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Sample records for carbonyl sulfide

  1. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  2. Instrument for Airborne Measurement of Carbonyl Sulfide, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop small, low power instrumentation for the real-time direct measurement of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) in the atmosphere, especially...

  3. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  4. Plant Uptake of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide in Coast Redwood Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, M. E.; Berry, J. A.; Hilton, T. W.; Zumkehr, A.; Stinecipher, J.; Lu, Y.; Kornfeld, A.; Seibt, U.; Dawson, T. E.; Montzka, S. A.; Baker, I. T.; Kulkarni, S.; Wang, Y.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Commane, R.; Loik, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    The future resilience of coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) is now of critical concern due to the detection of a 33% decline in California coastal fog over the 20th century. However, ecosystem-scale measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance are challenging in coast redwood forests, making it difficult to anticipate the impacts of future changes in fog. To address this methodological problem, we explore coastal variations in atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS), which could potentially be used as a tracer of these ecosystem processes. We conducted atmospheric flask campaigns in coast redwood sites, sampling at surface heights and in the canopy ( 70 m), at the University of California Landels-Hill Big Creek Reserve and Big Basin State Park. We simulated COS atmosphere-biosphere exchange with a high-resolution 3-D model to interpret these data. Flask measurements indicated a persistent daytime drawdown between the coast and the downwind forest (45 ± 6 ppt COS) that is consistent with the expected relationship between COS plant uptake, stomatal conductance, and gross primary production. Other sources and sinks of COS that could introduce noise to the COS tracer technique (soils, anthropogenic activity, nocturnal plant uptake, and surface hydrolysis on leaves) are likely to be small relative to daytime COS plant uptake. These results suggest that COS measurements may be useful for making ecosystem-scale estimates of carbon, water, and energy exchange in coast redwood forests.

  5. Global gridded anthropogenic emissions inventory of carbonyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumkehr, Andrew; Hilton, Tim W.; Whelan, Mary; Smith, Steve; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Campbell, J. Elliott

    2018-06-01

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS) is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the troposphere and is an atmospheric tracer for the carbon cycle. Gridded inventories of global anthropogenic COS are used for interpreting global COS measurements. However, previous gridded anthropogenic data are a climatological estimate based on input data that is over three decades old and are not representative of current conditions. Here we develop a new gridded data set of global anthropogenic COS sources that includes more source sectors than previously available and uses the most current emissions factors and industry activity data as input. Additionally, the inventory is provided as annually varying estimates from years 1980-2012 and employs a source specific spatial scaling procedure. We estimate a global source in year 2012 of 406 Gg S y-1 (range of 223-586 Gg S y-1), which is highly concentrated in China and is twice as large as the previous gridded inventory. Our large upward revision in the bottom-up estimate of the source is consistent with a recent top-down estimate based on air-monitoring and Antarctic firn data. Furthermore, our inventory time trends, including a decline in the 1990's and growth after the year 2000, are qualitatively consistent with trends in atmospheric data. Finally, similarities between the spatial distribution in this inventory and remote sensing data suggest that the anthropogenic source could potentially play a role in explaining a missing source in the global COS budget.

  6. Fast retrievals of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide with IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. Anthony; Dudhia, Anu

    2017-02-01

    Iterative retrievals of trace gases, such as carbonyl sulfide (OCS), from satellites can be exceedingly slow. The algorithm may even fail to keep pace with data acquisition such that analysis is limited to local events of special interest and short time spans. With this in mind, a linear retrieval scheme was developed to estimate total column amounts of OCS at a rate roughly 104 times faster than a typical iterative retrieval. This scheme incorporates two concepts not utilized in previously published linear estimates. First, all physical parameters affecting the signal are included in the state vector and accounted for jointly, rather than treated as effective noise. Second, the initialization point is determined from an ensemble of atmospheres based on comparing the model spectra to the observations, thus improving the linearity of the problem. All of the 2014 data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), instruments A and B, were analysed and showed spatial features of OCS total columns, including depletions over tropical rainforests, seasonal enhancements over the oceans, and distinct OCS features over land. Error due to assuming linearity was found to be on the order of 11 % globally for OCS. However, systematic errors from effects such as varying surface emissivity and extinction due to aerosols have yet to be robustly characterized. Comparisons to surface volume mixing ratio in situ samples taken by NOAA show seasonal correlations greater than 0.7 for five out of seven sites across the globe. Furthermore, this linear scheme was applied to OCS, but may also be used as a rapid estimator of any detectable trace gas using IASI or similar nadir-viewing instruments.

  7. Instrument for Airborne Measurement of Carbonyl Sulfide, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II SBIR program, Southwest Sciences will continue the development of small, low power instrumentation for real-time direct measurement of carbonyl...

  8. Ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrovski, Darko; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We present combined experimental and theoretical results on strong-field ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by circularly polarized laser pulses. The obtained molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions show pronounced asymmetries perpendicular to the direction of the molec......We present combined experimental and theoretical results on strong-field ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by circularly polarized laser pulses. The obtained molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions show pronounced asymmetries perpendicular to the direction......-dimensionally-oriented polar molecules, in particular asymmetries in the emission direction of the photoelectrons. In the following article [Phys. Rev. A 83, 023406 (2011)] the focus is to understand strong-field ionization from three-dimensionally-oriented asymmetric top molecules, in particular the suppression of electron...

  9. Sulfur isotopic analysis of carbonyl sulfide and its application for biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shohei; Kamezaki, Kazuki; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) is the most abundant gas containing sulfur in the atmosphere, with an average mixing ratio of 500 p.p.t.v. in the troposphere. OCS is suggested as a sulfur source of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSA) which plays an important role in Earth's radiation budget and ozone depletion. Therefore, OCS budget should be validated for prediction of climate change, but the global OCS budget is imbalance. Recently we developed a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions of OCS using nanomole level samples: the direct isotopic analytical technique of on-line gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions S+ (Hattori et al., 2015). The first measurement of the δ34S value for atmospheric OCS coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere (Hattori et al., 2011; Schmidt et al., 2012; Hattori et al., 2012) explains the reported δ34S value for background stratospheric sulfate, suggesting that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. This new method measuring δ34S values of OCS can be used to investigate OCS sources and sinks in the troposphere to better understand its cycle. It is known that some microorganisms in soil can degrade OCS, but the mechanism and the contribution to the OCS in the air are still uncertain. In order to determine sulfur isotopic enrichment factor of OCS during degradation via microorganisms, incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus, isolated from natural soil environments (Kato et al., 2008). As a result, sulfur isotope ratios of OCS were increased during degradation of OCS, indicating that reaction for OC32S is faster than that for OC33S and OC34S. OCS degradation via microorganisms is not mass-independent fractionation (MIF) process, suggesting that this

  10. Rotational spectrum and structure of the carbonyl sulfide-trifluoromethane weakly bound dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Michal M; Peebles, Sean A

    2006-11-02

    Pure rotational spectra of five isotopomers of the 1:1 weakly bound complex formed between carbonyl sulfide and trifluoromethane (TFM) have been measured using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The experimental rotational constants and dipole moment components are consistent with a structure of C(s) symmetry in which the dipole moment vectors of OCS and HCF(3) are aligned antiparallel and at an angle of about 40 degrees and with a center of mass separation of 3.965(26) A. The derived H...O distance is 2.90(5) A, which is up to 0.6 A longer than is seen in other similar TFM complexes exhibiting C-H...O interactions. Ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level give a structure with rotational constants that are in reasonable agreement with those of the normal isotopic species.

  11. Neurotoxicity of carbonyl sulfide in F344 rats following inhalation exposure for up to 12 weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Daniel L.; Little, Peter B.; Herr, David W.; Moser, Virginia C.; Collins, Bradley; Herbert, Ronald; Johnson, G. Allan; Maronpot, Robert R.; Harry, G. Jean; Sills, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a high-priority Clean Air Act chemical, was evaluated for neurotoxicity in short-term studies. F344 rats were exposed to 75-600 ppm COS 6 h per day, 5 days per week for up to 12 weeks. In rats exposed to 500 or 600 ppm for up to 4 days, malacia and microgliosis were detected in numerous neuroanatomical regions of the brain by conventional optical microscopy and magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM). After a 2-week exposure to 400 ppm, rats were evaluated using a functional observational battery. Slight gait abnormality was detected in 50% of the rats and hypotonia was present in all rats exposed to COS. Decreases in motor activity, and forelimb and hindlimb grip strength were also detected. In rats exposed to 400 ppm for 12 weeks, predominant lesions were in the parietal cortex area 1 (necrosis) and posterior colliculus (neuronal loss, microgliosis, hemorrhage), and occasional necrosis was present in the putamen, thalamus, and anterior olivary nucleus. Carbonyl sulfide specifically targeted the auditory system including the olivary nucleus, nucleus of the lateral lemniscus, and posterior colliculus. Consistent with these findings were alterations in the amplitude of the brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) for peaks N 3 , P 4 , N 4 , and N 5 that represented changes in auditory transmission between the anterior olivary nucleus to the medial geniculate nucleus in animals after exposure for 2 weeks to 400 ppm COS. A concentration-related decrease in cytochrome oxidase activity was detected in the posterior colliculus and parietal cortex of exposed rats as early as 3 weeks. Cytochrome oxidase activity was significantly decreased at COS concentrations that did not cause detectable lesions, suggesting that disruption of the mitochondrial respiratory chain may precede these brain lesions. Our studies demonstrate that this environmental air contaminant has the potential to cause a wide spectrum of brain lesions that are dependent on the degree

  12. Isotope effect in the carbonyl sulfide reaction with O(3P)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Mahler, Denise W.

    2012-01-01

    The sulfur kinetic isotope effect (KIE) in the reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) with O((3)P) was studied in relative rate experiments at 298 ± 2 K and 955 ± 10 mbar. The reaction was carried out in a photochemical reactor using long path FTIR detection, and data were analyzed using a nonlinear...... least-squares spectral fitting procedure with line parameters from the HITRAN database. The ratio of the rate of the reaction of OC(34)S relative to OC(32)S was found to be 0.9783 ± 0.0062 ((34)e = (-21.7 ± 6.2)‰). The KIE was also calculated using quantum chemistry and classical transition state theory......; at 300 K, the isotopic fractionation was found to be (34)e = -14.8‰. The OCS sink reaction with O((3)P) cannot explain the large fractionation in (34)S, over +73‰, indicated by remote sensing data. In addition, (34)e in OCS photolysis and OH oxidation are not larger than 10‰, indicating that...

  13. Dimers of fluorinated methanes with carbonyl sulfide: the rotational spectrum and structure of difluoromethane-OCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Michal M; Peebles, Sean A

    2008-12-11

    The pure rotational spectra of four isotopologues of the difluoromethane-carbonyl sulfide dimer have been measured in the 5-15 GHz region with use of pulsed-nozzle Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. The complex was determined to possess an ab plane of symmetry with a center of mass separation of 3.41(2) A and dipole moment components mu(a) = 1.1386(18) D, mu(b) = 0.4840(63) D, mu(total) = 1.2372(41) D. Experimental planar moments indicate that the two fluorine atoms straddle the symmetry plane while one of the C-H bonds of the difluoromethane monomer is aligned to interact with the oxygen atom of the OCS molecule. The assignment of the rotational spectrum for this dimer completes the experimental studies of the series of dimers involving fluorinated methanes (HCF(3), H(2)CF(2), and H(3)CF) complexed with OCS and makes possible a comparison of properties within this series.

  14. Role of the oceans in the atmospheric cycle of carbonyl sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is both the dominant sulfur gas in the remote troposphere and, along with volcanoes, a major source of sulfur for the stratospheric sulfate layer. Prior to this work the ocean was regarded as a major sink for atmospheric OCS. The purpose of this study has been to assess the magnitude of the global air-sea flux of OCS. The author designed an analytical system which was centered around a Varian-3700 gas chromatograph with a flame-photometric detector. To increase the sensitivity of the detector, the hydrogen gas for the flame was doped with sulfur hexafluoride. Air samples were concentrated in a liquid nitrogen cooled freeze-out loop, then injected into the gas chromatograph. Water samples purged with sulfur-free zero-air which was analyzed similarly. He also built a permeation tube system for chemical standardization. This equipment was taken on two oceanographic cruises on the Pacific Ocean, one in the spring of 1983 and a second in the spring of 1983. Both of these cruises included measurements of air and seawater concentrations of OCS from the equator to the Aleutian Islands. The Henry's law constant of solubility for OCS was measured in the laboratory for filtered and boiled seawater at three temperatures

  15. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of 18O-Enriched Carbonyl Sulfide from 1825 to 2700 cm -1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugariu, T.; Naı̈m, S.; Fayt, A.; Bredohl, H.; Blavier, J.-F.; Dubois, I.

    1998-06-01

    We have measured the Fourier transform spectrum of carbonyl sulfide from 1825 to 2700 cm-1, using a sample enriched in both18O (94.0%) and17O (1.54%). A careful calibration yields a line-position accuracy between 1.5 and 3.0 10-5cm-1. We have observed and analyzed 118 infrared bands of which 93 are measured for the first time: 55 for18O12C32S, 20 for18O12C34S, 11 for18O12C33S, 1 for18O12C36S, 12 for17O12C32S, 4 for17O12C34S, 2 for17O12C33S, and 13 for18O13C32S. Intensities are also reported and analyzed for all those bands. The intensity accuracy is better than 10%, and the precision of approximately 1% allows us to determine some Herman-Wallis coefficients.

  16. Variability of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide at a semi-arid urban site in western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Chinmay; Chandra, Naveen; Venkataramani, S; Lal, Shyam

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a major precursor for sulfate aerosols that play a critical role in climate regulation. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of COS measurements as a reliable means to constrain biospheric carbon assimilation. In a scenario of limited availability of COS data around the globe, we present gas-chromatographic measurements of atmospheric COS mixing ratios over Ahmedabad, a semi-arid, urban region in western India. These measurements, being reported for the first time over an Indian site, enable us to understand the diurnal and seasonal variation in atmospheric COS with respect to its natural, anthropogenic and photochemical sources and sinks. The annual mean COS mixing ratio over Ahmedabad is found to be 0.83±0.43ppbv, which is substantially higher than free tropospheric values for the northern hemisphere. Inverse correlation of COS with soil and skin temperature, suggests that the dry soil of the semi-arid study region is a potential sink for atmospheric COS. Positive correlations of COS with NO2 and CO during post-monsoon and the COS/CO slope of 0.78pptv/ppbv reveals influence of diesel combustion and tire wear. The highest concentrations of COS are observed during pre-monsoon; COS/CO2 slope of 44.75pptv/ppmv combined with information from air mass back-trajectories reveal marshy wetlands spanning over 7500km(2) as an important source of COS in Ahmedabad. COS/CO2 slopes decrease drastically (8.28pptv/ppmv) during post-monsoon due to combined impact of biospheric uptake and anthropogenic emissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Heterogeneous reactions of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides: mechanism and kinetics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous reactions of carbonyl sulfide (OCS on the typical mineral oxides in the mineral dust particles were investigated using a Knudsen cell flow reactor and a diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy. The reaction pathway for OCS on mineral dust was identified based on the gaseous products and surface species. The hydrolysis of OCS and succeeding oxidation of intermediate products readily took place on α-Al2O3, MgO, and CaO. Reversible and irreversible adsorption of OCS were observed on α-Fe2O3 and ZnO, respectively, whereas no apparent uptake of OCS by SiO2 and TiO2 was observed. The reactivity of OCS on these oxides depends on both the basicity of oxides and the decomposition reactivity of oxides for H2S. Based on the individual uptake coefficients and chemical composition of authentic mineral dust, the uptake coefficient (γBET of mineral dust was estimated to be in the range of 3.84×10−7–2.86×10−8. The global flux of OCS due to heterogeneous reactions and adsorption on mineral dust was estimated at 0.13–0.29 Tg yr−1, which is comparable to the annual flux of OCS for its reaction with ·OH.

  18. Ice core carbonyl sulfide measurements from a new South Pole ice core (SPICECORE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, M.; Nicewonger, M. R.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the troposphere with a present-day mixing ratio of about 500 ppt. Direct and indirect emissions from the oceans are the predominant sources of atmospheric COS. The primary removal mechanism is uptake by terrestrial plants during photosynthesis. Because plants do not respire COS, atmospheric COS levels are linked to terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP). Ancient air trapped in polar ice cores has been used to reconstruct COS records of the past atmosphere, which can be used to infer past GPP variability and potential changes in oceanic COS emission. We are currently analyzing samples from a newly drilled intermediate depth ice core from South Pole, Antarctica (SPICECORE). This core is advantageous for studying COS because the cold temperatures of South Pole ice lead to very slow rates of in situ loss due to hydrolysis. One hundred and eighty-four bubbly ice core samples have been analyzed to date with gas ages ranging from about 9.2 thousand (733 m depth) to 75 years (126 m depth) before present. After a 2% correction for gravitational enrichment in the firn, the mean COS mixing ratio for the data set is 312±15 ppt (±1s), with the data set median also equal to 312 ppt. The only significant long-term trend in the record is a 5-10% increase in COS during the last 2-3 thousand years of the Holocene. The SPICECORE data agree with previously published ice core COS records from other Antarctic sites during times of overlap, confirming earlier estimates of COS loss rates to in situ hydrolysis in ice cores. Antarctic ice core data place strict constraints on the COS mixing ratio and its range of variability in the southern hemisphere atmosphere during the last several millennia. Implications for the atmospheric COS budget will be discussed.

  19. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gerdel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The trace gas carbonyl sulfide (COS has lately received growing interest from the eddy covariance (EC community due to its potential to serve as an independent approach for constraining gross primary production and canopy stomatal conductance. Thanks to recent developments of fast-response high-precision trace gas analysers (e.g. quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers, QCLAS, a handful of EC COS flux measurements have been published since 2013. To date, however, a thorough methodological characterisation of QCLAS with regard to the requirements of the EC technique and the necessary processing steps has not been conducted. The objective of this study is to present a detailed characterisation of the COS measurement with the Aerodyne QCLAS in the context of the EC technique and to recommend best EC processing practices for those measurements. Data were collected from May to October 2015 at a temperate mountain grassland in Tyrol, Austria. Analysis of the Allan variance of high-frequency concentration measurements revealed the occurrence of sensor drift under field conditions after an averaging time of around 50 s. We thus explored the use of two high-pass filtering approaches (linear detrending and recursive filtering as opposed to block averaging and linear interpolation of regular background measurements for covariance computation. Experimental low-pass filtering correction factors were derived from a detailed cospectral analysis. The CO2 and H2O flux measurements obtained with the QCLAS were compared with those obtained with a closed-path infrared gas analyser. Overall, our results suggest small, but systematic differences between the various high-pass filtering scenarios with regard to the fraction of data retained in the quality control and flux magnitudes. When COS and CO2 fluxes are combined in the ecosystem relative uptake rate, systematic differences between the high-pass filtering scenarios largely cancel out, suggesting that

  20. Using NDACC column measurements of carbonyl sulfide to estimate its sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Marshall, Julia; Palm, Mathias; Deutscher, Nicholas; Roedenbeck, Christian; Warneke, Thorsten; Notholt, Justus; Baker, Ian; Berry, Joe; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Jones, Nicholas; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Lejeune, Bernard; Hannigan, James; Conway, Stephanie; Strong, Kimberly; Campbell, Elliott; Wolf, Adam; Kremser, Stefanie

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is taken up by plants during photosynthesis through a similar pathway as carbon dioxide (CO2), but is not emitted by respiration, and thus holds great promise as an additional constraint on the carbon cycle. It might act as a sort of tracer of photosynthesis, a way to separate gross primary productivity (GPP) from the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) that is typically derived from flux modeling. However the estimates of OCS sources and sinks still have significant uncertainties, which make it difficult to use OCS as a photosynthetic tracer, and the existing long-term surface-based measurements are sparse. The NDACC-IRWG measures the absorption of OCS in the atmosphere, and provides a potential long-term database of OCS total/partial columns, which can be used to evaluate OCS fluxes. We have retrieved OCS columns from several NDACC sites around the globe, and compared them to model simulation with OCS land fluxes based on the simple biosphere model (SiB). The disagreement between the measurements and the forward simulations indicates that (1) the OCS land fluxes from SiB are too low in the northern boreal region; (2) the ocean fluxes need to be optimized. A statistical linear flux model describing OCS is developed in the TM3 inversion system, and is used to estimate the OCS fluxes. We performed flux inversions using only NOAA OCS surface measurements as an observational constraint and with both surface and NDACC OCS column measurements, and assessed the differences. The posterior uncertainties of the inverted OCS fluxes decreased with the inclusion of NDACC data comparing to those using surface data only, and could be further reduced if more NDACC sites were included.

  1. Continuous In-situ Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide to Constrain Ecosystem Carbon and Water Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, B.; Kim, Y.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Noone, D. C.; Lai, C. T.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bible, K.; Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.; Still, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon and water are critical for examining the role of forested ecosystems in changing climates. A small but increasing number of studies have identified Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) as a potential tracer for photosynthesis. OCS is hydrolyzed by an irreversible reaction in leaf mesophyll cells that is catalyzed by the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase. Leaf-level field and greenhouse studies indicate that OCS uptake is controlled by stomatal activity and that the ratio of OCS and CO2 uptake is reasonably constant. Existing studies on ecosystem OCS exchange have been based on laboratory measurements or short field campaigns and therefore little information on OCS exchange in a natural ecosystem over longer timescales is available. The objective of this study is to further assess the stability of OCS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis in an active forested ecosystem and also to assess its utility for constraining transpiration, since both fluxes are mediated by canopy stomatal conductance. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W). Canopy air was sampled from three heights to measure vertical gradients of OCS within the canopy, and OCS exchange between the forest and the atmosphere. Here we take advantage of simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopologues of H2O and CO2 at corresponding heights as well as NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) from eddy covariance measurements to compare GPP (Gross Primary Production) and transpiration estimates from a variety of independent techniques. Our findings seek to allow assessment of the environmental and ecophysicological controls on evapotranspiration rates, which are projected to change in coming decades, and are otherwise poorly constrained.

  2. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and atmosphere under various CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Behrendt, Thomas; Yi, Zhigang; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    A new continuous integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer and an automated soil chamber system were used to investigate the exchange processes of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and the atmosphere under laboratory conditions. The exchange patterns of OCS between soils and the atmosphere were found to be highly dependent on soil moisture and ambient CO2 concentration. With increasing soil moisture, OCS exchange ranged from emission under dry conditions to an uptake within an optimum moisture range, followed again by emission at high soil moisture. Elevated CO2 was found to have a significant impact on the exchange rate and direction as tested with several soils. There is a clear tendency toward a release of OCS at higher CO2 levels (up to 7600 ppm), which are typical for the upper few centimeters within soils. At high soil moisture, the release of OCS increased sharply. Measurements after chloroform vapor application show that there is a biotic component to the observed OCS exchange. Furthermore, soil treatment with the fungi inhibitor nystatin showed that fungi might be the dominant OCS consumers in the soils we examined. We discuss the influence of soil moisture and elevated CO2 on the OCS exchange as a change in the activity of microbial communities. Physical factors such as diffusivity that are governed by soil moisture also play a role. Comparing KM values of the enzymes to projected soil water CO2 concentrations showed that competitive inhibition is unlikely for carbonic anhydrase and PEPCO but might occur for RubisCO at higher CO2 concentrations.

  3. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change forces ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzymes which are metabolizing CO2, i.e. ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical acclimation of these enzymes affecting the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the acclimation of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2, and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of acclimation from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We demonstrate that a compensation point, by definition, does not exist. Instead, we propose to discuss a point of uptake affinity (PUA. The results indicate that such a PUA, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and may cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems, at least as long as the enzyme acclimation to CO2 is not surpassed by an increase of atmospheric COS. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise causing an increase of the radiative forcing in the troposphere. However, this increase is counterbalanced by the stronger input of this trace gas into the stratosphere causing a stronger energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space (Brühl et al., 2012. These data are very preliminary but may trigger a discussion on COS uptake acclimation to foster measurements with modern analytical instruments.

  4. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  5. Soil emission and uptake of carbonyl sulfide at a temperate mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitz, Florian; Hammerle, Albin; Laterza, Tamara; Spielmann, Felix M.; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Flux partitioning, i.e. inferring gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration from the measured net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange, is one uncertainty in modelling the carbon cycle and in times where robust models are needed to assess future global changes a persistent problem. A promising new approach is to derive GPP by measuring carbonyl sulfide (COS), the most abundant sulfur-containing trace gas in the atmosphere, with a mean concentration of about 500 pptv in the troposphere. This is possible because COS and CO2 enter the leaf via a similar pathway and are processed by the same enzyme (carbonic anhydrase). A prerequisite to use COS as a proxy for canopy photosynthesis is a robust estimation of COS sources and sinks in an ecosystem. Past studies described soils either as a sink or source, depending on properties like soil temperature and soil water content. The main aim of this study was to quantify the soil COS exchange and its drivers of a temperate mountain grassland in order to aid the use of COS as tracer for canopy CO2 and water vapor exchange. We conducted a field campaign with a Quantum cascade laser at a temperate mountain grassland to estimate the soil COS fluxes under ambient conditions and while simulating a drought. We used self-built fused silica (i.e. light-transparent) soil chambers to avoid COS emissions from built-in materials and to assess the impact of radiation. Vegetation was removed within the chambers, therefor more radiation reached the soil surface compared to natural conditions. This might be the reason for highly positive fluxes during daytime more similar to agricultural study sites. To further investigate this large soil COS source we conducted within canopy concentration measurements near the soil surface and still recorded fluxes confirming the soil as a COS source during daytime. Results from the drought experiment suggested a strong impact of incoming radiation on soil COS fluxes followed by soil

  6. Soil atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Diest

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS concentration, soil water content (WC and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS, indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  7. Sulfur isotopic fractionation of carbonyl sulfide during degradation by soil bacteria and enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamezaki, Kazuki; Hattori, Shohei; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Kato, Hiromi; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2017-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas that possess great potential for tracer of carbon cycle (Campbell et al., 2008). COS is taken up by vegetation during photosynthesis like absorption of carbon dioxide but COS can not emit by respiration of vegetation, suggesting possible tracer for gross primary production. However, some studies show the COS-derived GPP is larger than the estimates by using carbon dioxide flux because COS flux by photolysis and soil flux are not distinguished (e.g. Asaf et al., 2013). Isotope analysis is a useful tool to trace sources and transformations of trace gases. Recently our group developed a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions of COS using nanomole level samples: the direct isotopic analytical technique of on-line gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions S+ enabling us to easily analyze sulfur isotopes in COS (Hattori et al., 2015). Soil is thought to be important as both a source and a sink of COS in the troposphere. In particular, soil has been reported as a large environmental sink for atmospheric COS. Bacteria isolated from various soils actively degrade COS, with various enzymes such as carbonic anhydrase and COSase (Ogawa et al., 2013) involved in COS degradation. However, the mechanism and the magnitude of bacterial contribution in terms of a sink for atmospheric COS is still uncertain. Therefore, it is important to quantitatively evaluate this contribution using COS sulfur isotope analysis. We present isotopic fractionation constants for COS by laboratory incubation experiments during degradation by soil bacteria and COSase. Incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia, Cupriavidus, and Thiobacillus, isolated from natural soil or activated sludge and enzyme purified from a bacteria. As a result, the isotopic compositions of OCS were increased during degradation of

  8. Scaling up carbonyl sulfide (COS) fluxes from leaf and soil to the canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fulin; Yakir, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) with atmospheric concentrations around 500 ppt is an analog of CO2 which can potentially serve as powerful and much needed tracer of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, and global gross primary production (GPP). However, questions remain regarding the application of this approach due to uncertainties in the contributions of different ecosystem components to the canopy scale fluxes of COS. We used laser quantum cascade spectroscopy in combination with soil and branch chambers, and eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange fluxes of COS and CO2 (NEE) in citrus orchard during the driest summer month to test our ability to integrate the chamber measurements into the ecosystem fluxes. The results indicated that: 1) Soil fluxes showed clear gradient from continuous uptake under the trees in wet soil of up to -4 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~0.5 umol m-2s-1) to emission in dry hot and exposed soil between rows of trees of up to +3 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~11 umol m-2s-1). In all cases a clear correlation between fluxes and soil temperature was observed. 2) At the leaf scale, midday uptake was ~5.5 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 uptake of ~1.8 umol m-2s-1). Some nighttime COS uptake was observed in the citrus leaves consistent with nocturnal leaf stomatal conductance. Leaf relative uptake (LRU) of COS vs. CO2 was not constant over the diurnal cycle, but showed exponential correlation with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime. 3) At the canopy scale mid-day summer flux reached -12.0 pmol m-2s-1 (NEE ~6 umol m-2s-1) with the diurnal patterns of COS fluxes following those of CO2 fluxes during the daytime, but with small COS uptake fluxes maintained also during the night when significant CO2 emission fluxes were observed. The canopy-scale fluxes always indicated COS uptake, irrespective of the soil emission effects. GPP estimates were consistent with conventional indirect estimates based on NEE and nocturnal measurements. Scaling up

  9. INHALATIONAL EXPOSURE TO CARBONYL SULFIDE (COS) PRODUCES BRAIN LESIONS AND ALTERED BRAINSTEM AUDITORY (BAER) AND SOMATOSENSORY (SEP) EVOKED POTENTIALS IN FISHCER 344N RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of the amount of carbonyl sulfide (COS) emissions and the lack of toxicological data, COS was listed in the Clean Air Act of 1990 as a Hazardous Air Pollutant. In 1999 COS was nominated by the US EPA to the National Toxicology Program for additional toxicological investig...

  10. 12 WEEK EXPOSURE TO CARBONYL SULFIDE PRODUCES BRAIN LESIONS AND CHANGES IN BRAINSTEM AUDITORY (BAER) AND SOMATOSENAORY (SEP) EVOKED POTENTIALS IN FISCHER 344N RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a chemical intermediate in the production of pesticides and herbicides, is a metabolite of carbon disulfide, is produced by the combustion of organic material, and is found occurring in nature. COS was included in a Toxic Substances Control Act request f...

  11. TEN DAY EXPOSURES TO CARBONYL SULFIDE PRODUCE BRAINSTEM LESIONS AND CHANGES IN BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSES IN FISCHER 344N RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a chemical intermediate in the production of pesticides and herbicides, a metabolite of carbon disulfide, a byproduct of the combustion of organic material, and a naturally occurring compound. COS was included in a Toxic Substances Control Act request fo...

  12. Gas chromatographic studies of the relative retention of the sulfur isotopes in carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and sulfur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetzer, J.C.; Rogers, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    A precision gas chromatograph, coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an on-line computer, was used to study the fractionation on Porasil A of the 32 S/ 34 S isotopic pair in a variety of sulfur-containing molecules. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) yielded an average α value of 1.00074 +- 0.00017 (standard deviation) for the temperature range 25 0 C to 75 0 C. The carbon disulfide (CS 2 ) value was 1.00069 +- 0.00023 for the range 53 0 C to 103 0 C, and that for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) was 1.00090 +- 0.00018 for the range 62 0 C to 112 0 C. Differential thermodynamic data have been reported. A Porapak Q column showed no fractionation of this isotopic pair in these three molecules

  13. Adsorption/desorption of low concentration of carbonyl sulfide by impregnated activated carbon under micro-oxygen conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xueqian; Qiu, Juan; Ning, Ping; Ren, Xiaoguang; Li, Ziyan; Yin, Zaifei; Chen, Wei; Liu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbonyl sulfide can be catalytic oxidized by micro-oxygen in the off-gas. ► How to use the trace oxygen for the oxidation of carbonyl sulfide was a challenge. ► The SO 4 2− species in the adsorbent sample were generated by a catalytic oxidation process. - Abstract: Activated carbon modified with different impregnants has been studied for COS removal efficiency under micro-oxygen conditions. Activated carbon modified with Cu(NO 3 ) 2 –CoPcS–KOH (denoted as Cu–Co–KW) is found to have markedly enhanced adsorption purification ability. In the adsorption purification process, the reaction temperature, oxygen concentration, and relative humidity of the gas are determined to be three crucial factors. A breakthrough of 43.34 mg COS/g adsorbent at 60 °S and 30% relative humidity with 1.0% oxygen is shown in Cu–Co–KW for removing COS. The structures of the activated carbon samples are characterized using nitrogen adsorption, and their surface chemical structures are analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Modification of Cu(NO 3 ) 2 –CoPcS–KOH appears to improve the COS removal capacity significantly, during which, SO 4 2− is presumably formed, strongly adsorbed, and present in the micropores ranging from 0.7 to 1.5 nm. TPD is used to identify the products containing sulfur species on the carbon surface, where SO 2 and COS are detected in the effluent gas generated from exhausted Cu–Co–KW (denoted Cu–Co–KWE). According to the current study results, the activated carbon impregnated with Cu(NO 3 ) 2 –CoPcS–KOH promises a good candidate for COS adsorbent, with the purified gas meeting requirements for desirable chemical feed stocks.

  14. Adsorption/desorption of low concentration of carbonyl sulfide by impregnated activated carbon under micro-oxygen conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xueqian, E-mail: wxqian3000@yahoo.com.cn [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Qiu, Juan; Ning, Ping; Ren, Xiaoguang; Li, Ziyan; Yin, Zaifei; Chen, Wei; Liu, Wei [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonyl sulfide can be catalytic oxidized by micro-oxygen in the off-gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer How to use the trace oxygen for the oxidation of carbonyl sulfide was a challenge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} species in the adsorbent sample were generated by a catalytic oxidation process. - Abstract: Activated carbon modified with different impregnants has been studied for COS removal efficiency under micro-oxygen conditions. Activated carbon modified with Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-CoPcS-KOH (denoted as Cu-Co-KW) is found to have markedly enhanced adsorption purification ability. In the adsorption purification process, the reaction temperature, oxygen concentration, and relative humidity of the gas are determined to be three crucial factors. A breakthrough of 43.34 mg COS/g adsorbent at 60 Degree-Sign S and 30% relative humidity with 1.0% oxygen is shown in Cu-Co-KW for removing COS. The structures of the activated carbon samples are characterized using nitrogen adsorption, and their surface chemical structures are analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Modification of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-CoPcS-KOH appears to improve the COS removal capacity significantly, during which, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} is presumably formed, strongly adsorbed, and present in the micropores ranging from 0.7 to 1.5 nm. TPD is used to identify the products containing sulfur species on the carbon surface, where SO{sub 2} and COS are detected in the effluent gas generated from exhausted Cu-Co-KW (denoted Cu-Co-KWE). According to the current study results, the activated carbon impregnated with Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-CoPcS-KOH promises a good candidate for COS adsorbent, with the purified gas meeting requirements for desirable chemical feed stocks.

  15. Microwave spectrum, dipole moment, and internal dynamics of the methyl fluoride-carbonyl sulfide weakly bound complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Michal M; Peebles, Sean A

    2008-02-21

    Rotational spectra for the normal and four isotopically substituted species of the 1:1 complex between methyl fluoride (H3CF) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) have been measured using Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 5-16 GHz frequency region. The observed spectra fit well to a semirigid Watson Hamiltonian, and an analysis of the rotational constants has allowed a structure to be determined for this complex. The dipole moment vectors of the H3CF and OCS monomers are aligned approximately antiparallel with a C...C separation of 3.75(3) A and with an ab plane of symmetry. The values of the Pcc planar moments were found to be considerably different from the expected rigid values for all isotopologues. An estimate of approximately 14.5(50) cm-1 for the internal rotation barrier of the CH3 group with respect to the framework of the complex has been made using the Pcc values for the H3CF-OCS and D3CF-OCS isotopic species. Two structures, very close in energy and approximately related by a 60 degrees rotation about the C3 axis of the methyl fluoride, were identified by ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level and provide reasonable agreement with the experimental rotational constants and dipole moment components.

  16. Continuous In-situ Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) and Carbon Dioxide Isotopes to Constrain Ecosystem Carbon and Water Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, B.; Still, C. J.; Noone, D. C.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Whelan, M.; Lai, C. T.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J. B.; Huang, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon and water are critical for examining the role of forested ecosystems in changing climates. A small but increasing number of studies have identified Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) as a potential tracer for photosynthesis. OCS is hydrolyzed by an irreversible reaction in leaf mesophyll cells that is catalyzed by the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase. Leaf- level field and greenhouse studies indicate that OCS uptake is controlled by stomatal activity and that the ratio of OCS and CO2 uptake is reasonably constant. Existing studies on ecosystem OCS exchange have been based on laboratory measurements or short field campaigns and therefore little information on OCS exchange in a natural ecosystem over longer timescales is available. The objective of this study is to further assess the stability of OCS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis in an active forested ecosystem and also to assess its utility for constraining transpiration, since both fluxes are mediated by canopy stomatal conductance. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W). Canopy air was sampled from four heights as well as the soil to measure vertical gradients of OCS within the canopy, and OCS exchange between the forest and the atmosphere for the growing season. Here we take advantage of simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopologues of H2O and CO2 at corresponding heights as well as NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) from eddy covariance measurements to compare GPP (Gross Primary Production) and transpiration estimates from a variety of independent techniques. Our findings also seek to allow assessment of the environmental and ecophysicological controls on evapotranspiration rates, which are projected to change in coming decades, and are otherwise poorly constrained.

  17. Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in a boreal forest in southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wu; Kooijmans, Linda M. J.; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Chen, Huilin; Mammarella, Ivan; Vesala, Timo; Levula, Janne; Keskinen, Helmi; Seibt, Ulli

    2018-02-01

    Soil is a major contributor to the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon monoxide (CO). COS is a tracer with which to quantify terrestrial photosynthesis based on the coupled leaf uptake of COS and CO2, but such use requires separating soil COS flux, which is unrelated to photosynthesis, from ecosystem COS uptake. For CO, soil is a significant natural sink that influences the tropospheric CO budget. In the boreal forest, magnitudes and variabilities of soil COS and CO fluxes remain poorly understood. We measured hourly soil fluxes of COS, CO, and CO2 over the 2015 late growing season (July to November) in a Scots pine forest in Hyytiälä, Finland. The soil acted as a net sink of COS and CO, with average uptake rates around 3 pmol m-2 s-1 for COS and 1 nmol m-2 s-1 for CO. Soil respiration showed seasonal dynamics controlled by soil temperature, peaking at around 4 µmol m-2 s-1 in late August and September and dropping to 1-2 µmol m-2 s-1 in October. In contrast, seasonal variations of COS and CO fluxes were weak and mainly driven by soil moisture changes through diffusion limitation. COS and CO fluxes did not appear to respond to temperature variation, although they both correlated well with soil respiration in specific temperature bins. However, COS : CO2 and CO : CO2 flux ratios increased with temperature, suggesting possible shifts in active COS- and CO-consuming microbial groups. Our results show that soil COS and CO fluxes do not have strong variations over the late growing season in this boreal forest and can be represented with the fluxes during the photosynthetically most active period. Well-characterized and relatively invariant soil COS fluxes strengthen the case for using COS as a photosynthetic tracer in boreal forests.

  18. A top-down approach of surface carbonyl sulfide exchange by a Mediterranean oak forest ecosystem in southern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belviso, Sauveur; Reiter, Ilja Marco; Loubet, Benjamin; Gros, Valérie; Lathière, Juliette; Montagne, David; Delmotte, Marc; Ramonet, Michel; Kalogridis, Cerise; Lebegue, Benjamin; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Kazan, Victor; Gauquelin, Thierry; Fernandez, Catherine; Genty, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    The role that soil, foliage, and atmospheric dynamics have on surface carbonyl sulfide (OCS) exchange in a Mediterranean forest ecosystem in southern France (the Oak Observatory at the Observatoire de Haute Provence, O3HP) was investigated in June of 2012 and 2013 with essentially a top-down approach. Atmospheric data suggest that the site is appropriate for estimating gross primary production (GPP) directly from eddy covariance measurements of OCS fluxes, but it is less adequate for scaling net ecosystem exchange (NEE) to GPP from observations of vertical gradients of OCS relative to CO2 during the daytime. Firstly, OCS and carbon dioxide (CO2) diurnal variations and vertical gradients show no net exchange of OCS at night when the carbon fluxes are dominated by ecosystem respiration. This contrasts with other oak woodland ecosystems of a Mediterranean climate, where nocturnal uptake of OCS by soil and/or vegetation has been observed. Since temperature, water, and organic carbon content of soil at the O3HP should favor the uptake of OCS, the lack of nocturnal net uptake would indicate that its gross consumption in soil is compensated for by emission processes that remain to be characterized. Secondly, the uptake of OCS during the photosynthetic period was characterized in two different ways. We measured ozone (O3) deposition velocities and estimated the partitioning of O3 deposition between stomatal and non-stomatal pathways before the start of a joint survey of OCS and O3 surface concentrations. We observed an increasing trend in the relative importance of the stomatal pathway during the morning hours and synchronous steep drops of mixing ratios of OCS (amplitude in the range of 60-100 ppt) and O3 (amplitude in the range of 15-30 ppb) after sunrise and before the break up of the nocturnal boundary layer. The uptake of OCS by plants was also characterized from vertical profiles. However, the time window for calculation of the ecosystem relative uptake (ERU) of OCS

  19. Combining in situ and laboratory measurements of soil-atmosphere carbonyl sulfide fluxes from four different biomes across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitz, Florian; Gomez-Brandon, Maria; Hammerle, Albin; Spielmann, Felix M.; Insam, Heribert; Ibrom, Andreas; Migliavacca, Mirco; Moreno, Gerardo; Noe, Steffen M.; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Flux partitioning, the quantification of photosynthesis and respiration, is a major uncertainty in modelling the carbon cycle and in times when robust models are needed to assess future global changes a persistent problem. A promising new approach is to derive gross primary production (GPP) from measurements of the carbonyl sulfide (COS) flux, the most abundant sulfur-containing trace gas in the atmosphere, with a mean concentration of about 500 pptv in the troposphere. This is possible because COS and CO2 enter the leaf via a similar pathway and are processed by the same enzyme (carbonic anhydrase). A prerequisite for using COS as a proxy for photosynthesis is a robust estimation of all non-leaf sources and sinks in an ecosystem. Past studies described soils either as a sink or source, depending on their properties like soil temperature and soil water content. In 2016 we conducted field campaigns in Austria (managed temperate mountain grassland), Spain (savannah), Denmark (temperate beech forest) and Estonia (hemiboreal forest) to estimate the soil-atmosphere COS fluxes under ambient conditions in different biomes. We used self-built fused silica soil chambers to avoid COS emissions from built-in materials and to assess the impact of radiation. At the grassland sites (Austria, Spain) vegetation was removed below the chambers, therefor more radiation reached the soil surface compared to natural conditions. The grassland sites were characterized by highly positive COS fluxes during daytime and COS fluxes around zero during nighttime. In contrast, the soils at the forest sites (Denmark, Estonia), characterized by less radiation on the soil surface, acted as a sink for COS. The impact of other abiotic factors, like soil water content and soil temperature, varied between the ecosystems. In addition to the field measurements soil and litter samples were taken at the study sites and used to measure COS fluxes under controlled conditions in the lab. Results from the

  20. Sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide in a mountain grassland and relationships to the carbon dioxide exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Felix M.; Kitz, Florian; Hammerle, Albin; Gerdel, Katharina; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The trace gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been proposed as a tracer for canopy gross primary production (GPP), canopy transpiration and stomatal conductance of plant canopies in the last few years. COS enters the plant leaf through the stomata and diffuses through the intercellular space, the cell wall, the plasma membrane and the cytosol like CO2. It is then catalyzed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in a one-way reaction to H2S and CO2. This one-way flux into the leaf makes COS a promising tracer for the GPP. However there is growing evidence, that plant leaves aren't the only contributors to the ecosystem flux of COS. Therefor the COS uptake of soil microorganisms also containing CA and abiotic COS production might have to be accounted for when using COS as a tracer at the ecosystem scale. The overarching objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between the ecosystem-scale exchange of COS, CO2 and H2O and thus to test for the potential of COS to be used as a tracer for the plant canopy CO2 and H2O exchange. More specifically we aimed at quantifying the contribution of the soil to the ecosystem-scale COS exchange in order to understand complications that may arise due to a non-negligible soil COS exchange. In May 2015 we set up our quantum cascade laser (QCL) (Aerodyne Research Inc., MA, USA) at a temperate mountain grassland in Stubai Valley close to the village of Neustift, Austria. Our site lies at the valley bottom and is an intensively managed mountain grassland, which is cut 3-4 times a year. With the QCL we were able to measure concurrently the concentrations of COS, CO2, H2O (and CO) at a frequency of 10 Hz with minimal noise. This allowed us to conduct ecosystem-scale eddy covariance measurements. The eddy covariance flux measurements revealed that the COS uptake continues at night, which we confirmed was not caused by soil microorganisms, as the soil exchange was close to neutral during nighttime. Instead, the nocturnal COS uptake

  1. Gridded anthropogenic emissions inventory and atmospheric transport of carbonyl sulfide in the U.S.: U.S. Anthropogenic COS Source and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumkehr, Andrew [Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California, Merced California USA; Hilton, Timothy W. [Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California, Merced California USA; Whelan, Mary [Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California, Merced California USA; Smith, Steve [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL, College Park Maryland USA; Campbell, J. Elliott [Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California, Merced California USA

    2017-02-21

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS), the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the troposphere, has recently emerged as a potentially important atmospheric tracer for the carbon cycle. Atmospheric inverse modeling studies may be able to use existing tower, airborne, and satellite observations of COS to infer information about photosynthesis. However, such analysis relies on gridded anthropogenic COS source estimates that are largely based on industry activity data from over three decades ago. Here we use updated emission factor data and industry activity data to develop a gridded inventory with a 0.1 degree resolution for the U.S. domain. The inventory includes the primary anthropogenic COS sources including direct emissions from the coal and aluminum industries as well as indirect sources from industrial carbon disulfide emissions. Compared to the previously published inventory, we found that the total anthropogenic source (direct and indirect) is 47% smaller. Using this new gridded inventory to drive the STEM/WRF atmospheric transport model, we found that the anthropogenic contribution to COS variation in the troposphere is small relative to the biosphere influence, which is encouraging of carbon cycle applications in this region. Additional anthropogenic sectors with highly uncertain emission factors require further field measurements.

  2. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of Carbonyl Sulfide from 4800 to 8000 cm -1and New Global Analysis of 16O 12C 32S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rbaihi, E.; Belafhal, A.; Vander Auwera, J.; Naı̈m, S.; Fayt, A.

    1998-09-01

    We have measured the FT spectrum of natural OCS from 4800 to 8000 cm-1with a near Doppler resolution and a line-position accuracy between 2 and 8 × 10-4cm-1. For the normal isotopic species16O12C32S, 37 vibrational transitions have been analyzed for both frequencies and intensities. We also report six bands of16O12C34S, five bands of16O13C32S, two bands of16O12C33S, and two bands of18O12C32S. Important effective Herman-Wallis terms are explained by the anharmonic resonances between closely spaced states. As those results complete the study of the Fourier transform spectra of natural carbonyl sulfide from 1800 to 8000 cm-1, a new global rovibrational analysis of16O12C32S has been performed. We have determined a set of 148 molecular parameters, and a statistical agreement is obtained with all the available experimental data.

  3. Comparison study for multiple ionization of carbonyl sulfide by linearly and circularly polarized intense femtosecond laser fields using Coulomb explosion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pan; Wang, Chuncheng; Luo, Sizuo; Yu, Xitao; Li, Xiaokai; Wang, Zhenzhen; Hu, Wenhui; Yu, Jiaqi; Yang, Yizhang; Tian, Xu; Cui, Zhonghua; Ding, Dajun

    2018-05-01

    We studied the relative yields and dissociation dynamics for two- and three-body Coulomb explosion (CE) channels from highly charged carbonyl sulfide molecules in intense laser fields using the CE imaging technique. The electron recollision contributions are evaluated by comparing the relative yields for the multiple ionization process in linearly polarized and circularly polarized (LP and CP) laser fields. The nonsequential multiple ionization is only confirmed for the charge states of 2 to 4 because the energy for further ionization from the inner orbital is much larger than the maximum recollision energy, 3.2U p . The novel deviations of kinetic energy releases distributions between LP and CP pulses are observed for the charge states higher than 4. It can be attributed to the stronger molecular bending in highly charged states before three-body CE with CP light, in which the bending wave packet is initialed by the triple or quartic ionization and spread along their potential curves. Compared to LP light, CP light ionizes a larger fraction of bending molecules in the polarization plane.

