WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbonyl sulfide

  1. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  2. Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species: Carbonyl Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts satisfact......A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has been developed, based on a critical evaluation of data from the literature. The mechanism has been validated against experimental results from batch reactors, flow reactors, and shock tubes. The model predicts...... by the competition between chain‐branching and ‐propagating steps; modeling predictions are particularly sensitive to the branching fraction for the OCS + O reaction to form CO + SO or CO2 + S....

  3. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, Steven J.; Kasting, James F.

    1995-04-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (June 15, 1991), and the subsequent cooling of the earth's lower atmosphere [Dutton and Christy, 1992; Minnis et al., 1993] shows that stratospheric aerosols can have a strong effect on the earth's climate. This supports the notion that the intentional enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer through increased carbonyl sulfide (OCS) emissions might be an effective means for counteracting global warming. Through the use of a one-dimensional photochemical model, we investigate what effect such a program might have on global average stratospheric ozone. In addition, we consider the impact of enhanced OCS emissions on rainwater acidity and on the overall health of both plants and animals. We find that while the warming produced by a single CO2 doubling (1 to 4°C) might be offset with ozone losses of less than 5%, any attempt to use carbonyl sulfide as a permanent solution to global warming could result in depletion of global average ozone by 30% or more. We estimate that in order to achieve cooling of 4°C rainwater pH would fall to between 3.5 and 3.8. Finally, a 4°C cooling at the surface will require that ambient near ground OCS levels rise to above 10 ppmv which is probably greater than the safe exposure limit for humans. Thus, enhanced OCS emissions do not provide an environmentally acceptable solution to the problem of global warming.

  4. Carbonyl Sulfides as Possible Intermediates in the Photolysis of Oxathiiranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Snyder, J. P.; Holm, A.

    1981-01-01

    of sulfine to ketone via the oxathiirane and the subsequent blue intermediate implies the absence of triplet and biradical singlet transients. The unknown carbonyl sulfide functionality, R2C&z.dbnd;O&z.dbnd;S, thereby emerges as a strong candidate for producing the visible absorption. Comparison of the wave...... functions for CH2&z.dbnd;S&z.dbnd;O and CH2&z.dbnd;O&z.dbnd;S arising from MNDO limited CI geometry optimizations leads to the conclusion that the carbonyl sulfide structure is best described as a zwitterion rather than as a singlet biradical. The failure to observe cycloaddition products between the blue...

  5. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  6. Mechanism of heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Xu, Wenqing; Yu, Yunbo

    2007-05-24

    Heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) under ambient conditions was investigated by in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It reveals that OCS can be catalytically hydrolyzed by surface hydroxyl on MgO to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and then H2S can be further catalytically oxidized by surface oxygen or gaseous oxygen on MgO to form sulfite (SO3(2-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)). Hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) was found to be the crucial intermediate. Surface hydrogen sulfide (HS), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and surface sulfite (SO3(2-)) were also found to be intermediates for the formation of sulfate. Furthermore, the surface hydroxyl contributes not only to the formation of HSCO2- but also to HSCO2- decomposition. On the basis of experimental results, the heterogeneous reaction mechanism of OCS on MgO was discussed.

  7. Uptake and conversion of carbonyl sulfide in a lawn soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Mu, Yujing; Geng, Chunmei; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong; Zhang, Yuanhang

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange fluxes between a lawn soil and the atmosphere as well as influencing factors (temperature and water content of soil) were investigated using a static cuvette. The optimal soil temperature and water content for COS consumption were about 298 K and 12.5%, respectively. The converting products of the consumed COS in the lawn soil were researched using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The peaks of gas-phase products of CO2 and surface HCO3-, HS-, SO32-, HSO3-, and SO42- species were observed. The possible mechanism of COS conversion in the lawn soil was discussed. The conversion rates of consumed COS into water-soluble sulfate in the lawn soil were studied by ion chromatography (IC). The experimental results show that about 50% sulfur from the soil consumed COS was eventually converted into water-soluble sulfate.

  8. Tropical sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthor, Norbert; Höpfner, Michael; Baker, Ian T.; Berry, Joe; Campbell, Elliott; Kawa, Stephan R.; Krysztofiak, Gisele; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Stiller, Gabriele; Stinecipher, Jim; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    According to current budget estimations the seasonal variation of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is governed by oceanic release and vegetation uptake. Its assimilation by plants is assumed to be similar to the photosynthetic uptake of CO2 but, contrary to the latter process, to be irreversible. Therefore COS has been suggested as co-tracer of the carbon cycle. Observations of COS, however, are sparse, especially in tropical regions. We use the comprehensive data set of spaceborne measurements of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) to analyze its global distribution. Two major features are observed in the tropical upper troposphere around 250 hPa: enhanced amounts over the western Pacific and the Maritime Continent, peaking around 550 pptv in boreal summer, and a seasonally varying depletion of COS extending from tropical South America to Africa. The large-scale COS depletion, which in austral summer amounts up to -40 pptv as compared to the rest of the respective latitude band, has not been observed before and reveals the seasonality of COS uptake through tropical vegetation. The observations can only be reproduced by global models, when a large vegetation uptake and a corresponding increase in oceanic emissions as proposed in several recent publications is assumed.

