approach the technology-best-achievable performance, where greenhouse gas emissions and cost of treatment increases rapidly while the potential for algal growth reduce marginally. PMID:24597046

  13. Rehabilitation concepts for gas- and drinking water supply networks; Rehabilitationskonzepte fuer Erdgas- und Trinkwasserversorgungsnetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittl, M. [Thuega AG, Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The technical condition of the supply for gas and drinking-water is decisive for the security of supply and operation. There is an increasing pressure on cost reduction in the gas and water distribution utilities as well as an increasing demand of technical and external requirements to be complied with to ensure safe operation. This is why it is necessary to plan the maintenance on the basis of rehabilitation concepts. Forecasts of necessary renewals, priority lists, and the use of operational information systems have proved to be adequate for the practical adoption of the rehabilitation concepts. (orig.) [German] Der technische Zustand der Gas- und Trinkwasserversorgungsnetze ist entscheidend fuer die Versorgungssicherheit. Sowohl der Kostendruck in der Versorgungswirtschaft als auch die technischen und externen Anforderungen an einen sicheren Netzbetrieb nehmen zu. Damit wird die Planung der Instandhaltung auf Basis von Rehabilitationskonzepten notwendig. Erneuerungsbedarfsprognosen, Prioritaetenlisten und der Einsatz von Betriebsmittel-Informationssystemen haben sich zur praktischen Umsetzung der Rehabilitationskonzepte bewaehrt. (orig.)

  14. Advances in interaction mechanism of water (gas) on clay minerals in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Manchao; Sun Xiaoming; Zhao Jian

    2014-01-01

    Dealing with large-scale deformations in soft-rock tunnels is a very important issue in soft-rock tunnel engineering. The mechanism of this large-scale deformation is closely related to the physical and chem-ical properties of soft rock, interaction between soft rock and water, and interaction between soft rock and gas contained in soft rock. In order to gain a better predictive understanding of the governing prin-ciples associated with this phenomenon, we used experimental and theoretical methods to study the effects of point defect on physical and chemical properties of soft rock and mechanism of interaction between water (gas) and soft rock. Firstly, we calculated the impurity formation energies and transition energy levels of defects by using the first-principle calculation, the results showed the microscopic mech-anism of defects substitution in kaolinite and effects of defects on the structure of kaolinite. Moreover, comparing the experimental and theoretical results, we found the mechanism of interaction between water and soft rock. The results show that water is one of the most important factors which can induce various kinds of geological disasters. At last, the interaction between soft rock and surrounding gas as CO2, CH4 and CO is disused, the influence of surrounding gas on soft rock should not be ignored.

  15. Size Effect of Silica Shell on Gas Uptake Kinetics in Dry Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Diwei; Bai, Dongsheng; Li, Shujing; Wang, Xinrui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-07-26

    Two kinds of dry water (DW) particles are prepared by mixing water and hydrophobic silica particles with nanometer or micrometer dimensions, and the two DW particles are found to have similar size distributions regardless of the size of the silica shell. The CO2 uptake kinetics of DW with nanometer (nanoshell) and micrometer shells (microshell) are measured, and both uptake rate and capacity show the obvious size effect of the silica shell. The DW with a microshell possesses a larger uptake capacity, whereas the DW with a nanoshell has a faster uptake rate. By comparing the uptake kinetics of soluble NH3 and CO2 further, we found that the microshell enhances the stability and the dispersion degree of DW and the nanoshell offers a shorter path for the transit of guest gas into the water core. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation is introduced to illustrate the nanosize effect of the silica shell on the initial step of the gas uptake. It is found that the concentration of gas molecules close to the silica shell is higher than that in the bulk water core. With the increase in the size of the silica shell, the amount of CO2 in the silica shell decreases, and it is easier for the gas uptake to reach steady state. PMID:27350177

  16. 40 CFR 1065.645 - Amount of water in an ideal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amount of water in an ideal gas. 1065.645 Section 1065.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.645 Amount of...

  17. Correcting Laser-Based Water Stable Isotope Readings Biased by Carrier Gas Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralher, Benjamin; Herbstritt, Barbara; Weiler, Markus; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Stumpp, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Recently, laser-based water stable isotope spectrometers have become popular as they enable previously impossible approaches of environmental observations. Consequently, they have been subjected to increasingly heterogeneous atmospheric conditions. However, there is still a severe lack of data on the impact of nonstandardized gas matrices on analyzer performances. Against this background, we investigated the influence of changing proportions of N2, O2, and CO2 in the carrier gas on the isotope measurements of a typical laser-based water stable isotope analyzer (Picarro L2120-i). We combined environmentally relevant mixtures of N2, O2, and CO2 with referenced, flash-evaporated water and found that isotope readings of the same water were altered by up to +14.57‰ for δ(18)O and -35.9‰ for δ(2)H. All tested relationships between carrier gas changes and respective isotope readings were strongly linearly correlated (R(2) > 0.99). Furthermore, an analyzer-measured variable allowed for reliable postcorrection of the biased isotope readings, which we additionally tested on field data. Our findings are of importance for environmental data obtained by analyzers based on the same technology. They are relevant for assays where inconsistent gas matrices or a mismatch in this regard between unknown and reference analyses cannot be excluded, which is in particular common when investigating the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. PMID:27291718

  18. Density functional theory study on water-gas-shift reaction over molybdenum disulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, X. R.; Wang, Shengguang; Hu, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to investigate the adsorption of reaction intermediates appearing during water-gas-shift reaction at the sulfur covered MoS2 (1 0 0)surfaces, Mo-termination with 37.5% S coverage and S-termination with 50% S coverage using periodic slab...

  19. Physical simulation of gas reservoir formation in the Liwan 3-1 deep-water gas field in the Baiyun sag, Pearl River Mouth Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To figure out the process and controlling factors of gas reservoir formation in deep-waters, based on an analysis of geological features, source of natural gas and process of reservoir formation in the Liwan 3-1 gas field, physical simulation experiment of the gas reservoir formation process has been performed, consequently, pattern and features of gas reservoir formation in the Baiyun sag has been found out. The results of the experiment show that: ① the formation of the Liwan 3-1 faulted anticline gas field is closely related to the longstanding active large faults, where natural gas is composed of a high proportion of hydrocarbons, a small amount of non-hydrocarbons, and the wet gas generated during highly mature stage shows obvious vertical migration signs; ② liquid hydrocarbons associated with natural gas there are derived from source rock of the Enping & Zhuhai Formation, whereas natural gas comes mainly from source rock of the Enping Formation, and source rock of the Wenchang Formation made a little contribution during the early Eocene period as well; ③ although there was gas migration and accumulation, yet most of the natural gas mainly scattered and dispersed due to the stronger activity of faults in the early period; later as fault activity gradually weakened, gas started to accumulate into reservoirs in the Baiyun sag; ④ there is stronger vertical migration of oil and gas than lateral migration, and the places where fault links effective source rocks with reservoirs are most likely for gas accumulation; ⑤ effective temporal-spatial coupling of source-fault-reservoir in late stage is the key to gas reservoir formation in the Baiyun sag; ⑥ the nearer the distance from a trap to a large-scale fault and hydrocarbon source kitchen, the more likely gas may accumulate in the trap in late stage, therefore gas accumulation efficiency is much lower for the traps which are far away from large-scale faults and hydrocarbon source

  20. Numerical Investigation of a Liquid-Gas Ejector Used for Shipping Ballast Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueguan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shipping ballast water can have significant ecological and economic impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Currently, water ejectors are widely used in marine applications for ballast water treatment owing to their high suction capability and reliability. In this communication, an improved ballast treatment system employing a liquid-gas ejector is introduced to clear the ballast water to reduce environmental risks. Commonly, the liquid-gas ejector uses ballast water as the primary fluid and chemical ozone as the secondary fluid. In this study, high-pressure water and air, instead of ballast water and ozone, are considered through extensive numerical and experimental research. The ejector is particularly studied by a steady three-dimensional multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis with commercial software ANSYS-CFX 14.5. Different turbulence models (including standard k-ε, RNG k-ε, SST, and k-ω with different grid size and bubble size are compared extensively and the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical design and optimization. This study concludes that the RNG k-ε turbulence model is the most efficient and effective for the ballast water treatment system under consideration and simple change of nozzle shape can greatly improve the ejector performance under high back pressure conditions.

  1. High density gas state at water/graphite interface studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chun-Lei; Li Zhao-Xia; Li Jing-Yuan; Xiu Peng; Hu Jun; Fang Hai-Ping

    2008-01-01

    In this paper molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the accumulation behaviour of N2 and H2 at water/graphite interface under ambient temperature and pressure. It finds that both N2 and H2 molecules can accumulate at the interface and form one of two states according to the ratio of gas molecules number to square of graphite surface from our simulation results: gas films (pancake-like) for a larger ratio and nanobubbles for a Smaller ratio. In addition, we discuss the stabilities of nanobubbles at different environment temperatures. Surprisingly, it is found that the density of both kinds of gas states can be greatly increased, even comparable with that of the liquid N2 and liquid H2. The present results are expected to be helpful for the understanding of the stable existence of gas film (pancake-like) and nanobubbles.

  2. Cold gas spraying of semiconductor coatings for the photooxidation of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmler, T.; Gutzmann, H.; Hillebrand, P.; Schieda, M.; Just, R.; Gärtner, F.; Bogdanoff, P.; Herrmann-Geppert, I.; Klassen, T.

    2013-09-01

    This contribution shows the potential of cold gas spraying for the production of photoelectrodes employing photoelectrocatalysts for the water oxidation reaction. Conventional methods of coating usually employ sol-gel methods and calcination to obtain a good binding of the coating to the substrate. In cold gas spraying, particles are accelerated to high velocities by a pressurized gas. Nitrogen is used as process gas, preheated and then expanded in a De Laval type nozzle. On impact with the substrate the particles deform, break up and build an efficient interface to the back contact (as revealed, for example, by scanning electron microscopy). Cold gas spraying is a method for the direct bonding of particles to a substrate and does not require additives that have to be removed e.g. by a calcination step. Thereby it allows the direct fabrication of a working electrode ensemble. In our initial experiments, the state-of-the-art photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO2) was explored. The cold-gas-sprayed coatings revealed significantly higher activities for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), as compared to films derived from wet-chemical processes. Due to the demand for photocatalysts with band gap suitable for visible light absorption, this approach was extended to the promising catalyst material hematite. In correlation with photoelectrochemical measurements, the operating parameters of the cold gas spray process are discussed in terms of their influence on the photocatalytic properties of the semiconductor.

  3. A Statistical Framework for Automatic Leakage Detection in Smart Water and Gas Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fagiani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, due to the technological improvement of advanced metering infrastructures, water and natural gas grids can be regarded as smart-grids, similarly to power ones. However, considering the number of studies related to the application of computational intelligence to distribution grids, the gap between power grids and water/gas grids is notably wide. For this purpose, in this paper, a framework for leakage identification is presented. The framework is composed of three sections aimed at the extraction and the selection of features and at the detection of leakages. A variation of the Sequential Feature Selection (SFS algorithm is used to select the best performing features within a set, including, also, innovative temporal ones. The leakage identification is based on novelty detection and exploits the characterization of a normality model. Three statistical approaches, The Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM, Hidden Markov Model (HMM and One-Class Support Vector Machine (OC-SVM, are adopted, under a comparative perspective. Both residential and office building environments are investigated by means of two datasets. One is the Almanac of Minutely Power dataset (AMPds, and it provides water and gas data consumption at 1, 10 and 30 min of time resolution; the other is the Department of International Development (DFID dataset, and it provides water and gas data consumption at 30 min of time resolution. The achieved performance, computed by means of the Area Under the Curve (AUC, reaches 90 % in the office building case study, thus confirming the suitability of the proposed approach for applications in smart water and gas grids.

  4. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources in Texas and Other Mining Activities: the Water Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicot, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent study, sponsored by the Texas Water Development Board, considered current and projected water use in the mining industry. It looked at the upstream segment of the oil and gas industry (that is, water used to extract the commodity until it leaves the wellhead), the aggregate, and coal industry, and other substances (industrial sand, lime, etc.). We obtained data through state databases, data collection from private vendors, and direct surveys of the various sectors of the industry. Overall, in 2008, we estimated that the state consumed ~160 thousand acre-feet (AF) in the mining industry, including 35.8 thousand AF for fracing wells (mostly in the Barnett Shale/Fort Worth area) and ~21.0 thousand AF for other purposes in the oil and gas industry, although more spread out across the state, with a higher demand in the Permian Basin area in West Texas. The coal industry used 20.0 thousand AF along the lignite belt from Central to East Texas. The 71.6 thousand AF used by the aggregate industry is distributed over most of the state, but with a clear concentration around major metropolitan areas. The remainder amounts to 11.0 thousand AF and is dominated by industrial sand production (~80% of total). Water is used mostly for drilling wells, stimulating/fracing wells, and secondary and tertiary recovery processes (oil and gas industry); for dewatering and depressurizing pits, with a small amount used for dust control (coal industry); and for dust control and washing (aggregate industry and industrial sand). Reuse/recycling has already been accounted for in water-use values, as well as opportunity usages, such as stormwater collection (aggregates). The split between surface water and groundwater is difficult to assess but it is estimated at ~56% groundwater in 2008. Projections for future use were done by extrapolating current trends, mainly for coal (same energy mix) and aggregates (following population growth). Projections for the oil and gas industry (Barnett

  5. Theoretical insight into the conversion of xylose to furfural in the gas phase and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Liu, Chao; Li, Qibin; Xu, Xiaoxiao

    2015-11-01

    Furfural (FF) is a valuable ring-containing organic compound in the decomposition of xylose and can be produced massively in hydrothermal condition. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) methods are employed to investigate the formation mechanism of FF from xylose and the solvent effects on FF formation. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses indicate that xylulose could be the intermediate that leads to the formation of FF in the gas phase and water. The formation of xylulose is initiated by a six-membered transition state with energy barriers of 163.6 and 150.8 kJ mol(-1) in the gas phase and water, respectively. It is found that the strong stabilization of the reactants and transition states and the overall energy barriers of formation pathways of FF are reduced in water. The formation of FF is more thermodynamically favored in water compared with that in the gas phase. In addition, the inclusion of an explicit water molecule transforms four-membered transition states of ring-opening reaction, hydrogenation-cyclization, and dehydrations into less distorted six-membered transition states, which leads to the significant reduction of reaction barriers of FF formation.

  6. Isotopic, chemical and dissolved gas constraints on spring water from Popocatepetl volcano (Mexico): evidence of gas water interaction between magmatic component and shallow fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguaggiato, S.; Martin-Del Pozzo, A. L.; Aguayo, A.; Capasso, G.; Favara, R.

    2005-03-01

    Geochemical research was carried out on cold and hot springs at Popocatepetl (Popo) volcano (Mexico) in 1999 to identify a possible relationship with magmatic activity. The chemical and isotopic composition of the fluids is compatible with strong gas-water interaction between deep and shallow fluids. In fact, the isotopic composition of He and dissolved carbon species is consistent with a magmatic origin. The presence of a geothermal system having a temperature of 80-100° C was estimated on the basis of liquid geothermometers. A large amount of dissolved CO 2 in the springs was also detected and associated with high CO 2 degassing.

  7. ANALYSIS OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL IN WATER BY PURGE AND TRAP CONCENTRATOR COUPLED TO GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuixiaLan; YuancaiChen; ZhonghaoChen

    2004-01-01

    It is convenient and time saving to analyze pentachlorophenol (PCP) in water by purge and trap concentrator coupled to gas chromatography that avoids employing a great deal of organic solvent. In this paper, the appropriate purge and trap conditions of PCP are determined: the trapped sorbent is TenaxGC; the purge gas is pure nitrogen and purge flow is 40ml/min; the purge time is 30min. A series of standard PCP water samples 5, 10, 50, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1000ppb are analyzed in order to obtain standard curve, and the linear regressive equation obtained is Y=109.65X-687.72, which correlation coefficient r is 0.9949. The precision of the method is determined with 0.5ppb PCP water sample, and the standard deviation measured is 3%. The detection limit for PCP is 0.2ppb.

  8. Molecular Density Functional Theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. With this correction, molecular density functional theory gives, at a modest computational cost, quantita...

  9. Dynamic and thermal behavior of hot gas bubbles discharged into water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A postulated severe accident of a nuclear power plant can result in airborne radioactive fission products which are discharged into a water pool. The dynamic and thermal behavior of hot gas discharge into a water pool plays a major role in the scrubbing removal of fission products from the gas, thereby significantly reducing the radiation release from such a postulated accident. This paper employs both available literature and recent data, analyses and correlations to help quantify several aspects of bubble behavior which are important to scrubbing. These include the stable bubble size and rise velocity, large bubble detachment size from vents and breakup distance, and hot bubble size variation caused by heat transfer and water vaporization. (orig.)

  10. High-pressure water electrolysis: Electrochemical mitigation of product gas crossover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New technique to reduce gas crossover during water electrolysis • Increase of the efficiency of pressurized water electrolysis • Prevention of safety hazards due to explosive gas mixtures caused by crossover • Experimental realization for a polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer • Discussion of electrochemical crossover mitigation for alkaline water electrolysis - Abstract: Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis can be used as an energy carrier storing electricity generated from renewables. During water electrolysis hydrogen can be evolved under pressure at isothermal conditions, enabling highly efficient compression. However, the permeation of hydrogen through the electrolyte increases with operating pressure and leads to efficiency loss and safety hazards. In this study, we report on an innovative concept, where the hydrogen crossover is electrochemically mitigated by an additional electrode between the anode and the cathode of the electrolysis cell. Experimentally, the technique was applied to a proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer operated at a hydrogen pressure that was fifty times larger than the oxygen pressure. Therewith, the hydrogen crossover was reduced and the current efficiency during partial load operation was increased. The concept is also discussed for water electrolysis that is operated at balanced pressures, where the crossover of hydrogen and oxygen is mitigated using two additional electrodes

  11. Effects of water vapor on flue gas conditioning in the electric fields with corona discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liqiang, QI, E-mail: qi_liqiang@163.com; Yajuan, Zhang

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • The influence mechanism of water vapor humidification on SO{sub 2} oxidation was analyzed. •The effects of water vapor on the specific resistance in fly ash in ESPs were reported. • The effects of water vapor on the size distribution and specific surface area of fly ash were discussed. • The adhesive characteristic of fly ash in different water vapor was experimented. -- Abstract: Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal via pulsed discharge nonthermal plasma in the absence of ammonia was investigated to determine how electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) can effectively collect particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter from flue gas. SO{sub 2} removal increased as water vapor concentration increased. In a wet-type plasma reactor, directing a gas-phase discharge plasma toward the water film surface significantly enhanced the liquid-phase oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup −} to SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. Comparisons of various absorbents revealed that the hydroxyl radical is a key factor in plasma-induced liquid-phase reactions. The resistivity, size distribution, and cohesive force of fly ash at different water vapor contents were measured using a Bahco centrifuge, which is a dust electrical resistivity test instrument, as well as a cohesive force test apparatus developed by the researchers. When water vapor content increased by 5%, fly ash resistivity in flue gas decreased by approximately two orders of magnitude, adhesive force and size increased, and specific surface area decreased. Therefore, ESP efficiency increased.

  12. Strategies to diagnose and control microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, E.A.; Derr, R.M.; Pope, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen sulfide production (souring) in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems is a safety and environmental problem that can lead to operational shutdown when local hydrogen sulfide standards are exceeded. Systems affected by microbial souring have historically been treated using biocides that target the general microbial community. However, requirements for more environmentally friendly solutions have led to treatment strategies in which sulfide production can be controlled with minimal impact to the system and environment. Some of these strategies are based on microbial and/or nutritional augmentation of the sour environment. Through research sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in Chicago, Illinois, methods have been developed for early detection of microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs, and a variety of mitigation strategies have been evaluated. The effectiveness of traditional biocide treatment in gas storage reservoirs was shown to depend heavily on the methods by which the chemical is applied. An innovative strategy using nitrate was tested and proved ideal for produced water and wastewater systems. Another strategy using elemental iodine was effective for sulfide control in evaporation ponds and is currently being tested in microbially sour natural gas storage wells.

  13. Comprehensive Review of Foam Application during Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas (FAWAG Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shabib-asl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, much focus has been placed on enhancing oil recovery from existing fields. This is accomplished by the study and application of various methods. As for recent cases, the Study of fluid mobility control and sweep efficiency in gas injection process as well as Water Alternating Gas (WAG method have demonstrated positive results on oil recovery and thus gained wide interest in petroleum industry. WAG injection application results in an increased oil recovery. Its mechanism consists in reduction of Gas Oil Ratio (GOR. However, there are some problems associated with this which includes poor volumetric sweep efficiency due to its low density and high mobility when compared with oil. This has led to the introduction of Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas (FAWAG technique, which in contrast with WAG injection, acts in improving the sweep efficiency and reducing the gas oil ration therefore maximizing the production rate from the producer wells. This study presents a comprehensive review of FAWAG process from perspective of Snorre field experience. In addition some comparative results between FAWAG and the other EOR methods are presented including their setbacks. The main aim is to provide a solid background for future laboratory research and successful field application-extend.

  14. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  15. Measuring the critical conditions for gas entrainment inception at the free surface of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a liquid metal nuclear reactor using a sodium as coolant, the upper plenum of reactor vessel has a free surface where the coolant sodium contacts with the cover gas. If the cover gas is entrained by the sodium flow at the free surface, the gas causes a change in reactivity of the core and also reduces the heat removal capability of the intermediate heat exchanger. It is important to investigate the critical conditions for the inception of gas entrainment at the free surface. An experimental study has been carried out to measure the critical conditions in the 1/4 section of KALIMER upper plenum with 1/4 length scale in the water test facility. The experimental variables are the mean water level and the flow rate. The measurements have been carried out according to three cases of inception condition. In all of the cases, the relations between the mean level (H) and the flow rate (Q) are represented as H=b1n(Q-a). but the constants a and b are different. Also it is observed that the gas entrainment in the free surface occurs easily when the vane level becomes higher

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions, irrigation water use, and arsenic concentrations; a common thread in rice water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice has historically been grown as a flooded crop in the United States. As competition for water resources has grown, there is interest in reducing water use in rice production so as to maintain a viable and sustainable rice industry into the future. An irrigation study was established in 2011 at ...

  17. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes

  18. The effects of shale gas exploration and hydraulic fracturing on the quality of water resources in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vengosh, Avner; Warner, Nathaniel; Jackson, Rob; Darrah, Tom [Nicholas School of Environment, Duke University, Box 90227, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Advances in drilling technologies and production strategies such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have significantly improved the production of natural gas by stimulating fluid flow from wells. Since 2008, these technological developments have spurred exponential growth of gas well drilling across the U.S. While the new drilling for shale gas and hydraulic fracturing technologies have dramatically changed the energy landscape in the U.S., recent scientific findings show evidence for contamination of water resources. This paper provides key observations for the potential risks of shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing on the quality of water resources and include: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow groundwater overlying shale gas basins; (2) pathways and hydraulic connectivity between the deep shale gas formations and the overlying shallow drinking water aquifers; and (3) inadequate disposal of produced and flow-back waters associated with shale gas exploration that causes contamination of surface waters and long-term ecological effects. By using geochemical (e.g., Br/Cl) integrated with oxygen, hydrogen, strontium, radium, and boron isotopic tracers, we have characterized the geochemical fingerprints of brines from several shale gas basins in the USA, including the Utica and Marcellus brines in the Appalachian Basin and the Fayetteville brines in Arkansas. We use these geochemical fingerprints to delineate the impact of shale gas associated fluids on the environment. (authors)

  19. The effects of shale gas exploration and hydraulic fracturing on the quality of water resources in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in drilling technologies and production strategies such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have significantly improved the production of natural gas by stimulating fluid flow from wells. Since 2008, these technological developments have spurred exponential growth of gas well drilling across the U.S. While the new drilling for shale gas and hydraulic fracturing technologies have dramatically changed the energy landscape in the U.S., recent scientific findings show evidence for contamination of water resources. This paper provides key observations for the potential risks of shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing on the quality of water resources and include: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow groundwater overlying shale gas basins; (2) pathways and hydraulic connectivity between the deep shale gas formations and the overlying shallow drinking water aquifers; and (3) inadequate disposal of produced and flow-back waters associated with shale gas exploration that causes contamination of surface waters and long-term ecological effects. By using geochemical (e.g., Br/Cl) integrated with oxygen, hydrogen, strontium, radium, and boron isotopic tracers, we have characterized the geochemical fingerprints of brines from several shale gas basins in the USA, including the Utica and Marcellus brines in the Appalachian Basin and the Fayetteville brines in Arkansas. We use these geochemical fingerprints to delineate the impact of shale gas associated fluids on the environment. (authors)

  20. Kinetic and Phase Behaviors of Catalytic Cracking Dry Gas Hydrate in Water-in-Oil Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qinglan; HUANG Qiang; CHEN Guangjin; WANG Xiulin; SUN Changyu; YANG Lanying

    2013-01-01

    The systematic experimental studies were performed on the hydrate formation kinetics and gas-hydrate equilibrium for a simulated catalytic cracking gas in the water-in-oil emulsion.The effect of temperature,pressure and initial gas-liquid ratio on the hydrate formation was studied,respectively.The data were obtained at pressures ranging from 3.5 to 5 MPa and temperatures from 274.15 to 277.15 K.The results showed that hydrogen and methane can be separated from the C2+ fraction by forming hydrate at around 273.15 K which is much higher temperature than that of the cryogenic separation method,and the hydrate formation rate can be enhanced in the water-in-oil emulsion compared to pure water.The experiments provided the basic data for designing the industrial process,and setting the suitable operational conditions.The measured data of gas-hydrate equilibria were compared with the predictions by using the Chen-Guo hydrate thermodynamic model.

  1. Comparison of water-based foam and carbon dioxide gas emergency depopulation methods of turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, M K; Alphin, R L; Benson, E R; Johnson, A L; Hougentogler, D P; Mohankumar, P

    2013-12-01

    Recommended response strategies for outbreaks of avian influenza and other highly contagious poultry diseases include surveillance, quarantine, depopulation, disposal, and decontamination. The best methods of emergency mass depopulation should maximize human health and safety while minimizing disease spread and animal welfare concerns. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2 mass depopulation methods on adult tom turkeys. The methods tested were carbon dioxide gassing and water-based foam. The time to unconsciousness, motion cessation, brain death, and altered terminal cardiac activity were recorded for each bird through the use of an electroencephalogram, accelerometer, and electrocardiogram. Critical times for physiological events were extracted from sensor data and compiled in a spreadsheet for statistical analysis. A statistically significant difference was observed in time to brain death, with water-based foam resulting in faster brain death (µ = 190 s) than CO2 gas (µ = 242 s). Though not statistically significant, differences were found comparing the time to unconsciousness (foam: µ = 64 s; CO2 gas: µ = 90 s), motion cessation (foam: µ = 182 s; CO2 gas: µ = 153 s), and altered terminal cardiac activity (foam: µ = 208 s; CO2 gas µ = 242 s) between foam and CO2 depopulation treatments. The results of this study demonstrate that water-based foam can be used to effectively depopulate market size male turkeys.

  2. Gas chromatographic determination of sodium monofluoroacetate in water by derivatization with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, H.; Tsukioka, T.

    1987-12-15

    A method is described for the determination of trace amounts of sodium monofluoroacetate (MFA-Na) in water. MFA-Na was converted to the dichloroanilide derivative in a water sample acidified with hydrochloric acid by using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) and the derivative was extracted from the sample water and cleaned up by silica gel column chromatography. The derivative was quantified by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD). The limit of detection was 0.0006 ..mu..g/mL, with a 50-mL water sample. The recoveries from environmental waters spiked at concentrations of 0.005-0.01 ..mu..g/mL were 93-97% with less than 4% relative standard deviation.

  3. Challenges of Membrane Filtration for Produced Water Treatment in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kasper Lund; Hansen, Leif; Mai, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    the Water Flooding Technology (WFT) is employed. The quality requirements for WFT and the increasing environmental concerns for produced water discharge lead to increased interest in zero-pollutant discharge. Traditional Produced Water Treatment (PWT) technologies(such as hydrocyclones) are already......Tremendous amount of produced water are discharged into the sea from offshore oil & gas installations. Along with every barrel of oil three barrels of water are produced and this is only worsen as the fields mature. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is employed to increase production, as a part of EOR...... struggling to their fundamental limit, therefore the membrane filtration technology turns to be a potential candidate for zero pollutant discharge. Membrane filtration technology suffers from the notorious fouling problem, where many methods for fouling prevention and removal are explored, the general idea...

  4. New test for oil soluble/water dispersible gas pipeline inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegmann, D.W.; Asperger, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The wheel test provides good mixing of the condensate and water phases, the coupons are exposed to both phases. Therefore, the wheel test cannot distinguish between inhibitors that need continuous mixing of the these phases to maintain a water dispersion of the inhibitor and inhibitors that will self disperse into the water. This concept becomes important for pipelines in stratified flow where the water can settle out. In these cases with low turbulence, the inhibitor must self disperse into the water to be effective. The paper describes a test method to measure the effectiveness of an inhibitor and its ability to self disperse. The effectiveness of several inhibitors as predicted by the new test method is discussed relative to data from the wheel test and breaker tests. Field performance of these inhibitors in a gas gathering line, with liquids in stratified flow, are cities and compared with the results of the various laboratory tests.

  5. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett

    2005-09-29

    This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of

  6. Ab initio study of gas phase and water-assisted tautomerization of maleimide and formamide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susheel Kalia; Anju Sharma; B S Kaith

    2007-11-01

    Maleimide serves as an important starting material in the synthesis of drugs and enzyme inhibitors. In the present paper, knowing the importance of tautomerization in maleimide for its drug action, potential energy surface of maleimide is studied and its tautomerization has been discussed and compared with tautomerization of formamide. Gas phase tautomerization of maleimide requires large amount of energy (23.21 kcal/mol) in comparison to formamide (15.05 kcal/mol) at HF/6-31+G* level. Thus making the proton transfer reaction a difficult process in gas phase. Water molecule lowers the energy barrier of tautomerization thus facilitating the tautomerization of maleimide to 5-hydroxy-pyrrol-2-one. Water assisted tautomerization of maleimide requires 19.60 kcal/mol energy at HF/6-31+G* and 17.63 kcal/mol energy at B3LYP/6-31+G* level, a decrease of 3.61 and 5.96 kcal/mol over gas phase tautomerization. Whereas, tautomerization of formamide requires 14.16 and 12.84 kcal/mol energy, a decrease of 0.89 and 2.01 kcal/mol energy over gas phase tautomerization at HF/6-31+G* and B3LYP/6-31+G* level, respectively. Water-assisted tautomerization in maleimide and formamide showed that difference in energy barrier reduces to 2.83 kcal/mol from 10.41 kcal/mol (in gas phase) at B3LYP level, which resulted that maleimide readily undergoes tautomerization in water molecule.

  7. Electron attachment to oxygen, water, and methanol, in various drift chamber gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attachment of electrons to oxygen, water, and methanol molecules has been studied in various gas mixtures based on argon, methane and isobutane, a class of gases often used to operate large drift chambers. The measurements were performed using a drift chamber in which the conditions prevailing in large experiments could be closely reproduced. Attachment coefficients were extracted as a function of the gas composition and pressure, the drift field, and the concentration of the molecules under investigation. The observed effects are compared to other measurements, and are discussed within the frame of physical models. (orig.)

  8. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  9. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  10. Obliquity-Controlled Water Vapor/Trace Gas Feedback in the Martian Greenhouse Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischna, M. A.; Baker, V. R.; Milliken, R.; Richardson, M. I.; Lee, C.