  4. Methanol absorption characteristics for the removal of H2S (hydrogen sulfide), COS (carbonyl sulfide) and CO2 (carbon dioxide) in a pilot-scale biomass-to-liquid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Myung Won; Yun, Young Min; Cho, Won Chul; Ra, Ho Won; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Jae Goo; Kim, Yong Ku; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, See Hoon; Eom, Won Hyun; Lee, Uen Do; Lee, Sang Bong

    2014-01-01

    The BTL (biomass-to-liquid) process is an attractive process that produces liquid biofuels from biomass. The FT (Fisher–Tropsch) process is used to produce synfuels such as diesel and gasoline from gasified biomass. However, the H 2 S (hydrogen sulfide), COS (carbonyl sulfide) and CO 2 (carbon dioxide) in the syngas that are produced from the biomass gasifiers cause a decrease of the conversion efficiency and deactivates the catalyst that is used in the FT process. To remove the acid gases, a pilot-scale methanol absorption tower producing diesel at a rate of 1 BPD (barrel per day) was developed, and the removal characteristics of the acid gases were determined. A total operation time of 500 h was achieved after several campaigns. The average syngas flow rate at the inlet of methanol absorption tower ranged from 300 to 800 L/min. The methanol absorption tower efficiently removed H 2 S from 30 ppmV to less than 1 ppmV and COS from 2 ppmV to less than 1 ppmV with a removal of CO 2 from 20% to 5%. The outlet gas composition adhered to the guidelines for FT reactors. No remaining sulfurous components were found, and the tar component was analyzed in the spent methanol after long-term operations. - Highlights: • The gas cleaning system in a pilot-scale BTL (biomass-to-liquid) process is reported. • Although methanol absorption tower is conventional process, its application to BTL process is attempted. • The methanol absorption tower efficiently removed H 2 S, COS and CO 2 in the syngas. • The sulfurous and tar components in the methanol are analyzed

  5. Unveiling stomata 24/7: can we use carbonyl sulfide (COS) and oxygen isotopes (18O) to constrain estimates of nocturnal transpiration across different evolutionary plant forms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Teresa E.; Ogee, Jerome; Bosc, Alexander; Genty, Bernard; Wohl, Steven; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    Numerous studies have reported a continued flux of water through plants at night, suggesting that stomata are not fully closed. Growing evidence indicates that this nocturnal flux of transpiration might constitute an important fraction of total ecosystem water use in certain environments. However, because evaporative demand is usually low at night, nocturnal transpiration fluxes are generally an order of magnitude lower than rates measured during the day and perilously close to the measurement error of traditional gas-exchange porometers. Thus estimating rates of stomatal conductance in the dark (gnight) precisely poses a significant methodological challenge. As a result, we lack accurate field estimates of gnight and how it responds to different atmospheric drivers, indicating the need for a different measurement approach. In this presentation we propose a novel method to obtain detectable and robust estimates of gnight. We will demonstrate using mechanistic theory how independent tracers including the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 (δ18O) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) can be combined to obtain robust estimates of gnight. This is because COS and CO18O exchange within leaves are controlled by the light insensitive enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Thus, if plant stomata are open in the dark we will continue to observe COS and CO18O exchange. Using our theoretical model we will demonstrate that the exchange of these tracers can now be measured using advances in laser spectrometry techniques at a precision high enough to determine robust estimates of gnight. We will also present our novel experimental approach designed to measure simultaneously the exchange of CO18O and COS alongside the conventional technique that relies on measuring the total water flux from leaves in the dark. Using our theoretical approach we will additionally explore the feasibility of our proposed experimental design to detect variations in gnight during drought stress and across a variety of plant

  6. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) as a proxy for GPP: Complications derived from studies on the impact of CO2, soil humidity and sterilization on the OCS exchange between soils and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Behrendt, Thomas; Yi, Zhigang; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide is discussed to be used as a proxy for gross primary productivity (GPP) of forest ecosystems. However, soils may interfere. Soils play an important role in budgeting global and local carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes, yet the available data on the uptake and emission behavior of soils in conjunction with environmental factors is limited. The work of many authors has shown that the OCS exchange of soils depends on various factors, such as soil type, atmospheric OCS concentrations, temperature or soil water content (Kesselmeier et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, No. D9, 11577-11584, 1999; Van Diest & Kesselmeier, Biogeosciences, 5, 475-483, 2008; Masyek et al., PNAS, 111, No 25, 9064-9069, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1319132111, 2014; Whelan and Rhew, J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosciences., 120, 54-62, doi: 10.1002/2014JG002661, 2015) and the light dependent and obviously abiotic OCS production as reported by Whelan and Rhew (2015). To get a better constraint on the impact of some environmental factors on the OCS exchange of soils we used a new laser based integrated cavity output spectroscopy instrument (LGR COS/CO Analyzer Model 907-0028, Los Gatos, Mountain View, California, USA) in conjunction with an automated soil chamber system (as described in Behrendt et al, Biogeosciences, 11, 5463-5492, doi: 10.5194/bg-11-5463-2014, 2014). The OCS exchange of various soils under the full range of possible soil humidity and various CO2 mixing ratios was examined. Additionally OCS exchange of chloroform sterilized subsamples was compared to their live counterparts to illuminate the influence of microorganisms. Results were quite heterogeneous between different soils. With few exceptions, all examined soils show dependence between OCS exchange and soil humidity, usually with strongest uptake at a certain humidity range and less uptake or even emission at higher and lower humidity. Differences in CO2 mixing ratio also clearly impacts on OCS exchange, but trends for different soils

  7. Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species: Carbonyl Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    satisfactorily oxidation of OCS over a wide range of stoichiometric air–fuel ratios (0.5 ≤λ≤7.3), temperatures (450–1700 K), and pressures (0.02–3.0 atm) under dry conditions. The governing reaction mechanisms are outlined based on calculations with the kinetic model. The oxidation rate of OCS is controlled...... by the competition between chain‐branching and ‐propagating steps; modeling predictions are particularly sensitive to the branching fraction for the OCS + O reaction to form CO + SO or CO2 + S....

  8. Protein carbonylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Havelund, Jesper; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current knowledge on protein carbonylation in plants and its role in plant physiology. It starts with a brief outline of the turnover and production sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants and the causes of protein carbonylation. This is followed...... by a description of the methods used to study protein carbonylation in plants, which is also very brief as the methods are similar to those used in studies on animals. The chapter also focuses on protein carbonylation in plants in general and in mitochondria and in seeds in particular, as case stories where...... specific carbonylated proteins have been identified. Protein carbonylation appears to accumulate at all stages of seed development and germination investigated to date. In some cases, such as seed aging, it is probably simply an accumulation of oxidative damage. However, in other cases protein...

  9. Selenium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  10. Reciprocal carbonyl-carbonyl interactions in small molecules and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Abdur; Saha, Pinaki; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Sukumar, Nagamani; Sarma, Bani Kanta

    2017-07-19

    Carbonyl-carbonyl n→π* interactions where a lone pair (n) of the oxygen atom of a carbonyl group is delocalized over the π* orbital of a nearby carbonyl group have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to their ability to affect the 3D structure of small molecules, polyesters, peptides, and proteins. In this paper, we report the discovery of a "reciprocal" carbonyl-carbonyl interaction with substantial back and forth n→π* and π→π* electron delocalization between neighboring carbonyl groups. We have carried out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to show the presence of this interaction in both small molecules and proteins. In proteins, these interactions are primarily found in polyproline II (PPII) helices. As PPII are the most abundant secondary structures in unfolded proteins, we propose that these local interactions may have implications in protein folding.Carbonyl-carbonyl π* non covalent interactions affect the structure and stability of small molecules and proteins. Here, the authors carry out experimental studies, analyses of crystallographic databases and theoretical calculations to describe an additional type of carbonyl-carbonyl interaction.

  11. Validation of protein carbonyl measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustyniak, Edyta; Adam, Aisha; Wojdyla, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Protein carbonyls are widely analysed as a measure of protein oxidation. Several different methods exist for their determination. A previous study had described orders of magnitude variance that existed when protein carbonyls were analysed in a single laboratory by ELISA using different commercial...... protein carbonyl analysis across Europe. ELISA and Western blotting techniques detected an increase in protein carbonyl formation between 0 and 5min of UV irradiation irrespective of method used. After irradiation for 15min, less oxidation was detected by half of the laboratories than after 5min...... irradiation. Three of the four ELISA carbonyl results fell within 95% confidence intervals. Likely errors in calculating absolute carbonyl values may be attributed to differences in standardisation. Out of up to 88 proteins identified as containing carbonyl groups after tryptic cleavage of irradiated...

  12. THE METAL CARBONYLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, A A

    1941-10-03

    When the metal carbonyls were first discovered, their properties were startling because they seemed to violate nearly all the previously recognized generalizations of chemistry. Even to-day the existence of the carbonyls is not particularly emphasized in elementary courses of chemistry because it is rather hard to reconcile them with the first presentations of the generalizations of chemistry. Nevertheless, as the student progresses deeper into the knowledge of chemistry it becomes desirable to include the knowledge of the carbonyls both because they become more comprehensible when viewed in the light of Werner's system of coordination and because they themselves contribute to the comprehension of the Werner theory. As long ago as 1931, Reiff in his discussion of cobalt nitrosyl carbonyl recognized the correlation between the effective atomic number and the volatility of carbonyls. A more recent study of charged Werner coordination complexes, that is, of complex ions, has shown a similar role of the effective atomic number. We are standing on fairly firm ground when we point out the correlation between E.A.N. and the volatility of the carbonyl complexes and the existence of complex ions. Be it noted that we have made no postulates as to the arrangement of the electrons in quantum levels. In the inert gases the outer principal quantum group is supposed always to contain eight electrons. In the carbonyls and other Werner complexes there is no compelling reason to suppose that the electrons in the coordinating layer, be this layer of eight, ten, twelve or sixteen electrons, are not all at the same energy level. Although we have confined our discussion almost exclusively to the property of volatility, the carbonyls are very interesting from the standpoint of several other properties, for example, magnetic susceptibility and dielectric constant. Enthusiasts in the interpretation of such properties try to draw conclusions as to the condition of the electrons, sometimes

  13. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  14. Radical carbonylations using a continuous microflow system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide Fukuyama

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Radical-based carbonylation reactions of alkyl halides were conducted in a microflow reactor under pressurized carbon monoxide gas. Good to excellent yields of carbonylated products were obtained via radical formylation, carbonylative cyclization and three-component coupling reactions, using tributyltin hydride or TTMSS as a radical mediator.

  15. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  16. Transition metal catalyzed carbonylation reactions carbonylative activation of C-X bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Beller, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in organic synthesis with a detailed discussion of carbonylation from the basics through to applications. It discusses the past, present and future of carbonylation reactions.

  17. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  18. Kinetics of carbonyl reductase from human brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Bohren, K M; von Wartburg, J P; Wermuth, B

    1987-01-01

    Initial-rate analysis of the carbonyl reductase-catalysed reduction of menadione by NADPH gave families of straight lines in double-reciprocal plots consistent with a sequential mechanism being obeyed. The fluorescence of NADPH was increased up to 7-fold with a concomitant shift of the emission maximum towards lower wavelength in the presence of carbonyl reductase, and both NADPH and NADP+ caused quenching of the enzyme fluorescence, indicating formation of a binary enzyme-coenzyme complex. D...

  19. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  20. Protein carbonylation and adipocyte mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica M; Hahn, Wendy S; Stone, Matthew D; Inda, Jacob J; Droullard, David J; Kuzmicic, Jovan P; Donoghue, Margaret A; Long, Eric K; Armien, Anibal G; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J; Bernlohr, David A

    2012-09-21

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte.

  1. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  2. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  3. Titanocene sulfide chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 314, MAY 2016 (2016), s. 83-102 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/2368 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanocene sulfide chemistry * photolysis * titanocene hydrosulfides Ti-(SH)n Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.324, year: 2016

  4. Electron transfer to sulfides:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Ana Belen; Antonello, Sabrina; Arevalo, Maria Carmen; Maran, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of characterizing the steps associated with the dissociative reduction of sulfides has been addressed. The electrochemical reduction of diphenylmethyl para-methoxyphenyl sulfide in N,N-dimethylformamide, on both glassy carbon and mercury electrodes, was chosen as a test system. The electrode process involves the slow heterogeneous outer-sphere electron transfer to the sulfide, the fast cleavage of the C-S bond, the reduction of the ensuing carbon radical, and the self-protonation triggered by the generation of the strong base Ph 2 CH - . The latter reaction is rather slow, in agreement with the large intrinsic barriers characterizing proton transfers between CH-acids and carbon bases. The dissociative reduction was studied in the presence of an exogenous acid. The results, obtained by convolution analysis, point to a stepwise DET mechanism in which the ET step is accompanied by rather large reorganization energy. Similar results were obtained on both electrode materials. Analysis of the heterogeneous electron transfer and associated C-S bond cleavage indicate that the reduction of this and other sulfides lies between the stepwise dissociative electron transfers leading to the formation of stiff π* radical anions and those going through the intermediacy of loose σ* radical anions

  5. Glucosinolates and isothiocyanates from broccoliseed extractsuppressproteinglycationand carbonylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Hirano,

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucosinolates from brassica plants are hydrolyzed by internal or salivary myrosinase to produce isothiocyanates. Glucoraphanin, a major glucosinolate in broccoli, is hydrolyzed to sulforaphane (SFN, which exhibits antitumor and detoxification activities. Regarding the influence of broccoli and its constituents on the skin, a few studies have reported anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Recently, advanced glycation end products (AGEs and carbonyl proteins have been reported to accelerate skin aging. Objective: We evaluated the effects of broccoli seed extract (BSE and glucosinolates on protein glycation and carbonylation in vitro. Methods: To evaluate the effects of BSE and its constituents, protein glycation and carbonylation were induced by mixing fructose with bovine serum albumin (BSA and then measuring production of AGEs, fructosamine, and carbonyl proteins (CP. Production of CP after mixing fatty acids with BSA was also assessed. Furthermore, the effect of BSE and its constituents on CP production by human fibroblasts (TIG103 was examined. Results: BSE suppressed the production of AGEs, fructosamine, and CP after mixing fructose and BSA. BSE also suppressed production of CP when oxidized linoleic acid was mixed with BSA. Isothiocyanates, including SFN and iberin, suppressed fructose-based CP production, but SFN had no effect on CP production stimulated by oxidized linoleic acid. In contrast, glucosinolates from BSE did not suppress fructose-based CP production, but suppressed CP production due to oxidized linoleic acid. Among the glucosinolates in BSE, glucoberteroin showed the strongest suppression of CP production. CP production in fibroblasts was also suppressed by glucosinolates, including glucoiberin and glucoberteroin. Conclusions: BSE demonstrated anti-glycation and anti-carbonylation effects on protein reactions with fructose and oxidized fatty acids. Isothiocyanates suppressed protein carbonylation induced by

  6. Spatiotemporal distribution of carbonyl compounds in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.F.; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Huang, R.-J.; Dai, W.T.; Cao, J.J.; Tian, Linwei; Deng, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A sampling campaign was carried out at nine Chinese cities in 2010/2011. Fifteen monocarbonyls (C#= 1–9) were quantified. Temperature is the rate-determining factor of the summertime carbonyl levels. The carbonyl emissions in winter are mainly driven by the primary anthropogenic sources like automobile. A molar ratio of propionaldehyde to nonaldehyde is a barometer of the impact of atmospheric vegetation emission which suggesting that strong vegetation emissions exist in summer and high propionaldehyde abundance is caused by fossil fuel combustion in winter. Potential health risk assessment of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde was conducted and the highest cumulative risks were observed at Chengdu in summer and Wuhan in winter. Because of the strong photochemical reaction and large amount of anthropogenic emissions, high concentrations of carbonyl compounds were observed in Chengdu. The use of ethanol-blended gasoline in Wuhan is the key reason of acetaldehyde emission and action should be taken to avoid potential health risks. - Highlights: • A national wide survey of ambient carbonyl compounds were conducted in China. • Using ethanol-blended gasoline can lead to higher cancer risks. • High concentrations of HMW carbonyls (C6, C7, C8 and C9) were observed in all cities. • HMW carbonyls (C6–C9) species show a very consistent seasonal variation. • C 3 /C 9 acts as an indicator for the impact of vegetation emission in the atmosphere. - Capsule abstract: Strong vegetation emission occurs in summer atmosphere and high acetaldehyde emission due to ethanol-blended gasoline consumption in 9 Chinese cities is discouraged

  7. Effect of Sodium Sulfide on Ni-Containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Feng; Paul A. Lindahl

    2004-07-28

    OAK-B135 The structure of the active-site C-cluster in CO dehydrogenase from Carboxythermus hydrogenoformans includes a {mu}{sup 2}-sulfide ion bridged to the Ni and unique Fe, while the same cluster in enzymes from Rhodospirillum rubrum (CODH{sub Rr}) and Moorella thermoacetica (CODH{sub Mt}) lack this ion. This difference was investigated by exploring the effects of sodium sulfide on activity and spectral properties. Sulfide partially inhibited the CO oxidation activity of CODH{sub Rr} and generated a lag prior to steady-state. CODH{sub Mt} was inhibited similarly but without a lag. Adding sulfide to CODH{sub Mt} in the C{sub red1} state caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 EPR signal to decline and new features to appear, including one with g = 1.95, 1.85 and (1.70 or 1.62). Removing sulfide caused the g{sub av} = 1.82 signal to reappear and activity to recover. Sulfide did not affect the g{sub av} = 1.86 signal from the C{sub red2} state. A model was developed in which sulfide binds reversibly to C{sub red1}, inhibiting catalysis. Reducing this adduct causes sulfide to dissociate, C{sub red2} to develop, and activity to recover. Using this model, apparent K{sub I} values are 40 {+-} 10 nM for CODH{sub Rr} and 60 {+-} 30 {micro}M for CODH{sub Mt}. Effects of sulfide are analogous to those of other anions, including the substrate hydroxyl group, suggesting that these ions also bridge the Ni and unique Fe. This proposed arrangement raises the possibility that CO binding labilizes the bridging hydroxyl and increases its nucleophilic tendency towards attacking Ni-bound carbonyl.

  8. Convenient Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds to their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Alcohols and their derivatives occupy an important position in organic synthesis. ... review also reveals that the reduction of carbonyl compounds ..... 1 H.B. Ji and Y.B. She, Green Oxidation and Reduction, China Petrochemi- cal Press, Beijing ...

  9. Protein Carbonylation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváčková, A.; Štikarová, J.; Kotlín, R.; Chrastinová, L.; Šácha, Pavel; Májek, P.; Čermák, J.; Suttnar, J.; Dyr, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 23 (2015), s. 5232 ISSN 0006-4971. [Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Society of Hematology /55./. 07.12.2013-10.12.2013, New Orleans] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein carbonylation * myelodysplastic syndromes Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  10. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide ⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S.B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R.A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson’s A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. PMID:27738349

  11. Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilga, Michael A.; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Zacher, Alan H.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Orth, Rick J.

    2010-03-30

    A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

  12. Essential Factors in Removing Carbonyl Sulfide from Coal Gas with Lime and Limestone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2000), s. 302-306 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA ČR GA203/98/0101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.154, year: 2000

  13. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS measured remotely by FTIR solar absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Toon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric OCS abundances have been retrieved from infrared spectra measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL MkIV Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR spectrometer during 24 balloon flights and during nearly 1100 days of ground-based observations since 1985. Our spectral fitting approach uses broad windows to enhance the precision and robustness of the retrievals. Since OCS has a vertical profile similar in shape to that of N2O, and since tropospheric N2O is very stable, we reference the OCS observations to those of N2O, measured simultaneously in the same air mass, to remove the effects of stratospheric transport, allowing a clearer assessment of secular changes in OCS. Balloon measurements reveal less than 5 % change in stratospheric OCS amounts over the past 25 years. Ground-based measurements reveal a springtime peak of tropospheric OCS, followed by a rapid early-summer decrease, similar to the behavior of CO2. This results in a peak-to-peak seasonal cycle of 5–6 % of the total OCS column at northern mid-latitudes. In the long-term tropospheric OCS record, a 5 % decrease is seen from 1990 to 2002, followed by a 5 % increase from 2003 to 2012.

  14. Resonant X-ray Scattering of carbonyl sulfide at the sulfur K edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journel, Loïc; Marchenko, Tatiana; Guillemin, Renaud; Kawerk, Elie; Simon, Marc; Kavčič, Matjaž; Žit-nik, Matjaž; Bučar, Klemen; Bohinc, Rok

    2015-01-01

    New results on free OCS molecules have been obtained using Resonant X-ray Inelastic Scattering spectroscopy. A deconvolution algorithm has been applied to improve the energy resolution spectra of which we can extract detailed information on nuclear dynamics in the system. (paper)

  15. Resonant X-ray Scattering of carbonyl sulfide at the sulfur K edge

    OpenAIRE

    Journel , Loïc; Marchenko , Tatiana; Guillemin , Renaud; Kawerk , Elie; Kavčič , Matjaž; Žit-nik , Matjaž; Bučar , Klemen; Bohinc , Rok; Simon , Marc

    2015-01-01

    International audience; New results on free OCS molecules have been obtained using Resonant X-ray Inelastic Scattering spectroscopy. A deconvolution algorithm has been applied to improve the energy resolution spectra of which we can extract detailed information on nuclear dynamics in the system.

  16. Organocatalytic Hydrophosphonylation Reaction of Carbonyl Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Raquel P

    2017-09-01

    This revision is covering the limited examples reported for a pivotal strategy in the formation of C-P bonds such as the asymmetric organocatalytic hydrophosphonylation of carbonyl groups (Pudovik reaction). The scope and limitations, and the proposed mechanisms for the scarce different possibilities of asymmetric induction are also shown. The recent evolution and future trends of this undeveloped approach are commented. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Spatiotemporal distribution of carbonyl compounds in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K F; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Huang, R-J; Dai, W T; Cao, J J; Tian, Linwei; Deng, W J

    2015-02-01

    A sampling campaign was carried out at nine Chinese cities in 2010/2011. Fifteen monocarbonyls (C# = 1-9) were quantified. Temperature is the rate-determining factor of the summertime carbonyl levels. The carbonyl emissions in winter are mainly driven by the primary anthropogenic sources like automobile. A molar ratio of propionaldehyde to nonaldehyde is a barometer of the impact of atmospheric vegetation emission which suggesting that strong vegetation emissions exist in summer and high propionaldehyde abundance is caused by fossil fuel combustion in winter. Potential health risk assessment of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde was conducted and the highest cumulative risks were observed at Chengdu in summer and Wuhan in winter. Because of the strong photochemical reaction and large amount of anthropogenic emissions, high concentrations of carbonyl compounds were observed in Chengdu. The use of ethanol-blended gasoline in Wuhan is the key reason of acetaldehyde emission and action should be taken to avoid potential health risks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbonyl Compounds Generated from Electronic Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Bekki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon.

  19. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims: The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods: The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152-308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results: The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of

  20. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  1. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by

  2. Validation of protein carbonyl measurement: A multi-centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Augustyniak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein carbonyls are widely analysed as a measure of protein oxidation. Several different methods exist for their determination. A previous study had described orders of magnitude variance that existed when protein carbonyls were analysed in a single laboratory by ELISA using different commercial kits. We have further explored the potential causes of variance in carbonyl analysis in a ring study. A soluble protein fraction was prepared from rat liver and exposed to 0, 5 and 15 min of UV irradiation. Lyophilised preparations were distributed to six different laboratories that routinely undertook protein carbonyl analysis across Europe. ELISA and Western blotting techniques detected an increase in protein carbonyl formation between 0 and 5 min of UV irradiation irrespective of method used. After irradiation for 15 min, less oxidation was detected by half of the laboratories than after 5 min irradiation. Three of the four ELISA carbonyl results fell within 95% confidence intervals. Likely errors in calculating absolute carbonyl values may be attributed to differences in standardisation. Out of up to 88 proteins identified as containing carbonyl groups after tryptic cleavage of irradiated and control liver proteins, only seven were common in all three liver preparations. Lysine and arginine residues modified by carbonyls are likely to be resistant to tryptic proteolysis. Use of a cocktail of proteases may increase the recovery of oxidised peptides. In conclusion, standardisation is critical for carbonyl analysis and heavily oxidised proteins may not be effectively analysed by any existing technique.

  3. Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M. Judith; Green, Peter G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured using an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde forcarbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for>_C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 ? 2000 ?g/L fuel for LDVs and 1.8 - 27000 mu g/L fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95percent of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88percent from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19percent of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37percent of POC emissions from three-way catalyst equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9percent depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas- and particle-phase under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the current study.

  4. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  5. Pattern of occurrence and occupancy of carbonylation sites in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    sites. Comparison of metal-catalyzed oxidation of two closely related proteins indicates that this type of carbonylation might not be very specific in proteins. Interestingly, carbonylated sites show a very strong tendency to cluster together in the protein primary sequence hinting at some sort......Proteins are targets for modification by reactive oxygen species, and carbonylation is an important irreversible modification that increases during oxidative stress. While information on protein carbonylation is accumulating, its pattern is not yet understood. We have made a meta...

  6. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchi Nenkova; Peter Velev; Mirela Dragnevska; Diyana Nikolova; Kiril Dimitrov

    2011-01-01

    Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of co...

  7. Electromagnetic properties of carbonyl iron and their microwave ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The aim of this paper is to develop a novel thin micro- wave absorber with good absorbing performance in wide bandwidth and lightweight. So we investigated the micro- wave absorbing characterization of silicone rubber using carbonyl iron as filler. Carbonyl iron can be widely used in the field of electromagnetic shielding ...

  8. Bifunctional dendrons for multiple carbohydrate presentation via carbonyl chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of new dendrons of the generations 0, 1 and 2 with a double bond at the focal point and a carbonyl group at the termini has been carried out. The carbonyl group has been exploited for the multivalent conjugation to a sample saccharide by reductive amination and alkoxyamine conjugation.

  9. Removal of dimethyl sulfide by the combination of non-thermal plasma and biological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Z S; Li, H Q; He, J C; Ye, Q H; Huang, Q R; Luo, Y W

    2013-10-01

    A bench scale system integrated with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) and a biotricking filtration (BTF) unit for the treatment of gases containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was investigated. DMS removal efficiency in the integrated system was up to 96%. Bacterial communities in the BTF were assessed by PCR-DGGE, which play the dominant role in the biological processes of metabolism, sulfur oxidation, sulfate-reducing and carbon oxidation. The addition of ozone from NTP made microbial community in BTF more complicated and active for DMS removal. The NTP oxidize DMS to simple compounds such as methanol and carbonyl sulfide; the intermediate organic products and DMS are further oxidized to sulfate, carbon dioxide, water vapors by biological degradation. These results show that NTP-BTF is achievable and open new possibilities for applying the integrated with NTP and BTF to odour gas treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbonyl-Olefin Exchange Reaction: Present State and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Radostina; Jossifov, Christo

    The carbonyl-olefin exchange reaction (COER) is a new reaction between carbonyl group and olefin double bond, which has a formal similarity with the olefin metathesis (OM) - one carbon atom in the latter is replaced with an oxygen atom. Till now the new reaction is performed successfully only when the two functional groups (carbonyl group and olefin double bond) are in one molecule and are conjugated. The α, β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (substituted propenones) are the compounds with such a structure. They polymerize giving substituted polyacetylenes. The chain propagation step of this polymerization is in fact the COER. The question arises: is it possible the COER to take place when the two functional groups are not in one molecule and are not conjugated, and could this reaction became an alternative of the existing carbonyl olefination reactions?

  11. Optimized biotin-hydrazide enrichment and mass spectrometry analysis of peptide carbonyls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F.; Wojdyla, K; Jensen, O. N.

    Irreversible cell damage through protein carbonylation is the result of reaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been coupled to many diseases. The precise molecular consequences of protein carbonylation, however, are still not clear. The localization of the carbonylated amino acid is ...... modifications are isobaric to carbonylation and it is often challenging to detect the weaker signal from carbonylated peptides necessitating enrichment step. We here present an optimized method for the enrichment of carbonylated peptides....

  12. Catalyst Initiation in the Oscillatory Carbonylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Novakovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium(II iodide is used as a catalyst in the phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction that has demonstrated oscillatory behaviour in both pH and heat of reaction. In an attempt to extract the reaction network responsible for the oscillatory nature of this reaction, the system was divided into smaller parts and they were studied. This paper focuses on understanding the reaction network responsible for the initial reactions of palladium(II iodide within this oscillatory reaction. The species researched include methanol, palladium(II iodide, potassium iodide, and carbon monoxide. Several chemical reactions were considered and applied in a modelling study. The study revealed the significant role played by traces of water contained in the standard HPLC grade methanol used.

  13. Carbonyl complexes of rhodium with N-donor ligands: factors determining the formation of terminal versus bridging carbonyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzik, W.I.; Creusen, C.; de Gelder, R.; Peters, T.P.J.; Smits, J.M.M.; de Bruin, B.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic rhodium carbonyl complexes supported by a series of different N-3- and N-4-donor ligands were prepared, and their ability to form carbonyl-bridged species was evaluated. Complex [Rh(K3-bpa)(cod)r (1(+)) (bpa = bis(2-picolyBamine, cod = cis,cis-1,5-cyclooctadiene) reacts with I bar of CO to

  14. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  15. Sulfide-conducting solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, L.A.; Shirokova, G.I.; Murin, I.V.; Ushakova, Yu.N.; Fominykh, E.G.; Lyalina, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Feasibility of sulfide transfer in phases on the basis of BaZrS 3 and MLn 2 S 4 ( M = Ca, Ba; Ln = La, Y, Tm, Nd, Sm, Pr) is considered. Solid solution regions on the basis of ternary compounds are determined. Systematic study of the phases is carried out making use of the methods of conductometry, emf in chemical concentration chains without/with transfer, potentiostatic chronoamperometry. Possible mechanism of defect formation during successive alloying of ternary sulfides by binary ones in suggested [ru

  16. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  17. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  18. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S...

  19. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in...

  20. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, N; Cavaille, J P; Graziani, F; Robin, M; Ouari, O; Pietri, S; Stocker, P

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  1. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  2. 16th Carbonyl Metabolism Meeting: from enzymology to genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maser Edmund

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 16th International Meeting on the Enzymology and Molecular Biology of Carbonyl Metabolism, Castle of Ploen (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, July 10–15, 2012, covered all aspects of NAD(P-dependent oxido-reductases that are involved in the general metabolism of xenobiotic and physiological carbonyl compounds. Starting 30 years ago with enzyme purification, structure elucidation and enzyme kinetics, the Carbonyl Society members have meanwhile established internationally recognized enzyme nomenclature systems and now consider aspects of enzyme genomics and enzyme evolution along with their roles in diseases. The 16th international meeting included lectures from international speakers from all over the world.

  3. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  4. Degradation of carbonyl hydroperoxides in the atmosphere and in combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Xing, Lili; Bao, Junwei Lucas; Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Feng; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2017-01-01

    Oxygenates with carbonyl and hydroperoxy functional groups are important intermediates that are generated during the autooxidation of organic compounds in the atmosphere and during the autoignition of transport fuels. In the troposphere

  5. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the α-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N ε -(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress

  6. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2003-01-28

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the {alpha}-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress.

  7. Propheromones that release pheromonal carbonyl compounds in light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Macaulay, E D; Pickett, J A

    1984-05-01

    Pheromonal carbonyl compounds; (Z)-11-hexadecanal, (E)-citral, and 2-heptanone were treated with six alcohols to give acetals or ketals, some of which acted as propheromones by releasing the pheromonal carbonyl compounds in ultraviolet or simulated sunlight. Highest yields of pheromone were obtained from adducts prepared witho-nitrobenzyl alcohol ando-nitrophenylethane-1,2-diol. Adducts from (Z)-11-hexadecenal and these two alcohols were employed in lures to catch diamondback moths,Plutella xylostella (L.).

  8. Dansyl labeling and bidimensional mass spectrometry to investigate protein carbonylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmese, Angelo; De Rosa, Chiara; Marino, Gennaro; Amoresano, Angela

    2011-01-15

    Carbonylation is a non-enzymatic irreversible post-translational modification. The adduction of carbonyl groups to proteins is due to the presence of excess of ROS in cells. Carbonylation of specific amino acid side chains is one of the most abundant consequences of oxidative stress; therefore, the determination of carbonyl groups content in proteins is regarded as a reliable way to estimate the cellular damage caused by oxidative stress. This paper reports a novel RIGhT (Reporter Ion Generating Tag) (A. Amoresano, G. Monti, C. Cirulli, G. Marino. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2006, 20, 1400) approach for selective labeling of carbonyl groups in proteins using dansylhydrazide, coupled with selective analysis by bidimensional mass spectrometry. We first applied this approach to ribonuclease A and lysozyme as model proteins. According to the so-called 'gel-free procedures', the analysis is carried out at the level of peptides following tryptic digest of the whole protein mixture. Modified RNaseA was analyzed in combined MS(2) and MS(3) scan mode, to specifically select the dansylated species taking advantage of the dansyl-specific fragmentation pathways. This combination allowed us to obtain a significant increase in signal/noise ratio and a significant increase in sensitivity of analysis, due to the reduction of duty cycle of the mass spectrometer. The unique signal obtained was correlated to peptide 1-10 of RNaseA carbonylated and labeled by dansylhydrazide. This strategy represents the first method leading to the direct identification of the carbonylation sites in proteins, thus indicating the feasibility of this strategy to investigate protein carbonylation in a proteomic approach. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. LIGNOCELLULOSE NANOCOMPOSITE CONTAINING COPPER SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchi Nenkova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfide-containing lignocellulose nanocomposites with improved electroconductivity were obtained. Two methods for preparing the copper sulfide lignocellulose nanocomposites were developed. An optimization of the parameters for obtaining of the nanocomposites with respect to obtaining improved electroconductivity, economy, and lower quantities and concentration of copper and sulfur ions in waste waters was conducted. The mechanisms and schemes of delaying and subsequent connection of copper sulfides in the lignocellulosic matrix were investigated. The modification with a system of 2 components: cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4. 5H2O and sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3.5H2O for wood fibers is preferred. Optimal parameters were established for the process: 40 % of the reduction system; hydromodule M=1:6; and ratio of cupric sulfate pentahydrate:sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate = 1:2. The coordinative connection of copper ions with oxygen atoms of cellulose OH groups and aromatic nucleus in lignin macromolecule was observed.

  10. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  11. Ozone Effects on Protein Carbonyl Content in the Frontal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is a critical part of community-based human health risk assessment of chemical exposures. There is growing concern over a common air pollutant, ozone (03), and adverse health effects including dysfunction of the pulmonary, cardiac, and nervous systems. The objective of this study was to test whether OS plays a role in the adverse effects caused by 03 exposure, and if so, if effects were age-dependent. We selected protein carbonyl as an indicator of OS because carbonyl content of cells is a useful indicator of oxidative protein damage and has been linked to chemical-induced adverse effects. Male Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were exposed to 03 (0,0.25 or 1 ppm) via inhalation for 6 h/day, 2 days per week for 13 weeks. Frontal cortex (FC) and cerebellum (CB) were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at -80°C. Protein carbonyls were assayed using commercial kits. Hydrogen peroxide, a positive control, increased protein carbonyls in cortical tissue in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant effects of age on protein carbonyls in FC and a significant effect of age and 03 dose on protein carbonyls in CB were observed. In control rats, there was an age-dependent increase in protein carbonyls indicating increased OS in 12 and 24 month old rats compared to 4 month old rats. Although 03 increase

  12. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...... not present in terrestrial plants at that level. Sulfide is not necessarily toxic but used as sulfur nutrition, presupposing healthy seagrass ecosystems that can support detoxification mechanisms. Presence or absence of those mechanisms determines susceptibility of seagrass ecosystems to sediment sulfide...

  13. Neutron diffraction investigations of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altorfer, F.

    1990-03-01

    Statics and dynamics of the superionic conductors lithium sulfide and sodium sulfide were investigated using the following experimental methods: elastic scattering on sodium sulfide powder in the temperature range 20 - 1000 C, elastic scattering on a lithium sulfide single crystal in the temperature range 20 - 700 C, inelastic scattering on a 7 Li 2 S single crystal at 10 K. 34 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  14. Determination of Carbonyl Compounds in Exhaled Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings on a quantitative evaluation of carbonyl levels in exhaled cigarette smoke from human subjects. The cigarettes evaluated include products with 5.0 mg ‘tar’, 10.6 mg ‘tar’ and 16.2 mg ‘tar’, where ‘tar’ is defined as the weight of total wet particulate matter (TPM minus the weight of nicotine and water, and the cigarettes are smoked following U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC recommendations. The measured levels of carbonyls in the exhaled smoke were compared with calculated yields of carbonyls in the inhaled smoke and a retention efficiency was obtained. The number of human subjects included a total of ten smokers for the 10.6 mg ‘tar’, five for the 16.2 mg ‘tar’, and five for the 5.0 mg ‘tar’ product, each subject smoking three cigarettes. The analyzed carbonyl compounds included several aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde and n-butyraldehyde, and two ketones (acetone and 2-butanone. The smoke collection from the human subjects was vacuum assisted. Exhaled smoke was collected on Cambridge pads pretreated with a solution of dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of the dinitrophenylhydrazones of the carbonyl compounds. The cigarette butts from the smokers were collected and analyzed for nicotine. The nicotine levels for the cigarette butts from the smokers were used to calculate the level of carbonyls in the inhaled smoke, based on calibration curves. These were generated separately by analyzing the carbonyls in smoke and the nicotine in the cigarette butts obtained by machine smoking under different puffing regimes. The comparison of the level of carbonyl compounds in exhaled smoke with that from the inhaled smoke showed high retention of all the carbonyls. The retention of aldehydes was above 95% for all three different ‘tar’ levels cigarettes. The ketones were retained with a

  15. Sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillis, Marina Fuser

    2001-01-01

    Alloys for use in high temperature environments rely on the formation of an oxide layer for their protection. Normally, these protective oxides are Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 and, some times, SiO 2 . Many industrial gaseous environments contain sulfur. Sulfides, formed in the presence of sulfur are thermodynamically less stable, have lower melting points and deviate much more stoichiometrically, compared to the corresponding oxides. The mechanism of sulfidation of various metals is as yet not clear, in spite of the concerted efforts during the last decade. To help address this situation, the sulfidation behavior of Fe20Cr has been studied as a function of compositional modifications and surface state of the alloy. The alloys Fe20Cr, Fe20Cr0.7Y, Fe20Cr5Al and Fe20Cr5Al0.6Y were prepared and three sets of sulfidation tests were carried out. In the first set, the alloys were sulfidized at 700 deg C and 800 deg C for 10h. In the second set, the alloys were pre-oxidized at 1000 deg C and then sulfidized at 800 deg C for up to 45h. In the third set of tests, the initial stages of sulfidation of the alloys was studied. All the tests were carried out in a thermobalance, in flowing H 2 /2%H 2 S, and the sulfidation behavior determined as mass change per unit area. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to characterize the reaction products. The addition of Y and Al increased sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr. The addition of Y altered the species that diffused predominantly during sulfide growth. It changed from predominant cationic diffusion to predominant anionic diffusion. The addition of Al caused an even greater increase in sulfidation resistance of Fe20Cr, with the parabolic rate constant decreasing by three orders of magnitude. Y addition to the FeCrAl alloy did not cause any appreciable alteration in sulfidation resistance. Pre-oxidation of the FeCrAl and FeCrAlY alloys resulted in an extended

  16. Emissions of carbonyl compounds from various cookstoves in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Smith, K.R.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new database of carbonyl emission factors for commonly used cookstoves in China. The emission factors, reported both on a fuel-mass basis (mg/kg) and on a defined cooking-task basis (mg/task), were determined using a carbon balance approach for 22 types of fuel/stove combinations. These include various stoves using different species of crop residues and wood, kerosene, and several types of coals and gases. The results show that all the tested cookstoves produced formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and that the vast majority of the biomass stoves produced additional carbonyl compounds such as acetone, acrolein, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, 2-butanone, isobutyraldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, valeraldehyde, hexaldehyde, benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m,p-tolualdehyde, and 2,4-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Carbonyls other than formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, however, were rarely generated by burning coal, coal gas, and natural gas. Kerosene and LPG stoves generated more carbonyl compounds than coal, coal gas, and natural gas stoves, but less than biomass stoves. Indoor levels of carbonyl compounds for typical village houses during cooking hours, estimated using a mass balance model and the measured emission factors, can be high enough to cause acute health effects documented for formaldehyde exposure, depending upon house parameters and individuals' susceptibility

  17. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  18. Characterization of upgraded fast pyrolysis oak oil distillate fractions from sulfided and non-sulfided catalytic hydrotreating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olarte, Mariefel V.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Ferrell, Jack R.; Christensen, Earl D.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lucke, Richard B.; Burton, Sarah D.; Lemmon, Teresa L.; Swita, Marie S.; Fioroni, Gina; Elliott, Douglas C.; Drennan, Corinne

    2017-08-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing of pyrolysis oils from biomass produces hydrocarbons that can be considered for liquid fuel production. This process requires removal of oxygen and cracking of the heavier molecular weight bio-oil constituents into smaller fragments at high temperatures and pressures under hydrogen. A comprehensive understanding of product oils is useful to optimize cost versus degree of deoxygenation. Additionally, a better understanding of the chemical composition of the distillate fractions can open up other uses of upgraded oils for potentially higher-value chemical streams. We present in this paper the characterization data for five well-defined distillate fractions of two hydroprocessed oils with different oxygen levels: a low oxygen content (LOC, 1.8% O, wet basis) oil and a medium oxygen content (MOC, 6.4% O, wet basis) oil. Elemental analysis and 13C NMR results suggest that the distillate fractions become more aromatic/unsaturated as they become heavier. Our results also show that the use of sulfided catalysts directly affects the S content of the lightest distillate fraction. Carbonyl and carboxylic groups were found in the MOC light fractions, while phenols were present in the heavier fractions for both MOC and LOC. PIONA analysis of the light LOC fraction shows a predominance of paraffins with a minor amount of olefins. These results can be used to direct future research on refinery integration and production of value-added product from specific upgraded oil streams.

  19. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  20. Metal-Diazo Radicals of α-Carbonyl Diazomethanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feifei; Xiao, Longqiang; Liu, Lijian

    2016-03-01

    Metal-diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes are new members of the radical family and are precursors to metal-carbene radicals. Herein, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-trapping, we detect diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes, induced by [RhICl(cod)]2, [CoII(por)] and PdCl2, at room temperature. The unique quintet signal of the Rh-diazo radical was observed in measurements of α-carbonyl diazomethane adducts of [RhICl(cod)]2 in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO). DFT calculations indicated that 97.2% of spin density is localized on the diazo moiety. Co- and Pd-diazo radicals are EPR silent but were captured by DMPO to form spin adducts of DMPO-N• (triplet-of-sextets signal). The spin-trapping also provides a powerful tool for detection of metal-carbene radicals, as evidenced by the DMPO-trapped carbene radicals (DMPO-C•, sextet signal) and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane-carbene adducts (MNP-C•, doublet-of-triplets signal). The transformation of α-carbonyl diazomethanes to metal-carbene radicals was confirmed to be a two-step process via metal-diazo radicals.

  1. Carbonyl atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Genevieve; Aschmann, Sara M.; Atkinson, Roger; Arey, Janet

    To convert gaseous carbonyls to oximes during sampling, an XAD-4 resin denuder system pre-coated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine and followed by analysis with methane positive chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to measure carbonyls in ambient air samples in Riverside, CA. In conjunction with similar analyses of environmental chamber OH radical-initiated reactions of o- and p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, ethylbenzene, 4-hydroxy-2-butanone and 1,4-butanediol, we identified benzaldehyde, o-, m- and p-tolualdehyde and acetophenone and the dicarbonyls glyoxal, methylglyoxal, biacetyl, ethylglyoxal, 1,4-butenedial, 3-hexene-2,5-dione, 3-oxo-butanal, 1,4-butanedial and malonaldehyde in the ambient air samples. As discussed, these carbonyls and dicarbonyls can be formed from the OH radical-initiated reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere, and we conclude that in situ atmospheric formation is a major source of these carbonyls in our Riverside, CA, ambient air samples.

  2. Plasma protein carbonyl levels and breast cancer risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Terry, M. B.; Gammon, M. D.; Agrawal, M.; Zhang, F. F.; Ferris, J.S.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Eng, S. M.; Gaudet, M. M.; Neugut, A. I.; Santella, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2007), s. 1138-1148 ISSN 1582-1838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : oxidative stress * protein carbonyl * breast cancer Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 6.807, year: 2007

  3. Selective Oxidative Carbonylation of Aniline to Diphenylurea with Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahrtmann, Nanette; Claver, Carmen; Godard, Cyril

    2018-01-01

    A catalytic system for the selective oxidative carbonylation of aniline to diphenylurea based on Pd complexes in combination with imidazolium ionic liquids is presented. Both oxidants, Pd complexes and ionic liquids affect the activity of the reaction while the choice of oxidant determines...

  4. cyclo-addition reaction of triplet carbonyl compounds to substituted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    cited state energy of the olefin must be higher than that of the ketone so that ... the first singlet and triplet1,3 (n, π*) excited state of the carbonyl compounds.3,4 ... of the oxetane via carbon–carbon and carbon–oxygen attacks. They found the ...

  5. Olefination of carbonyl compounds: modern and classical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotchenko, V N; Nenajdenko, Valentine G; Balenkova, Elizabeth S [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shastin, Aleksey V [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2004-10-31

    The published data on the methods for alkene synthesis by olefination of carbonyl compounds are generalised and systematised. The main attention is given to the use of transition metals and organoelement compounds. The review covers the data on both classical and newly developed methods that are little known to chemists at large.

  6. Olefination of carbonyl compounds: modern and classical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotchenko, V. N.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Balenkova, Elizabeth S.; Shastin, Aleksey V.

    2004-10-01

    The published data on the methods for alkene synthesis by olefination of carbonyl compounds are generalised and systematised. The main attention is given to the use of transition metals and organoelement compounds. The review covers the data on both classical and newly developed methods that are little known to chemists at large.

  7. Frustrated Lewis pairs-assisted reduction of carbonyl compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Ales; Pedersen, Martin Holst Friborg

    2015-01-01

    An alternative and robust method for the reduction of carbonyl groups by frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) is reported in this paper. With its very mild reaction conditions, good to excellent yields, absolute regioselectivity and the non-metallic character of the reagent, it provides an excellent too...

  8. Degradation of carbonyl hydroperoxides in the atmosphere and in combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Xing, Lili

    2017-10-12

    Oxygenates with carbonyl and hydroperoxy functional groups are important intermediates that are generated during the autooxidation of organic compounds in the atmosphere and during the autoignition of transport fuels. In the troposphere, the degradation of carbonyl hydroperoxides leads to low-vapor-pressure polyfunctional species that be taken into in cloud and fog droplets or to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In combustion, the fate of carbonyl hydroperoxides is important for the performance of advanced combustion engines, especially for autoignition. A key fate of the carbonyl hydroperoxides is reac-tion with OH radicals, for which kinetics data are experimentally unavailable. Here, we study 4-hydroperoxy-2-pentanone (CH3C(=O)CH2CH(OOH)CH3) as a model compound to clarify the kinetics of OH reactions with carbonyl hydroperoxides, in par-ticular H-atom abstraction and OH addition reactions. With a combination of electronic structure calculations, we determine previ-ously missing thermochemical data, and with multipath variational transition state theory (MP-VTST), a multidimensional tunnel-ing (MT) approximation, multiple-structure anharmonicity, and torsional potential anharmonicity we obtained much more accurate rate constants than the ones that can computed by conventional single-structure harmonic transition state theory (TST) and than the empirically estimated rate constants that are currently used in atmospheric and combustion modeling. The roles of various factors in determining the rates are elucidated. The pressure-dependent rate constants for the addition reaction are computed using system-specific quantum RRK theory. The calculated temperature range is 298-2400 K, and the pressure range is 0.01–100 atm. The accu-rate thermodynamic and kinetics data determined in this work are indispensable in the global modeling of SOAs in atmospheric science and in the detailed understanding and prediction of ignition properties of hydrocarbons

  9. Low pressure carbonylation of benzyl chloride = Die carbonylierung von benzylchlorid bei niedrigen drücken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luggenhorst, H.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    For carbonylations, metal carbonyls, particularly cobalt and iron carbonyls, are often used as catalysts. These reactions take place under rather drastic reaction conditions, e.g. 200–300 °C and 60–100 MPa. In some patents it is stated that similar reactions using the same catalysts can also be

  10. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of Carbonyl Sulfide from 3700 to 4800 cm -1and Selection of a Line-Pointing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naı̈m, S.; Fayt, A.; Bredohl, H.; Blavier, J.-F.; Dubois, I.

    1998-11-01

    We have measured the Fourier transform spectrum of natural OCS from 3700 to 4800 cm-1with a near Doppler resolution and a line-position accuracy between 4 and 8 × 10-5cm-1. For the normal isotopic species, 37 vibrational transitions have been analyzed for both frequencies and intensities. We also report 15 bands of OC34S, eight bands of O13CS, nine bands of OC33S, and two bands of18OCS. Important effective Herman-Wallis terms are explained on the basis of eigenvectors. A comparison of different line-pointing programs is also presented.

  11. Sulfidation/oxidation resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The patent describes a nickel-base, high chromium alloy. It is characterized by excellent resistance to sulfidation and oxidation at elevated temperatures as high as 2000 degrees F. (1093 degrees C.) and higher, a stress-rupture life of about 200 hours or more at a temperature at least as high as 1800 degrees F. (990:0083 degrees C.) and under a stress of 2000 psi, good tensile strength and good ductility both at room and elevated temperature. The alloy consists essentially of about 27 to 35% chromium, about 2.5 to 5% aluminum, about 2.5 to about 6% iron, 0.5 to 2.5% columbium, up to 0.1% carbon, up to 1% each of titanium and zirconium, up to 0.05% cerium, up to 0.05% yttrium, up to 1% silicon, up to 1% manganese, and the balance nickel

  12. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......: (1) impact of low viscous droplets of iron sulfide; and (2) sulfur diffusion. Previous research on the influence of pyrite on slagging focused on the decomposition of pyrite into pyrrhotite and especially on the oxidation stage of this product during impact on the heat transfer surfaces...

  13. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  14. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field...... as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments....