  9. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  10. Carbonyl Sulfide for Tracing Carbon Fluxes Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. Elliott [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Berry, Joseph A. [Carnegie Inst. of Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Billesbach, Dave [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Torn, Margaret S [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zahniser, Mark [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Seibt, Ulrike [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Maseyk, Kadmiel [Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France)

    2016-04-01

    The April-June 2012 campaign was located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site Central Facility and had three purposes. One goal was to demonstrate the ability of current instrumentation to correctly measure fluxes of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS). The approach has been describe previously as a critical approach to advancing carbon cycle science1,2, but requires further investigation at the canopy scale to resolve ecosystem processes. Previous canopy-scale efforts were limited to data rates of 1Hz. While 1 Hz measurements may work in a few ecosystems, it is widely accepted that data rates of 10 to 20 Hz are needed to fully capture the exchange of traces gases between the atmosphere and vegetative canopy. A second goal of this campaign was to determine if canopy observations could provide information to help interpret the seasonal double peak in airborne observations at SGP of CO2 and COS mixing ratios. A third goal was to detect potential sources and sinks of COS that must be resolved before using COS as a tracer of gross primary productivity (GPP).

  11. Regional-Scale Carbon Flux Partitioning Using Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Naser, M.; Campbell, J. E.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous analysis of atmospheric concentrations of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon dioxide (CO2) has been proposed as an approach to partitioning gross primary production and respiration fluxes at regional and global scales. The basis for this approach was that the observation and regional gradients in atmospheric CO2 are dominated by net ecosystem fluxes while regional gradients in atmospheric COS are dominated by GPP-related plant uptake. Here we investigate the spatial and temporal gradients in airborne COS and CO2 measurements in comparison to flux estimates from ecosystem models and eddy covariance methods over North America. The spatial gradients in the ecosystem relative uptake (ERU), the normalized ratio of COS and CO2 vertical gradients, were consistent with the theoretical relationship to flux estimates from ecosystem models and eddy covariance methods. The seasonality of the gross primary productivity flux estimates was consistent with airborne observations in the midwestern region but had mixed results in the southeastern region. Inter-annual changes in the ERU and regional drought index data suggested a potential relationship between drought stress and low ratios of gross primary production to net ecosystem exchange.

  12. Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YongChun; LIU JunFeng; HE Hong; YU YunBo; XUE Li

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on mineral oxides including SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, ZnO and TiO2, which are the main components of atmospheric particles, were investigated using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS), ion chromatography (IC), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The main products and intermediates of the heterogeneous oxidation of OCS on these oxides were identified with in situ DRIFTS and IC. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were also discussed. It is found that the reaction mechanism on these mineral oxides is the same as that on Al2O3 for the same final products and the intermediates at room temperature. Namely, OCS can be catalytically oxidized to produce surface SO42- species and gaseous CO2 through the surface hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) and HSO3- species. The activity series for heterogeneous oxidation of OCS follows: Al2O3 ≈ CaO>MgO>TiO2 ≈ ZnO>Fe2O3>SiO2. The specific area, basic hydroxyl and surface basicity of these oxides have effect on the reactivity. This study suggests that heterogeneous reactions of OCS on mineral dust may be an unneglectable sink of OCS.

  13. Carbonyl sulfide uptake and chloroform emissions from an Arctic site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Montzka, S. A.; Nance, J. D.; Hall, B. D.; Thoning, K. W.; Miller, J. B.; White, J.; Vaugh, B.; Manning, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region is most sensitive to future climate change. Quantifying emissions and sinks of many important biogenic trace gases there may become important indicators of potential climate feedback. Once snowmelt at Pt. Barrow, Alaska (77o N) occurs, ground cover is exposed by sunlight and higher temperatures, then photosynthesis starts up. Peaks of chloroform (CHCl3) appear throughout the summer from southerly-based air masses based over northern Alaska and northwest Canada. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) undergoes uptake throughout the summer season through the same enzymes that uptake carbon dioxide (CO2). We will calculate the footprint of emissions of CHCl3 and uptake of COS using high frequency in situ observations, and the NAME and FLEXPART models. Previous studies show a large source of CHCl3 (8% of the total budget) may be coming from soils in high latitude pine forests. We will examine emissions of CHCl3 to see whether or not they are coming from the tundra just south of Pt. Barrow. We will identify the regions for uptake of COS and CO2 from the footprint generated from the models.