    2013-12-01

    We have explored possible mechanisms for the generation of warm, wet climates on early Mars as a result of greenhouse warming by both water vapor and periodic volcanic trace gas emissions, using the Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) general circulation model. The presence of both water vapor (a strong greenhouse gas) and other trace greenhouse gases (such as SO2) in a predominantly CO2 atmosphere may act, under certain conditions, to elevate surface temperatures above the freezing point of liquid water, at least episodically. The levels of warming obtained in our simulations do not reach the values seen in Johnson et al., (2008, JGR, 113, E08005), nor are they widespread for extended periods. Rather, warming above 273 K is found in more localized environments and for geologically brief periods of time. Such periodic episodes are controlled by two factors. First is the obliquity of the planet, which plays a significant role is ';activating' extant surface water ice reservoirs, allowing levels of atmospheric water vapor to rise when obliquity is high, and fall precipitously when the obliquity is low. During these low-obliquity periods, the atmosphere is all but incapable of supporting warm surface temperatures except for brief episodes localized wholly in the tropics; thus, there is a natural regulator in the obliquity cycle for maintaining periodic warming. Second is the presence of a secondary trace gas 'trigger', like volcanically released SO2, in the atmosphere. In the absence of such a trace gas, water vapor alone appears incapable of raising temperatures above the melting point; however, by temporarily raising the baseline global temperatures (in the absence of warming by water vapor) by 10-15 K, as with SO2, the trigger gas keeps atmospheric temperatures sufficiently warm, especially during nighttime, to maintain levels of water vapor in the atmosphere that provide the needed warming. Furthermore, we find that global warming can be achieved more

  11. Impacts of Coal Seam Gas (Coal Bed Methane) Extraction on Water Resources in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, David

    2016-04-01

    While extraction of methane from shale gas deposits has been the principal source of the recent expansion of the industry in the United States and Europe, in Australia extraction of methane from coal bed methane deposits (termed 'coal seam gas' in Australia) has been the focus to date. The two sources of methane share many of the same characteristics including the potential requirement for hydraulic fracturing. However, as coal seam gas deposits generally occur at shallower depths than shale gas, the potential impacts of extraction on surface and groundwater resources may be of even greater concern. In Australia, an Independent Expert Scientific Committee (IESC) has been established to provide scientific advice to federal and state government regulators on the impact that coal seam gas and large coal mining developments may have on water resources. This advice is provided to enable decisions to be informed by the best available science about the potential water-related impacts associated with these developments. To support this advice, the Australian Government Department of the Environment has implemented a programme of research termed 'bioregional assessments' to investigate these potential impacts. A bioregional assessment is defined as a scientific analysis of the ecology, hydrology, geology and hydrogeology of a bioregion with explicit assessment of the potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining development on water resources. These bioregional assessments are currently being carried out across large portions of eastern Australia underlain by coal reserves. Further details of the programme and results to date can be found at http://www.bioregionalassessments.gov.au. Surface water and groundwater modelling is now complete for two regions where coal seam gas development may proceed, namely the Clarence-Moreton and Gloucester regions in eastern New South Wales. This presentation will discuss how the results of these

  12. The Spatial and Temporal Consumptive Water Use Impacts of Rapid Shale Gas Development and Use in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacsi, A. P.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several years, the development of shale gas resources has proceeded rapidly in many areas of the United States, and this shale gas development requires the use of millions of gallons of water, per well, for hydraulic fracturing. Recent life cycle assessments of natural gas from shale formations have calculated the potential for water use reduction when water use is integrated along the entire natural gas supply chain, if the shale gas is used in natural-gas power plants to displace coal-fired electricity generation. Actual grid operation, however, is more complicated and would require both that sufficient unused natural gas generation capacity exists for the displacement of coal-fired power generation and that the natural gas price is low enough that the switching is financially feasible. In addition, water savings, which would occur mainly from a reduction in the cooling water demand at coal-fired power plants, may occur in different regions and at different times than water used in natural gas production. Thus, consumptive water impacts may be spatial and temporally disparate, which is not a consideration in current life-cycle literature. The development of shale gas resources in Texas in August 2008 through December 2009 was chosen as a case study for characterizing this phenomenon since Texas accounted for two-thirds of the shale gas produced in the United States during this period and since the price of natural gas for electricity generation dropped significantly over the episode. Changes to the Texas self-contained electric grid (ERCOT) for a scenario with actual natural gas production and prices was estimated using a constrained grid model, rather than assuming that natural gas generation would displace coal-fired power plant usage. The actual development scenario was compared to an alternative development scenario in which natural gas prices remained elevated throughout the episode. Upstream changes in water consumption from lignite (coal

  13. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Platon, Alexandru; Datye, Abhaya K.; Vohs, John M.; Wang, Yong; Palo, Daniel R.

    2008-03-07

    Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts were studied for water-gas-shift (WGS), methanol steam reforming, and reverse-water-gas-shift (RWGS) reactions. WGS activity was found to be dependent on the Pd:Zn ratio with a maximum activity obtained at approximately 0.50, which was comparable to that of a commercial Pt-based catalyst. The catalyst stability was demonstrated for 100 hours time-on-stream at a temperature of 3600C without evidence of metal sintering. WGS reaction rates were approximately 1st order with respect to CO concentration, and kinetic parameters were determined to be Ea = 58.3 kJ mol-1 and k0 = 6.1x107 min-1. During methanol steam reforming, the CO selectivities were observed to be lower than the calculated equilibrium values over a range of temperatures and steam/carbon ratios studied while the reaction rate constants were approximately of the same magnitude for both WGS and methanol steam reforming. These results indicate that although Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 are active WGS catalysts, WGS is not involved in methanol steam reforming. RWGS rate constants are on the order of about 20 times lower than that of methanol steam reforming, suggesting that RWGS reaction could be one of the sources for small amount of CO formation in methanol steam reforming.

  14. Two Noveland Simple Correlations to Estimate Equilibrium Water Dew Point for Natural Gas Dehydration Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Alberto Benitez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Water is probably the most undesirable component found in crude natural gas because its presence can produce hydrate formation, and it can also lead to corrosion or erosion problems in pipes and equipment. Natural gas must be dehydrated before being transported through a long distance to ensure an efficient and trouble-free operation. Thermodynamic modelling of triethyleneglycol (TEG-water system is still rather inaccurate, especially with regard to systems at high temperature and high TEG concentration. As a consequence, design and operation of absorber towers are affected by the lack of accurate data. Two novel correlations have been developed to estimate the equilibrium water dew point of a natural gas stream by evaluating experimental data and literature. These data were collected and analyzed by means of images scanned with MATLAB software R2012B version. An average percentage error is of 1-2% for linear correlation and it is of 2-3% for non-linear correlation. Results are quite accurate and they are consistent with literature data. Due to the simplicity and precision of the correlations developed in this work, the equations obtained have a great practical value. Consequently, they allow process engineers to perform a quick check of the water dew point at different conditions without using complex expressions or graphics.

  15. Experimental study of gas engine driven air to water heat pump in cooling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays a sustainable development for more efficient use of energy and protection of the environment is of increasing importance. Gas engine heat pumps represent one of the most practicable solutions which offer high energy efficiency and environmentally friendly for heating and cooling applications. In this paper, the performance characteristics of gas engine driven heat pump used in water cooling were investigated experimentally without engine heat recovery. The effects of several important factors (evaporator water inlet temperature, evaporator water volume flow rate, ambient air temperature, and engine speed) on the performance of gas engine driven heat pump were studied in a wide range of operating conditions. The results showed that primary energy ratio of the system increased by 22.5% as evaporator water inlet temperature increased from 13 oC to 24 oC. On the other hand, varying of engine speed from 1300 rpm to 1750 rpm led to decrease in system primary energy ratio by 13%. Maximum primary energy ratio has been estimated with a value of two over a wide range of operating conditions.

  16. Effects of water vapor on flue gas conditioning in the electric fields with corona discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liqiang, Qi; Yajuan, Zhang

    2013-07-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal via pulsed discharge nonthermal plasma in the absence of ammonia was investigated to determine how electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) can effectively collect particulate matter less than 2.5μm in diameter from flue gas. SO2 removal increased as water vapor concentration increased. In a wet-type plasma reactor, directing a gas-phase discharge plasma toward the water film surface significantly enhanced the liquid-phase oxidation of HSO3(-) to SO4(2-). Comparisons of various absorbents revealed that the hydroxyl radical is a key factor in plasma-induced liquid-phase reactions. The resistivity, size distribution, and cohesive force of fly ash at different water vapor contents were measured using a Bahco centrifuge, which is a dust electrical resistivity test instrument, as well as a cohesive force test apparatus developed by the researchers. When water vapor content increased by 5%, fly ash resistivity in flue gas decreased by approximately two orders of magnitude, adhesive force and size increased, and specific surface area decreased. Therefore, ESP efficiency increased. PMID:23669785

  17. Impacts of shale gas wastewater disposal on water quality in western Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Nathaniel R; Christie, Cidney A; Jackson, Robert B; Vengosh, Avner

    2013-10-15

    The safe disposal of liquid wastes associated with oil and gas production in the United States is a major challenge given their large volumes and typically high levels of contaminants. In Pennsylvania, oil and gas wastewater is sometimes treated at brine treatment facilities and discharged to local streams. This study examined the water quality and isotopic compositions of discharged effluents, surface waters, and stream sediments associated with a treatment facility site in western Pennsylvania. The elevated levels of chloride and bromide, combined with the strontium, radium, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the effluents reflect the composition of Marcellus Shale produced waters. The discharge of the effluent from the treatment facility increased downstream concentrations of chloride and bromide above background levels. Barium and radium were substantially (>90%) reduced in the treated effluents compared to concentrations in Marcellus Shale produced waters. Nonetheless, (226)Ra levels in stream sediments (544-8759 Bq/kg) at the point of discharge were ~200 times greater than upstream and background sediments (22-44 Bq/kg) and above radioactive waste disposal threshold regulations, posing potential environmental risks of radium bioaccumulation in localized areas of shale gas wastewater disposal. PMID:24087919

  18. Impacts of shale gas wastewater disposal on water quality in western Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Nathaniel R; Christie, Cidney A; Jackson, Robert B; Vengosh, Avner

    2013-10-15

    The safe disposal of liquid wastes associated with oil and gas production in the United States is a major challenge given their large volumes and typically high levels of contaminants. In Pennsylvania, oil and gas wastewater is sometimes treated at brine treatment facilities and discharged to local streams. This study examined the water quality and isotopic compositions of discharged effluents, surface waters, and stream sediments associated with a treatment facility site in western Pennsylvania. The elevated levels of chloride and bromide, combined with the strontium, radium, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the effluents reflect the composition of Marcellus Shale produced waters. The discharge of the effluent from the treatment facility increased downstream concentrations of chloride and bromide above background levels. Barium and radium were substantially (>90%) reduced in the treated effluents compared to concentrations in Marcellus Shale produced waters. Nonetheless, (226)Ra levels in stream sediments (544-8759 Bq/kg) at the point of discharge were ~200 times greater than upstream and background sediments (22-44 Bq/kg) and above radioactive waste disposal threshold regulations, posing potential environmental risks of radium bioaccumulation in localized areas of shale gas wastewater disposal.

  19. Soil Erosion and Surface Water Quality Impacts of Natural Gas Development in East Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew McBroom

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to greater demands for hydrocarbons and improvements in drilling technology, development of oil and natural gas in some regions of the United States has increased dramatically. A 1.4 ha natural gas well pad was constructed in an intermittent stream channel at the Alto Experimental Watersheds in East Texas, USA (F1, while another 1.1 ha well pad was offset about 15 m from a nearby intermittent stream (F2. V-notch weirs were constructed downstream of these well pads and stream sedimentation and water quality was measured. For the 2009 water year, about 11.76 cm, or almost 222% more runoff resulted from F1 than F2. Sediment yield was significantly greater at F1, with 13,972 kg ha−1 yr−1 versus 714 kg ha−1yr−1 at F2 on a per unit area disturbance basis for the 2009 water year. These losses were greater than was observed following forest clearcutting with best management practices (111–224 kg ha−1. Significantly greater nitrogen and phosphorus losses were measured at F1 than F2. While oil and gas development can degrade surface water quality, appropriate conservation practices like retaining streamside buffers can mitigate these impacts.

  20. Fouling of microfiltration membranes by flowback and produced waters from the Marcellus shale gas play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Boya; Zydney, Andrew L; Kumar, Manish

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in possible options for treatment or reuse of flowback and produced waters from natural gas processing. Here we investigated the fouling characteristics during microfiltration of different flowback and produced waters from hydraulic fracturing sites in the Marcellus shale. All samples caused severe and highly variable fouling, although there was no direct correlation between the fouling rate and total suspended solids, turbidity, or total organic carbon. Furthermore, the fouling of water after prefiltration through a 0.2 μm membrane was also highly variable. Low fouling seen with prefiltered water was mainly due to removal of submicron particles 0.4-0.8 μm during prefiltration. High fouling seen with prefiltered water was mainly caused by a combination of hydrophobic organics and colloidal particles fracking fluids. The colloid concentration was as high as 10(11) colloids/ml, which is more than 100 times greater than that in typical seawater. Furthermore, these colloids were only partially removed by MF, causing substantial fouling during a subsequent ultrafiltration. These results clearly show the importance of organics and colloidal material in membrane fouling caused by flowback and produced waters, which is of critical importance in the development of more sustainable treatment strategies in natural gas processing. PMID:27155988

  1. The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of thermal,salt and depressurization on gas hydrate dissociation.The method has the advantage of high efficiency,low cost and enhanced safety.Based on the proposed conceptual method,the physical and mathematical models are established,in which the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,salt inhibition,dispersion,convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production are considered.The gas and water rates,formation pressure for the combination method are compared with that of the single depressurization,which is referred to the method in which only depressurization is used.The results show that the combination method can remedy the deficiency of individual producing methods.It has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single depressurization.It can also reduce the geologic hazard caused by the formation deformation due to the maintaining of the formation pressure by injected ocean warm water.

  2. Proposal and examination of method of water removal from gas diffusion layer by applying slanted microgrooves inside gas channel in separator to improve polymer electrolyte fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utaka, Yoshio; Okabe, Akira; Omori, Yasuyuki

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the management of moisture from the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in the gas channel of a separator for PEFC. At the cathode-side, oxygen is transported as reactant gas from gas channel through GDL. When large quantity of moisture is generated during high power generation, moisture blocks transport of oxygen, and the cell voltage drops drastically. Narrow microgrooves with axes at tilt angle to the air flow were arranged inside channel walls. The water from GDL was discharged along microgrooves to facing top of GDL by forces of capillary and air flow shearing. Laser induced fluorescence method was used to measure water velocity in microgrooves. The effect of air velocity in the gas channel on water velocity in microgrooves was investigated. It was shown microgrooves manufactured inside gas channel worked properly. Water velocity in microgrooves increased with increasing air velocity, and moisture could be discharged from GDL by applying microgrooves. Furthermore, effective length of the microgrooves needed to remove water from the GDL surface increased with decreasing inclination angle of microgrooves in the range of 20°-45°. An effective length of approximately 200 mm was attained, which was overall length of experimental apparatus.

  3. Prevention of the water flooding by micronizing the pore structure of gas diffusion layer for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramitsu, Yusuke; Sato, Hitoshi; Hori, Michio

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells, high humidity must be established to maintain high proton conductivity in the polymer electrolyte. However, the water that is produced electrochemically at the cathode catalyst layer can condense in the cell and cause an obstruction to the diffusion of reaction gas in the gas diffusion layer and the gas channel. This leads to a sudden decrease of the cell voltage. To combat this, strict water management techniques are required, which usually focus on the gas diffusion layer. In this study, the use of specially treated carbon paper as a flood-proof gas diffusion layer under extremely high humidity conditions was investigated experimentally. The results indicated that flooding originates at the interface between the gas diffusion layer and the catalyst layer, and that such flooding could be eliminated by control of the pore size in the gas diffusion layer at this interface.

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions from oilfield-produced water in Shengli Oilfield, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Yang, Wei; Chen, Guojun; Fang, Xuan; Lv, Chengfu; Zhong, Jiaai; Xue, Lianhua

    2016-08-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from oil and gas systems are an important component of the GHG emission inventory. To assess the carbon emissions from oilfield-produced water under atmospheric conditions correctly, in situ detection and simulation experiments were developed to study the natural release of GHG into the atmosphere in the Shengli Oilfield, the second largest oilfield in China. The results showed that methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were the primary gases released naturally from the oilfield-produced water. The atmospheric temperature and release time played important roles in determining the CH4 and CO2 emissions under atmospheric conditions. Higher temperatures enhanced the carbon emissions. The emissions of both CH4 and CO2 from oilfield-produced water were highest at 27°C and lowest at 3°C. The bulk of CH4 and CO2 was released from the oilfield-produced water during the first release period, 0-2hr, for each temperature, with a maximum average emission rate of 0.415gCH4/(m(3)·hr) and 3.934gCO2/(m(3)·hr), respectively. Then the carbon emissions at other time periods gradually decreased with the extension of time. The higher solubility of CO2 in water than CH4 results in a higher emission rate of CH4 than CO2 over the same release duration. The simulation proved that oilfield-produced water is one of the potential emission sources that should be given great attention in oil and gas systems. PMID:27521941

  5. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model

  6. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  7. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  8. Bacterioneuston control of air-water methane exchange determined with a laboratory gas exchange tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upstill-Goddard, Robert C.; Frost, Thomas; Henry, Gordon R.; Franklin, Mark; Murrell, J. Colin; Owens, Nicholas J. P.

    2003-12-01

    The apparent transfer velocities (kw) of CH4, N2O, and SF6 were determined for gas invasion and evasion in a closed laboratory exchange tank. Tank water (pure Milli-RO® water or artificial seawater prepared in Milli-RO®) and/or tank air gas compositions were adjusted, with monitoring of subsequent gas transfer by gas chromatography. Derived kw was converted to "apparent k600," the value for CO2 in freshwater at 20°C. For CH4, analytical constraints precluded estimating apparent k600 based on tank air measurements. In some experiments we added strains of live methanotrophs. In others we added chemically deactivated methanotrophs, non-CH4 oxidizers (Vibrio), or bacterially associated surfactants, as controls. For all individual controls, apparent k600 estimated from CH4, N2O, or SF6 was indistinguishable. However, invasive estimates always exceeded evasive estimates, implying some control of gas invasion by bubbles. Estimates of apparent k600 differed significantly between methanotroph strains, possibly reflecting species-specific surfactant release. For individual strains during gas invasion, apparent k600 estimated from CH4, N2O, or SF6 was indistinguishable, whereas during gas evasion, k600-CH4 was significantly higher than either k600-N2O or k600-SF6, which were identical. Hence evasive k600-CH4/k600-SF6 was always significantly above unity, whereas invasive k600-CH4/k600-SF6 was not significantly different from unity. Similarly, k600-CH4/k600-SF6 for the controls and k600-N2O/k600-SF6 for all experiments did not differ significantly from unity. Our results are consistent with active metabolic control of CH4 exchange by added methanotrophs in the tank microlayer, giving enhancements of ˜12 ± 10% for k600-CH4. Hence reactive trace gas fluxes determined by conventional tracer methods at sea may be in error, prompting a need for detailed study of the role of the sea surface microlayer in gas exchange.

  9. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL

  10. Portable mixed abrasive water jet equipment for rescue in high gas mine shaft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Rui; DU Chang-long; XU Rui; ZHAO Jing

    2011-01-01

    In order to rescue a trapped miner and clean out roadways quickly in a high gas mine shaft after a mining mishap, a special portable cold-cutting equipment is needed, the main technology parameters were calculated according to the advanced cold-cutting technology of high pressure abrasive water jet and the portable mixed abrasive water jet equipment (PAWE) was designed to meet the needs of emergency rescue in high gas mine shafts. Tested the PAWE in a high gas environment, and the result shows that the maximum cutting depth of solid iron pipe is 18 mm and the recoilforce of the sprayer is 28.9 N under the conditions that actual cutting pressure is 29 MPa, starting target distance is 10 mm, cutting speed is 180 mm/min and concentration of abrasive is 32%. The course of the experiment in the high gas environment was smooth and continuous, without any explosion. The PAWE is easy to move and operate, but the nozzle which was worn badly in the sprayer should be changed every 8 minutes.

  11. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

    2003-11-01

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of

  12. Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidic, Radisav [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-01-24

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using abandoned mine drainage (AMD) as make- up water for the reuse of produced water for hydraulic fracturing. There is an abundance of AMD sources near permitted gas wells as documented in this study that can not only serve as makeup water and reduce the demand on high quality water resources but can also as a source of chemicals to treat produced water prior to reuse. The assessment of AMD availability for this purpose based on proximity and relevant regulations was accompanied by bench- and pilot-scale studies to determine optimal treatment to achieve desired water quality for use in hydraulic fracturing. Sulfate ions that are often present in AMD at elevated levels will react with Ba²⁺ and Sr²⁺ in produced water to form insoluble sulfate compounds. Both membrane microfiltration and gravity separation were evaluated for the removal of solids formed as a result of mixing these two impaired waters. Laboratory studies revealed that neither AMD nor barite formed in solution had significant impact on membrane filtration but that some produced waters contained submicron particles that can cause severe fouling of microfiltration membrane. Coagulation/flocculation was found to be an effective process for the removal of suspended solids and both bench- and pilot-scale studies revealed that optimal process conditions can consistently achieve the turbidity of the finished water below 5 NTU. Adjusting the blending ratio of AMD and produced water can achieve the desired effluent sulfate concentration that can be accurately predicted by chemical thermodynamics. Co-treatment of produced water and AMD will result in elevated levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the solid waste generated in this process due to radium co-precipitation with barium sulfate. Laboratory studies revealed that the mobility of barite that may form in the subsurface due to the presence of sulfate in the fracturing fluid can be

  13. A mini review on the chemistry and catalysis of the water gas shift reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zhun

    2014-01-01

    Water gas shift (WGS) reaction is a chemical reaction in which carbon monoxide reacts with water vapor to form carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It is an important reaction industrially used in conjunction with steam reforming of hydrocarbons for the production of high purity hydrogen. Grenoble et al examined the roles of both active metals and metal oxide support on the kinetics of the WGS reaction. They found out that the turn over numbers of various Al2O3 supported transition metals decreased i...

  14. Methodology for Calculation of Pressure Impulse Distribution at Gas-Impulse Regeneration of Water Well Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ivashechkin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a mathematical model for process of pressure impulse distribution in a water well which appear as a result of underwater gas explosions in cylindrical and spherical explosive chambers with elastic shells and in a rigid cylindrical chamber which is open from the bottom. The proposed calculation methodology developed on the basis of the mathematical model makes it possible to determine pressure in the impulse on a filter wall and at any point of a water well pre-filter zone. 

  15. Breach and safety analysis of spills over water from large liquefied natural gas carriers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Attaway, Stephen W.

    2008-05-01

    In 2004, at the request of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) prepared a report, ''Guidance on the Risk and Safety Analysis of Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spills Over Water''. That report provided framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. The report also presented the general scale of possible hazards from a spill from 125,000 m3 o 150,000 m3 class LNG carriers, at the time the most common LNG carrier capacity.

  16. Shale gas produced water treatment using innovative microbial capacitive desalination cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Zachary A; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Xu, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of unconventional oil and gas production has generated large amounts of wastewater for disposal, raising significant environmental and public health concerns. Treatment and beneficial use of produced water presents many challenges due to its high concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons and salinity. The objectives of this study were to investigate the feasibility of treating actual shale gas produced water using a bioelectrochemical system integrated with capacitive deionization-a microbial capacitive desalination cell (MCDC). Microbial degradation of organic compounds in the anode generated an electric potential that drove the desalination of produced water. Sorption and biodegradation resulted in a combined organic removal rate of 6.4 mg dissolved organic carbon per hour in the reactor, and the MCDC removed 36 mg salt per gram of carbon electrode per hour from produced water. This study is a proof-of-concept that the MCDC can be used to combine organic degradation with desalination of contaminated water without external energy input. PMID:25464328

  17. Effects of Morphology of Cerium Oxide Catalysts for Reverse Water Gas Shift Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kovasevic, M.; Mojet, B.L.; Ommen, van, B.; Lefferts, L.

    2016-01-01

    Reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS) was investigated over cerium oxide catalysts of distinct morphologies: cubes, rods and particles. Catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) in hydrogen. Nanoshapes with high concentration of oxygen vacancies contain less surface oxygen removable in TPR. Cerium oxide cubes exhibited two times higher activity per surface area as compared to rods and particles. Catalytic activity of the...

  18. Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-11-19

    Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

  19. In situ and laboratory toxicity of coalbed natural gas produced waters with elevated sodium bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Aida M.; Harper, David D.; Skaar, Don

    2014-01-01

    Some tributaries in the Powder River Structural Basin, USA, were historically ephemeral, but now contain water year round as a result of discharge of coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced waters. This presented the opportunity to study field sites with 100% effluent water with elevated concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. In situ experiments, static renewal experiments performed simultaneously with in situ experiments, and static renewal experiments performed with site water in the laboratory demonstrated that CBNG-produced water reduces survival of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). Age affected survival of fathead minnow, where fish 2 d posthatch (dph) were more sensitive than 6 dph fish, but pallid sturgeon survival was adversely affected at both 4 and 6 dph. This may have implications for acute assays that allow for the use of fish up to 14 dph. The survival of early lifestage fish is reduced significantly in the field when concentrations of NaHCO3 rise to more than 1500 mg/L (also expressed as >1245 mg HCO3 (-) /L). Treatment with the Higgin's Loop technology and dilution of untreated water increased survival in the laboratory. The mixing zones of the 3 outfalls studied ranged from approximately 800 m to 1200 m below the confluence. These experiments addressed the acute toxicity of effluent waters but did not address issues related to the volumes of water that may be added to the watershed.

  20. In situ and laboratory toxicity of coalbed natural gas produced waters with elevated sodium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Aïda M; Harper, David D; Skaar, Don

    2014-09-01

    Some tributaries in the Powder River Structural Basin, USA, were historically ephemeral, but now contain water year round as a result of discharge of coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced waters. This presented the opportunity to study field sites with 100% effluent water with elevated concentrations of sodium bicarbonate. In situ experiments, static renewal experiments performed simultaneously with in situ experiments, and static renewal experiments performed with site water in the laboratory demonstrated that CBNG-produced water reduces survival of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). Age affected survival of fathead minnow, where fish 2 d posthatch (dph) were more sensitive than 6 dph fish, but pallid sturgeon survival was adversely affected at both 4 and 6 dph. This may have implications for acute assays that allow for the use of fish up to 14 dph. The survival of early lifestage fish is reduced significantly in the field when concentrations of NaHCO(3) rise to more than 1500 mg/L (also expressed as >1245 mg HCO(3) (-) /L). Treatment with the Higgin's Loop technology and dilution of untreated water increased survival in the laboratory. The mixing zones of the 3 outfalls studied ranged from approximately 800 m to 1200 m below the confluence. These experiments addressed the acute toxicity of effluent waters but did not address issues related to the volumes of water that may be added to the watershed. PMID:24909548

  1. Methane gas generation from waste water extraction process of crude palm oil in experimental digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, A.; Penafiel, R.; Garzón, P. V.; Ochoa, V.

    2015-12-01

    Industrial processes to extract crude palm oil, generates large amounts of waste water. High concentrations of COD, ST, SV, NH4 + and low solubility of O2, make the treatment of these effluents starts with anaerobic processes. The anaerobic digestion process has several advantages over aerobic degradation: lower operating costs (not aeration), low sludge production, methane gas generation. The 4 stages of anaerobic digestion are: hydrolysis, acidogenic, acetogenesis and methanogenesis. Through the action of enzymes synthesized by microbial consortia are met. The products of each step to serve as reagents is conducted as follows. The organic load times and cell hydraulic retention, solids content, nutrient availability, pH and temperature are factors that influence directly in biodigesters. The objectives of this presentation is to; characterize the microbial inoculum and water (from palm oil wasted water) to be used in biodigestores, make specific methanogenic activity in bioassays, acclimatize the microorganisms to produce methane gas using basal mineral medium with acetate for the input power, and to determine the production of methane gas digesters high organic load.

  2. Determination of flow rates of oil, water and gas in pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, G.J.; Watt, J.S.; Zastawny, H.W. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Div. of Mineral Physics

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes a multiphase flow meter developed by CSIRO for determining of the flow rates of oil, water and gas in high pressure pipelines, and the results of a trial of this flow meter on an offshore oil platform. Two gamma-ray transmission gauges are mounted about a pipeline carrying the full flow of oil, water and gas. The flow rates are determined by combining single energy gamma-ray transmission measurements which determine the mass per unit area of fluids in the gamma-ray beam as a function of time, dual energy gamma-ray transmission (DUET) which determine the approximate mass fraction of oil in the liquids, cross-correlation of gamma-ray transmission measurements, with one gauge upstream of the other, which determines flow velocity, pressure and temperature measurements, and knowledge of the specific gravities of oil and (salt) water, and solubility of the gas in the liquids, all as a function of pressure and temperature. 3 figs.

  3. Molecular density functional theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume, E-mail: g.jeanmairet@fkf.mpg.de; Levesque, Maximilien, E-mail: maximilien.levesque@ens.fr [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr [SIS2M, LIONS, CEA, Saclay (France); Borgis, Daniel [École Normale Supérieure - PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, Sorbonne Universités - UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS UMR 8640 PASTEUR, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Maison de la Simulation, USR 3441, CEA - CNRS - INRIA - Univ. Paris-Sud - Univ. de Versailles, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2015-04-21

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. The solvation free energy of small molecular solutes like n-alkanes and hard sphere solutes whose radii range from angstroms to nanometers is now in quantitative agreement with reference all atom simulations. The macroscopic liquid-gas surface tension predicted by the theory is comparable to experiments. This theory gives an alternative to the empirical hard sphere bridge correction used so far by several authors.