  15. Accumulation of carbonyls accelerates the formation of pentosidine, an advanced glycation end product: carbonyl stress in uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, T; Ueda, Y; Yamada, Y; Izuhara, Y; Wada, T; Jadoul, M; Saito, A; Kurokawa, K; van Ypersele de Strihou, C

    1998-12-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation is related to hyperglycemia in diabetes but not in uremia, because plasma AGE levels do not differ between diabetic and nondiabetic hemodialysis patients. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains elusive. Previously, it was suggested that elevation of AGE levels in uremia might result from the accumulation of unknown AGE precursors. The present study evaluates the in vitro generation of pentosidine, a well identified AGE structure. Plasma samples from healthy subjects and nondiabetic hemodialysis patients were incubated under air for several weeks. Pentosidine levels were determined at intervals by HPLC assay. Pentosidine rose to a much larger extent in uremic than in control plasma. Pentosidine yield, i.e., the change in pentosidine level between 0 and 4 wk divided by 28 d, averaged 0.172 nmol/ml per d in uremic versus 0.072 nmol/ml per d in control plasma (P aminoguanidine and OPB-9195, which inhibit the Maillard reaction, lowered pentosidine yield in both uremic and control plasma. When ultrafiltrated plasma was exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, the yield of hydrazones, formed by interaction with carbonyl groups, was markedly higher in uremic than in control plasma. These observations strongly suggest that the pentosidine precursors accumulated in uremic plasma are carbonyl compounds. These precursors are unrelated to glucose or ascorbic acid, whose concentration is either normal or lowered in uremic plasma. They are also unrelated to 3-deoxyglucosone, a glucose-derived dicarbonyl compound whose level is raised in uremic plasma: Its addition to normal plasma fails to increase pentosidine yield. This study reports an elevated level of reactive carbonyl compounds ("carbonyl stress") in uremic plasma. Most have a lower than 5000 Da molecular weight and are thus partly removed by hemodialysis. Their effect on pentosidine generation can be inhibited by aminoguanidine or OPB-9195. Carbonyl stress might contribute to

  16. Crossett Hydrogen Sulfide Air Sampling Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of the EPA’s hydrogen sulfide air monitoring conducted along Georgia Pacific’s wastewater treatment system and in surrounding Crossett, AR, neighborhoods in 2017.

  17. Phenolic carbonyls undergo rapid aqueous photodegradation to form low-volatility, light-absorbing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy D.; Kinney, Haley; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the aqueous photochemistry of six phenolic carbonyls - vanillin, acetovanillone, guaiacyl acetone, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone, and coniferyl aldehyde - that are emitted from wood combustion. The phenolic carbonyls absorb significant amounts of solar radiation and decay rapidly via direct photodegradation, with lifetimes (τ) of 13-140 min under Davis, CA winter solstice sunlight at midday (solar zenith angle = 62°). The one exception is guaiacyl acetone, where the carbonyl group is not directly connected to the aromatic ring: This species absorbs very little sunlight and undergoes direct photodegradation very slowly (τ > 103 min). We also found that the triplet excited states (3C*) of the phenolic carbonyls rapidly oxidize syringol (a methoxyphenol without a carbonyl group), on timescales of 1-5 h for solutions containing 5 μM phenolic carbonyl. The direct photodegradation of the phenolic carbonyls, and the oxidation of syringol by 3C*, both efficiently produce low volatility products, with SOA mass yields ranging from 80 to 140%. Contrary to most aliphatic carbonyls, under typical fog conditions we find that the primary sink for the aromatic phenolic carbonyls is direct photodegradation in the aqueous phase. In areas of significant wood combustion, phenolic carbonyls appear to be small but significant sources of aqueous SOA: over the course of a few hours, nearly all of the phenolic carbonyls will be converted to SOA via direct photodegradation, enhancing the POA mass from wood combustion by approximately 3-5%.

  18. Measurements of carbonyls in a 13-story building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, Armando P; Padilla, Hugo G; García, Rocío M; Belmont, Raúl D; Torres, Maria del Carmen B

    2004-01-01

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are emitted by many mobile and stationary sources and secondary aldehydes are intermediates in the photo-oxidation of organic compounds in the atmosphere. These aldehydes are emitted indoors by many materials such as furniture, carpets, heating and cooling systems, an by smoking. Carbonyls, mainly formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, have been studied because of their adverse health effects. In addition, formaldehyde is a suspected carcinogen. Therefore, the concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were determined to assess the inhalation exposure doses to carbonyls for people who work in a 13-story building and in order to evaluate the cancer hazard. Carbonyl compounds in indoor and outdoor air were measured at a 13-story building located in Mexico City. The mezzanine, fifth and tenth floors, and the third level-parking garage were selected for sampling. Samples were collected in two sampling periods, the first from April 20 to 29, 1998 and the second from December 1 to 20, 1998. Carbonyls were sampled by means of DNHP-coated cartridges at a flow rate of 1 l min(-1) from 9:00 to 19:00 hours, during 2-hour time intervals and analyzed by HPLC with hours, during 2-hour time intervals and analyzed by HPLC with UV/VIS detection. Mean carbonyl concentrations were highest in the 3rd level-parking garage, with the formaldehyde concentration being the highest ranging from 108 to 418 microg m(-3). In working areas, the highest carbonyl arithmetic mean concentrations (AM) were observed on the 5th floor. Acetone and formaldehyde concentrations were highest in April ranging from 161 to 348 microg m(-3) (AM = 226) and from 157 to 270 microg m(-3) (AM = 221), respectively. Propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde were present in smaller concentrations ranging from 2 to 25 and 1 to 28 microg m(-3), respectively, considering all the samples. Mean indoor/outdoor ratios of carbonyls ranged from 1.8 to 9.6. A reduction of inhalation exposure doses of 41% and

  19. Anchoring selenido-carbonyl ruthenium clusters to functionalized silica xerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauzzi, Daniele; Graiff, Claudia; Pattacini, Roberto; Predieri, Giovanni; Tiripicchio, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Silica Xerogels containing carbonyl Ru 3 Se 2 nido clusters were prepared in three different ways. The simple dispersion of [Ru 3 (μ 3 -Se) 2 (CO) 7 (PPh 3 ) 2 ] via sol gel process produces an inhomogeneous material; by contrast, homogeneous xerogels were obtained by reaction of [Ru 3 (μ 3 -Se) 2 (CO) 8 (PPh 3 )] with functionalized xerogels containing grafted diphenylphosphine moieties and by reaction of [Ru 3 (CO) 12 ] with a xerogel containing grafted phosphine-selenide groups. The reaction between [Ru 3 (CO) 12 ] and dodecyl diphenylphosphine selenide led to the formation of four selenido carbonyl clusters, which are soluble in hydrocarbon solvents and can be deposited as thin films from their solution by slow evaporation. (author)

  20. Reactions of α-phosphorylated carbonyl compounds with amino alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskva, V.V.; Sitdikova, T.Sh.; Zykova, T.V.; Alparova, M.V.; Shagvaleev, F.Sh.

    1986-01-01

    2-Aminoethanol reacts with carbonyl compounds with the formation, depending on the structure of the latter, either of a mixture of azomethines and oxazolidines, or of only azomethines. In the development of investigations on the reactivity of α-phosphorylated carbonyl compounds the authors studied the reactions of a number of amino alcohols with phosphorylated acetaldehyde and acetone. In both cases they observed the formation of compounds of enamine structure, oxazolidines and azomethines were not observed. By means of NMR spectroscopy they established clearly the formation of the E-isomeric products. The 1 H, 31 P, and 13 C NMR spectra were recorded on a WP-80 spectrometer. Chemical shifts of protons and 13 C nuclei are given relative to TMS, and phosphorus nuclei relative to orthophosphoric acid

  1. Synthetic and mechanistic aspects of titanium-mediated carbonyl olefinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petasis, N.A.; Staszewski, J.P.; Hu, Yong-Han; Lu, Shao-Po [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A new method for the olefination of carbonyl compounds with dimethyl titanocene, and other related bishydrocarbyl titanocene derivatives has been recently developed in the author`s laboratories. This process is experimentally convenient and works with various types of carbonyl compounds, including aldehydes, ketones, esters, lactones, carbonates, anhydrides, amides, imides, lactams, thioesters, selenoesters, and acylsilanes. More recent studies have focused on the scope and utility of this reaction, including mechanistic studies and synthetic applications. In addition to varying the reaction conditions, the authors have examined several mixed titanocene derivatives and have found ways for carrying out this type of olefination at room temperature, such as the use of tris(trimethylsilyl) titanacyclobutene. The authors have also employed this reaction in the modification of carbohydrates and cyclobutenediones. This olefination was also followed-up with subsequent transformations to produce carbocycles and heterocycles, including tetrahydrofurans and tetrahydropyrans.

  2. A three-membered ring approach to carbonyl olefination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyomchon, Supaporn; Oppedisano, Alberto; Aillard, Paul; Maulide, Nuno

    2017-10-23

    The carbon-carbon double bond, with its diverse and multifaceted reactivity, occupies a prominent position in organic synthesis. Although a variety of simple alkenes are readily available, the mild and chemoselective introduction of a unit of unsaturation into a functionalized organic molecule remains an ongoing area of research, and the olefination of carbonyl compounds is a cornerstone of such approaches. Here we show the direct olefination of hydrazones via the intermediacy of three-membered ring species generated by addition of sulfoxonium ylides, departing from the general dogma of alkenes synthesis from carbonyls. Moreover, the mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity of the transformation render the methodology appealing from a practical point of view.

  3. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  4. Emissions of Toxic Carbonyls in an Electronic Cigarette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthery William

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs provide a smoke-free alternative for inhalation of nicotine without the vast array of toxic and carcinogenic combustion products produced by tobacco smoke. Elevated levels of toxic carbonyls may be generated during vaporisation; however, it is unclear whether that is indicative of a fault with the device or is due to the applied conditions of the test. A device, designed and built at this facility, was tested to determine the levels of selected toxic carbonyls. The reservoir was filled with approximately 960 mg of an e-liquid formulation containing 1.8% (w/v nicotine. Devices were puffed 200 times in blocks of 40 using a standardised regime consisting of a 55 mL puff volume; 3 s puff duration; 30 s puff interval; square wave puff profile. Confirmatory testing for nicotine and total aerosol delivery resulted in mean (n = 8 values of 10 mg (RSD 12.3% and 716 mg (RSD 11.2%, respectively. Emissions of toxic carbonyls were highly variable yet were between < 0.1% and 22.9% of expected levels from a Kentucky Reference Cigarette (K3R4F puffed 200 times under Health Canada Intense smoking conditions. It has been shown that a device built to a high specification with relatively consistent nicotine and aerosol delivery emits inconsistent levels of carbonyls. The exposure is greatly reduced when compared with lit tobacco products. However, it was observed that as the reservoirs neared depletion then emission levels were significantly higher

  5. Nucleophilic tetrafluoroethylation of carbonyl compounds with fluorinated sulfones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavík, Jiří; Chernykh, Yana; Jurásek, Bronislav; Beier, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 169, Jan (2015), s. 24-31 ISSN 0022-1139 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/11/0421 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : fluorine * tetrafluoroethylation * sulfones * nucleophilic addition * carbonyl compounds Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.213, year: 2015

  6. Magnetophoretic manipulation in microsystem using carbonyl iron-polydimethylsiloxane microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Faivre, Magalie; Gelszinnis, Renaud; Degouttes, Jérôme; Terrier, Nicolas; Rivière, Charlotte; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the use of a recent composite material, noted hereafter i-PDMS, made of carbonyl iron microparticles mixed in a PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) matrix, for magnetophoretic functions such as capture and separation of magnetic species. We demonstrated that this composite which combine the advantages of both components, can locally generate high gradients of magnetic field when placed between two permanent magnets. After evaluating the magnetic susceptibility of the material as a ...

  7. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  8. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  9. Carbonyl compounds in gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Xiaobing, E-mail: pangxbyuanj@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Lewis, Alastair C., E-mail: ally.lewis@york.ac.uk [National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-01

    Carbonyl compounds (carbonyls) are important constituents of cigarette smoke and some are toxic and may be carcinogenic or mutagenic to humans. In this study carbonyl emissions in the gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke were assessed by GC-MS with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH) derivatization. Seven brands of cigarettes and one brand of cigar common in the UK market and having differing nicotine, tar and carbon monoxide yields were investigated. Sixteen carbonyl components were identified in gaseous emissions and twenty in the particle phase. In the gaseous emissions, acetaldehyde presented as the predominant species, followed by formaldehyde, 2-propenal, and pentanal. In the particulate emissions, 1-hydroxy-2-propanone was the most abundant followed by formaldehyde, benzaldehyde, and 2,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Significant differences were found in carbonyl emissions among the brands of cigarettes. The gaseous carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 216-405 {mu}g cigarette{sup -1} ({mu}g cig{sup -1}) and the particulate carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 23-127 {mu}g cig{sup -1}. Positive correlations were found between the total emission of carbonyls, tar yield and carbon monoxide yield. Similar gas/particle (G/P) partitioning ratios of carbonyls were found among all cigarettes, which implies that G/P partitions of carbonyls in smoke mainly depend on the physical properties of the carbonyls. The gaseous carbonyl emissions were enhanced by 40% to 130% when some of the water, accounting for 8-12% of cigarettes in mass, was removed from the tobacco. Non-filtered cigarettes showed significantly higher carbonyl emissions compared to their filtered equivalents. Carbonyl particulate accounted for 11-19% by mass of total particulate matter from tobacco smoke. The cigar generated 806 {mu}g cig{sup -1} gaseous and 141 {mu}g cig{sup -1} particulate carbonyls, which is 2-4 times greater than the cigarettes. - Highlights: {yields} Carbonyl

  10. Carbonyl compounds in gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Xiaobing; Lewis, Alastair C.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl compounds (carbonyls) are important constituents of cigarette smoke and some are toxic and may be carcinogenic or mutagenic to humans. In this study carbonyl emissions in the gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke were assessed by GC-MS with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH) derivatization. Seven brands of cigarettes and one brand of cigar common in the UK market and having differing nicotine, tar and carbon monoxide yields were investigated. Sixteen carbonyl components were identified in gaseous emissions and twenty in the particle phase. In the gaseous emissions, acetaldehyde presented as the predominant species, followed by formaldehyde, 2-propenal, and pentanal. In the particulate emissions, 1-hydroxy-2-propanone was the most abundant followed by formaldehyde, benzaldehyde, and 2,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Significant differences were found in carbonyl emissions among the brands of cigarettes. The gaseous carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 216-405 μg cigarette -1 (μg cig -1 ) and the particulate carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 23-127 μg cig -1 . Positive correlations were found between the total emission of carbonyls, tar yield and carbon monoxide yield. Similar gas/particle (G/P) partitioning ratios of carbonyls were found among all cigarettes, which implies that G/P partitions of carbonyls in smoke mainly depend on the physical properties of the carbonyls. The gaseous carbonyl emissions were enhanced by 40% to 130% when some of the water, accounting for 8-12% of cigarettes in mass, was removed from the tobacco. Non-filtered cigarettes showed significantly higher carbonyl emissions compared to their filtered equivalents. Carbonyl particulate accounted for 11-19% by mass of total particulate matter from tobacco smoke. The cigar generated 806 μg cig -1 gaseous and 141 μg cig -1 particulate carbonyls, which is 2-4 times greater than the cigarettes. - Highlights: → Carbonyl emission factors in both gas (16 species) and

  11. Ambient levels of carbonyl compounds and their sources in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanli; Wen, Sheng; Chen, Yingjun; Wang, Xinming; Lü, Huixiong; Bi, Xinhui; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    Ambient levels of carbonyl compounds and their possible sources, vehicular exhaust and cooking exhaust, were studied at seven places in Guangzhou, including five districts (a residential area, an industrial area, a botanical garden, a downtown area and a semi-rural area), a bus station and a restaurant during the period of June-September 2003. Nineteen carbonyl compounds were identified in the ambient air, of which acetone was the most abundant carbonyl, followed by formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Only little changes were found in carbonyl concentration levels in the five different districts because of their dispersion and mixture in the atmosphere in summer. The lower correlations between the carbonyls' concentrations might result from the mixture of carbonyls derived from different sources, including strong photochemical reactions at noon in summer. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the main carbonyls in bus station, while straight-chain carbonyls were comparatively abundant in cooking exhaust. Besides vehicular exhaust, cooking might be another major source of carbonyl compounds in Guangzhou City, especially for high molecular weight carbonyls.

  12. A method of detecting carbonyl compounds in tree leaves in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Feng, Yanli; Fu, Jiamo; Sheng, Guoying

    2010-06-01

    Carbonyl compounds have been paid more and more attention because some carbonyl species have been proven to be carcinogenic or a risk for human health. Plant leaves are both an important emission source and an important sink of carbonyl compounds. But the research on carbonyl compounds from plant leaves is very scarce. In order to make an approach to the emission mechanism of plant leaves, a new method was established to extract carbonyl compounds from fresh plant leaves. The procedure combining derivatization with ultrasonication was developed for the fast extraction of carbonyl compounds from tree leaves. Fresh leaves (Metasequoia glyptostroboides), were selected and extracted by this method. Seven carbonyl compounds, including formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, acrolein, p-tolualdehyde, m/o-tolualdehyde, and hexaldehyde were determined and quantified. The most common carbonyl species of the four tree leaves were formaldehyde, acrolein, and m/o-tolualdehyde. They accounted for 67.3% in cedar, 50.8% in sweet olive, 45.8% in dawn redwood, and 44.6% in camphor tree, respectively. Camphor tree had the highest leaf level of m/o-tolualdehyde with 15.0 +/- 3.4 microg g(-1)(fresh leaf weight), which indicated that camphor tree may be a bioindicator of the level of tolualdehyde or xylene in the atmosphere. By analyzing carbonyl compounds from different tree leaves, it is not only helpful for further studying the relationship between sink and emission of carbonyls from plants, but also helpful for exploring optimum plant population in urban greening.

  13. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R

    2017-02-07

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Additionally, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. While traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 °C.

  14. Sulfurization of Dissolved Organic Matter Increases Hg-Sulfide-Dissolved Organic Matter Bioavailability to a Hg-Methylating Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew M; Cameron-Burr, Keaton T; Hajic, Hayley A; Lee, Connie; Msekela, Deborah; Gilmour, Cynthia C

    2017-08-15

    Reactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with aqueous sulfide (termed sulfurization) in anoxic environments can substantially increase DOM's reduced sulfur functional group content. Sulfurization may affect DOM-trace metal interactions, including complexation and metal-containing particle precipitation, aggregation, and dissolution. Using a diverse suite of DOM samples, we found that susceptibility to additional sulfur incorporation via reaction with aqueous sulfide increased with increasing DOM aromatic-, carbonyl-, and carboxyl-C content. The role of DOM sulfurization in enhancing Hg bioavailability for microbial methylation was evaluated under conditions typical of Hg methylation environments (μM sulfide concentrations and low Hg-to-DOM molar ratios). Under the conditions of predicted metacinnabar supersaturation, microbial Hg methylation increased with increasing DOM sulfurization, likely reflecting either effective inhibition of metacinnabar growth and aggregation or the formation of Hg(II)-DOM thiol complexes with high bioavailability. Remarkably, Hg methylation efficiencies with the most sulfurized DOM samples were similar (>85% of total Hg methylated) to that observed in the presence of l-cysteine, a ligand facilitating rapid Hg(II) biouptake and methylation. This suggests that complexes of Hg(II) with DOM thiols have similar bioavailability to Hg(II) complexes with low-molecular-weight thiols. Overall, our results are a demonstration of the importance of DOM sulfurization to trace metal and metalloid (especially mercury) fate in the environment. DOM sulfurization likely represents another link between anthropogenic sulfate enrichment and MeHg production in the environment.

  15. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  16. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Experimental simulations of sulfide formation in the solar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretta, D S; Lodders, K; Fegley, B

    1997-07-18

    Sulfurization of meteoritic metal in H2S-H2 gas produced three different sulfides: monosulfide solid solution [(Fe,Ni)1-xS], pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9-xS8], and a phosphorus-rich sulfide. The composition of the remnant metal was unchanged. These results are contrary to theoretical predictions that sulfide formation in the solar nebula produced troilite (FeS) and enriched the remaining metal in nickel. The experimental sulfides are chemically and morphologically similar to sulfide grains in the matrix of the Alais (class CI) carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting that these meteoritic sulfides may be condensates from the solar nebula.

  18. Sulfide Precipitation in Wastewater at Short Timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Bruno; van de Ven, Wilbert; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2017-01-01

    Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows that this i......Abatement of sulfides in sewer systems using iron salts is a widely used strategy. When dosing at the end of a pumping main, the reaction kinetics of sulfide precipitation becomes important. Traditionally the reaction has been assumed to be rapid or even instantaneous. This work shows...... that this is not the case for sulfide precipitation by ferric iron. Instead, the reaction time was found to be on a timescale where it must be considered when performing end-of-pipe treatment. For real wastewaters at pH 7, a stoichiometric ratio around 14 mol Fe(II) (mol S(−II))−1 was obtained after 1.5 s, while the ratio...

  19. Functional consortium for denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-03-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process simultaneously converts sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewaters to elemental sulfur, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. This investigation utilizes a dilution-to-extinction approach at 10(-2) to 10(-6) dilutions to elucidate the correlation between the composition of the microbial community and the DSR performance. In the original suspension and in 10(-2) dilution, the strains Stenotrophomonas sp., Thauera sp., and Azoarcus sp. are the heterotrophic denitrifiers and the strains Paracoccus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. are the sulfide-oxidizing denitrifers. The 10(-4) dilution is identified as the functional consortium for the present DSR system, which comprises two functional strains, Stenotrophomonas sp. strain Paracoccus sp. At 10(-6) dilution, all DSR performance was lost. The functions of the constituent cells in the DSR granules were discussed based on data obtained using the dilution-to-extinction approach.

  20. Carbonyl Compounds Produced by Vaporizing Cannabis Oil Thinning Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutt, William D; DiDonato, Matthew D

    2017-11-01

    Cannabis use has increased in the United States, particularly the use of vaporized cannabis oil, which is often mixed with thinning agents for use in vaporizing devices. E-cigarette research shows that heated thinning agents produce potentially harmful carbonyls; however, similar studies have not been conducted (1) with agents that are commonly used in the cannabis industry and (2) at temperatures that are appropriate for cannabis oil vaporization. The goal of this study was to determine whether thinning agents used in the cannabis industry produce potentially harmful carbonyls when heated to a temperature that is appropriate for cannabis oil vaporization. Four thinning agents (propylene glycol [PG], vegetable glycerin [VG], polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400], and medium chain triglycerides [MCT]) were heated to 230°C and the resulting vapors were tested for acetaldehyde, acrolein, and formaldehyde. Each agent was tested three times. Testing was conducted in a smoking laboratory. Carbonyl levels were measured in micrograms per puff block. Analyses showed that PEG 400 produced significantly higher levels of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde than PG, MCT, and VG. Formaldehyde production was also significantly greater in PG compared with MCT and VG. Acrolein production did not differ significantly across the agents. PG and PEG 400 produced high levels of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde when heated to 230°C. Formaldehyde production from PEG 400 isolate was particularly high, with one inhalation accounting for 1.12% of the daily exposure limit, nearly the same exposure as smoking one cigarette. Because PG and PEG 400 are often mixed with cannabis oil, individuals who vaporize cannabis oil products may risk exposure to harmful formaldehyde levels. Although more research is needed, consumers and policy makers should consider these potential health effects before use and when drafting cannabis-related legislation.

  1. Determination of Carbonyl Compounds in Cigarette Mainstream Smoke. The CORESTA 2010 Collaborative Study and Recommended Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intorp M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A recommended method has been developed and published by CORESTA, applicable to the quantification of selected carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, acetone, acrolein, methyl ethyl ketone, crotonaldehyde, propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde in cigarette mainstream smoke. The method involved smoke collection in impinger traps, derivatisation of carbonyls with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH, separation of carbonyl hydrazones by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and detection by ultra violet or diode array.

  2. Production and Preservation of Sulfide Layering in Mercury's Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukare, C.-E.; Parman, S. W.; Parmentier, E. M.; Anzures, B. A.

    2018-05-01

    Mercury's magma ocean (MMO) would have been sulfur-rich. At some point during MMO solidification, it likely became sulfide saturated. Here we present physiochemical models exploring sulfide layer formation and stability.

  3. Determination of carbonyl compounds in air by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.; Perez, R.M.; Campos, A.; Gonzalez, D.

    1995-09-01

    A method for the determination of seven carbonyl compounds in air is presented. The procedure involve sampling of air by a Sep-Pak cartridge impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Elution was done with 3 mL of acetonitrile and the eluate was diluted to 5 mL. The analysis was done by HPLC with UV detection and external standard method quantification. It has been achieved relative standard deviations about 5% and detection limits of 80 ng/cartridge for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone+acrolein. Three different types of samples (rural, urban, petrol emission) were successfully analyzed

  4. Determination of carbonyl compounds in air by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.; Perez, R.M.; Campos, A.; Gonzalez, D.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of seven carbonyl compounds in air is presented. The procedure involve sampling of air by a Sep-Pak Cartridge impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Elution was done with 3 mL of acetonitrile and the eluate was diluted to 5 mL. The analysis was done by HPLC with UV detection and external standard method quantification. It has been achieved relative standard deviations about 5% and detection limits of 80 ng/cartridge for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetoacetonitrile. Three different types of samples (rural, urban, petrol emission) were successfully analyzed. (Author) 12 refs

  5. Magnetic properties of carbonyl iron particles in magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkin, S R; James, R O; Kordonski, W I

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the magnetic properties of dispersed magnetic particles is a prerequisite to the design an MR fluid with desired performance. A term specific susceptibility is introduced for characterization of particle susceptibility. The study was performed with the Bartington MS2B magnetic susceptibility system on small samples volume. Specific magnetic susceptibility of iron particles was found to be a linear function of median particle size. Structural change in the fluid, including particle organization, led to susceptibility drift and may affect fluid performance. It was shown that susceptibility data can be used for evaluation of the concentration of carbonyl iron particles in MR fluids.

  6. Selective transformation of carbonyl ligands to organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, A.R.

    1992-05-12

    Studies on the carbonylation of ({eta}{sup 5}-indenyl)(L)(CO)Ru-R complexes (L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = CH{sub 2}OMe, CH{sub 3}) have been completed. Particularly noteworthy is that the methoxymethyl complexes readily transform to their acyl derivatives under mild conditions that leave their iron congeners inert towards CO. Surprisingly, even ({eta}{sup 5}-indenyl)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}Ru-CH{sub 3} carbonylates and gives ({eta}{sup 5}-indenyl)(PPh{sub 3})(CO)Ru-C(O)CH{sub 3}. Mechanistic studies on the non catalyzed'' hydrosilation of the manganese acyls (CO){sub 5}Mn-C(O)CH{sub 2}R (R = H, OCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}) with Et{sub 3}SiH and of cobalt acetyls (CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3})CoC(O)CH{sub 3} with several monohydrosilanes have been completed. The cobalt acetyls cleanly give ethoxysilanes (not acetaldehyde), and the manganese acyls provide {alpha}-siloxyvinyl complexes Z-(CO){sub 5}Mn-C(OSiEt{sub 3})=CHR (R = H, CH{sub 3}, OCH{sub 3}). Carbonylation and protolytic cleavage of the latter generate pyruvoyl complexes (CO){sub 5}Mn-COCOR (R = CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), formally the products of net double carbonylation'' sequences. Studies in progress are concerned with how manganese complexes as diverse as (CO){sub 5}Mn-Y (Y = C(O)R, R, BR - but not SiMe{sub 3} or Mn(CO){sub 5}) and ({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5})Mn(CO){sub 2}L (but not CpMn(CO){sub 3} or CpMn(CO){sub 2}({eta}{sup 2}HSiR{sub 3})) function as efficient hydrosilation catalysts towards Cp(CO){sub 2}FeC(O)CH{sub 3}, for example. These reactions cleanly afford fully characterized {alpha}-siloxyethyl complexes Fp-CH(OSiR{sub 3})CH{sub 3} under conditions where typically Rh(1) hydrosilation catalysts are inactive. Several of these manganese complexes also catalytically hydrosilate organic esters, including lactones, to their ethers R-CH{sub 2}OR; these novel ester reductions occur quantitatively at room temperature and appear to be general in scope.

  7. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Davies, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible protein oxidation correlated with oxidative stress, various diseases and ageing. Here we describe a peptide-centric approach for identification and characterisation of up to 14 different types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins. The modified residues...... in vitro metal ion-catalysed oxidation. Furthermore, we assigned 133 carbonylated sites in 36 proteins in native human plasma protein samples. The optimised workflow enabled detection of 10 hitherto undetected types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins: aldehyde and ketone modifications of leucine...

  8. Ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed olefination via carbonyl reductive cross-coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Dai, Xi-Jie; Wang, Haining; Li, Chenchen; Yang, Xiaobo; Li, Chao-Jun

    2017-12-01

    Natural availability of carbonyl groups offers reductive carbonyl coupling tremendous synthetic potential for efficient olefin synthesis, yet the catalytic carbonyl cross-coupling remains largely elusive. We report herein such a reaction, mediated by hydrazine under ruthenium(ii) catalysis. This method enables facile and selective cross-couplings of two unsymmetrical carbonyl compounds in either an intermolecular or intramolecular fashion. Moreover, this chemistry accommodates a variety of substrates, proceeds under mild reaction conditions with good functional group tolerance, and generates stoichiometric benign byproducts. Importantly, the coexistence of KO t Bu and bidentate phosphine dmpe is vital to this transformation.

  9. Girdler-sulfide process physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuburg, H.J.; Atherley, J.F.; Walker, L.G.

    1977-05-01

    Physical properties of pure hydrogen sulfide and of gaseous and liquid solutions of the H 2 S-H 2 O system have been formulated. Tables for forty-nine different properties in the pressure and temperature range of interest to the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) process for heavy water production are given. All properties are presented in SI units. A computer program capable of calculating properties of the pure components as well as gaseous mixtures and liquid solutions at saturated and non-saturated conditions is included. (author)

  10. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to

  11. Composition of amino acid using carbon monoxide. Amide carbonylation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izawa, Kunisuke (Ajinomoto Co., Inc., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-02-01

    Amide carbonylation reaction is a method to compose N-acyl-{alpha}-amino acid from aldehyde, carboxylic acid amide, and carbon monoxide in a phase and with high yield. Unlike the conventional Strecker reaction, this method does not use HCN which is in question on public pollution and does not require hydrolysis. This amide carbonylation reaction was discovered by Wakamatsu and others of Ajinomoto Co.,Ltd. Present application examples of this method are the composition of N-acetyl amino acid from the aldehyde class, the composition of N-Acyl amino acid from olefin, the composition of N-acyl or acetyl amino acid from the raw material of alcohol and the halide class, the composition of N-acyl or acetyl amino acid via the isomerization of epoxide and allyl alcohol, the composition of amino dicarboxylic acid, applying deoxidation of ring acid anhydride, the composition of N-acyl amino acid from the raw material of the amine class, the stereoselective composition of -substitution ring-{alpha}-amino acid, and the composition of amino aldehyde. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate by oxidative carbonylation of methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B.G.; Han, M.S.; Kim, H.S.; Ahn, B.S.; Park, K.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) synthesis reaction by oxidative carbonylation of methanol has been studied using vapor phase flow reaction system in the presence of Cu-based catalysts. A series of Cu-based catalysts were prepared by the conventional impregnation method using activated carbon (AC) as support. The effect of various promoters and reaction conditions on the catalytic reactivities was intensively evaluated in terms of methanol conversion and DMC selectivity. The morphological change of catalysts during the reaction was also compared by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Regardless of catalyst compositions, the optimal reaction temperature for oxidative carbonylation of methanol was found to be around 120--130 C. The reaction rate was too slow below 100 C, while too many by-products were produced above 150 C. Among the various catalysts employed, CuCl{sub 2}/NaOH/AC catalyst with the mole ratio of OH/Cu = 0.5--1.0 has shown the best catalytic performance, which appears to have a strong relationship with the formation of intermediate species, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl.

  13. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  14. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  15. Microaeration reduces hydrogen sulfide in biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although there are a variety of biological and chemical treatments for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from biogas, all require some level of chemical or water inputs and maintenance. In practice, managing biogas H2S remains a significant challenge for agricultural digesters where labor and opera...

  16. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149 ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  17. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  18. Acid volatile sulfide (AVS)- a comment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The review by Rickard and Morse (this volume) adequately summarizes our current understanding with respect to acid-volatile sulfides (AVS). At the same time, this review addresses some of the misunderstandings with regard to measurements and dynamics of this important sedimentary sulfur pool. In

  19. Carbon a support for sulfide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Lensing, T.J.; Mercx, F.P.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of carbon materials, carbon black composite and carbon covered alumina, were studied for-their use as support for sulfide catalysts. The following parameters were varied: type of carbon black, carbon coverage of the alumina and carbon pretreatment. Pore size distributions were determined

  20. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH IEP of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C S in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH IEP of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C S in the solution declined from 1000 × 10 −6 mol/L to 1.4 × 10 −6 mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S 2− and CO 3 2− ions

  1. Rh(I) -Catalyzed Intramolecular Carbonylative C-H/C-I Coupling of 2-Iodobiphenyls Using Furfural as a Carbonyl Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Takuma; Morimoto, Tsumoru; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Tanimoto, Hiroki; Kakiuchi, Kiyomi

    2016-08-19

    Synthesis of fluoren-9-ones by a Rh-catalyzed intramolecular C-H/C-I carbonylative coupling of 2-iodobiphenyls using furfural as a carbonyl source is presented. The findings indicate that the rate-determining step is not a C-H bond cleavage but, rather, the oxidative addition of the C-I bond to a Rh(I) center. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Preparation and microwave shielding property of silver-coated carbonyl iron powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiao Guo; Ren, Hao; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is prepared by the electroless plating process. • The silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is a new kind of conductive filler. • The reflection and absorption dominate the shielding mechanism of the prepared powder. • Increasing the thickness of electroconductive adhesive will increase the SE. - Abstract: Electroless silver coating of carbonyl iron powder is demonstrated in the present investigation. The carbonyl iron powders are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) before and after the coating process. The relatively uniform and continuous silver coating is obtained under the given coating conditions. In this paper, the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding mechanism of the silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is suggested. The reflection of silver coating and absorption of carbonyl iron powder dominate the shielding mechanism of the silver-coated carbonyl iron powder. The silver-coated carbonyl iron powders are used as conductive filler in electroconductive adhesive for electromagnetic interference shielding applications. The effect of the thickness of electroconductive adhesive on the shielding effectiveness (SE) is investigated. The results indicate that the SE increases obviously with the increase of the thickness of electroconductive adhesive. The SE of the electroconductive adhesive with 0.35 mm thickness is above 38 dB across the tested frequency range

  3. Reactions of ruthenium and osmium cluster carbonyls with heteroatom-substituted and functionalized alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koridze, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The results of studies of the reactions of ruthenium and osmium cluster carbonyls with metal (M = Re, Mn, Fe) alkynes, silylalkynes, propargyl alcohols and their derivatives, diynes, enynes, and ferrocenylacetylene are summarized. Intramolecular rearrangements in the cluster complexes including migrations of carbonyl, hydride, and hydrocarbon ligands and the metal core reorganization are considered [ru

  4. Comparison of carbonyl compounds emissions from diesel engine fueled with biodiesel and diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Ge, Yunshan; Tan, Jianwei; You, Kewei; Han, Xunkun; Wang, Junfang; You, Qiuwen; Shah, Asad Naeem

    The characteristics of carbonyl compounds emissions were investigated on a direct injection, turbocharged diesel engine fueled with pure biodiesel derived from soybean oil. The gas-phase carbonyls were collected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated silica cartridges from diluted exhaust and analyzed by HPLC with UV detector. A commercial standard mixture including 14 carbonyl compounds was used for quantitative analysis. The experimental results indicate that biodiesel-fueled engine almost has triple carbonyls emissions of diesel-fueled engine. The weighted carbonyls emission of 8-mode test cycle of biodiesel is 90.8 mg (kW h) -1 and that of diesel is 30.7 mg (kW h) -1. The formaldehyde is the most abundant compound of carbonyls for both biodiesel and diesel, taking part for 46.2% and 62.7% respectively. The next most significant compounds are acetaldehyde, acrolein and acetone for both fuels. The engine fueled with biodiesel emits a comparatively high content of propionaldehyde and methacrolein. Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel, has lower specific reactivity (SR) caused by carbonyls compared with diesel. When fueled with biodiesel, carbonyl compounds make more contribution to total hydrocarbon emission.

  5. Protein carbonyl content: a novel biomarker for aging in HIV/AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kolgiri

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Carbonyl content may has a role as a biomarker for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced ART toxicity and/or accelerated aging in HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to elucidate the role of carbonyl content as a biomarker for premature aging in HIV/AIDS patients.

  6. Design and fabrication of microfluidic mixer from carbonyl iron–PDMS composite membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jiaxing; Zhang, Mengying; Wang, Limu; Li, Weihua; Sheng, Ping; Wen, Weijia

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a carbonyl iron-PDMS (CI-PDMS) composite magnetic elastomer in which carbonyl iron (CI) particles are uniformly distributed in a PDMS matrix. The CI particles and the PDMS were mixed at different weight ratios and tested

  7. Metal-atom fluorescence from the quenching of metastable rare gases by metal carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingsworth, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    A flowing afterglow apparatus was used to study the metal fluorescence resulting from the quenching of metastable rare-gas states by metal carbonyls. The data from the quenching or argon, neon, and helium by iron and nickel carbonyl agreed well with a restricted degree of freedom model indicating a concerted bond-breaking dissociation

  8. Reactions of rhodium(I) carbonyl chloride with olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshavskii, Yu.S.; Kiseleva, N.V.; Cherkasova, T.G.; Buzina, N.A.; Bresler, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactions of [Rh(CO) 2 Cl] 2 (Y 0 ) with cyclooctene and several other olefins (1-heptene, 1-hexene, ethylene, and cyclohexene) have been studied by IR and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The main reaction products are the binuclear complexes Rh 2 L(CO) 3 Cl 2 (Y 1 ) and [RhL(CO)Cl] 2 (Y 2 ), where L denotes the olefin. The extent of replacement of the carbonyl groups depends on the nature of the olefin and the conditions under which the reaction is carried out (the L:Rh ratio and the removal of CO from the reaction sphere). The liquid olefins form the following series according to their ability to replace the carbonyl groups: C 8 H 14 > C 7 H 14 , C 6 H 12 > C 6 H 10 . In the presence of an excess of C 8 H 14 , Y 2 disproportionates with the formation of a dicarbonyl product, which presumably corresponds to the formula Rh(C 8 H 14 ) 2 (CO) 2 Cl (a pentacoordinate complex with a trigonal-bipyramidal structure). The 13 C signal in the NMR spectrum of a solution of Y 2 in C 8 H 14 is a singlet with σ( 13 C) 180.3 ppm, which is an indication of the rapid exchange of the carbonyl groups. Rapid exchange of the CO ligands is also observed in solutions of Y 0 in the olefins (with the exception of C 6 H 10 ). For example, the 13 C signal in the spectrum of a solution of Y 0 in C 8 H 14 is a singlet with σ( 13 C) 179.8 ppm. The spectrum of Y 0 in C 6 H 10 is a doublet with σ( 13 C) = 178.5 ppm and 1 J(CRh) = 76.3 Hz. A scheme for the interaction of Y 0 with olefins based on the conception of the trans antagonism of π-acceptor ligands has been proposed

  9. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, R S P

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  10. Development of an automatic sampling device for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perraud, V.

    2007-12-01

    Two sampling strategies were studied to develop an automatic instrument for the continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyl compounds. Because of its specificity towards carbonyls compounds, sampling by using a transfer of gaseous phase in a liquid phase associated with a simultaneous chemical derivatization of the trapped compounds was first studied. However, this method do not allow a quantitative sampling of all studied carbonyl compounds, nor a continuous measurement in the field. To overcome the difficulties, a second strategy was investigated: the cryogenic adsorption onto solid adsorbent followed by thermodesorption and a direct analysis by GC/MS. Collection efficiency using different solid adsorbents was found greater than 95% for carbonyl compounds consisting of 1 to 7 carbons. This work is a successful first step towards the realization of the automatic sampling device for a continuous measurement of atmospheric carbonyls compounds. (author)

  11. Impact of HVAC filter on indoor air quality in terms of ozone removal and carbonyls generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-Yu

    2014-06-01

    This study aims at detecting ozone removal rates and corresponding carbonyls generated by ozone reaction with HVAC filters from various building, i.e., shopping mall, school, and office building. Studies were conducted in a small-scale environmental chamber. By examining dust properties including organic carbon proportion and specific surface area of dusts adsorbed on filters along with ozone removal rates and carbonyls generation rate, the relationship among dust properties, ozone removal rates, and carbonyls generation was identified. The results indicate a well-defined positive correlation between ozone removal efficiency and carbonyls generation on filters, as well as a positive correlation among the mass of organic carbon on filters, ozone removal efficiency and carbonyls generations.

  12. Activation of heterogenised rhodium carbonylation catalyst infrared spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scurrell, M S

    1977-01-01

    In a study related to heterogeneous versions of homogeneous catalysts active in carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, the catalyst consisted of 1Vertical Bar3< rhodium as rhodium trichloride supported on 13X zeolite and evacuated at 437/sup 0/K. Contacting the catalyst with carbon monoxide caused two bands, at 2025 and 2095 cm/sup -1/, to appear. Contact with a mixture of carbon monoxide and methyl iodide (the usual promoter) caused bands at 2085, 1710, 1440, and 1370 cm/sup -1/ to appear; the first two correspond to the bands at 2062 and 1711 cm/sup -1/ in homogeneous catalysts attributed to the formation of Rh(CH/sup 3/CO)(CO)X/sup 2/I/sup -/. Spectra.

  13. SILP catalysis in gas-phase hydroformylation and carbonylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riisager, A.; Fehrmann, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Haumann, M.; Wasserscheid, P. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Chemische Reaktionstechnik

    2006-07-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts are new materials consisting of an ionic liquid-metal catalyst solution highly dispersed on a porous support. The use of a non-volatile, ionic liquid catalyst phase in SILP catalysts results in a stable heterogeneous-type material with selectivity and efficiency like homogeneous catalysts. The silica-supported SILP Rh-bisphosphine hydroformylation catalyst exhibited good activities and excellent selectivities in gas phase hydroformylation with stability exceeding 700 hours time-on-stream. Spectroscopic and kinetic data confirmed the homogeneous nature of the catalyst. In the Rh- SILP catalysed carbonylation of methanol the formation of undesired by-products could be suppressed by variation of residence time and gas pressure. (orig.)

  14. Hydrogen sulfide concentration in Beaver Dam Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Concentration-time profiles calculated with LODIPS for various hypothetical releases of hydrogen sulfide from the heavy water extraction facility predict lethal conditions for swamp fish from releases as small as 568 kg discharged over a period of 30 minutes or from releases of 1818 kg discharged over a period of 6 hours or less. The necessary volatilization and oxidation coefficients for LODIPS were derived from field measurements following planned releases of H 2 S. Upsets in the operation of the wastewater strippers in the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) heavy water extraction facility in D Area have released significant amounts of dissolved H 2 S to Beaver Dam Creek. Because H 2 S is toxic to fish in concentrations as low as 1 mg/liter, the downstream environmental impact of H 2 S releases from D Area was evaluated

  15. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  17. Active control of methanol carbonylation selectivity over Au/carbon anode by electrochemical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakawa, Akiyasu; Yamanaka, Ichiro; Otsuka, Kiyoshi

    2005-05-12

    Electrochemical oxidative carbonylation of methanol was studied over Au supported carbon anode in CO. The major carbonylation products were dimethyl oxalate (DMO) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC). The minor oxidation products were dimethoxy methane (DMM) and methyl formate (MF) from methanol and CO(2). Influences of various reaction conditions were studied on carbonylation activities and selectivities. The selectivities to DMO and DMC can be controlled by the electrochemical potential. Electrocatalysis of Au/carbon anode was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), stoichiometric reactions among Au(3+), methanol, and CO, and UV-vis spectra. The Au/carbon anode was characterized by XRD, SEM, and BE images before and after the carbonylation. These experimental facts strongly suggest that transition of oxidation states of Au affects changing of the carbonylation selectivities to DMO and DMC. Au(0) is the active species for the selective DMO formation by direct electrochemical carbonylation at low potentials (selective DMC formation by indirect electrochemical carbonylation through Au(3+)/Au(+) redox at high potentials (>+1.3 V).

  18. Protein carbonylation sites in bovine raw milk and processed milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkovska-Stamenova, Sanja; Mnatsakanyan, Ruzanna; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2017-08-15

    During thermal treatment of milk, proteins are oxidized, which may reduce the nutritional value of milk, abolish protein functions supporting human health, especially important for newborns, and yield potentially harmful products. The side chains of several amino acids can be oxidized to reactive carbonyls, which are often used to monitor oxidative stress in organisms. Here we mapped protein carbonylation sites in raw milk and different brands of pasteurized, ultra high temperature (UHT) treated milk, and infant formulas (IFs) after digesting the precipitated proteins with trypsin. Reactive carbonyls were derivatized with O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl)hydroxylamine to enrich the modified peptides by avidin-biotin affinity chromatography and analyze them by nanoRP-UPLC-ESI-MS. Overall, 53 unique carbonylated peptides (37 carbonylation sites, 15 proteins) were identified. Most carbonyls were derived from dicarbonyls (mainly glyoxal). The number of carbonylation sites increased with the harsher processing from raw milk (4) to pasteurized (16) and UHT milk (16) and to IF (24). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Aijie; Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun; Lee Duujong

    2010-01-01

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S 0 ), N 2 , and CO 2 , or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  20. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Lihong; Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary sulfur produced by oxidizing sulfide that is a recoverable resource from sulfide-laden wastewaters can be reduced back to sulfide by sulfur-reducing Methanobacterium sp. The Methanobacterium sp. was stimulated with excess organic carbon (acetate) when nitrite was completely consumed by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Adjusting hydraulic retention time of a DSR reactor when nitrite is completely consumed provides an additional control variable for maximizing DSR performance.

  2. Study on the sulfidation behavior of smithsonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dandan; Wen, Shuming, E-mail: shmwen@126.com; Deng, Jiushuai, E-mail: dengshuai689@163.com; Liu, Jian; Mao, Yingbo

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Zeta potential showed that the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite decreased from 7.7 to 6. • ICP test showed the gradual reduction of C{sub S} in the solution. • SEM showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film. • XPS indicated that the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions. - Abstract: Zinc extraction from low-grade mineral resources of oxidized zinc has recently become a focus of study. Sulfidation is an important process in oxidized ore flotation. In this study, the influence of sulfur ion adsorption on smithsonite surface was investigated with the use of zeta potential, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Zeta potential measurements of sodium sulfide showed that sulfur ions were adsorbed onto the surface of pure smithsonite, as evidenced by the increased negative charge and the decrease in the pH{sub IEP} of smithsonite from 7.7 to 6 after sodium sulfide treatment. The ICP test revealed the gradual reduction in sulfur ion adsorption onto the surface of smithsonite in pulp sulfur. After 30 min of absorption, C{sub S} in the solution declined from 1000 × 10{sup −6} mol/L to 1.4 × 10{sup −6} mol/L. SEM results showed that the mineral surface was partially changed to ZnS film after sodium sulfide treatment, whereas EDS analysis results showed that 2% S is contained on the smithsonite surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated the presence of a characteristic signal peak of sulfur ions after sulfidation. Sulfur concentration increased to 11.89%, whereas oxygen concentration decreased from 42.31% to 13.74%. Sulfur ions were not only present during chemical adsorption, but were also incorporated into the crystal lattices of minerals by the exchange reaction between S{sup 2−} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ions.

  3. The Emergence of Manganese-Based Carbonyl Hydrosilylation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovitch, Ryan J

    2017-11-21

    In recent years, interest in homogeneous manganese catalyst development has intensified because of the earth-abundant and nontoxic nature of this metal. Although compounds of Mn have largely been utilized for epoxidation reactions, recent efforts have revealed that Mn catalysts can mediate a broad range of reductive transformations. Low-valent Mn compounds have proven to be particularly effective for the hydrosilylation of carbonyl- and carboxylate-containing substrates, and this Account aims to highlight my research group's contributions to this field. In our initial 2014 communication, we reported that the bis(imino)pyridine-supported compound ( Ph2PPr PDI)Mn mediates ketone hydrosilylation with exceptional activity under solvent-free conditions. Silanes including Ph 2 SiH 2 , (EtO) 3 SiH, (EtO) 2 MeSiH, and (EtO)Me 2 SiH were found to partially reduce cyclohexanone in the presence of ( Ph2PPr PDI)Mn, while turnover frequencies of up to 1280 min -1 were observed using PhSiH 3 . This led us to evaluate the hydrosilylation of 11 additional ketones and allowed for the atom-efficient preparation of tertiary and quaternary silanes. At that time, it was also discovered that ( Ph2PPr PDI)Mn catalyzes the dihydrosilylation of esters (by way of acyl C-O bond hydrosilylation) to yield a mixture of silyl ethers with modest activity. Earlier this year, the scope of these transformations was extended to aldehydes and formates, and the observed hydrosilylation activities are among the highest obtained for any transition-metal catalyst. The effectiveness of three related catalysts has also been evaluated: ( Ph2PPr PDI)MnH, ( PyEt PDEA)Mn, and [( Ph2PEt PDI)Mn] 2 . To our surprise, ( Ph2PPr PDI)MnH was found to exhibit higher carboxylate dihydrosilylation activity than ( Ph2PPr PDI)Mn, while ( PyEt PDEA)Mn demonstrated remarkable carbonyl hydrosilylation activity considering that it lacks a redox-active supporting ligand. The evaluation of [( Ph2PEt PDI)Mn] 2 revealed

  4. Low pressure carbonylation of benzyl chloride = Die carbonylierung von benzylchlorid bei niedrigen drücken

    OpenAIRE

    Luggenhorst, H.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    For carbonylations, metal carbonyls, particularly cobalt and iron carbonyls, are often used as catalysts. These reactions take place under rather drastic reaction conditions, e.g. 200–300 °C and 60–100 MPa. In some patents it is stated that similar reactions using the same catalysts can also be carried out under rather mild reaction conditions, such as 0–100 °C and 0–2.5 MPa. We studied the conversion of benzyl chloride to phenyl acetic methyl ester in a semi-batch reactor in which one of the...