  14. Degradation of ambient carbonyl sulfide by Mycobacterium spp. in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiromi; Saito, Masahiko; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Katayama, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    The ability to degrade carbonyl sulfide (COS) was confirmed in seven bacterial strains that were isolated from soil, without the addition of COS. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that these isolates belonged to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus. For example, Mycobacterium sp. strain THI401, grown on PYG agar medium, was able to degrade an initial level of 30 parts per million by volume COS within 1 h, while 60 % of the initial COS was decreased by abiotic conversion in 30 h. Considering natural COS flux between soil and the atmosphere, COS degradation by these bacteria was confirmed at an ambient level of 500 parts per trillion by volume (p.p.t.v.), using sterilized soil to cultivate the bacterium. Autoclave sterilization of soil resulted in a small amount of COS emission, while Mycobacterium spp. degraded COS at a faster rate than it was emitted from the soil, and reduced the COS mixing ratio to a level that was lower than the ambient level: THI401 degraded COS from an initial level of 530 p.p.t.v. to a level of 330 p.p.t.v. in 30 h. These results provide experimental evidence of microbial activity in soil as a sink for atmospheric COS.

  15. Positive trends in Southern Hemisphere observations of carbonyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Stefanie; Jones, Nicholas; Smale, Dan; Palm, Mathias; Lejeune, Bernard; Wang, Yuting; Deutscher, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS; lifetime of about 5.7 years) is the longest lived reduced sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere. The primary source of OCS is the ocean, which is both a direct source (through OCS emission) and an indirect source (due to oxidation of carbon disulfide, CS2, and dimethyl sulfide). Other natural sources of OCS include volcanic outgassing and direct fluxes from wetland regions. The removal of OCS from the atmosphere is dominated by soil and vegetation uptake, with minor contributions from reactions with the hydroxyl radical. Small anthropogenic sources of OCS are coal combustion, biomass burning, and aluminum production. A dominant indirect source results from CS2 emissions from the rayon industry. Transport of tropospheric OCS to the stratosphere during volcanically quiescent periods has been suggested to contribute sulfur to the stratospheric aerosol layer which affects atmospheric radiative balance. If, however, production of stratospheric aerosols from OCS oxidation is smaller than typical estimates, this OCS contribution would be overestimated. The magnitude of the OCS flux to the stratosphere is currently not well quantified as is the relative contribution of OCS to background aerosol loading. While earlier model simulations indicate OCS fluxes into the atmosphere exceeding removal, past total column observations of OCS show no significant trend. Analysis of tropospheric OCS columns at Arrival Heights (Antarctica) and Lauder (New Zealand) show strong positive trends from 2001-2008 followed by weaker trends to 2015, with unexpected temporal coherence. Since trends in ocean and land sources/sinks at these two sites, respectively, are unlikely to be similar, the coherence in trend structure likely results from changes in transport of OCS from the tropics to middle and high latitudes. Potential causes for OCS increases are (i) increases in tropical lower stratospheric OCS and/or (ii) strengthening of the large-scale circulation which

  16. Fast retrievals of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide with IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. Anthony; Dudhia, Anu

    2017-02-01

    Iterative retrievals of trace gases, such as carbonyl sulfide (OCS), from satellites can be exceedingly slow. The algorithm may even fail to keep pace with data acquisition such that analysis is limited to local events of special interest and short time spans. With this in mind, a linear retrieval scheme was developed to estimate total column amounts of OCS at a rate roughly 104 times faster than a typical iterative retrieval. This scheme incorporates two concepts not utilized in previously published linear estimates. First, all physical parameters affecting the signal are included in the state vector and accounted for jointly, rather than treated as effective noise. Second, the initialization point is determined from an ensemble of atmospheres based on comparing the model spectra to the observations, thus improving the linearity of the problem. All of the 2014 data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), instruments A and B, were analysed and showed spatial features of OCS total columns, including depletions over tropical rainforests, seasonal enhancements over the oceans, and distinct OCS features over land. Error due to assuming linearity was found to be on the order of 11 % globally for OCS. However, systematic errors from effects such as varying surface emissivity and extinction due to aerosols have yet to be robustly characterized. Comparisons to surface volume mixing ratio in situ samples taken by NOAA show seasonal correlations greater than 0.7 for five out of seven sites across the globe. Furthermore, this linear scheme was applied to OCS, but may also be used as a rapid estimator of any detectable trace gas using IASI or similar nadir-viewing instruments.