  4. Integrating geophysics and geochemistry to evaluate coalbed natural gas produced water disposal, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Brian Andrew

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coalbeds in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming has created water management issues. More than 4.1 billion barrels of water have been produced with coalbed natural gas (CBNG) since 1997. Infiltration impoundments, which are the principal method used to dispose CBNG water, contribute to the recharge of underlying aquifers. Airborne electromagnetic surveys of an alluvial aquifer that has been receiving CBNG water effluent through infiltration impoundments since 2001 reveal produced water plumes within these aquifers and also provide insight into geomorphologic controls on resultant salinity levels. Geochemical data from the same aquifer reveal that CBNG water enriched in sodium and bicarbonate infiltrates and mixes with sodium-calcium-sulfate type alluvial groundwater, which subsequently may have migrated into the Powder River. The highly sodic produced water undergoes cation exchange reactions with native alluvial sediments as it infiltrates, exchanging sodium from solution for calcium and magnesium on montmorillonite clays. The reaction may ultimately reduce sediment permeability by clay dispersion. Strontium isotope data from CBNG wells discharging water into these impoundments indicate that the Anderson coalbed of the Fort Union Formation is dewatered due to production. Geophysical methods provide a broad-scale tool to monitor CBNG water disposal especially in areas where field based investigations are logistically prohibitive, but geochemical data are needed to reveal subsurface processes undetectable by geophysical techniques. The results of this research show that: (1) CBNG impoundments should not be located near streams because they can alter the surrounding hydraulic potential field forcing saline alluvial groundwater and eventually CBNG water into the stream, (2) point bars are poor impoundment locations because they are essentially in direct hydraulic communication with the associated stream and because plants

  5. Geological implications and controls on the determination of water saturation in shale gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, David; Lovell, Mike; Davies, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    A significant challenge to the petrophysical evaluation of shale gas systems can be attributed to the conductivity behaviour of clay minerals and entrained clay bound waters. This is compounded by centimetre to sub-millimetre vertical and lateral heterogeneity in formation composition and structure. Where despite significant variation in formation geological and therefore petrophysical properties, we routinely rely on conventional resistivity methods for the determination of water saturation (Sw), and hence the free gas saturation (Sg) in gas bearing mudstones. The application of resistivity based methods is the subject of continuing debate, and there is often significant uncertainty in both how they are applied and the saturation estimates they produce. This is partly a consequence of the view that "the quantification of the behaviour of shale conductivity....has only limited geological significance" (Rider 1986). As a result, there is a separation between our geological understanding of shale gas systems and the petrophysical rational and methods employed to evaluate them. In response to this uncertainty, many petrophysicists are moving away from the use of more complex 'shaly-sand' based evaluation techniques and returning to traditional Archie methods for answers. The Archie equation requires various parameter inputs such as porosity and saturation exponents (m and n), as well as values for connate fluid resistivity (Rw). Many of these parameters are difficult to determine in shale gas systems, where obtaining a water sample, or carrying out laboratory experiments on recovered core is often technically impractical. Here we assess the geological implications and controls on variations in pseudo Archie parameters across two geological formations, using well data spanning multiple basinal settings for a prominent shale gas play in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin. The results, of numerical analysis and systematic modification of parameter values to minimise the

  6. GIS based location optimization for mobile produced water treatment facilities in shale gas operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitwadkar, Amol Hanmant

    Over 60% of the nation's total energy is supplied by oil and natural gas together and this demand for energy will continue to grow in the future (Radler et al. 2012). The growing demand is pushing the exploration and exploitation of onshore oil and natural gas reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing has proven to not only create jobs and achieve economic growth, but also has proven to exert a lot of stress on natural resources---such as water. As water is one of the most important factors in the world of hydraulic fracturing, proper fluids management during the development of a field of operation is perhaps the key element to address a lot of these issues. Almost 30% of the water used during hydraulic fracturing comes out of the well in the form of flowback water during the first month after the well is fractured (Bai et. al. 2012). Handling this large amount of water coming out of the newly fractured wells is one of the major issues as the volume of the water after this period drops off and remains constant for a long time (Bai et. al. 2012) and permanent facilities can be constructed to take care of the water over a longer period. This paper illustrates development of a GIS based tool for optimizing the location of a mobile produced water treatment facility while development is still occurring. A methodology was developed based on a multi criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to optimize the location of the mobile treatment facilities. The criteria for MCDA include well density, ease of access (from roads considering truck hauls) and piping minimization if piping is used and water volume produced. The area of study is 72 square miles east of Greeley, CO in the Wattenberg Field in northeastern Colorado that will be developed for oil and gas production starting in the year 2014. A quarterly analysis is done so that we can observe the effect of future development plans and current circumstances on the location as we move from quarter to quarter. This will help the operators to

  7. Effect of catalysts on degradation of organic dyes in water by gas phase surface corona discharge plasma using water electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, L.; Wu, Y.; Li, J. [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China). Inst. of Electrostatics and Special Power; Key Lab of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education, Dalian (China); Zhang, D.D.; Li, G.F. [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China). Inst. of Electrostatics and Special Power

    2010-07-01

    This study reported on the feasibility of using the discharge plasma technique for the decoloration of synthetic complex organic dyes from water. Conventional dye wastewater treatment methods involving biological degradation are ineffective because of the high degree of aromatics present in the molecules as well as the the stability and toxicity of the dyes. In this study, a gas phase surface corona discharge (GPSCD) reactor was designed in which waste water was used as the ground electrode, and to cool the high electrode. The energy efficiency of the reactor can be improved by combining discharge plasma with catalysts. For that reason, this study investigated the effects of 3 different catalysts on degradation of Methyl Red (MR) dye in water. The catalysts chosen were Fe{sup 2+}, TiO{sub 2} and MnO{sub 2}. The results showed that catalytic activity of MnO{sub 2} is superior to that of Fe{sup 2+} and TiO{sub 2}. Fe{sup 2+} inhibits the degradation of MR due to the combination of generated Fe{sup 3+} with produced organic acid to form a coloured complex compound. The optimal amount of MnO{sub 2} addition was determined to be 0.10 g, which could increase the MR removal efficiency of 16 percent after 2 min discharge. It was concluded that the GPSCD reactor may be suitable for wastewater treatment other than dye water. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO(2) sink in natural gas fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfillan, Stuart M V; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Holland, Greg; Blagburn, Dave; Stevens, Scott; Schoell, Martin; Cassidy, Martin; Ding, Zhenju; Zhou, Zheng; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Ballentine, Chris J

    2009-04-01

    Injecting CO(2) into deep geological strata is proposed as a safe and economically favourable means of storing CO(2) captured from industrial point sources. It is difficult, however, to assess the long-term consequences of CO(2) flooding in the subsurface from decadal observations of existing disposal sites. Both the site design and long-term safety modelling critically depend on how and where CO(2) will be stored in the site over its lifetime. Within a geological storage site, the injected CO(2) can dissolve in solution or precipitate as carbonate minerals. Here we identify and quantify the principal mechanism of CO(2) fluid phase removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO(2) phase and provide a natural analogue for assessing the geological storage of anthropogenic CO(2) over millennial timescales. We find that in seven gas fields with siliciclastic or carbonate-dominated reservoir lithologies, dissolution in formation water at a pH of 5-5.8 is the sole major sink for CO(2). In two fields with siliciclastic reservoir lithologies, some CO(2) loss through precipitation as carbonate minerals cannot be ruled out, but can account for a maximum of 18 per cent of the loss of emplaced CO(2). In view of our findings that geological mineral fixation is a minor CO(2) trapping mechanism in natural gas fields, we suggest that long-term anthropogenic CO(2) storage models in similar geological systems should focus on the potential mobility of CO(2) dissolved in water. PMID:19340078

  9. Water Determination in Solid Pharmaceutical Products Utilizing Ionic Liquids and Headspace Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Lillian A; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-08-01

    A rapid, accurate, and precise headspace gas chromatographic (HSGC) analytical method was developed for the detection and quantification of water in drug products. The analysis is able to be performed in 10 min and automated. The HSGC method used an ionic liquid (IL) based open tubular capillary gas chromatographic column to increase the ruggedness of this method and provide improved peak shapes for water. Due to the ionic liquids low vapor pressure, unique physiochemical properties, and high thermal stability, they also make idea solvents for HSGC. Unlike Karl Fischer titration methods, this HSGC method is not affected by side reactions. The developed method was shown to be broadly applicable. The water content in 12 different samples was found to range from 1%-7% water. The use of HSGC was highly sensitive and only required 10 mg of sample. In addition, it was found to have greater precision and accuracy than Karl Fischer titration and greater precision and speed than loss on drying. PMID:27364462

  10. Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

    2013-08-01

    Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

  11. Water pollution risk associated with natural gas extraction from the Marcellus Shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozell, Daniel J; Reaven, Sheldon J

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, shale gas formations have become economically viable through the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. These techniques carry potential environmental risk due to their high water use and substantial risk for water pollution. Using probability bounds analysis, we assessed the likelihood of water contamination from natural gas extraction in the Marcellus Shale. Probability bounds analysis is well suited when data are sparse and parameters highly uncertain. The study model identified five pathways of water contamination: transportation spills, well casing leaks, leaks through fractured rock, drilling site discharge, and wastewater disposal. Probability boxes were generated for each pathway. The potential contamination risk and epistemic uncertainty associated with hydraulic fracturing wastewater disposal was several orders of magnitude larger than the other pathways. Even in a best-case scenario, it was very likely that an individual well would release at least 200 m³ of contaminated fluids. Because the total number of wells in the Marcellus Shale region could range into the tens of thousands, this substantial potential risk suggested that additional steps be taken to reduce the potential for contaminated fluid leaks. To reduce the considerable epistemic uncertainty, more data should be collected on the ability of industrial and municipal wastewater treatment facilities to remove contaminants from used hydraulic fracturing fluid. PMID:22211399

  12. Toxicity associated with produced waters from inland and offshore oil and gas operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPDES permits require that discharges from oil and gas operations meet standards for aquatic life. When these aquatic life standards are violated, it is necessary to determine the causes of toxicity and to implement treatment methodologies that will eliminate significant mortalities and/or chronic growth and reproduction effects to the test organisms. Over the last several years, monitoring has been conducted on produced waters from oil and gas operations at inland and offshore locations. This work has been done in the U.S. as well as in South America. The toxicity in these discharges has been shown to be variable and due to a broad range of causes. The objective of this paper is to review the chemistry and biology with regards to the causes of toxicity in these waters. Samples collected from the Rocky Mountain west have generally demonstrated toxicity due to high total dissolved solids, hydrogen sulfides, and non-polar organics. Toxicity has ranged from extremely toxic to non-toxic. The levels of sensitivity for fathead minnows and Ceriodaphnia dubia differ between the various produced water samples. Three samples are currently being investigated which show different sources of toxicity in spite of close proximity to one another. Preliminary studies indicate toxicity may be due to trace metals and polar organics associated with treatment products. Produced waters from offshore Gulf of Mexico platforms have been shown to produce high levels of toxicity in chronic and acute tests

  13. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  14. Gas hydrates in the deep water Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae

    2016-04-01

    Studies on gas hydrates in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea was initiated by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) to secure the future energy resources in 1996. Bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) were first identified on seismic data collected in the southwestern part of the basin from 1998 to 1999. Regional geophysical surveys and geological studies of gas hydrates in the basin have been carried out by KIGAM from 2000 to 2004. The work included 12,367 km of 2D multi-channel seismic reflection lines and 38 piston cores 5 to 8 m long. As a part of the Korean National Gas Hydrate Program that has been performed since 2005, 6690 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic lines, 900 km2 of 3D seismic data, 69 piston cores and three PROD cores were additionally collected. In addition, two gas hydrate drilling expeditions were performed in 2007 and 2010. Cracks generally parallel to beddings caused by the dissociation of gas hydrate were often observed in cores. The lack of higher hydrocarbons and the carbon isotope ratios indicate that the methane is primarily biogenic. The seismic data showed clear and wide-spread bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs). The BSR was identified by (a) its polarity opposite to the seafloor, (b) its seafloor-parallel reflection behavior, and (c) its occurrence at a sub-bottom depth corresponding to the expected base of gas hydrate stability zone. Several vertical to sub-vertical chimney-like blank zones up to several kilometers in diameter were also identified in the study area. They are often associated with velocity pull-up structures that are interpreted due to higher velocity in gas hydrate-bearing deposits. Seismic velocity analysis also showed a high velocity anomaly within the pull-up structure. Gas hydrate samples were collected from the shallow sedimentary section of blanking zone by piston coring in 2007. BSRs mainly occur in the southern part of the basin. They also locally observed in the

  15. Toward the development of erosion-free ultrasonic cavitation cleaning with gas-supersaturated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2015-11-01

    In ultrasonic cleaning, contaminant particles attached at target surfaces are removed by liquid flow or acoustic waves that are induced by acoustic cavitation bubbles. However, the inertial collapse of such bubbles often involve strong shock emission or water hammer by re-entrant jets, thereby giving rise to material erosion. Here, we aim at developing an erosion-free ultrasonic cleaning technique with the aid of gas-supersaturated water. The key idea is that (gaseous) cavitation is triggered easily even with low-intensity sonication in water where gases are dissolved beyond Henry's saturation limit, allowing us to buffer violent bubble collapse. In this presentation, we report on observations of the removal of micron/submicron-sized particles attached at glass surfaces by the action of gaseous cavitation bubbles under low-intensity sonication.

  16. Gas transfer at the air-water interface in a turbulent flow environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlina

    2005-07-01

    The gas transfer process across the air-water interface in a bottom-shear-induced turbulent environment was investigated to gain improved fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms that control the process. For this purpose, it is necessary to reveal the hydrodynamics of the flow field as well as the molecular diffusion and the turbulent transport contributions to the total flux. Therefore, detailed laboratory experiments were conducted to obtain this information. The experiments were performed in a grid-stirred tank using a combined Particle Image Velocimetry - Laser Induced Fluorescence (PIV-LIF) technique that has been developed for these near surface gas transfer measurements. The turbulence characteristics of the velocity near the interface were acquired from the PIV measurements and showed generally good agreement with the theoretical profiles from Hunt and Graham (1978). The LIF technique enabled visualization of the planar concentration fields which provided more insight into the gas transfer mechanisms. The high data resolution allowed detailed quantification of the concentration distribution within the thin aqueous boundary layer. The interrelated interpretation of the obtained results suggest that the gas transfer process is controlled by a spectrum of different eddy sizes and the gas transfer at different turbulence levels can be associated to certain eddy sizes. For high turbulence levels the gas transfer should be asymptotic to the small eddy model, whereas for low turbulence level to the large eddy model. The new results of turbulent mass flux should aid as an excellent database in refining numerical models and developing more accurate models for the prediction of the transfer velocity. (orig.)

  17. The Pennsylvania Experience with Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Gas Development: Relatively Infrequent Water Quality Incidents with Lots of Public Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Li, Z.; Yoxtheimer, D.; Vidic, R.

    2015-12-01

    New techniques of hydraulic fracturing - "fracking" - have changed the United States over the last 10 years into a leading producer of natural gas extraction from shale. The first such gas well in Pennsylvania was drilled and completed using high-volume hydraulic fracturing in 2004. By late 2014, more than 8500 of these gas wells had been drilled in the Marcellus Shale gas field in Pennsylvania alone. Almost 1000 public complaints about groundwater quality were logged by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) between 2008 and 2012. Only a fraction of these were attributed to unconventional gas development. The most common problem was gas migration into drinking water, but contamination incidents also included spills, seepage, or leaks of fracking fluids, brine salts, or very occasionally, radioactive species. Many problems of gas migration were from a few counties in the northeastern part of the state. However, sometimes one gas well contaminated multiple water wells. For example, one gas well was reported by the state regulator to have contaminated 18 water wells with methane near Dimock PA. It can be argued that such problems at a relatively small fraction of gas wells initiated pockets of pushback against fracking worldwide. This resistance to fracking has grown even though fracking has been in use in the U.S.A. since the 1940s. We have worked as part of an NSF-funded project (the Shale Network) to share water quality data and publish it online using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System. Sharing data has led to collaborative investigation of specific contamination incidents to understand how problems can occur, and to efforts to quantify the frequency of impacts. The Shale Network efforts have also highlighted the need for more transparency with water quality data in the arena related to the energy-water nexus. As more data are released, new techniques of data analysis will allow better understanding of how to tune best practices to be

  18. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Thomas H; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Warner, Nathaniel R; Poreda, Robert J

    2014-09-30

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced energy production but raised concerns about drinking-water contamination and other environmental impacts. Identifying the sources and mechanisms of contamination can help improve the environmental and economic sustainability of shale-gas extraction. We analyzed 113 and 20 samples from drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales, respectively, examining hydrocarbon abundance and isotopic compositions (e.g., C2H6/CH4, δ(13)C-CH4) and providing, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive analyses of noble gases and their isotopes (e.g., (4)He, (20)Ne, (36)Ar) in groundwater near shale-gas wells. We addressed two questions. (i) Are elevated levels of hydrocarbon gases in drinking-water aquifers near gas wells natural or anthropogenic? (ii) If fugitive gas contamination exists, what mechanisms cause it? Against a backdrop of naturally occurring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete clusters of fugitive gas contamination, seven in Pennsylvania and one in Texas that showed increased contamination through time. Where fugitive gas contamination occurred, the relative proportions of thermogenic hydrocarbon gas (e.g., CH4, (4)He) were significantly higher (P water; e.g., N2, (36)Ar) were significantly lower (P data link four contamination clusters to gas leakage from intermediate-depth strata through failures of annulus cement, three to target production gases that seem to implicate faulty production casings, and one to an underground gas well failure. Noble gas data appear to rule out gas contamination by upward migration from depth through overlying geological strata triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing.

  19. Method 349.0 Determination of Ammonia in Estuarine and Coastal Waters by Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method provides a procedure for the determination of ammonia in estuarine and coastal waters. The method is based upon the indophenol reaction,1-5 here adapted to automated gas-segmented continuous flow analysis.

  20. Nitrogen removal and greenhouse gas emissions from constructed wetlands receiving tile drainage water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Tyler A; Gentry, Lowell E; David, Mark B

    2015-05-01

    Loss of nitrate from agricultural lands to surface waters is an important issue, especially in areas that are extensively tile drained. To reduce these losses, a wide range of in-field and edge-of-field practices have been proposed, including constructed wetlands. We re-evaluated constructed wetlands established in 1994 that were previously studied for their effectiveness in removing nitrate from tile drainage water. Along with this re-evaluation, we measured the production and flux of greenhouse gases (GHGs) (CO, NO, and CH). The tile inlets and outlets of two wetlands were monitored for flow and N during the 2012 and 2013 water years. In addition, seepage rates of water and nitrate under the berm and through the riparian buffer strip were measured. Greenhouse gas emissions from the wetlands were measured using floating chambers (inundated fluxes) or static chambers (terrestrial fluxes). During this 2-yr study, the wetlands removed 56% of the total inlet nitrate load, likely through denitrification in the wetland. Some additional removal of nitrate occurred in seepage water by the riparian buffer strip along each berm (6.1% of the total inlet load, for a total nitrate removal of 62%). The dominant GHG emitted from the wetlands was CO, which represented 75 and 96% of the total GHG emissions during the two water years. The flux of NO contributed between 3.7 and 13% of the total cumulative GHG flux. Emissions of NO were 3.2 and 1.3% of the total nitrate removed from wetlands A and B, respectively. These wetlands continue to remove nitrate at rates similar to those measured after construction, with relatively little GHG gas loss. PMID:26024280

  1. Inelastic scattering in ocean water and its impact on trace gas retrievals from satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vountas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Over clear ocean waters, photons scattered within the water body contribute significantly to the upwelling flux. In addition to elastic scattering, inelastic Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS by liquid water is also playing a role and can have a strong impact on the spectral distribution of the outgoing radiance. Under clear-sky conditions, VRS has an influence on trace gas retrievals from space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance such as from e.g. GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. The effect is particularly important for geo-locations with small solar zenith angles and over waters with low chlorophyll concentration. In this study, a simple ocean reflectance model (Sathyendranath and Platt, 1998 accounting for VRS has been incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The model has been validated by comparison with measurements from a swimming-pool experiment dedicated to detect the effect of scattering within water on the outgoing radiation and also with selected data sets from GOME. The comparisons show good agreement between experimental and model data and highlight the important role of VRS. To evaluate the impact of VRS on trace gas retrieval, a sensitivity study was performed on synthetic data. If VRS is neglected in the data analysis, errors of more than 30% are introduced for the slant column (SC of BrO over clear ocean scenarios. Exemplarily DOAS retrievals of BrO from real GOME measurements including and excluding a VRS compensation led to comparable results as in the sensitivity study, but with somewhat smaller differences between the two analyses. The results of this work suggest, that DOAS retrievals of atmospheric trace species from measurements of nadir viewing space-borne instruments have to take VRS scattering into account over waters with low chlorophyll concentrations, and that a simple correction term is enough to reduce the errors to an acceptable level.

  2. Inelastic scattering in ocean water and its impact on trace gas retrievals from satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vountas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Over clear ocean waters, photons scattered within the water body contribute significantly to the upwelling flux. In addition to elastic scattering, inelastic Vibrational Raman Scattering (VRS by liquid water is also playing a role and can have a strong impact on the spectral distribution of the outgoing radiance. Under clear-sky conditions, VRS has an influence on trace gas retrievals from space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance such as from e.g. GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. The effect is particularly important for geo-locations with small solar zenith angles and over waters with low chlorophyll concentration.

    In this study, a simple ocean reflectance model (Sathendranath and Platt, 1998 accounting for VRS has been incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The model has been validated by comparison with measurements from a swimming-pool experiment dedicated to detect the effect of scattering within water on the outgoing radiation and also with selected data sets from GOME. The comparisons showed good agreement between experimental and model data and highlight the important role of VRS.

    To evaluate the impact of VRS on trace gas retrieval, a sensitivity study was performed on synthetic data. If VRS is neglected in the data analysis, errors of about 36% are introduced for the slant column (SC of BrO over clear ocean scenarios. The VRS-related error for the SC of HCHO is about 75%. Exemplarily DOAS retrievals of BrO from real GOME measurements including and excluding a VRS compensation led to comparable results as in the sensitivity study, but with somewhat smaller differences between the two analyses.

    The results of this work suggest, that DOAS retrieval of atmospheric trace species from measurements of nadir viewing space-borne instruments have to take VRS scattering into account over waters with low chlorophyll concentrations, and that a simple correction term is enough to reduce the

  3. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  4. Effect of biochar on soil structural characteristics: water retention and gas transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Møldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad;

    characteristics, as indicated from water retention and gas transport measurements on intact soil samples. Soil was sampled from a field experiment on a sandy loam with four control plots (C) without biochar and four plots (B) with incorporated biochar at a rate of 20 tons per hectare (plot size, 6 x 8 m). The C...... and B plots were placed in a mixed sequence (C-B-C-B-C-B-C-B) and at the same time the eight plots formed a natural pH gradient ranging from pH 7.7 to 6.3. We determined bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity (K-sat), soil water retention characteristics, soil-air permeability, and soil-gas......Biochar addition to agricultural soil has been reported to reduce climate gas emission, as well as improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little, however, is known about biochar effects on soil structural characteristics. This study investigates if biochar-application changes soil structural...

  5. Existence for a global pressure formulation of water-gas flow in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Amaziane

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a model of water-gas flow in porous media with an incompressible water phase and a compressible gas phase. Such models appear in gas migration through engineered and geological barriers for a deep repository for radioactive waste. The main feature of this model is the introduction of a new global pressure and it is fully equivalent to the original equations. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation as a degenerate parabolic system with the global pressure and the saturation potential as the main unknowns. The major difficulties related to this model are in the nonlinear degenerate structure of the equations, as well as in the coupling in the system. Under some realistic assumptions on the data, including unbounded capillary pressure function and non-homogeneous boundary conditions, we prove the existence of weak solutions of the system. Furthermore, it is shown that the weak solution has certain desired properties, such as positivity of the saturation. The result is proved with the help of an appropriate regularization and a time discretization of the coupled system. We use suitable test functions to obtain a priori estimates and a compactness result in order to pass to the limit in nonlinear terms.

  6. Fluorometric, water-based sensors for the detection of nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Andreas; Winter, Andreas; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-01-25

    Water-based Zn(II) bisterpyridine systems were used as fluorometric sensors for the detection of the nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP. Analyte concentrations in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-6) M are detectable in solution. The utilization of a test stripe additionally allows the detection of organophosphonates from the gas phase. PMID:22158657

  7. Fluorometric, water-based sensors for the detection of nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Andreas; Winter, Andreas; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-01-25

    Water-based Zn(II) bisterpyridine systems were used as fluorometric sensors for the detection of the nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP. Analyte concentrations in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-6) M are detectable in solution. The utilization of a test stripe additionally allows the detection of organophosphonates from the gas phase.

  8. Surface waters as a sink and source of atmospheric gas phase ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, G Brooks; Foley, Laura; Carroll, Angela L; Roebuck, Jesse Alan; Guy, Amanda; Mead, Ralph N; Kieber, Robert J; Willey, Joan D; Skrabal, Stephen A; Felix, J David; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Helms, John R

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the first ethanol concentrations in fresh and estuarine waters and greatly expands the current data set for coastal ocean waters. Concentrations for 153 individual measurements of 11 freshwater sites ranged from 5 to 598 nM. Concentrations obtained for one estuarine transect ranged from 56 to 77 nM and levels in five coastal ocean depth profiles ranged from 81 to 334 nM. Variability in ethanol concentrations was high and appears to be driven primarily by photochemical and biological processes. 47 gas phase concentrations of ethanol were also obtained during this study to determine the surface water degree of saturation with respect to the atmosphere. Generally fresh and estuarine waters were undersaturated indicating they are not a source and may be a net sink for atmospheric ethanol in this region. Aqueous phase ethanol is likely converted rapidly to acetaldehyde in these aquatic ecosystems creating the undersaturated conditions resulting in this previously unrecognized sink for atmospheric ethanol. Coastal ocean waters may act as either a sink or source of atmospheric ethanol depending on the partial pressure of ethanol in the overlying air mass. Results from this study are significant because they suggest that surface waters may act as an important vector for the uptake of ethanol emitted into the atmosphere including ethanol from biofuel production and usage.

  9. Determination of the flow velocity of oil/water/gas mixtures by dual energy gamma ray transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual energy gamma ray transmission (DUET) techniques have previously been applied to the determination of the volume concentrations of oil, water and gas in pipelines, a step towards a mass flow meter for this multiphase mixture. A method is proposed for the determination of the velocity of the liquids, based on cross-correlation of the DUET function, R, determined by two DUET assemblies. R is dependent on the ratio of the mass fractions of oil and water, but is essentially independent of the gas because the mass fraction of gas in the gamma ray beam is usually small compared with that of the liquids. Computer modelling of the application of DUET systems to oil/water/gas mixtures shows that the liquids velocity is determined independently of the velocity of the gas. The modelling also shows that R must be determined very precisely, which in practice means that count rates must be determined to 0.1%. Experiments using a two component mixture of water and oil show that cross-correlation of R determines, as expected, the same velocity as for cross-correlation using the gamma rays of a single energy. Experiments using air and water show that R is independent of variations in gas volume and gas velocity. (author). 13 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of the gas-water two phase flow through a conductance multiphase Venturi meter in vertical annular (wet gas) flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annular gas-liquid two phase flow widely occurs in nuclear industry. Various combinations of techniques have been employed in annular gas-liquid two phase flows to measure the flow parameters (e.g. liquid film thickness, gas volume fraction and the phase flow rates). One of the most useful techniques which has proven attractive for many multiphase flow applications is the electrical conductance technique. This paper presents an advanced conductance multiphase Venturi meter (CMVM) which is capable of measuring the gas volume fractions at the inlet and the throat of the Venturi. A new model was investigated to measure the gas flow rate. This model is based on the measurement of the gas volume fractions at the inlet and the throat of the Venturi meter using a conductance technique rather than relying on prior knowledge of the mass flow quality x. We measure conductance using two ring electrodes flush with the inner surface of the Venturi throat and two ring electrodes flush with the inner surface of the Venturi inlet. The basic operation of the electrical conductance technique in a multiphase flow is that the conductance of the mixture depends on the gas volume fraction in the water. An electronic circuit was built and calibrated to give a dc voltage output which is proportional to the conductance of the mixture which can then be related to the water film thickness in annular flow (and hence to the gas volume fraction). It was inferred from the experimental results that the minimum average percentage error of the predicted gas mass flow rates (i.e. -0.0428%) can be achieved at the optimum gas discharge coefficient of 0.932.

  11. Investigation of Controlling Factors Impacting Water Quality in Shale Gas Produced Brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W.; Hayes, K. F.; Ellis, B. R.

    2014-12-01

    The recent boom in production of natural gas from unconventional reservoirs has generated a substantial increase in the volume of produced brine that must be properly managed to prevent contamination of fresh water resources. Produced brine, which includes both flowback and formation water, is often highly saline and may contain elevated concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material and other toxic elements. These characteristics present many challenges with regard to designing effective treatment and disposal strategies for shale gas produced brine. We will present results from a series of batch experiments where crushed samples from two shale formations in the Michigan Basin, the Antrim and Utica-Collingwood shales, were brought into contact with synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluids under in situ temperature and pressure conditions. The Antrim has been an active shale gas play for over three decades, while the Utica-Collingwood formation (a grouped reservoir consisting of the Utica shale and Collingwood limestone) is an emerging shale gas play. The goal of this study is to investigate the influence of water-rock interactions in controlling produced water quality. We evaluate toxic element leaching from shale samples in contact with model hydraulic fracturing fluids under system conditions corresponding to reservoir depths up to 1.5 km. Experimental results have begun to elucidate the relative importance of shale mineralogy, system conditions, and chemical additives in driving changes in produced water quality. Initial results indicate that hydraulic fracturing chemical additives have a strong influence on the extent of leaching of toxic elements from the shale. In particular, pH was a key factor in the release of uranium (U) and divalent metals, highlighting the importance of the mineral buffering capacity of the shale. Low pH values persisted in the Antrim and Utica shale experiments and resulted in higher U extraction efficiencies than that

  12. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl O. Cadena-Pereda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  13. Densification behavior of gas and water atomized 316L stainless steel powder during selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The densification during selective laser melting (SLM) process is an important factor determining the final application of SLM-part. In the present work, the densifications under different processing conditions were investigated and the densification mechanisms were elucidated. It was found that the higher laser power, lower scan speed, narrower hatch spacing and thinner layer thickness could enable a much smoother melting surface and consequently a higher densification. The gas atomized powder possessed better densification than water atomized powder, due to the lower oxygen content and higher packing density of gas atomized powder. A large number of regular-shaped pores can be generated at a wider hatch spacing, even if the scanning track is continuous and wetted very well. The densification mechanisms were addressed and the methods for building dense metal parts were also proposed as follows: inhibiting the balling phenomenon, increasing the overlap ratio of scanning tracks and reducing the micro-cracks.

  14. A review on risk assessment techniques for hydraulic fracturing water and produced water management implemented in onshore unconventional oil and gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Luisa; Yadav, Om Prakash; Khan, Eakalak

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review different risk assessment techniques applicable to onshore unconventional oil and gas production to determine the risks to water quantity and quality associated with hydraulic fracturing and produced water management. Water resources could be at risk without proper management of water, chemicals, and produced water. Previous risk assessments in the oil and gas industry were performed from an engineering perspective leaving aside important social factors. Different risk assessment methods and techniques are reviewed and summarized to select the most appropriate one to perform a holistic and integrated analysis of risks at every stage of the water life cycle. Constraints to performing risk assessment are identified including gaps in databases, which require more advanced techniques such as modeling. Discussions on each risk associated with water and produced water management, mitigation strategies, and future research direction are presented. Further research on risks in onshore unconventional oil and gas will benefit not only the U.S. but also other countries with shale oil and gas resources. PMID:26386446

  15. Water emergence from the land region and water-sidewall interactions in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell gas channels with microgrooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir M.; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid water produced in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) can adversely affect the fuel cell performance in two ways: (a) reduction in surface area available for reactant transport at the channel-gas diffusion layer (GDL) interface, and (b) increase in two-phase pressure drop in channels leading to flow maldistribution and increased pumping power. Further, the channels blocked by water reduce reactant availability at reaction sites. Most of the earlier water transport studies were focused on water droplet formation on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in the channel and its removal from the gas flow without considering the sidewall interactions. In an actual fuel cell, water under the land emerges in the channel and fills the corner, drawing in additional water from the GDL surface. The present work explores water droplet-sidewall interactions and the transport of water from the corner region. Transverse micro-grooves are introduced on the sidewalls and their effect on water removal from the corner region, flow patterns, area coverage ratio and pressure drop are investigated. The micro-grooves are also seen to introduce a wetting regime that facilitates removal of water at the channel exit without causing blockage at the manifold region.

  16. Optimal water resources management and system benefit for the Marcellus shale-gas reservoir in Pennsylvania and West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi; He, Li; Lu, Hongwei; Chen, Yizhong; Ren, Lixia

    2016-09-01

    A major concern associated with current shale-gas extraction is high consumption of water resources. However, decision-making problems regarding water consumption and shale-gas extraction have not yet been solved through systematic approaches. This study develops a new bilevel optimization problem based on goals at two different levels: minimization of water demands at the lower level and maximization of system benefit at the upper level. The model is used to solve a real-world case across Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Results show that surface water would be the largest contributor to gas production (with over 80.00% from 2015 to 2030) and groundwater occupies for the least proportion (with less than 2.00% from 2015 to 2030) in both districts over the planning span. Comparative analysis between the proposed model and conventional single-level models indicates that the bilevel model could provide coordinated schemes to comprehensively attain the goals from both water resources authorities and energy sectors. Sensitivity analysis shows that the change of water use of per unit gas production (WU) has significant effects upon system benefit, gas production and pollutants (i.e., barium, chloride and bromide) discharge, but not significantly changes water demands.