  5. Mechanistic differences between methanol and dimethyl ether carbonylation in side pockets and large channels of mordenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Mercedes; Martínez, Cristina; Corma, Avelino

    2011-02-21

    The activity and selectivity towards carbonylation presented by Brønsted acid sites located inside the 8MR pockets or in the main 12MR channels of mordenite is studied by means of quantum-chemical calculations, and the mechanistic differences between methanol and DME carbonylation are investigated. The selectivity towards carbonylation is higher inside the 8MR pockets, where the competitive formation of DME and hydrocarbons that finally leads to catalyst deactivation is sterically impeded. Moreover, inclusion of dispersion interactions in the calculations leads to agreement between the calculated activation barriers for the rate determining step and the experimentally observed higher reactivity of methoxy groups located inside the 8MR channels.

  6. Formation of neutral and charged gold carbonyls on highly facetted gold nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Thoi-Dai; Visart de Bocarmé, Thierry; Kruse, Norbert; Wang, Richard L. C.; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2003-12-01

    We show that gold mono- and di-carbonyls are formed on gold field emitter tips during interaction with carbon monoxide gas at room temperature and in the presence of high electrostatic fields. The experiments are done in a time-of-flight atom probe to obtain mass spectra. The yield of monocarbonyl cations is about twice that of di-carbonyl ions. Density functional theory calculations are reported that explain the field stabilization of adsorbed carbonyls and the desorption yield of their cations.

  7. Carbonylation of 1-hexene in the presence of palladium-anion-exchange resin catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.L.; Pirozhkov, S.D.; Buiya, M.A.; Lunin, A.F.; Karapetyan, L.P.; Saldadze, K.M.

    1986-06-20

    Activated charcoal, silica gel, and zeolites containing palladium are active in the carbonylation of lower olefins by carbon monoxide. In the present work, they studied the carbonylation of 1-hexene in the presence of a series of palladium catalysts containing An-221, An-251, and AN-511 anion-exchange catalysts produced in the USSR as the supports. A catalyst obtained by the deposition of palladium(II) on weakly basic anion-exchange resins displays high efficiency in the carbonylation of 1-hexene with the formation of a nixture of enanthoic and 2-methylcaproic acids.

  8. Nanostructured silver sulfide: synthesis of various forms and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Rempel, A. A.; Gusev, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental studies on nanostructured silver sulfide are analyzed and generalized. The influence of small particle size on nonstoichiometry of silver sulfide is discussed. Methods for the synthesis of various forms of nanostructured Ag2S including nanopowders, stable colloidal solutions, quantum dots, core–shell nanoparticles and heteronanostructures are described. The advantages and drawbacks of different synthetic procedures are analyzed. Main fields of application of nanostructured silver sulfide are considered. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  9. Catalase as a sulfide-sulfur oxido-reductase: An ancient (and modern?) regulator of reactive sulfur species (RSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kenneth R; Gao, Yan; DeLeon, Eric R; Arif, Maaz; Arif, Faihaan; Arora, Nitin; Straub, Karl D

    2017-08-01

    Catalase is well-known as an antioxidant dismutating H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O. However, catalases evolved when metabolism was largely sulfur-based, long before O 2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) became abundant, suggesting catalase metabolizes reactive sulfide species (RSS). Here we examine catalase metabolism of H 2 S n , the sulfur analog of H 2 O 2 , hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and other sulfur-bearing molecules using H 2 S-specific amperometric electrodes and fluorophores to measure polysulfides (H 2 S n ; SSP4) and ROS (dichlorofluorescein, DCF). Catalase eliminated H 2 S n , but did not anaerobically generate H 2 S, the expected product of dismutation. Instead, catalase concentration- and oxygen-dependently metabolized H 2 S and in so doing acted as a sulfide oxidase with a P 50 of 20mmHg. H 2 O 2 had little effect on catalase-mediated H 2 S metabolism but in the presence of the catalase inhibitor, sodium azide (Az), H 2 O 2 rapidly and efficiently expedited H 2 S metabolism in both normoxia and hypoxia suggesting H 2 O 2 is an effective electron acceptor in this reaction. Unexpectedly, catalase concentration-dependently generated H 2 S from dithiothreitol (DTT) in both normoxia and hypoxia, concomitantly oxidizing H 2 S in the presence of O 2 . H 2 S production from DTT was inhibited by carbon monoxide and augmented by NADPH suggesting that catalase heme-iron is the catalytic site and that NADPH provides reducing equivalents. Catalase also generated H 2 S from garlic oil, diallyltrisulfide, thioredoxin and sulfur dioxide, but not from sulfite, metabisulfite, carbonyl sulfide, cysteine, cystine, glutathione or oxidized glutathione. Oxidase activity was also present in catalase from Aspergillus niger. These results show that catalase can act as either a sulfide oxidase or sulfur reductase and they suggest that these activities likely played a prominent role in sulfur metabolism during evolution and may continue do so in modern cells as well. This also appears

  10. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzoni, P.; Burkart, A.L.; Garavaglia, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author) [es

  11. Thermal characterization of magnetically aligned carbonyl iron/agar composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Bleis, D; Vales-Pinzón, C; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2014-01-01

    Composites of magnetic particles into polymeric matrices have received increasing research interest due to their capacity to respond to external magnetic or electromagnetic fields. In this study, agar from Gelidium robustum has been chosen as natural biocompatible polymer to build the matrix of the magnetic carbonyl iron particles (CIP) for their uses in biomedical fields. Heat transfer behavior of the CIP-agar composites containing different concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% w/w) of magnetically aligned and non-aligned CIP in the agar matrix was studied using photothermal radiometry (PTR) in the back-propagation emission configuration. The morphology of the CIP-agar composites with aligned and non-aligned CIP under magnetic field was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed a dominant effect of CIP concentration over the alignment patterns induced by the magnetic field, which agrees with the behavior of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. Agar served as a perfect matrix to be used with CIP, and CIP-agar composites magnetically aligned at 20% CIP concentration can be considered as promising 'smart' material for hyperthermia treatments in the biomedical field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbonyl group for deuterated compound production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluhoi, C. Andreea; Marginean, P.; Lazar, Diana; Almasan, V.

    1999-01-01

    The total deuterated isopropyl alcohol can be produced starting from acetone. The developed technology comprises two steps: Deuteration of acetone by H/D isotopic exchange between acetone and heavy water in homogeneous catalysis. Reduction of the deuterated acetone with deuterium in presence of a metal/support catalyst. H/D isotopic exchange reaction of the H atoms from CH 3 groups is easy to occur because carbonyl group weakens C-H bond (ceto-enolyc tautomery). The big difference between boiling points of acetone and water permits an easy separation of acetone by distillation method. The reduction of acetone with deuterium was performed in a dynamic reactor by passing a deuterium flow saturated with acetone vapour through a supported nickel catalyst bed. The reaction products were analysed on-line using a flame ionisation detector. The supported nickel catalysts were checked for this reaction. By using nickel over different supports the selectivity for isopropyl alcohol was about 100%. The propane was detected only as traces. The catalytic activity depends strongly on the support nature: the Ni/SiO 2 is less active, while the Ni/TiO 2 presents the larger value for the intrinsic activity. (authors)

  13. Relationship between laparoscopic cholecystectomy operative time and carbonyl hemoglobin content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate whether operative time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy impacts the carbonyl hemoglobin (COHb concentration in peripheral blood. MethodsForty patients with gallstones and indications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected at the beginning and end of the operative procedure. COHb concentration was measured by UV spectroscopy. The significance of changes in COHb concentration in relation to time of the operative procedure (rounded to the nearest minute was assessed by statistical correlation coefficient test. ResultsThe laparoscopic procedure was completed in 38 cases, and two patients required conversion to laparotomy. The content of COHb in peripheral venous blood had significantly increased during the laparoscopic operation (operation beginning: 11.07%±1.18% vs. operation end: 1.44%±0.26%, P<0.05. The change was positively correlated with operation time (r=0.85. ConclusionCarbon monoxide produced during the laparoscopic cholecystectomy procedure can lead to an increase in peripheral venous blood COHb. The longer the operation lasts, the greater the increase in COHb.

  14. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  15. Efficient and selective α-bromination of carbonyl compounds with N-bromosuccinimide under microwave

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Xiao-Yu; Al-Misba'a, Zahra; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    A highly efficient method for the synthesis of α-halocarbonyl compounds has been achieved via selective monobromination of aromatic and aliphatic carbonyl compounds with N-bromosuccinimide catalyzed by p-toluenesulfonic acid under microwave irradiation within 30 min.

  16. Structure and Bonding in Binuclear Metal Carbonyls. Classical Paradigms vs. Insights from Modern Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1053, SI (2015), s. 195-213 ISSN 2210-271X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : binuclear metal carbonyls * DAFH analysis * 18-electron rule Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.403, year: 2015

  17. Nanostructured palladium tailored via carbonyl chemical route towards oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y.; Mora-Hernández, J.M.; Estudillo-Wong, L.A.; Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Alonso-Vante, N.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical Abstract: Mass-depending morphologies of nanostructured Palladium obtained via the carbonyl chemical route. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Mass-depending morphology was observed in nanostructured palladium supported on carbon prepared by the carbonyl chemical route. •The Morphological effect of carbon supported Pd was investigated towards ORR. -- Abstract: Carbon supported palladium nanostructures were synthesized via the carbonyl chemical route. Compared with nanostructured platinum, prepared via carbonyl chemical route, Pd nanomaterials showed mass-loading morphology, whereas particle size and morphology of Pt nanostructures was constant. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on nanostructured Pd, with different morphology in both acid and alkaline medium was investigated. A relationship, based on X-ray diffraction structural analysis pattern, transmission electron microscope, with the Pd morphological effect on ORR activity was identified

  18. Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marling, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    A deuterium-enriched material is produced by selective photoinduced dissociation of a gas phase organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom adjacent to a carbonyl group. Alkyl carbonyl compounds such as acetone, acetaldehyde, trifluoroacetic acid, cyclobutanone, cyclopentanone, methyl acetate, 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone, 2,4-pentanedione, and 4-methyl-2-pentanone are preferred. The carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation from one laser, or two lasers operating at different frequencies, to selectively dissociate the deuterated molecules into stable products. The undissociated compound may be redeuterated by direct aqueous liquid phase H/D exchange, or by indirect liquid phase exchange using an alkanol in an intermediate step

  19. Efficient and selective α-bromination of carbonyl compounds with N-bromosuccinimide under microwave

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Xiao-Yu

    2014-02-07

    A highly efficient method for the synthesis of α-halocarbonyl compounds has been achieved via selective monobromination of aromatic and aliphatic carbonyl compounds with N-bromosuccinimide catalyzed by p-toluenesulfonic acid under microwave irradiation within 30 min.

  20. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  1. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schindler@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-15

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO{sub 2} and reduced to graphite to determine {sup 14}C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  2. Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Microwave Heating for Hybrid Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Martínez-Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-n are excellent electron acceptor for hybrid solar cell applications. However, the particle size and properties of the CdS-n products depend largely on the synthesis methodologies. In this work, CdS-n were synthetized by microwave heating using thioacetamide (TA or thiourea (TU as sulfur sources. The obtained CdS-n(TA showed a random distribution of hexagonal particles and contained TA residues. The latter could originate the charge carrier recombination process and cause a low photovoltage (Voc, 0.3 V in the hybrid solar cells formed by the inorganic particles and poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT. Under similar synthesis conditions, in contrast, CdS-n synthesized with TU consisted of spherical particles with similar size and contained carbonyl groups at their surface. CdS-n(TU could be well dispersed in the nonpolar P3HT solution, leading to a Voc of about 0.6–0.8 V in the resulting CdS-n(TU : P3HT solar cells. The results of this work suggest that the reactant sources in microwave methods can affect the physicochemical properties of the obtained inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles, which finally influenced the photovoltaic performance of related hybrid solar cells.

  3. Fluoride-Mediated Dephosphonylation of α-Diazo-β-carbonyl Phosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatake, Ravindra S; Mullapudi, Venkannababu; Wakchaure, Vivek C; Ramana, Chepuri V

    2017-01-20

    The possibility of fluoride-mediated selective dephosphonylation of α-diazo-β-carbonyl phosphonates such as the Ohira-Bestmann reagent has been proposed and executed. The resulting α-diazocarbonyl intermediates undergo a (3 + 2)-cycloaddition at room temperature with conjugated olefins and benzynes. Interestingly, under the current conditions, the resulting cycloaddition products underwent either N-acylation (with excess α-diazo-β-carbonyl phosphonates) or Michael addition (with conjugated olefins).

  4. Structure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of Alcohols

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Daniel Neal

    2010-01-01

    AbstractStructure and Reactivity of Zeolite- and Carbon-Supported Catalysts for the Oxidative Carbonylation of AlcoholsbyDaniel Neal BriggsDoctor of Philosophy in Chemical EngineeringUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Alexis T. Bell, Chair The oxidative carbonylation of alcohols to produce dialkyl carbonates is a process that takes place commercially in a slurry of cuprous chloride in the appropriate alcohol. While this process is chemically efficient, it incurs costs in terms of ene...

  5. Chemoselective Reduction and Alkylation of Carbonyl Functions Using Phosphonium Salts as an in Situ Protecting Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Reiya; Fujioka, Hiromichi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in the chemoselective reduction and alkylation of carbonyl functions using our in situ protection method is described. Methods that enable reversal or control of the reactivity of a carbonyl functional group are potentially useful. They open up new areas of synthetic organic chemistry and change the concept of retrosynthesis because they remove the need for complicated protection/deprotection sequences. In this account, we discuss the strategy and applications of our in situ protection method using phosphonium salts.

  6. Cytoprotective Effects of Pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata) Fruit Extract against Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayesteh, Reyhaneh; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Adiban, Hasan; Kardan, Azin; Keyhanfar, Fariborz; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic endocrine disorder that is associated with significant mortality and morbidity due to microvascular and macrovascular complications. Diabetes complications accompanied with oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in different organs of human body because of the increased generation of free radicals and impaired antioxidant defense systems. In the meantime, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) have key mediatory roles in the development and progression of diabetes complications. Therapeutic strategies have recently focused on preventing such diabetes-related abnormalities using different natural and chemical compounds. Pumpkin ( Cucurbita moschata ) is one of the most important vegetables in the world with a broad-range of pharmacological activities such as antihyperglycemic effect. Methods In the present study, the cytoprotective effects of aqueous extract of C. moschata fruit on hepatocyte cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonylation model) were investigated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Results The extract of C. moschata (50 μg/ml) excellently prevented oxidative and carbonyl stress markers, including hepatocyte lysis, ROS production, lipid peroxidation, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, lysosomal damage, and cellular proteolysis. In addition, protein carbonylation was prevented by C. moschata in glyoxal-induced carbonyl stress. Conclusion It can be concluded that C. moschata has cytoprotective effects in oxidative stress and carbonyl stress models and this valuable vegetable can be considered as a suitable herbal product for the prevention of toxic subsequent of oxidative stress and carbonyl stress seen in chronic hyperglycemia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Organocatalyzed α-Sulfenylation of carbonyl compounds using N-formly/Acyl Sulfenmides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Hyeon Wan; Lee, Chan; Jang, Hye Young

    2017-01-01

    α-Sulfenylation of aldehydes and ketones using N-formyl and N-acyl sulfenamides, prepared by Cu-catalyzed aerobic coupling of amides and thiols, was achieved in the presence of cyclic secondary amine⋅HCl catalysts. To obtain various sulfur-functionalized carbonyl compounds, sulfenamides containing aromatic and aliphatic organosulfur were investigated. As carbonyl compounds, cyclic and acyclic ketones, 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, and aldehydes were investigated, affording the desired α-sulfenylation products in good yields

  8. Organocatalyzed α-Sulfenylation of carbonyl compounds using N-formly/Acyl Sulfenmides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyeon Wan; Lee, Chan; Jang, Hye Young [Dept. of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    α-Sulfenylation of aldehydes and ketones using N-formyl and N-acyl sulfenamides, prepared by Cu-catalyzed aerobic coupling of amides and thiols, was achieved in the presence of cyclic secondary amine⋅HCl catalysts. To obtain various sulfur-functionalized carbonyl compounds, sulfenamides containing aromatic and aliphatic organosulfur were investigated. As carbonyl compounds, cyclic and acyclic ketones, 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, and aldehydes were investigated, affording the desired α-sulfenylation products in good yields.

  9. Ammonia synthesis in the presence of rhodium-ruthenium-iridium carbonyl clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.V.

    2007-01-01

    Researches in the field of platinum metal coordination compounds, where nitrogen enters as a ligand in coordination sphere of metal, are discussed. Results of experiments on the ammonia synthesis during the CO+N 2 mixture passing through alkali solution containing mixture of carbonyl clusters of rhodium, ruthenium and iridium at atmospheric pressure are given. Technique of the experiment and steps of assumed reactions of nitrogen fixation by Rh, Ir and Ru carbonyl clusters are demonstrated [ru

  10. Plasma-treated carbonyl iron particles as a dispersed phase in magnetorheological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlačík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Lehocký, M.; Mráček, A.; Grulich, O.; Švrčinová, P. (Petra); Filip, P. (Petr); Vesel, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to document suitability of plasma-treated carbonyl iron particles as a dispersed phase in magnetorheological fluids. Surface-modified carbonyl iron particles were prepared via their exposure to 50% argon and 50% octafluorocyclobutane plasma. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used for analysis of chemical bonding states in the surface layer. Plasma-treated particles were adopted for a dispersed phase in magnetorheological (MR) fluids, and the MR behaviour was in...

  11. Iron sulfide crystal growth: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, E.J.

    1977-04-01

    Iron pyrite (FeS 2 ) is often found on trays and in heat exchangers in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) plants used to extract D 2 O from fresh water. A critical review of the literature was made to find: (i) what is known about FeS 2 crystal growth; (ii) which techniques could be used to study FeS 2 crystal growth experimentally; (iii) potential chemical additives that could be used in trace amounts to poison FeS 2 crystals and reduce their growth rate in G.S. plants. (author)

  12. Sulfide geochronlogy along the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Tao, C.; Li, H.; Liang, J.; Liao, S.

    2017-12-01

    Dragon Flag and Duanqiao hydrothermal field is located between the Indomed and Gallieni fracture zones in the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Ten subsamples from active and inactive vents of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field and twenty-eight subsamples from Duanqiao hydrothermal field were dated using the 230Th/238U method. Four main episodes of hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao were determined according to the restricted results: 68.9-84.3, 43.9-48.4, 25.3-34.8, and 0.7-17.3 kyrs. Hydrothermal activity of Duanqiao probably started about 84.3 (±0.5) kyrs ago and ceased about 0.737 (±0.023) kyrs ago. And sulfide samples from the nearby Dragon Flag filed at the same time and the results show that the ages of most sulfides from Dragon Flag field range from 1.496(±0.176) to 5.416 (±0.116) kyrs with the oldest age estimated at 15.997 (±0.155) kyrs Münch et al. (2001) reconstructed the evolution history of Mt. Jourdanne hydrothermal field. The age dating results indicate activity in two episodes, at 70-40 and 27-13 kyrs. The hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. The massive sulfides are younger than the sulfides from other hydrothermal fields such as Rainbow, Sonne and Ashadze-2. All these results suggest that hydrothermal activity of Dragon Flag field is much more recent than that of Duanqiao or Mt. Jourdanne fields. Mt. Jourdanne is situated on an axial volcanic ridge which has both volcanic and tectonic activity. This is necessary to develop the heat source and pathways for the fluid convection, which enables the hydrothermal circulation. Hydrothermal activity in Dragon Flag Field is located next to the detachment fault termination. The detachment fault system provides a pathway for hydrothermal convection. Such style of heat source can contribute to continuous hydrothermal activity for over 1000 years. Duanqiao field is located near the central volcano and there is a hot

  13. Role of protein-bound carbonyl groups in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggins, J; Furth, A J

    1997-08-22

    Several mechanisms have been postulated for the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) from glycated proteins; they all feature protein-bound carbonyl intermediates. Using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), we have detected these intermediates on bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin after in vitro glycation by glucose or fructose. Carbonyls were formed in parallel with AGE-fluorophores, via oxidative Maillard reactions. Neither Amadori nor Heyns products contributed to the DNPH reaction. Fluorophore and carbonyl yields were much enhanced in lipid-associated proteins, but both groups could also be detected in lipid-free proteins. When pre-glycated proteins were incubated in the absence of free sugar, carbonyl groups were rapidly lost in a first-order reaction, while fluorescence continued to develop beyond the 21 days of incubation. Another unexpected finding was that not all carbonyl groups were blocked by aminoguanidine, although there was complete inhibition of reactions leading to AGE-fluorescence. It is suggested that carbonyls acting as fluorophore precursors react readily with aminoguanidine, while others are resistant to this hydrazine, possibly because they are involved in ring closure. Factors influencing the relative rates of acyclisation and hydrazone formation are discussed, together with possible implications for antiglycation therapy.

  14. Carbonyl Emissions in E-cigarette Aerosol: A Systematic Review and Methodological Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos E. Farsalinos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonyl emissions from tobacco cigarettes represent a substantial health risk contributing to smoking-related morbidity and mortality. As expected, this is an important research topic for tobacco harm reduction products, in an attempt to compare the relative risk of these products compared to tobacco cigarettes. In this study, a systematic review of the literature available on PubMed was performed analyzing the studies evaluating carbonyl emissions from e-cigarettes. A total of 32 studies were identified and presented. We identified a large diversity of methodologies, with substantial discrepancies in puffing patterns, aerosol collection and analytical methods as well as reported units of measurements. Such discrepancies make comparisons difficult, and in some cases the accuracy of the findings cannot be determined. Importantly, control for the generation of dry puffs was not performed in the vast majority of studies, particularly in studies using variable power devices, which could result in testing conditions and reported carbonyl levels that have no clinical relevance or context. Some studies have been replicated, verifying the presence of dry puff conditions. Whenever realistic use conditions were ensured, carbonyl emissions from e-cigarettes were substantially lower than tobacco cigarette smoke, while newer generation (bottom-coil, cotton wick atomizers appeared to emit minimal levels of carbonyls with questionable clinical significance in terms of health risk. However, extremely high levels of carbonyl emissions were reported in some studies, and all these studies need to be replicated because of potentially important health implications.

  15. Predicting personal exposure to airborne carbonyls using residential measurements and time/activity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weili; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Korn, Leo R.; Zhang, Lin; Weisel, Clifford P.; Turpin, Barbara; Morandi, Maria; Stock, Tom; Colome, Steve

    As a part of the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study, 48 h integrated residential indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure concentrations of 10 carbonyls were simultaneously measured in 234 homes selected from three US cities using the Passive Aldehydes and Ketones Samplers (PAKS). In this paper, we examine the feasibility of using residential indoor concentrations to predict personal exposures to carbonyls. Based on paired t-tests, the means of indoor concentrations were not different from those of personal exposure concentrations for eight out of the 10 measured carbonyls, indicating indoor carbonyls concentrations, in general, well predicted the central tendency of personal exposure concentrations. In a linear regression model, indoor concentrations explained 47%, 55%, and 65% of personal exposure variance for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and hexaldehyde, respectively. The predictability of indoor concentrations on cross-individual variability in personal exposure for the other carbonyls was poorer, explainingexposure concentrations. It was found that activities related to driving a vehicle and performing yard work had significant impacts on personal exposures to a few carbonyls.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF EFFICACY OF FERROUS SULPHATE AND CARBONYL IRON IN ANEMIA OF ANTENATAL WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia is the most common and important public health problem all over the world in the risk group of antenatal women. Research is going on to improve the iron status of the pregnant women with different forms of iron available. In this regard, Carbonyl Iron is showing promising results in improving the red cell mass with better compliance. 120 antenatal women were recruited in this study. The study comprised of 6weeks for each patient. They were given Carbonyl Iron 100 mg/day and FeS04 100gm/day . Before and after treatment all the baseline and specific investigations were one. Results were tabulated, comparison and significance were tested by unpaired student ’s’ test and their 'p' value was calculated. Results were shown graphically also. Carbonyl Iron showed improvement in hemoglobin, PCV and better than ferrous Sulphate (P <0.001. Incidence of side effects were less with Carbonyl Iron than Ferrous Sulphate, better compliance was seen with Carbonyl Iron. In conclusion, the present study s howed that Carbonyl Iron had better efficacy and safety in the management of Iron deficiency anemia in antenatal women than ferrous Sulphate

  17. Protein carbonylation associated to high-fat, high-sucrose diet and its metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Lucía; Pazos, Manuel; Molinar-Toribio, Eunice; Sánchez-Martos, Vanesa; Gallardo, José M; Rosa Nogués, M; Torres, Josep L; Medina, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    The present research draws a map of the characteristic carbonylation of proteins in rats fed high-caloric diets with the aim of providing a new insight of the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases derived from the high consumption of fat and refined carbohydrates. Protein carbonylation was analyzed in plasma, liver and skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet by a proteomics approach based on carbonyl-specific fluorescence-labeling, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Oxidized proteins along with specific sites of oxidative damage were identified and discussed to illustrate the consequences of protein oxidation. The results indicated that long-term HFHS consumption increased protein oxidation in plasma and liver; meanwhile, protein carbonyls from skeletal muscle did not change. The increment of carbonylation by HFHS diet was singularly selective on specific target proteins: albumin from plasma and liver, and hepatic proteins such as mitochondrial carbamoyl-phosphate synthase (ammonia), mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, argininosuccinate synthetase, regucalcin, mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase subunit beta, actin cytoplasmic 1 and mitochondrial glutamate dehydrogenase 1. The possible consequences that these specific protein carbonylations have on the excessive weight gain, insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease resulting from HFHS diet consumption are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Line profile analyses of rhodium metal obtained by decomposition of rhodium carbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, D.; Mandalia, H.; Garner, M.L.; Blakely, M.K.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    Metal carbonyls are important for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metals and alloys and formation of high surface area metallic particles which have potential applications as catalysts. Rhodium carbonyl [Rh 6 (CO) 16 ] produces high surface area metallic particles whose structure has been reported as monoclinic (I2/a) with lattice dimensions, a=17.00(±0.03)Angstrom, b=9.78(±0.02)Angstrom, c=17.53(±0.03)Angstrom and Β=121 degrees 45' ± 30' at room temperature. Generally, metal carbonyl crystals dissociate under vacuum as carbonyl gas and decompose to metallic crystals and carbon monoxide at higher temperatures. However, the behavior of rhodium carbonyl crystals is different; they decompose directly to metallic rhodium without the formation of rhodium carbonyl gas in vacuum. Several residual fine grains of rhodium metal are found after the decomposition in vacuum at relatively low temperatures. The metallic samples of rhodium were obtained from vapor pressure experiments using torsion Knudsen-effusion apparatus. X-ray diffraction analyses performed on these gains showed severely broadened Bragg reflections indicative of small particle size and/or lattice microgram. In this study, a comparison of lattice strains and domain sizes obtained by integral breadth and Fourier methods has been made. In addition a comparison of the lattice strains and domain sizes has been made between the Cauchy, Gaussian, Cauchy-Gaussian and Aqua integral breadth methods

  19. Characteristics of carbonyl compounds in public vehicles of Beijing city: Concentrations, sources, and personal exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaobing; Mu, Yujing

    The characteristics of carbonyl compounds (carbonyls) including concentrations, major sources, and personal exposure were investigated for 29 vehicles including taxi, bus and subway in Beijing. It was found that the taxis (Xiali, TA) and buses (Huanghe, BA) fueled by gasoline with longer service years had the higher indoor carbonyl levels (178±42.7 and 188±31.6 μg m -3) while subways energized by electricity without exhaust and the jingwa buses (BB) driven in the suburb had the lower levels with total concentrations of 98.5±26.3 and 92.1±20.3 μg m -3, respectively. Outdoor carbonyls of taxi cars and buses were nearly at the same level with their total concentrations varying from 80 to 110 μg m -3. The level of outdoor subways carbonyls was equal with the ambient air levels. Exhaust leakage, indoor material emissions, photochemical formation, and infiltration of outdoor air were considered to be the major sources to in-vehicle carbonyls. Personal exposures and cancer risk to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were calculated for professional bus and taxi drivers, respectively. Taxi drivers had the highest cancer risk with personal exposure to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde of 212 and 243 μg day -1, respectively. The public concern should pay considerable attention to professional drivers' health.

  20. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  1. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  2. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  3. Technetium behavior in sulfide and ferrous iron solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pertechnetate oxyanion ( 99 TcO 4- ), a potentially mobile species in leachate from a breached radioactive waste repository, was removed from a brine solution by precipitation with sulfide, iron, and ferrous sulfide at environmental pH's. Maghemite (ν-Fe 2 O 3 ) and geothite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant minerals in the precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -ferrous iron reaction. The observation of small particle size and poor crystallinity of the minerals formed in the presence of Tc suggested that the Tc was incorporated into the mineral structure after reduction to a lower valence state. Amorphous ferrous sulfide, an initial phase precipitating in the TcO 4- -ferrous iron-sulfide reaction, was transformed to goethite and hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) on aging. The black precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -sulfide reaction was poorly crystallized technetium sulfide (Tc 2 S 7 ) which was insoluble in both acid and alkaline solution in the absence of strong oxidents. The results suggested that ferrous- and/or sulfide-bearing groundwaters and minerals in host rocks or backfill barriers could reduce the mobility of Tc through the formation of less-soluble Tc-bearing iron and/or sulfide minerals

  4. Sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Oers, van E.M.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The sulfidation of carbon-supported iron oxide catalysts was studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at temperatures down to 4.2 K. The catalysts were dried in two different ways and then sulfided in a flow of 10% H2S in H2 at temperatures between 293 and 773 K. Thiophene

  5. New Ir Bis-Carbonyl Precursor for Water Oxidation Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Daria L. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Beltrán-Suito, Rodrigo [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Thomsen, Julianne M. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Hashmi, Sara M. [Department of Chemical and Environmental; Materna, Kelly L. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Sheehan, Stafford W. [Catalytic Innovations LLC, 70 Crandall; Mercado, Brandon Q. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Brudvig, Gary W. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225; Crabtree, Robert H. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225

    2016-02-05

    This paper introduces IrI(CO)2(pyalc) (pyalc = (2-pyridyl)-2-propanoate) as an atom-efficient precursor for Ir-based homogeneous oxidation catalysis. This compound was chosen to simplify analysis of the water oxidation catalyst species formed by the previously reported Cp*IrIII(pyalc)OH water oxidation precatalyst. Here, we present a comparative study on the chemical and catalytic properties of these two precursors. Previous studies show that oxidative activation of Cp*Ir-based precursors with NaIO4 results in formation of a blue IrIV species. This activation is concomitant with the loss of the placeholder Cp* ligand which oxidatively degrades to form acetic acid, iodate, and other obligatory byproducts. The activation process requires substantial amounts of primary oxidant, and the degradation products complicate analysis of the resulting IrIV species. The species formed from oxidation of the Ir(CO)2(pyalc) precursor, on the other hand, lacks these degradation products (the CO ligands are easily lost upon oxidation) which allows for more detailed examination of the resulting Ir(pyalc) active species both catalytically and spectroscopically, although complete structural analysis is still elusive. Once Ir(CO)2(pyalc) is activated, the system requires acetic acid or acetate to prevent the formation of nanoparticles. Investigation of the activated bis-carbonyl complex also suggests several Ir(pyalc) isomers may exist in solution. By 1H NMR, activated Ir(CO)2(pyalc) has fewer isomers than activated Cp*Ir complexes, allowing for advanced characterization. Future research in this direction is expected to contribute to a better structural understanding of the active species. A diol crystallization agent was needed for the structure determination of 3.

  6. Plasma protein carbonyl responses to anaerobic exercise in female cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E Afzalpour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single bouts of aerobic exercise may leads to oxidative stress due to the use of oxygen for metabolism and the generation of reactive oxygen. In athletes, oxidative stress can lead to several deleterious performance effects, such as muscular oxidative damage, muscle soreness, loss of skeletal muscle force production and/or inflammation. However, little is known regarding the severity and duration of oxidative stress arising from intensive anaerobic modes of exercise in aerobically-trained athletes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a single bout of intensive anaerobic exercise on plasma protein carbonyl (PC in aerobically-trained women. Aerobically-trained, provincial female cyclists [n = 18, age: 24.2±2.7 years; stature: 163.6±4.6 cm; body mass: 53.4±4.2 kg] were randomly assigned into either a non-exercising control (CON; n = 9 or experimental (EXP; n = 9 group that underwent a 30-second anaerobic (Wingate cycle ergometer exercise session. Blood sampling took place before exercise, immediately after the exercise (IE, and 24 hours following the exercise (24HR bout. In the EXP, results indicated significant (P ≤ 0.05 differences in PC levels between the pre-test and IE (0.010±0.0124 to 0.0149±0.0420 mmol/milt; P = 0.010, and IE and 24HR (0.0149±0.0420 to 0.0111±0.0183 mmol/milt; P = 0.013. No significant differences were observed between pre-test and 24HR (0.010±0.0124 to 0.0111±0.0183 mmol/milt; P = 0.371. These results indicate that oxidative protein damage, as indicated by PC levels, rises immediately with the onset of anaerobic exercise, but returns to resting levels within 24 hours following exercise in aerobically-trained women.

  7. Organometallic and Bioorganometallic Chemistry - Ferrocene and Metal Carbonyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čakić Semenčić, M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Organometallic chemistry deals with compounds containing metal-carbon bonds. Basic organometallics derived from the s- and p-block metals (containing solely σ-bonds were understood earlier, while organometallic chemistry of the d- and f-block has developed much more recently. These compounds are characterized by three types of M-C bonds (σ, π and δand their structures are impossible to deduce by chemical means alone; fundamental advances had to await the development of X-ray diffraction, as well as IR- and NMR-spectroscopy. On the other hand, elucidation of the structure of e. g. vitamin B12 and ferrocene (discovered in 1951 contributed to progress in these instrumental analytical methods, influencing further phenomenal success of transition-metal organometallic chemistry in the second half of the twentieth century. The most thoroughly explored fields of application of organometallics were in the area of catalysis, asymmetric synthesis, olefin metathesis, as well as organic synthesis and access to new materials and polymers.The most usual ligands bound to d- and f-metals are carbon monoxide, phosphines, alkyls, carbenes and arenes, and in this review the bonding patterns in the metal carbonyls and ferrocene are elaborated. The common characteristics of these two classes are two-component bonds. The CO-M bonds include (i donation from ligand HOMO to vacant M d-orbitals (σ-bond, and (ii back-donation from the filled M d-orbitals in the ligand LUMO (π-bond. Similar (but much more complicated ferrocene contains delocalized bonds consisting of electron donation from Cp to Fe (σ-bonds- and π-bonding and δ-back-bonding from metal to Cp. In such a way ferrocene, i. e. (η5-Cp2Fe contains 18 bonding electrons giving to this compound "superaromatic" properties in the sense of stability and electrophilic substitution. In contrast to benzenoid aromatic compounds reactions in two Cp-rings can occur giving homo- and heteroannularly mono-, two-… per

  8. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  9. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  10. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    risks and corrosion of concrete and metals. Most of the problems relate to the buildup of hydrogen sulfide in the atmosphere of sewer networks. In this respect, the processes of the sulfur cycle are of fundamental importance in ultimately determining the extent of such problems. This study focused...... calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... to the sewer atmosphere, potentially resulting in concrete corrosion. The extended WATS model represents a major improvement over previously developed models for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks. Compared to such models, the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks...

  11. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barzegar, Mohsen [Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jabbari, Ali [K. N. Toosi University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Majid [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples.

  12. Kinetic Spectrophotometric Determination of Trace Amounts of Sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, Mohsen; Jabbari, Ali; Esmaeili, Majid

    2003-01-01

    A method for the determination of trace amount of sulfide based on the addition reaction of sulfide with methyl green at pH 7.5 and 25 .deg. C is described. The reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of the dyestuff at 637 nm by the initial rate and fixed time method. The calibration graph is linear in the range 30-1200 ppb. The theoretical limit of detection was 0.014 ppm. Seven replicate analysis of a sample solution containing 0.70 ppm sulfide gave a relative standard deviation of 1.5%. The interfering effects of various ions on sulfide determination have been reported and procedures for removal of interference have been described. The proposed method was applied successfully to the determination of sulfide in tap and wastewater samples

  13. Anoxic sulfide biooxidation using nitrite as electron acceptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng Ping; Cai Jing; Wu Donglei; Hu, Baolan; Li Jinye

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology can be used to assess the well being of ecosystems, transform pollutants into benign substances, generate biodegradable materials from renewable sources, and develop environmentally safe manufacturing and disposal processes. Simultaneous elimination of sulfide and nitrite from synthetic wastewaters was investigated using a bioreactor. A laboratory scale anoxic sulfide-oxidizing (ASO) reactor was operated for 135 days to evaluate the potential for volumetric loading rates, effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and substrate concentration on the process performance. The maximal sulfide and nitrite removal rates were achieved to be 13.82 and 16.311 kg/(m 3 day), respectively, at 0.10 day HRT. The process can endure high sulfide concentrations, as the sulfide removal percentage always remained higher than 88.97% with influent concentration up to 1920 mg/L. Incomplete sulfide oxidation took place due to lower consumed nitrite to sulfide ratios of 0.93. It also tolerated high nitrite concentration up to 2265.25 mg/L. The potential achieved by decreasing HRT at fixed substrate concentration is higher than that by increasing substrate concentration at fixed HRT. The process can bear short HRT of 0.10 day but careful operation is needed. Nitrite conversion was more sensitive to HRT than sulfide conversion when HRT was decreased from 1.50 to 0.08 day. Stoichiometric analyses and results of batch experiments show that major part of sulfide (89-90%) was reduced by nitrite while some autooxidation (10-11%) was resulted from presence of small quantities of dissolved oxygen in the influent wastewater. There was ammonia amassing in considerably high amounts in the bioreactor when the influent nitrite concentration reached above 2265.25 mg/L. High ammonia concentrations (200-550 mg/L) in the bioreactor contributed towards the overall inhibition of the process. Present biotechnology exhibits practical value with a high potential for simultaneous removal of nitrite

  14. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.; Lires, O.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author) [es

  15. Molecular Engineering with Organic Carbonyl Electrode Materials for Advanced Stationary and Redox Flow Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Organic carbonyl electrode materials that have the advantages of high capacity, low cost and being environmentally friendly, are regarded as powerful candidates for next-generation stationary and redox flow rechargeable batteries (RFBs). However, low carbonyl utilization, poor electronic conductivity and undesired dissolution in electrolyte are urgent issues to be solved. Here, we summarize a molecular engineering approach for tuning the capacity, working potential, concentration of active species, kinetics, and stability of stationary and redox flow batteries, which well resolves the problems of organic carbonyl electrode materials. As an example, in stationary batteries, 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) with two carbonyls delivers a capacity of 257 mAh g -1 (2.27 V vs Li + /Li), while increasing the number of carbonyls to four with the formation of 5,7,12,14-pentacenetetrone results in a higher capacity of 317 mAh g -1 (2.60 V vs Li + /Li). In RFBs, AQ, which is less soluble in aqueous electrolyte, reaches 1 M by grafting -SO 3 H with the formation of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonic acid, resulting in a power density exceeding 0.6 W cm -2 with long cycling life. Therefore, through regulating substituent groups, conjugated structures, Coulomb interactions, and the molecular weight, the electrochemical performance of carbonyl electrode materials can be rationally optimized. This review offers fundamental principles and insight into designing advanced carbonyl materials for the electrodes of next-generation rechargeable batteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in F344 rat hippocampus after 1-bromopropane exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhenlie [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan); Department of Toxicology, Guangdong Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Diseases, Guangzhou 510‐300 (China); Ichihara, Sahoko [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu 514‐8507 (Japan); Oikawa, Shinji [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514‐8507 (Japan); Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku, E-mail: gak@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and humans. Previous proteomic analysis of rat hippocampus implicated alteration of protein expression in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. To understand this role at the protein level, we exposed male F344 rats to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 week or 4 weeks by inhalation and quantitated changes in hippocampal protein carbonyl using a protein carbonyl assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Hippocampal reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl were significantly increased, demonstrating 1-BP-associated induction of oxidative stress and protein damage. MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identified 10 individual proteins with increased carbonyl modification (p < 0.05; fold-change ≥ 1.5). The identified proteins were involved in diverse biological processes including glycolysis, ATP production, tyrosine catabolism, GTP binding, guanine degradation, and neuronal metabolism of dopamine. Hippocampal triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activity was significantly reduced and negatively correlated with TPI carbonylation (p < 0.001; r = 0.83). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels were significantly elevated both in the hippocampus and plasma, and hippocampal AGEs correlated negatively with TPI activity (p < 0.001; r = 0.71). In conclusion, 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus seems to involve oxidative damage of cellular proteins, decreased TPI activity, and elevated AGEs. -- Highlights: ► 1-BP increases hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampal and plasma protein carbonyls. ► 1-BP increases TPI carbonylation and decreases TPI activity in the hippocampus. ► 1-BP increases hippocampal and plasma AGE levels.

  17. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide: management of hydrogen sulfide exposure victims (Preprint No. SA-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1989-04-01

    National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, U.S.A. has listed 73 industries with potential exposure to hydrogen sulphide. Though the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide is known to mankind since the beginning of seventeenth century the exact mode of its toxicity and effective therapeutic regimen remains unclear as yet. This paper presents current thoughts on the toxicity of this substance and a discussion on the role of various antidotes used in H 2 S poisoning. (autho r)

  18. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  19. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate: Kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Aijie, E-mail: waj0578@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Liu Chunshuang; Ren Nanqi; Han Hongjun [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Lee Duujong [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology (SKLUWRE, HIT), Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2010-06-15

    Biological removal of sulfide, nitrate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) simultaneously from industrial wastewaters to elementary sulfur (S{sup 0}), N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, or named the denitrifying sulfide (DSR) process, is a cost effective and environmentally friendly treatment process for high strength sulfide and nitrate laden organic wastewater. Kinetic model for the DSR process was established for the first time on the basis of Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1). The DSR experiments were conducted at influent sulfide concentrations of 200-800 mg/L, whose results calibrate the model parameters. The model correlates well with the DSR process dynamics. By introducing the switch function and the inhibition function, the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifiers is quantitatively described and the degree of inhibition of sulfide on heterotrophic denitrifiers is realized. The model output indicates that the DSR reactor can work well at 0.5 < C/S < 3.0 with influent sulfide concentration of 400-1000 mg/L. At >1000 mg/L influent sulfide, however, the DSR system will break down.

  20. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  1. Eelgrass fairy rings: sulfide as inhibiting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borum, Jens; Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2014-01-01

    specifically, for the apparent die- off of eelgrass shoots on the inner side of the rings. The fairy rings were up to 15 m in diameter consisting of 0.3- to 1-m-wide zones of sea grass shoots at densities of up to 1,200 shoots m−2 and rooted in an up to 10-cm-thick sediment layer. On the outer side, shoots...... expanded over the bare chalk plates. On the inner side, shoots were smaller, had lower absolute and specific leaf growth, shoot density was lower and the sediment eroded leaving the bare chalk with scattered boulders behind. Sediment organic matter and nutrients and tissue nutrient contents were...... substantial invasion of sulfide from the sediment. neither the clonal growth pattern of eelgrass, sediment burial of shoots, hydrodynamic forcing nor nutrient limitation could explain the ring-shaped pattern. We conclude that the most likely explanation must be found in invasion of eelgrass shoots by toxic...

  2. On the pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palant, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Investigation results are discussed on the process of pelletizing with the use of various binders (water, syrup, sulfite-alcoholic residue and bentonite) for flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (∼84 % MoS 2 ) of the Mongolian deposit. It is established that with the use of syrup rather strong pellets (>300 g/p) of desired size (2-3 mm) can be obtained at a binder flowrate of 1 kg per 100 kg of concentrate. The main advantage of using syrup instead of bentonite lies in the fact that in this instance no depletion of a molybdenum calcine obtained by oxidizing roasting of raw ore takes place due to syrup complete burning out. This affects positively subsequent hydrometallurgical conversion because of decreasing molybdenum losses with waste cakes [ru

  3. Modulated structure calculated for superconducting hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Tse, John S.; Yao, Yansun [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2017-09-11

    Compression of hydrogen sulfide using first principles metadynamics and molecular dynamics calculations revealed a modulated structure with high proton mobility which exhibits a diffraction pattern matching well with experiment. The structure consists of a sublattice of rectangular meandering SH{sup -} chains and molecular-like H{sub 3}S{sup +} stacked alternately in tetragonal and cubic slabs forming a long-period modulation. The novel structure offers a new perspective on the possible origin of the superconductivity at very high temperatures in which the conducting electrons in the SH chains are perturbed by the fluxional motions of the H{sub 3}S resulting in strong electron-phonon coupling. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Enhanced microwave absorption in ZnO/carbonyl iron nano-composites by coating dielectric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Chang [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230036 (China); Key Laboratory of Opto-electronic Information Acquisition and Manipulation Ministry of Education, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Fang Qingqing, E-mail: physfangqq@126.com [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230036 (China) and Key Laboratory of Opto-electronic Information Acquisition and Manipulation Ministry of Education, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Yan Fangliang; Wang Weina; Wu Keyue; Liu Yanmei; Lv Qingrong; Zhang Hanming; Zhang Qiping; Li Jinguang; Ding Qiongqiong [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230036 (China); Key Laboratory of Opto-electronic Information Acquisition and Manipulation Ministry of Education, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)

    2012-05-15

    The microwave absorption properties of zinc oxide/carbonyl iron composite nanoparticles fabricated by high energy ball milling were studied at 0-20 GHz. Experiments showed that ZnO as a kind of dielectric material coating carbonyl iron particles made the bandwidth of reflection loss (RL)<-5 dB expanding to the low frequency, and enhanced absorption effect obviously. For a 3 mm thickness absorber of ZnO/carbonyl iron after 30 h milling, the values of RL<-5 dB and RL<-8 dB were obtained in the frequency range from 7.0 GHz to 17.8 GHz and from 9.8 dB to 14.9 dB, respectively, and its strongest RL peak was -29.34 dB at 13.59 GHz. The magnetic loss of carbonyl iron particles and the dielectric loss of ZnO particles were the main mechanisms of microwave absorption for the composites. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricated zinc oxide/carbonyl iron composites by high energy ball milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO dielectric property increased absorption effect and absorption bandwidth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbing frequence of composites is expanding to low frequency direction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The craft of high energy ball milling is easy to realize commerce production.

  5. Enhanced microwave absorption in ZnO/carbonyl iron nano-composites by coating dielectric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chang; Fang Qingqing; Yan Fangliang; Wang Weina; Wu Keyue; Liu Yanmei; Lv Qingrong; Zhang Hanming; Zhang Qiping; Li Jinguang; Ding Qiongqiong

    2012-01-01

    The microwave absorption properties of zinc oxide/carbonyl iron composite nanoparticles fabricated by high energy ball milling were studied at 0–20 GHz. Experiments showed that ZnO as a kind of dielectric material coating carbonyl iron particles made the bandwidth of reflection loss (RL)<−5 dB expanding to the low frequency, and enhanced absorption effect obviously. For a 3 mm thickness absorber of ZnO/carbonyl iron after 30 h milling, the values of RL<−5 dB and RL<−8 dB were obtained in the frequency range from 7.0 GHz to 17.8 GHz and from 9.8 dB to 14.9 dB, respectively, and its strongest RL peak was −29.34 dB at 13.59 GHz. The magnetic loss of carbonyl iron particles and the dielectric loss of ZnO particles were the main mechanisms of microwave absorption for the composites. - Highlights: ► We fabricated zinc oxide/carbonyl iron composites by high energy ball milling. ► ZnO dielectric property increased absorption effect and absorption bandwidth. ► Absorbing frequence of composites is expanding to low frequency direction. ► The craft of high energy ball milling is easy to realize commerce production.

  6. Catalytic reactions of synthesis gas. Part 2. Methanol carbonylation and homologation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemelae, M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the review is to evaluate the applicability of methanol hydrocarbonylation as a second test reaction to study the nondissociative activation of CO by heterogeneous rhodium and cobalt catalysts. The main emphasis in methanol (hydro)carbonylation chemistry has been on homogeneous reactions. These systems have been seen advantageous in selectivity, activity and ease of modification. The heterogenization attempts have been carried out to obtain easier separation of the catalyst and the product. The activity of cobalt, rhodium and other metals supported on different materials have been studied in heterogeneous methanol (hydro)carbonylation. The observed activities have been considerably influenced by the support. The most effective catalyst support has been activated carbon. Good carbonylation activities and selectivities have also been observed in conjunction with zeolite supports. The literature study indicates that the typical experimental conditions of methanol (hydro)carbonylation do not exceed the constructional and operational limits of the available reactor system, i.e. 500 C and 50 bar. The reaction is suitable for testing Co and Rh precursors, since both cobalt and rhodium compounds have shown carbonylation activity.

  7. Enhanced antioxidation and microwave absorbing properties of SiO2-coated flaky carbonyl iron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Xie, Hui; Zhou, Wancheng; Ren, Zhaowen

    2018-01-01

    SiO2 was successfully coated on the surface of flaky carbonyl iron particles using a chemical bath deposition method in the presence of 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). The morphologies, composition, valence states of elements, as well as antioxidation and electromagnetic properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric (TG) and microwave network analyzer. TG curve shows the obvious weight gain of carbonyl iron was deferred to 360 °C after SiO2-coated, which can be ascribed to the exits of SiO2 overlayer. Compared with the raw carbonyl iron, SiO2-coated sample shows good wave absorption performance due to its impedance matching. The electromagnetic properties of raw and SiO2-coated carbonyl iron particles were characterized in X band before and after heat treatment at 250 °C for 10 h. It was established that SiO2-coated carbonyl iron demonstrate good thermal stability, indicating SiO2-coating is useful in the usage of microwave absorbers operating at temperature up to 250 °C.