  17. Soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) across four distinct ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K. S.; Lett, C.; Juarez, S.; Kooijmans, L.; Mammarella, I.; Vesala, T.; Chen, H.; Seibt, U.

    2015-12-01

    Soils are additional but poorly resolved sinks of carbonyl sulfide (COS) in terrestrial ecosystems. COS has been proposed as a tracer for quantifying gross photosynthesis based on the coupled stomatal uptake of COS and CO2. But applying this tracer requires the soil COS flux to be subtracted from the ecosystem flux to obtain the actual plant flux. To simulate soil COS fluxes, we have built a 1-D diffusion-reaction model accounting for vertical transport in the soil, microbial sinks and sources, and a litter layer. Uptake and production of COS in the soil column are linked with soil temperature and moisture through empirical functions adapted from enzyme kinetics and lab incubations. We have measured soil COS fluxes and the related soil variables in four distinct ecosystems: a wheat field (Southern Great Plains, OK, USA), an oak woodland (Santa Monica Mountains, CA, USA), a tropical rainforest (La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica) and a boreal pine forest (Hyytiälä, Finland). Across all sites, a lower soil temperature and a humid climate are generally favorable to soil COS uptake. Strong COS emissions were observed in the wheat field at high soil temperatures after harvesting but were absent in other ecosystems, indicating that COS exchange may behave differently in agricultural soils. We simulated the soil fluxes in all ecosystems using the diffusion-reaction model, and optimized the source/sink strength parameters with field data. The optimized model provides insights that are not attainable from data analysis alone: For example, the wheat field soil must have continued uptake activity even when it showed net emissions, and leaf litter contributed dominantly to the COS sink after rain in the oak woodland. We expect the new model to be useful for simulating global soil COS fluxes as field data on soil fluxes from a broader range of ecosystems become available.

  18. Bio-orthogonal "click-and-release" donation of caged carbonyl sulfide (COS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Andrea K; Yang, Yang; Royzen, Maksim; Pluth, Michael D

    2017-01-24

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biomolecule with high therapeutic potential. Here we leverage the inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) click reaction between a thiocarbamate-functionalized trans-cyclooctene and a tetrazine to deliver carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is quickly converted to H2S by the uniquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), thus providing a new strategy for bio-orthogonal COS/H2S donation.

  19. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  20. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide exchange between lawn and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chunmei; Mu, Yujing

    2004-06-01

    The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between lawn and the atmosphere was investigated by using a static enclosure under natural field conditions. The results indicated that the lawn acted as a sink for atmospheric COS and a source of dimethyl sulfide (DMS). The exchange fluxes of COS and DMS ranged between -3.24 pmol m-2 s-1 and -94.52 pmol m-2 s-1, and between 0 and 3.14 pmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The lawn was capable of continuously absorbing COS in nighttime as well as in daytime. The COS fluxes depended strongly on the ambient COS mixing ratios. The dependency of DMS emission fluxes on temperature was observed in November 2002. Soil also acted as a sink for COS during our study. However, the COS exchange fluxes of the lawn were much higher than that of the soil. The average COS and DMS fluxes were much higher in spring than in autumn and in summer. The daytime vertical profiles of COS also indicated that the lawn acted as a net sink for COS.

  1. Strong soil source of carbonyl sulfide in an agricultural field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseyk, K. S.; Seibt, U.; Berry, J. A.; Billesbach, D. P.; Campbell, J.; Torn, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    A promising new approach to constrain biosphere-atmosphere carbon and water exchange is the use of carbonyl sulfide (COS). COS is taken up by leaves via the same pathway as CO2, leading to a close coupling of vegetation COS and CO2 fluxes during photosynthesis. Therefore it has been proposed that the gross fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration can be quantified through the concurrent measurements of COS and CO2. A necessary requirement for this approach at ecosystem and continental scales are estimates of soil COS fluxes. Soil is largely considered a sink for COS, but our knowledge of in situ soil COS fluxes remains very limited. We measured soil COS fluxes in a wheat field in Oklahoma from April to June 2012, using a novel combination of an automated soil chamber coupled to a COS laser analyzer. We provide the first continuous record of soil COS fluxes under natural conditions, and report on a phenomenon that has not been observed before. In contrast to the majority of published results, we found that the agricultural soil was a strong source of COS under most conditions during the campaign. The COS flux over the study period was highly correlated with soil temperature. Up to a soil temperature of around 15°C, the soil acted as a COS sink. Above 15°C, it acted a source of COS, with fluxes of up to 25 pmol m-2 s-1. To locate the source of the COS production, we investigated different soil components. Wheat roots were found to be emitting COS under all conditions. Root-free soil was a COS sink up to a soil temperature of around 25°C, but turned into a COS source at higher soil temperatures. We also observed COS production from the roots of several other species, indicating that this may be a widespread phenomenon. Using eddy covariance data of COS and CO2 that was collected concurrently with the soil measurements, we also demonstrate how the soil COS source can be taken into account when partitioning net ecosystem exchange into photosynthesis and respiration.