  17. Effect of damage on water retention and gas transport properties geo-materials: Application to geological storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of geological disposal of radioactive waste, this work contributes to the characterization of the effect of diffuse damage on the water retention and gas transfer properties of concrete (CEM I and CEM V) selected by Andra, Callovo-Oxfordian argillite (host rock) and argillite / concrete interfaces. This study provides information on the concrete microstructure from Mercury porosimetry intrusion and water retention curves: each concrete has a distinct microstructure, CEM I concrete is characterized by a significant proportion of capillary pores while CEM V concrete has a large proportion of C-S-H pores. Several protocols have been developed in order to damage concrete. The damage reduces water retention capacity of CEM I concrete and increases its gas permeability. Indeed, gas breakthrough pressure decreases significantly for damaged concrete, and this regardless of the type of concrete. For argillite, the sample mass increases gradually at RH = 100%, which creates and increases damage in the material. This reduces its ability to retain water. Otherwise, water retention and gas transport properties of argillite are highly dependent of its initial water saturation, which is linked to its damage. Finally, we observed a clogging phenomenon at the argillite/concrete interfaces, which is first mechanical and then hydraulic (and probably chemical) after water injection. This reduces the gas breakthrough pressure interfaces. (author)

  18. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  19. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  20. Testing for Nonlinearity in Dynamic Characteristics of Vertical Upward Oil-Gas-Water Three-phase Bubble and Slug Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雷; 金宁德; 高忠科; 杜萌; 王振亚

    2012-01-01

    Based on the conductance fluctuation signals measured from vertical upward oil-gas-water three-phase flow experiment, time frequency representation and surrogate data method were used to investigate dynamical characteristics of oil-in-water type bubble and slug flows. The results indicate that oil-in-water type bubble flow will turn to deterministic motion with the increase of oil phase fraction f o and superficial gas velocity U sg under fixed flowrate of oil-water mixture Q mix . The dynamics of oil-in-water type slug flow becomes more complex with the increase of U sg under fixed flowrate of oil-water mixture. The change of f o leads to irregular influence on the dynamics of slug flow. These interesting findings suggest that the surrogate data method can be a faithful tool for characterizing dynamic characteristics of oil-in-water type bubble and slug flows.

  1. Water and dissolved gas geochemistry of the monomictic Paterno sinkhole (central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Nocentini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the chemical and isotope features of water and dissolved gases from lake Paterno (max. depth 54 m, a sinkhole located in the NE sector of the S. Vittorino plain (Rieti, Central Italy, where evidences of past and present hydrothermal activity exists. In winter (February 2011 lake Paterno waters were almost completely mixed, whereas in summer time (July 2011 thermal and chemical stratifications established. During the stratification period, water and dissolved gas chemistry along the vertical water column were mainly controlled by biological processes, such as methanogenesis, sulfate-reduction, calcite precipitation, denitrification, and NH4 and H2 production. Reducing conditions at the interface between the bottom sediments and the anoxic waters are responsible for the relatively high concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe and manganese (Mn, likely present in their reduced oxidation state. Minerogenic and biogenic products were recognized at the lake bottom even during the winter sampling. At relatively shallow depth the distribution of CH4 and CO2 was controlled by methanotrophic bacteria and photosynthesis, respectively. The carbon isotope signature of CO2 indicates a significant contribution of deep-originated inorganic CO2 that is related to the hydrothermal system feeding the CO2-rich mineralized springs discharging in the surrounding areas of lake Paterno. The seasonal lake stratification likely controls the vertical and horizontal distribution of fish populations in the different periods of the year.

  2. Technical Note: Drifting vs. anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lorke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stream networks were recently discovered as major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams having different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1 drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (2 anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (3 the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4 there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil seal to the water surface rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  3. Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

    2011-10-16

    Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

  4. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment.

  5. Application of finite inverse gas chromatography in hypromellose acetate succinate-water-acetone systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sheng-Wei; Sturm, Derek R; Moser, Justin D; Danner, Ronald P

    2016-09-30

    A modification of a GC was developed to investigate both infinitely dilute and finite concentrations of solvents in polymers. Thermodynamic properties of hypromellose acetate succinate (HPMCAS-L)-acetone-water systems are important for the optimization of spray-drying processes used in pharmaceutical manufacturing of solid dispersion formulations. These properties, at temperatures below the glass transition temperature, were investigated using capillary column inverse gas chromatography (CCIGC). Water was much less soluble in the HPMCAS-L than acetone. Experiments were also conducted at infinitely dilute concentrations of one of the solvents in HPMCAS-L that was already saturated with the other solvent. Overall the partitioning of the water was not significantly affected by the presence of either water or acetone in the polymer. The acetone partition coefficient decreased as either acetone or water was added to the HPMCAS-L. A representation of the HPMCAS-L structure in terms of UNIFAC groups has been developed. With these groups, the UNIFAC-vdw-FV model did a reasonable job of predicting the phase equilibria in the binary and ternary systems. The Flory-Huggins correlation with fitted interaction parameters represented the data well. PMID:27629480

  6. Salinity independent volume fraction prediction in water-gas-oil multiphase flows using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, C.M.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (DIRA/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radiofarmacos

    2011-07-01

    This work investigates the response of a volume fraction prediction system for water-gas-oil multiphase flows considering variations on water salinity. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means the artificial neural networks (ANNs). The detection system uses appropriate fan beam geometry, comprised of a dual-energy gamma-ray source and two NaI(Tl) detectors adequately positioned outside the pipe in order measure transmitted and scattered beams. An ideal and static theoretical model for annular flow regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the ANN. More than 500 simulations have been done, in which water salinity have been ranged from 0 to 16% in order to cover a most practical situations. Validation tests have included values of volume fractions and water salinity different from those used in ANN training phase. The results presented here show that the proposed approach may be successfully applied to material volume fraction prediction on watergas- oil multiphase flows considering practical (real) levels of variations in water salinity. (author)

  7. Conversion of air mixture with ethanol and water vapors in nonequilibrium gas-discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchedrin, A. I.; Levko, D. S.; Chernyak, V. Ya.; Yukhimenko, V. V.; Naumov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    In search for an alternative fuel for internal combustion engines, we have studied the possibility of obtaining molecular hydrogen via the conversion of air mixture with ethanol and water vapors in a new plasma reactor. It is shown that, in agreement with experimental data, the H2 concentration is a linear function of the discharge current and decreases with increasing gas flow rate in the interelectrode gap. It is established that the proposed approach provides higher molecular hydrogen concentrations as compared to those achieved with other methods.

  8. Electrochemical Synthesis of Mo2C Catalytical Coatings for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey A.; Dubrovskiy, Anton R.; Rebrov, Evgeny V.; Schouten, Jaap C.

    2007-11-01

    The electroreduction of CO32- ions on a molybdenum cathode in a NaCl-KCl-Li2CO3 melt was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical synthesis of Mo2C on molybdenum substrates has been performed at 1123 K for 7 h with a cathodic current density of 5 mA cm-2. If molybdenum carbide is present as a thin (ca. 500 nm) film on a molybdenum substrate (Mo2C/Mo), its catalytic activity in the water gas-shift reaction is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude compared to that of the bulk Mo2C phase.

  9. A review of selected aspects of the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A selective review is presented of previous measurements and the analysis of experiments on the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide. Evidence for the time-dependent composition of the uranium oxycarbide fuel; the diffusional release of fission gas; and the initial, rapid and limited release of stored fission gas is discussed. In regard to the initial, rapid release of fission gas, clear restrictions on mechanistic hypotheses can be deduced from the experimental data. However, more fundamental experiments may be required to establish the mechanism of the rapid release

  10. Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

    2008-03-31

    Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve

  11. The Energy Efficiency of Hot Water Production by Gas Water Heaters with a Combustion Chamber Sealed with Respect to the Room

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Czerski; Andrzej Strugała

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents investigative results of the energy efficiency of hot water production for sanitary uses by means of gas-fired water heaters with the combustion chamber sealed with respect to the room in single-family houses and multi-story buildings. Additionally, calculations were made of the influence of pre-heating the air for combustion in the chimney and air supply system on the energy efficiency of hot water production. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software was used for calcu...

  12. Experimental Study on Gas-water Two-phase Seepage Characteristics of Water-saturated Gas-containing Coal%饱和水含瓦斯煤气水两相渗流特性试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    位乐; 王登科; 刘志伟

    2016-01-01

    Through experiments on gas-water two-phase permeability of water-saturated gas-containing coal samples under the constant temperature condition, study was carried out on the permeation characteristics and rule of gas-water two-phase flow. Tests were made on the seepage discharge of gas-containing coal samples with the change of the saturation degree of coal under different combinations of confining pressures and gas pressures by using the self-developed triaxial gas seepage testing system, the relational expression between the water content and the permeability of gas-containing coal was obtained, and some new understandings on gas-water two-phase seepage characteristics of water-saturated gas-containing coal were revealed:(1) with the decrease of water saturation, water permeability did not always reduced, but it still assumed a whole reduction trend with the decrease of the water saturation of coal samples, there was a large fluctuation in the early stage, permeability decreased first and then increased to a peak, then it gradually decreased and quickly decreased to the minimum extent;(2) water had a significant inhibitory effect on gas permeability, the gas can hardly get through coal samples in a water-saturated state, but under the conditions of high water saturation, gas permeability was not necessarily close to zero; ( 3 ) with the increase of gas pressure, gas-water isotonic point moved to the right.%通过恒温条件下饱和水煤样气水两相渗透率的测定试验,研究了含瓦斯煤样气水两相渗透特性规律。利用自主研发的三轴瓦斯渗流试验系统,测定随着含水饱和度变化,煤样在围压和瓦斯压力的不同组合情况下的渗流量,得到气水两相渗透率与含瓦斯煤含水饱和度之间的关系,揭示了饱和水含瓦斯煤气水两相渗透特性的一些新的认识:①随着含水饱和度的减小,水的渗透率不是一直减小的,而是整体呈现出随着煤样含水饱和

  13. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  14. U.S. Geological Survey Noble Gas Laboratory’s standard operating procedures for the measurement of dissolved gas in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-08-12

    This report addresses the standard operating procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Noble Gas Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A., for the measurement of dissolved gases (methane, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide) and noble gas isotopes (helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, argon-36, argon-38, argon-40, kryton-84, krypton-86, xenon-103, and xenon-132) dissolved in water. A synopsis of the instrumentation used, procedures followed, calibration practices, standards used, and a quality assurance and quality control program is presented. The report outlines the day-to-day operation of the Residual Gas Analyzer Model 200, Mass Analyzer Products Model 215–50, and ultralow vacuum extraction line along with the sample handling procedures, noble gas extraction and purification, instrument measurement procedures, instrumental data acquisition, and calculations for the conversion of raw data from the mass spectrometer into noble gas concentrations per unit mass of water analyzed. Techniques for the preparation of artificial dissolved gas standards are detailed and coupled to a quality assurance and quality control program to present the accuracy of the procedures used in the laboratory.

  15. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  16. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  17. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  18. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamindu, Deepagoda; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus;

    2014-01-01

    utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions....... Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air...... permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions...

  19. Water scaling in the North Sea oil and gas fields and scale prediction: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, M.

    1996-12-31

    Water-scaling is a common and major production chemistry problem in the North Sea oil and gas fields and scale prediction has been an important means to assess the potential and extent of scale deposition. This paper presents an overview of sulphate and carbonate scaling problems in the North Sea and a review of several widely used and commercially available scale prediction software. In the paper, the water chemistries and scale types and severities are discussed relative of the geographical distribution of the fields in the North Sea. The theories behind scale prediction are then briefly described. Five scale or geochemical models are presented and various definitions of saturation index are compared and correlated. Views are the expressed on how to predict scale precipitation under some extreme conditions such as that encountered in HPHT reservoirs. 15 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Gas-dynamic explosion of water microparticles under action high-power femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlyanov, Alexander A.; Geints, Yuri E.; Apeksimov, Dmitrii V.

    2006-02-01

    Among the broad audience of problems of atmospheric nonlinear optics the important place is occupied with a problem about interaction of intensive laser radiation with water microparticles. Drops, being in a field of powerful light radiation, owing to effects of evaporation or explosion change the optical characteristics and influence on the optical properties of an environment. It results to that process and the distribution of intensive laser radiation in a particle is characterized by self-influence and is capable to change the internal power of a drop due to occurrence of areas of optical breakdown. In the report the model of destruction of water microparticles under action of supershort laser radiation is submitted. The physical contents of model is the effect of shock boiling up of a liquid at it gas-dynamic expansion from areas subject to optical breakdown.

  1. Water transport in gas diffusion media for PEM fuel cells. Experimental and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Joerg

    2010-08-20

    The water flux in partially saturated hydrophobic carbon fibre paper for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications is investigated and compared with the frequently used constitutive two-phase flow model based on Darcy's law. Further, the first steps towards a math-based material design for gas diffusion media are explored in this thesis. Two self-developed ex-situ experiments to investigate the liquid water transport are introduced. The first is a newly developed buoyancy-based measurement of the pressuresaturation relationship on thin porous material with an accuracy of 0.5 kPa for the pressure and {+-} 5% for the saturation. The second experiment measures the pressure drop in dependence of flow rates down to magnitudes of {mu}L/s across the partially saturated thin porous material. This flow rate is relevant for the fuel cell application. The liquid water transport through Toray 060 carbon fibre paper, impregnated with 7% and 10% PTFE is investigated at wet and dry boundary conditions. The experiments are also accompanied by analytical and numerical free surface modelling with the consideration of the material morphology and liquid-solid interaction. The imbibing and draining cases of an arrangement of six fibres at varying solid-liquid interaction and boundary conditions are studied with 'Surface Evolver'. In order to evaluate the findings of ex-situ and modelling work for applicability to water transport in fuel cell operation, the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is assessed. The focus is on the visualisation of 2D and 3D water distribution in the operating fuel cell. The compatibility of the NMR experiment with fuel cell operation in relation to material selection, operating temperature, and current density is addressed. NMR imaging is employed for different current densities, stoichiometries, and fuel cell arrangements. The fuel cell arrangements differ by the cathode diffusion medium. Plain, hydrophobic, and

  2. An optimized process for tritium-containing waste water collection of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An optimized process for tritium-containing waste water collection of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor was developed. • The optimized process and verification experiment using the HTR-10 were presented in detail. • A large quantity of high-dose tritium-containing waste water was successfully collected in commissioning experiment of the improved HTR-10. • The optimized process was proved to be reliable to avoid the large emission of radioactive waste water to the environment. - Abstract: An optimized process for tritium-containing waste water collection of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) was developed and experimentally verified using the 10 MW High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor-test module (HTR-10). Compared with the previous process, an auxiliary molecular sieve bed was added in helium purification regeneration system and new operation process was proposed to collect tritium-containing waste water. In this paper, the optimized process and verification experiment were presented in detail. In commissioning experiment of the improved HTR-10, a large quantity of high-dose tritium-containing waste water was successfully collected in the water separator of helium purification regeneration system, with the specific activity being 6.1 × 109 Bq/L. The verification experiment confirms that the optimized process is effective and reliable for the demonstration plant design of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor-Pebble bed module (HTR-PM) to avoid the large emission of detrimentally radioactive waste water to the environment

  3. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  4. New evidence for the origin of natural gas in Ordos Basin from hydrocarbons of oil water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The chief aim of the present work is to investigate the controversy origin of natural gas in the Ordos Basin by using the hydrocarbons of oil water. New evidence has been found: There is relatively high content of light hydrocarbons and low content of heavy components in the hydrocarbons fraction of oil water in the middle gas field of the Majiagou Formation, Ordovician reservoir. The hydrocarbons of oil water in Well Shan 12 and Well Shan 78 have relatively high abundance of tricyclic terpane. Tricyclic terpane/hopane of the two samples are 1.48 and 0.36, respectively. They also show that pregnane and hompregnane are in relatively high abundance with lower hopane/sterane ratio. Pr/Ph is less than 2.0. These characteristics reflected the source input of marine carbonate sedimentary environment. In contrast, the hydrocarbon of Well Shan 81 is lack of tricyclic terpane series and pregnane. It has a high hopane/sterane ratio and Pr/Ph is 3.27. These parameters are typical character of terrestrial organic matter. Furthermore, the hydrocarbons of oil water in Well Shan 37 and Well Shan 34 is between the two typical situations. They have little content of tricyclic terpanes. They may be derived from a mixing source of marine carbonate and terrestrial organic matter input. Similarly, the maturity parameters approve this suggestion. The samples of Well Shan 12 and Well Shan 78 which derived from marine carbonate have relatively high maturity and samples derived from terrestrial organic matter have lower maturity. The maturity of the hydrocarbons of mixing source is between these two situations. The suggestion coincides with the geological background and source rocks distribution.

  5. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, water use, and grain arsenic levels in rice systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linquist, Bruce A; Anders, Merle M; Adviento-Borbe, Maria Arlene A; Chaney, Rufus L; Nalley, L Lanier; da Rosa, Eliete F F; van Kessel, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is faced with the challenge of providing healthy food for a growing population at minimal environmental cost. Rice (Oryza sativa), the staple crop for the largest number of people on earth, is grown under flooded soil conditions and uses more water and has higher greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than most crops. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that alternate wetting and drying (AWD--flooding the soil and then allowing to dry down before being reflooded) water management practices will maintain grain yields and concurrently reduce water use, greenhouse gas emissions and arsenic (As) levels in rice. Various treatments ranging in frequency and duration of AWD practices were evaluated at three locations over 2 years. Relative to the flooded control treatment and depending on the AWD treatment, yields were reduced by 63%, global warming potential (GWP of CH4 and N2 O emissions) reduced by 45-90%, and grain As concentrations reduced by up to 64%. In general, as the severity of AWD increased by allowing the soil to dry out more between flood events, yields declined while the other benefits increased. The reduction in GWP was mostly attributed to a reduction in CH4 emissions as changes in N2 O emissions were minimal among treatments. When AWD was practiced early in the growing season followed by flooding for remainder of season, similar yields as the flooded control were obtained but reduced water use (18%), GWP (45%) and yield-scaled GWP (45%); although grain As concentrations were similar or higher. This highlights that multiple environmental benefits can be realized without sacrificing yield but there may be trade-offs to consider. Importantly, adoption of these practices will require that they are economically attractive and can be adapted to field scales.

  6. Combined biological treatment of sinter plant waste water, blast furnace gas scrubber water polluted groundwater and coke plant effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine van Hoorn [Corus Staal, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Waste water from the Corus coke plant in IJmuiden had been handled by the activated sludge process since start-up in 1972 but in the eighties it was clear that although this removed most phenols, the rest of the COD and thiocyanate must also be removed before discharge. The paper describes the original water treatment process and the higher pressure gas scrubber system for removal of SO{sub 2}, heavy metals and other harmful components. It goes on to describe development of a combined biological treatment system, the heart of which is the so-called Bio 2000. The performance of this new plant is discussed. COD concentrations are very constant but Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) concentrations fluctuate. COD, TKN and heavy metals are in compliance but cyanide and suspended solids are not always so. A method of overcoming this is being sought. This paper was presented at a COMA meeting in March 2005 held in Scunthorpe, UK. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Confirmation of phorate, terbufos, and their sulfoxides and sulfones in water by capillary gas chromatography/chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method capable of confirming phorate, terbufos, their sulfoxides, and sulfones in water is reported. Parents and their metabolites are separated in less than 5 min using a short capillary GC column and high carrier gas linear velocities. Positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry generates (M + H) ions indicative of the different molecular weights of the analytes and at least one confirmatory fragment ion for each analyte. Residues have been qualitatively confirmed at the 1 ppb level in fortified water samples from a variety of sources. Apparent residues in control water were less than 0.1 ppb

  8. Management of Water for Unconventional Oil and Gas Operations Enhanced with the Expanded U.S.Geological Survey Produced Waters Geochemical Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, K. D.; Blondes, M. S.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Reidy, M. E.; Engle, M.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Rowan, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in hydraulic fracturing practices for shale gas and tight oil reservoirs have dramatically increased petroleum production in the USA, but have also made the issue of water management from these operations a high priority. Hydraulic fracturing requires ~ 10,000 to 50,000 m3 of water per well for injection in addition to water used to drill the well. Initially much of the water used for hydraulic fracturing was fresh water, but attitudes and operations are changing in response to costs and concerns. Concerns about groundwater depletion and contamination have prompted operators to increase the amount of produced water that can be recycled for hydraulic fracturing and to find suitable locations for salt-water injection. Knowledge of the geochemistry of produced waters is valuable in determining the feasibility of produced water recycling. Water with low salinity can be reclaimed for use outside of the petroleum industry (e.g. irrigation, municipal uses, and industrial operations). The updated and expanded USGS Produced Waters Database available at http://eerscmap.usgs.gov/pwapp/ will facilitate and enhance studies on management of water, including produced water, for unconventional oil and gas drilling and production. The USGS database contains > 160,000 samples. Expanding on the 2002 database, we have filled in state and regional gaps with information from conventional and unconventional wells and have increased the number of constituents to include minor and trace chemicals, isotopes, and time series data. We currently have produced water data from 5,200 tight gas wells, 4,500 coal-bed methane (CBM) wells, 3,500 shale gas wells, and 700 tight oil wells. These numbers will increase as we continue to receive positive responses from oil companies, state oil and gas commissions, and scientists wanting to contribute their data. This database is an important resource for a wide range of interested parties. Scientists from universities, government agencies, public

  9. Transition state for the gas-phase reaction of uranium hexafluoride with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Stephen L; Becnel, James M

    2008-06-19

    Density functional theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transition states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F 5, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structures and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the structure of the product complex was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF 4, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF 6 with water. PMID:18500792

  10. The Energy-Water Nexus: potential groundwater-quality degradation associated with production of shale gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Thordsen, James J.; Conaway, Christopher H.; Thomas, Randal B.

    2013-01-01

    Oil and natural gas have been the main sources of primary energy in the USA, providing 63% of the total energy consumption in 2011. Petroleum production, drilling operations, and improperly sealed abandoned wells have caused significant local groundwater contamination in many states, including at the USGS OSPER sites in Oklahoma. The potential for groundwater contamination is higher when producing natural gas and oil from unconventional sources of energy, including shale and tight sandstones. These reservoirs require horizontally-completed wells and massive hydraulic fracturing that injects large volumes (up to 50,000 m3/well) of high-pressured water with added proppant, and toxic organic and inorganic chemicals. Recent results show that flow back and produced waters from Haynesville (Texas) and Marcellus (Pennsylvania) Shale have high salinities (≥200,000 mg/L TDS) and high NORMs (up to 10,000 picocuries/L) concentrations. A major research effort is needed worldwide to minimize all potential environmental impacts, especially groundwater contamination and induced seismicity, when producing these extremely important new sources of energy.

  11. Estimating greenhouse gas fluxes from constructed wetlands used for water quality improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanda Chuersuwan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 , nitrous oxide (N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2 fluxes were evaluated from constructed wetlands (CWs used to improve domestic wastewater quality. Experiments employed subsurface flow (SF and free water surface flow (FWS CWs planted with Cyperus spp. Results showed seasonal fluctuations of greenhouse gas fluxes. Greenhouse gas fluxes from SF-CWs and FWS-CWS were significantly different (p<0.05 while pollutant removal efficiencies of both CWs were not significantly different. The average CH4 , N2O and CO2 fluxes from SF-CWs were 2.9±3.5, 1.0±1.7, and 15.2±12.3 mg/m2 /hr, respectively, corresponding to the average global warming potential (GWP of 392 mg CO2 equivalents/m2 /hr. For FWS-CWs, the average CH4 , N2O and CO2 fluxes were 5.9±4.8, 1.8±1.0, and 29.6±20.2 mg/m2 /hr, respectively, having an average GWP of 698 mg CO2 equivalents/m2 /hr. Thus, FWS-CWs have a higher GWP than SF-CWs when they were used as a system for domestic water improvement.

  12. Radioactivity in produced water from oil and gas installations - doses to biota and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substantial amounts of produced water containing elevated levels of 226Ra and 228Ra are discharged into the sea as a result of oil and gas production on the Norwegian continental shelf. The average concentration in the discharges is 3.3 and 2.8 Bq/L of 226Ra and 228Ra, respectively. The main objective of the project described in the paper is to establish radiological safe discharge limits for radium, lead and polonium in produced water produced by oil and gas installations on the Norwegian continental shelf. One of the objectives of the study is to provide information to enable risk assessment based on doses from ionizing radiation to marine biota and man. Reference organisms for the North Sea area have been chosen for calculation of absorbed dose to biota. The dose calculations rely on specific knowledge of activity concentration in the reference organism, activity concentration in seawater and sediments, dose conversion factors and time spent at different locations relative to the point of discharge. Based on the calculated doses to marine biota, 'potential no effect concentrations' are recommended. (author)

  13. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  14. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanenchuk, C.A.; Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    A Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was operated simultaneously with a Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst in a slurry reactor for over 400 hours. The process conditions were held constant at a temperature of 240[degrees]C, a pressure of 0.79 MPa, and a 1.1 H[sub 2]/CO feed of 0.065 Nl/min-g.cat. The Fischer-Tropsch activity remained constant at the level predicted by the operation of the Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] catalyst alone. The water-gas-shift reaction was near equilibrium. The hydrocarbon product distribution of the combined catalyst system was stable and matched that of the CO/MgO/SiO[sub 2] operating alone under similar conditions. The combined catalyst system exhibited a high selectivity to n-alkanes. Neither catalysts's operation appeared to have a detrimental effect on that of the other, showing promise for future option.

  15. Combustion of ultrafine coal/water mixtures and their application in gas turbines: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toqan, M.A.; Srinivasachar, S.; Staudt, J.; Varela, F.; Beer, J.M.

    1987-10-01

    The feasibility of using coal-water fuels (CWF) in gas turbine combustors has been demonstrated in recent pilot plant experiments. The demands of burning coal-water fuels with high flame stability, complete combustion, low NO/sub x/ emission and a resulting fly ash particle size that will not erode turbine blades represent a significant challenge to combustion scientists and engineers. The satisfactory solution of these problems requires that the variation of the structure of CWF flames, i.e., the fields of flow, temperature and chemical species concentration in the flame, with operating conditions is known. Detailed in-flame measurements are difficult at elevated pressures and it has been proposed to carry out such experiments at atmospheric pressure and interpret the data by means of models for gas turbine combustor conditions. The research was carried out in five sequential tasks: cold flow studies; studies of conventional fine-grind CWF; combustion studies with ultrafine CWF fuel; reduction of NO/sub x/ emission by staged combustion; and data interpretation-ignition and radiation aspects. 37 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Gas Engine-Driven Heat Pump Chiller for Air-Conditioning and Hot Water Supply Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshihiko; Mita, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tadashi; Hoshino, Norimasa; Kimura, Yoshihisa

    In Part 1 of this study, the performance characteristics of a 457kW gas engine-driven heat pump (GHP) chiller have been obtained from a simulation model analysis for both cooling and heating modes and it has been found that the part-load characteristics of the GHP chiller are fairly well. On the back of Part 1, a computer simulation program has been developed for the evaluation of GHP chiller systems to compare with the other types of heat source systems for air-conditioning and hot water supply applications. The simulation program can be used to estimate annual energy consumption, annual CO2 emission, etc. of the systems with the data of monthly and hourly thermal loads on various buildings, outdoor air conditions, and characteristics of various components comprising the systems. By applying this to some cases of medium-scale hotel, office, shop, and hospital buildings, it has been found that the GHP chiller systems have advantages particularly in the cases of hotels and hospitals where a lot of hot water demand exists. It has also been found that the combination of a GHP chiller and a direct-fired absorption water chiller boiler (hot and chilled water generator) appears promising.

  17. The utilisation of two detectors for the determination of water in honey using headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Lillian A; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-08-15

    A headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) method was developed for the determination of water content in honey. This method was shown to work with five different honey varieties which had a range of water from 14-16%. It also utilised two different detectors, the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and the barrier discharge ionisation detector (BID). This method needs no heating pretreatment step as in the current leading method, (i.e. the measurement of refractive index). The solvent-free procedure negates the possibility of solvent-compound interactions as well as solubility limitations, as is common with Karl Fischer titrations. It was also apparent that the classic loss on drying method consistently and substantially produced results that were lower than the correct values. This approach is shown to be rapid, with an analysis time of 4 min when using the TCD detector and under 3 min when utilising the BID detector. HSGC is feasible for the determination of water due to the new PEG-linked geminal dicationic ionic-liquid-coated GC capillary column. In addition it provides accurate and precise determinations of the water content in honey. When using the sensitive BID detector, other trace volatile compounds are observed as well. PMID:27006209

  18. Determination of volatile organic compounds in river water by solid phase extraction and gas chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. A. Mottaleb; M. Z. Abedin; M. S. Islam

    2004-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and reproducible method is described employing solid-phase extraction(SPE) using dichloromethane followed by gas chromatography(GC) with flame ionization detection(FID) for determination of volatile organic compound(VOC) from the Buriganga River water of Bangladesh. The method was applied to detect the benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene and cumene(BTEXC) in the sample collected from the surface or 15 cm depth of water. Two-hundred ml of n-hexane-pretreated and filtered water samples were applied directly to a C18 SPE column. BTEXC were extracted with dichloromethane and average concentrations were obtained as 0.104 to 0.372 (g/ml. The highest concentration of benzene was found as 0.372 (g/ml with a relative standard deviation(RSD) of 6.2%, and cumene was not detected. Factors influencing SPE e.g., adsorbent types, sample load volume, eluting solvent, headspace and temperatures, were investigated. A cartridge containing a C18 adsorbent and using dichloromethane gave better performance for extraction of BTEXC from water.Average recoveries exceeding 90% could be achieved for cumene at 4℃with a 2.7%RSD

  19. Technical Note: Detection of gas bubble leakage via correlation of water column multibeam images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schneider von Deimling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydroacoustic detection of natural gas release from the seafloor has been conducted in the past by using singlebeam echosounders. In contrast, modern multibeam swath mapping systems allow much wider coverage, higher resolution, and offer 3-D spatial correlation. Up to the present, the extremely high data rate hampers water column backscatter investigations and more sophisticated visualization and processing techniques are needed. Here, we present water column backscatter data acquired with a 50 kHz prototype multibeam system over a period of 75 seconds. Display types are of swath-images as well as of a "re-sorted" singlebeam presentation. Thus, individual and/or groups of gas bubbles rising from the 24 m deep seafloor clearly emerge in the acoustic images, making it possible to estimate rise velocities. A sophisticated processing scheme is introduced to identify those rising gas bubbles in the hydroacoustic data. We apply a cross-correlation technique adapted from particle imaging velocimetry (PIV to the acoustic backscatter images. Temporal and spatial drift patterns of the bubbles are assessed and are shown to match very well to measured and theoretical rise patterns. The application of this processing to our field data gives clear results with respect to unambiguous bubble detection and remote bubble rise velocimetry. The method can identify and exclude the main source of misinterpretations, i.e. fish-mediated echoes. Although image-based cross-correlation techniques are well known in the field of fluid mechanics for high resolution and non-inversive current flow field analysis, we present the first application of this technique as an acoustic bubble detector.