  8. Proteomic evaluation of myofibrillar carbonylation in chilled fish mince and its inhibition by catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Manuel; Maestre, Rodrigo; Gallardo, José M; Medina, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the susceptibility of individual myofibrillar proteins from mackerel (Scomber scombrus) mince to undergo carbonylation reactions during chilled storage, and the antioxidant capacity of (+)-catechin to prevent oxidative processes of proteins. The carbonylation of each particular protein was quantified by combining the labelling of protein carbonyls by fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide (FTSC) with 1-D or 2-D gel electrophoresis. Alpha skeletal actin, glycogen phosphorylase, unnamed protein product (UNP) similar to enolase, pyruvate kinase, isoforms of creatine kinase, aldolase A and an isoform of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) showed elevated oxidation in chilled non-supplemented mince. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not carbonylated in chilled muscle, but an extensive MHC degradation was observed in those samples. The supplementation of catechin reduced protein oxidation and lipid oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner: control>25>100≈200ppm. Therefore, the highest catechin concentrations (100 and 200ppm) exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity. Catechin (200ppm) reduced significantly carbonylation of protein spots identified as glycogen phosphorylase, pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme, isoforms of creatine kinase. Conversely, catechin was ineffective to inhibit the oxidation of actin and UNP similar to enolase. These results draw attention to the inefficiency of catechin to prevent actin oxidation, in contrast to the extremely high efficiency of catechin in inhibiting oxidation of lipids and other proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation on phosphides and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S Ted; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2005-02-17

    The mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of 2-methylpiperidine was studied over a silica-supported nickel phosphide catalyst (Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/P = 1/2) and a commercial Ni-Mo-S/Al2O3 catalyst in a three-phase trickle-bed reactor operated at 3.1 MPa and 450-600 K. Analysis of the product distribution as a function of contact time indicated that the reaction proceeded in both cases predominantly by a substitution mechanism, with a smaller contribution of an elimination mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the 2-methylpiperidine indicated that at reaction conditions a piperidinium ion intermediate was formed on both the sulfide and the phosphide. It is concluded that the mechanism of HDN on nickel phosphide is very similar to that on sulfides. The mechanism on the nickel phosphide was also probed by comparing the reactivity of piperidine and several of its derivatives in the presence of 3000 ppm S. The relative elimination rates depended on the structure of the molecules, and followed the sequence: 4-methylpiperidine approximately piperidine > 3-methylpiperidine > 2,6-dimethylpiperidine > 2-methylpiperidine. [Chemical structure: see text] This order of reactivity was not dependent on the number of alpha-H or beta-H atoms in the molecules, ruling out their reaction through a single, simple mechanism. It is likely that the unhindered piperidine molecules reacted by an S(N)2 substitution process and the more hindered 2,6-dimethylpiperidine reacted by an E2 elimination process.

  10. New cyclic sulfides, garlicnins I2, M, N, and O, from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2018-01-01

    One atypical thiolane-type sulfide, garlicnin I 2 (1), two 3,4-dimethylthiolane-type sulfides, garlicnins M (2) and N (3), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin O (4), were isolated from the acetone extracts of Chinese garlic bulbs, Allium sativum and their structures were characterized. Hypothetical pathways for the production of the respective sulfides were discussed.

  11. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  12. Optimization of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarenko, N. N.; Masur, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electron and phonon spectra, as well as the densities of electron and phonon states of the SH3 phase and the stable orthorhombic structure of hydrogen sulfide SH2, are calculated for the pressure interval 100-225 GPa. It is found that the I4/ mmm phase can be responsible for the superconducting properties of metallic hydrogen sulfide along with the SH3 phase. Sequential stages for obtaining and conservation of the SH2 phase are proposed. The properties of two (SH2 and SH3) superconducting phases of hydrogen sulfide are compared.

  13. Process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, I.

    1981-01-01

    A process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gases utilizes iron oxide particles of unique chemical and physical properties. These particles have large surface area, and are comprised substantially of amorphous Fe 2 O 3 containing a crystalline phase of Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 and combinations thereof. In scavenging hydrogen sulfide, the iron oxide particles are suspended in a liquid which enters into intimate mixing contact with hydrocarbon gases; the hydrogen sulfide is reacted at an exceptional rate and only acid-stable reaction products are formed. Thereafter, the sweetened hydrocarbon gases are collected

  14. Sulfidization of an aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst using the 35S radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagulyants, G.V.; Greish, A.A.; Kogan, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    It has been established that in aluminocobaltomolybdenum catalyst sulfidized with elemental sulfur there are two types of sulfur, free and bound. The maximum amount of bound sulfur in ACM catalyst is 6.6 wt. %, which corresponds to practically complete sulfidation of the ACM catalyst. In the presence of hydrogen an equilibrium distribution of bound sulfur is achieved in a granule of ACM catalyst irrespective of the temperature of sulfidation. In a nitrogen atmosphere it is primarily the surface layers of the catalyst that are sulfured

  15. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO

    1991-01-01

    per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the sulfide zone....

  16. Thermoelectric properties of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, E.; Danielson, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    The lanthanum sulfides are promising candidate materials for high-efficiency thermoelectric applications at temperatures up to 1300 0 C. The nonstoichiometric lanthanum sulfides (LaS /SUB x/ , where 1.33 2 //rho/ can be chosen. The thermal conductivity remains approximately constant with stoichiometry, so a material with an optimum value of α 2 //rho/ should possess the optimum figure-of-merit. Data for the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of non-stoichiometric lanthanum sulfides is presented, together with structural properties of these materials

  17. Denitrifying sulfide removal process on high-salinity wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunshuang; Zhao, Chaocheng; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Yadong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-08-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide, and acetate into nitrogen gas, elemental sulfur (S(0)), and carbon dioxide, respectively. Sulfide- and nitrate-laden wastewaters at 2-35 g/L NaCl were treated by DSR process. A C/N ratio of 3:1 was proposed to maintain high S(0) conversion rate. The granular sludge with a compact structure and smooth outer surface was formed. The microbial communities of DSR consortium via high-throughput sequencing method suggested that salinity shifts the predominating heterotrophic denitrifiers at 10 g/L NaCl.

  18. Use of sulfide-containing liquors for removing mercury from flue gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Paul S.; Downs, William; Bailey, Ralph T.; Vecci, Stanley J.

    2006-05-02

    A method and apparatus for reducing and removing mercury in industrial gases, such as a flue gas, produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, adds sulfide ions to the flue gas as it passes through a scrubber. Ideally, the source of these sulfide ions may include at least one of: sulfidic waste water, kraft caustic liquor, kraft carbonate liquor, potassium sulfide, sodium sulfide, and thioacetamide. The sulfide ion source is introduced into the scrubbing liquor as an aqueous sulfide species. The scrubber may be either a wet or dry scrubber for flue gas desulfurization systems.

  19. Remediation of Sulfidic Wastewater by Aeration in the Presence of Ultrasonic Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ahmad

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the aerial oxidation of sodium sulfide in the presence of ultrasonic vibration is investigated. Sulfide analysis was carried out by the methylene blue method. Sodium sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur in the presence of ultrasonic vibration. The influence of air flow rate, initial sodium sulfide concentration and ultrasonic vibration intensity on the oxidation of sodium sulfide was investigated. The rate law equation regarding the oxidation of sulfide was determined from the experimental data. The order of reaction with respect to sulfide and oxygen was found to be 0.36 and 0.67 respectively. The overall reaction followed nearly first order kinetics.

  20. Influence of the Dielectric Medium on the Carbonyl Infrared Absorption Peak of Acetylferrocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. López-Linares

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The solvent effect on the position of the carbonyl vibrational stretching ofacetylferrocene in aprotic media was studied in this work. The solvent-induced shifts in thisorganometallic compound were interpreted in terms of the alternative reaction field model(SCRF-MO proposed by Kolling. In contrast to the established trends for carbonyl groupsin organic systems, the results suggest that the continuum models for the reaction field arenot adequate and that the influence of dipolarity-polarizability described by aninhomogeneous coupling function θ (ε L(n 2 that assumes optical dielectric saturation isresponsible for the carbonyl band shift and, there is empirical evidence that the effect offield-induced intermolecular interaction on band shift, interpreted in terms of the van derWaals forces from the solvent, have a important contribution to this phenomena.

  1. Coal and biomass-based chemicals via carbonylation, hydroformylation and homologation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunavala, P.D.; Raghunath, B.

    The paper emphasizes the importance of carbonylation, hydroformylation and homologation reactions in the manufacture of organic chemicals (such as acetic acid, acetic anhydride, cellulose acetate, vinyl acetate monomer, aliphatic amines, isocyanates, methanol, ethanol, n-butanol, ethylene glycol, acrylic acid, etc.) from coal and biomass feedstocks. Topics covered are: synthesis of acetic acid; manufacture of acetic anhydride; synthesis of vinyl acetate monomer by carbonylation; synthesis of aliphatic amines by hydroformylation; synthesis of organic diisocyanates; ethanol synthesis by homologation of methanol; synthesis of ethylene glycol via hydroformylation of formaldehyde; synthesis of n- butanol and n-butyraldehyde by propylene formylation; synthesis of acrylic acid; homologation reaction of carboxylic acid esters with ruthenium catalysts; and synthesis of phenyl isocyanate from nitrobenzene by reductive carbonylation. 26 refs.

  2. Effect of carbonyl iron particles composition on the physical characteristics of MR grease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad, Norzilawati, E-mail: mnorzilawati@gmail.com; Mazlan, Saiful Amri, E-mail: amri.kl@utm.my [Vehicle System Engineering, Malaysia – Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Yahya Petra (Jalan Semarak), Kuala Lumpur, 54000 (Malaysia); Ubaidillah, E-mail: ubaidillah@uns.ac.id [Vehicle System Engineering, Malaysia – Japan International Institute of Technology, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Yahya Petra (Jalan Semarak), Kuala Lumpur, 54000 (Malaysia); Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Kentingan, Surakarta, 57126, Central Java, Surakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Magnetorheological (MR) grease is an extension of the study of magnetorheological materials. The MR grease can help to reduce the particles sedimentation problem occurred in the MR fluids. Within this study, an effort has been taken to investigate the effect of different weight compositions of carbonyl iron particles on the physical and chemical characteristics of the MR grease under off-state condition (no magnetic field). The MR grease is prepared by mixing carbonyl iron particles having a size range of 1 to 10 µm with commercial NPC Highrex HD-3 grease. Characterizations of MR grease are investigated using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) and rheometer. The dependency of carbonyl iron particles weight towards the magnetic properties of MR grease and other characterizations are investigated.

  3. Highly enantioselective rhodium(I)-catalyzed carbonyl carboacylations initiated by C-C bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillart, Laetitia; Cramer, Nicolai

    2014-09-01

    The lactone motif is ubiquitous in natural products and pharmaceuticals. The Tishchenko disproportionation of two aldehydes, a carbonyl hydroacylation, is an efficient and atom-economic access to lactones. However, these reaction types are limited to the transfer of a hydride to the accepting carbonyl group. The transfer of alkyl groups enabling the formation of CC bonds during the ester formation would be of significant interest. Reported herein is such asymmetric carbonyl carboacylation of aldehydes and ketones, thus affording complex bicyclic lactones in excellent enantioselectivities. The rhodium(I)-catalyzed transformation is induced by an enantiotopic CC bond activation of a cyclobutanone and the formed rhodacyclic intermediate reacts with aldehyde or ketone groups to give highly functionalized lactones. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Stereoselective Carbonyl Olefination with Fluorosulfoximines: Facile Access to Z or E Terminal Monofluoroalkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinghe; Shen, Xiao; Ni, Chuanfa; Hu, Jinbo

    2017-01-09

    Terminal monofluoroalkenes are important structural motifs in the design of bioactive compounds, such as homeostasis regulators and mechanism-based enzyme inhibitors. However, it is difficult to control the stereoselectivity of known carbonyl olefination reactions, and olefin metathesis is limited to disubstituted terminal monofluoroalkenes. Although sulfoximines have been used extensively in organic synthesis, reports on their use in carbonyl olefination reactions have not appeared to date. Herein, we report highly stereoselective carbonyl monofluoroolefination with a fluorosulfoximine reagent. The potential of this method is demonstrated by the synthesis of MDL 72161 and by the late-stage monofluoromethylenation of complex molecules, such as haloperidol and steroid derivatives. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Enhanced sulfidation xanthate flotation of malachite using ammonium ions as activator

    OpenAIRE

    Dandan Wu; Wenhui Ma; Yingbo Mao; Jiushuai Deng; Shuming Wen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, ammonium ion was used to enhance the sulfidation flotation of malachite. The effect of ammonium ion on the sulfidation flotation of malachite was investigated using microflotation test, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, zeta potential measurements, and scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM). The results of microflotation test show that the addition of sodium sulfide and ammonium sulfate resulted in better sulfidation than the addition of sodium sulfide alone. The ...

  6. New sulfide catalysts for the hydroliquefaction of coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.P.R.; Oers, van E.M.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Prins, R.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities for the preparation of new metal sulfide catalyst systems based on carbon carriers having favourable textural and surface properties have been explored, and attention has been given to the characterization (structure) and evaluation (hydrosulfurization activity) of these catalysts. Two

  7. Formation of Copper Sulfide Precipitate in Solid Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    The growth rate of copper sulfide precipitates has been measured in low carbon steel samples such as Fe-0.3mass%Cu-0.03mass%S-0.1mass%C and Fe-0.1mass%Cu-0.01mass%S- 0.1mass%C. Heat-treatment of the samples was conducted at 1273, 1423 and 1573 K for 100 s - 14.4 ks for precipitation of copper sulfides and then the samples were observed by a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope to measure the diameter of copper sulfides precipitated in the samples. The growth rate of copper sulfide has been found to be well described by the Ostwald growth model, as follows: R\

  8. Optimization of biological sulfide removal in a CSTR bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Aliakbar; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush; Niazi, Ali; Sotoodeh, Hamidreza

    2012-08-01

    In this study, biological sulfide removal from natural gas in a continuous bioreactor is investigated for estimation of the optimal operational parameters. According to the carried out reactions, sulfide can be converted to elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, and polysulfide, of which elemental sulfur is the desired product. A mathematical model is developed and was used for investigation of the effect of various parameters on elemental sulfur selectivity. The results of the simulation show that elemental sulfur selectivity is a function of dissolved oxygen, sulfide load, pH, and concentration of bacteria. Optimal parameter values are calculated for maximum elemental sulfur selectivity by using genetic algorithm as an adaptive heuristic search. In the optimal conditions, 87.76% of sulfide loaded to the bioreactor is converted to elemental sulfur.

  9. First application of supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis for continuous methanol carbonylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Jørgensen, Betina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A solid, silica-supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) rhodium iodide Monsanto-type catalyst system, [BMIM][Rh(CO)(2)I-2]-[BMIM]I -SiO2, exhibits excellent activity and selectivity towards acetyl products in fixed-bed, continuous gas-phase methanol carbonylation.......A solid, silica-supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) rhodium iodide Monsanto-type catalyst system, [BMIM][Rh(CO)(2)I-2]-[BMIM]I -SiO2, exhibits excellent activity and selectivity towards acetyl products in fixed-bed, continuous gas-phase methanol carbonylation....

  10. Reductive coupling of carbon monoxide in a rhenium carbonyl complex with pendant Lewis acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexander J M; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2008-09-10

    Phosphinoborane ligands impart unique reactivity to a rhenium carbonyl cation relative to simple phosphine complexes. Addition of either triethylborohydride or a platinum hydride (that can be formed from H2) forms a rhenium boroxycarbene. This carbene, which crystallizes as a dimer, disproportionates over a period of days to afford the starting cation and a structurally unprecedented boroxy(boroxymethyl)carbene, in which a new C-C bond has been formed between two reduced CO ligands. This product of C-C bond formation can be independently synthesized by addition of 2 equiv of hydride to the rhenium carbonyl cation.

  11. Reaction of acid esters of methylenebis(phosphonous acid) with carbonyl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, Z.S.; Odinets, I.L.; Lutsenko, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction of methylenebis(phosphonites) containing two hydrophosphoryl groupings with aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones in the presence of alkali metal fluorides leads to methylenebis(α-hydroxyalkylphosphinates). The reaction of methylenebis(phosphonites) containing one hydrophosphoryl groupings with carbonyl compounds in the presence of alkali metal fluorides proceeds with the formation of a new type of heterocyclic phosphorus compound, viz., 1,2λ 3 ,4λ 5 -oxadiphospholanes. The reaction of acid esters of methylenebis(phosphonous) acid with carbonyl compounds in the presence of alkali metal alkoxides or a tertiary amine is accompanied by phosphinate-phosphonate rearrangement of the intermediately formed α-hydroxylalkylphosphinates

  12. Impaired cardiac SIRT1 activity by carbonyl stress contributes to aging-related ischemic intolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhu Gu

    Full Text Available Reactive aldehydes can initiate protein oxidative damage which may contribute to heart senescence. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 is considered to be a potential interventional target for I/R injury management in the elderly. We hypothesized that aldehyde mediated carbonyl stress increases susceptibility of aged hearts to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms with a focus on SIRT1. Male C57BL/6 young (4-6 mo and aged (22-24 mo mice were subjected to myocardial I/R. Cardiac aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2, SIRT1 activity and protein carbonyls were assessed. Our data revealed that aged heart exhibited increased endogenous aldehyde/carbonyl stress due to impaired ALDH2 activity concomitant with blunted SIRT1 activity (P<0.05. Exogenous toxic aldehydes (4-HNE exposure in isolated cardiomyocyte verified that aldehyde-induced carbonyl modification on SIRT1 impaired SIRT1 activity leading to worse hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R injury, which could all be rescued by Alda-1 (ALDH2 activator (all P<0.05. However, SIRT1 inhibitor blocked the protective effect of Alda-1 on H/R cardiomyocyte. Interestingly, myocardial I/R leads to higher carbonylation but lower activity of SIRT1 in aged hearts than that seen in young hearts (P<0.05. The application of Alda-1 significantly reduced the carbonylation on SIRT1 and markedly improved the tolerance to in vivo I/R injury in aged hearts, but failed to protect Sirt1(+/- knockout mice against myocardial I/R injury. This was verified by Alda-1 treatment improved postischemic contractile function recovery in ex vivo perfused aged but not in Sirt1(+/- hearts. Thus, aldehyde/carbonyl stress is accelerated in aging heart. These results provide a new insight that impaired cardiac SIRT1 activity by carbonyl stress plays a critical role in the increased susceptibility of aged heart to I/R injury. ALDH2 activation can restore this aging-related myocardial ischemic intolerance.

  13. Nicotine and Carbonyl Emissions From Popular Electronic Cigarette Products: Correlation to Liquid Composition and Design Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hellani, Ahmad; Salman, Rola; El-Hage, Rachel; Talih, Soha; Malek, Nathalie; Baalbaki, Rima; Karaoghlanian, Nareg; Nakkash, Rima; Shihadeh, Alan; Saliba, Najat A

    2018-01-05

    Available in hundreds of device designs and thousands of flavors, electronic cigarette (ECIG) may have differing toxicant emission characteristics. This study assesses nicotine and carbonyl yields in the most popular brands in the U.S. market. These products included disposable, prefilled cartridge, and tank-based ECIGs. Twenty-seven ECIG products of 10 brands were procured and their power outputs were measured. The e-liquids were characterized for pH, nicotine concentration, propylene glycol/vegetable glycerin (PG/VG) ratio, and water content. Aerosols were generated using a puffing machine and nicotine and carbonyls were, respectively, quantified using gas chromatograph and high-performance liquid chromatography. A multiregression model was used to interpret the data. Nicotine yields varied from 0.27 to 2.91 mg/15 puffs, a range corresponding to the nicotine yield of less than 1 to more than 3 combustible cigarettes. Nicotine yield was highly correlated with ECIG type and brand, liquid nicotine concentration, and PG/VG ratio, and to a lower significance with electrical power, but not with pH and water content. Carbonyls, including the carcinogen formaldehyde, were detected in all ECIG aerosols, with total carbonyl concentrations ranging from 3.72 to 48.85 µg/15 puffs. Unlike nicotine, carbonyl concentrations were mainly correlated with power. In 15 puffs, some ECIG devices emit nicotine quantities that exceed those of tobacco cigarettes. Nicotine emissions vary widely across products but carbonyl emissions showed little variations. In spite of that ECIG users are exposed to toxicologically significant levels of carbonyl compounds, especially formaldehyde. Regression analysis showed the importance of design and e-liquid characteristics as determinants of nicotine and carbonyl emissions. Periodic surveying of characteristics of ECIG products available in the marketplace is valuable for understanding population-wide changes in ECIG use patterns over time. © The

  14. Dithioacetals as an Entry to Titanium-Alkylidene Chemistry: A New and Efficient Carbonyl Olefination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, Bernhard

    1998-03-02

    Wittig, Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons, Julia-Lythgoe, Tebbe, Grubbs, and Petasis-when it comes to carbonyl olefinations, these names are familiar to all chemistry students. In the future, the name Takeda will probably have to be added to this list. His recent work on the formation of titanium-alkylidene species from dithioacetals has provided organic chemists with a remarkable method for carbonyl olefination that is generally applicable under neutral to Lewis acidic conditions. © 1998 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  15. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  16. Determination of Hydrogen Sulfide in Fermentation Broths Containing SO21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, T. E.; Sonoff, Elisabeth P.; Splittstoesser, D. F.

    1971-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of hydrogen sulfide in fermentation broths containing up to 100 μg of SO2 per ml is described. The method involves the sparging of H2S from the broth into a cadmium hydroxide absorption solution, the formation of methylene blue from the absorbed sulfide, and the measuring of this color spectrophotometrically. The use of cadmium hydroxide instead of zinc acetate, the common absorbent, substantially reduced the interference of SO2 with the analysis. PMID:5111300

  17. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation without oxygen - oxidation products and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossing, H.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation was studied in anoxic marine sediments-both in undisturbed sediment cores and in sediment slurries. The turn over of hydrogen sulfide was followed using 35 S-radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide which was injected into the sediment. However, isotope exchange reactions between the reduced sulfur compounds, in particular between elemental sulfur and hydrogen sulfide, influenced on the specific radioactivity of these pools. It was, therefore, not possible to measure the turn over rates of the reduced sulfur pools by the radiotracer technique but merely to use the radioisotope to demonstrate some of the oxidation products. Thiosulfate was one important intermediate in the anoxic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and was continuously turned over by reduction, oxidation and disproportionation. The author discusses the importance of isotope exchange and also presents the results from experiments in which both 35 S-radiolabeled elemental sulfur, radiolabeled hydrogen sulfide and radiolabeled thiosulfate were used to study the intermediates in the oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle

  18. Bioavailability and stability of mercury sulfide in Armuchee (USA) soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Su, Yi; Monts, David L.; Waggoner, Charles A.; Matta, Frank B.

    2007-01-01

    Because of the adverse effects of elemental mercury and mercury compounds upon human health, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in an on-going effort to monitor and remediate mercury-contaminated DOE sites. In order to more cost effectively implement those extensive remediation efforts, it is necessary to obtain an improved understanding of the role that mercury and mercury compounds play in the ecosystem. We have conducted pilot scale experiments to study the bioavailability of mercury sulfide in an Armuchee (eastern US ) soil. The effects of plants and incubation time on chemical stability and bioavailability of HgS under simulated conditions of the ecosystem have been examined, as has the dynamics of the dissolution of mercury sulfide by various extractants. The results show that mercury sulfide in contaminated Armuchee soil was still to some extent bioavailable to plants. After planting, soil mercury sulfide is more easily dissolved by both 4 M and 12 M nitric acid than pure mercury sulfide reagent. Dissolution kinetics of soil mercury sulfide and pure chemical reagent by nitric acid are different. Mercury release by EDTA from HgS-contaminated soil increased with time of reaction and soil mercury level. Chelating chemicals increase the solubility and bioavailability of mercury in HgS-contaminated soil. (authors)

  19. Laser cleaning of sulfide scale on compressor impeller blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Q.H.; Zhou, D.; Wang, Y.L.; Liu, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of sulfide layers and fluence values on the mechanism of laser cleaning were experimentally established. • The specimen surface with sulfide scale becomes slightly smoother than that before laser cleaning. • The mechanism of laser cleaning the sulfide scale of stainless steel is spallation without oxidization. • It would avoid chemical waste and dust pollution using a fiber laser instead of using nitric acids or sandblasting. - Abstract: Sulfide scale on the surface of a compressor impeller blade can considerably reduce the impeller performance and its service life. To prepare for subsequent remanufacturing, such as plasma spraying, it needs to be removed completely. In the corrosion process on an FV(520)B stainless steel, sulfide scale is divided into two layers because of different outward diffusion rates of Cr, Ni and Fe. In this paper, the cleaning threshold values of the upper and inner layers and the damage threshold value of the substrate were investigated using a pulsed fiber laser. To obtain experimental evidence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D surface profilometry were employed to investigate the two kinds of sulfide layers on specimens before, during, and after laser cleaning.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3  7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiological behavior of hydrogen sulfide in rice plant. Part 5. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on respiration of rice roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okajima, H; Takagi, S

    1955-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of hydrogen sulfide on the respiration of rice plant roots were investigated using Warburg's manometory technique. Hydrogen sulfide inhibited not only aerobic respiration but anaerobic respiration process of roots. Inhibitory action of hydrogen sulfide and potassium cyanide on the respiration were apparently reversible, but the style of recovery reaction from inhibition was somewhat different in each case. Oxygen consumption of roots was increased by addition of ammonium salts, but the same effects were not recognized by the addition of any other salt examined (except nitrate salts). There was close relationship between respiration of roots and assimilation of nitrogen by roots. The increased oxygen uptake by addition of ammonium salt was also inhibited by hydrogen sulfide. The reactivation of this reaction occurred with the recovery of endogenous respiration of roots. 19 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Thiosulfate leaching of gold from sulfide wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block-Bolten, A.; Torma, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    The kinetics of gold extraction from lead-zinc sulfide flotation tailings by thiosulfate leachants has been investigated. The order of reaction as well as the overall reaction rate constant were, with respect to thiosulfate concentration, calculated to be n=0.75 and k=1.05 x 10/sup -6/ mol/sup 1/4/ dm/sup 5/4/ min/sup -1/. The apparent activation energy was found to be ..delta..E/sub a/=48.53 kJ and the frequency factor A=7.5 x 10/sup 2/ mol dm/sup -3/ min/sup -1/. This activation energy value suggests chemical control of the reaction mechanism. Optimum leach temperature of 50/sup 0/C was established. Gold extractions as high as 99% have been realized in two step countercurrent leachings. Change in pH throughout the leaching process was found to be an excellent indicator for the progress of the extraction. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process is given.

  3. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  4. Comparison of Carbon XANES Spectra from an Iron Sulfide from Comet Wild 2 with an Iron Sulfide Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Sanford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, Nakamura K.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among one of the first particles removed from the aerogel collector from the Stardust sample return mission was an approx. 5 micron sized iron sulfide. The majority of the spectra from 5 different sections of this particle suggests the presence of aliphatic compounds. Due to the heat of capture in the aerogel we initially assumed these aliphatic compounds were not cometary but after comparing these results to a heated iron sulfide interplanetary dust particle (IDP) we believe our initial interpretation of these spectra was not correct. It has been suggested that ice coating on iron sulfides leads to aqueous alteration in IDP clusters which can then lead to the formation of complex organic compounds from unprocessed organics in the IDPs similar to unprocessed organics found in comets [1]. Iron sulfides have been demonstrated to not only transform halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons but also enhance the bonding of rubber to steel [2,3]. Bromfield and Coville (1997) demonstrated using Xray photoelectron spectroscopy that "the surface enhancement of segregated sulfur to the surface of sulfided precipitated iron catalysts facilitates the formation of a low-dimensional structure of extraordinary properties" [4]. It may be that the iron sulfide acts in some way to protect aliphatic compounds from alteration due to heat.

  5. Ketene as a Reaction Intermediate in the Carbonylation of Dimethyl Ether to Methyl Acetate over Mordenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Temel, Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented insight into the carbonylation of dimethyl ether over Mordenite is provided through the identification of ketene (CH2CO) as a reaction intermediate. The formation of ketene is predicted by detailed DFT calculations and verified experimentally by the observation of doubly deuterated ...

  6. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J.; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple...

  7. Femtosecond Fluorescence and Intersystem Crossing in Rhenium(I) Carbonyl-Bipyridine Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cannizzo, A.; Blanco-Rodríguez, A. M.; Nahhas, A. E.; Šebera, Jakub; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček, Antonín; Chergui, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 28 (2008), s. 8967-8974 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : rhenium(I) * carbonyl-bipyridine * intersystem crossing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 8.091, year: 2008

  8. Formation and emissions of carbonyls during and following gas-phase ozonation of indoor materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poppendieck, D.G.; Hubbard, H.F.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    at concentrations of 1000 ppm in the inlet stream of experimental chambers. Fifteen target carbonyls were selected and measured as building ozonation by-products (BOBPs). During the 36 h that include the 16 h ozonation and 20 h persistence phase, the total BOBP mass released from flooring and wall coverings ranged...

  9. First application of supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis for continuous methanol carbonylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisager, Anders; Jørgensen, Betina; Wasserscheid, Peter; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2006-03-07

    A solid, silica-supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) rhodium iodide Monsanto-type catalyst system, [BMIM][Rh(CO)2I2]-[BMIM]I-SiO2, exhibits excellent activity and selectivity towards acetyl products in fixed-bed, continuous gas-phase methanol carbonylation.

  10. Unsuitability of using the DNPH-coated solid sorbent cartridge for determination of airborne unsaturated carbonyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, K. F.; Liu, W. D.; Lee, S. C.; Dai, W. T.; Cao, J. J.; Ip, H. S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of aldehydes and ketones are typically conducted by derivatization using sorbent cartridges coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The collected samples are eluted with acetonitrile and analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with an ultra-violet detector (HPLC/UV). This paper intends to examine artifacts about its suitability in identification of unsaturated carbonyls. Kinetic tests for acrolein, crotonaldehyde, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) showed formations of carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone during sampling, which could further react with DNPH, resulting in undesired UV absorption products [e.g., carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone-DNPH (dimer) and 2(carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone)-DNPH (trimer)]. The dimerization and trimerization occurred for acrolein and MVK whereas only dimerization for crotonaldehyde and methacrolein. The polymerization products undoubtedly affect the integrity of the chromatogram, leading to misidentification and inaccurate quantification. Whether precautions taken during sampling and/or sample treatment could avoid or minimize this artifact has not been thoughtfully investigated. More often, such artifacts are usually overlooked by scientists when the data are reported.

  11. Antioxidative potential of Perna viridis and its protective role against ROS induced lipidperoxidation and protein carbonyl

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jena, K.B.; Jagtap, T.G.; Verlecar, X.N.

    ) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH•), and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (LPX) and protein carbonyl (PC). The scavenging activity of DPPH radical, H sub(2) O sub(2) and OH• radicals increased in dose dependent manner. The reducing power...

  12. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  13. [1,3-Bis(diphenyl-phosphino)pentane-κP,P']tetra-carbonyl-chromium(0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawkataly, Omar Bin; Thangadurai, Daniel T; Pankhi, Mohd Aslam A; Shahinoor Dulal Islam, S M; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2009-02-04

    In the title compound, [Cr(C(29)H(30)P(2))(CO)(4)], the Cr atom is octa-hedrally coordinated by four carbonyl ligands and one bidentate phosphine ligand, which is bounded as a chelate in a cis position. The average Cr-P and Cr-C bond lengths are 2.377 and 1.865 Å, respectively.

  14. Mechanism of stimulation of endogenous fermentation in yeast by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noshiro, A.; Purwin, C.; Laux, M.; Nicolaij, K.; Scheffers, W.A.; Holzer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Addition of the uncoupler and protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to starved yeast cells starts endogenous alcoholic fermentation lasting about 20 min. Hexose 6-phosphates, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, and pyruvate accumulate in less than 2 min after addition of CCCP from

  15. Efficient Conversion of Oximes to the Corresponding Carbonyl Compounds with Tetrabutylammonium Chromate under Aprotic Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourali, Ali Reza; Goli, Arezou

    2006-01-01

    The solubility in several solvents, mildness, simple work-up and absence of side reactions provide advantages of using TBAC in deoximation reactions. This is an efficient and selective method for homogeneous deoximation of structurally different compounds under the moderately acidic and aprotic conditions in high yields. Regeneration of ketones and aldehydes from their oximes has assumed added importance since the discovery of the Barton reaction in which oximes are produced at non-activated hydrocarbon sites. Also, their synthesis from non-carbonyl compounds, such as by nitrosation of an active methylene group, nitrosation of an α-halo carbonyl compound and condensation of a nitro-alkene with an aldehyde provides a valid alternative pathway to carbonyl compounds. Therefore, there has been a continued interest in the effective regeneration of carbonyl compounds from the corresponding oximes especially under mild conditions. Oxidative and reductive methods have been found to show advantages over the classical hydrolytic methods. Although many oxidizing agents have been used, only a limited number of methods are efficient because of the low solubility of these metallic reagents in most organic solvents

  16. Iron Dextran treatment does not induce serum protein carbonyls in the newborn pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of serum proteins can lead to carbonyl formation which alters their function and is often associated with stress-related diseases. Since it is recommended that all pigs reared in modern production facilities be given supplemental iron at birth to prevent anemia, and metals can catalyze th...

  17. Weak carbonyl-methyl intermolecular interactions in acetone clusters explored by IR plus VUV spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Jiwen; Hu, Yongjun; Xie, Min; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The carbonyl overtone of acetone clusters is observed by IR-VUV spectroscopy. ► Acetone molecules in the dimer are stacked with an antiparallel way. ► The structure of the acetone trimer and the tetramer are the cyclic structures. ► The carbonyl groups would interact with the methyl groups in acetone clusters. ► These weak interactions are further confirmed by H/D substitution experiment. -- Abstract: Size-selected IR–VUV spectroscopy is employed to detect vibrational characteristics in the region 2850 ∼ 3550 cm −1 of neutral acetone and its clusters (CH 3 COCH 3 ) n (n = 1–4). Features around 3440 cm −1 in the spectra of acetone monomer and its clusters are assigned to the carbonyl stretch (CO) overtone. These features red-shift from 3455 to 3433 cm −1 as the size of the clusters increases from the monomer to the tetramer. Based on calculations, the experimental IR spectra in the C=O overtone region suggest that the dominant structures for the acetone trimer and tetramer should be cyclic in the supersonic expansion sample. This study also suggests that the carbonyl groups interact with the methyl groups in the acetone clusters. These weak interactions are further confirmed by the use of deuterium substitution.

  18. Effect of carotenoid structure on excited-state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chábera, P.; Fuciman, M.; Hříbek, P.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2009), s. 8795-8703 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : excited-state dynamics * carbonyl carotenoids * femtosecond spectroscopy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.116, year: 2009

  19. Ruthenium(II) carbonyl compounds with the 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Rajendhraprasad; Haukka, Matti

    2017-04-01

    Two ruthenium carbonyl complexes with the 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine ligand (tpy-Cl, C 15 H 10 ClN 3 ), i.e. [RuCl(tpy-Cl)(CO) 2 ][RuCl 3 (CO) 3 ] (I) [systematic name: cis -di-carbonyl-chlorido(4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-κ 3 N )ruthenium(II) fac -tricarbonyltri-chlorido-ruthenate(II)], and [RuCl 2 (tpy-Cl)(CO) 2 ] (II) [ cis -dicarbonyl- trans -di-chlorido(4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-κ 2 N 1 , N 1' )ruthenium(II)], were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Ru II atoms in both centrosymmetric structures (I) and (II) display similar, slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination spheres. The coordination sphere in the complex cation in compound (I) is defined by three N atoms of the tridentate tpy-Cl ligand, two carbonyl carbon atoms and one chlorido ligand; the charge is balanced by an octa-hedral [Ru(CO) 3 Cl 3 ] - counter-anion. In the neutral compound (II), the tpy-Cl ligand coordinates to the metal only through two of its N atoms. The coordination sphere of the Ru II atom is completed by two carbonyl and two chlorido ligands. In the crystal structures of both (I) and (II), weak C-H⋯Cl inter-actions are observed.

  20. Proteomic and carbonylation profile analysis of rat skeletal muscles following acute swimming exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Magherini

    Full Text Available Previous studies by us and other groups characterized protein expression variation following long-term moderate training, whereas the effects of single bursts of exercise are less known. Making use of a proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of acute swimming exercise (ASE on protein expression and carbonylation patterns in two hind limb muscles: the Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL and the Soleus, mostly composed of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibres, respectively. Carbonylation is one of the most common oxidative modifications of proteins and a marker of oxidative stress. In fact, several studies suggest that physical activity and the consequent increase in oxygen consumption can lead to increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS production, hence the interest in examining the impact of RONS on skeletal muscle proteins following ASE. Results indicate that protein expression is unaffected by ASE in both muscle types. Unexpectedly, the protein carbonylation level was reduced following ASE. In particular, the analysis found 31 and 5 spots, in Soleus and EDL muscles respectively, whose carbonylation is reduced after ASE. Lipid peroxidation levels in Soleus were markedly reduced as well. Most of the decarbonylated proteins are involved either in the regulation of muscle contractions or in the regulation of energy metabolism. A number of hypotheses may be advanced to account for such results, which will be addressed in future studies.

  1. Adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Qicheng; Wen, Shuming; Zhao, Wenjuan; Deng, Jiushuai; Xian, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new discussion on the lead sulfide species is introduced. • The Na_2S concentration determines cerussite sulfidization. • The activity of lead sulfide species also determines cerussite sulfidization. • Disulfide and polysulfide in lead sulfide species affect its activity. - Abstract: The adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, micro-flotation tests, and surface adsorption experiments. The XPS analysis results indicated that lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface after treatment by Na_2S, and the increase in the Na_2S concentration was beneficial for sulfidization. In addition to the content of lead sulfide species, its activity, which was determined by the proportion of sulfide, disulfide and polysulfide, also played an important role in cerussite sulfidization. Micro-flotation tests results demonstrated that insufficient or excessive addition of Na_2S in pulp solutions has detrimental effects on flotation performance, which was attributed to the dosage of Na_2S and the activity of lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface. Surface adsorption experiments of sulfide ions determined the residual S concentrations in pulp solutions and provided a quantitative illustration for the inhibition of cerussite flotation by excessive sulfide ions. Moreover, it also revealed that sulfide ions in the pulp solution were transformed onto the mineral surface and formed lead sulfide species. These results showed that both of lead sulfide species and its activity acted as an important role in sulfidization flotation process of cerussite.

  2. Adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Qicheng [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Wen, Shuming, E-mail: fqckmust@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhao, Wenjuan [Kunming Metallurgical Research Institute, Kunming 650031 (China); Deng, Jiushuai; Xian, Yongjun [State Key Laboratory of Complex Nonferrous Metal Resources Clean Utilization, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Land Resource Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new discussion on the lead sulfide species is introduced. • The Na{sub 2}S concentration determines cerussite sulfidization. • The activity of lead sulfide species also determines cerussite sulfidization. • Disulfide and polysulfide in lead sulfide species affect its activity. - Abstract: The adsorption of sulfide ions on cerussite surfaces and implications for flotation were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, micro-flotation tests, and surface adsorption experiments. The XPS analysis results indicated that lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface after treatment by Na{sub 2}S, and the increase in the Na{sub 2}S concentration was beneficial for sulfidization. In addition to the content of lead sulfide species, its activity, which was determined by the proportion of sulfide, disulfide and polysulfide, also played an important role in cerussite sulfidization. Micro-flotation tests results demonstrated that insufficient or excessive addition of Na{sub 2}S in pulp solutions has detrimental effects on flotation performance, which was attributed to the dosage of Na{sub 2}S and the activity of lead sulfide species formed on the mineral surface. Surface adsorption experiments of sulfide ions determined the residual S concentrations in pulp solutions and provided a quantitative illustration for the inhibition of cerussite flotation by excessive sulfide ions. Moreover, it also revealed that sulfide ions in the pulp solution were transformed onto the mineral surface and formed lead sulfide species. These results showed that both of lead sulfide species and its activity acted as an important role in sulfidization flotation process of cerussite.

  3. Chemical and colloidal aspects of collectorless flotation behavior of sulfide and non-sulfide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Sajjad; Mousavinezhad, Seyed Kamal; Gharabaghi, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Flotation has been widely used for separation of valuable minerals from gangues based on their surface characterizations and differences in hydrophobicity on mineral surfaces. As hydrophobicity of minerals widely differs from each other, their separation by flotation will become easier. Collectors are chemical materials which are supposed to make selectively valuable minerals hydrophobic. In addition, there are some minerals which based on their surface and structural features are intrinsically hydrophobic. However, their hydrophobicities are not strong enough to be floatable in the flotation cell without collectors such as sulfide minerals, coal, stibnite, and so forth. To float these minerals in a flotation cell, their hydrophobicity should be increased in specific conditions. Various parameters including pH, Eh, size distribution, mill types, mineral types, ore characterization, and type of reaction in flotation cells affect the hydrophobicity of minerals. Surface analysis results show that when sulfide minerals experience specific flotation conditions, the reactions on the surface of these minerals increase the amount of sulfur on the surface. These phenomenons improve the hydrophobicity of these minerals due to strong hydrophobic feature of sulfurs. Collectorless flotation reduces chemical material consumption amount, increases flotation selectivity (grade increases), and affects the equipment quantities; however, it can also have negative effects. Some minerals with poor surface floatability can be increased by adding some ions to the flotation system. Depressing undesirable minerals in flotation is another application of collectorless flotation.

  4. Silver sulfide nanoparticle assembly obtained by reacting an assembled silver nanoparticle template with hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Nuhfer, Noel T; Moussa, Laura; Morris, Hannah R; Whitmore, Paul M

    2008-11-12

    A fast, simple procedure is described for obtaining an assembly of silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag(2)S NPs) on a glass substrate through reaction of a template of an assembled layer of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) gas. The Ag NP template was prepared by assembling a monolayer of spherical Ag NPs (mean diameter of 7.4 nm) on a polyethylenimine-treated glass substrate. Exposure to pure H(2)S for 10 min converted the Ag NPs of the template to Ag(2)S NPs. The resulting Ag(2)S NP assembly, which retains the template nanostructure and particle distribution, was characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning high resolution TEM, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ag(2)S NPs have a crystal structure of monoclinic acanthite, and while they retained the spherical shape of the original Ag NPs, their mean particle size increased to 8.4 nm due to changes to the crystal structure when the Ag NPs are converted into Ag(2)S NPs. The measured optical absorption edge of the Ag(2)S NP assembly indicated an indirect interband transition with a band gap energy of 1.71 eV. The Ag(2)S NP assembly absorbed light with wavelengths below 725 nm, and the absorbance increased monotonically toward the UV region.

  5. Gas-phase chemistry of Mo, Ru, W, and Os metal carbonyl complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Qin, Z.; Fan, F.L.

    2014-01-01

    Metal carbonyl complexes were used for studying the gas-phase chemical behavior of Mo, Ru, W and Os isotopes with an on-line low temperature isothermal gas chromatography apparatus. Short-lived Mo and Ru isotopes were produced by a 252 Cf spontaneous fission source. Short-lived nuclides of W and Os were produced using the heavy ion reactions 19 F + 159 Tb and 165 Ho, respectively. Short-lived products were thermalized in a recoil chamber filled with a gas mixture of helium and carbon monoxide. The carbonyls formed were then transported through capillaries to an isothermal chromatography column for study of the adsorption behavior as a function of temperature. On-line isothermal chromatography (IC) experiments on Teflon (PTFE) and quartz surfaces showed that short-lived isotopes of the listed elements can form carbonyl complexes which are very volatile and interact most likely in physical sorption processes. Deduced adsorption enthalpies of Mo and Ru carbonyls were -38 ± 2 kJ/mol and -36 ± 2 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in good agreement with literature data, partly obtained with different chromatographic techniques. A validation of the applied Monte Carlo model to deduce adsorption enthalpies with Mo isotopes of different half-lives proved the validity of the underlying adsorption model. The investigations using a gas-jet system coupled to a heavy ion accelerator without any preseparator clearly showed the limitations of the approach. The He and CO gas mixture, which was directly added into the chamber, will result in decomposition of CO gas and produce some aerosol particles. After the experiment of 173 W and 179 Os in the heavy ion experiments, the Teflon column was covered by a yellowish deposit; the adsorption enthalpy of W and Os carbonyls could therefore not be properly deduced using Monte Carlo simulations. (orig.)

  6. Protein carbonyl content: a novel biomarker for aging in HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolgiri, Vaishali; Patil, Vinayak Wamanrao

    The major complications of "treated" Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are cardiovascular disease, malignancy, renal disease, liver disease, bone disease, and perhaps neurological complications, which are phenomena of the normal aging process occurring at an earlier age in the HIV-infected population. The present study is aimed to explore protein carbonyl content as a biomarker for detecting oxidative DNA damage induced ART toxicity and/or accelerated aging in HIV/AIDS patients. To investigate the potential of carbonyl content as a biomarker for detecting oxidative Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage induced Antiretroviral Theraphy (ART) toxicity and/or accelerated aging in HIV/AIDS patients. In this case-control study a total 600 subjects were included. All subjects were randomly selected and grouped as HIV-negative (control group) (n=300), HIV-infected ART naive (n=100), HIV-infected on first line ART (n=100), and HIV-infected on second line ART (n=100). Seronegative control subjects were age- and sex-matched with the ART naive patients and the two other groups. Carbonyl protein was determined by the method described in Levine et al. DNA damage marker 8-OH-dG was determined using 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy Guanosine StressXpress ELA Kit by StressMarq Biosciences. Protein carbonyl content levels and oxidative DNA damage were significantly higher (paging in HIV/AIDS patients. Larger studies are warranted to elucidate the role of carbonyl content as a biomarker for premature aging in HIV/AIDS patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation mechanism of ammonium ions on sulfidation of malachite (-201) surface by DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Mao, Yingbo; Deng, Jiushuai; Wen, Shuming

    2017-07-01

    The activation mechanism of ammonium ions on the sulfidation of malachite (-201) was determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Results of DFT calculations indicated that interlayer sulfidation occurs during the sulfidation process of malachite (-201). The absorption of both the ammonium ion and sulfide ion on the malachite (-201) surface is stronger than that of sulfur ion. After sulfidation was activated with ammonium ion, the Cu 3d orbital peak is closer to the Fermi level and characterized by a stronger peak value. Therefore, the addition of ammonium ions activated the sulfidation of malachite (-201), thereby improving the flotation performance.

  8. Cuprous sulfide as a film insulation for superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, G.R.; Uphoff, J.H.; Vecchio, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    The LCP test coil utilizes a conductor of forced-flow design having 486 strands of multifilametary Nb 3 Sn compacted in a stainless steel sheath. The impetus for the work reported here stemmed from the need for some form of insulation for those strands to prevent sintering during reaction and to reduce ac losses. The work reported here experimented with cuprous sulfide coatings at various coating rates and thicknesses. Two solenoids that were wound with cuprous sulfide-coated wires and heat-treated at 700 degrees C were found to demonstrate that the film is effective in providing turn-to-turn insulation for less than about 0.5V between turns. The sulfide layer provided a metal-semiconductor junction which became conducting at roughly 0.5V. Repeated cycling of the coil voltage in excess of that value produced no damage to the sulfide layer. The junction provided self-protection for the coil as long as the upper allowable current density in the sulfide was not exceeded. No training was apparent up to 6.4 T

  9. Sulfide Species Optical Monitoring by a Miniaturized Silicon Photomultiplier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Petralia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of water-soluble pollutants is receiving a growing interest from the scientific community. In this context, sulfide anion species S2− and HS− are particularly relevant since they can cause acute and chronic toxicity including neurological effects and at high concentrations, even death. In this study, a new strategy for fast and sensitive optical detection of sulfide species in water samples is described. The method uses an integrated silicon photomultiplier (SiPM device coupled with the appropriate analytical strategy applied in a plastic microchip with dried reagents on board. More specifically, all sulfide species (H2S, HS− and S2− in water samples are detected by the fluorescence signal emitted upon the reaction with N,N-dimethyl-phenylenediamine sulfate in the presence of Fe3+, leading to the formation of the fluorescent methylene blue (MB species. It has been proven that the system herein proposed is able to measure sulfide concentration in a linear range from 0–10 mg L−1 with a sensitivity value of about 6.7 µA mg−1 L and a detection limit of 0.5 mg L−1. A comparison with conventional UV-Vis detection method has been also carried out. Data show a very good linear correlation (R2 = 0.98093, proving the effectiveness of the method. Results pave the way toward the development of portable and low-cost device systems for water-soluble sulfide pollutants.