  2. Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide in Binary Mixture of Diethylene Glycol Diethyl Ether and Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新学; 刘迎新; 魏雄辉

    2005-01-01

    The solubility and hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide in binary mixture of diethylene glycol diethyl ether and water are studied as a function of composition. The use of an aqueous solution of diethylene glycol diethyl ether enhances the solubility and hydrolysis rate of carbonyl sulfide compared with that in pure water. The composition of the mixture with maximum hydrolysis rate varies with temperature. The thermophysical properties including density, viscosity, and surface tension as a function of composition at 20℃ under atmospheric pressure as well as liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data over the temperature range from 28℃ to 90℃ are also measured for the binary mixture.

  3. Is carbonyl sulfide a precursor for carbon disulfide in vegetation and soil? Interconversion of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide in fresh grain tissues in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y

    1999-05-01

    The interconversion of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS(2)) was studied in the roots and shoots of barley and chickpeas. Ratios of conversion gases, K, 40 h after the addition of COS or CS(2) are recorded. The proportion of COS converted to each of CS(2), CO, and H(2)S and the proportion of CS(2) converted to COS were greater in roots than in shoots. More COS was converted to CS(2) than CS(2) to COS in roots and shoots of barley and chickpeas. The amount of COS converted to H(2)S and CO was 8 times the amount converted to CS(2) in barley and 3-4 times the amount in chickpeas. Carbonyl sulfide may be a precursor for CS(2) in vegetation and soil, just as the reverse is true in the atmosphere. These two different results might form a cycle of COS and CS(2).

  4. Soil atmosphere exchange of Carbonyl Sulfide (COS) regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    OpenAIRE

    H. Van Diest; Kesselmeier, J.

    2007-01-01

    The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS) concentration, soil water content (WC) and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as significant sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil ...

  5. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between the atmosphere and various soils in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, J; C. Geng; Mu, Y; Zhang, Y; Wu, H

    2009-01-01

    Using a dynamic enclosure, the exchange fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between the atmosphere and 18 soils from 10 provinces in China were investigated. The emission or uptake of COS from the soils was highly dependent on the soil type, soil temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric COS mixing ratio. In general, with the only exception being paddy soils, the soils in this investigation acted as sinks for atmospheric COS under wide ranges of soil temperature and soil moisture. Two i...

  6. Carbonyl sulfide exchange in soils for better estimates of ecosystem carbon uptake

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. Whelan; Hilton, T. W.; Berry, J. A.; M. Berkelhammer; A. R. Desai; Campbell, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) measurements are one of the emerging tools to better quantify gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux in the global carbon cycle. COS is a gas with a similar structure to CO2; COS uptake is thought to be a proxy for GPP. However, soils are a potential source or sink of COS. This study presents a framework for understanding soil-COS interactions. Excluding wetlands, most of the few observations of isolated soils that have been ...

  7. Sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide in an agricultural field in the Southern Great Plains

    OpenAIRE

    Maseyk, Kadmiel; Berry, Joseph A; Billesbach, Dave; Campbell, John Elliott; Torn, Margaret S.; Zahniser, Mark; Seibt, Ulli

    2014-01-01

    Net photosynthesis is the largest single flux in the global carbon cycle, but controls over its variability are poorly understood because there is no direct way of measuring it at the ecosystem scale. We report observations of ecosystem carbonyl sulfide (COS) and CO2 fluxes that resolve key gaps in an emerging framework for using concurrent COS and CO2 measurements to quantify terrestrial gross primary productivity. At a wheat field in Oklahoma we found that in the peak growing season the flu...

  8. Carbonyl sulfide exchange in soils for better estimates of ecosystem carbon uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Mary E.; Hilton, Timothy W; Berry, Joseph A; Berkelhammer, Max; Desai, Ankur R; Campbell, J. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) measurements are one of the emerging tools to better quantify gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux in the global carbon cycle. COS is a gas with a similar structure to CO2; COS uptake is thought to be a proxy for GPP. However, soils are a potential source or sink of COS. This study presents a framework for understanding soil–COS interactions. Excluding wetlands, most of the few observations of isolated soils that have been made show smal...

  9. Litter dominates surface fluxes of carbonyl sulfide in a Californian oak woodland

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Wu; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Seibt, Ulli

    2016-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a promising tracer for partitioning terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration from net carbon fluxes, based on its daytime co-uptake alongside CO2 through leaf stomata. Because ecosystem COS fluxes are the sum of plant and soil fluxes, using COS as a photosynthesis tracer requires accurate knowledge of soil COS fluxes. At an oak woodland in Southern California, we monitored below-canopy surface (soil + litter) COS and CO2 fluxes for 40 days using chambers and laser ...