  20. Noble gas residence times of saline waters within crystalline bedrock, Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.; Niedermann, Samuel; Wiersberg, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Noble gas residence times of saline groundwaters from the 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, located within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of the Fennoscandian Shield in Finland, are presented. The accumulation of radiogenic (4He, 40Ar) and nucleogenic (21Ne) noble gas isotopes in situ together with the effects of diffusion are considered. Fluid samples were collected from depths between 180 and 2480 m below surface, allowing us to compare the modelled values with the measured concentrations along a vertical depth profile. The results show that while the concentrations in the upper part are likely affected by diffusion, there is no indication of diffusive loss at or below 500 m depth. Furthermore, no mantle derived gases were found unequivocally. Previous studies have shown that distinct vertical variation occurs both in geochemistry and microbial community structuring along the drill hole, indicating stagnant waters with no significant exchange of fluids between different fracture systems or with surface waters. Therefore in situ accumulation is the most plausible model for the determination of noble gas residence times. The results show that the saline groundwaters in Outokumpu are remarkably old, with most of the samples indicating residence times between ∼20 and 50 Ma. Although being first order approximations, the ages of the fluids clearly indicate that their formation must predate more recent events, such as Quaternary glaciations. Isolation within the crust since the Eocene-Miocene epochs has also direct implications to the deep biosphere found at Outokumpu. These ecosystems must have been isolated for a long time and thus very likely rely on energy and carbon sources such as H2 and CO2 from groundwater and adjacent bedrock rather than from the ground surface.

  1. Organic and inorganic composition and microbiology of produced waters from Pennsylvania shale gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Dunlap, Darren S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulically fractured shales are becoming an increasingly important source of natural gas production in the United States. This process has been known to create up to 420 gallons of produced water (PW) per day, but the volume varies depending on the formation, and the characteristics of individual hydraulic fracture. PW from hydraulic fracturing of shales are comprised of injected fracturing fluids and natural formation waters in proportions that change over time. Across the state of Pennsylvania, shale gas production is booming; therefore, it is important to assess the variability in PW chemistry and microbiology across this geographical span. We quantified the inorganic and organic chemical composition and microbial communities in PW samples from 13 shale gas wells in north central Pennsylvania. Microbial abundance was generally low (66–9400 cells/mL). Non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) was high (7–31 mg/L) relative to typical shallow groundwater, and the presence of organic acid anions (e.g., acetate, formate, and pyruvate) indicated microbial activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in four samples (∼1 to 11.7 μg/L): benzene and toluene in the Burket sample, toluene in two Marcellus samples, and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in one Marcellus sample. VOCs can be either naturally occurring or from industrial activity, making the source of VOCs unclear. Despite the addition of biocides during hydraulic fracturing, H2S-producing, fermenting, and methanogenic bacteria were cultured from PW samples. The presence of culturable bacteria was not associated with salinity or location; although organic compound concentrations and time in production were correlated with microbial activity. Interestingly, we found that unlike the inorganic chemistry, PW organic chemistry and microbial viability were highly variable across the 13 wells sampled, which can have important implications for the reuse and handling of these fluids

  2. Reduction and Analysis of Low Temperature Shift Heterogeneous Catalyst for Water Gas Reaction in Ammonia Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zečević, N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain additional quantities of hydrogen after the reforming reactions of natural gas and protect the ammonia synthesis catalyst, it is crucial to achieve and maintain maximum possible activity, selectivity and stability of the low temperature shift catalyst for conversion of water gas reaction during its lifetime. Whereas the heterogeneous catalyst comes in oxidized form, it is of the utmost importance to conduct the reduction procedure properly. The proper reduction procedure and continuous analysis of its performance would ensure the required activity, selectivity and stability throughout the catalyst’s service time. For the proper reduction procedure ofthe low temperature shift catalyst, in addition to process equipment, also necessary is a reliable and realistic system for temperature measurements, which will be effective for monitoring the exothermal temperature curves through all catalyst bed layers. For efficiency evaluation of low shift temperature catalyst reduction and its optimization, it is necessary to determine at regular time intervals the temperature approach to equilibrium and temperature profiles of individual layers by means of "S" and "die off" temperature exothermal curves. Based on the obtained data, the optimum inlet temperature could be determined, in order to maximally extend the service life of the heterogeneous catalyst as much as possible, and achieve the optimum equilibrium for conversion of the water gas. This paper presents the methodology for in situ reduction of the low temperature shift heterogeneous catalyst and the developed system for monitoring its individual layers to achieve the minimum possible content of carbon monoxide at the exit of the reactor. The developed system for temperature monitoring through heterogeneous catalyst layers provides the proper procedure for reduction and adjustment of optimum process working conditions for the catalyst by the continuous increase of reactor inlet

  3. Unconventional oil and gas development and its stresses on water resources in the context of Water-Energy-Food Nexus: The case of Weld County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, P. D.; Waskom, R.; Boone, K.; Ryan, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    The development of unconventional oil and gas resources in Colorado started to rapidly increase since the early 2000's. The recent oil price plunge resulted in a decline of well starts' rate in the US, but in Weld County, Colorado, it is currently at the 2013-levels. The additional water demand, despite its insignificant percentage in overall state's demand (0.1% in 2012), it competes with traditional ones, since Colorado's water is almost fully appropriated. Presently, the state has 53,597 active producing oil and gas wells. More than 40% of these are located in Weld County, which happens also to be one of top food production U.S. counties. The competition for land and water resources between the energy and agricultural sectors in water stressed areas, like the western U.S., is further intensified if recycle and reuse practices are not preferred to water disposal by the energy industry. Satisfying the multiple objectives of the Water-Energy-Food Nexus in order to achieve sustainable economic development requires balanced management of these resources. Identifying pressures on key areas that food and energy sectors are competing for water, is essential for prudent water management and developing appropriate policies. Weld County, as a water stressed and fossil fuel producing area, was selected for investigating current stresses on local water resources alongside with future climatic and water demand scenarios for exploring probable long-term effects.

  4. CNMM: a Catchment Environmental Model for Managing Water Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Mitigating agricultural diffuse pollution and greenhouse gas emissions is a complicated task due to tempo-spatial lags between the field practices and the watershed responses. Spatially-distributed modeling is essential to the implementation of cost-effective and best management practices (BMPs) to optimize land uses and nutrient applications as well as to project the impact of climate change on the watershed service functions. CNMM (the Catchment Nutrients Management Model) is a 3D spatially-distributed, grid-based and process-oriented biophysical model comprehensively developed to simulate energy balance, hydrology, plant/crop growth, biogeochemistry of life elements (e.g., C, N and P), waste treatment, waterway vegetation/purification, stream water quality and land management in agricultural watersheds as affected by land utilization strategies such as BMPs and by climate change. The CNMM is driven by a number of spatially-distributed data such as weather, topography (including DEM and shading), stream network, stream water, soil, vegetation and land management (including waste treatments), and runs at an hourly time step. It represents a catchment as a matrix of square uniformly-sized cells, where each cell is defined as a homogeneous hydrological response unit with all the hydrologically-significant parameters the same but varied at soil depths in fine intervals. Therefore, spatial variability is represented by allowing parameters to vary horizontally and vertically in space. A four-direction flux routing algorithm is applied to route water and nutrients across soils of cells governed by the gradients of either water head or elevation. A linear channel reservoir scheme is deployed to route water and nutrients in stream networks. The model is capable of computing CO2, CH4, NH3, NO, N2O and N2 emissions from soils and stream waters. The CNMM can serve as an idea modelling tool to investigate the overwhelming critical zone research at various catchment scales.

  5. Research and development of a high efficiency gas-fired water heater. Volume 2. Task reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilakis, A.D.; Pearson, J.F.; Gerstmann, J.

    1980-01-01

    Design and development of a cost-effective high efficiency gas-fired water heater to attain a service efficiency of 70% (including the effect of exfiltration) and a service efficiency of 78% (excluding exfiltration) for a 75 GPD draw at a 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, with a stored water to conditioned air temperature difference of 80/sup 0/F, are described in detail. Based on concept evaluation, a non-powered natural draft water heater was chosen as the most cost-effective design to develop. The projected installed cost is $374 compared to $200 for a conventional unit. When the project water heater is compared to a conventional unit, it has a payback of 3.7 years and life cycle savings of $350 to the consumer. A prototype water heater was designed, constructed, and tested. When operated with sealed combustion, the unit has a service efficiency of 66.4% (including the effect of exfiltration) below a burner input of 32,000 Btu/h. In the open combustion configuration, the unit operated at a measured efficiency of 66.4% Btu/h (excluding exfiltration). This compares with a service efficiency of 51.3% for a conventional water heater and 61% for a conventional high efficiency unit capable of meeting ASHRAE 90-75. Operational tests showed the unit performed well with no evidence of stacking or hot spots. It met or exceeded all capacity or usage tests specified in the program test plan and met all emission goals. Future work will concentrate on designing, building, and testing pre-production units. It is anticipated that both sealed combustion and open draft models will be pursued.

  6. Treatment of produced water:targeting dissolved compounds to meet a zero harmful discharge in oil and gas production

    OpenAIRE

    Scurtu, Ciprian Teodor

    2009-01-01

    High amounts of dissolved compounds are discharged into the sea with the producedwater generated from the offshore oil and gas platforms. Some of these compounds are toxic to the environment, having important contributions to the environmental impact factors (EIF) calculated for produced water discharges. No performance standards currently exist for the removal of dissolved compounds from produced water. However, the overall goals for oil, natural components and chemicals in produced water re...

  7. Enhanced formation of disinfection byproducts in shale gas wastewater-impacted drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kimberly M; Zeng, Teng; Harkness, Jennifer; Vengosh, Avner; Mitch, William A

    2014-10-01

    The disposal and leaks of hydraulic fracturing wastewater (HFW) to the environment pose human health risks. Since HFW is typically characterized by elevated salinity, concerns have been raised whether the high bromide and iodide in HFW may promote the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and alter their speciation to more toxic brominated and iodinated analogues. This study evaluated the minimum volume percentage of two Marcellus Shale and one Fayetteville Shale HFWs diluted by fresh water collected from the Ohio and Allegheny Rivers that would generate and/or alter the formation and speciation of DBPs following chlorination, chloramination, and ozonation treatments of the blended solutions. During chlorination, dilutions as low as 0.01% HFW altered the speciation toward formation of brominated and iodinated trihalomethanes (THMs) and brominated haloacetonitriles (HANs), and dilutions as low as 0.03% increased the overall formation of both compound classes. The increase in bromide concentration associated with 0.01-0.03% contribution of Marcellus HFW (a range of 70-200 μg/L for HFW with bromide = 600 mg/L) mimics the increased bromide levels observed in western Pennsylvanian surface waters following the Marcellus Shale gas production boom. Chloramination reduced HAN and regulated THM formation; however, iodinated trihalomethane formation was observed at lower pH. For municipal wastewater-impacted river water, the presence of 0.1% HFW increased the formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during chloramination, particularly for the high iodide (54 ppm) Fayetteville Shale HFW. Finally, ozonation of 0.01-0.03% HFW-impacted river water resulted in significant increases in bromate formation. The results suggest that total elimination of HFW discharge and/or installation of halide-specific removal techniques in centralized brine treatment facilities may be a better strategy to mitigate impacts on downstream drinking water treatment plants than altering

  8. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  9. Water transport in gas diffusion media for PEM fuel cells. Experimental and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Joerg

    2010-08-20

    The water flux in partially saturated hydrophobic carbon fibre paper for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications is investigated and compared with the frequently used constitutive two-phase flow model based on Darcy's law. Further, the first steps towards a math-based material design for gas diffusion media are explored in this thesis. Two self-developed ex-situ experiments to investigate the liquid water transport are introduced. The first is a newly developed buoyancy-based measurement of the pressuresaturation relationship on thin porous material with an accuracy of 0.5 kPa for the pressure and {+-} 5% for the saturation. The second experiment measures the pressure drop in dependence of flow rates down to magnitudes of {mu}L/s across the partially saturated thin porous material. This flow rate is relevant for the fuel cell application. The liquid water transport through Toray 060 carbon fibre paper, impregnated with 7% and 10% PTFE is investigated at wet and dry boundary conditions. The experiments are also accompanied by analytical and numerical free surface modelling with the consideration of the material morphology and liquid-solid interaction. The imbibing and draining cases of an arrangement of six fibres at varying solid-liquid interaction and boundary conditions are studied with 'Surface Evolver'. In order to evaluate the findings of ex-situ and modelling work for applicability to water transport in fuel cell operation, the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is assessed. The focus is on the visualisation of 2D and 3D water distribution in the operating fuel cell. The compatibility of the NMR experiment with fuel cell operation in relation to material selection, operating temperature, and current density is addressed. NMR imaging is employed for different current densities, stoichiometries, and fuel cell arrangements. The fuel cell arrangements differ by the cathode diffusion medium. Plain, hydrophobic, and

  10. Energy and greenhouse-gas emissions in irrigated agriculture of SE (southeast) Spain. Effects of alternative water supply scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global warming is leading to a water resources decrease in the Mediterranean basin, where future farming resilience depends on incorporating alternative water sources and improving water-energy use efficiency. This paper assesses water and energy consumption when natural water sources are partially replaced by desalinated sea water. Initially, energy consumption, water supply and GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions were recorded for the current farming practices in SE (southeast) Spain. The results of our study indicate that citrus orchards have the lowest energy consumption and GHG emissions. Annual vegetables were the least energy efficient crops. Subsequently, two alternative water supply scenarios were analysed, in which the reduction of natural water resources associated to climate change was compensated with desalinated sea water. The use of 16.8% of desalinated seawater would increase energy consumption by 32.4% and GHG emissions by 19.6%, whereas for the use of 26.5% of desalinated seawater such increases would amount to 50.0% and 30.3%, respectively. Therefore maintaining irrigated agriculture in water-stressed regions by incorporating high energy demanding non-traditional water sources could negatively contribute to combat global warming. - Highlights: • Water supply, energy consumption and GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions in irrigated agriculture are very connected. • The use of desalinated sea water will increase the energy consumption, and GHG emissions will rise. • The use of non-traditional water resources enhances global warming processes. • Citrus orchards are the less sensitive crop to alternative water supplied scenarios. • Artichoke is the most sensitive crop to alternative water supplied scenarios

  11. A cost-benefit analysis of produced water management opportunities in selected unconventional oil and gas plays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsters, P.; Macknick, J.; Bazilian, M.; Newmark, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Unconventional oil and gas production in North America has grown enormously over the past decade. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has made production from shale and other unconventional resources economically attractive for oil and gas operators, but has also resulted in concerns over potential water use and pollution issues. Hydraulic fracturing operations must manage large volumes of water on both the front end as well as the back end of operations, as significant amounts of water are coproduced with hydrocarbons. This water--often called flowback or produced water--can contain chemicals from the hydraulic fracturing fluid, salts dissolved from the source rock, various minerals, volatile organic chemicals, and radioactive constituents, all of which pose potential management, safety, and public health issues. While the long-term effects of hydraulic fracturing on aquifers, drinking water supplies, and surface water resources are still being assessed, the immediate impacts of produced water on local infrastructure and water supplies are readily evident. Produced water management options are often limited to underground injection, disposal at centralized treatment facilities, or recycling for future hydraulic fracturing operations. The costs of treatment, transport, and recycling are heavily dependent on local regulations, existing infrastructure, and technologies utilized. Produced water treatment costs also change over time during energy production as the quality of the produced water often changes. To date there is no publicly available model that evaluates the cost tradeoffs associated with different produced water management techniques in different regions. This study addresses that gap by characterizing the volume, qualities, and temporal dynamics of produced water in several unconventional oil and gas plays; evaluating potential produced water management options, including reuse and recycling; and assessing how hydraulic

  12. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  13. Determination of Prometryn in Vetiver Grass and Water Using Gas Chromatography-Nitrogen Chemiluminescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shixian; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Ping; Punamiya, Pravin; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Dan, Youming; Ma, Junrong; Zheng, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD) is a nitrogen-specific detector that responds to ammonia, hydrazine, hydrogen cyanide and nitrogen oxide. A method to analyze the herbicide prometryn in plant and water samples was developed using gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with NCD. Extracts from plant (vetiver grass) and water matrices were analyzed for prometryn using an Agilent 7890A GC coupled with an Agilent 255 NCD in a split injection mode with a ratio of 2 : 1. Separation was carried out at 200°C and combustion at 1,018°C with H2 and O2 following optimized method development conditions. The percent recovery of prometryn in the two different matrices tested ranged from 81 to 107%, with relative standard deviations varying from 0.10 to 3.30% for spiked samples. Detection limit of the proposed method was 0.02 µg mL(-1) and the limit of quantification was 0.06 µg mL(-1). The proposed GC-NCD method was successfully applied to determine prometryn extracted from plant and water samples without potential interference of S-triazine, a pesticide from the same group.

  14. Gas exchange and leaf contents in bell pepper under energized water and biofertilizer doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca R. M. Borges

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of energized water and bovine biofertilizer doses on the gas exchange and NPK contents in leaves of yellow bell pepper plants. The experiment was conducted at the experimental area of the Federal University of Ceará, in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, from June to November 2011. The experiment was set in a randomized block design, in a split-plot scheme; the plots were composed of treatments with energized and non-energized water and the subplots of five doses of liquid biofertilizer (0, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 mL plant-1 week-1. The following variables were analyzed: transpiration, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis and leaf contents of nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K. Water energization did not allow significant increases in the analyzed variables. The use of biofertilizer as the only source of fertilization was sufficient to provide the nutrients N, P and K at appropriate levels for the bell pepper crop.

  15. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liukang [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); McDermitt, Dayle [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Anderson, Tyler [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Riensche, Brad [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Komissarov, Anatoly [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Howe, Julie [LI-COR Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been

  16. The Effect of Water Stress on the Gas Exchange Parameters, Productivity and Seed Health of Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Pszczółkowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present pot experiment studied the effect of different soil moisture contents (60 - 70% CWC (capillary water capacity - control; 30 - 35% CWC - water stress on buckwheat productivity, the gas exchange parameters and health of buckwheat nuts. It was found that water deficit affected adversely certain biometric features investigated (plant height, number of nuts per cluster and caused a decrease in seed weight per plant. It was also shown that water stress reduced the values of the investigated gas exchange parameters (photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, intercellular-space CO2 concentration, and stomatal conductance relative to the control treatment. Different soil moisture contents did not have a clear effect on fungal colonization of seeds. The multiplex PCR assays did not enable the detection of the genes responsible for mycotoxin synthesis. Under water deficit conditions, an increase was found in the content of albumin and globulin fractions as well as of glutelin fractions.

  17. The functional potential of microbial communities in hydraulic fracturing source water and produced water from natural gas extraction characterized by metagenomic sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Murali Mohan

    Full Text Available Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobic classes related to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Epsilonproteobacteria in produced water as compared to predominantly aerobic Alphaproteobacteria in the fracturing source water. The metabolic profile revealed a relative increase in genes responsible for carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, sporulation and dormancy, iron acquisition and metabolism, stress response and sulfur metabolism in the produced water samples. These results suggest that microbial communities in produced water have an increased genetic ability to handle stress, which has significant implications for produced water management, such as disinfection.

  18. Drinking hydrogen water and intermittent hydrogen gas exposure, but not lactulose or continuous hydrogen gas exposure, prevent 6-hydorxydopamine-induced Parkinson’s disease in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Mikako

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactulose is a synthetic disaccharide that can be catalyzed only by intestinal bacteria in humans and rodents, and a large amount of hydrogen is produced by bacterial catalysis of lactulose. We previously reported marked effects of ad libitum administration of hydrogen water on prevention of a rat model of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods End-alveolar breath hydrogen concentrations were measured in 28 healthy subjects and 37 PD patients, as well as in 9 rats after taking hydrogen water or lactulose. Six-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-induced hemi-PD model was stereotactically generated in rats. We compared effects of hydrogen water and lactulose on prevention of PD. We also analyzed effects of continuous and intermittent administration of 2% hydrogen gas. Results Hydrogen water increased breath hydrogen concentrations from 8.6 ± 2.1 to 32.6 ± 3.3 ppm (mean and SEM, n = 8 in 10 min in healthy subjects. Lactulose increased breath hydrogen concentrations in 86% of healthy subjects and 59% of PD patients. Compared to monophasic hydrogen increases in 71% of healthy subjects, 32% and 41% of PD patients showed biphasic and no increases, respectively. Lactulose also increased breath hydrogen levels monophasically in 9 rats. Lactulose, however, marginally ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats. Continuous administration of 2% hydrogen gas similarly had marginal effects. On the other hand, intermittent administration of 2% hydrogen gas prevented PD in 4 of 6 rats. Conclusions Lack of dose responses of hydrogen and the presence of favorable effects with hydrogen water and intermittent hydrogen gas suggest that signal modulating activities of hydrogen are likely to be instrumental in exerting a protective effect against PD.

  19. The Energy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Cost Implications of Municipal Water Supply & Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Winter, Thelma

    All man-made structures and materials have a design life. Across the United States there is a common theme for our water and wastewater treatment facilities and infrastructure. The design life of many of our mid 20 th century water and wastewater infrastructures in the United States have reached or are reaching life expectancy limits (ASCE, 2010). To compound the financial crisis of keeping up with the degradation, meeting and exceeding quality standards has never been more important in order to protect local fresh water supplies. This thesis analyzes the energy consumption of a municipal water and wastewater treatment system from a Lake Erie intake through potable treatment and back through wastewater treatment then discharge. The system boundary for this thesis includes onsite energy consumed by the treatment system and distribution/reclamation system as well as the energy consumed by the manufacturing of treatment chemicals applied during the study periods. By analyzing energy consumption, subsequent implications from greenhouse gas emissions and financial expenditures were quantified. Through the segregation of treatment and distribution processes from non-process energy consumption, such as heating, lighting, and air handling, this study identified that the potable water treatment system consumed an annual average of 2.42E+08 kBtu, spent 5,812,144 for treatment and distribution, and emitted 28,793 metric tons of CO2 equivalent emissions. Likewise, the wastewater treatment system consumed an annual average of 2.45E+08 kBtu, spent 3,331,961 for reclamation and treatment, and emitted 43,780 metric tons of CO2 equivalent emissions. The area with the highest energy usage, financial expenditure, and greenhouse gas emissions for the potable treatment facility and distribution system was from the manufacturing of the treatment chemicals, 1.10E+08 kBtu, 3.7 million, and 17,844 metric tons of CO2 equivalent, respectively. Of the onsite energy (1.4E-03 kWh per gallon

  20. Saline gas-produced waters treatment with macrophytes in a hydroponic system. Final report, July 1, 1991-December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewell, W.J.; Albright, L.D.; Cummings, R.J.; Hicks, E.E.; Nock, T.D.

    1993-06-01

    A review of potential pollution problems of natural gas produced waters emphasized that present regulations do not adversely affect gas production, but future changes may be a concern (Fillo et al.). Also, the economics of the present treatment and disposal practices are becoming unacceptably high. Thus, new and more effective methods of treating and disposing of produced waters should be sought. A hydroponic system has been developed at Cornell University and piloted on domestic sewage partly with support from the Gas Research Institute, the U.S. Department of Energy (SERI), USEPA and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Jewell et al.). The hydroponic plant system is referred to as the 'Nutrient Film Technique' (NFT). The general goal of the project is to conduct a preliminary study to determine the feasibility of developing a biological treatment system capable of removing organic and inorganic pollutants from highly saline waters while minimizing the effluent volume by enhanced evapotranspiration.

  1. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas Mass Fraction on Condensation Heat Transfer for Water-Ethanol Vapor Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixue; Utaka, Yoshio

    The condensation heat transfer characteristic curves for a ternary vapor mixture of water, ethanol and air (or nitrogen) under several ethanol concentrations and relatively low concentrations of air (or nitrogen) were measured. The effect of non-condensable gas on several different domains in the condensation curves was discussed. The effect of non-condensable gas in the domains controlled by the diffusion resistance and the filmwise condensation was not notable; whereas that in the domain dominated by the condensate resistance of dropwise mode was remarkable. Moreover, variations due to changes in non-condensable gas concentration of several characteristic points representing the curves were discussed.

  2. The Influence of Extreme Water Pulses on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, S.; Vargas, R.; Seyfferth, A.; Kan, J.; Inamdar, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic activity increasing the amount of radiatively active gases, or Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) in the earth's atmosphere has led to shifts in weather patterns. Climate models predict the occurrence of large storms may increase in frequency and intensity in the mid-Atlantic region. Knowing that extreme precipitation events are rare, testing the influence of large water pulses across different soil types within an ecosystem is challenging. Large additions of water could promote or inhibit microbial activity, and change soil chemistry within a few days. Rapid changes in soil moisture lead to shifts in the behavior of soils as either sinks or sources of several GHGs (i.e., CO2, CH4 and N2O). Unfortunately, it is still unclear how rewetting events could impact the magnitude of GHG fluxes and how changing soil chemical parameters influence these responses. An experiment was designed to test the influence of extreme repeated water pulses on GHG fluxes from four different soils, representing key topographic locations within a watershed in the Piedmont region (i.e., forested upland, forested lowland, creek, wetland). Intact soil cores from these four soil types were kept under constant temperature (22oC) and we measured their responses to extreme water pulses. We continuously (hourly resolution) measured CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes using a LI-8100A (Licor, Lincoln, NE) multiplexed system coupled to a Picarro G2508 (Picarro, Santa Clara, CA). Furthermore, we used a rhizolysimeter for porewater extraction to measure pH, redox, and water chemistry throughout the experiment. We hypothesized that repeated extreme water pulses would result in non-linear responses of GHG flux magnitudes and dynamics, and these dynamics would relate to changes in soil chemistry. We found that soil moisture alone could not explain the dynamics of GHG fluxes, but these extreme water pulses influenced the overall temporal patterns of all GHGs across all soil types. We also examined the 100 year

  3. The Functional Potential of Microbial Communities in Hydraulic Fracturing Source Water and Produced Water from Natural Gas Extraction Characterized by Metagenomic Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Murali Mohan; Bibby, Kyle J.; Daniel Lipus; Richard W Hammack; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobi...

  4. A dynamic two-dimensional heterogeneous model for water gas shift reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Thomas A. II.; Barton, Paul I. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic, heterogeneous, two-dimensional model for packed-bed water gas shift reactors is presented. It can be applied to both high and low temperature shifts, and at scales ranging from industrial (for power plant applications) to small (such as automotive fuel cell applications). The model is suitable for any catalyst for which kinetic data are available, and shows excellent agreement with available experimental data for non-equilibrium conditions. The model is applied to an IGCC-TIGAS polygeneration plant to examine the dynamic behavior of the WGS units. The development of catalyst hot-spots is predicted during start-up or transition between steady states under certain conditions. (author)

  5. Reverse water gas shift reaction over Co-precipitated Ni-CeO2 catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Luhui; ZHANG Shaoxing; LIU Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The Ni-CeO2 catalysts with different Ni contents were prepared by a co-precipitation method and used for Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) reaction. 2wt.%Ni-CeO2 showed excellent catalytic performance in terms of activity, selectivity, and stability for RWGS reaction. Characterizations of the catalyst samples were conducted by XRD and TPR. The results indicated that, in Ni-CeO2 catalysts, there were three kinds of nickel, nickel ions in ceria lattice, highly dispersed NiO and bulk NiO. Oxygen vacancies were formed in CeO2 lattice due to the incorporation of Ni2+ ions into ceria lattice. Oxygen vacancies formed in ceda lattice and highly dispersed Ni were key active components for RWGS, and bulk Ni was key active component for methanation of CO2.

  6. Harnessing the Power of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction for Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Andrea; Denmark, Scott E

    2016-09-26

    Since its original discovery over a century ago, the water-gas shift reaction (WGSR) has played a crucial role in industrial chemistry, providing a source of H2 to feed fundamental industrial transformations such as the Haber-Bosch synthesis of ammonia. Although the production of hydrogen remains nowadays the major application of the WGSR, the advent of homogeneous catalysis in the 1970s marked the beginning of a synergy between WGSR and organic chemistry. Thus, the reducing power provided by the CO/H2 O couple has been exploited in the synthesis of fine chemicals; not only hydrogenation-type reactions, but also catalytic processes that require a reductive step for the turnover of the catalytic cycle. Despite the potential and unique features of the WGSR, its applications in organic synthesis remain largely underdeveloped. The topic will be critically reviewed herein, with the expectation that an increased awareness may stimulate new, creative work in the area.

  7. Water Retention, Gas Transport, and Pore Network Complexity during Short-Term Regeneration of Soil Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per;

    2013-01-01

    threshold corresponding to the physically based diffusion threshold increased with structural complexity (SR = 0.02 μm2; incubated = 0.20 μm2; natural = 0.70 μm2). Thus, critical reexamination is needed of the often-used 1.0-μm2 percolation threshold for convective air transport when analyzing pore network......, and smectite) amended with organic material (7.5 Mg ha−1). The newly formed structure was compared with that of sieved, repacked (SR) and natural intact samples described in previous studies. Assessment and comparison of structural complexity and organization was done using water retention (pore size...... distribution), soil gas diffusivity, air permeability, and derived pore network complexity parameters. Significant decreases in bulk density and increases in pores >100 μm were observed for incubated samples compared with SR samples. For the soils studied, the proportion of pores >100 μm increased in the order...

  8. Influence of frame inelasticity on poroviscoelastic reflections from a gas-water contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Chesnokov, Evgeny; Brown, Raymon

    2016-01-01

    As a natural extension of Biot theory, poroviscoelasticity is more comprehensive. The only difference between them is frame inelasticity, which influences wave dispersion, attenuation, reflection, and transmission. Hence we compute the influence, which uses the data of typical sand with gas and water saturation in the Gulf of Mexico with four values of frame inelasticity. The graphically illustrated results show that frame inelasticity has a small influence on the dispersion of P1- and S-waves and almost no influence on the dispersion of P2-wave. The frame inelasticity's influence on the P1- and S-wave attenuation is substantial with only a relatively small impact on the P2-wave attenuation. In some frequency and incident-angle ranges, frame inelasticity's influence on the reflection and transmission coefficients is considerable.

  9. Gas chromatographic thermodynamics on hydration processes of magnesium chloride with low water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建军; 陈关城; 马培华; 保积庆; 马玉涛; 陈丰秋

    2003-01-01

    The dehydration and hydration processes of magnesium chloride hydrates were studied by means of frontal chromatography analysis, calorimetry, thermogravimetry and chemical analysis. The mathematical imitation for the adsorption isotherms of MgCl2*4H2O and MgCl2*2H2O at different temperatures indicates that Boltzmann Function is the ideal equation to describe those adsorption isotherms. Its adsorption heat is -13.06kJ/mol and -16.11kJ/mol, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium constants are also given. From the data obtained, there is a thermodynamical possibility to use partial dehydrated magnesium chloride hydrates as an absorbance to clean water vapor contained in bischophite dehydration equipment and let the protection gas HCl recycle in the fluid bed reaction system.

  10. Disposal/recovery options for brine waters from oil and gas production in New York State. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, M.R.; Atkinson, J.F.; Bunn, M.D.; Hodge, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    Produced water from oil and gas operations, or brine as it is typically referred, may be characterized as being highly saline, with total dissolved solids greater than 100 g/L. If these bribes are disposed improperly there may be severe adverse environmental effects. Thus, it is important that brine be disposed using environmentally sound methods. Unfortunately, costs for the disposal of brine water are a significant burden to oil and gas producers in New York State. These costs and the relatively low market price of oil and natural gas have contributed to the decline in gas and oil production in New York State during the past 10 years. The objectives of this study were to evaluate new and existing options for brine disposal in New York State, examine the technical and economic merits of these options, and assess environmental impacts associated with each option. Two new disposal options investigated for New York State oil and gas producers included construction of a regional brine treatment facility to treat brine prior to discharge into a receiving water and a salt production facility that utilizes produced water as a feed stock. Both options are technically feasible; however, their economic viability depends on facility size and volume of brine treated.