  10. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate under denitrifying sulfide removal condition: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xijun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Wanqian; Zhou, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: djlee@ntu.edu.tw [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ren, Nanqi, E-mail: rnq@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Model evaluation applied to case study 1: (A-G) S{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N, NO{sub 2}{sup −}-N, and Ac{sup −}-C profiles under initial sulfide concentrations of 156.2 (A), 539 (B), 964 (C), 1490 (D), 342.7 (E), 718 (F), and 1140.7 (G) mg L{sup −1}. The solid line represents simulated result and scatter represents experimental result. -- Highlights: • This work developed a mathematical model for DSR process. • Kinetics of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between denitrifiers were studied. • Kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting. • The model described kinetic behaviors of DSR processes over wide parametric range. -- Abstract: Simultaneous removal of sulfide (S{sup 2−}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and acetate (Ac{sup −}) under denitrifying sulfide removal process (DSR) is a novel biological wastewater treatment process. This work developed a mathematical model to describe the kinetic behavior of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between autotrophic denitrifiers and heterotrophic denitrifiers. The kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting considering the effects of initial S{sup 2−} concentration, S{sup 2−}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio and Ac{sup −}-C/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio. Simulation supported that the heterotrophic denitratation step (NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction to NO{sub 2}{sup −}) was inhibited by S{sup 2−} compared with the denitritation step (NO{sub 2}{sup −} reduction to N{sub 2}). Also, the S{sup 2−} oxidation by autotrophic denitrifiers was shown two times lower in rate with NO{sub 2}{sup −} as electron acceptor than that with NO{sub 3}{sup −} as electron acceptor. NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction by autotrophic denitrifiers occurs 3–10 times slower when S{sup 0} participates as final electron donor compared to the S{sup 2−}-driven pathway. Model simulation on continuous-flow DSR reactor suggested that the adjustment of

  11. Characterization of hydrocarbons, halocarbons and carbonyls in the atmosphere of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Lee, S C; Louie, P K K; Ho, K F

    2004-12-01

    Ambient air quality measurements of 156 species including 39 alkanes, 32 alkenes, 2 alkynes, 24 aromatic hydrocarbons, 43 halocarbons and 16 carbonyls, were carried out for 120 air samples collected at two sampling stations (CW and TW) in 2001 throughout Hong Kong. Spatial variations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere were investigated. Levels of most alkanes and alkenes at TW site were higher than that at the CW site, while the BTEX concentrations at the two sites were close. The BTEX ratios at CW and TW were 1.6:10.1:1.0:1.6 and 2.1:10.8:1.0:2.0, respectively. For major halogenated hydrocarbons, the mean concentrations of chloromethane, CFCs 12 and 22 did not show spatial variations at the two sites. However, site-specific differences were observed for trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene. Furthermore, there were no significant differences for carbonyls such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone between the two sites. The levels of selected hydrocarbons in winter were 1-5 times that in summer. There were no common seasonal trends for carbonyls in Hong Kong. The ambient level of formaldehyde, the most abundant carbonyl, was higher in summer. However, levels of acetaldehyde, acetone and benzaldehyde in winter were 1.6-3.8 times that in summer. The levels of CFCs 11 and 12, and chloromethane in summer were higher than that in winter. Strong correlation of most hydrocarbons with propene and n-butane suggested that the primary contributors of hydrocarbons were vehicular emissions in Hong Kong. In addition, gasoline evaporation, use of solvents, leakage of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), natural gas leakage and other industrial emissions, and even biogenic emissions affected the ambient levels of hydrocarbons. The sources of halocarbons were mainly materials used in industrial processes and as solvents. Correlation analysis suggested that photochemical reactions made significant contributions to the ambient levels of carbonyls in summer whereas

  12. Separation of platinum metals by theirs extraction as sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Ryabushko, O.P.; Ty Van Mak

    1978-01-01

    Separation of platinum metals by means of their sediment in the form of sulfides with subsequent extraction is studied. The optimum conditions of metal sulfide extraction are determined, the metal output dependence from acidness and aqueous phase composition and also the organic solvent nature are investigated. Ruthenium concentration was determined photometrically. Ruthenium sulfide is extracted by butyl spirit from 1-4 normal hydrochloric acid. The maximum extraction grade of 63% is reached in 3.2-normal acid. When the mixture of acetic and hydrochloric acids (2:1) is used for decomposition of ruthenium tiosalts, the grade of ruthenium extraction by amyl spirit or the mixture of anyl and butyl spirits (1:1) constitutes 100%

  13. Metal sulfide electrodes and energy storage devices thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Woodford, William Henry; Li, Zheng; Carter, W. Craig

    2017-02-28

    The present invention generally relates to energy storage devices, and to metal sulfide energy storage devices in particular. Some aspects of the invention relate to energy storage devices comprising at least one flowable electrode, wherein the flowable electrode comprises an electroactive metal sulfide material suspended and/or dissolved in a carrier fluid. In some embodiments, the flowable electrode further comprises a plurality of electronically conductive particles suspended and/or dissolved in the carrier fluid, wherein the electronically conductive particles form a percolating conductive network. An energy storage device comprising a flowable electrode comprising a metal sulfide electroactive material and a percolating conductive network may advantageously exhibit, upon reversible cycling, higher energy densities and specific capacities than conventional energy storage devices.

  14. Preparation of transition metal sulfide nanoparticles via hydrothermal route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei-Ling, P.; Chin-Hua, C.; Sarani Zakaria; Tze-Khong, L.; Mohd Ambar Yarmo; Nay-Ming, H.

    2010-01-01

    Nano sized copper sulfide, iron sulfide and molybdenum sulfide were successfully synthesised via a simple hydrothermal method. Sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na 2 S 2 O 3 ·5H 2 O) and hydroxylamine sulfate ((H 3 NO) 2 ·H 2 SO 4 ) were used as the starting materials and reacted with the transition metal source at 200 degree Celsius for 90 min. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Spherical shape CuS and FeS 2 nanoparticles with high crystallinity were successfully produced. The transmission electron micrographs revealed the well-dispersibility of the produced nanoparticles. Scanning electron micrograph showed the MoS 2 nanoparticles possessed a spherical shape with sheet-like structure covering on the outer surface of the particles. (author)

  15. Conspicuous veils formed by vibrioid bacteria on sulfidic marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    , but the bacteria have so far not been isolated in pure culture, and a detailed characterization of their metabolism is still lacking. The bacteria are colorless, gram-negative, and vibrioid-shaped (1.3- to 2.5- by 4- to 10-µm) cells that multiply by binary division and contain several spherical inclusions of poly......We describe the morphology and behavior of a hitherto unknown bacterial species that forms conspicuous veils (typical dimensions, 30 by 30 mm) on sulfidic marine sediment. The new bacteria were enriched on complex sulfidic medium within a benthic gradient chamber in oxygen-sulfide countergradients......, forming a cohesive whitish veil at the oxic-anoxic interface. Bacteria attached to the veil kept rotating and adapted their stalk lengths dynamically to changing oxygen concentrations. The joint action of rotating bacteria on the veil induced a homogeneous water flow from the oxic water region toward...

  16. Study of radiation synovectomy using 188Re-sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gang; Li Peiyong; Jiang Xufeng; Zhang Liying; Wang Xuefeng; Sun Zhenming; Zhang Huan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the radiation synovectomy with 188 Re-sulfide. Methods: Thirty cases were divided into 2 groups, the group with hemophilia and the group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with joint synovitis were injected different doses of 188 Re-sulfide, 222 - 444 MBq intra-articular. MRI was taken before and 3 - 6 months after the radiation synovectomy to evaluate the treatment efficacy, and the symptoms were also evaluated. Results: MRI study showed that after the treatment the synovium became thiner and the edema was reduced in the lesioned joint. The symptoms were improved with the pain relieved and duration of intra-articular hemorrhage reduced. Conclusions: Radiation synovectomy using 188 Re-sulfide has effects on synovitis. It can be used clinically to improve the symptoms of joint synovitis and reduce the duration of intra-articular hemorrhage

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AT CARBON NANOTUBE MODIFIED ELECTRODES. (R830900)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibiting a strong and stable electrocatalytic response towards sulfide are described. A substantial (400 mV) decrease in the overvoltage of the sulfide oxidation reaction (compared to ordinary carbon electrodes) is...

  18. Vegetation successfully prevents oxidization of sulfide minerals in mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-07-15

    The oxidization of metal sulfide in tailings causes acid mine drainage. However, it remains unclear whether vegetation prevents the oxidization of metal sulfides. The oxidization characteristics and microbial indices of the tailings in the presence of various plant species were investigated to explore the effects of vegetation on the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. The pH, reducing sulfur, free iron oxides (Fed), chemical oxygen consumption (COC) and biological oxygen consumption (BOC) were measured. Key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum spp. and Thiobacillus spp.) were quantified using real-time PCR. The results indicate that vegetation growing on tailings can effectively prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. A higher pH and reducing-sulfur content and lower Fed were observed in the 0-30 cm depth interval in the presence of vegetation compared to bare tailings (BT). The COC gradually decreased with depth in all of the soil profiles; specifically, the COC rapidly decreased in the 10-20 cm interval in the presence of vegetation but gradually decreased in the BT profiles. Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanoides (CZ) profiles contained the highest BOC in the 10-20 cm interval. The abundance of key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the vegetated tailings were significantly lower than in the BT; in particular, IC was associated with the lowest iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial abundance. In conclusion, vegetation successfully prevented the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the tailings, and Imperata cylindrica is the most effective in reducing the number of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and helped to prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental constraints on gold and silver solubility in iron sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' yanova, Galina [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Mikhlin, Yuri [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, 50/24, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation); Kokh, Konstantin, E-mail: k.a.kokh@gmail.com [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Siberian Physical–Technical Institute of Tomsk State University, 1, Novosobornaya, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Karmanov, Nick [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Seryotkin, Yurii [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3, Koptyuga, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Russia, 2, Pirogova, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were performed to determine crystallization of Fe,S-melts (pyriti≿ and troilitic with molar ratio S/Fe ratios of 2 and 1, respectively) containing traces of gold and silver at (Ag/Au){sub wt} ratios varying from 10 to 0.1. The solid products were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), microprobe analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to reveal the concentration limits of “invisible” gold and silver in magmatic iron sulfides, and to determine the influence of sulfur on forms of precious metals in the Fe–S system with different Ag/Au ratios. Au–Ag phases do not form inclusions but instead concentrate on the grain boundaries in the synthetic pyrrhotite and troilite, while pyrite comprises micro- (1–5 μm) and macroinclusions of Au–Ag alloys and Au–Ag sulfides. In “pyriti≿” systems, the fineness of alloys increases from 650 to 970‰ and the composition of sulfides changes from acanthite (Ag{sub 2}S) to uytenbogaardtite (Ag{sub 3}AuS{sub 2}) and petrovskaite (AgAuS) as the Ag/Au ratio decreases. The concentrations of “invisible” precious metals revealed in troilite were 0.040 ± 0.013 wt.% Au and 0.079 ± 0.016 wt.% Ag. Measured concentrations in pyrite and pyrrhotite were <0.024 wt.% Au and <0.030 wt.% Ag. The surface layers of iron sulfides probed with XPS were enriched in the precious metals, and in silver relative to gold, especially in the systems with Fe/S = 1, probably, due to depletion of the metallic alloy surfaces with gold. Au- and Ag-bearing iron sulfides crystallized primarily from melts may be the source of redeposited phases in hydrothermal and hypergene processes. - Highlights: • The samples of Fe–S–Au–Ag system were synthesized. • Coupled solubility of gold and silver in iron sulfides was specified. • Ag–Au inclusions on surfaces of iron sulfides are likely to be enriched in silver. • Au–Ag sulfides can exist along with

  20. A sulfidation-resistant nickel-base alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.

    1989-01-01

    For applications in mildly to moderately sulfidizing environments, stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys (e.g., alloys 800 and 330), and more recently Fe-Ni-Cr-Co alloys (e.g., alloy 556) are frequently used for construction of process equipment. However, for many highly sulfidizing environments, few existing commercial alloys have adequate performance. Thus, a new nickel-based alloy containing 27 wt.% Co, 28 wt.% Cr, 4 wt.% Fe, 2.75 wt.% Si, 0.5 wt.% Mn and 0.05 wt.% C (Haynes alloy HR-160) was developed

  1. The solubility of iron sulfides and their role in mass transport in Girdler-Sulfide heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, P.H.; Wallace, G.; Campbell, A.B.

    1978-04-01

    The solubilities of several iron sulfides, mackinawite FeSsub((1-x)), troilite FeS, pyrrhotite Fesub((1-x))S (monoclinic and hexagonal), and pyrite FeS 2 have been determined in aqueous H 2 S solution at 0.1 MPa and 1.8 MPa H 2 S pressures between 25 deg and 125 deg C. The dependence of solubility on the pH of the medium has also been studied. It is concluded that since mackinawite is the most soluble of the iron sulfides, and has the highest dissolution rate and the steepest decline in solubility with temperature, its prolonged formation during plant operation should be avoided to minimize iron transport from lower to higher temperature areas in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants. This can be achieved by a preconditioning of carbon steel surfaces to convert mackinawite to pyrrhotite and pyrite

  2. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-La/C-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol to Acetates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Dagle, Robert; Tustin, Gerald C; Zoeller, Joseph R; Allard, Lawrence F; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-06

    We report that when Ir and La halides are deposited on carbon, exposure to CO spontaneously generates a discrete molecular heterobimetallic structure, containing an Ir-La covalent bond that acts as a highly active, selective, and stable heterogeneous catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to produce acetic acid. This catalyst exhibits a very high productivity of ∼1.5 mol acetyl/mol Ir·s with >99% selectivity to acetyl (acetic acid and methyl acetate) without detectable loss in activity or selectivity for more than 1 month of continuous operation. The enhanced activity can be mechanistically rationalized by the presence of La within the ligand sphere of the discrete molecular Ir-La heterobimetallic structure, which acts as a Lewis acid to accelerate the normally rate-limiting CO insertion in Ir-catalyzed carbonylation. Similar approaches may provide opportunities for attaining molecular (single site) behavior similar to homogeneous catalysis on heterogeneous surfaces for other industrial applications.

  3. Influence of gamma radiation reaction on the hydroesterification of butenes catalyzed by metal carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velde, J. van der.

    1976-01-01

    In the hydro carboxylation reaction, which first has been studied by Reppe, olefine and acetylene compounds are processed with carbon monoxide and water at high pressures and high temperatures in the presence of metal carbonyls. This reaction can be enhanced considerably by application of ionizing radiation. Lower pressures and in particular lower temperatures can be used if gamma irradiation is performed during carboxylation. For the experiments a mixture of buten-1 and buten-2 as well as pure buten-1 and pure buten-2 has been used to study the behaviour of these olefines with respect to the isomerization of the reaction products and to the olefines not transformed in the reaction process. Replacing water, methanol has been used as a reaction component, thus obtaining directly the respective carbonyl acid esters, which can be analysed quantitatively and qualitatively with respect to their isomeric composition by gaschromatography. (orig./HK) [de

  4. Spectroscopic and theoretical studies on the aromaticity of pyrrol-2-yl-carbonyl conformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubis, Alina T.; Wojtulewski, Sławomir; Filipkowski, Karol

    2013-06-01

    The aromaticity of s-cis and s-trans pyrrol-2-yl carbonyl conformers was studied by FT-IR, 1H NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The Harmonic Oscillator Model of Aromaticity (HOMA) and Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) indices were calculated to estimate π-electron delocalization in the pyrrole ring. The usefulness of infrared spectroscopy in the evaluation of the aromaticity of the homogeneous set of pyrroles is discussed. The influence of 2-substitution on different aspects of aromaticity and stability of the pyrrol-2-yl carbonyl conformers is also discussed. It is concluded that the substitution effect of the title pyrrole derivatives can be explained on the basis of theoretical and experimental measurements of π-electron delocalization, including IR data.

  5. Contribution to radiation-chemically catalyzed hydroformylation of butenes in the presence of metal carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, L.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper a study is presented of the influence of gamma-radiation on the catalytic hydroformylation of olefines. As model olefines buten-1 and buten-2 as well as their mixtures have been used together with the catalysts di-cobalt octacarbonyle and rhodium (I) tristri phenyl-phosphine carbonyle hydride. In addition the catalytic activity of the VI. side group carbonyles Cr(CO) 6 , Mo(CO) 6 and W(CO) 6 has been studied under radiation chemical conditions. For this purpose a mixture of olefine, solvent (cyclo hexane) and calalyst has been pressurized and processed in a mixing autoklave together with a Co and H 2 (1:1) mixture, variing the reaction variables within certain limits. (orig.) [de

  6. Age-related carbonylation of fibrocartilage structural proteins drives tissue degenerative modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Brian; Clement, Cristina C; Yodmuang, Supansa; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Aphkhazava, David; Thi, Mia M; Perino, Giorgio; Hardin, John A; Cobelli, Neil; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Santambrogio, Laura

    2013-07-25

    Aging-related oxidative stress has been linked to degenerative modifications in different organs and tissues. Using redox proteomic analysis and illustrative tandem mass spectrometry mapping, we demonstrate oxidative posttranslational modifications in structural proteins of intervertebral discs (IVDs) isolated from aging mice. Increased protein carbonylation was associated with protein fragmentation and aggregation. Complementing these findings, a significant loss of elasticity and increased stiffness was measured in fibrocartilage from aging mice. Studies using circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence revealed a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structures of purified collagens following oxidation. Collagen unfolding and oxidation promoted both nonenzymatic and enzymatic degradation. Importantly, induction of oxidative modification in healthy fibrocartilage recapitulated the biochemical and biophysical modifications observed in the aging IVD. Together, these results suggest that protein carbonylation, glycation, and lipoxidation could be early events in promoting IVD degenerative changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and fabrication of microfluidic mixer from carbonyl iron–PDMS composite membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jiaxing

    2010-10-12

    This paper introduces a carbonyl iron-PDMS (CI-PDMS) composite magnetic elastomer in which carbonyl iron (CI) particles are uniformly distributed in a PDMS matrix. The CI particles and the PDMS were mixed at different weight ratios and tested to determine the influence of CI concentration. The magnetic and mechanical properties of the magnetic elastomers were characterized, respectively, by vibrating-sample magnetometer and by tensile testing using a mechanical analyzer. The elastomer was found to exhibit high magnetization and good mechanical flexibility. The morphology and deformation of the CI-PDMS membrane also were observed. A magnetically actuated microfluidic mixer (that is, a micromixer) integrated with CI-PDMS elastomer membranes was successfully designed and fabricated. The high efficiency and quality of the mixing makes possible the impressive potential applications of this unique CI-PDMS material in microfluidic systems. © Springer-Verlag 2010.

  8. Alkylselenite-catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation of Amines: Density Functional Theory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sun; Kim, Hoon Sik; Cheong, Minserk [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Ureas and carbamates have been conventionally produced by the reaction of amines with phosgene. However, phosgenation processes raise severe environmental concerns, which are attributed to the toxicity of phosgene and the formation of corrosive hydrogen chloride as a co-product. The considerable industrial interest in replacing current phosgene-based processes prompted several methods using non-phosgene routes including carbonylation of amines or nitro compounds and carbomethoxylation of amines with dialkylcarbonates. Among these, catalytic oxidative carbonylation of an amine in the presence of alcohol has been studied most extensively. Catalytic systems based on precious metals such as Rh and Pd are commonly used for this purpose, but most of these catalytic systems suffer from either low reactivity or severe reaction conditions such as high temperature and pressures. In conclusion, the facile change of selenium oxidation state by CO and O{sub 2} might be the main reason for the activity of the selenium catalyst for this reaction.

  9. Alkylselenite-catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation of Amines: Density Functional Theory Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sun; Kim, Hoon Sik; Cheong, Minserk

    2012-01-01

    Ureas and carbamates have been conventionally produced by the reaction of amines with phosgene. However, phosgenation processes raise severe environmental concerns, which are attributed to the toxicity of phosgene and the formation of corrosive hydrogen chloride as a co-product. The considerable industrial interest in replacing current phosgene-based processes prompted several methods using non-phosgene routes including carbonylation of amines or nitro compounds and carbomethoxylation of amines with dialkylcarbonates. Among these, catalytic oxidative carbonylation of an amine in the presence of alcohol has been studied most extensively. Catalytic systems based on precious metals such as Rh and Pd are commonly used for this purpose, but most of these catalytic systems suffer from either low reactivity or severe reaction conditions such as high temperature and pressures. In conclusion, the facile change of selenium oxidation state by CO and O 2 might be the main reason for the activity of the selenium catalyst for this reaction

  10. Deoxygenative gem-difluoroolefination of carbonyl compounds with (chlorodifluoromethyltrimethylsilane and triphenylphosphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: 1,1-Difluoroalkenes cannot only be used as valuable precursors for organic synthesis, but also act as bioisosteres for enzyme inhibitors. Among various methods for their preparation, the carbonyl olefination with difluoromethylene phosphonium ylide represents one of the most straightforward methods.Results: The combination of (chlorodifluoromethyltrimethylsilane (TMSCF2Cl and triphenylphosphine (PPh3 can be used for the synthesis of gem-difluoroolefins from carbonyl compounds. Comparative experiments demonstrate that TMSCF2Cl is superior to (bromodifluoromethyltrimethylsilane (TMSCF2Br and (trifluoromethyltrimethylsilane (TMSCF3 in this reaction.Conclusion: Similar to many other Wittig-type gem-difluoroolefination reactions in the presence of PPh3, the reaction of TMSCF2Cl with aldehydes and activated ketones is effective.

  11. Criegee Intermediates: What Direct Production and Detection Can Teach Us About Reactions of Carbonyl Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taatjes, Craig A.

    2017-05-01

    The carbonyl oxide intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, often known as Criegee intermediates, are potentially important reactants in Earth's atmosphere. For decades, careful analysis of ozonolysis systems was employed to derive an understanding of the formation and reactions of these species. Recently it has proved possible to synthesize at least some of these intermediates separately from ozonolysis, and hence to measure their reaction kinetics directly. Direct measurements have allowed new or more detailed understanding of each type of gas-phase reaction that carbonyl oxides undergo, often acting as a complement to highly detailed ozonolysis experiments. Moreover, the use of direct characterization methods to validate increasingly accurate theoretical investigations can enhance their impact well beyond the set of specific reactions that have been measured. Reactions that initiate particles or fuel their growth could be a new frontier for direct measurements of Criegee intermediate chemistry.

  12. Analysis of protein carbonylation - pitfalls and promise in commonly used methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.; Wojdyla, K.; Nedic, O.

    2014-01-01

    that research scientists are becoming more eager to be able to measure accurately the level of oxidized protein in biological materials, and to determine the precise site of the oxidative attack on the protein, in order to get insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of diseases....... Several methods for measuring protein carbonylation have been implemented in different laboratories around the world. However, to date no methods prevail as the most accurate, reliable, and robust. The present paper aims at giving an overview of the common methods used to determine protein carbonylation...... in biological material as well as to highlight the limitations and the potential. The ultimate goal is to give quick tips for a rapid decision making when a method has to be selected and taking into consideration the advantage and drawback of the methods....

  13. Analysis of protein carbonylation-pitfalls and promise in commonly used methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wojdyla, K; Nedić, O

    2014-01-01

    that research scientists are becoming more eager to be able to measure accurately the level of oxidized protein in biological materials, and to determine the precise site of the oxidative attack on the protein, in order to get insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of diseases....... Several methods for measuring protein carbonylation have been implemented in different laboratories around the world. However, to date no methods prevail as the most accurate, reliable, and robust. The present paper aims at giving an overview of the common methods used to determine protein carbonylation...... in biological material as well as to highlight the limitations and the potential. The ultimate goal is to give quick tips for a rapid decision making when a method has to be selected and taking into consideration the advantage and drawback of the methods....

  14. Is succession in wet calcareous dune slacks affected by free sulfide?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, EB; van Gemerden, H; Grootjans, AP; Adema, Erwin B.; Grootjans, Ab P.; Rapson, G.

    Consequences of sulfide toxicity on succession in wet calcareous dune slacks were investigated. Sulfide may exert an inhibitory effect on dune slack plants, but several pioneer species exhibit ROL (Radial Oxygen Loss) and thereby protect themselves against free sulfide. Under oxic conditions free

  15. Identifying the Prospective Area of Sulfide Groundwater within the Area of Palvantash Oil and Gas Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Zhurayev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the methodology of prospecting for sulfide groundwater in the area of Palvantash oil fields. In result of study allowed determining the favorable conditions for the sulfide waters formation, and mapping the areas of different sulfide water concentration. The relatively permeable areas were established and the water borehole positions were recommended.

  16. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide; Correction. SUMMARY: The... Administrative Stay of the reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide. The Office of the Federal Register...

  17. A real support effect on the hydrodeoxygenation of methyl oleate by sulfided NiMo catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumans, A.E.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the support on the catalytic performance of sulfided NiMo in the hydrodeoxygenation of methyl oleate as a model compound for triglyceride upgrading to green diesel was investigated. NiMo sulfides were prepared by impregnation and sulfidation on activated carbon, silica, γ-alumina and

  18. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1,

  19. Sulfidation of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Crajé, M.W.J.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum catalysts from the oxidic precursor to the sulfided catalysts was systematically studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature. This enabled the adjudgement of various sulfidic phases in the sulfided catalysts. The

  20. Red coloration by heat treatment of the coprecipitate of cadmium sulfide and mercury(II) sulfide prepared from the nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Fujiya

    1979-01-01

    The effects of starting salts on the color, particle size and crystal structure of mercury-cadmium-sulfide pigments were investigated. The coprecipitate (N-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was prepared by adding sodium sulfide solution to a mixed cadmium-mercury (II) nitrate solution. The coprecipitate (C-S) of cadmium sulfide and mercury (II) sulfide was also prepared from the mixed solution of their chlorides by the same method as described above. The coprecipitated products were heat-treated (calcination or hydrothermal treatment) at 350 0 C for 2 hours and subsequent changes in powder properties of both products were compared from each other. The powder properties of N-S, C-S and their heat-treated products were investigated by spectral reflectance, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and specific surface area measurements. Sample (N-C) obtained by the calcination of N-S was brown, indicating no red coloration, but the calcined product (C-C) of C-S developed a red color. Cl - and hot water were found to be effective for the red color development of the pigment. The effectiveness was confirmed by calcining N-S in the presence of NaCl or by treating it hydrothermally. It was found that halides other than NaCl, (e.g., NH 4 Cl, KCl, KBr and KI), were also effective for the color development of the pigment. The red samples are solid solutions with a basically hexagonal CdS structure, and it appears that CdS takes up HgS without any apparent structural changes. The particle size of the red samples are larger than those of the non red samples. (author)

  1. Novel Routes to Ethylene Glycol Synthesis via Acid-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Formaldehyde and Dimethoxymethane

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Fuat Emin

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond forming carbonylation reactions were investigated as candidates to replace ethene epoxidation as the major source of ethylene glycol production. This work was motivated by the potentially lower cost of carbon derived from synthesis gas as compared to ethylene. Synthesis gas can be produced from relatively abundant and cheap natural gas, coal, and biomass resources whereas ethylene is derived from increasingly scarce and expensive crude oil. From synthesis gas, a range of...

  2. Characterization of Carbonyl Compounds in the Ambient Air of an Industrial City in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ok Baek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize spatial and temporal variations of carbonyl compounds in Gumi city, where a number of large electronic-industrial complexes are located. Carbonyl samples were collected at five sites in the Gumi area: three industrial, one commercial, and one residential area. Sampling was carried out throughout a year from December 2003 to November 2004. At one industrial site, samples were taken every six days, while those of the other sites were for seven consecutive days in every season. Each sample was collected for 150 minutes and at intervals of three times a day (morning, afternoon, and evening. A total of 476 samples were analyzed to determine 15 carbonyl compounds by the USEPA TO-11A (DNPH-cartridge/HPLC method. In general, acetaldehyde appeared to be the most abundant compound, followed by formaldehyde, and acetone+acrolein. Mean concentrations of acetaldehyde were two to three times higher in the industrial sites than in the other sites, with its maximum of 77.7 ppb. In contrast, ambient levels of formaldehyde did not show any significant difference between the industrial and non-industrial groups. Its concentrations peaked in summer probably due to the enhanced volatilization and photochemical reactivity. These results indicate significant emission sources of acetaldehyde in the Gumi industrial complexes. Mean concentrations of organic solvents (such as acetone+acrolein and methyl ethyl ketone were also significantly high in industrial areas. In conclusion, major sources of carbonyl compounds, including acetaldehyde, are strongly associated with industrial activities in the Gumi city area.

  3. Carbonylative Heck Reactions Using CO Generated ex Situ in a Two-Chamber System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermange, Philippe; Gøgsig, Thomas; Lindhardt, Anders Thyboe

    2011-01-01

    A carbonylative Heck reaction of aryl iodides and styrene derivatives employing a two-chamber system using a stable, crystalline, and nontransition metal based carbon monoxide source is reported. By applying near-stoichiometric amounts of the carbon monoxide precursor, an effective exploitation o...... of the hazardous CO gas is obtained affording chalcone derivatives in good yields. Application to isotope labeling, incorporating 13CO, was further established....

  4. Reductive Coupling of Carbon Monoxide in a Rhenium Carbonyl Complex with Pendant Lewis Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Alexander J. M.; Labinger, Jay A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphinoborane ligands impart unique reactivity to a rhenium carbonyl cation relative to simple phosphine complexes. Addition of either triethylborohydride or a platinum hydride (that can be formed from H2) forms a rhenium boroxycarbene. This carbene, which crystallizes as a dimer, disproportionates over a period of days to afford the starting cation and a structurally unprecedented boroxy(boroxymethyl)carbene, in which a new C−C bond has been formed between two reduced CO ligands. This prod...

  5. The magnetorheological fluid of carbonyl iron suspension blended with grafted MWCNT or graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwei, Syang-Peng; Ranganathan, Palraj; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Wang, Tza-Yi

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the magnetorheological (MR) fluids containing MWCNT/CI (carbonyl iron) complex and graphene/CI complex were prepared and have the better dispersity in silicone oil than CI powders alone. 1, 4-Aminobenzoic acid (PABA) was used as a grafting agent to modify CI powders to have NH2-end-group so that such nanoparticles can adsorb to acid-treated MWCNT or graphene via attraction of NH2 and COOH groups. The MWCNT/CI complex and graphene/CI complex have a structure of carbonyl iron nanoparticles adsorbed to MWCNT and graphene by self assembly, respectively. Because the carbonyl iron particles possessing magnetic permeability in nanometer scale adsorb to MWCNT or graphene which usually has a nanometer-scaled diameter and a micrometer-scaled length in this work, the dispersity of MWCNT/CI or graphene/CI complex in silicone oil is superior than the previous report [15] that the micrometer-scaled carbonyl iron microspheres were coated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Among CI (unmodified), MWCNT/CI and graphene/CI, graphene/CI has the best dispersity while MWCNT/CI still has the better dispersity than unmodified CI. At the temperature T = 300 K, the saturation magnetizations of CI, MWCNT/CI, graphene/CI are 208, 211 emu/g, and 204 emu/g, respectively, indicating that MWCNT/CI complex and graphene/CI complex still maintain the saturation magnetization as high as CI without being interfered by the blended MWCNT or graphene. A wide dynamic range of the yield stress adjusted through varying the electric current can be achieved by the MR fluids containing 69 wt% MWCNT/CI and graphene/CI which is useful in a shock absorber or damper. The result of the yield stress indicates the suspended MWCNT/CI particles are oriented more easily toward the direction perpendicular to the flow direction to block the flow stream lines.

  6. Organocatalyzed Asymmetric α-Oxidation, α-Aminoxylation and α-Amination of Carbonyl Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Worawan Bhanthumnavin; Tirayut Vilaivan

    2010-01-01

    Organocatalytic asymmetric α-oxidation and amination reactions of carbonyl compounds are highly useful synthetic methodologies, especially in generating chiral building blocks that previously have not been easily accessible by traditional methods. The concept is relatively new and therefore the list of new catalysts, oxidizing and aminating reagents, as well as new substrates, are expanding at an amazing rate. The scope of this review includes new reactions and catalysts, mechanistic aspects ...

  7. The interaction of metal carbonyl compounds with organic polymers and monomers

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Michael P.

    1993-01-01

    The photochemistry of W(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and Cr(CO)6 in the presence of monomeric and polymeric triphenylphosphine ligands was investigated in toluene solution, using laser flash photolysis with 355nm excitation. The mechanism and kinetics of interaction of the primary photoproducts M(CO)5(toluene) (M = W, Mo, or Cr) with the various monomeric ligands were investigated. Interaction of the metal carbonyl photofragments with various homopolymers is also discussed. The polymerisation methods used ...

  8. Plasma-treated carbonyl iron particles as a dispersed phase in magnetorheological fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlačík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Lehocký, M.; Mráček, A.; Grulich, O.; Švrčinová, Petra; Filip, Petr; Vesel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 387, 1-3 (2011), s. 99-103 ISSN 0927-7757 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD104/09/H080; OP VaVpI(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0111 Program:GD Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : carbonyl iron * magnetorheological fluid * plasma * viscoelasticity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.236, year: 2011

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Nidhi; Mandal, P. K.; Gautham, Namasivayam; Chadha, Anju

    2013-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies on C. parapsilosis carbonyl reductase are reported. The NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330 catalyses the asymmetric reduction of ethyl 4-phenyl-2-oxobutanoate to ethyl (R)-4-phenyl-2-hydroxybutanoate, a precursor of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors such as Cilazapril and Benazepril. The carbonyl reductase was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by GST-affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 1.86 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of carbonyl reductase, with a solvent content of 48%. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a search model

  10. Selectivity of a heterogeneous rhodium catalyst for the carbonylation of monohydric alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, B; Scurrell, M S

    1977-01-01

    Selectivity of a heterogeneous rhodium catalyst for the carbonylation of monohydric alcohols with carbon monoxide in the presence of the corresponding alkyl iodides as promotors was studied in a glass reactor at approx. 0.05:1 alcohol/carbon monoxide ratio. The 1% by wt rhodium-zeolite catalyst was prepared by immersing a Linde molecular sieve zeolite Type 13X in rhodium trichloride at 80/sup 0/C for 15 hr. Methanol was converted to methyl acetate at 433/sup 0/-513/sup 0/K with selectivites > 90% even at the highest temperatures, and dimethyl ether was by-produced. In the absence of methyl iodide, the carbonylation rate decreased drastically but the dehydration was virtually unaffected. The selectivity for ethanol carbonylation decreased from 99% at 383/sup 0/K to 6% at 523/sup 0/K due to the formation of ethylene (predominant at > 470/sup 0/K) and diethyl ether. The only product of the reaction with propan-2-ol studied at 433/sup 0/ or 473/sup 0/K was propene with 100% conversion at 473/sup 0/K. These results are consistent with the relative ease of reactant dehydration on polar catalysts. Table and 13 references.

  11. Catalytic performance of heterogeneous Rh/C3N4 for the carbonylation of methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiman, Anatta Wahyu; Choi, Myoung Jae; Nur, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    The excess of water in homogeneous the carbonylation of methanol system could increase the amount of by-products formed through water-gas shift reaction and could accelerate the rusting of equipment. Many scientists tried to decrease the content of water in the carbonylation of methanol system by using lithium and iodide promoter that results a moderate catalytic activity in the water content at 2wt%. The heterogenized catalyst offers several distinct advantages such as it was enables increased catalyst concentration in the reaction mixture, which is directly proportional to acetic acid production rate, without the addition of an alkali iodide salt promoter. The heterogeneous catalyst also results in reduced by-product formation. This study is aimed to produce a novel catalyst (Rh/C3N4) with a high selectivity of acetic acid in a relatively lower water and halide content. This novel catalyst performs high conversion and selectivity of acetic acid as the result of the strong ionic bonding of melamine and rhodium complex species that was caused by the presence of methyl iodide species. The CO2 in feed gas significantly decreases the catalytic activity of Rh-melamine because of its inert characteristics. The kinetic test was performed as that the first order kinetic equation. The kinetic tests revealed the reaction route of the the carbonylation of methanol in this system was performed trough the methyl acetate.

  12. Vapor phase carbonylation of dimethyl ether and methyl acetate with supported transition metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikada, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Tominaga, H.O.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of acetic acid (AcOH) from methanol (MeOH) and carbon monoxide has been performed industrially in the liquid phase using a rhodium complex catalyst and an iodide promoter. The selectivity to AcOH is more than 99% under mild conditions (175 0 C, 28 atm). The homogeneous rhodium catalyst has been also effective for the synthesis of acetic anhydride (Ac 2 O) by carbonylation of dimethyl ether (DME) or methyl acetate (AcOMe). However, rhodium is one of the most expensive metals and its proved reserves are quite limited. It is highly desired, therefore, to develop a new catalyst as a substitute for rhodium. The authors have already reported that nickel supported on active carbon exhibits an excellent activity for the vapor phase carbonylation of MeOh in the presence of iodide promoter and under moderately pressurized conditions. In addition, corrosive attack on reactors by iodide compounds is expected to be negligible in the vapor phase system. In the present work, vapor phase carbonylation of DME and AcOMe on nickel-active carbon (Ni/A.C.) and molybdenum-active carbon (Mo/A.C.) catalysts was studied

  13. Gas chromatographic analysis of reactive carbonyl compounds formed from lipids upon UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, K.J.; Shibamoto, T.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidation of lipids produces carbonyl compounds; some of these, e.g., malonaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, are genotoxic because of their reactivity with biological nucleophiles. Analysis of the reactive carbonyl compounds is often difficult. The methylhydrazine method developed for malonaldehyde analysis was applied to simultaneously measure the products formed from linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and squalene upon ultraviolet-irradiation (UV-irradiation). The photoreaction products, saturated monocarbonyl, alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls, and beta-dicarbonyls, were derivatized with methylhydrazine to give hydrazones, pyrazolines, and pyrazoles, respectively. The derivatives were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Lipid peroxidation products identified included formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, malonaldehyde, n-hexanal, and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. Malonaldehyde levels formed upon 4 hr of irradiation were 0.06 micrograms/mg from squalene, 2.4 micrograms/mg from linolenic acid, and 5.7 micrograms/mg from arachidonic acid. Significant levels of acrolein (2.5 micrograms/mg) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (0.17 micrograms/mg) were also produced from arachidonic acid upon 4 hr irradiation

  14. A carnosine intervention study in overweight human volunteers: bioavailability and reactive carbonyl species sequestering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzoni, Luca; de Courten, Barbora; Garzon, Davide; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Jakubova, Michaela; Vallova, Silvia; Krumpolec, Patrik; Carini, Marina; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide able to react with reactive carbonyl species, which have been recently associated with the onset and progression of several human diseases. Herein, we report an intervention study in overweight individuals. Carnosine (2 g/day) was orally administered for twelve weeks in order to evaluate its bioavailability and metabolic fate. Two carnosine adducts were detected in the urine samples of all subjects. Such adducts are generated from a reaction with acrolein, which is one of the most toxic and reactive compounds among reactive carbonyl species. However, neither carnosine nor adducts have been detected in plasma. Urinary excretion of adducts and carnosine showed a positive correlation although a high variability of individual response to carnosine supplementation was observed. Interestingly, treated subjects showed a significant decrease in the percentage of excreted adducts in reduced form, accompanied by a significant increase of the urinary excretion of both carnosine and carnosine-acrolein adducts. Altogether, data suggest that acrolein is entrapped in vivo by carnosine although the response to its supplementation is possibly influenced by individual diversities in terms of carnosine dietary intake, metabolism and basal production of reactive carbonyl species.

  15. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Seasonal behavior of carbonyls and source characterization of formaldehyde (HCHO) in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, K. H.; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Louie, Peter K. K.; Chan, C. S.; Lee, S. C.; Hu, Di; Chan, P. W.; Lee, Jeffrey Chi Wai; Ho, K. F.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO) is an intermediate and a sensitive indicator for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) oxidation, which drives tropospheric ozone production. Effective photochemical pollution control strategies demand a thorough understanding of photochemical oxidation precursors, making differentiation between sources of primary and secondary generated HCHO inevitable. Spatial and seasonal variations of airborne carbonyls based on two years of measurements (2012-2013), coupled with a correlation-based HCHO source apportionment analysis, were determined for three sampling locations in Hong Kong (denoted HT, TC, and YL). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the two most abundant compounds of the total quantified carbonyls. Pearson's correlation analysis (r > 0.7) implies that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde possibly share similar sources. The total carbonyl concentration trends (HT rural). A regression analysis further quantifies the relative primary HCHO source contributions at HT (∼13%), TC (∼21%), and YL (∼40%), showing more direct vehicular emissions in urban than rural areas. Relative secondary source contributions at YL (∼36%) and TC (∼31%) resemble each other, implying similar urban source contributions. Relative background source contributions at TC could be due to a closed structure microenvironment that favors the trapping of HCHO. Comparable seasonal differences are observed at all stations. The results of this study will aid in the development of a new regional ozone (O3) control policy, as ambient HCHO can enhance O3 production and also be produced from atmospheric VOCs oxidation (secondary HCHO).

  17. Role of Protein Carbonylation in Skeletal Muscle Mass Loss Associated with Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Barreiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscle dysfunction, characterized by a reductive remodeling of muscle fibers, is a common systemic manifestation in highly prevalent conditions such as chronic heart failure (CHF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cancer cachexia, and critically ill patients. Skeletal muscle dysfunction and impaired muscle mass may predict morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic diseases, regardless of the underlying condition. High levels of oxidants may alter function and structure of key cellular molecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids, leading to cellular injury and death. Protein oxidation including protein carbonylation was demonstrated to modify enzyme activity and DNA binding of transcription factors, while also rendering proteins more prone to proteolytic degradation. Given the relevance of protein oxidation in the pathophysiology of many chronic conditions and their comorbidities, the current review focuses on the analysis of different studies in which the biological and clinical significance of the modifications induced by reactive carbonyls on proteins have been explored so far in skeletal muscles of patients and animal models of chronic conditions such as COPD, disuse muscle atrophy, cancer cachexia, sepsis, and physiological aging. Future research will elucidate the specific impact and sites of reactive carbonyls on muscle protein content and function in human conditions.

  18. Carbonyl compounds and PAH emissions from CNG heavy-duty engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambino, M.; Cericola, R.; Corbo, P.; Iannaccone, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous works carried out in Istituto Motori laboratories have shown that natural gas is a suitable fuel for general means of transportation. This is because of its favorable effects on engine performance and pollutant emissions. The natural gas fueled engine provided the same performance as the diesel engine, met R49 emission standards, and showed very low smoke levels. On the other hand, it is well known that internal combustion engines emit some components that are harmful for human health, such as carbonyl compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). This paper shows the results of carbonyl compounds and PAH emissions analysis for a heavy-duty Otto cycle engine fueled with natural gas. The engine was tested using the R49 cycle that is used to measure the regulated emissions. The test analysis has been compared with an analysis of a diesel engine, tested under the same conditions. Total PAH emissions from the CNG engine were about three orders of magnitude lower than from the diesel engine. Formaldehyde emission from the CNG engine was about ten times as much as from the diesel engine, while emissions of other carbonyl compounds were comparable

  19. Effect of fiber material on ozone removal and carbonyl production from carpets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbass, Omed A.; Sailor, David J.; Gall, Elliott T.

    2017-01-01

    Indoor air quality is affected by indoor materials such as carpets that may act as sources and/or sinks of gas-phase air pollutants. Heterogeneous reactions of ozone with carpets may result in potentially harmful products. In this study, indoor residential carpets of varying fiber types were tested to evaluate their ability to remove ozone, and to assess their role in the production of carbonyls when exposed to elevated levels of ozone. Tests were conducted with six types of new unused carpets. Two sets of experiments were conducted, the first measured ozone removal and ozone deposition velocities, and the second measured primary carbonyl production and secondary production as a result of exposure to ozone. The tests were conducted using glass chambers with volume of 52 L each. Air exchange rates for all tests were 3 h-1. The ozone removal tests show that, for the conditions tested, the polyester carpet sample had the lowest ozone removal (40%), while wool carpet had the greatest ozone removal (65%). Most carpet samples showed higher secondary than primary carbonyl emissions, with carpets containing polypropylene fibers being a notable exception. Carpets with polyester fibers had both the highest primary and secondary emissions of formaldehyde among all samples tested. While it is difficult to make blanket conclusions about the relative air quality merits of various carpet fiber options, it is clear that ozone removal percentages and emissions of volatile organic compounds can vary drastically as a function of fiber type.

  20. Excited state characterization of carbonyl containing carotenoids: a comparison between single and multireference descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Knecht, Stefan; Mennucci, Benedetta

    Carotenoids can play multiple roles in biological photoreceptors thanks to their rich photophysics. In the present work, we have investigated six of the most common carbonyl containing carotenoids: Echinenone, Canthaxanthin, Astaxanthin, Fucoxanthin, Capsanthin and Capsorubin. Their excitation properties are investigated by means of a hybrid density functional theory (DFT) and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) approach to elucidate the role of the carbonyl group: the bright transition is of {\\pi}{\\pi}* character, as expected, but the presence of a C=O moiety reduces the energy of n{\\pi}* transitions which may become closer to the {\\pi}{\\pi}* transition, in particular as the conjugation chain decreases. This can be related to the presence of a low-lying charge transfer state typical of short carbonyl- containing carotenoids. The DFT/MRCI results are finally used to benchmark single- reference time-dependent DFT-based methods: among the investigated functionals, the meta- GGA (and in particular M11L and MN12L) functionals show to perform the best for all six investigated systems.

  1. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial distributions of and diurnal variations in low molecular weight carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater, and the controlling factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuhiko, E-mail: takedaq@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Katoh, Shinya; Mitsui, Yumi; Nakano, Shinichi [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Nakatani, Nobutake [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Department of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Rakuno Gakuen University, 582 Bunkyodai-Midorimachi, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Sakugawa, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    We studied the spatial distributions of and the diurnal variations in four low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and glyoxal, in coastal seawater. The samples were taken from the coastal areas of Hiroshima Bay, the Iyo Nada, and the Bungo Channel, western Japan. The formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and glyoxal concentrations were higher in the northern part of Hiroshima Bay than at offshore sampling points in the Iyo Nada and the Bungo Channel. These three compounds were found at much higher concentrations in the surface water than in deeper water layers in Hiroshima Bay. It is noteworthy that propionaldehyde was not detected in any of the seawater samples, the concentrations present being lower than the detection limit (1 nanomole per liter (nM)) of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system we used. Photochemical and biological experiments were performed in the laboratory to help understand the characteristic distributions and fates of the LMW carbonyl compounds. The primary process controlling their fate in the coastal environment appears to be their biological consumption. The direct photo degradation of propionaldehyde, initiated by ultraviolet (UV) absorption, was observed, although formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not degraded by UV irradiation. Our results suggest that the degradation of the LMW carbonyl compounds by photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals is relatively insignificant in the study area. Atmospheric deposition is a possible source of soluble carbonyl compounds in coastal surface seawater, but it may not influence the carbonyl concentrations in offshore waters. - Highlights: • Low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater were determined. • Photochemical productions of LMW carbonyl compounds in seawater were observed. • LMW carbonyl compounds were largely consumed biologically. • Photochemical degradation was relatively insignificant in the study area.

  3. Spatial distributions of and diurnal variations in low molecular weight carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater, and the controlling factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kazuhiko; Katoh, Shinya; Mitsui, Yumi; Nakano, Shinichi; Nakatani, Nobutake; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We studied the spatial distributions of and the diurnal variations in four low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and glyoxal, in coastal seawater. The samples were taken from the coastal areas of Hiroshima Bay, the Iyo Nada, and the Bungo Channel, western Japan. The formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and glyoxal concentrations were higher in the northern part of Hiroshima Bay than at offshore sampling points in the Iyo Nada and the Bungo Channel. These three compounds were found at much higher concentrations in the surface water than in deeper water layers in Hiroshima Bay. It is noteworthy that propionaldehyde was not detected in any of the seawater samples, the concentrations present being lower than the detection limit (1 nanomole per liter (nM)) of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system we used. Photochemical and biological experiments were performed in the laboratory to help understand the characteristic distributions and fates of the LMW carbonyl compounds. The primary process controlling their fate in the coastal environment appears to be their biological consumption. The direct photo degradation of propionaldehyde, initiated by ultraviolet (UV) absorption, was observed, although formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not degraded by UV irradiation. Our results suggest that the degradation of the LMW carbonyl compounds by photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals is relatively insignificant in the study area. Atmospheric deposition is a possible source of soluble carbonyl compounds in coastal surface seawater, but it may not influence the carbonyl concentrations in offshore waters. - Highlights: • Low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater were determined. • Photochemical productions of LMW carbonyl compounds in seawater were observed. • LMW carbonyl compounds were largely consumed biologically. • Photochemical degradation was relatively insignificant in the study area

  4. Time and dose effects of cigarette smoke and acrolein on protein carbonyl formation in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avezov, K; Reznick, A Z; Aizenbud, D

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is an important environmental source of human exposure to a highly toxic and chemically active α,β-unsaturated aldehyde: acrolein. It is capable of causing protein carbonylation and dysfunction, especially in oral tissues of smokers, constantly exposed to CS toxic constituents. The foremost damage is considered to be cumulative, but even a short exposure can be potentially harmful. The objectives of the current study were to examine the short time and dose effects of direct CS and acrolein exposure on intracellular protein carbonylation in epithelial cells. HaCaT-keratinocytes were exposed to different doses of acrolein and whole phase CS using a unique smoking simulator apparatus that mimics the exposure in smokers. The rate of intracellular protein carbonyl modification was examined 10-60 min after the exposure by Western blot. In addition, the effect of pre-incubation with a thiol scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was also assessed. We found that intracellular protein carbonyls increased as fast as 10 min after CS exposure and their concentration doubled after 20 min, with a slight elevation afterwards. Also, carbonyl levels increased gradually as CS and acrolein doses were elevated. Addition of 1 mM NAC neutralized part of the damage. We conclude that CS and acrolein intracellular protein carbonylation is dose- and time- dependent. Even a short time exposure to CS and its aldehydic constituents can be potentially harmful.

  5. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature.