  10. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between the atmosphere and various soils in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, J; C. Geng; Mu, Y; Zhang, Y.; Xu, Z.; Wu, H

    2010-01-01

    Using a dynamic enclosure, the exchange rates of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between the atmosphere and 18 soils from 12 provinces in China were investigated. The emission or uptake of COS from the soils was highly dependent on the soil type, soil temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric COS mixing ratio. In general, with the only exception being paddy soils, the soils in this investigation acted as sinks for atmospheric COS under wide ranges of soil temperature and soil moisture. Two intensive...

  11. Fumigation with carbonyl sulfide: a model for the interaction of concentration, time and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, G L.; Morton, R

    2001-10-01

    The new fumigant carbonyl sulfide offers an alternative to both methyl bromide and phosphine as a grain fumigant. Separate mathematical models for levels of kill, based on quantitative toxicological studies were developed for adults and eggs of the rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae (L.). These models suggest that fumigation exposure times for carbonyl sulfide will be a compromise between those of methyl bromide (typically 24h) and phosphine (7-10d) to achieve a very high kill of all developmental stages. S. oryzae eggs were more difficult to kill with carbonyl sulfide fumigation than the adults. At 30 degrees C, a 25gm(-3) fumigation killed 99.9% of adults in less than 1d, but took 4d to kill the same percentage of eggs. Models were generated to describe the mortality of adults at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees C. From these models it is predicted that fumigation with carbonyl sulfide for 1-2d at 30gm(-3) will kill 99.9% of adults. Furthermore the models illustrate that fumigations with concentrations below 10gm(-3) are unlikely to kill all adult S. oryzae. Significant variation was observed in the response of eggs to the fumigant over the temperature range of 10 to 30 degrees C. Models were generated to describe the mortality of eggs at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees C. As the temperature was reduced below 25 degrees C, the time taken to achieve an effective fumigation increased. Extrapolating from the models, a 25gm(-3) fumigation to control 99.9% of S. oryzae eggs will take 95h (4d) at 30 degrees C, 77h (3.2d) at 25 degrees C, 120h (5d) at 20 degrees C, 174h (7.5d) at 15 degrees C and about 290h (11d) at 10 degrees C. The role of temperature in the time taken to kill eggs with carbonyl sulfide cannot be ignored. In order to achieve the desired level of kill of all developmental stages, the fumigation rates need to be set according to the most difficult life stage to kill, in this instance, the egg stage.

  12. Influence of Gas Components on the Formation of Carbonyl Sulfide over Water-Gas Shift Catalyst B303Q

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Water-gas shift reaction catalyst at lower temperature (200-400 ℃) may improve the conversion of carbon monoxide. But carbonyl sulfide was found to be present over the sulfided cobaltmolybdenum/alumina catalyst for water-gas shift reaction. The influences of temperature, space velocity,and gas components on the formation of carbonyl sulfide over sulfided cobalt-molybdenum/alumina catalyst B303Q at 200-400 ℃ were studied in a tubular fixed-bed quartz-glass reactor under simulated water-gas shift conditions. The experimental results showed that the yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst reached a maximum at 220 ℃ with the increase in temperature, sharply decreased with the increase in space velocity and the content of water vapor, increased with the increase in the content of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, and its yield increased and then reached a stable value with the increase in the content of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The formation mechanism of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was discussed on the basis of how these factors influence the formation of COS. The yield of carbonyl sulfide over B303Q catalyst at 200-400 ℃ was the combined result of two reactions, that is, COS was first produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen sulfide,and then the as-produced COS was converted to hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide by hydrolysis. The mechanism of COS formation is assumed as follows: sulfur atoms in the Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3 crystal lattice were easily removed and formed carbonyl sulfide with CO, and then hydrogen sulfide in the water-gas shift gas reacted with the crystal lattice oxygen atoms in CoO-MoO3/Al2O3 to form Co9Ss-MoS2/Al2O3.This mechanism for the formation of COS over water-gas shift catalyst B303Q is in accordance with the Mars-Van Krevelen's redox mechanism over metal sulfide.

  13. (Uncertain) Carbonyl Sulfide Plant Fluxes Spatially Constrain (Even More Uncertain) CO2 GPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, T. W.; Whelan, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Zumkehr, A. L.; Berry, J. A.; Campbell, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    With predictions of future terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2)gross primary productivity (GPP) remaining stubbornly uncertain,ecosystem carbonyl sulfide (COS) fluxes provide an independent source ofinformation that may be able to reduce that uncertainty. Several openquestions must be addressed before COS may be applied widely as a GPPtracer. Here we employ an atmospheric chemistry and transport model(STEM) and airborne atmospheric COS concentration observations todemonstrate that COS plant uptake spatially constrains CO2 GPP even whenaccounting for soil COS flux uncertainty and COS leaf-scale relativeuptake variability and uncertainty.