  11. Disposal/recovery options for brine waters from oil and gas production in New York State. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced water from oil and gas operations, or brine as it is typically referred, may be characterized as being highly saline, with total dissolved solids greater than 100 g/L. If these bribes are disposed improperly there may be severe adverse environmental effects. Thus, it is important that brine be disposed using environmentally sound methods. Unfortunately, costs for the disposal of brine water are a significant burden to oil and gas producers in New York State. These costs and the relatively low market price of oil and natural gas have contributed to the decline in gas and oil production in New York State during the past 10 years. The objectives of this study were to evaluate new and existing options for brine disposal in New York State, examine the technical and economic merits of these options, and assess environmental impacts associated with each option. Two new disposal options investigated for New York State oil and gas producers included construction of a regional brine treatment facility to treat brine prior to discharge into a receiving water and a salt production facility that utilizes produced water as a feed stock. Both options are technically feasible; however, their economic viability depends on facility size and volume of brine treated

  12. Microbial electrodialysis cell for simultaneous water desalination and hydrogen gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, Maha; Kiely, Patrick D; Call, Douglas F; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m(3) H(2)/m(3) d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements.

  13. Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process for In-Situ Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2000-01-01

    This report focuses on the development of mathematical models and simulation tools developed for the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process. This process is a candidate technology for oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) project. An analysis of the RWGS process was performed using a material balance for the system. The material balance is very complex due to the downstream separations and subsequent recycle inherent with the process. A numerical simulation was developed for the RWGS process to provide a tool for analysis and optimization of experimental hardware, which will be constructed later this year at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Attempts to solve the material balance for the system, which can be defined by 27 nonlinear equations, initially failed. A convergence scheme was developed which led to successful solution of the material balance, however the simplified equations used for the gas separation membrane were found insufficient. Additional more rigorous models were successfully developed and solved for the membrane separation. Sample results from these models are included in this report, with recommendations for experimental work needed for model validation.

  14. Gas-Microjet Reactive Scattering: Collisions of HCl and DCl with Cool Salty Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jennifer A; Sobyra, Thomas B; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2016-02-18

    Liquid microjets provide a powerful means to investigate reactions of gases with salty water in vacuum while minimizing gas-vapor collisions. We use this technique to explore the fate of gaseous HCl and DCl molecules impinging on 8 molal LiCl and LiBr solutions at 238 K. The experiments reveal that HCl or DCl evaporate infrequently if they become thermally accommodated at the surface of either solution. In particular, we observe minimal thermal desorption of HCl following HCl collisions and no distinct evidence for rapid, interfacial DCl→HCl exchange following DCl collisions. These results imply that surface thermal motions are not generally strong enough to propel momentarily trapped HCl or DCl back into the gas phase before they ionize and disappear into solution. Instead, only HCl and DCl molecules that scatter directly from the surface escape entry. These recoiling molecules transfer less energy upon collision to LiBr/H2O than to LiCl/H2O, reflecting the heavier mass of Br(-) than of Cl(-) in the interfacial region. PMID:26828574

  15. Microbial Electrodialysis Cell for Simultaneous Water Desalination and Hydrogen Gas Production

    KAUST Repository

    Mehanna, Maha

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m3 H2/m3 d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Geochemical analysis of atlantic rim water, carbon county, wyoming: New applications for characterizing coalbed natural gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J.F.; Frost, C.D.; Sharma, S.

    2011-01-01

    Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production typically requires the extraction of large volumes of water from target formations, thereby influencing any associated reservoir systems. We describe isotopic tracers that provide immediate data on the presence or absence of biogenic natural gas and the identify methane-containing reservoirs are hydrologically confined. Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon and strontium, along with water quality data, were used to characterize the CBNG reservoirs and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Water was analyzed from a stream, springs, and CBNG wells. Strontium isotopic composition and major ion geochemistry identify two groups of surface water samples. Muddy Creek and Mesaverde Group spring samples are Ca-Mg-S04-type water with higher 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting relatively young groundwater recharged from precipitation in the Sierra Madre. Groundwaters emitted from the Lewis Shale springs are Na-HCO3-type waters with lower 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting sulfate reduction and more extensive water-rock interaction. To distinguish coalbed waters, methanogenically enriched ??13CDIC wasused from other natural waters. Enriched ??13CDIC, between -3.6 and +13.3???, identified spring water that likely originates from Mesaverde coalbed reservoirs. Strongly positive ??13CDIC, between +12.6 and +22.8???, identified those coalbed reservoirs that are confined, whereas lower ??13CDIC, between +0.0 and +9.9???, identified wells within unconfined reservoir systems. Copyright ?? 2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

  18. Real-time surrogate analysis for potential oil and gas contamination of drinking water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H.

    2015-09-01

    Public concerns related to the fast-growing shale oil and gas industry have increased during recent years. The major concern regarding shale gas production is the potential of fracturing fluids being injected into the well or produced fluids flowing out of the well to contaminate drinking water resources such as surface water and groundwater. Fracturing fluids contain high total dissolved solids (TDS); thus, changes in TDS concentrations in groundwater might indicate influences of fracturing fluids. An increase of methane concentrations in groundwater could also potentially be due to hydraulic fracturing activities. To understand the possible contamination of groundwater by fracturing activities, real-time groundwater monitoring is being implemented in the Denver-Julesburg basin of northeast Colorado. A strategy of monitoring of surrogate parameters was chosen instead of measuring potential contaminants directly, an approach that is not cost effective or operationally practical. Contaminant surrogates of TDS and dissolved methane were proposed in this study, and were tested for correlation and data distribution with laboratory experiments. Correlations between TDS and electrical conductivity (EC), and between methane contamination and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) were strong at low concentrations of contaminants (1 mg/L TDS and 0.3 mg/L CH4). Dissolved oxygen (DO) was only an effective surrogate at higher methane concentrations (≥2.5 mg/L). The results indicated that EC and ORP are effective surrogates for detecting concentration changes of TDS and methane, respectively, and that a strategy of monitoring for easy to measure parameters can be effective detecting real-time, anomalous behavior relative to a predetermined baseline.

  19. A perspective on cost-effectiveness of greenhouse gas reduction solutions in water distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water distribution systems (WDSs) face great challenges as aging infrastructures require significant investments in rehabilitation, replacement, and expansion. Reducing environmental impacts as WDSs develop is essential for utility managers and policy makers. This study quantifies the existing greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of common WDS elements using life-cycle assessment (LCA) while identifying the greatest opportunities for emission reduction. This study addresses oversights of the related literature, which fails to capture several WDS elements and to provide detailed life-cycle inventories. The life-cycle inventory results for a US case study utility reveal that 81% of GHGs are from pumping energy, where a large portion of these emissions are a result of distribution leaks, which account for 270 billion l of water losses daily in the United States. Pipe replacement scheduling is analyzed from an environmental perspective where, through incorporating leak impacts, a tool reveals that optimal replacement is no more than 20 years, which is in contrast to the US average of 200 years. Carbon abatement costs (CACs) are calculated for different leak reduction scenarios for the case utility that range from −$130 to $35 t−1 CO2(eq). Including life-cycle modeling in evaluating pipe materials identified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cement-lined ductile iron (DICL) as the Pareto efficient options, however; utilizing PVC presents human health risks. The model developed for the case utility is applied to California and Texas to determine the CACs of reducing leaks to 5% of distributed water. For California, annual GHG savings from reducing leaks alone (3.4 million tons of CO2(eq)) are found to exceed California Air Resources Board’s estimate for energy efficiency improvements in the state’s water infrastructure. (paper)

  20. Quantitative Variation in Water-Use Efficiency across Water Regimes and Its Relationship with Circadian, Vegetative, Reproductive, and Leaf Gas-Exchange Traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christine E. Edwards; Brent E. Ewers; C. Robertson McClung; Ping Lou; Cynthia Weinig

    2012-01-01

    Drought limits light harvesting,resulting in lower plant growth and reproduction.One trait important for plant drought response is water-use efficiency (WUE).We investigated (1) how the joint genetic architecture of WUE,reproductive characters,and vegetative traits changed across drought and well-watered conditions,(2) whether traits with distinct developmental bases (e.g.leaf gas exchange versus reproduction) differed in the environmental sensitivity of their genetic architecture,and (3) whether quantitative variation in circadian period was related to drought response in Brassica rapa.Overall,WUE increased in drought,primarily because stomatal conductance,and thus water loss,declined more than carbon fixation.Genotypes with the highest WUE in drought expressed the lowest WUE in well-watered conditions,and had the largest vegetative and floral organs in both treatments.Thus,large changes in WUE enabled some genotypes to approach vegetative and reproductive trait optima across environments.The genetic architecture differed for gas-exchange and vegetative traits across drought and well-watered conditions,but not for floral traits.Correlations between circadian and leaf gas-exchange traits were significant but did not vary across treatments,indicating that circadian period affects physiological function regardless of water availability.These results suggest that WUE is important for drought tolerance in Brassica rapa and that artificial selection for increased WUE in drought will not result in maladaptive expression of other traits that are correlated with WUE.

  1. The Energy Efficiency of Hot Water Production by Gas Water Heaters with a Combustion Chamber Sealed with Respect to the Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Czerski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigative results of the energy efficiency of hot water production for sanitary uses by means of gas-fired water heaters with the combustion chamber sealed with respect to the room in single-family houses and multi-story buildings. Additionally, calculations were made of the influence of pre-heating the air for combustion in the chimney and air supply system on the energy efficiency of hot water production. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics software was used for calculation of the heat exchange in this kind of system. The studies and calculations have shown that the use of gas water heaters with a combustion chamber sealed with respect to the room significantly increases the efficiency of hot water production when compared to traditional heaters. It has also been proven that the pre-heating of combustion air in concentric chimney and air supply ducts essentially improves the energy efficiency of gas appliances for hot water production.

  2. Water usage for natural gas production through hydraulic fracturing in the United States from 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Carter, Kimberly E

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has promoted the exploitation of shale oil and natural gas in the United States (U.S.). However, the large amounts of water used in hydraulic fracturing may constrain oil and natural gas production in the shale plays. This study surveyed the amounts of freshwater and recycled produced water used to fracture wells from 2008 to 2014 in Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, North Dakota, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Results showed that the annual average water volumes used per well in most of these states ranged between 1000 m(3) and 30,000 m(3). The highest total amount of water was consumed in Texas with 457.42 Mm(3) of water used to fracture 40,521 wells, followed by Pennsylvania with 108.67 Mm(3) of water used to treat 5127 wells. Water usages ranged from 96.85 Mm(3) to 166.10 Mm(3) annually in Texas from 2012 to 2014 with more than 10,000 wells fractured during that time. The percentage of water used for hydraulic fracturing in each state was relatively low compared to water usages for other industries. From 2009 to 2014, 6.55% (median) of the water volume used in hydraulic fracturing contained recycled produced water or recycled hydraulic fracturing wastewater. 10.84% (median) of wells produced by hydraulic fracturing were treated with recycled produced water. The percentage of wells where recycled wastewater was used was lower, except in Ohio and Arkansas, where more than half of the wells were fractured using recycled produced water. The median recycled wastewater volume in produced wells was 7127 m(3) per well, more than half the median value in annual water used per well 11,259 m(3). This indicates that, for wells recycling wastewater, more than half of their water use consisted of recycled wastewater.

  3. Water usage for natural gas production through hydraulic fracturing in the United States from 2008 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Carter, Kimberly E

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has promoted the exploitation of shale oil and natural gas in the United States (U.S.). However, the large amounts of water used in hydraulic fracturing may constrain oil and natural gas production in the shale plays. This study surveyed the amounts of freshwater and recycled produced water used to fracture wells from 2008 to 2014 in Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, North Dakota, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Results showed that the annual average water volumes used per well in most of these states ranged between 1000 m(3) and 30,000 m(3). The highest total amount of water was consumed in Texas with 457.42 Mm(3) of water used to fracture 40,521 wells, followed by Pennsylvania with 108.67 Mm(3) of water used to treat 5127 wells. Water usages ranged from 96.85 Mm(3) to 166.10 Mm(3) annually in Texas from 2012 to 2014 with more than 10,000 wells fractured during that time. The percentage of water used for hydraulic fracturing in each state was relatively low compared to water usages for other industries. From 2009 to 2014, 6.55% (median) of the water volume used in hydraulic fracturing contained recycled produced water or recycled hydraulic fracturing wastewater. 10.84% (median) of wells produced by hydraulic fracturing were treated with recycled produced water. The percentage of wells where recycled wastewater was used was lower, except in Ohio and Arkansas, where more than half of the wells were fractured using recycled produced water. The median recycled wastewater volume in produced wells was 7127 m(3) per well, more than half the median value in annual water used per well 11,259 m(3). This indicates that, for wells recycling wastewater, more than half of their water use consisted of recycled wastewater. PMID:26826457

  4. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  5. Water and gas geochemistry of the Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) hydrothermal system (Ciudad Real, central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaselli, Orlando; Nisi, Barbara; Tassi, Franco; Giannini, Luciano; Grandia, Fidel; Darrah, Tom; Capecchiacci, Francesco; del Villar, Pèrez

    2013-04-01

    An extensive geochemical and isotopic investigation was carried out in the water and gas discharges of the Late Miocene-Quaternary Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) (Ciudad Real, Spain) with the aim reconstruct the fluid circulation in the area. CVP consists of a series of scattered (monogenetic) vents from where alkaline lava flows and pyroclastic deposits formed in two different periods. The first stage (8.7-6.4 Ma) mainly included ultra-potassic mafic extrusives, whilst the second stage (4.7-1.75 Ma) prevalently originated alkaline and ultra-alkaline volcanics. Both stages were followed by a volcanic activity that extended up to 1.3 and 0.7 Ma, respectively. This area can likely be regarded as one of the most important emitting zones of CO2 in the whole Peninsular Spain along with that of Selva-Emporda in northeastern Spain (Cataluña) and it can be assumed as one of the best examples of natural analogues of CO2 leakages in Spain. This latter aspect is further evidenced by the relatively common water-gas blast events that characterize the CCVF. In the last few years the presence of a CO2-pressurized reservoir at a relatively shallow level as indeed caused several small-sized explosion particularly during the drilling of domestic wells. The fluid discharging sites are apparently aligned along well-defined directions: NW-SE and NNW-SSE and subordinately, ENE-WSW, indicating a clear relationship between the thermal discharges and the volcanic centers that also distribute along these lineaments. The CVP waters are mostly hypothermal (up to 33 °C) and are generally Mg(Ca)-HCO3 in composition and occasionally show relatively high concentrations of Fe and Mn, with pH and electrical conductivity down to 5.5 and up to 6.5 mS/cm, respectively. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest a meteoric origin for these waters. The mantle source of these volcanic products is apparently preserved in the many CO2-rich (up to 990,000 mmol/mol) gas discharges that characterize CVP

  6. CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-De

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. PMID:24850953

  7. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours.

  8. Alternative sorptive extraction method for gas chromatography determination of halogenated anisoles in water and wine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain); Rodriguez, I. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)], E-mail: qnisaac@usc.es; Rubi, E.; Bollain, M.H.; Cela, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2007-09-05

    An alternative sorptive microextraction method for the determination of five halogenated anisoles in water and wine matrices is proposed. Analytes were concentrated in an inexpensive and disposable piece of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), desorbed with a small volume of organic solvent, and determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) or tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of several factors on the efficiency of extraction and desorption steps was investigated in detail and the observed behaviour justified on the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics of the solid-phase microextraction technique. Under optimised conditions, analytes were first extracted in the headspace (HS) mode, at room temperature, for 2.5 h and then desorbed with 1 mL of n-pentane. This extract was further evaporated to 50 {mu}L. The overall extraction yield of the procedure ranged from 40 to 55% and the limits of quantification remained between 0.5 and 20 ng L{sup -1}, depending on the compound considered and the detection technique. Precision and linearity of the method were excellent for all species with both GC-ECD and GC-MS/MS detection. Matrix effects were evaluated with different water and wine samples; moreover, the suitability of the PDMS sorbent for storage of analytes, under different conditions, was demonstrated.

  9. Biogenic methane production in formation waters from a large gas field in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Neil D; Sherry, Angela; Larter, Stephen R; Erdmann, Michael; Leyris, Juliette; Liengen, Turid; Beeder, Janiche; Head, Ian M

    2009-05-01

    Methanogenesis was investigated in formation waters from a North Sea oil rimmed gas accumulation containing biodegraded oil, which has not been subject to seawater injection. Activity and growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens was measured but acetoclastic methanogenesis was not detected. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens showed activity between 40 and 80 degrees C with a temperature optimum (ca. 70 degrees C) consistent with in situ reservoir temperatures. They were also active over a broad salinity range, up to and consistent with the high salinity of the waters (90 g l(-1)). These findings suggest the methanogens are indigenous to the reservoir. The conversion of H(2) and CO(2) to CH(4) in methanogenic enrichments was enhanced by the addition of inorganic nutrients and was correlated with cell growth. Addition of yeast extract also stimulated methanogenesis. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from enrichment cultures were closely related to Methanothermobacter spp. which have been identified in other high-temperature petroleum reservoirs. It has recently been suggested that methanogenic oil degradation may be a major factor in the development of the world's heavy oils and represent a significant and ongoing process in conventional deposits. Although an oil-degrading methanogenic consortium was not enriched from these samples the presence and activity of communities of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea was demonstrated. Stimulation of methanogenesis by addition of nutrients suggests that in situ methanogenic biodegradation of oil could be harnessed to enhance recovery of stranded energy assets from such petroleum systems.

  10. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours. PMID:22841594

  11. AQUEOUS TWO-PHASE GAS FLOATATION SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE TETRACYCLINE IN ENVIRONMENTAL WATER SAMPLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Yanmin; YAN Yongsheng; LI Chunxiang; ZHAO Xiaojun; WANG Liang

    2008-01-01

    A green method for separating and enriching trace tetracycline (TC) in environment water by Aqueous Two-phase Gas Fioatation Spectrophotometry has been proposed, the principium was discussed.In this paper, the hydrophobic complex composed of Mg(Ⅱ) and TC was floated into organic phase under the optimal conditions: pH=10, the floatatlon equipment is home-made, n-propyl alcohol as the organic solvent, sodium chloride as the separating phase reagent.The data were obtained by spectrophotometry after floatatlon; The linear regression ,equation is A=2.33×105 C(mol/L)+0.2179, linear range is from 3.77×107mol/L to 6.32×105mol/L, respectively, with the correlation coefficient (r) better than 0.9997, relative recoveries is 99.7% to 100.3%, limit of detection was 4.29×10-8mol/L, The method can be applied to analyse the trace TC in water sample, the result is better.

  12. A simple inexpensive gas phase chemiluminescence analyzer for measuring trace levels of arsenic in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Mrinal K.; Hossain, Zafreen A.; Ohira, Shin-Ichi [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Arlington, 700 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019-0065 (United States); Dasgupta, Purnendu K., E-mail: dasgupta@uta.ed [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Arlington, 700 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019-0065 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    An inexpensive sensitive gas-phase chemiluminescence (GPCL) based analyzer for arsenic is described; this device utilizes manual fluid dispensing operations to reduce size, weight and cost. The analyzer in its present form has a limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) of 1.0 mug/L total inorganic As (peak heightbased, 3 mL sample). The system was used to measure low level arsenic in tap water samples from Texas and New Mexico and compared with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as those from an automated GPCL analyzer. Good correlations were observed. Higher levels of As (50-500 mug/L, As(III), As(V) and mixtures thereof) were spiked into local tap water; the recoveries ranged from 95 +- 2% to 101 +- 1%. A single instrument weighs less than 3 kg, consumes <25 W in power, can be incorporated in a briefcase and constructed for <$US $1000. It is easily usable in the field. - An inexpensive instrument capable of measuring down to 1 mug/L As is reported.

  13. Ternary System of Fe-based Ionic Liquid, Ethanol and Water for Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解美莹; 李沛沛; 郭惠锋; 高丽霞; 余江

    2012-01-01

    Fe-based ionic liquid (Fe-IL) was synthesized by mixing FeCl3·6H2O and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [Bmim]C1 in this paper. The phase diagram of a ternary Fe-IL, ethanol and water system was investigated to construct a ternary desulfurization solution for wet flue gas desulfurization. The effects of flow rate and concentration of SO2, reaction temperature, pH and Fe-IL fraction in aqueous desulfurization solution on the desulfiariza- tion efficiency were investigated. The results shows that the best composition of ternary desulfurization solution of Fe-IL, ethanol and water is 1 : 1.5 : 3 by volume ratio, and pH should be controlled at 2.0. Under such conditions, a desulfurization rate greater than 90% could be obtained. The product of sulfuric acid had inhibition effect on the wet desulfurization process. With applying this new ternary desulfurization solution, not only the catalyst Fe-IL can be recycled and reused, but also the product sulfuric acid can be separated directly from the ternary desulfurization system.

  14. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  15. A simple inexpensive gas phase chemiluminescence analyzer for measuring trace levels of arsenic in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inexpensive sensitive gas-phase chemiluminescence (GPCL) based analyzer for arsenic is described; this device utilizes manual fluid dispensing operations to reduce size, weight and cost. The analyzer in its present form has a limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) of 1.0 μg/L total inorganic As (peak heightbased, 3 mL sample). The system was used to measure low level arsenic in tap water samples from Texas and New Mexico and compared with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as those from an automated GPCL analyzer. Good correlations were observed. Higher levels of As (50-500 μg/L, As(III), As(V) and mixtures thereof) were spiked into local tap water; the recoveries ranged from 95 ± 2% to 101 ± 1%. A single instrument weighs less than 3 kg, consumes <25 W in power, can be incorporated in a briefcase and constructed for <$US $1000. It is easily usable in the field. - An inexpensive instrument capable of measuring down to 1 μg/L As is reported.

  16. A mini review on the chemistry and catalysis of the water gas shift reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhun

    2014-01-01

    Water gas shift (WGS) reaction is a chemical reaction in which carbon monoxide reacts with water vapor to form carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It is an important reaction industrially used in conjunction with steam reforming of hydrocarbons for the production of high purity hydrogen. Grenoble et al examined the roles of both active metals and metal oxide support on the kinetics of the WGS reaction. They found out that the turn over numbers of various Al2O3 supported transition metals decreased in the trend of Cu, Re, Co, Ru, Ni, Pt, Os, Au, Fe, Pd, Rh, and Ir, which corresponds nicely to the observed volcano shaped correlation between catalytic activities and respective CO adsorption heat. This is a strong indication that CO gets activated on the metal surface during the reaction and different metals have different activation energies. The authors also observed that the turn over number of Pt/Al2O3 was one order of magnitude higher than that of Pt/SiO2, indicating a strong support effect, which the authors ascri...

  17. A study of gas lift on oil/water flow in vertical risers

    OpenAIRE

    Brini Ahmed, Salem Kalifa

    2014-01-01

    Gas lift is a means of enhancing oil recovery from hydrocarbon reservoirs. Gas injected at the production riser base reduces the gravity component of the pressure drop and thereby, increases the supply of oil from the reservoir. Also, gas injection at the base of a riser helps to mitigate slugging and thus, improving the performance of the topside facility. In order to improve the efficiency of the gas lifting technique, a good understanding of the characteristics of gas-liq...

  18. Generation of ozone by pulsed corona discharge over water surface in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukes, Petr [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Clupek, Martin [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Babicky, Vaclav [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Janda, Vaclav [Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 160 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sunka, Pavel [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2005-02-07

    Ozone formation by a pulse positive corona discharge generated in the gas phase between a planar high voltage electrode made from reticulated vitreous carbon and a water surface with an immersed ground stainless steel plate electrode was investigated under various operating conditions. The effects of gas flow rate (0.5-3 litre min{sup -1}), discharge gap spacing (2.5-10 mm), applied input power (2-45 W) and gas composition (oxygen containing argon or nitrogen) on ozone production were determined. Ozone concentration increased with increasing power input and with increasing discharge gap. The production of ozone was significantly affected by the presence of water vapour formed through vaporization of water at the gas-liquid interface by the action of the gas phase discharge. The highest energy efficiency for ozone production was obtained using high voltage pulses of approximately 150 ns duration in Ar/O{sub 2} mixtures with the maximum efficiency (energy yield) of 23 g kW h{sup -1} for 40% argon content.

  19. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry. PMID:20058916

  20. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry.

  1. Seasonal and diurnal characteristics of water soluble inorganic compounds in the gas and aerosol phase in the Zurich area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fisseha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas and aerosol samples were taken using a wet effluent diffusion denuder/aerosol collector (WEDD/AC coupled to ion chromatography (IC in the city of Zurich, Switzerland from August to September 2002 and in March 2003. Major water soluble inorganic ions; nitrate, sulfate, and nitrite were analyzed online with a time resolution of two hours for the gas and aerosol phase. The fraction of water soluble inorganic anions in PM10 varied from 15% in August to about 38% in March. Seasonal and diurnal variations of nitrate in the gas and aerosol phase were observed with more than 50% of the total nitrate in the gas phase during August and more than 80% of nitrate in the aerosol phase during March exceeding the concentration of sulfate by a factor of 2. Aerosol sulfate, on the other hand, did not show significant variability with season. However, in the gas phase, the SO2 concentration was 6.5 times higher in winter than in summer. Nitrous acid (HONO also showed a diurnal variation in both the gas and aerosol phase with the lowest concentration (0.2–0.6 µg/m3 in the afternoon. The primary pollutants, NO, CO and SO2 mixing ratios were often at their highest between 04:00–10:00 local time due to the build up of fresh vehicle emission under a nocturnal inversion.

  2. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  3. A large-scale laboratory investigation into the movement of gas and water through clay barriers exposed to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a large scale laboratory investigation into the movements of gas and water through clay barriers exposed to the environment. The test beds, each 3m square were constructed and filled with clay to a depth of 400 mm, after compaction. One test bed contained London Clay, the other Glacial Till. The clays were subjected to accelerated environmental cycling and tests carried out on samples of the clays at appropriate intervals. The tests included measurements of the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the clays and their permeability to gas and water. Gas permeability emerged as the more appropriate for the clays being investigated. The report discusses the difficulties of measuring the permeability of partially saturated clays and the need to define the measuring techniques when specifying limiting acceptability values. 55 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs., 27 plates

  4. Parametric Limits of Efficient Use of a Centrifugal Water Atomizer in Contact Waste-Gas Heat-Utilization Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrodnyi, M. K.; Rachinskii, A. Yu.; Barabash, P. A.; Goliyad, N. N.

    2016-07-01

    The relation for the limiting temperature of water heating in a contact gas-droplet-type apparatus with a centrifugal atomizer has been determined experimentally in relation to the conditions of utilization of heat of power plant waste-gases. Investigations were carried out in the range of excess water pressures in front of the atomizer 0.2-0.6 MPa and of the volume fraction of steam in the vapor-gas mixture at the inlet of the apparatus from 0.02 to 0.45. The possibility of using the obtained dependence for calculating the limiting values of the vapor-gas flow parameters that limit the range of efficient operation of the contact apparatus with steam condensation and in the absence of heated liquid droplet evaporation is shown.

  5. Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Stigkær, Jens Peter; Løhndorf, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of plant-wide control philosophy to enhance the performance and capacity of the Produced Water Treatment (PWT) in offshore oil & gas production processes. Different from most existing facility- or material-based PWT innovation methods, the objective of this work...

  6. Water-gas shift (WGS) Operation of Pre-combustion CO2 Capture Pilot Plant at the Buggenum IGCC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, H.A.J.; Damen, K.; Makkee, M.; Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Nuon/Vattenfall CO2 Catch-up project, a pre-combustion CO2 capture pilot plant was built and operated at the Buggenum IGCC power plant, the Netherlands. The pilot consist of sweet water-gas shift, physical CO2 absorption and CO2 compression. The technology performance was verified and validat

  7. Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources (ERD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this report, EPA reviews and synthesizes scientific literature to assess the potential for hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas to change the quality or quantity of drinking water resources. This report also identifies factors affecting the frequency or severity of any potenti...

  8. Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing for Oil and Gas on Drinking Water Resources (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This assessment provides a review and synthesis of available scientific literature and data to assess the potential for hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas to impact the quality or quantity of drinking water resources, and identifies factors affecting the frequency or severity o...

  9. Determination of Chlorophenols in Water Samples Using Solid-Phase Extraction Enrichment Procedure and Gas Chromatography Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hassine, S; Hammami, B; Touil, S; Driss, M R

    2015-11-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure followed by derivatization and gas chromatography electron capture detection was evaluated for the determination of trace amounts of chlorophenols (CPs) in waters samples. Different parameters affecting extraction efficiency such as, volume of elution solvent, volume and pH of water sample, quantity of sorbent phase were studied and optimized. SPE was carried out on polystyrene-divinylbenzene (Bond Elut ENV) and high recoveries were obtained using 1000 mg of this cartridge for the treatment of 500 mL of acidified water sample. The described method was then tested on spiked tap, mineral, ground and surface water samples. The overall procedure provided limits of detection lower than 20 ng L(-1), recoveries of 70%-106% and an enrichment factor of 500 for the examined CPs in 500 mL water samples. Among the studied compounds, pentachlorophenol was detected in tap water at a concentration level of 0.06 µg L(-1). PMID:26067701

  10. Estimation of air–water gas exchange coefficient in a shallow lagoon based on 222Rn mass balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radon-222 mass balance is now commonly used to quantify water fluxes due to Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) in coastal areas. One of the main loss terms of this mass balance, the radon evasion to the atmosphere, is based on empirical equations. This term is generally estimated using one among the many empirical equations describing the gas transfer velocity as a function of wind speed that have been proposed in the literature. These equations were, however, mainly obtained from areas of deep water and may be less appropriate for shallow areas. Here, we calculate the radon mass balance for a windy shallow coastal lagoon (mean depth of 6 m and surface area of 1.55*108 m2) and use these data to estimate the radon loss to the atmosphere and the corresponding gas transfer velocity. We present new equations, adapted to our shallow water body, to express the gas transfer velocity as a function of wind speed at 10 m height (wind range from 2 to 12.5 m/s). When compared with those from the literature, these equations fit particularly well with the one of Kremer et al. (2003). Finally, we emphasize that some gas transfer exchange may always occur, even for conditions without wind. - Highlights: • We used, for the first time, a radon mass balance approach to determine gas transfer exchange in a shallow area. • We were more particularly able to highlight that gas transfer occurred for low wind or for conditions without winds. • We also expressed new expressions for the gas transfer coefficient as a function of wind speed in shallow areas

  11. Effects of resident water and non-equilibrium adsorption on the primary and enhanced coalbed methane gas recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahediesfanjani, Hossein

    The major part of the gas in coalbed methane and shale gas reservoirs is stored as the adsorbed gas in the coal and organic materials of the black shale internal surfaces. The sorption sites in both reservoirs are composed of several macropores that contain very small pore sizes. Therefore, the adsorption/desorption is very slow process and follows a non-equilibrium trend. The time-dependency of the sorption process is further affected by the reservoir resident water. Water can diffuse into the matrix and adsorption sites, plug the pores and affect the reservoir gas production. This study presents an experimental and theoretical procedure to investigate the effects of the resident water and time-dependency of the sorption process on coalbed and shale gas primary and enhanced recovery by simultaneous CO 2/N2 injection. Series of the experiments are conducted to construct both equilibrium and non-equilibrium single and multi-component isotherms with the presence of water. A novel and rapid data interpretation technique is developed based on the nonequilibrium adsorption/desorption thermodynamics, mass conservation law, and volume filling adsorption theory. The developed technique is implemented to construct both equilibrium and non-equilibrium multi-component multi-phase isotherms from the early time experimental measurements. The non-equilibrium isotherms are incorporated in the coalbed methane/shale gas reservoir simulations to account for the time-dependency of the sorption process. The experimental results indicate that the presence of water in the sorption system reduces both carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption rates. Reduction in the adsorption rate for carbon dioxide is more than nitrogen. The results also indicate that the resident water reduces the adsorption ability of low rank coals more than high rank ones. The results of the multi-component sorption tests indicate that increasing the initial mole fraction of the nitrogen gas in the injected CO2/N2

  12. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, John

    2013-09-30

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO{sub 2}-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux o to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  13. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

  14. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of gas hydrate- and pore-water samples obtained from gas hydrate-bearing sediment cores retrieved from a mud volcano in the Kukuy Canyon, Lake Baikal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, H.; Hachikubo, A.; Krylov, A.; Sakagami, H.; Ohashi, M.; Bai, J.; Kataoka, S.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Khlystov, O.; Zemskaya, T.; Grachev, M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk (Russian Federation). Limnological Inst.