  6. The Complex Resistivity Spectrum Characteristics About Stratabound Sulfide Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, P.; Sun, B.; Wang, L.; Chen, Z.; Dong, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Complex resistivity method has become the key technique of deep prospecting, and widely applied in stratabound sulfide deposits which often form massive ores. However, the complex resistivity spectrum characteristics of stratabound sulfide deposits remains unknown. Through studying variation problem of two-dimensional polarization medium, deducing the differential equations and calculating formula,we applied Cole-Cole model to deduce the spectrum of complex resistivity based on the model of three-node and four-node finite element method, and programmed homologous procedure. We utilized the Earth Model of Geological Layers which has accurate analytical solution to test rationality and accuracy of our modeling. We applied the layer structure provided by drilling results in Chenmenshan copper mine,which is typical strata-bound sulfide deposits in Jiangxi province,China, and calculated the spectra of complex resistivity, then made comparison between modeled and measured values. We find good corellation between them. Our studies may have imporved the interpretation of complex resistivity data, which help apply complex resistivity methods of propecting on stratabound sulfide deposites.

  7. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  8. Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using culture supernatants of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Lactobacillus ... The process of extracellular and fast biosynthesis may help in the development of an easy and eco-friendly route for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles.

  9. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene... coatings of articles intended for repeated use in contact with food, in accordance with the following... are available from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), Food and Drug...

  10. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards. 425.04 Section 425.04 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions...

  11. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. 425.03 Section 425.03 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions...

  12. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  13. Carbon-supported iron and iron-molybdenum sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective was to describe the relations between the characteristics (composition and dispersion) of the actual sulfide phase and the catalytic activity. Attention was also paid to the influence of preparational aspects on these characteristics. The catalysts were characterized using in-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy down to 2.0 K. 254 refs.; 47 figs.; 22 tabs

  14. Impact of Iron Sulfide Transformation on Trichloroethylene Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most common and persistent groundwater contaminants encountered at hazardous waste sites around the world. A growing body of evidence indicates that iron sulfides play an important role in degrading TCE in natural environments and in enginee...

  15. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-02-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with sulfur was studied. The effects of temperature, sulfur dosage, carbon, and Na salts additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation. The results indicated that more than 96 pct of zinc in the slag could be converted into sulfides. Increasing temperature, sulfur dosage, or Na salts dosage was conducive to the sulfidation of the zinc oxides in the slag. High temperature and excess Na salts would result in the more consumption of carbon and sulfur. Carbon addition not only promoted the selective sulfidation but reduced the sulfur dosage and eliminated the generation of SO2. Iron oxides had a buffering role on the sulfur efficient utilization. The transformation of sphalerite to wurtzite was feasible under reducing condition at high temperature, especially above 1273 K (1000 °C). The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon the roasting temperature. They were significantly increased when the temperature was above 1273 K (1000 °C), which was attributed to the formation of a liquid phase.

  16. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thioamides as collectors at flotation of sulfide minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, B.M.; Solozhenkin, P.M.; Rukhadze, E.G.; Lyubavina, L.L.

    1976-01-01

    The collective properties of thioamides at flotation of number of sulfide minerals are considered. It is defined that studied thioamides fix on the surface of minerals with formation of appropriate complexes. The spectres of copper thioamides are studied by means of electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy.

  18. Iridium Sulfide and Ir Promoted Mo Based Catalysts.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vít, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 322, - (2007), s. 142-151 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/06/0870 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : iridium sulfide * IrMo catalyst * hydrodesulfurization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2007

  19. Remediation of arsenic and lead with nanocrystalline zinc sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquette, Alan; Cannon, Cody; Apblett, Allen W

    2012-07-27

    Nanocrystalline (1.7 ± 0.3 nm) zinc sulfide with a specific surface area up to 360 m(2) g(-1) was prepared from the thermal decomposition of a single-source precursor, zinc ethylxanthate. Zinc ethylxanthate decomposes to cubic zinc sulfide upon exposure to temperatures greater than or equal to 125 °C. The resulting zinc sulfide was tested as a water impurity extractant. The target impurities used in this study were As(5+), As(3+), and Pb(2+). The reaction of the nanocrystalline ZnS with Pb(2+) proceeds as a replacement reaction where solid PbS is formed and Zn(2+) is released into the aqueous system. Removal of lead to a level of less than two parts per billion is achievable. The results of a detailed kinetics experiment between the ZnS and Pb(2+) are included in this study. Unlike the instance of lead, both As(5+) and As(3+) adsorb on the surface of the ZnS extractant as opposed to an ion-exchange process. An uptake capacity of > 25 mg g(-1) for the removal of As(5+) is possible. The uptake of As(3+) appears to proceed by a slower process than that of the As(5+) with a capacity of nearly 20 mg g(-1). The nanocrystalline zinc sulfide was extremely successful for the removal of arsenic and lead from simulated oil sand tailing pond water.

  20. Exploiting fields of gases containing hydrogen-sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevets, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The anthology is devoted to problems of geology, hydrogeology, drilling, industrial development, and processing of gas and condensate at the Orenburg Gas-Chemical Complex. Reviews ways to develop the technology for further processing of hydrogen sulfide gas, as well as handling corrosion.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  2. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  3. Formation of nanocolloidal metacinnabar in mercury-DOM-sulfide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbig, Chase A.; Kim, Christopher S.; Stegemeier, John P.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Aiken, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct determination of mercury (Hg) speciation in sulfide-containing environments is confounded by low mercury concentrations and poor analytical sensitivity. Here we report the results of experiments designed to assess mercury speciation at environmentally relevant ratios of mercury to dissolved organic matter (DOM) (i.e., structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Aqueous Hg(II) and a DOM isolate were equilibrated in the presence and absence of 100 μM total sulfide. In the absence of sulfide, mercury adsorption to the resin increased as the Hg:DOM ratio decreased and as the strength of Hg-DOM binding increased. EXAFS analysis indicated that in the absence of sulfide, mercury bonds with an average of 2.4 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms with a bond length typical of mercury-organic thiol ligands (2.35 Å). In the presence of sulfide, mercury showed greater affinity for the C18 resin, and its chromatographic behavior was independent of Hg:DOM ratio. EXAFS analysis showed mercury–sulfur bonds with a longer interatomic distance (2.51–2.53 Å) similar to the mercury–sulfur bond distance in metacinnabar (2.53 Å) regardless of the Hg:DOM ratio. For all samples containing sulfide, the sulfur coordination number was below the ideal four-coordinate structure of metacinnabar. At a low Hg:DOM ratio where strong binding DOM sites may control mercury speciation (1.9 nmol mg–1) mercury was coordinated by 2.3 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms, and the coordination number rose with increasing Hg:DOM ratio. The less-than-ideal coordination numbers indicate metacinnabar-like species on the nanometer scale, and the positive correlation between Hg:DOM ratio and sulfur coordination number suggests progressively increasing particle size or crystalline order with increasing abundance of mercury with respect to DOM. In DOM-containing sulfidic systems nanocolloidal metacinnabar-like species may form, and these species need to be considered when addressing mercury biogeochemistry.

  4. Volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrence model: Chapter C in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Koski, Randolph A.; Mosier, Dan L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Slack, John F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Seal, Robert R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Thurston, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, also known as volcanic-hosted massive sulfide, volcanic-associated massive sulfide, or seafloor massive sulfide deposits, are important sources of copper, zinc, lead, gold, and silver (Cu, Zn, Pb, Au, and Ag). These deposits form at or near the seafloor where circulating hydrothermal fluids driven by magmatic heat are quenched through mixing with bottom waters or porewaters in near-seafloor lithologies. Massive sulfide lenses vary widely in shape and size and may be podlike or sheetlike. They are generally stratiform and may occur as multiple lenses.

  5. Solubility Measurements and Modeling of Zinc, Lead and Iron Sulfides at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    Solubility measurements of sulfides in aqueous solutions are necessary to understand the behaviour of these scaling minerals in geothermal and oil reservoirs. The low solubility levels of Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) make the solubility measurements a challenging...... oxygen atmosphere to avoid the risk of oxidation of sulfide minerals. The solution is kept in an equilibrium cell at constant temperature and pressure with continuous stirring. The concentration of Zn2+, Pb2+, Fe2+ and S2- are measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission spectrometry (ICP...

  6. Hydrogen sulfide waste treatment by microwave plasma-chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    A waste-treatment process that recovers both hydrogen and sulfur from industrial acid-gas waste streams is being developed to replace the Claus technology, which recovers only sulfur. The proposed process is derived from research reported in the Soviet technical literature and uses microwave (or radio-frequency) energy to initiate plasma-chemical reactions that dissociate hydrogen sulfide into elemental hydrogen and sulfur. This process has several advantages over the current Claus-plus-tail-gas-cleanup technology, which burns the hydrogen to water. The primary advantage of the proposal process is its potential for recovering and recycling hydrogen more cheaply than the direct production of hydrogen. Since unconverted hydrogen sulfide is recycled to the plasma reactor, the plasma-chemical process has the potential for sulfur recoveries in excess of 99% without the additional complexity of the tail-gas-cleanup processes associated with the Claus technology. There may also be some environmental advantages to the plasma-chemical process, because the process purge stream would primarily be the carbon dioxide and water contained in the acid-gas waste stream. Laboratory experiments with pure hydrogen sulfide have demonstrated the ability of the process to operate at or above atmospheric pressure with an acceptable hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy. Experiments with a wide range of acid-gas compositions have demonstrated that carbon dioxide and water are compatible with the plasma-chemical dissociation process and that they do not appear to create new waste-treatment problems. However, carbon dioxide does have negative impacts on the overall process. First, it decreases the hydrogen production, and second, it increases the hydrogen sulfide dissociation energy.

  7. The use of biodiesel blends on a non-road generator and its impacts on ozone formation potentials based on carbonyl emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Ming; Lu, Mingming; Liang, Fuyan; Tzillah, Aisha; Dendramis, Nancy; Watson, Libya

    2013-01-01

    In this study, emissions of carbonyl compounds from the use B50 and B100 were measured with a non-road diesel generator. A total of 25 carbonyl compounds were identified in the exhaust, including 10 with laboratory-synthesized standards. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein were found as the most abundant carbonyl compounds emitted for both diesel and biodiesel. The sulphur content of diesel fuels and the source of biodiesel fuels were not found to have a significant impact on the emission of carbonyl compounds. The overall maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) was the highest at 0 kW and slightly increased from 25 to 75 kW. The MIR of B100 was the highest, followed by diesel and B50, which is consistent with the emission rates of total carbonyl compounds. This suggests that the use of biodiesel blends may be more beneficial to the environment than using pure biodiesel. -- Highlights: •Carbonyl compound emission from biodiesel blends combustion on a non-road generator. •25 compounds were identified, including 10 by laboratory-synthesized standards. •Sources of biodiesel have insignificant impacts on carbonyl compounds emission. •Sulphur contents have insignificant impacts on carbonyl compounds emission. •MIR of emitted carbonyls decreases in the following order: B100, diesel, B50. -- The study found that B50 resulted in lower total carbonyl emission rates and ozone formation potential resultant from these compounds, whereas both increased with B100

  8. Hydrogen sulfide production from cysteine and homocysteine by periodontal and oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Ohara, Naoya; Yoshimura, Shigeru; Nagashima, Shiori; Takehara, Tadamichi; Nakayama, Koji

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is one of the predominant volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) produced by oral bacteria. This study developed and evaluated a system for detecting hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria. L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane-lyase (METase) and beta carbon-sulfur (beta C-S) lyase were used to degrade homocysteine and cysteine, respectively, to produce hydrogen sulfide. Enzymatic reactions resulting in hydrogen sulfide production were assayed by reaction with bismuth trichloride, which forms a black precipitate when mixed with hydrogen sulfide. The enzymatic activities of various oral bacteria that result in hydrogen sulfide production and the capacity of bacteria from periodontal sites to form hydrogen sulfide in reaction mixtures containing L-cysteine or DL-homocysteine were assayed. With L-cysteine as the substrate, Streptococcus anginosus FW73 produced the most hydrogen sulfide, whereas Porphyromonas gingivalis American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 33277 and W83 and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 produced approximately 35% of the amount produced by the P. gingivalis strains. Finally, the hydrogen sulfide found in subgingival plaque was analyzed. Using bismuth trichloride, the hydrogen sulfide produced by oral bacteria was visually detectable as a black precipitate. Hydrogen sulfide production by oral bacteria was easily analyzed using bismuth trichloride. However, further innovation is required for practical use.

  9. Adaptation of cyanobacteria to the sulfide-rich microenvironment of black band disease of coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jamie L; Richardson, Laurie L

    2009-02-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mat that migrates across living coral colonies lysing coral tissue and leaving behind exposed coral skeleton. The mat is sulfide-rich due to the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, integral members of the BBD microbial community, and the sulfide they produce is lethal to corals. The effect of sulfide, normally toxic to cyanobacteria, on the photosynthetic capabilities of five BBD cyanobacterial isolates of the genera Geitlerinema (3), Leptolyngbya (1), and Oscillatoria (1) and six non-BBD cyanobacteria of the genera Leptolyngbya (3), Pseudanabaena (2), and Phormidium (1) was examined. Photosynthetic experiments were performed by measuring the photoincorporation of [(14)C] NaHCO(3) under the following conditions: (1) aerobic (no sulfide), (2) anaerobic with 0.5 mM sulfide, and (3) anaerobic with 0.5 mM sulfide and 10 microM 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU). All five BBD cyanobacterial isolates tolerated sulfide by conducting sulfide-resistant oxygenic photosynthesis. Five of the non-BBD cyanobacterial isolates did not tolerate sulfide, although one Pseudanabaena isolate continued to photosynthesize in the presence of sulfide at a considerably reduced rate. None of the isolates conducted anoxygenic photosynthesis with sulfide as an electron donor. This is the first report on the physiology of a culture of Oscillatoria sp. found globally in BBD.

  10. Enrichment and immobilization of sulfide removal microbiota applied for environmental biological remediation of aquaculture area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yang-Guo; Zheng, Yu; Tian, Weijun; Bai, Jie; Feng, Gong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2016-01-01

    To remove sulfide in the deteriorating aquaculture sediment and water, sulfide-oxidizing microbiota was enriched from Jiaozhou Bay, China, by using sulfide-rich medium. Composition and structure of microbial communities in the enrichments were investigated by 16S rDNA molecular biotechniques. Results showed that microbial community structure continuously shifted and the abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria, i.e., Desulfobacterium, Desulfococcus and Desulfobacca apparently declined. Several halophile genera, Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, Prochlorococcus, Pediococcus and Thiobacillus predominated finally in the microbiota. The enriched microbiota was capable of removing a maximum of 1000 mg/L sulfide within 12 h with 10% inoculum at pH 7.0, 20–30 °C. After immobilized, the microbiota presented excellent resistance to impact and could completely remove 600 mg/L sulfide in 12 h. Moreover, the immobilized microbiota recovered well even recycled for five times. In conclusion, the immobilized sulfide-removing microbiota showed a quite promising application for biological restoring of sulfide-rich aquaculture environment. - Highlights: • A sulfide-oxidizing microbiota successfully enriched from aquaculture sediment. • Microbiota dominated by Vibrio, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas and Thiobacillus spp. • Sulfide-oxidizing microbiota removed sulfide at an average rate of 100 mg/(L·h). • Immobilized microbiota removed over 85% of sulfide even recycled for five times.

  11. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  12. Pyrite formation and mineral transformation pathways upon sulfidation of ferric hydroxides depend on mineral type and sulfide concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Behrends, Thilo; Hellige, Katrin; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Wan, Moli; Pollok, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of ferric (hydr)oxides with dissolved sulfide does not lead to the instantaneous production of thermodynamically stable products but can induce a variety of mineral transformations including the formation of metastable intermediates. The importance of the various transformation pathways

  13. Kinetic studies of sulfide mineral oxidation and xanthate adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-10-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are few of the most abundant minerals, yet economically insignificant. Their existence with other sulfide minerals leads to an inefficient separation process as well as environmental problems, such as acid mine drainage during mining and processing and SO 2 emissions during smelting process. A part of the present study is focused on understanding their behavior, which leads to undesired flotation and difficulties in separation. The major reasons for the undesired flotation are attributed to the collectorless hydrophobicity and the activation with heavy metal ions. To better understand the collectorless hydrophobicity of pyrite, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) of freshly fractured pyrite electrodes was used to study the oxidation and reduction of the mineral. The EIS results showed that the rate of reaction increases with oxidation and reduction. At moderate oxidizing potentials, the rate of reaction is too slow to replenish hydrophilic iron species leaving hydrophobic sulfur species on the surface. However, at higher potentials, iron species are replaced fast enough to depress its flotation. Effects of pH and polishing were also explored using EIS. Besides collectorless hydrophobicity, the activation of pyrrhotite with nickel ions and interaction with xanthate ions makes the separation more difficult. DETA and SO2 are commonly used as pyrrhotite depressants; however, the mechanism is not very well understood. Contact angle measurements, cyclic voltammetry and Tafel

  14. Protein conjugated with aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation as an independent parameter of the carbonyl stress in the kidney damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina-Navarro Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the well-defined and characterized protein modifications usually produced by oxidation is carbonylation, an irreversible non-enzymatic modification of proteins. However, carbonyl groups can be introduced into proteins by non-oxidative mechanisms. Reactive carbonyl compounds have been observed to have increased in patients with renal failure. In the present work we have described a procedure designed as aldehyde capture to calculate the protein carbonyl stress derived solely from lipid peroxidation. Methods Acrolein-albumin adduct was prepared as standard at alkaline pH. Rat liver microsomal membranes and serum samples from patients with diabetic nephropathy were subjected to the aldehyde capture procedure and aldol-protein formation. Before alkalinization and incubation, samples were precipitated and redisolved in 6M guanidine. The absorbances of the samples were read with a spectrophotometer at 266 nm against a blank of guanidine. Results Evidence showed abundance of unsaturated aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomal membranes and in the serum of diabetic patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. Carbonyl protein and aldol-proteins resulted higher in the diabetic nephropathy patients (p Conclusion The aldehyde-protein adduct represents a non oxidative component of carbonyl stress, independent of the direct amino acid oxidation and could constitute a practical and novelty strategy to measure the carbonyl stress derived solely from lipid peroxidation and particularly in diabetic nephropathy patients. In addition, we are in a position to propose an alternative explanation of why alkalinization of urine attenuates rhabdomyolysis-induced renal dysfunction.

  15. Characterisation and optimisation of a method for the detection and quantification of atmospherically relevant carbonyl compounds in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodigast, M.; Mutzel, A.; Iinuma, Y.; Haferkorn, S.; Herrmann, H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl compounds are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and either emitted primarily from anthropogenic and biogenic sources or they are produced secondarily from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Despite a number of studies about the quantification of carbonyl compounds a comprehensive description of optimised methods is scarce for the quantification of atmospherically relevant carbonyl compounds. Thus a method was systematically characterised and improved to quantify carbonyl compounds. Quantification with the present method can be carried out for each carbonyl compound sampled in the aqueous phase regardless of their source. The method optimisation was conducted for seven atmospherically relevant carbonyl compounds including acrolein, benzaldehyde, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and 2,3-butanedione. O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) was used as derivatisation reagent and the formed oximes were detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The main advantage of the improved method presented in this study is the low detection limit in the range of 0.01 and 0.17 μmol L-1 depending on carbonyl compounds. Furthermore best results were found for extraction with dichloromethane for 30 min followed by derivatisation with PFBHA for 24 h with 0.43 mg mL-1 PFBHA at a pH value of 3. The optimised method was evaluated in the present study by the OH radical initiated oxidation of 3-methylbutanone in the aqueous phase. Methyl glyoxal and 2,3-butanedione were found to be oxidation products in the samples with a yield of 2% for methyl glyoxal and 14% for 2,3-butanedione.

  16. Cross-talk between lipid and protein carbonylation in a dynamic cardiomyocyte model of mild nitroxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Griesser

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS play an important role in the regulation of cardiac function. Increase in ROS/RNS concentration results in lipid and protein oxidation and is often associated with onset and/or progression of many cardiovascular disorders. However, interplay between lipid and protein modifications has not been simultaneously studied in detail so far. Biomolecule carbonylation is one of the most common biomarkers of oxidative stress. Using a dynamic model of nitroxidative stress we demonstrated rapid changes in biomolecule carbonylation in rat cardiomyocytes. Levels of carbonylated species increased as early as 15 min upon treatment with the peroxynitrite donor, 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, and decreased to values close to control after 16 h. Total (lipids+proteins vs. protein-specific carbonylation showed different dynamics, with a significant increase in protein-bound carbonyls at later time points. Treatment with SIN-1 in combination with inhibitors of proteasomal and autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways allowed confirmation of a significant role of the proteasome in the degradation of carbonylated proteins, whereas lipid carbonylation increased in the presence of autophagy/lysosomal inhibitors. Electrophilic aldehydes and ketones formed by lipid peroxidation were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. Molecular identity of reactive species was used for data-driven analysis of their protein targets. Combination of different enrichment strategies with LC-MS/MS analysis allowed identification of more than 167 unique proteins with 332 sites modified by electrophilic lipid peroxidation products. Gene ontology analysis of modified proteins demonstrated enrichment of several functional categories including proteins involved in cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, ion channels and their regulation. Using calcium mobilization assays, the effect of nitroxidative stress on the activity of several ion

  17. Separation of Trace Amount Zn (II Using Additional Carbonyl and Carboxyl Groups Functionalized-Nano Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moghimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of Zn(IIions in water samples has been developed.  The first additional carbonyl and carboxyl functionalized-nano graphene (SPFNano graphene. The presence of additional carbonyl and carboxyl groups located at the edge of the sheets makes GO sheets strongly hydrophilic, allowing them to readily swell and disperse in water. Based on these oxygen functionalities, different model structures of GO were used as absorbent for extraction of Zn (II   ions by solid phase extraction method. The complexes were eluted with HNO3 (2M10% V.V-1 methanol in acetone and determined the analyte by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.  The procedure is based on the selective formation of Zn (II at optimum pH by elution with organic eluents and determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The method is based on complex formation on the surface of the ENVI-18 DISKTM disks modified carbonyl and carboxyl functionalized-nano graphene oxide molecules covalently bonded together followed by stripping of the retained species by minimum amounts of appropriate organic solvents. The elution is efficient and quantitative. The effect of potential interfering ions, pH, SPFNano graphene, amount, stripping solvent, and sample flow rate were also investigated. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the break-through volume was found to about 1000mL providing a preconcentration factor of 500. The maximum capacity of the disks was found to be 456± 3 µg for Zn2+.The limit of detection of the proposed method is 5ng per 1000mL.The method was applied to the extraction and recovery of Zn in different water samples.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of carbonyl iron-carbon nanocomposite: Characterization and electromagnetic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakimeh Pourabdollahi

    Full Text Available In this research, the electromagnetic absorption properties of the carbonyl iron-carbon (CI/C nanocomposite prepared via hydrothermal reaction using glucose as carbon precursor was studied in the range of 8.2–12.4 GHz. In hydrothermal reaction, glucose solution containing CI particles, placed in autoclave for 4 h under 453 K. Using surface coating technology is a method that prevents Cl oxidation and improves CI electromagnetic absorption. The structure, morphology and magnetic performances of the prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The electromagnetic properties including complex permittivity (εr, the permeability (µr, dielectric loss, magnetic loss, reflection loss, and attenuation constant were investigated using a vector network analyzer. For The CI/C nanocomposite, the bandwidth of −10 dB and −20 dB were obtained in the frequency range of 9.8–12.4 and 11.0–11.8 GHz, respectively. As well as, the reflection loss was −46.69 dB at the matching frequency of 11.5 GHz, when the matching thickness was 1.3 mm. While for CI particles the reflection loss for 4.4 mm thickness was −16.86 dB at the matching frequency of 12.3 GHz. The results indicate that the existence layer of carbon on carbonyl iron enhance the electromagnetic absorbing properties. Therefore, this nanocomposite can be suitable for in the radar absorbing coatings. Keywords: Hydrothermal synthesis, Carbonyl iron-carbon nanocomposite, Microwave absorption, Reflection loss

  19. The Drosophila carbonyl reductase sniffer is an efficient 4-oxonon-2-enal (4ONE) reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hans-Jörg; Ziemba, Marta; Kisiela, Michael; Botella, José A; Schneuwly, Stephan; Maser, Edmund

    2011-05-30

    Studies with the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that the enzyme sniffer prevented oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. Mutant flies overexpressing sniffer had significantly extended life spans in a 99.5% oxygen atmosphere compared to wild-type flies. However, the molecular mechanism of this protection remained unclear. Sequence analysis and database searches identified sniffer as a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily with a 27.4% identity to the human enzyme carbonyl reductase type I (CBR1). As CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of the lipid peroxidation products 4HNE and 4ONE, we tested whether sniffer is able to metabolize these lipid derived aldehydes by carbonyl reduction. To produce recombinant enzyme, the coding sequence of sniffer was amplified from a cDNA-library, cloned into a bacterial expression vector and the His-tagged protein was purified by Ni-chelate chromatography. We found that sniffer catalyzed the NADPH-dependent carbonyl reduction of 4ONE (K(m)=24±2 μM, k(cat)=500±10 min(-1), k(cat)/K(m)=350 s(-1) mM(-1)) but not that of 4HNE. The reaction product of 4ONE reduction by sniffer was mainly 4HNE as shown by HPLC- and GC/MS analysis. Since 4HNE, though still a potent electrophile, is less neurotoxic and protein reactive than 4ONE, one mechanism by which sniffer exerts its neuroprotective effects in Drosophila after oxidative stress may be enzymatic reduction of 4ONE. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbonyl Stress and Microinflammation-Related Molecules as Potential Biomarkers in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Ohnuma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This literature review primarily aims to summarize our research, comprising both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, and discuss the possibility of using microinflammation-related biomarkers as peripheral biomarkers in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with schizophrenia. To date, several studies have been conducted on peripheral biomarkers to recognize the potential markers for the diagnosis of schizophrenia and to determine the state and effects of therapy in patients with schizophrenia. Research has established a correlation between carbonyl stress, an environmental factor, and the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia. In addition, studies on biomarkers related to these stresses have achieved results that are either replicable or exhibit consistent increases or decreases in patients with schizophrenia. For instance, pentosidine, an advanced glycation end product (AGE, is considerably elevated in patients with schizophrenia; however, low levels of vitamin B6 [a detoxifier of reactive carbonyl compounds (RCOs] have also been reported in some patients with schizophrenia. Another study on peripheral markers of carbonyl stress in patients with schizophrenia revealed a correlation of higher levels of glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs with higher neurotoxicity and lower levels of soluble receptors capable of diminishing the effects of AGEs. Furthermore, studies on evoked microinflammation-related biomarkers (e.g., soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 have reported relatively consistent results, suggesting the involvement of microinflammation in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We believe that our cross-sectional and longitudinal studies as well as various previous inflammation marker studies that could be interpreted from several perspectives, such as mild localized encephalitis and microvascular disturbance, highlighted the importance of early intervention as prevention and distinguished the possible

  1. A Simple Catalytic Mechanism for the Direct Coupling of α-Carbonyls with Functionalized Amines: A One-Step Synthesis of Plavix

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Ryan W.; Zbieg, Jason R.; Zhu, Shaolin; Li, Wei; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The direct α-amination of ketones, esters, and aldehydes has been accomplished via copper catalysis. In the presence of catalytic copper(II) bromide, a diverse range of carbonyl and amine substrates undergo fragment coupling to produce synthetically useful α-amino substituted motifs. The transformation is proposed to proceed via a catalytically generated α-bromo carbonyl species; nucleophilic displacement of the bromide by the amine then delivers the α-amino carbonyl adduct while the catalyst...

  2. A green synthesis of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds from glyceraldehyde acetonide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia O. Veloso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic behavior of Cs-exchanged and Cs-impregnated zeolites (X and Y was studied using the Knoevenagel condensation between glyceraldehyde acetonide and ethyl acetoacetate in order to produce the corresponding α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compound that is an important intermediate for fine chemicals. The influence of reaction temperature, type of zeolite, and basicity of the sites on the catalytic behavior of the samples was evaluated. All zeolites were active for the studied reaction. The formation of the main condensation product was favored at lower reaction temperatures. Products of further condensations were also observed especially for samples that were only dried before catalytic test.

  3. Chemical reactions in organic monomolecular layers. Condensation of hydrazine on carbonyl functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosilio, Charles; Ruaudel-Teixier, Annie.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is given for chemical reactions of hydrazine (NH 2 -NH 2 ) with different carbonyl functional groups of organic molecules in the solid state, in monomolecular layer structures. The condensation of hydrazine with these molecules leads to conjugated systems by bridging the N-N links, to cyclizations, and also to polycondensations. The reactions investigated were followed up by infrared spectrophotometry, by transmission and metallic reflection. These chemical reactions revealed in the solid phase constitute a polycondensation procedure which is valuable in obtaining organized polymers in monomolecular layers [fr

  4. Contribution of carbonyl photochemistry to aging of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mang, Stephen A.; Henricksen, Dana K.; Bateman, Adam P.

    2008-01-01

    of freshly prepared SOA was estimated to be on the order of' 15 L mol(-1) cm(-1) at 300 rim, implying one carbonyl group in every SOA constituent. The absorption by the SOA material slowly increased in the visible and near-UV during storage of SOA in open air in the dark, presumably as a result......The photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material by actinic UV radiation was investigated. SOA was generated via the dark reaction of ozone and d-limonene, collected onto quartz-fiber filters, and exposed to wavelength-tunable radiation. Photochemical production of CO was monitored...

  5. Determination of carbonyl compounds in air by HPLC; Determinacion de compuestos carbonilicos en aire por HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S; Perez, R M; Campos, A; Gonzalez, D

    1995-07-01

    A method for the determination of seven carbonyl compounds in air is presented. The procedure involve sampling of air by a Sep-Pak Cartridge impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Elution was done with 3 mL of acetonitrile and the eluate was diluted to 5 mL. The analysis was done by HPLC with UV detection and external standard method quantification. It has been achieved relative standard deviations about 5% and detection limits of 80 ng/cartridge for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetoacetonitrile. Three different types of samples (rural, urban, petrol emission) were successfully analyzed. (Author) 12 refs.

  6. 13C NMR investigation of the structure of cationic carbonyls in transition metal zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Taarit, Y.

    1979-01-01

    13 C NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of carbon monoxide adsorbed on transition metal ions hosted in a synthetic faujastite type zeolite. The adsorbed CO species was characterised by a highly shielded carbon nucleus. Using the Pople approximation for the paramagnetic shielding term, the observed chemical shift was rationalised assuming the formation of a cationic carbonyl species with an appreciable electronic transfer from the carbon lone pair to the transition metal ion and negligible π back-bonding if at all. (Auth.)

  7. Copper-catalyzed 1,2-addition of α-carbonyl iodides to alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Hu, Xile

    2015-01-19

    β,γ-Unsaturated ketones are an important class of organic molecules. Herein, copper catalysis has been developed for the synthesis of β-γ-unsaturated ketones through 1,2-addition of α-carbonyl iodides to alkynes. The reactions exhibit wide substrate scope and high functional group tolerance. The reaction products are versatile synthetic intermediates to complex small molecules. The method was applied for the formal synthesis of (±)-trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Electrochemical synthesis of transition element complexes with carboxyl- and carbonyl-containing ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.Yu.; Bolotin, S.N.; Panyushkin, V.T.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of d- and f-elements (E = Cu, Ni, Zn, Nd, Tb, Pr, Gd, Er) with carboxyl- and carbonyl-containing ligands were synthesized by the electrochemical method. The products were characterized by elemental analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and IR spectra. The influence exerted by a number of factors on the process course was studied. The dependence of the electro synthesis parameters on the composition of the forming compounds was established. A new method for anodic synthesis of these compounds was developed [ru

  9. Organocatalyzed Asymmetric α-Oxidation, α-Aminoxylation and α-Amination of Carbonyl Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worawan Bhanthumnavin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Organocatalytic asymmetric α-oxidation and amination reactions of carbonyl compounds are highly useful synthetic methodologies, especially in generating chiral building blocks that previously have not been easily accessible by traditional methods. The concept is relatively new and therefore the list of new catalysts, oxidizing and aminating reagents, as well as new substrates, are expanding at an amazing rate. The scope of this review includes new reactions and catalysts, mechanistic aspects and synthetic applications of α-oxidation, hydroxylation, aminoxylation, amination, hydrazination, hydroxyamination and related α-heteroatom functionalization of aldehydes, ketones and related active methylene compounds published during 2005–2009.

  10. Elevated Levels of Carbonyl Compounds in the Atmosphere of Eastern Himalaya in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, C.; Chatterjee, A.; Majumdar, D.; Raha, S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Srivastava, A.

    2015-12-01

    A first ever study on atmospheric carbonyl compounds (CC) were made over eastern Himalaya in India. Samples were collected over a high altitude hill station, Darjeeling (27.01°N, 88.15°E, 2200 masl) during 2011-2012. It is well known that CC have toxic and carcinogenic properties as well as they have important effects on regional climate. Therefore their presence in the environment is of great concern especially for the Himalayan region because of the ecological and geographical importance of the area. The average annual concentration of total CCs was 293.3 ± 463.9 μgm-3 with maximum during post monsoon (1104.8 ± 568.0 μgm-3) and minimum during winter season (72.2 ± 42.9 μgm-3). Darjeeling experiences huge emissions of carbonaceous pollutants from massive influx of tourists during premonsoon and postmonsoon seasons. Though the emission strength could be comparable, the loss of carbonyls from the atmosphere could be due to photochemical degradation under high solar insolation during premonsoon. Acetone was most abundant species with an annual average concentration of 200.8±352.9 μgm-3 with 70 % contribution to the total CCs measured. Interestingly, acetone over Darjeeling was found to be much higher than most of the metropolitan cities in the world. The average formaldehyde to acetaldehyde ratio (1.64 ± 1.43) over Darjeeling is a good representation of a typical urban atmosphere at this high altitude over this part of Himalaya. High carbonyl concentration over eastern Himalaya compared to other megacities across the globe could be attributed to uncontrolled activities related to development in tourism, high population density and moreover it's unique orography and land use pattern with narrow roads, unplanned township etc. The unscientific treatment of human and animal and other domestic waste is another major concern which significantly contribute to carbonyl and other carbonaceous pollutants over this part of Himalaya.

  11. Selective transformation of carbonyl ligands to organic molecules. Progress report, September 1, 1989--November 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, A.R.

    1992-05-12

    Studies on the carbonylation of ({eta}{sup 5}-indenyl)(L)(CO)Ru-R complexes (L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = CH{sub 2}OMe, CH{sub 3}) have been completed. Particularly noteworthy is that the methoxymethyl complexes readily transform to their acyl derivatives under mild conditions that leave their iron congeners inert towards CO. Surprisingly, even ({eta}{sup 5}-indenyl)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}Ru-CH{sub 3} carbonylates and gives ({eta}{sup 5}-indenyl)(PPh{sub 3})(CO)Ru-C(O)CH{sub 3}. Mechanistic studies on the ``non catalyzed`` hydrosilation of the manganese acyls (CO){sub 5}Mn-C(O)CH{sub 2}R (R = H, OCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}) with Et{sub 3}SiH and of cobalt acetyls (CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3})CoC(O)CH{sub 3} with several monohydrosilanes have been completed. The cobalt acetyls cleanly give ethoxysilanes (not acetaldehyde), and the manganese acyls provide {alpha}-siloxyvinyl complexes Z-(CO){sub 5}Mn-C(OSiEt{sub 3})=CHR (R = H, CH{sub 3}, OCH{sub 3}). Carbonylation and protolytic cleavage of the latter generate pyruvoyl complexes (CO){sub 5}Mn-COCOR (R = CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), formally the products of net ``double carbonylation`` sequences. Studies in progress are concerned with how manganese complexes as diverse as (CO){sub 5}Mn-Y [Y = C(O)R, R, BR - but not SiMe{sub 3} or Mn(CO){sub 5}] and ({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5})Mn(CO){sub 2}L [but not CpMn(CO){sub 3} or CpMn(CO){sub 2}({eta}{sup 2}HSiR{sub 3})] function as efficient hydrosilation catalysts towards Cp(CO){sub 2}FeC(O)CH{sub 3}, for example. These reactions cleanly afford fully characterized {alpha}-siloxyethyl complexes Fp-CH(OSiR{sub 3})CH{sub 3} under conditions where typically Rh(1) hydrosilation catalysts are inactive. Several of these manganese complexes also catalytically hydrosilate organic esters, including lactones, to their ethers R-CH{sub 2}OR; these novel ester reductions occur quantitatively at room temperature and appear to be general in scope.

  12. A Device-Independent Evaluation of Carbonyl Emissions from Heated Electronic Cigarette Solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate how the two main electronic (e- cigarette solvents-propylene glycol (PG and glycerol (GL-modulate the formation of toxic volatile carbonyl compounds under precisely controlled temperatures in the absence of nicotine and flavor additives.PG, GL, PG:GL = 1:1 (wt/wt mixture, and two commercial e-cigarette liquids were vaporized in a stainless steel, tubular reactor in flowing air ranging up to 318°C to simulate e-cigarette vaping. Aerosols were collected and analyzed to quantify the amount of volatile carbonyls produced with each of the five e-liquids.Significant amounts of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were detected at reactor temperatures ≥215°C for both PG and GL. Acrolein was observed only in e-liquids containing GL when reactor temperatures exceeded 270°C. At 318°C, 2.03±0.80 μg of formaldehyde, 2.35±0.87 μg of acetaldehyde, and a trace amount of acetone were generated per milligram of PG; at the same temperature, 21.1±3.80 μg of formaldehyde, 2.40±0.99 μg of acetaldehyde, and 0.80±0.50 μg of acrolein were detected per milligram of GL.We developed a device-independent test method to investigate carbonyl emissions from different e-cigarette liquids under precisely controlled temperatures. PG and GL were identified to be the main sources of toxic carbonyl compounds from e-cigarette use. GL produced much more formaldehyde than PG. Besides formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, measurable amounts of acrolein were also detected at ≥270°C but only when GL was present in the e-liquid. At 215°C, the estimated daily exposure to formaldehyde from e-cigarettes, exceeded United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA and California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA acceptable limits, which emphasized the need to further examine the potential cancer and non-cancer health risks associated with e-cigarette use.

  13. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to

  14. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  15. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamraiz, Umair, E-mail: umairshamraiz@gmail.com; Hussain, Raja Azadar, E-mail: hussainazadar@gamil.com; Badshah, Amin, E-mail: aminbadshah@yahoo.com

    2016-06-15

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite). - Highlights: • This review article presents the synthesis and applications of copper sulfide. • CuS has been used over the years for different applications in nanoscience. • Different synthetic protocols are followed for their preparation which help in the possible modifications in the morphology of CuS.

  16. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  17. Stabilization of sulfide cations: mechanisms relevant to oxidation of peptides and proteins containing methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrowski, K.; Hug, G.L.; Pogocki, D.; Horner, G.; Marciniak, B.; Schoneich, C.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfide radical cations (R 2 S +. ) have recently attracted considerable attention. In particular they are implicated in assorted biological electron transfers where they are likely intermediates in biological redox-processes. There is unambigous theoretical and experimental evidence that R 2 S +. can be stabilized through intramolecular complexation with nucleophiles that are present in neighboring groups. Reactions of this type are of special interest to biology when stabilization of sulfide radical cations derived from methionine, Met(>S +. ) occurs in peptides and proteins. The methionine (Met) residues in these biopolymers are susceptible to attack by Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) during oxidative stress and biological aging. Moreover, the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's, Jacob-Creutzfeld's, and Parkinson's) seems to be strongly linked to the presence in brain tissue of β-amyloid peptide (βAP), human prion protein (hPrP), and an aggregated form of α-synuclein, respectively. These macro- molecules contain methionine(s) with βAP having a Met 35 residue in its C-terminal α-helical domain, hPrP having three out of nine Met-residues (namely Met 205 , Met 206 , and Met 213 ) located within its α-helical segments, and α-synuclein having four Met-residues. The effective neighboring-group interactions would likely involve nucleophilic functionalities in the side chain of amino acids residues. However, very often heteroatoms in peptide bonds are the only nucleophiles present in the vicinity of Met(>S +. ). In this regard, it was recently shown that such interactions play an important role in N-acetylmethione amide and in oligopeptides of the form N-Ac-Gly-Met-Gly and N-Ac-Gly-(Gly) 2 -Met-(Gly) 3 . Intramolecularly bonded sulfide radical cations, Met(>S +. ), were directly observed in these systems with the bonding partner being either the carbonyl oxygen or the amide nitrogen of a peptide bond. Cyclic dipeptides are suitable model

  18. Engineered Trx2p industrial yeast strain protects glycolysis and fermentation proteins from oxidative carbonylation during biomass propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Pastor Rocío

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast biomass production process, protein carbonylation has severe adverse effects since it diminishes biomass yield and profitability of industrial production plants. However, this significant detriment of yeast performance can be alleviated by increasing thioredoxins levels. Thioredoxins are important antioxidant defenses implicated in many functions in cells, and their primordial functions include scavenging of reactive oxygen species that produce dramatic and irreversible alterations such as protein carbonylation. Results In this work we have found several proteins specifically protected by yeast Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2p. Bidimensional electrophoresis and carbonylated protein identification from TRX-deficient and TRX-overexpressing cells revealed that glycolysis and fermentation-related proteins are specific targets of Trx2p protection. Indeed, the TRX2 overexpressing strain presented increased activity of the central carbon metabolism enzymes. Interestingly, Trx2p specifically preserved alcohol dehydrogenase I (Adh1p from carbonylation, decreased oligomer aggregates and increased its enzymatic activity. Conclusions The identified proteins suggest that the fermentative capacity detriment observed under industrial conditions in T73 wine commercial strain results from the oxidative carbonylation of specific glycolytic and fermentation enzymes. Indeed, increased thioredoxin levels enhance the performance of key fermentation enzymes such as Adh1p, which consequently increases fermentative capacity.

  19. Characterization of selected volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carbonyl compounds at a roadside monitoring station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Chiu, Gloria M. Y.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), PAHs and carbonyl compounds are the major toxic components in Hong Kong. Emissions from motor vehicles have been one of the primary pollution sources in the metropolitan areas throughout Hong Kong for a long time. A 1-yr monitoring program for VOCs, PAHs and carbonyl compounds had been performed at a roadside urban station at Hong Kong Polytechnic University in order to determine the variations and correlations of each selected species (VOCs, PAHs and carbonyl compounds). This study is aimed to analyze toxic volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), two carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde), and selective polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The monitoring program started from 16 April 1999 to 30 March 2000. Ambient VOC concentrations, many of which originate from the same sources as particulate PAHs and carbonyls compounds, show significant quantities of benzene, toluene and xylenes. Correlations and multivariate analysis of selected gaseous and particulate phase organic pollutants were performed. Source identification by principle component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis allowed the identification of four sources (factors) for the roadside monitoring station. Factor 1 represents the effect of diesel vehicle exhaust. Factor 2 shows the contribution of aromatic compounds. Factor 3 explains photochemical products—formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Factor 4 explains the effect of gasoline vehicle exhaust.

  20. Carbonyl emission and toxicity profile of diesel blends with an animal-fat biodiesel and a tire pyrolysis liquid fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, R; Guillén-Flores, J; Martínez, J D

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, two diesel fuels, an animal-fat biodiesel and two diesel blends with the animal-fat biodiesel (50vol.%) and with a tire pyrolysis liquid (TPL) fuel (5vol.%) have been tested in a 4-cylinder, 4-stroke, turbocharged, intercooled, 2.0L Nissan diesel automotive engine (model M1D) with common-rail injection system and diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). Carbonyl emissions have been analyzed both before and after DOC and specific reactivity of carbonyl profile has been calculated. Carbonyl sampling was carried out by means of a heated line, trapping the gas in 2,4-DNPH cartridges. The eluted content was then analyzed in an HPLC system, with UV-VIS detection. Results showed, on the one hand, an increase in carbonyl emissions with the biodiesel fraction in the fuel. On the other hand, the addition of TPL to diesel also increased carbonyl emissions. These trends were occasionally different if the emissions were studied after the DOC, as it seems to be selectivity during the oxidation process. The specific reactivity was also studied, finding a decrease with the oxygen content within the fuel molecule, although the equivalent ozone emissions slightly increased with the oxygen content. Finally, the emissions toxicity was also studied, comparing them to different parameters defined by different organizations. Depending on the point of study, emissions were above or below the established limits, although acrolein exceeded them as it has the least permissive values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optical and structural characteristics of lead sulfides thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim Deraman; Bakar Ismail; Samsudi Sakrani; Gould, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Tin sulfide films have been prepared by evaporation technique at 1x10 - 4 torr and at substrate temperatures between 100 to 300 0 C. The films thickness were 52 to 370 nm. From the absorption 1.47 eV and X-ray diffraction patent shows that the composition of films have changed from SnS 2 (at low temperature) to SnS (at higher temperature)

  2. Non-stoichiometry in sulfides produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    and the most volatile component in the film. A very well studied case in the one of oxides, for which the O2 or N2O background gases can reduce the loss of oxygen in the growing films. A much less studied case is the one of sulfides or selenides, such as the solar cell absorber layers of CIGS (Cu(Ga,In)Se2...

  3. Hydrogen sulfide metabolism regulates endothelial solute barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is an important gaseous signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In addition to free H2S, H2S can be oxidized to polysulfide which can be biologically active. Since the impact of H2S on endothelial solute barrier function is not known, we sought to determine whether H2S and its various metabolites affect endothelial permeability. In vitro permeability was evaluated using albumin flux and transendothelial electrical resistance. Different H2S donors were used to examine the effects of exogenous H2S. To evaluate the role of endogenous H2S, mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs were isolated from wild type mice and mice lacking cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, a predominant source of H2S in endothelial cells. In vivo permeability was evaluated using the Miles assay. We observed that polysulfide donors induced rapid albumin flux across endothelium. Comparatively, free sulfide donors increased permeability only with higher concentrations and at later time points. Increased solute permeability was associated with disruption of endothelial junction proteins claudin 5 and VE-cadherin, along with enhanced actin stress fiber formation. Importantly, sulfide donors that increase permeability elicited a preferential increase in polysulfide levels within endothelium. Similarly, CSE deficient MAECs showed enhanced solute barrier function along with reduced endogenous bound sulfane sulfur. CSE siRNA knockdown also enhanced endothelial junction structures with increased claudin 5 protein expression. In vivo, CSE genetic deficiency significantly blunted VEGF induced hyperpermeability revealing an important role of the enzyme for barrier function. In summary, endothelial solute permeability is critically regulated via exogenous and endogenous sulfide bioavailability with a prominent role of polysulfides.

  4. Catalytic oxidation of sulfide in drinking water treatment: activated carbon as catalyst; Katalytische Oxidation von Sulfid bei der Trinkwasseraufbereitung: Aktivkohle als Katalysator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultsch, V; Grischek, T; Wolff, D; Worch, E [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasserchemie; Gun, J [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Div. of Environmental Sciences, Fredy and Nadine Herrmann School of Applied Science

    2001-07-01

    In regions with warm climate and limited water resources high sulfide concentrations in groundwater can cause problems during drinking water treatment. Aeration of the raw water is not always sufficient to ensure the hydrogen sulfide concentration below the odour threshold value for hydrogen sulfide. As an alternative, activated carbon can be used as a catalyst for sulfide oxidation of raw water. The use of different types of activated carbon was investigated in kinetic experiments. Both Catalytic Carbon from Calgon Carbon and granulated activated carbon from Norit showed high catalytic activities. The results of the experiments are discussed with regard to the practical use of activated carbon for the elimination of hydrogen sulfide during drinking water treatment. (orig.)

  5. Benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized polypropylene/halloysite nanotubes composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Mingxian [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guo Baochun, E-mail: psbcguo@scut.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Lei Yanda; Du Mingliang; Jia Demin [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Clay-philic benzothiazole sulfide, capable of donating electrons, is grafted onto polypropylene (PP) backbones when N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), a commonly used accelerator in the tire industry, is included in the processing of PP/halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) composites. CBS decomposes at elevated temperature and yields benzothiazole sulfide radicals, which react with the PP polymeric free radicals generated during the processing of the composites. On the other hand, the benzothiazole group of CBS is reactive to HNTs via electron transferring. The compatibilization between HNTs and PP is thus realized via interfacial grafting and electron transferring mechanism. The interfacial interactions in the compatibilized systems were fully characterized. Compared with the control sample, the dispersion of HNTs and the interfacial bonding are enhanced substantially in the compatibilized composites. The significantly improved mechanical properties and thermal properties of benzothiazole sulfide compatibilized PP/HNTs composites are correlated to the enhanced interfacial property. The present work demonstrates a novel interfacial design via interfacial grafting/electron transferring for the compatibilization of PP/clay composites.

  6. Reduction kinetics of zinc and cadmium sulfides with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgenev, I.S.; Kabisov, I.Kh.; Zviadadze, G.N.; Vasil'eva, O.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetics of reduction processes of zinc sulfide in the temperature range 800-1100 deg C and of cadmium sulfide 600-900 deg C has been stodied. Activation energies and reaction order in terms of hydrogen are calculated. Thermodynamic processes of reduction depend on aggregate state of the metal formed. For vaporous zinc in the temperature range 1050-950 deq C activation energy constitutes 174 kJ/mol, for liquid in the range 900-850 deg - 151 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 1.0. For vaporous cadmium in the temperature range 900-700 deg C activation energy constitutes 144 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 0.86, for liquid in the range 675-600 deg C 127 kJ/mol and 0.8 respectively. The processes of zinc and cadmium sulfide reduction proceed in kinetic regime and are limited by the rate of chemical reaction

  7. Reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Akimasa; Matsuzaki, Ryoko; Saeki, Yuzo

    1978-01-01

    The details of the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide were examined at 20 and 60 0 C. The main products by the reaction were vanadium dichloride oxide, sulfur, and hydrogen chloride. In addition to these products, small amounts of vanadium trichloride, vanadium tetrachloride, disulfur dichloride, and sulfur dioxide were formed. The formations of the above-mentioned reaction products can be explained as follows: The first stage is the reaction between vanadium trichloride oxide and hydrogen sulfide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). Then the resulting sulfur reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + 2S(s)→2VOCl 2 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l). The resulting disulfur dichloride subsequently reacts with the unreacted vanadium trichloride oxide, 2VOCl 3 (l) + S 2 Cl 2 (l)→2VCl 4 (l) + S(s) + SO 2 (g). The resulting vanadium tetrachloride reacts with the sulfur formed during the reaction, 2VCl 4 (l) + 2S(s)→2VCl 3 (s) + S 2 Cl 2 (l), and also reacts with hydrogen sulfide, 2VCl 4 (l) + H 2 S(g)→2VCl 3 (s) + S(s) + 2HCl(g). (auth.)