  14. Sulfur isotopic analysis of carbonyl sulfide and its application for biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shohei; Kamezaki, Kazuki; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) is the most abundant gas containing sulfur in the atmosphere, with an average mixing ratio of 500 p.p.t.v. in the troposphere. OCS is suggested as a sulfur source of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSA) which plays an important role in Earth's radiation budget and ozone depletion. Therefore, OCS budget should be validated for prediction of climate change, but the global OCS budget is imbalance. Recently we developed a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions of OCS using nanomole level samples: the direct isotopic analytical technique of on-line gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions S+ (Hattori et al., 2015). The first measurement of the δ34S value for atmospheric OCS coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere (Hattori et al., 2011; Schmidt et al., 2012; Hattori et al., 2012) explains the reported δ34S value for background stratospheric sulfate, suggesting that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. This new method measuring δ34S values of OCS can be used to investigate OCS sources and sinks in the troposphere to better understand its cycle. It is known that some microorganisms in soil can degrade OCS, but the mechanism and the contribution to the OCS in the air are still uncertain. In order to determine sulfur isotopic enrichment factor of OCS during degradation via microorganisms, incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus, isolated from natural soil environments (Kato et al., 2008). As a result, sulfur isotope ratios of OCS were increased during degradation of OCS, indicating that reaction for OC32S is faster than that for OC33S and OC34S. OCS degradation via microorganisms is not mass-independent fractionation (MIF) process, suggesting that this

  15. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Wang, Xinming

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China. Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS. The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2 sec), respectively). Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils. Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime. COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29 degrees C. While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature. COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios, and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  16. Effect of rainfall on terrestrial fluxes of global cooling gases: carbonyl sulfide (COS) and its precursor dimethyl sulfide (DMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M.; Rhew, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric sulfur compounds regulate climate by affecting cloud dynamics and reducing the amount of direct solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, and are notable for sometimes resulting in a global cooling effect. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS), known to be produced by phytoplankton and bacteria, is oxidized in the atmosphere by hydroxl radicals, forming a considerable portion of the total atmospheric COS. Changes in soil moisture are expected to influence the direction of net gas fluxes of both COS and DMS. With the goal of refining existing models of sulfur gas fluxes, this study observes dramatic changes in the rates of production and consumption of COS and DMS when in situ grass-covered soils are initially wetted. Here we report the effect of simulated rainfall on uncultivated marine terrace field sites near Santa Cruz, CA (37.0 °N, 122°W) in the dry season using static flux chambers. Dry plots exhibited fluxes of DMS and COS below method detection limits. Immediately after a simulated rainfall event, DMS fluxes increased, then declined from their post-rainfall maxima by 90 minutes after wetting. Fluxes of COS from wetted plots showed occasional uptake, but were not consistent between sites. These results agree with observations from our lab-based soil incubation experiments.

  17. Carbonyl sulfide and dimethyl sulfide fluxes in an urban lawn and adjacent bare soil in Guangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Yi; Xinming Wang

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fluxes from an urban Cynodon dactylon lawn and adjacent bare soil were measured during April-July 2005 in Guangzhou, China.Both the lawn and bare soil acted as sinks for COS and sources for DMS.The mean fluxes of COS and DMS in the lawn (-19.27 and 18.16 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively) were significantly higher than those in the bare soil (-9.89 and 9.35 pmol/(m2·sec), respectively).Fluxes of COS and DMS in mowed lawn were also higher than those in bare soils.Both COS and DMS fluxes showed diurnal variation with detectable but much lower values in the nighttime than in the daytime.COS fluxes were related significantly to temperature and the optimal temperature for COS uptake was 29℃.While positive linear correlations were found between DMS fluxes and temperature.COS fluxes increased linearly with ambient COS mixing ratios,and had a compensation point of 336 ppt.

  18. Isotope effect in the carbonyl sulfide reaction with O(3P)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Mahler, Denise W.;

    2012-01-01

    The sulfur kinetic isotope effect (KIE) in the reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) with O((3)P) was studied in relative rate experiments at 298 ± 2 K and 955 ± 10 mbar. The reaction was carried out in a photochemical reactor using long path FTIR detection, and data were analyzed using a nonlinear ...