    2008-07-01

    This paper provided details of a method developed to obtain gas hydrate water samples from a mud volcano in Lake Baikal, Russia. Chemical and isotopic analyses were conducted to examine the hydrate and pore water samples as well as to evaluate the original water involved in shallow gas hydrate accumulations in the region. Lake sediment core samples were retrieved from the bottom of the lake with gravity corers. A squeezer was used to take pore water samples from the sediments. Hydrate samples were taken from a gas hydrate placed on a polyethylene funnel. Dissolved hydrate water was filtered through a membrane into bottles. Both samples were kept under chilled or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Ion chromatography was used to determine concentrations of anions and hydrogen carbonate ions. Sodium and magnesium concentrations were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. An absorption spectrometer was used to determine potassium and calcium concentrations, and a mass spectrometer was used to analyze stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. Results of the study suggested that the gas dissolved in pore water and adsorbed on the surfaces of sediment particles was not the original gas from the hydrates retrieved at the mud volcano. Original gas hydrate-forming fluids were chemically different from the pore- and lake-water samples. The oxygen isotopic composition of the gas hydrate water samples correlated well with hydrogen values. It was concluded that ascending fluid and water delivered the gas into the gas stability zone, and is the main gas hydrate-forming fluid in the area of study. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Determination of the solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds in water using volatile-tracer assisted headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2016-02-26

    This study reports a new headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of water solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds (LVLOs). The HS-GC analysis was performed on a set of aqueous solutions containing a range of concentrations of toluene-spiked (as a tracer) LVLOs, from under-saturation to over-saturation. A plot of the toluene tracer GC signal vs. the concentration of the LVLO results in two lines of different slopes that intersect at the concentration corresponding to the compound's solubility in water. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD liquids in waters of environmental and biological systems.

  16. Hydrogeological investigations for mineral water and CO2 gas in the village of Bac, Bitola, The Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mircovski, Vojo; Spasovski, Orce; Petrov, Dimitar

    2005-01-01

    Tree exploration drill holes were dug in the Neogene Middle Pliocene sediments in the vicinity of the village of Bac for the investigation of the mineral water and CO2 gas. The first drill hole (B 1) was dug 30 m in depth indicated a water bearing horizon in o to 26.4 m thick grey marly sandstone with a free level aquifer and ground water 2.2 m at depth and yield of 10l/s. The second and third drill holes (ED-1 and ED-2) were dug 301 m to depth and determined a free level aquifer, a sub ar...

  17. Brief Introduction on the Treatment of Gas Field Waste Water%浅谈气田水废水处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽; 赵国勇

    2016-01-01

    针对气田废水进行处理研究,对气田废水的主要成分进行处理,将其废水中的主要有害物质去除,提高废水的利用率,减少废水对环境的污染等。%According to the research of treatment on gas field waste water, disposes the dominant components in it. Moreover, remove the major harmful substance in the waste water, and enhance the utilization ratio of it. Finally, reduce the pollution of waste water on the environment.

  18. A further step toward H2 in automobile : development of an efficient bi-functional catalyst for single stage water gas shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzam, Khalid Ghazi

    2008-01-01

    The suitability of polymer electrolyte fuel (PEM) cells for stationary and vehicular applications initiated research in all areas of fuel processor (i.e. reformer, water-gas-shift, preferential oxidation of CO (PROX)) catalysts for hydrogen generation. Water gas shift (WGS) reaction is an essential

  19. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110 m wide and 50 m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  20. Application of the water gas shift reaction to fusion fuel exhaust streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Fusion Fuel Clean Up (FCU) system, impurities will be removed from the fusion reactor exhaust and neutral beam line streams. Tritium in this impurity stream will be recovered and recycled to the fuel stream. In one flowsheet configuration of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), tritium is recovered from a simulated impurity stream via uranium hot metal beds and recycled to an isotope separation system. This study has shown, however, that the catalyzed water gas shift reaction, by which (H,D,T)2O and CO are converted to (H,D,T)2 and CO2 is a better method of (H,D,T)2O reduction than the hot metal beds. Catalytic reactors were designed, built and tested to provide data for the design of a prototype reactor to replace the hot metal beds in the FCU system. The prototype reactor contains only 10 g of catalyst and is expected to last at least 5 years. The reactor is small (1.3 cm OD x 13 cm long), operates at low temperatures (approximately 490 K) and will convert water to hydrogen, at a CO/H2O ratio of 1.5, with an efficiency of greater than 98 percent. Results show that the catalytic reactor is very stable even during upset conditions. Wide ranges of flow and a CO/H2O ratio variance from 1.3 upward have little effect on the conversion efficiency. Short term high temperature excursions do not affect the catalyst and lower temperatures will simply decrease the reaction rate resulting in lower conversions. The reactor appears to be unaffected by NO2, CO2, O2 and N2 in the feed stream at concentration levels expected in a fusion reactor exhaust stream

  1. Thermodynamic properties of acid gases in mixture with natural gas and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, X.

    2011-01-01

    The reliable removal of acid gas components, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from natural gas is an important technical challenge. Crude oil and hydrocarbon gas streams may contain high levels of CO2 and/or H2S as contaminants. It is desirable to prevent any contaminant to re

  2. Validation of gas temperature measurements by OES in an atmospheric air glow discharge with water electrode using Rayleigh scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verreycken, T; Van Gessel, A F H; Pageau, A; Bruggeman, P, E-mail: p.j.bruggeman@tue.n [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    Rayleigh scattering is used to determine the gas temperature of an atmospheric pressure dc excited glow discharge in air with a water electrode. The obtained temperatures are compared with calculated rotational temperatures measured by optical emission spectroscopy of OH(A-X) and N{sub 2}(C-B). At a current of 15 mA a deviation is found between T{sub rot}(OH) and the gas temperature obtained from Rayleigh scattering of about 1000 K. The gas temperatures obtained from Rayleigh scattering, N{sub 2}(C) and OH(A) in the positive column are, respectively, 2600 {+-} 100 K, 2700 {+-} 150 K and 3600 {+-} 200 K. It is shown that the rotational temperature of N{sub 2}(C) is a reliable measurement of the gas temperature while this is not the case for OH(A). The results are explained in the context of quenching processes of the excited states. Spatially resolved gas temperatures in both longitudinal and radial directions are presented. The observed strong temperature gradients near the electrodes are checked to be consistent with the power dissipation and the heat transfer in the discharge. The effect of the polarity of the water electrode and filamentation on the measured temperatures is discussed.

  3. Improved sensitivity gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of parabens in waters using ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, Juan Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure for the introduction of ionic liquid samples in gas chromatography (GC) is proposed. This procedure, based on microvial insert thermal desorption, allows the direct analysis of the compounds preconcentrated by ionic liquid based liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-LLME) using the combination of a thermal desorption unit (TDU) and a programmed temperature vaporization injector (PTV). Two different IL-LLME methodologies, one based on the formation of a microdroplet emulsion by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other through ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction (USAEME) were studied and evaluated. IL-DLLME proved advantageous and consequently, it was adopted for preconcentration purposes. This easy to apply approach was used for the determination of five parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl- and isobutyl paraben) in swimming pool waters, after in situ acetylation. The optimized conditions of TDU/PTV allowed the analytes contained in 20 µL of the enriched IL to be transferred to the capillary column. Quantification of the samples was carried out against aqueous standards, and quantification limits of between 4.3 and 8.1 ng L(-1) were obtained, depending on the compound. Concentrations of between 9 and 47 ng L(-1) for some analytes were obtained in the analysis of ten samples. PMID:26695305

  4. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovits, P. (Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. (Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  5. Support effects and catalytic trends for water gas shift activity of transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Astrid; Janssens, T.V.W.; Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii;

    2010-01-01

    CO and atomic oxygen on the metal; the latter is a good measure for the reactivity of the metal towards H2O. Generally, the activity of the catalysts with the Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 support is higher, compared to the corresponding MgAl2O4-supported catalysts. Exceptions are Cu and Au, which have a higher......Water gas shift activity measurements for 12 transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Ir, Pt, Au) supported on inert MgAl2O4 and Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 are presented, to elucidate the influence of the active metal and the support. The activity is related to the adsorption energy of molecular...... activity on the MgAl2O4 support and are both characterized by weak CO adsorption. For the MgAl2O4-supported catalysts a volcano-type relation between the activity and the adsorption energy of atomic oxygen on the metal is obtained. The maximum activity is found for metals with a binding energy of oxygen...

  6. Electricity, water, and natural gas consumption of a residential house in Canada from 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makonin, Stephen; Ellert, Bradley; Bajić, Ivan V; Popowich, Fred

    2016-01-01

    With the cost of consuming resources increasing (both economically and ecologically), homeowners need to find ways to curb consumption. The Almanac of Minutely Power dataset Version 2 (AMPds2) has been released to help computational sustainability researchers, power and energy engineers, building scientists and technologists, utility companies, and eco-feedback researchers test their models, systems, algorithms, or prototypes on real house data. In the vast majority of cases, real-world datasets lead to more accurate models and algorithms. AMPds2 is the first dataset to capture all three main types of consumption (electricity, water, and natural gas) over a long period of time (2 years) and provide 11 measurement characteristics for electricity. No other such datasets from Canada exist. Each meter has 730 days of captured data. We also include environmental and utility billing data for cost analysis. AMPds2 data has been pre-cleaned to provide for consistent and comparable accuracy results amongst different researchers and machine learning algorithms. PMID:27271937

  7. Development of gas diffusion layer using water based carbon slurry for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.F.; Liu, X.; Adame, A.; Villacorta, R. [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Engineering Technology Department, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Wertz, J. [Hollingsworth and Vose Co., A.K. Nicholson Research Lab, 219 Townsend Road, West Groton, MA 01472 (United States); Ahmad, R.; Thommes, M. [Quantachrome Instruments, 1900 Corporate Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (United States); Kannan, A.M., E-mail: amk@asu.ed [Fuel Cell Research Laboratory, Engineering Technology Department, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The micro-porous layer of gas diffusion layers (GDLs) was fabricated with the carbon slurry dispersed in water containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), by wire rod coating process. The aqueous carbon slurry with micelle-encapsulation was highly consistent and stable without losing any homogeneity even after adding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder for hundreds of hours. The surface morphology, contact angle and pore size distribution of the GDLs were examined using SEM, Goniometer and Hg Porosimeter, respectively. GDLs fabricated with various SDS concentrations were assembled into MEAs and evaluated in a single cell PEMFC under diverse operating relative humidity (RH) conditions using H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air as reactants. The peak power density of the single cell using the GDLs with optimum SDS concentration was 1400 and 500 mW cm{sup -2} with H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air at 90% RH, respectively. GDLs were also fabricated with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) based carbon slurry for fuel cell performance comparison. It was found that the composition of the carbon slurry, specifically SDS concentration played a critical role in controlling the pore diameter as well as the corresponding pore volumes of the GDLs.

  8. Dense Gas and Star Formation Characteristics of Cloud Cores Associated with Water Masers

    CERN Document Server

    Plume, R; Evans, N J; Martín-Pintado, J; Gómez-González, J; Plume, Rene; II, Neal J. Evans

    1996-01-01

    We have observed 150 regions of massive star formation, selected originally by the presence of a water maser, in the J = 5-4, 3-2, and 2-1 transitions of CS, and 49 regions in the same transitions of C$^{34}$S. Over 90% of the 150 regions were detected in the J = 2-1 and 3-2 transitions of CS and 75% were detected in the J=5-4 transition. We have combined the data with the J = 7-6 data from our original survey (Plume et al. 1992) to determine the density by analyzing the excitation of the rotational levels. Using Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) models, we have determined densities and column densities for 71 of these regions. The gas densities are very high (the mean log of the density is 5.9), but much less than the critical density of the J=7-6 line. Small maps of 25 of the sources in the J = 5-4 line yield a mean diameter of 1.0 pc. The mean virial mass is 3800 solar masses. The mean ratio of bolometric luminosity to virial mass (L/M) is 190, about 50 times higher than estimates using CO emission, suggesting...

  9. Simulation and control of water-gas shift packed bed reactor with inter-stage cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. Z.; Nandong, J.

    2016-03-01

    Water-Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) has become one of the well-known pathways for H2 production in industries. The issue with WGSR is that it is kinetically favored at high temperatures but thermodynamically favored at low temperatures, thus requiring careful consideration in the control design in order to ensure that the temperature used does not deactivate the catalyst. This paper studies the effect of a reactor arrangement with an inter-stage cooling implemented in the packed bed reactor to look at its effect on outlet temperature. A mathematical model is developed based on one-dimensional heat and mass transfers which incorporate the intra-particle effects. It is shown that the placement of the inter-stage cooling and the outlet temperature exiting the inter-stage cooling have strong influence on the reaction conversion. Several control strategies are explored for the process. It is shown that a feedback- feedforward control strategy using Multi-scale Control (MSC) is effective to regulate the reactor temperature profile which is critical to maintaining the catalysts activity.

  10. Water-gas dynamics and coastal land subsidence over Chioggia Mare field, northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teatini, Pietro; Baú, Domenico; Gambolati, Giuseppe

    2000-09-01

    A major development programme comprising 15 gas fields of the northern Adriatic Sea has recently been submitted to the Ministry of the Environment, VIA Committee for the assessment of the environmental impact, by ENI-Agip, the Italian national oil company. One of the largest reservoirs is Chioggia Mare, located about 10 km offshore of the Venetian littoral, with a burial depth of 1000-1400 m. The planned gas production from this field is expected to impact the shoreline stability with a potential threat to the city of Venice, 25 km northwest of the center of Chioggia Mare. To evaluate the risk of anthropogenic land subsidence due to gas withdrawal, a numerical model was developed that predicts the compaction of both the gas-bearing formations and the lateral/bottom aquifer (water drive) during a 13-year producing and a 12-year post-production period, and the transference of the deep compaction to the ground surface. To address the uncertainty of a few important hydromechanical parameters, several scenarios are simulated and the most pessimistic predictions obtained. The modeling results show that at most 1 cm of land subsidence over 25 years may be expected at the city of Chioggia, whereas Venice is not subject to settlement. If aquifer drawdown is mediated by water injection, land subsidence is arrested 5 km offshore, with the Chioggia littoral zone experiencing a rebound of 0.6-0.7 cm. Résumé. Un important programme de développement portant sur 15 gisements de gaz du nord de l'Adriatique a été récemment soumis au Comité VIA pour l'évaluation de l'impact sur l'environnement du Ministère de l'Environnement, par la société ENI-Agip, la compagnie nationale pétrolière italienne. L'un des plus importants réservoirs est celui de Chioggia Mare, situé à environ 10 km au large du littoral vénitien, à une profondeur de 1000 à 1400 m. La production de gaz prévue pour ce gisement laisse envisager un impact sur la stabilité du trait de côte, avec une

  11. Effects of total dissolved gas supersaturated water on lethality and catalase activity of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker)*

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shi-Chao; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Wen JIANG; Li, Ke-feng; Du, Jun; Shen, Dan-zhou; Gong, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation caused by dam sluicing can result in gas bubble trauma (GBT) in fish and threaten their survival. In the present study, Chinese suckers (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker) were exposed to TDG supersaturated water at levels ranging from 120% to 145% for 48 h. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the median lethal time (LT50) were determined to evaluate acute lethal effects on Chinese suckers. The results showed that the LC50 values of 4, 6, 8, and 1...

  12. A numerical scheme to calculate temperature and salinity dependent air-water transfer velocities for any gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Johnson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The transfer velocity determines the rate of exchange of a gas across the air-water interface for a given deviation from Henry's law equilibrium between the two phases. In the thin film model of gas exchange, which is commonly used for calculating gas exchange rates from measured concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere and ocean/freshwaters, the overall transfer is controlled by diffusion-mediated films on either side of the air-water interface. Calculating the total transfer velocity (i.e. including the influence from both molecular layers requires the Henry's law constant and the Schmidt number of the gas in question, the latter being the ratio of the viscosity of the medium and the molecular diffusivity of the gas in the medium. All of these properties are both temperature and (on the water side salinity dependent and extensive calculation is required to estimate these properties where not otherwise available. The aim of this work is to standardize the application of the thin film approach to flux calculation from measured and modelled data, to improve comparability, and to provide a numerical framework into which future parameter improvements can be integrated. A detailed numerical scheme is presented for the calculation of the gas and liquid phase transfer velocities (ka and kw respectively and the total transfer velocity, K. The scheme requires only basic physical chemistry data for any gas of interest and calculates K over the full range of temperatures, salinities and wind-speeds observed in and over the ocean. Improved relationships for the wind-speed dependence of ka and for the salinity-dependence of the gas solubility (Henry's law are derived. Comparison with alternative schemes and methods for calculating air-sea flux parameters shows good agreement in general but significant improvements under certain conditions. The scheme is provided as a downloadable

  13. Gas-and water-saturated conditions in the Piceance Basin, Western Colorado: Implications for fractured reservoir detection in a gas-centered coal basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoak, T.E.; Decker, A.D.

    1995-10-01

    Mesaverde Group reservoirs in the Piceance Basin, Western Colorado contain a large reservoir base. Attempts to exploit this resource base are stymied by low permeability reservoir conditions. The presence of abundant natural fracture systems throughout this basin, however, does permit economic production. Substantial production is associated with fractured reservoirs in Divide Creek, Piceance Creek, Wolf Creek, White River Dome, Plateau, Shire Gulch, Grand Valley, Parachute and Rulison fields. Successful Piceance Basin gas production requires detailed information about fracture networks and subsurface gas and water distribution in an overall gas-centered basin geometry. Assessment of these three parameters requires an integrated basin analysis incorporating conventional subsurface geology, seismic data, remote sensing imagery analysis, and an analysis of regional tectonics. To delineate the gas-centered basin geometry in the Piceance Basin, a regional cross-section spanning the basin was constructed using hydrocarbon and gamma radiation logs. The resultant hybrid logs were used for stratigraphic correlations in addition to outlining the trans-basin gas-saturated conditions. The magnitude of both pressure gradients (paludal and marine intervals) is greater than can be generated by a hydrodynamic model. To investigate the relationships between structure and production, detailed mapping of the basin (top of the Iles Formation) was used to define subtle subsurface structures that control fractured reservoir development. The most productive fields in the basin possess fractured reservoirs. Detailed studies in the Grand Valley-Parachute-Rulison and Shire Gulch-Plateau fields indicate that zones of maximum structural flexure on kilometer-scale structural features are directly related to areas of enhanced production.

  14. Water in Low-Mass Star-Forming Regions with Herschel: The Link Between Water Gas and Ice in Protostellar Envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalzl, M; Walsh, C; Albertsson, T; van Dishoeck, E F; Kristensen, L E; Mottram, J C

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our aim is to determine the critical parameters in water chemistry and the contribution of water to the oxygen budget by observing and modelling water gas and ice for a sample of eleven low-mass protostars, for which both forms of water have been observed. Methods: A simplified chemistry network, which is benchmarked against more sophisticated chemical networks, is developed that includes the necessary ingredients to determine the water vapour and ice abundance profiles in the cold, outer envelope in which the temperature increases towards the protostar. Comparing the results from this chemical network to observations of water emission lines and previously published water ice column densities, allows us to probe the influence of various agents (e.g., FUV field, initial abundances, timescales, and kinematics). Results: The observed water ice abundances with respect to hydrogen nuclei in our sample are 30-80ppm, and therefore contain only 10-30% of the volatile oxygen budget of 320ppm. The keys to reprodu...

  15. Estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water treatment ponds in Uintah Basin oil and gas field using modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H.; Mansfield, M. L.; Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Jones, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions from produced-water treatment ponds are poorly characterized sources in oil and gas emission inventories that play a critical role in studying elevated winter ozone events in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S. Information gaps include un-quantified amounts and compositions of gases emitted from these facilities. The emitted gases are often known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which, beside nitrogen oxides (NOX), are major precursors for ozone formation in the near-surface layer. Field measurement campaigns using the flux-chamber technique have been performed to measure VOC emissions from a limited number of produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah. Although the flux chamber provides accurate measurements at the point of sampling, it covers just a limited area of the ponds and is prone to altering environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure). This fact raises the need to validate flux chamber measurements. In this study, we apply an inverse-dispersion modeling technique with evacuated canister sampling to validate the flux-chamber measurements. This modeling technique applies an initial and arbitrary emission rate to estimate pollutant concentrations at pre-defined receptors, and adjusts the emission rate until the estimated pollutant concentrations approximates measured concentrations at the receptors. The derived emission rates are then compared with flux-chamber measurements and differences are analyzed. Additionally, we investigate the applicability of the WATER9 wastewater emission model for the estimation of VOC emissions from produced-water ponds in the Uintah Basin. WATER9 estimates the emission of each gas based on properties of the gas, its concentration in the waste water, and the characteristics of the influent and treatment units. Results of VOC emission estimations using inverse-dispersion and WATER9 modeling techniques will be reported.

  16. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  17. Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

    2012-01-01

    Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

  18. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  19. Seasonal evolution of water and dissolved gas chemistry in monomictic lakes: an example from Paterno sinkhole (Central Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, F.; Cabassi, J.; Rouwet, D.; Palozzi, R.; Marcelli, M.; Quartararo, M.; Capecchiacci, F.; Nocentini, M.; Vaselli, O.

    2012-04-01

    This study examines the distribution of chemical (major, minor and trace compounds) and isotope compositions of water and dissolved gases along the vertical water column of Lake Paterno, a sinkhole located in the NE sector of the S. Vittorino plain (Rieti, Central Italy), an area showing evidences of past and present hydrothermal activity. The main aim of this investigation is to describe the seasonal evolution of the water and dissolved gas chemistry and its dependence on biogeochemical processes occurring in the lake water and within the bottom sediments. Water and dissolved gases were sampled in winter (February) and summer (July) 2011 from the surface to the maximum depth of 54 m at regular intervals of 5 m. Analytical results show that in winter Lake Paterno waters were almost completely mixed, although relatively low amounts of minerogenic and biogenic products were recognized at the interface between lake water and bottom sediments. In summer, well-defined thermal and chemical stratifications established. The occurrence of annual meromixis is a typical feature of non-freezing lakes in temperate climates and is called monomixis. During the stratification period, biological processes, such as sulfate-reduction, denitrification, and NH4 and H2 production are the main controlling factors for the vertical distribution of the chemical species in the water body The carbon isotopic signature of CH4 suggests that this gas is produced by methanogenic processes related to anaerobic activity of archeabacteria. On the contrary, dissolved CO2 seems to have two different sources: 1) bacteria-driven reactions; 2) contribution from the hydrothermal system that is also feeding the CO2-rich mineralized springs discharging in the surrounding areas of the lake. The input of deep-seated CO2 may play a significant role for the development of the seasonal stratification of Lake Paterno. The latter controls the macro-invertebrate population dynamics: in summer, fishes are forced to

  20. Converter Gas and Waste Water Treatment by OG-system in Steel Smelting Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tianyi

    2013-01-01

    OG system, which stands for Oxygen Converter Gas recovery system, is the suppressed combustion type exhaust gas recovery system for the converters of steel smelt shops. This system is designed for cooling and purifying the converter gas which is produced from process of steel smelting. Metallurgical industry includes two types of technologies, which are ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy. There are two smelting methods, combined method (BOF-method) and electric arc furnace method. At pre...

  1. Downhole fluid sampling and noble gas analysis of saline waters from the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersberg, Thomas; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Niedermann, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    The 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole is situated at the NW-SE trending boundary between the Archaean and Proterozoic domains of the eastern Fennoscandian Shield (Finland). In August 2011, eight fluid samples were collected with a Leutert positive displacement sampler (PDS) from 500 m to 2480 m depth in the open bore hole. The PDS allows sampling at in situ pressures, thus minimising fractionation from degassing during sampling. At the surface, the samples were transferred into an evacuated sampling line connected with a Cu-tube and a glass bulb for gas sampling, a pressure gauge, and a thermometer. Gas was liberated with a heated ultrasonic bath and then admitted to the sampling devices. Gas/water ratios were already determined in the field during gas extraction. Saline groundwaters rich in methane, nitrogen, hydrogen and helium and with water stable isotope composition distinctive from meteoric and sea water have been found to host isolated ecosystems within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of Outokumpu (Kietäväinen et al., 2013). In order to characterise the geochemical and microbiological evolution of the deep subsurface of the area, noble gas residence times have been calculated based on radiogenic (4He, 40Ar), nucleogenic (21Ne) and fissiogenic (134Xe, 136Xe) noble gas nuclides. Geochemical and microbiological variations together with hydrogeological and geophysical data indicate negligible vertical fluid flow in the bedrock. Moreover, noble gas diffusion models show that diffusion is not likely to affect noble gas concentrations of groundwater at or below 500 m depth in Outokumpu. Therefore in situ accumulation was assumed as a basis for the age determination. In general, residence times between 10 and 50 Ma were indicated by 4He and21Ne, while somewhat younger ages were obtained by 40Ar, using average values for porosity, density and concentration of radioactive elements in the bedrock of Outokumpu. Kietäväinen R., Ahonen L., Kukkonen I

  2. Evaluation of a cathode gas channel with a water absorption layer/waste channel in a PEFC by using visualization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, Kimihiko; Nakata, Motoki; Yodo, Tadakatsu; Nishiguchi, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Makoto [Osaka Prefectural College of Technology, 26-12 Saiwai, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8572 (Japan); Itoh, Yasuhiko [SANYO Electric Co., Ltd., 1-1-1 Sakata, Oizumi-machi, Ora-gun, Gunma 370-0596 (Japan)

    2005-08-18

    The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) cathode is a performance-limiting component due to the slower oxygen reduction kinetics and mass transport limitations imposed by water generated in an electrochemical reaction. This water assists the performance of the PEFC by preventing drying of the polymer electrolyte. Conversely, the water hinders the transport of the reactant species by blocking the pores in the gas diffusion layer. Moreover, the effective electrode area is decreased, causing the cathode channel to become clogged with supersaturated water from the gas diffusion layer. This problem is overcome by separating the gas channel and the waste channel, and installing a water absorption layer (WAL). The new 'WAL type' gas channel has an installed WAL in which the designed waste channel is compared with the gas flow characteristics of a conventional cathode gas channel by using the visualization technique. Gas flowing into the WAL type separator is barely blocked before the WAL absorbs water condensed in the cathode gas channel. Therefore, the WAL type separator effectively improves the PEFC performance. (author)

  3. Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

  4. Water slug formation and motion in gas flow channels: the effects of geometry, surface wettability, and gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, May J; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Benziger, Jay B

    2013-08-01

    Water emerging from ∼100 μm pores into millimeter-size gas flow channels forms drops that grow and become slugs which span the flow channel. Flowing gas causes the slugs to detach and move down the channel. The effect of channel geometry, surface wettability, and gravity on the formation and motion of water slugs has been analyzed using high-speed video images of the drops and differential pressure-time traces. Drops grow and appear, assuming a sequence of shapes that minimize the total interfacial energy of the gas-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces. The drops are initially spherical caps centered on the pore (the liquid contacts one wall). Above a certain size, the drops move to the corner, forming "corner drops" (the liquid contacts two walls). Corner drops grow across the channel, evolving into partial liquid bridges (drops confined by three walls), and finally the drops span the channel cross-section forming slugs (contacting all four walls). Smaller slugs are formed in channels with hydrophobic walls than in channels with hydrophilic walls. Smaller slugs are formed in channels with curved walls than in square or rectangular channels. Slugs move when the differential gas pressure overcomes the force to move the advancing and receding gas-liquid-solid contact lines of the slugs. Residual water left behind in corners by moving slugs reduces the barriers for drops to form slugs, causing the steady-state slug volumes to be smaller than those seen at start-up in dry channels.

  5. Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Control Technology Options within the Energy, Water and Food Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Tareq; Korre, Anna; Nie, Zhenggang; Shah, Nilay

    2015-04-01

    The utilisation of Energy, Water and Food (EWF) resources can be described as a nexus of complex linkages embodied in industrial and natural processes. Food production is one such example of a system that mobilises EWF resources to deliver a product which is highly influenced by the efficiency of the industrial processes contributing to it and the conditions of the surrounding natural environment. Aggregating the utilisation of EWF resources into interconnected sub-systems is necessary for the accurate representation of the system's dynamics in terms of its material flow and resource consumption. The methodology used in this study is an extension of previous work developed regarding nexus analysis (Al-Ansari et al. 2014a, Al-Ansari et al. 2014b). Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to prepare detailed models of the sub-system components, determine the linkages between the different nexus constituents and evaluate impacts on the natural environment. The nexus system is comprised of water sub-systems represented by a reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process. Energy sub-systems for power generation include models for a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) and solar Photovoltaics (PV) energy generation, as well as an amine based CO2 capture process enabling the utilisation of CO2 for the artificial fertilization of crops. The agricultural sub-systems include the production and application of fertilizers and the raising of livestock. A biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) for power generation using waste manure from the livestock sub-system is also included. The objective of this study is to consider a conventional food system in Qatar and enhance its environmental performance by using a nexus approach to examine different scenarios and operating modes. For the Qatar case study, three scenarios and four modes of operation were developed as part of the analysis. The baseline scenario uses fossil fuel to power the entire EWF nexus system using CCGT, the

  6. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor. PMID:25940479

  7. Xylem anatomy correlates with gas exchange, water-use efficiency and growth performance under contrasting water regimes: evidence from Populus deltoides x Populus nigra hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichot, Régis; Laurans, Françoise; Monclus, Romain; Moreau, Alain; Pilate, Gilles; Brignolas, Franck

    2009-12-01

    Six Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. x P. nigra L. genotypes were selected to investigate whether stem xylem anatomy correlated with gas exchange rates, water-use efficiency (WUE) and growth performance. Clonal copies of the genotypes were grown in a two-plot common garden test under contrasting water regimes, with one plot maintained irrigated and the other one subjected to moderate summer water deficit. The six genotypes displayed a large range of xylem anatomy, mean vessel and fibre diameter varying from about 40 to 60 microm and from 7.5 to 10.5 microm, respectively. Decreased water availability resulted in a reduced cell size and an important rise in vessel density, but the extent of xylem plasticity was both genotype and trait dependent. Vessel diameter and theoretical xylem-specific hydraulic conductivity correlated positively with stomatal conductance, carbon isotope discrimination and growth performance-related traits and negatively with intrinsic WUE, especially under water deficit conditions. Vessel diameter and vessel density measured under water deficit conditions correlated with the relative losses in biomass production in response to water deprivation; this resulted from the fact that a more plastic xylem structure was generally accompanied by a larger loss in biomass production. PMID:19825869

  8. Water management reduces greenhouse gas emissions in a Mediterranean rice paddy field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruening, Carsten; Meijide, Ana; Manca, Giovanni; Goded, Ignacio; Seufert, Guenther; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Rice paddy fields are one of the biggest anthropogenic sources of methane (CH4), the second most important greenhouse gas (GHG) after carbon dioxide (CO2). Therefore most studies on greenhouse gases (GHG) in these agricultural systems focus on the evaluation of CH4 production. However, there are other GHGs such as CO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O) also exchanged within the atmosphere. Since each of the GHGs has its own radiative forcing effect, the total GHG budget of rice cultivation and its global warming potential (GWP) must be assessed. For this purpose a field experiment was carried out in a Mediterranean rice paddy field in the Po Valley (Italy), the largest rice producing region in Europe. Ecosystem CO2 and CH4 fluxes were assessed using the eddy covariance technique, while soil respiration and soil CH4 and N2O fluxes were measured with closed chambers for two complete years. Combining all GHGs measured, the rice paddy field acted as a sink of -368 and -828 g CO2 eq m-2 year-1 in the first and second years respectively. Both years, it was a CO2 sink and a CH4 source, while the N2O contribution to the GWP was relatively small. Differences in the GHG budget between the two years of measurements were mainly caused by the greater CH4 emissions in the first year (37.4 g CH4 m-2 compared to 21.03 g CH4 m-2 in the second year), probably as a consequence of the drainage of the water table in the middle of the growing season during the second year, which resulted in lower CH4 emissions without significant increases of N2O and CO2 fluxes. However, midseason drainage also resulted in small decreases of yield, indicating that GHG budget studies from agricultural systems should consider carbon exports through the harvest. The balance between net GWP and carbon yield indicated a loss of carbon equivalents from the system, which was more than 30-fold higher in the first year. Our results therefore suggest that an adequate management of the water table has the potential to be an

  9. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION; F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction

  10. The chronic toxicity of sodium bicarbonate, a major component of coal bed natural gas produced waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Aida M.; Harper, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is the principal salt in coal bed natural gas produced water from the Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming, USA, and concentrations of up to 3000 mg NaHCO3/L have been documented at some locations. No adequate studies have been performed to assess the chronic effects of NaHCO3 exposure. The present study was initiated to investigate the chronic toxicity and define sublethal effects at the individual organism level to explain the mechanisms of NaHCO3 toxicity. Three chronic experiments were completed with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), 1 with white suckers (Catostomus commersoni), 1 with Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 1 with a freshwater mussel, (Lampsilis siliquoidea). The data demonstrated that approximately 500 mg NaHCO3/L to 1000 mg NaHCO3/L affected all species of experimental aquatic animals in chronic exposure conditions. Freshwater mussels were the least sensitive to NaHCO3 exposure, with a 10-d inhibition concentration that affects 20% of the sample population (IC20) of 952 mg NaHCO3/L. The IC20 for C. dubia was the smallest, at 359 mg NaHCO3/L. A significant decrease in sodium–potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+/K+ ATPase) together with the lack of growth effects suggests that Na+/K+ ATPase activity was shut down before the onset of death. Several histological anomalies, including increased incidence of necrotic cells, suggested that fish were adversely affected as a result of exposure to >450 mg NaHCO3/L.