  8. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims . The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results . H 2 S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H 2 S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ -lyase (CSE) and cystathionine- β -synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H 2 S donor (NaHS, 50  μ mol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H 2 S administration and contributed to elevated H 2 S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions . Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H 2 S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  9. Control of malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds using microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaktasang, Numfon; Min, Hyeong-Sik; Kang, Christina; Kim, Han S

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to control malodorous hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from domestic wastewaters. The electricity production demonstrated a distinct pattern of a two-step increase during 170 h of system run: the first maximum current density was 118.6 ± 7.2 mA m⁻² followed by a rebound of current density increase, reaching the second maximum of 176.8 ± 9.4 mA m⁻². The behaviors of the redox potential and the sulfate level in the anode compartment indicated that the microbial production of hydrogen sulfide compounds was suppressed in the first stage, and the hydrogen sulfide compounds generated from the system were removed effectively as a result of their electrochemical oxidation, which contributed to the additional electricity production in the second stage. This was also directly supported by sulfur deposits formed on the anode surface, which was confirmed by analyses on those solids using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as an elemental analyzer. To this end, the overall reduction efficiencies for HS⁻ and H₂S(g) were as high as 67.5 and 96.4 %, respectively. The correlations among current density, redox potential, and sulfate level supported the idea that the electricity signal generated in the MFC can be utilized as a potential indicator of malodor control for the domestic wastewater system.

  10. Evaluation of methods for monitoring air concentrations of hydrogen sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Janoszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of different branches of industry and a growing fossil fuels mining results in a considerable emission of by-products. Major air pollutants are: CO, CO₂, SO₂, SO₃, H₂S, nitrogen oxides, as well as compounds of an organic origin. The main aspects of this paper is to review and evaluate methods used for monitoring of hydrogen sulfide in the air. Different instrumental techniques were discussed, electrochemical, chromatographic and spectrophotometric (wet and dry, to select the method most suitable for monitoring low levels of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold. Based on the literature review the method for H₂S determination in the air, involving absorption in aqueous zinc acetate and reaction with N,N-dimethylo-p-phenylodiamine and FeCl₃, has been selected and preliminary verified. The adopted method allows for routine measurements of low concentration of hydrogen sulfide, close to its odor threshold in workplaces and ambient air. Med Pr 2013;64(3:449–454

  11. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  12. Effect of ambient hydrogen sulfide on the physical properties of vacuum evaporated thin films of zinc sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Beer Pal [Department of Physics, C.C.S. University, Meerut 250004 (India)], E-mail: drbeerpal@gmail.com; Singh, Virendra [Forensic Science Laboratory, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi 110017 (India); Tyagi, R.C.; Sharma, T.P. [Department of Physics, C.C.S. University, Meerut 250004 (India)

    2008-02-15

    Evaporated thin films of zinc sulfide (ZnS) have been deposited in a low ambient atmosphere of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S {approx}10{sup -4} Torr). The H{sub 2}S atmosphere was obtained by a controlled thermal decomposition of thiourea [CS(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}] inside the vacuum chamber. It has been observed that at elevated substrates temperature of about 200 deg. C helps eject any sulfur atoms deposited due to thermal decomposition of ZnS during evaporation. The zinc ions promptly recombine with H{sub 2}S to give better stoichiometry of the deposited films. Optical spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns and scanning electron micrographs depict the better crystallites and uniformity of films deposited by this technique. These deposited films were found to be more adherent to the substrates and are pinhole free, which is a very vital factor in device fabrication.

  13. A recovery installation for sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides from waste water resulting from hydrogen sulfide fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazilu, Mihai; Costescu, Sanda

    2002-01-01

    An installation for recovery of sodium sulfate and sulfur suspensions from waste water was conceived. It consists from a preheater, vacuum evaporator and a refrigerating system with drum and scraper. This equipment concentration the solution by eliminating in the first stage the water in the vacuum evaporator. The water resulting at this stage is chemically pure and can be discharged in the sewage sludge system. The concentrated solution is then directed to the refrigerating system with drum and scrapper. Here the sodium sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides get crystallized onto the drum surface. The resulting aqueous solution to be discharged in the sewage sludge system is previously analyzed as in case of the absent of the recovery installation, but the amount of pollutants will be much lower because sulfates, thiosulfates and sulfides were already recovered as scales from the drum. These solid scales can be used in detergent industry

  14. Toward Green Acylation of (Heteroarenes: Palladium-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Olefins to Ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Green Friedel–Crafts acylation reactions belong to the most desired transformations in organic chemistry. The resulting ketones constitute important intermediates, building blocks, and functional molecules in organic synthesis as well as for the chemical industry. Over the past 60 years, advances in this topic have focused on how to make this reaction more economically and environmentally friendly by using green acylating conditions, such as stoichiometric acylations and catalytic homogeneous and heterogeneous acylations. However, currently well-established methodologies for their synthesis either produce significant amounts of waste or proceed under harsh conditions, limiting applications. Here, we present a new protocol for the straightforward and selective introduction of acyl groups into (hetero­arenes without directing groups by using available olefins with inexpensive CO. In the presence of commercial palladium catalysts, inter- and intramolecular carbonylative C–H functionalizations take place with good regio- and chemoselectivity. Compared to classical Friedel–Crafts chemistry, this novel methodology proceeds under mild reaction conditions. The general applicability of this methodology is demonstrated by the direct carbonylation of industrial feedstocks (ethylene and diisobutene as well as of natural products (eugenol and safrole. Furthermore, synthetic applications to drug molecules are showcased.

  15. Carbonylation Modification Regulates Na/K-ATPase Signaling and Salt Sensitivity: A Review and a Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Preeya T; Martin, Rebecca; Yan, Yanling; Shapiro, Joseph I; Liu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Na/K-ATPase signaling has been implicated in different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress not only regulates the Na/K-ATPase enzymatic activity, but also regulates its signaling and other functions. While cardiotonic steroids (CTS)-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is an intermediate step in CTS-mediated Na/K-ATPase signaling, increase in ROS alone also stimulates Na/K-ATPase signaling. Based on literature and our observations, we hypothesize that ROS have biphasic effects on Na/K-ATPase signaling, transcellular sodium transport, and urinary sodium excretion. Oxidative modulation, in particular site specific carbonylation of the Na/K-ATPase α1 subunit, is a critical step in proximal tubular Na/K-ATPase signaling and decreased transcellular sodium transport leading to increases in urinary sodium excretion. However, once this system is overstimulated, the signaling, and associated changes in sodium excretion are blunted. This review aims to evaluate ROS-mediated carbonylation of the Na/K-ATPase, and its potential role in the regulation of pump signaling and sodium reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule (RPT).

  16. Determination of carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde and formaldehyde in polyethylene terephthalate containers designated for water conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redžepović Azra S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene terephthalate (PET has in the last several years become the main packaging material for many food products, particularly carbonated beverages and bottled water, as well as for products of chemical industry (packaging of various hygiene maintenance agents, pesticides, solvents, etc.. The strength and permeability properties of PET are very good for packaging of beverages, its resistance to chemicals is high and it has a high degree of transparency. Acetaldehyde and formaldehyde are formed during the thermoforming of PET containers. After cooling, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde remain trapped in the walls of a PET bottle and may migrate into the water after filling and storage. Since there are no migration tests in Serbia prescribed for the determination of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde, the purpose of the paper is to test the quantitative contents of carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde and formaldehyde in PET containers of different volumes, made by various manufacturers of bottled mineral carbonated and noncarbonated water, and exposed to different temperatures. In this study, the migration of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde from PET bottles into mineral carbonated and noncarbonated water was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Taking into consideration that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde have no UV active or fluorescent group, the chromatography shall be preceded by derivatization in a closed system (due to a low boiling point of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde, which shall transform carbonyl compounds into UV active compounds.

  17. Penicitroamide, an Antimicrobial Metabolite with High Carbonylization from the Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. (NO. 24).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zi-Wei; Lv, Meng-Meng; Li, Xue-Shuang; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Cheng-Xiong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Deng, Zhang-Shuang; Zou, Kun; Proksch, Peter

    2016-10-28

    Penicitroamide ( 1 ), a new metabolite with a new framework, was isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the PDB (Potato Dextrose Broth) medium of Penicillium sp. (NO. 24). The endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. (NO. 24) was obtained from the healthy leaves of Tapiscia sinensis Oliv. The structure of penicitroamide ( 1 ) features a bicyclo[3.2.1]octane core unit with a high degree of carbonylization (four carbonyl groups and one enol group). The chemical structure of penicitroamide ( 1 ) was elucidated by analysis of 1D-, 2D-NMR and MS data. In bioassays, penicitroamide ( 1 ) displayed antibacterial potency against two plant pathogens, Erwinia carotovora subsp. Carotovora (Jones) Bersey, et al. and Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. with MIC 50 at 45 and 50 μg/mL. Compound 1 also showed 60% lethality against brine shrimp at 10 μg/mL. Penicitroamide ( 1 ) exhibited no significant activity against A549, Caski, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells with IC 50 > 50 μg/mL. Finally, the possible biosynthetic pathway of penicitroamide ( 1 ) was discussed.

  18. Diverse roles of hydrogen in rhenium carbonyl chemistry: hydrides, dihydrogen complexes, and a formyl derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-11-04

    Rhenium carbonyl hydride chemistry dates back to the 1959 synthesis of HRe(CO)₅ by Hieber and Braun. The binuclear H₂Re₂(CO)₈ was subsequently synthesized as a stable compound with a central Re₂(μ-H)₂ unit analogous to the B₂(μ-H)₂ unit in diborane. The complete series of HRe(CO)(n) (n = 5, 4, 3) and H₂Re₂(CO)(n) (n = 9, 8, 7, 6) derivatives have now been investigated by density functional theory. In contrast to the corresponding manganese derivatives, all of the triplet rhenium structures are found to lie at relatively high energies compared with the corresponding singlet structures consistent with the higher ligand field splitting of rhenium relative to manganese. The lowest energy HRe(CO)₅ structure is the expected octahedral structure. Low-energy structures for HRe(CO)(n) (n = 4, 3) are singlet structures derived from the octahedral HRe(CO)₅ structure by removal of one or two carbonyl groups. For H₂Re₂(CO)₉ a structure HRe₂(CO)₉(μ-H), with one terminal and one bridging hydrogen atom, lies within 3 kcal/mol of the structure Re₂(CO)₉(η²-H₂), similar to that of Re₂(CO)₁₀. For H₂Re₂(CO)(n) (n = 8, 7, 6) the only low-energy structures are doubly bridged singlet Re₂(μ-H)₂(CO)(n) structures. Higher energy dihydrogen complex structures are also found.

  19. Structural insights into the neuroprotective-acting carbonyl reductase Sniffer of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgraja, Tanja; Ulschmid, Julia; Becker, Katja; Schneuwly, Stephan; Klebe, Gerhard; Reuter, Klaus; Heine, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    In vivo studies with the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster have shown that the Sniffer protein prevents age-dependent and oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative processes. Sniffer is a NADPH-dependent carbonyl reductase belonging to the enzyme family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs). The crystal structure of the homodimeric Sniffer protein from Drosophila melanogaster in complex with NADP+ has been determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion and refined to a resolution of 1.75 A. The observed fold represents a typical dinucleotide-binding domain as detected for other SDRs. With respect to the cofactor-binding site and the region referred to as substrate-binding loop, the Sniffer protein shows a striking similarity to the porcine carbonyl reductase (PTCR). This loop, in both Sniffer and PTCR, is substantially shortened compared to other SDRs. In most enzymes of the SDR family this loop adopts a well-defined conformation only after substrate binding and remains disordered in the absence of any bound ligands or even if only the dinucleotide cofactor is bound. In the structure of the Sniffer protein, however, the conformation of this loop is well defined, although no substrate is present. Molecular modeling studies provide an idea of how binding of substrate molecules to Sniffer could possibly occur.

  20. Carbonylation as a key reaction in anaerobic acetone activation by Desulfococcus biacutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Acosta, Olga B; Hardt, Norman; Schink, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Acetone is activated by aerobic and nitrate-reducing bacteria via an ATP-dependent carboxylation reaction to form acetoacetate as the first reaction product. In the activation of acetone by sulfate-reducing bacteria, acetoacetate has not been found to be an intermediate. Here, we present evidence of a carbonylation reaction as the initial step in the activation of acetone by the strictly anaerobic sulfate reducer Desulfococcus biacutus. In cell suspension experiments, CO was found to be a far better cosubstrate for acetone activation than CO2. The hypothetical reaction product, acetoacetaldehyde, is extremely reactive and could not be identified as a free intermediate. However, acetoacetaldehyde dinitrophenylhydrazone was detected by mass spectrometry in cell extract experiments as a reaction product of acetone, CO, and dinitrophenylhydrazine. In a similar assay, 2-amino-4-methylpyrimidine was formed as the product of a reaction between acetoacetaldehyde and guanidine. The reaction depended on ATP as a cosubstrate. Moreover, the specific activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (coenzyme A [CoA] acylating) tested with the putative physiological substrate was found to be 153 ± 36 mU mg(-1) protein, and its activity was specifically induced in extracts of acetone-grown cells. Moreover, acetoacetyl-CoA was detected (by mass spectrometry) after the carbonylation reaction as the subsequent intermediate after acetoacetaldehyde was formed. These results together provide evidence that acetoacetaldehyde is an intermediate in the activation of acetone by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  1. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Carbonylated Proteins from the Striatum and Cortex of Pesticide-Treated Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies indicate exposures to the herbicide paraquat (PQ and fungicide maneb (MB are associated with increased risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Oxidative stress appears to be a premier mechanism that underlies damage to the nigrostriatal dopamine system in PD and pesticide exposure. Enhanced oxidative stress leads to lipid peroxidation and production of reactive aldehydes; therefore, we conducted proteomic analyses to identify carbonylated proteins in the striatum and cortex of pesticide-treated mice in order to elucidate possible mechanisms of toxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were treated biweekly for 6 weeks with saline, PQ (10 mg/kg, MB (30 mg/kg, or the combination of PQ and MB (PQMB. Treatments resulted in significant behavioral alterations in all treated mice and depleted striatal dopamine in PQMB mice. Distinct differences in 4-hydroxynonenal-modified proteins were observed in the striatum and cortex. Proteomic analyses identified carbonylated proteins and peptides from the cortex and striatum, and pathway analyses revealed significant enrichment in a variety of KEGG pathways. Further analysis showed enrichment in proteins of the actin cytoskeleton in treated samples, but not in saline controls. These data indicate that treatment-related effects on cytoskeletal proteins could alter proper synaptic function, thereby resulting in impaired neuronal function and even neurodegeneration.

  2. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of pure copper in synthetic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawasaki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion rate and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of pure copper under anaerobic conditions were studied by immersion tests and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in synthetic seawater containing Na 2 S. The corrosion rate was increased with sulfide concentration both in simple saline solution and in bentnite-sand mixture. The results of SSRT showed that copper was susceptible to intergranular attack; selective dissolution at lower sulfide concentration (less than 0.005 M) and SCC at higher sulfide concentration (0.01 M). It was expected that if the sulfide concentration in groundwater is less than 0.001 M, pure copper is possible to exhibit superior corrosion resistance under anaerobic condition evident by very low corrosion rates and immunity to SCC. In such a low sulfide environment, copper overpack has the potential to achieve super-long lifetimes exceeding several tens of thousands years according to long-term simulations of corrosion based on diffusion of sulfide in buffer material

  3. Effect of Sulfide Concentration on Copper Corrosion in Anoxic Chloride-Containing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Aoni; Man, Cheng; He, Chang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    The structure and property of passive film on copper are strongly dependent on the sulfide concentration; based on this, a series of electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the effect of sulfide concentration on copper corrosion in anaerobic chloride-containing solutions. The cyclic voltammetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the corrosion products formed on copper in anaerobic sulfide solutions comprise Cu2S and CuS. And the corrosion resistance of copper decreased with increasing sulfide concentration and faster sulfide addition, owing to the various structures of the passive films observed by the atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. A p-type semiconductor character was obtained under all experimental conditions, and the defect concentration, which had a magnitude of 1022-1023 cm-3, increased with increasing sulfide concentration, resulting in a higher rate of both film growth and dissolution.

  4. Sulfide phase in the Fe-Ti-S and Fe-C-Ti-S alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinochka, Ya.N.; Balakina, N.A.; Shmelev, Yu.S.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the sulfide phases in Fe-Ti-S and Fe-C-Ti-S alloys was studied. The carbide and the sulfide phase were identified the aid of X-ray spectral microanalysis. It was established that for a small content of titanium and sulfur in ternary Fe-Ti-S alloys the solidification of the γ-solution on the boundaries of dendritic branches is accompanied, along with the precipitation of a sulfide rich in iron of the (Fe, Ti) S type where a small quantity of titanium is dissolved, by the formation of a titanium-bearing sulfide eutectic γ + TiS. The amount of the sulfide eutectic increases with the contents of titanium and sulfur until a purely eutectic alloy is formed. Both carbides and sulfides may be formed in the solidification of quaternary alloys Fe-C-Ti-S

  5. A method for measuring sulfide toxicity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshits, Leonid; Gross, Einav

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine catabolism by gut microbiota produces high levels of sulfide. Excessive sulfide can interfere with colon function, and therefore may be involved in the etiology and risk of relapse of ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how cells/animals regulate the detoxification of sulfide generated by bacterial cysteine catabolism in the gut. Here we describe a simple and cost-effective way to explore the mechanism of sulfide toxicity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans ( C. elegans ). •A rapid cost-effective method to quantify and study sulfide tolerance in C. elegans and other free-living nematodes.•A cost effective method to measure the concentration of sulfide in the inverted plate assay.

  6. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2005-01-01

    in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system accelerates......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutions was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured by electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if biofilm...

  7. Alkaline sulfide pretreatment of an antimonial refractory Au-Ag ore for improved cyanidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Ibrahim; Celep, Oktay; Deveci, Haci

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the alkaline sulfide pretreatment of an antimonial refractory gold and silver ore. In the ore, gold occurs mainly as gold-silver alloys and as associated with quartz and framboidal pyrite grains, and, to a small extent, as the inclusions within antimonial sulfides. Silver is present extensively as antimonial sulfides such as andorite. Alkaline sulfide pretreatment was shown to allow the decomposition of the antimonial sulfide minerals (up to 98% Sb removal) and to remarkably improve the amenability of gold (e.g., from leaching. An increase in reagent concentration (1-4 mol/L Na2S or NaOH) and temperature (20-80°C), and a decrease in particle size seem to produce an enhancing effect on metal extraction. These findings suggest that alkaline sulfide leaching can be suitably used as a chemical pretreatment method prior to the conventional cyanidation for antimonial refractory gold and silver ores.

  8. Complex permeability and permittivity variation of carbonyl iron rubber in the frequency range of 2 to 18 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Medeiros Gama

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The complex dielectric permittivity (e and magnetic permeability (m of Radar Absorbing Materials (RAM based on metallic magnetic particles (carbonyl iron particles embedded in a dielectric matrix (silicon rubber have been studied in the frequency range of 2 to 18 GHz. The relative permeability and permittivity of carbonyl iron-silicon composites for various mass fractions are measured by the transmission/reflection method using a vector network analyzer. The concentration dependence of permittivity and permeability on the frequency is analyzed. In a general way, the results show that e´ parameter shows a more significant variation among the evaluated parameters (e”, m”, m’. The comparison of dielectric and magnetic loss tangents (e”/e” and m”/m’, respectively shows more clearly the variation of both parameters (e and m according to the frequency. It is also observed that higher carbonyl iron content fractions favor both dielectric and magnetic loss tangents.

  9. Leaching of strontium sulfide from produced clinker in conversion furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanian, S. A.; Salehpour, A. R.; Radpour, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Iran is rich in mineral resources one of which is mineral Celestine. Basing on current estimations, the capacity of mineral Celestine is over two million tons, 75-95% of which is strontium sulfate. However; in industries such as Color cathode Ray Tubes, pyrochemical processes, ceramics, paint production, zinc purification processes; strontium sulfate is not a direct feed, rather it is largely consumed in the form of strontium carbonate. Two conventional methods are used to produce strontium carbonate from the sulfate; that is direct reaction and black ash methods. Strontium sulfide, as an intermediate component has a key role in black ash process including strontium sulfate reduction by coke, hence producing and leaching the strontium sulfide by hot water. Finally the reaction of strontium sulfate with sodium carbonate lead to strontium carbonate. In this paper, a system was designed to analyze and optimize the process parameters of strontium sulfide production which is less expensive and available solvent in water. Fundamentally, when strontium sulfide becomes in contact with strontium sulfate; Sr(SH) 2 , and Sr(OH) 2 , are produced. The solubility of strontium sulfide depends on water temperature and the maximum solubility achieved at 90 d egree C . The results showed that in the experimental scale, at water to SrS ratio of 6; they sediment for 45 minutes at 95 d egree C in five operational stages; the separation of 95 and 97.1 percent of imported SrS is possible in effluent of fourth and fifth stages, respectively. Thus; four leaching stages could be recommended for pilot scale plants. Also, the results show that at water to SrS ratio of 8, 40 minutes sedimentation at 85-95 d egree C in one operational stage, the separation of 95 percent separation of inputted SrS, is possible. Solvent leaching process is continued till no smell of sulfur components is felt. It could be used as a key role to determine the number of leaching stages in experiments. Finally, the

  10. Gas/particle partitioning of carbonyls in the photooxidation of isoprene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A new denuder-filter sampling technique has been used to investigate the gas/particle partitioning behaviour of the carbonyl products from the photooxidation of isoprene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. A series of experiments was performed in two atmospheric simulation chambers at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature in the presence of NOx and at a relative humidity of approximately 50%. The denuder and filter were both coated with the derivatizing agent O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl-hydroxylamine (PFBHA to enable the efficient collection of gas- and particle-phase carbonyls respectively. The tubes and filters were extracted and carbonyls identified as their oxime derivatives by GC-MS. The carbonyl products identified in the experiments accounted for around 5% and 10% of the mass of secondary organic aerosol formed from the photooxidation of isoprene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene respectively.

    Experimental gas/particle partitioning coefficients were determined for a wide range of carbonyl products formed from the photooxidation of isoprene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and compared with the theoretical values based on standard absorptive partitioning theory. Photooxidation products with a single carbonyl moiety were not observed in the particle phase, but dicarbonyls, and in particular, glyoxal and methylglyoxal, exhibited gas/particle partitioning coefficients several orders of magnitude higher than expected theoretically. These findings support the importance of heterogeneous and particle-phase chemical reactions for SOA formation and growth during the atmospheric degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons.

  11. Investigation of carbonyl compound sources at a rural site in the Yangtze River Delta region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Chen, Wentai; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua; Zeng, Limin; Hu, Min

    2015-02-01

    Carbonyl compounds are important intermediates in atmospheric photochemistry, but their primary sources are still not understood well. In this work, carbonyls, hydrocarbons, and alkyl nitrates were continuously measured during November 2011 at a rural site in the Yangtze River Delta region of China. Mixing ratios of carbonyls and hydrocarbons showed large fluctuations during the entire measurement. The average level for total measured volatile organic compounds during the pollution episode from 25th to 27th November, 2011 was 91.6 ppb, about 7 times the value for the clean period of 7th-8th, November, 2011. To preliminarily identify toluene sources at this site, the emission ratio of toluene to benzene (T/B) during the pollution episode was determined based on photochemical ages derived from the relationship of alkyl nitrates to their parent alkanes. The calculated T/B was 5.8 ppb/ppb, significantly higher than the values of 0.2-1.7 ppb/ppb for vehicular exhaust and other combustion sources, indicating the dominant influence of industrial emissions on ambient toluene. The contributions of industrial sources to ambient carbonyls were then calculated using a multiple linear regression fit model that used toluene and alkyl nitrates as respective tracers for industrial emission and secondary production. During the pollution episode, 18.5%, 69.0%, and 52.9% of measured formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone were considered to be attributable to industrial emissions. The emission ratios relative to toluene for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone were determined to be 0.10, 0.20 and 0.40 ppb/ppb, respectively. More research on industrial carbonyl emission characteristics is needed to understand carbonyl sources better. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Gas-Phase Reaction of Selected Carbonyls with Cl Atoms between 250 and 340 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, A. S.; Algrim, L.; Abdelhamid, A.; Tyndall, G. S.; Orlando, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonyls are important products from the gas phase degradation of most volatile organic compounds. Their atmospheric reactions therefore have a significant impact on atmospheric composition, particularly in aged air masses. While the reactions of short-chain linear carbonyls are well understood, the chemistry of larger (> C6) and branched carbonyl is more uncertain. To provide insight into these reactions, the reactions of three carbonyls (methyl isopropyl ketone, MIK; di-isopropyl ketone, DIK; and diethyl ketone, DEK) with chlorine atoms were investigated between 250 and 340 K and 1 atm in the presence and absence of NOx and an HO2 source (methanol). Experiments were performed in a photochemical reactor using a combination of long-path Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The kinetics were studied using the relative rate technique with butanone and isopropanol as the reference compounds. The Arrhenius expression for the three rate coefficients was determined to be k(DEK+Cl) = 3.87 x 10-11e(2 × 7 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 , k(MIPK+Cl) = 7.20 x 10-11e(0.2× 8 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 , and k(DIPK+Cl) = 3.33 x 10-10e(-3× 8 kJ/mol)/RT cm3 molecules-1 s-1 . Measured reaction products accounted for 38-72 % of the reacted carbon and were consistent with strong deactivation of the carbon atom adjacent to the carbonyl group with respect to H-atom abstraction by Cl atoms. The product distributions also provide insight into radical recycling from the organic peroxy + HO2 reaction, and the relative rates of isomerization, fragmentation and reaction with O2 for carbonyl-containing alkoxy radicals. Implications of these results will be discussed.

  13. New method to determine the total carbonyl functional group content in extractable particulate organic matter by tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, J; Zheng, W; Marchand, N; Wortham, H

    2008-08-01

    A functional group analysis method was developed to determine the quantitative content of carbonyl functional groups in atmospheric particulate organic matter (POM) using constant neutral loss scanning-tandem mass spectrometry (CNLS-MS/MS). The neutral loss method consists in monitoring the loss of a neutral fragment produced by the fragmentation of a precursor ion in a collision cell. The only ions detected are the daughter ions resulting from the loss of the neutral fragment under study. Then, scanning the loss of a neutral fragment characteristic of a functional group enables the selective detection of the compounds bearing the chemical function under study within a complex mixture. The selective detection of carbonyl functional groups was achieved after derivatization with pentafluorophenylhydrazine (PFPH) by monitoring the neutral loss of C(6)F(5)N (181 amu), which was characteristic of a large panel of derivatized carbonyl compounds. The method was tested on 25 reference mixtures of different composition, all containing 24 carbonyl compounds at randomly determined concentrations. The repeatability and calibration tests were satisfying as they resulted in a relative standard deviation below 5% and a linear range between 0.01 and 0.65 mM with a calculated detection limit of 0.0035 mM. Also, the relative deviation induced by changing the composition of the mixture while keeping the total concentration of carbonyl functional groups constant was less than 20%. These reliability experiments demonstrate the high robustness of the developed procedure for accurate carbonyl functional group measurement, which was applied to atmospheric POM samples. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Antifoaming materials in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) heavy water plants. Thermical stability. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    In Girlder sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants hydrogen sulfide-water systems are inherentely foaming, so the adding of antifoaming materials is of great importance. These may be of high volatility, pyrolizable or chemically unstable in plant operation conditions (water and hydrogen sulfide at 2 MPa, up to 230 deg C). About twenty commercial surfactants were studied from the point of view of their thermical stability. (Author) [es

  15. Application of vanadium incorporated phosphomolybdate supported on the modified kaolinin synthesis of diphenyl carbonate by oxidative carbonylation with phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Meng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Keggin-type molybdophosphoric acid, molybdophosphoric salt and vanadium incorporated molybdophosphoric salt supported on the modified kaolin (MK were investigated as redox co-catalysts for the oxidative carbonylation of phenol to diphenyl carbonate (DPC in the absence of solvent. The 20 wt.% of MnAMPV5 (one kind of vanadium incorporated molybdophosphoric salt loaded on MK showed the highest catalytic activity with the yield of 24.68% and a TON of 306, while the selectivity amounts to nearly 100% in all the carbonylation reactions. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, BET, XPS and H2-TPR. The reusability study showed that the catalysts were stable and active.

  16. Determination of gaseous and particulate carbonyls (glycolaldehyde, hydroxyacetone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nonanal and decanal in the atmosphere at Mt. Tai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kawamura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous and particulate semi-volatile carbonyl compounds were determined every three hours in the atmosphere of Mount Tai (elevation, 1534 m in the North China Plain during 2–5, 23–24 and 25 June 2006 under clear sky conditions. Using a two-step filter cartridge in a series, particulate carbonyls were first collected on a quartz filter and then gaseous carbonyls were collected on a quartz filter impregnated with O-benzylhydroxylamine (BHA. After the two-step derivatization with BHA and N,O-Bis(trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (BSTFA, carbonyl derivatives were measured using a gas chromatography. The gaseous concentrations were obtained as follow: glycolaldehyde (range 0–826 ng m−3, average 303 ng m−3, hydroxyacetone (0–579 ng m−3, 126 ng m−3, glyoxal (46–1200 ng m−3, 487 ng m−3, methylglyoxal (88–2690 ng m−3, 967 ng m−3, n-nonanal (0–500 ng m−3, 89 ng m−3, and n-decanal (0–230 ng m−3, 39 ng m−3. These concentrations are among the highest ever reported in the urban and forest atmosphere. We found that gaseous α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal are more than 20 times more abundant than particulate carbonyls and that glycolaldehyde is one order of magnitude more abundant than in aerosol phase. In contrast, hydroxyacetone and normal aldehydes (nonanal and decanal are equally present in both phases. Time-resolved variations of carbonyls did not show any a clear diurnal pattern, except for hydroxyacetone. We found that glyoxal, methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde positively correlated with levoglucosan (a tracer of biomass burning, suggesting that a contribution from field burning of agricultural wastes (wheat crops is significant for the bifunctional carbonyls in the atmosphere of Mt. Tai. Upward transport of the pollutants to the mountaintop from the low lands in the North China Plain is a major process to control the distributions of carbonyls in the upper atmosphere over Mt. Tai.

  17. Reactions of carbonyl compounds with α,β-unsaturated nitriles as a convenient pathway to carbo- and heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharanin, Yu A; Goncharenko, M P; Litvinov, Victor P

    1998-01-01

    Published data on the methods for synthesis of carbo- and heterocyclic compounds based on reactions of α,β-unsaturated nitriles with carbonyl compounds and activated phenols are surveyed. It is demonstrated that all these reactions occur via nucleophilic addition of the carbanion generated from a carbonyl compound to the double bond of an unsaturated nitrile (the Michael reaction). The main routes of transformation of the adducts into carbo- and heterocyclic compounds are considered. The methods for regioselective preparation of fused 4H-pyrans or 1,4-dihydropyridines by varying conditions of cyclisation of Michael adducts are discussed. The bibliography includes 249 references.

  18. Microwave electromagnetic properties of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qing Yuchang; Zhou Wancheng; Luo Fa; Zhu Dongmei

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic characteristics of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coatings were studied. The reflection loss of the coatings exceeds -10 dB at 8-18 GHz and -9 dB at 2-18 GHz when the coating thickness is 1 and 3 mm, respectively. The dielectric and magnetic absorbers filled coatings possess excellent microwave absorption, which could be attributed to the proper incorporate of the multi-polarization mechanisms as well as strong natural resonance. It is feasible to develop the thin and wideband microwave absorbing coatings using carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder.

  19. Microwave electromagnetic properties of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2010-02-01

    The electromagnetic characteristics of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coatings were studied. The reflection loss of the coatings exceeds -10 dB at 8-18 GHz and -9 dB at 2-18 GHz when the coating thickness is 1 and 3 mm, respectively. The dielectric and magnetic absorbers filled coatings possess excellent microwave absorption, which could be attributed to the proper incorporate of the multi-polarization mechanisms as well as strong natural resonance. It is feasible to develop the thin and wideband microwave absorbing coatings using carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder.

  20. Composition tunable cobalt–nickel and cobalt–iron alloy nanoparticles below 10 nm synthesized using acetonated cobalt carbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schooneveld, Matti M. van; Campos-Cuerva, Carlos; Pet, Jeroen; Meeldijk, Johannes D.; Rijssel, Jos van; Meijerink, Andries; Erné, Ben H.; Groot, Frank M. F. de

    2012-01-01

    A general organometallic route has been developed to synthesize Co x Ni 1−x and Co x Fe 1−x alloy nanoparticles with a fully tunable composition and a size of 4–10 nm with high yield. In contrast to previously reported synthesis methods using dicobalt octacarbonyl (Co 2 (CO) 8 ), here the cobalt–cobalt bond in the carbonyl complex is first broken with anhydrous acetone. The acetonated compound, in the presence of iron carbonyl or nickel acetylacetonate, is necessary to obtain small composition tunable alloys. This new route and insights will provide guidelines for the wet-chemical synthesis of yet unmade bimetallic alloy nanoparticles.

  1. Spectral induced polarization and electrodic potential monitoring of microbially mediated iron sulfide transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Susan; Personna, Y.R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.; O' Brien, M.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-02-15

    Stimulated sulfate-reduction is a bioremediation technique utilized for the sequestration of heavy metals in the subsurface.We performed laboratory column experiments to investigate the geoelectrical response of iron sulfide transformations by Desulfo vibriovulgaris. Two geoelectrical methods, (1) spectral induced polarization (SIP), and (2) electrodic potential measurements, were investigated. Aqueous geochemistry (sulfate, lactate, sulfide, and acetate), observations of precipitates (identified from electron microscopy as iron sulfide), and electrodic potentials on bisulfide ion (HS) sensitive silver-silver chloride (Ag-AgCl) electrodes (630 mV) were diagnostic of induced transitions between an aerobic iron sulfide forming conditions and aerobic conditions promoting iron sulfide dissolution. The SIP data showed 10m rad anomalies during iron sulfide mineralization accompanying microbial activity under an anaerobic transition. These anomalies disappeared during iron sulfide dissolution under the subsequent aerobic transition. SIP model parameters based on a Cole-Cole relaxation model of the polarization at the mineral-fluid interface were converted to (1) estimated biomineral surface area to pore volume (Sp), and (2) an equivalent polarizable sphere diameter (d) controlling the relaxation time. The temporal variation in these model parameters is consistent with filling and emptying of pores by iron sulfide biofilms, as the system transitions between anaerobic (pore filling) and aerobic (pore emptying) conditions. The results suggest that combined SIP and electrodic potential measurements might be used to monitor spatiotemporal variability in microbial iron sulfide transformations in the field.

  2. Effect of sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates in inversed fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa-Gomez, D., E-mail: d.villagomez@unesco-ihe.org [Core Pollution Prevention and Control, UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands); Ababneh, H.; Papirio, S.; Rousseau, D.P.L.; Lens, P.N.L. [Core Pollution Prevention and Control, UNESCO-IHE, Institute for Water Education, PO Box 3015, 2601 DA Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Sulfide concentration governs the location of metal precipitates in sulfate reducing bioreactors. {yields} High dissolved sulfide induces metal precipitation in the bulk liquid as fines. {yields} Low dissolved sulfide concentrations yield local supersaturation and thus metal precipitation in the biofilm. -- Abstract: The effect of the sulfide concentration on the location of the metal precipitates within sulfate-reducing inversed fluidized bed (IFB) reactors was evaluated. Two mesophilic IFB reactors were operated for over 100 days at the same operational conditions, but with different chemical oxygen demand (COD) to SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio (5 and 1, respectively). After a start up phase, 10 mg/L of Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn each were added to the influent. The sulfide concentration in one IFB reactor reached 648 mg/L, while it reached only 59 mg/L in the other one. In the high sulfide IFB reactor, the precipitated metals were mainly located in the bulk liquid (as fines), whereas in the low sulfide IFB reactor the metal preciptiates were mainly present in the biofilm. The latter can be explained by local supersaturation due to sulfide production in the biofilm. This paper demonstrates that the sulfide concentration needs to be controlled in sulfate reducing IFB reactors to steer the location of the metal precipitates for recovery.

  3. Enhanced sulfidation xanthate flotation of malachite using ammonium ions as activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Ma, Wenhui; Mao, Yingbo; Deng, Jiushuai; Wen, Shuming

    2017-05-18

    In this study, ammonium ion was used to enhance the sulfidation flotation of malachite. The effect of ammonium ion on the sulfidation flotation of malachite was investigated using microflotation test, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, zeta potential measurements, and scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM). The results of microflotation test show that the addition of sodium sulfide and ammonium sulfate resulted in better sulfidation than the addition of sodium sulfide alone. The results of ICP analysis indicate that the dissolution of enhanced sulfurized malachite surface is significantly decreased. Zeta potential measurements indicate that a smaller isoelectric point value and a large number of copper-sulfide films formed on the malachite surface by enhancing sulfidation resulted in a large amount of sodium butyl xanthate absorbed onto the enhanced sulfurized malachite surface. EDS semi-quantitative analysis and XPS analysis show that malachite was easily sulfurized by sodium sulfide with ammonium ion. These results show that the addition of ammonium ion plays a significant role in the sulfidation of malachite and results in improved flotation performance.

  4. Microbial oxidation of soluble sulfide in produced water from the Bakkeen Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevertz, D.; Zimmerman, S. [Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Jenneman, G.E. [Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The presence of soluble sulfide in produced water results in problems for the petroleum industry due to its toxicity, odor, corrosive nature, and potential for wellbore plugging. Sulfide oxidation by indigenous nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) present in brine collected from wells at the Coleville Unit (CVU) in Saskatchewan, Canada, was investigated. Sulfide oxidation took place readily when nitrate and phosphate were added to brine enrichment cultures, resulting in a decrease in sulfide levels of 99-165 ppm to nondetectable levels (< 3.3 ppm). Produced water collected from a number of producing wells was screened to determine the time required for complete sulfide oxidation, in order to select candidate wells for treatment. Three wells were chosen, based on sulfide removal in 48 hours or less. These wells were treated down the backside of the annulus with a solution containing 10 mM KNO{sub 3} and 100 {mu}M NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Following a 24- to 72-hour shut-in, reductions in pretreatment sulfide levels of greater than 90% were observed for two of the wells, as well as sustained sulfide reductions of 50% for at least two days following startup. NRB populations in the produced brine were observed to increase significantly following treatment, but no significant increases in sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of stimulating indigenous populations of NRB to remediate and control sulfide in produced brine.

  5. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-07-15

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chuan; Ren Nanqi; Wang Aijie; Liu Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed.

  7. Copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization-oxygenation of thiocarbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen: an efficient method for the preparation of oxygen isotopically labeled carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Suenami, Aiko; Yoshida, Atsunori; Murai, Toshiaki

    2007-06-21

    A novel copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization reaction of thiocarbonyl compounds, using molecular oxygen as an oxidant and leading to formation of carbonyl compounds, has been developed, and the utility of the process is demonstrated by its application to the preparation of a carbonyl-18O labeled sialic acid derivative.

  8. On the Reaction of Carbonyl Diphosphonic Acid with Hydroxylamine and O-alkylhydroxylamines: Unexpected Degradation of P-C-P Bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, Olga A; Yanvarev, Dmitry V; Novikov, Roman A; Kornev, Alexey B; Puljulla, Elina; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Khomutov, Alex R; Kochetkov, Sergey N

    2017-06-23

    Derivatives of methylenediphosphonic acid possess wide spectra of biological activities and are used in enzymology as research tools as well as in practical medicine. Carbonyl diphosphonic acid is a promising starting building block for synthesis of functionally substituted methylenediphosphonates. Investigation of the interaction of carbonyl diphosphonic acid with hydroxylamine clearly demonstrates that it is impossible to isolate oxime within the pH range 2-12, while only cyanophosphonic and phosphoric acids are the products of the fast proceeding Beckmann-like fragmentation. In the case of O -alkylhydroxylamines, corresponding alcohols are found in the reaction mixtures in addition to cyanophosphonic and phosphoric acids. Therefore, two residues of phosphonic acid being attached to a carbonyl group provide new properties to this carbonyl group, making its oximes very unstable. This principally differs carbonyl diphosphonic acid from structurally related phosphonoglyoxalic acid and other α-ketophosphonates.

  9. Relative flotation response of zinc sulfide: Mineral and precipitate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, S.R.; Finch, J.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering; Zhou, Z.; Xu, Z. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    1998-04-01

    Flotation continues to extend to nonmineral applications, including recycling of materials, soil remediation, and effluent treatment. A study has been conducted to compare the floatability of fine zinc sulfide (ZnS) precipitates and sphalerite particles. The floatability of the precipitates was significantly poorer compared to sphalerite particles when xanthate was used as the collector. The floatability was improved by using dodecylamine as the collector, and the difference in floatability between the precipitates was further improved significantly by incorporating a hydrodynamic cavitation tube in a conventional (mechanical) flotation cell. The improved kinetics was attributed to in-situ gas nucleation on the precipitates.

  10. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. (Portland State Univ., OR (USA))

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  11. Synthesis of copper sulfide nanotube in the hydrogel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Changhui; Zhu Yulan; Lu Ran; Xue Pengchong; Bao Chunyan; Liu Xinli; Fei Zhuping; Zhao Yingying

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the preparation of copper sulfide (CuS) nanotubes using hydrogel based on N-lauroylalanine as template under mild condition. The resulting samples are examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is found that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds play an important role on the formation of the hydrogel and the Cu 2+ coordination gel. The formation process of CuS nanotube is also discussed

  12. Synthesis of Lead Sulfide Nanoparticles by Chemical Precipitation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongad, L S; Sharma, A; Banerjee, M; Jain, A

    2016-01-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical precipitation method (CPM) with the assistance of H 2 S gas. The microstructure and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns of the PbS nanoparticles reveal formation of cubic phase. To investigate the quality of prepared nanoparticles, the particles size, lattice constant, strain, dislocation density etc. have been determined using XRD. TEM images reveal formation of cubic nanoparticles and the particle size determined from TEM images agree well with those from XRD. (paper)

  13. Microbial Oxidation of Iron Sulfides in Anaerobic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaclavkova, Sarka

    Abstract (shortened): Iron sulfides (FeSx), representing 0.04-10 % of Danish dry soil weight, oxidize in a presence of oxygen, releasing sulfuric acid and free iron. Environmental impact of FeSx oxidation is commonly seen on agricultural sites cultivated by drainage as acid sulfate soil formation....... MISON was found to count for about 1/3 of the net NO3- reduction in MISON active environments, despite the presence of alternative electron donor, organic carbon. The rate of MISON was found to be dependent on the available reactive surface area of FeSx and on the microorganism involved. The findings...

  14. Identification of the non-pertechnetate species in Hanford waste tanks, Tc(I) carbonyl complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Shuh, David K.; Schroeder, Norman C.; Ashley, Kenneth R.

    2003-10-16

    Immobilization of the high-level nuclear waste stored at the Hanford Reservation has been complicated by the presence of soluble, lower-valent technetium species. Previous work by Schroeder and Blanchard has shown that these species cannot be removed by ion-exchange and are difficult to oxidize. The Tc-K edge XANES spectra of the species in Tanks SY-101 and SY-103 were reported by Blanchard, but they could not be assigned to any known technetium complex. We report that the XANES spectra are most likely those of Tc(I) carbonyl species, especially fac-Tc(CO){sub 3}(gluconate){sup 2-}. This is further supported by EXAFS and {sup 99}Tc-NMR studies in nonradioactive simulants of these tank wastes.

  15. Catalytic synthesis of aromatic diisocyanates by means of carbonylation of nitrocompounds with carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefedov, B K; Manov-Yuvenskii, V I; Khoshdurdev, Kh O; Novikov, S S [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii

    1977-02-11

    The development of an active and selective heterogeneous catalyst for synthesis of aromatic diisocyanates has been studied. The catalytic ability of the catalyst PdO-MoO/sub 3/-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ deposited on ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has been investigated in the reactions of carbonylation of aromatic dinitrocompounds with carbon oxide. The effect of the catalyst composition, method of catalyst production, reaction temperature and pressure on the catalytic ability have been studied. It has been established that the catalyst PdO-MoO/sub 3/-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/(2-6:1:1) deposited on ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is highly active and selective in the reactions of carbonilation of aromatic dinitrocompounds at 210 deg and 300 atm. It has been used for synthesis of aromatic diisocyanates in yield 32-75%.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Low Solubility Poly Carbonyl Urea as a Slow Release Fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Sun, X.

    2016-01-01

    Low solubility poly carbonyl urea has been successfully synthesized by the reaction of urea with methyl carbamate (MC) under the conditions of potassium carbonate as an initiator. It was characterized by FT-IR, /sup 13/C-NMR, and elemental analyser. In addition, the influences of the quantity of initiator, reaction temperature, reaction time and the molar ratio of starting materials on the conversion are discussed in detail. All those observations suggest that when initiator as 10 wt percent of urea, the reaction temperature 160 Degree C, 6 h, and n(urea):n(MC)=1:10, the reaction conversion rate can reach 78.4 percent. Moreover, the novel procedure is reported for the first time and has a significant N slow release properties, the N release in soil was 80 percent over 30 days. (author)

  17. A Moessbauer effect study of the bonding in several organoiron carbonyl clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, G.J.; O'Brien, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    After a brief review of the applications of the Moessbauer effect to cyclopentadienyl containing compounds, the chemistry and spectral properties of the various iron carbonyl complexes are described. The electronic properties of a series of trinuclear and tetranuclear organoiron clusters have been investigated through Fenske-Hall self-consistent field molecular orbital calculations, and the results are compared with the Moessbauer effect isomer shifts. A linear correlation is found between the Slater effective nuclear charge, as calculated from the Fenske-Hall partial orbital occupancy factors, and the isomer shift. In these compounds the 4s orbital populations are rather constant. However, the cis and trans isomers of [CpFe(CO) 2 ] 2 have a significantly lower 4s orbital populations. In this case, the reduced 4s population must be accounted for by adding it to the effective nuclear charge to obtain a good correlation with the isomer shift. (orig.)

  18. Protonation Sites, Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Computational Calculations of o-Carbonyl Carbazolequinone Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cifuentes, Maximiliano; Clavijo-Allancan, Graciela; Zuñiga-Hormazabal, Pamela; Aranda, Braulio; Barriga, Andrés; Weiss-López, Boris; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2016-07-05

    A series of a new type of tetracyclic carbazolequinones incorporating a carbonyl group at the ortho position relative to the quinone moiety was synthesized and analyzed by tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS-MS), using Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) to dissociate the protonated species. Theoretical parameters such as molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), local Fukui functions and local Parr function for electrophilic attack as well as proton affinity (PA) and gas phase basicity (GB), were used to explain the preferred protonation sites. Transition states of some main fragmentation routes were obtained and the energies calculated at density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP level were compared with the obtained by ab initio quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitation (QCISD). The results are in accordance with the observed distribution of ions. The nature of the substituents in the aromatic ring has a notable impact on the fragmentation routes of the molecules.

  19. Microbial carbonylation and hydroxylation of 20(R)-panaxadiol by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bin; Chen, Zhihua; Zhai, Xuguang; Yin, Guibo; Ai, Yafei; Chen, Guangtong

    2018-04-01

    20(R)-panaxadiol (PD) was metabolised by the fungus Aspergillus niger AS 3.3926 to its C-3 carbonylated metabolite and five other hydroxylated metabolites (1-6). Their structures were elucidated as 3-oxo-20(R)-panaxadiol (1), 3-oxo-7β-hydroxyl- 20(R)-panaxadiol (2), 3-oxo-7β,23α-dihydroxyl-20(R)-panaxadiol (3), 3,12-dioxo- 7β,23β-dihydroxyl-20(R)-panaxadiol (4), 3-oxo-1α,7β-dihydroxyl-20(R)-panaxadiol (5) and 3-oxo-7β,15β-dihydroxyl-20(R)-panaxadiol (6) by spectroscopic analysis. Among them, compounds 2-6 were new compounds. Pharmacological studies revealed that compound 6 exhibited significant anti-hepatic fibrosis activity.

  20. Magnetomechanical properties of composites and fibers made from thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) and carbonyl iron powder (CIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrödner, Mario; Pflug, Günther

    2018-05-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAE) made from composites of five thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) of different stiffness with carbonyl iron powder (CIP) as magnetic component were investigated. The composites were produced by melt blending of the magnetic particles with the TPEs in a twin-screw extruder. The resulting materials were characterized by ac permeability testing, stress-strain measurements with and without external magnetic field and magnetically controlled bending of long cylindrical rods in a homogenous magnetic field. The magnetic field necessary for deflection of the rods decreases with decreasing modulus and increasing iron particle content. This effect can be used e.g. for magnetically controlled actuation. Some highly filled MAE show a magnetic field induced increase of Young's modulus. Filaments could be spun from some of the composites.