  11. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2001-10-16

    This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction.

  12. Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Tom

    2013-06-30

    The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

  13. Ultrasonic Water Thickness Measurement at a Gas-Liquid Interface Area in Full-scale Mockup Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic pre-examination in the mockup condition was performed to do an analysis for cooling performance in a complete test channel by the investigation of the two-phase flow that will be developed in an inclined gap with heating from the top. This ultrasonic technique for measuring water layer thickness measurement employs the higher relative acoustic impedance of air with respect to that of liquids. By this method it is possible to determine both liquid water distance, void fraction in a gas-liquid two-phase flow. Instantaneous measurement of the water layer thickness is useful in understanding heat and mass transfer characteristics in a two-phase separated flow. An ultrasonic measurement technique for determining water layer thickness in the wavy and slug flow regime of horizontal tube flow has been produced as an A-scan mode and B-scan mode

  14. Treatment of discharge water from hydrostatic testing of natural gas pipelines. Volume 4. Topical report, January 1989-June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents results developed from bench- and full-scale treatment testing conducted on discharge water from hydrostatic testing of natural gas pipelines. Bench-scale testing examined sedimentation with and without chemical coagulants for reducing iron and total suspended solids, aeration for removal of volatile organics, and activated carbon adsorption for removal of organic constituents. Treatment results are provided for a full-scale treatment process, which utilized a hay bale structure and adsorbent booms for removing suspended solids and oil from the discharge water. Detailed characterization results are presented for test water collected before and after treatment. Results developed from an economic analysis of other potential treatment/disposal alternatives are also presented. A total of eight approaches that may be applied for managing constituents present in hydrostatic test waters are examined. The report is Volume 4 of a five-volume report series

  15. Simulating Gas-Liquid-Water Partitioning and Fluid Properties of Petroleum under Pressure: Implications for Deep-Sea Blowouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Jonas; Reddy, Christopher M; Nelson, Robert K; Socolofsky, Scott A; Arey, J Samuel

    2016-07-19

    With the expansion of offshore petroleum extraction, validated models are needed to simulate the behaviors of petroleum compounds released in deep (>100 m) waters. We present a thermodynamic model of the densities, viscosities, and gas-liquid-water partitioning of petroleum mixtures with varying pressure, temperature, and composition based on the Peng-Robinson equation-of-state and the modified Henry's law (Krychevsky-Kasarnovsky equation). The model is applied to Macondo reservoir fluid released during the Deepwater Horizon disaster, represented with 279-280 pseudocomponents, including 131-132 individual compounds. We define >n-C8 pseudocomponents based on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) measurements, which enable the modeling of aqueous partitioning for n-C8 to n-C26 fractions not quantified individually. Thermodynamic model predictions are tested against available laboratory data on petroleum liquid densities, gas/liquid volume fractions, and liquid viscosities. We find that the emitted petroleum mixture was ∼29-44% gas and ∼56-71% liquid, after cooling to local conditions near the broken Macondo riser stub (∼153 atm and 4.3 °C). High pressure conditions dramatically favor the aqueous dissolution of C1-C4 hydrocarbons and also influence the buoyancies of bubbles and droplets. Additionally, the simulated densities of emitted petroleum fluids affect previous estimates of the volumetric flow rate of dead oil from the emission source.

  16. Simulating Gas-Liquid-Water Partitioning and Fluid Properties of Petroleum under Pressure: Implications for Deep-Sea Blowouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Jonas; Reddy, Christopher M; Nelson, Robert K; Socolofsky, Scott A; Arey, J Samuel

    2016-07-19

    With the expansion of offshore petroleum extraction, validated models are needed to simulate the behaviors of petroleum compounds released in deep (>100 m) waters. We present a thermodynamic model of the densities, viscosities, and gas-liquid-water partitioning of petroleum mixtures with varying pressure, temperature, and composition based on the Peng-Robinson equation-of-state and the modified Henry's law (Krychevsky-Kasarnovsky equation). The model is applied to Macondo reservoir fluid released during the Deepwater Horizon disaster, represented with 279-280 pseudocomponents, including 131-132 individual compounds. We define >n-C8 pseudocomponents based on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) measurements, which enable the modeling of aqueous partitioning for n-C8 to n-C26 fractions not quantified individually. Thermodynamic model predictions are tested against available laboratory data on petroleum liquid densities, gas/liquid volume fractions, and liquid viscosities. We find that the emitted petroleum mixture was ∼29-44% gas and ∼56-71% liquid, after cooling to local conditions near the broken Macondo riser stub (∼153 atm and 4.3 °C). High pressure conditions dramatically favor the aqueous dissolution of C1-C4 hydrocarbons and also influence the buoyancies of bubbles and droplets. Additionally, the simulated densities of emitted petroleum fluids affect previous estimates of the volumetric flow rate of dead oil from the emission source. PMID:27117673

  17. Plant water use efficiency over geological time--evolution of leaf stomata configurations affecting plant gas exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmuel Assouline

    Full Text Available Plant gas exchange is a key process shaping global hydrological and carbon cycles and is often characterized by plant water use efficiency (WUE - the ratio of CO2 gain to water vapor loss. Plant fossil record suggests that plant adaptation to changing atmospheric CO2 involved correlated evolution of stomata density (d and size (s, and related maximal aperture, amax . We interpreted the fossil record of s and d correlated evolution during the Phanerozoic to quantify impacts on gas conductance affecting plant transpiration, E, and CO2 uptake, A, independently, and consequently, on plant WUE. A shift in stomata configuration from large s-low d to small s-high d in response to decreasing atmospheric CO2 resulted in large changes in plant gas exchange characteristics. The relationships between gas conductance, gws , A and E and maximal relative transpiring leaf area, (amax ⋅d, exhibited hysteretic-like behavior. The new WUE trend derived from independent estimates of A and E differs from established WUE-CO2 trends for atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeding 1,200 ppm. In contrast with a nearly-linear decrease in WUE with decreasing CO2 obtained by standard methods, the newly estimated WUE trend exhibits remarkably stable values for an extended geologic period during which atmospheric CO2 dropped from 3,500 to 1,200 ppm. Pending additional tests, the findings may affect projected impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 on components of the global hydrological cycle.

  18. Application of the Analogy Between Water Flow with a Free Surface and Two-dimensional Compressible Gas Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, W James; Lindner, Norman J; Bitterly, Jack G

    1947-01-01

    The theory of hydraulic analogy, that is, the analogy between water flow with a free surface and two-dimensional compressible gas flow and the limitations and conditions of the analogy are discussed. A test run was made using the hydraulic analogy as applied to the flow about circular cylinders at various diameters at subsonic velocities extending to the super critical range. The apparatus and techniques used in this application are described and criticized. Reasonably satisfactory agreement of pressure distributions and flow fields existed between water and airflow about corresponding bodies. This agreement indicated the possibility of extending experimental compressibility research by new methods.

  19. Analysis on blow-down transient in water ingress accident of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction with the increase of steam density in reactor core to enhance neutron slowing-down, also the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and the damage of reflector structure material. The increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The research on water ingress transient is significant for the verification of inherent safety characteristics of high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM), designed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, is exampled to be analyzed in this paper. The design basis accident (DBA) scenarios of double-ended guillotine break of single heat-exchange tube (steam generator heat-exchange tube rupture) are simulated by the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, and some key concerns which are relative to the amount of water into the reactor core during the blow-down transient are analyzed in detail. The results show that both of water mass and steam ratio of the fluid spouting from the broken heat-exchange tube are affected by break location, which will increase obviously with the broken location closing to the outlet of the heat-exchange tube. The double-ended guillotine rupture at the outlet of the heat-exchange will result more steam penetrates into the reactor core in the design basis accident of water ingress. The mass of water ingress will also be affected by the draining system. It is concluded that, with reasonable optimization on design to balance safety and economy, the total mass of water ingress into the primary circuit of reactor could be limited effectively to meet the safety requirements, and the pollution of

  20. Methanotrophic activity in the water column above shallow gas flares west of Prins Karls Forland, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründger, Friederike; Svenning, Mette M.; Niemann, Helge; Silyakova, Anna; Serov, Pavel; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Granskog, Mats A.; Ferre, Bénédicte; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Numerous gas flares, interpreted to be streams of methane bubbles, were discovered in shallow waters (average water depth about 90 m) on the continental shelf west of Prins Karls Forland (Western Svalbard) in the Arctic Ocean. Gas is released from the seabed to the water column and potentially transferred into the atmosphere where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. In order to resolve the fate of dissolved methane in the water column, we carried out grid-pattern biogeochemical measurements in the study area of 30 x 15 km. Specifically, we measured concentrations of dissolved methane and microbial methane oxidation (MOx) rates at 8 water depths at 31 sampling stations and performed 16S rRNA sequencing analysis on selected samples to characterize the microbial community composition. Availability of dissolved methane is essential for the process of microbial methane oxidation. However, our measurements reveal that high concentrations of dissolved methane in the water column do not necessarily lead to high MOx rates. Our results indicated that the presence of marine methanotrophic biomass as well as dissolved organic matter is of larger importance for the process of microbial methane oxidation. For example, we found MOx hot spots with values up to 13 nmol l‑1 d‑1 at bottom water depth with dissolved methane concentrations less than 160 nmol l‑1. In contrast, at stations where bottom methane concentration values reached 640 nmol l‑1, MOx rates were less than 0.7 nmol l‑1 d‑1. To interpret observed interconnection between methane concentrations and MOx rates, we use vertical distributions of seawater temperature, salinity and properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). This information helps us characterize the oceanographic setting and circulation patterns in the area, which we believe has a major impact on the origin and distribution of methanotrophic microbial biomass and methane oxidation in methanerich bottom water. This study is part of the

  1. Optimised thallium precipitation in a waste water treatment system of the flue gas desulphurisation; Optimierte Thalliumabscheidung einer RAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritzerfeld, Guenter [RWE Power AG, Bergheim (Germany); Birngruber, Ingolf [RWE Power AG, Hamm (Germany); Muelder, Thomas [RWE Power AG, Ibbenbueren (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    When co-combusting substitute fuels in power plants, the element Thallium should be checked in the drain of the waste water treatment system of flue gas desulphurisation. In 2005 Thallium-concentrations exceeding the limit value were determined for the first time as a consequence of the modified analysis of the supervisory authority. The previous lower Thallium concentrations with graphite tube-atomic absorption spectrometry were caused by the high chloride concentration in RAA waste water. The RAA operating mode was checked and changed. Equipment-related weak spots were detected and corrected. (orig.)

  2. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Iwanowicz, Luke; Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Mumford, Adam; Orem, William H.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, >95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby.

  3. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Akob, Denise M; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Mumford, Adam C; Orem, William H; Nagel, Susan C

    2016-07-01

    Currently, >95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby. PMID:27073166

  4. Radioactivity in produced water from Norwegian oil and gas installations - concentrations, bioavailability and doses to marine biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, R.; Eriksen, D. Oe.; Straalberg, E.; Iden, K. I.; Rye, H.; Hylland, K.; Ruus, A.; Roeyset, O.; Berntssen, M. H. G.

    2006-03-15

    Substantial amounts of produced water, containing elevated levels of radionuclides (mainly 226Ra and 228Ra) are discharged to the sea as a result of oil and gas production on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. So far no study has assessed the potential radiological effects on marine biota in connection with radionuclide discharges to the North Sea. The main objective of the project is to establish radiological safe discharge limits for radium, lead and polonium associated with other components in produced water from oil and gas installations on the Norwegian continental shelf. Preliminary results indicate that presence of added chemicals such as scale inhibitors in the produced water has a marked influence on the formation of radium and barium sulphates when produced water is mixed with sea water. Thus, the mobility and bio-availability of radium (and barium) may be larger than anticipated. Also, the bio-availability of radium may be increased due to presence of such chemicals, and this is presently being studied. (author) (tk)

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(arylene ether sulfone)s for Reverse Osmosis Water Purification and Gas Separation Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Sundell, Benjamin James

    2014-01-01

    Crosslinking is an effective technique for increasing the salt rejection of water purification membranes and the selectivity of gas separation membranes. An abundance of monomers, telechelic oligomers, and novel polymers were synthesized for use as separation membranes. These materials were often imbued with crosslinking functionalities to increase their performance during testing at the University of Texas-Austin. Crosslinking of sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) oligomers was stud...

  6. Multiclass determination of 66 organic micropollutants in environmental water samples by fast gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Hernández, Félix; Beltrán Arandes, Joaquim; Portolés Nicolau, Tania; Cherta Cucala, Laura

    2012-01-01

    A multiresidue method has been developed for quantification and identification of 66 multiclass priority organic pollutants in water by fast gas chromatography (GC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). Capabilities and limitations of single quadrupole mass spectrometer as detector in fast GC were studied evaluating the chromatographic responses in terms of sensitivity and chromatographic peak shapes, as they were influenced by scan time. The number of monitored ions in a selected ion monitoring...

  7. Application of the methods of gas dynamics to water flows with free surface I : flows with no energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiswerk, Ernst

    1940-01-01

    The application is treated in sufficient detail to facilitate as much as possible its application by the engineer who is less familiar with the subject. The present work was undertaken with two objects in view. In the first place, it is considered as a contribution to the water analogy of gas flows, and secondly, a large portion is devoted to the general theory of the two-dimensional supersonic flows.

  8. Flame made ceria supported noble metal catalysts for efficient H2 production via the water gas shift reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Lichtenberg, H.; Gaur, A.; Goldbach, A.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Rh/ceria catalysts were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis for high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reactions. These catalysts show a high specific surface area due to a high degree of nanocrystallinity. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) unraveled the formation of small Rh particles under WGS reaction conditions. The catalytic activity was examined at atmospheric pressure by measuring CO conversion as a function of temperature. Some methane formation was observed above 310°C.

  9. Host-Guest Chemistry in the Gas Phase: Complex Formation of Cucurbit[6]uril with Proton-bound Water Dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Dong Hun; Lee, Shin Jung C.; Lee, Jong Wha; Kim, Hugh I.

    2014-03-01

    The hydration of cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) in the gas phase is investigated using electrospray ionization traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-TWIM-MS). Highly abundant dihydrated and tetrahydrated species of diprotonated CB[6] are found in the ESI-TWIM-MS spectrum. The hydration patterns of the CB[6] ion and the dissociation patterns of the hydrated CB[6] ion indicate that two water molecules are bound to each other, forming a water dimer in the CB[6] complex. Ion mobility studies combined with the structures calculated by density functional theory suggest that the proton-bound water dimer is present as a Zundel-like structure in the CB[6] portal, forming a hydrogen bond network with carbonyl groups of the CB[6]. When a large guest molecule is bound to a CB[6] portal, water molecules cannot bind to the portal. In addition, the strong binding energy of the water dimer blocks the portal, hindering the insertion of the long alkyl chain of the guest molecule into the CB[6] cavity. With small alkali metal cations, such as Li+ and Na+, a single water molecule interacts with the CB[6] portal, forming hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl groups of CB[6]. A highly stable Zundel-like structure of the proton-bound water dimer or a metal-bound water molecule at the CB[6] portal is suggested as an initial hydration process for CB[6], which is only dissolved in aqueous solution with acid or alkali metal ions.

  10. [Diurnal variations of greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface of aquaculture ponds in the Min River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Tong, Chuan; He, Qing-Hua; Huang, Jia-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Wetland reclamation and aquaculture is one of the main disturbance types in coastal wetlands. Diurnal variations of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface were determined using a floating chambers + gas chromatography method in a shrimp pond, and a mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp in October in the Shanyutan Wetland of the Min River estuary, southeast China. Meanwhile, the meteorological indicators in ground surface and physical, chemical and biological indicators of surface water were also measured. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface all demonstrated distinct diurnal variations. Both shrimp pond and mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp functioned as a sink of CO2 [the diurnal averaged CO2 fluxes were -48.79 and -105.25 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively], and a source of CH4 [the diurnal averaged CH4 fluxes were 1.00 and 5.74 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively]; the diurnal averaged CO2 and CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture of fish and shrimp pond were higher than that of the shrimp pond. Greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface from the aquaculture ponds were influenced by many factors. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the concentration of Chlorophyll was the major factor affecting the CO2 fluxes, and the concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the shrimp pond; whereas water temperature and Chlorophyll were the major factors affecting the CO2 fluxes, and dissolved oxygen, PO4(3-) and pH were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp. PMID:23379142

  11. Effect of ageing of gas diffusion layers on the water distribution in flow field channels of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätzel, Juliane; Markötter, Henning; Arlt, Tobias; Klages, Merle; Haußmann, Jan; Messerschmidt, Matthias; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Scholta, Joachim; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the influence of artificial ageing of gas diffusion layers (GDL) on the water distribution and transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) during cell operation. Water droplet size distributions are measured by means of in-operando neutron radiography. We find a strong correlation between droplet size distribution and GDL ageing time: With increasing GDL ageing, water droplet sizes in the flow field channels strongly decrease, indicating an ineffective water transport that leads to a reduced cell performance. This effect can be assigned to water accumulations on the GDL surface that block the gas supply towards the catalyst layer.

  12. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Maier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO2 and NH3, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high.

  13. Volumetric fraction measurement in oil-water-gas multiphase flow with dual energy gamma-ray system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong-hui; WU Ying-xiang; LI Zhi-biao; ZHONG Xing-fu

    2005-01-01

    Volumetric fraction distribution measurement is a constituent part of process tomography system in oil-water-gas mulfiphase flow. With the technological development of nuclear radial inspection, dual-energy γ-ray techniques make it possible to investigate the concentration of the different components on the cross-section of oil-water-gas multiphase pipe-flow. The dual-energy gamma-ray technique is based on materials attenuation coefficients measurement comprised of two radioactive isotopes of 241Am and 241Cs which have emission energies at 59.5 keV and 662 keV in this project. Nuclear instruments and data acquisition system were designed to measure the material's attenuation dose rate and a number of static tests were conducted at the Multiphase Laboratory, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Three phases of oil-water-gas media were investigated for their possible use to simulate different media volumetric fraction distributions in experimental vessels. Attenuation intensities were measured, and the arithmetic of linear attenuation coefficients and the equations of volumetric fractions were studied. Investigation of an unexpected measurement error from attenuation equations revealed that a modified arithmetic was involved and finally the system achieved acceptable accuracy in experimental research.

  14. Cooling of gas turbines IX : cooling effects from use of ceramic coatings on water-cooled turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Byron; Livingood, John N B

    1948-01-01

    The hottest part of a turbine blade is likely to be the trailing portion. When the blades are cooled and when water is used as the coolant, the cooling passages are placed as close as possible to the trailing edge in order to cool this portion. In some cases, however, the trailing portion of the blade is so narrow, for aerodynamic reasons, that water passages cannot be located very near the trailing edge. Because ceramic coatings offer the possibility of protection for the trailing part of such narrow blades, a theoretical study has been made of the cooling effect of a ceramic coating on: (1) the blade-metal temperature when the gas temperature is unchanged, and (2) the gas temperature when the metal temperature is unchanged. Comparison is also made between the changes in the blade or gas temperatures produced by ceramic coatings and the changes produced by moving the cooling passages nearer the trailing edge. This comparison was made to provide a standard for evaluating the gains obtainable with ceramic coatings as compared to those obtainable by constructing the turbine blade in such a manner that water passages could be located very near the trailing edge.

  15. The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program: Lessons Learned by Pairing Scientists and Teachers to Develop Curriculum on Global Climate Change and Regional Unconventional Oil and Gas Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Rogers, J. D.; Casey, J. G.; Lackey, G.; Birdsell, D.; Brown, K.; Polmear, M.; Capps, S.; Rosenblum, J.; Sitterley, K.; Hafich, K. A.; Hannigan, M.; Knight, D.

    2015-12-01

    The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program, run by the UCAR Center for Science Education, brought together scientists and secondary science teachers in a yearlong program culminating in the development of curriculum related to the impacts of unconventional oil and gas development. Graduate students and research scientists taught about their research area and its relationship to oil and gas throughout three online courses during the 2015-16 school year, during which teachers and scientists engaged in active online discussions. Topics covered included climate change, oil and gas infrastructure, air quality, water quality, public health, and practices and policies relating to oil and gas development. Building upon their initial online interactions and a face-to-face meeting in March, teachers were paired with appropriate AirWaterGas team members as science advisors during a month-long residency in Boulder, Colorado. During the residency, graduate student scientists provided resources and feedback as teachers developed curriculum projects in collaboration with each other and UCAR science educators. Additionally, teachers and AirWaterGas researchers shared experiences on an oil and gas well site tour, and a short course on drilling methods with a drilling rig simulator. Here, we share lessons learned from both sides of the aisle, including initial results from program assessment conducted with the participating teachers.

  16. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  17. Surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in ice-free and ice-covered waters

    KAUST Repository

    Solberg, Ingrid

    2013-10-04

    Upward-facing echosounders that provided continuous, long-term measurements were applied to address the surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) throughout an entire winter in a 150-m-deep Norwegian fjord. During ice-free conditions, the sprat surfaced and released gas bubbles at night with an estimated surfacing rate of 3.5 times per fish day-1. The vertical swimming speeds during surfacing were considerably higher (~10 times) than during diel vertical migrations, especially when returning from the surface, and particularly when the fjord was not ice covered. The sprat released gas a few hours after surfacing, suggesting that the sprat gulped atmospheric air during its excursions to the surface. While the surface activity increased after the fjord became ice covered, the records of gas release decreased sharply. The under-ice fish then displayed a behavior interpreted as "searching for the surface" by repeatedly ascending toward the ice, apparently with limited success of filling the swim bladder. This interpretation was supported by lower acoustic target strength in ice-covered waters. The frequent surfacing behavior demonstrated in this study indicates that gulping of atmospheric air is an important element in the life of sprat. While at least part of the population endured overwintering in the ice-covered habitat, ice covering may constrain those physostome fishes that lack a gas-generating gland in ways that remain to be established. 2013 The Author(s).

  18. Forced assembly of water-dispersible carbon nanotubes trapped in paper for cheap gas sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xinyue; Huang, Xiaopeng; Wang, Shujun; Qian, Qiuping; Du, Wenbin; Wang, Yapei

    2013-11-25

    A versatile and readily scalable approach to fabricate a cheap and sensitive paper gas sensor is described. Chemically acidified single-walled carbon nanotubes are assembled in paper, forming continuous sensing arrays with a low detection limit and high detection selectivity for ammonia gas.

  19. METHOD 530 DETERMINATION OF SELECT SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ MASS SPECTROMETRY (GC/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1.1. This is a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the determination of selected semivolatile organic compounds in drinking waters. Accuracy and precision data have been generated in reagent water, and in finished ground and surface waters for the compounds li...

  20. Organic compounds in produced waters from coalbed natural gas wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orem, W.H.; Tatu, C.A.; Lerch, H.E.; Rice, C.A.; Bartos, T.T.; Bates, A.L.; Tewalt, S.; Corum, M.D. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The organic composition of produced water samples from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells in the Powder River Basin, WY, sampled in 2001 and 2002 are reported as part of a larger study of the potential health and environmental effects of organic compounds derived from coal. The quality of CBNG produced waters is a potential environmental concern and disposal problem for CBNG producers, and no previous studies of organic compounds in CBNG produced water have been published. Organic compounds identified in the produced water samples included: phenols, biphenyls, N-, O-, and S-containing heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic amines, various non-aromatic compounds, and phthalates. Many of the identified organic compounds (phenols, heterocyclic compounds, PAHs) are probably coal-derived. PAHs represented the group of organic compounds most commonly observed. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged up to 23 {mu} g/L. Concentrations of individual compounds ranged from about 18 to {lt}0.01 {mu} g/L. Temporal variability of organic compound concentrations was documented, as two wells with relatively high organic compound contents in produced water in 2001 had much lower concentrations in 2002. In many areas, including the PRB, coal strata provide aquifers for drinking water wells. Organic compounds observed in produced water are also likely present in drinking water supplied from wells in the coal. Some of the organic compounds identified in the produced water samples are potentially toxic, but at the levels measured in these samples are unlikely to have acute health effects. The human health effects of low-level, chronic exposure to coal-derived organic compounds in drinking water are currently unknown. Continuing studies will evaluate possible toxic effects from low level, chronic exposure to coal-derived organic compounds in drinking water supplies.

  1. Organic compounds in produced waters from coalbed natural gas wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, W.H.; Tatu, C.A.; Lerch, H.E.; Rice, C.A.; Bartos, T.T.; Bates, A.L.; Tewalt, S.; Corum, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    The organic composition of produced water samples from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells in the Powder River Basin, WY, sampled in 2001 and 2002 are reported as part of a larger study of the potential health and environmental effects of organic compounds derived from coal. The quality of CBNG produced waters is a potential environmental concern and disposal problem for CBNG producers, and no previous studies of organic compounds in CBNG produced water have been published. Organic compounds identified in the produced water samples included: phenols, biphenyls, N-, O-, and S-containing heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic amines, various non-aromatic compounds, and phthalates. Many of the identified organic compounds (phenols, heterocyclic compounds, PAHs) are probably coal-derived. PAHs represented the group of organic compounds most commonly observed. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged up to 23 ??g/L. Concentrations of individual compounds ranged from about 18 to compound concentrations was documented, as two wells with relatively high organic compound contents in produced water in 2001 had much lower concentrations in 2002. In many areas, including the PRB, coal strata provide aquifers for drinking water wells. Organic compounds observed in produced water are also likely present in drinking water supplied from wells in the coal. Some of the organic compounds identified in the produced water samples are potentially toxic, but at the levels measured in these samples are unlikely to have acute health effects. The human health effects of low-level, chronic exposure to coal-derived organic compounds in drinking water are currently unknown. Continuing studies will evaluate possible toxic effects from low level, chronic exposure to coal-derived organic compounds in drinking water supplies.

  2. Computation and comparison of Pd-based membrane reactor performances for water gas shift reaction and isotope swamping in view of highly tritiated water decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A dedicated detritiation process for highly tritiated water (HTW) has to be identified. • Water gas shift and isotopic swamping via Pd–Ag membrane reactor are possible processes. • A parametric analysis through two simulation codes is performed. • A comparison in terms of the decontamination factor is provided. -- Abstract: In a D–T fusion machine, due to the possible reaction between tritium and oxygen, some potential sources of highly tritiated water (HTW) can be identified. Therefore, a dedicated detritiation process has to be assessed either for economic and safety reasons. In this view, the use of a Pd-based membrane reactor performing isotopic exchange reactions can be considered since hydrogen isotopes exclusively permeate the Pd–Ag membrane and their exchange over the catalyst realizes the water detritiation. In this activity, the treatment of highly tritiated water, generated by an ITER-like machine (i.e. 2 kg of stoichiometric HTO containing up to 300 g of tritium), via a Pd-membrane reactor is studied in terms of decontamination capability. Especially, a parametric analysis of two processes (water gas shift and isotopic swamping) performed in a Pd-based membrane reactor is carried out by using two mathematical models previously developed and experimentally verified. Particularly, the effect of the reactor temperature, the membrane thickness, the reaction pressure and the protium sweep flow-rate is investigated. Moreover, a comparison in terms of the decontamination factor and the number of reactors necessary to detritiate the HTW are provided. Generally, the results reveal a higher decontamination capability of the WGS reaction respect with the IS (maximum DF values of about 120 and 1.6 in the case of WGS and IS, respectively). However some drawbacks, mainly related with the formation of tritiated species, can occur by performing the WGS

  3. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of organophosphate pesticides in filtered water by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Virendra K.; Wydoski, Duane S.

    2002-01-01

    A method for the isolation of 20 parent organophosphate pesticides and 5 pesticide degradates from filtered natural-water samples is described. Seven of these compounds are reported permanently with an estimated concentration because of performance issues. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter, and then 1 liter of filtrate is pumped through disposable solid-phase extraction columns that contain octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the compounds. The C-18 columns are dried with nitrogen gas, and method compounds are eluted from the columns with ethyl acetate. The extract is analyzed by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Single-operator method detection limits in all three water-matrix samples ranged from 0.004 to 0.012 microgram per liter. Method performance was validated by spiking all compounds into three different matrices at three different concentrations. Eight replicates were analyzed at each concentration level in each matrix. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in surface-water samples ranged from 39 to 149 percent and those in ground-water samples ranged from 40 to 124 percent for all pesticides except dimethoate. Mean recoveries of method compounds spiked in reagent-water samples ranged from 41 to 119 percent for all pesticides except dimethoate. Dimethoate exhibited reduced recoveries (mean of 43 percent in low- and medium-concentration level spiked samples and 20 percent in high-concentration level spiked samples) in all matrices because of incomplete collection on the C-18 column. As a result, concen-trations of dimethoate and six other compounds (based on performance issues) in samples are reported in this method with an estimated remark code.

  4. Beaufort Sea deep-water gas hydrate recovery from a seafloor mound in a region of widespread BSR occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patrick E.; Pohlman, John W.; Lorenson, T.D.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate was recovered from the Alaskan Beaufort Sea slope north of Camden Bay in August 2010 during a U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy expedition (USCG cruise ID HLY1002) under the direction of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Interpretation of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected in 1977 by the USGS across the Beaufort Sea