  19. Adiabatic mixed-field orientation of ground-state-selected carbonyl sulfide molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kienitz, Jens S; Mullins, Terry; Długołęcki, Karol; González-Férez, Rosario; Küpper, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrated strong adiabatic mixed-field orientation of carbonyl sulfide molecules (OCS) in their absolute ground state of $\\text{N}_{\\text{up}}/\\text{N}_{\\text{tot}}=0.882$. OCS was oriented in combined non-resonant laser and static electric fields inside a two-plate velocity map imaging spectrometer. The transition from non-adiabatic to adiabatic orientation for the rotational ground state was studied by varying the applied laser and static electric field. Above static electric field strengths of 10~kV/cm and laser intensities of $10^{11} \\text{W/cm}^2$ the observed degree of orientation reached a plateau. These results are in good agreement with computational solutions of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation.

  20. Carbonyl sulfide as an inverse tracer for biogenic organic carbon in gas and aerosol phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Montzka, S. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Atlas, E. L.; Weber, R. J.; Flocke, F. M.

    2009-03-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a long-lived trace gas in the atmosphere with an oceanic source and a surface sink through the uptake by vegetation and soils. We demonstrate the use of COS as an inverse tracer for the impact of biogenic emissions on an air mass including the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Using airborne data from the summer of 2004 over the northeastern U.S., we find that air masses with reduced COS in the continental boundary layer had on average higher mixing ratios of biogenic VOCs (isoprene, monoterpenes, methanol) and their photo-oxidation products (methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, methyl furan and MPAN, a peroxyacyl nitrate derived from isoprene). Measurements of water-soluble organic carbon were only weakly correlated with COS, indicating that SOA formation from biogenic precursors was a small contribution to the total.

  1. Field observations of carbonyl sulfide deficit near the ground: Possible implication of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalopoulos, N.; Bonsang, B.; Nguyen, B. C.; Kanakidou, M.; Belviso, S.

    In order to study carbonyl sulfide sources and sinks at ground level, two experiments were conducted in 1986 during temperature inversion events. In the first experiment, the samples were collected in a coastal area during land-breeze events. In the second experiment, COS vertical profiles were carried out in an agricultural area, within and above an inversion layer near the ground. Both stable atmospheric situations resulted in a deficit of COS near the ground which is attributed to the existence of a sink of COS at this level. Deposition onto vegetation seems to be the most likely mechanism for this COS uptake, a conclusion in agreement with the results of laboratory and soil flux chambers experiments.

  2. Review of the toxicology of carbonyl sulfide, a new grain fumigant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomaeus, Andrew R; Haritos, Victoria S

    2005-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a new grain fumigant which has been developed to replace methyl bromide, being phased out due to its ozone depletion properties, and to supplement phosphine gas which is experiencing increased insect resistance. Treatment of commodities with COS, a highly effective fumigant, results in residues that are near or indistinguishable to natural background levels of this compound. COS is a naturally occurring gas, being the predominant sulfur moiety in the atmosphere, occurs naturally in food and is a normal by-product of mammalian aerobic metabolism. COS has low acute inhalational toxicity but with a steep dose response curve; COS is neither genotoxic nor a developmental toxicant but does reversibly impair male fertility. Prolonged, repeated exposure to COS is likely to present similar neurotoxicity hazards to that of the structurally and toxicologically related compound carbon disulfide. Although the occupational risks presented by COS as a fumigant of bulk grain are significant, these are, as they have been for a considerable time for phosphine and methyl bromide, manageable by good occupational safety practices. Consideration may need to be given to scrubbing of ventilated COS and its breakdown product hydrogen sulfide, at the completion of fumigation to minimise worker and bystander exposure. In terms of classical regulatory toxicology studies, the available database for COS is deficient in many aspects and registration in most jurisdictions will depend on sound scientific argument built upon the totality of the existing scientific data as there are strong arguments supporting the registration of this compound.

  3. Global budget of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Temporal and spatial variations of the dominant sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, A. J.; Kuhn, U.; von Hobe, M.; Kesselmeier, J.; Andreae, M. O.

    2002-11-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of the global fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) is discussed together with possible implications for total column atmospheric COS loading. The input of COS into the atmosphere is calculated as the sum of all known direct sources of COS plus the conversion of carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) to COS by atmospheric oxidation processes. Recent models are used to predict COS, CS2, and DMS release from the oceans and COS uptake by soils, plants, and oceans. This forward approach to constructing global integrated COS fluxes has a large associated range of uncertainty. The best guess global annual-integrated COS net flux estimate does not differ from zero within the range of estimated uncertainty, consistent with the observed absence of long-term trends in atmospheric COS loading. Interestingly, the hemispheric time-dependent monthly fluxes are very close in phase for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The monthly variation of the Northern Hemisphere flux seems to be driven primarily by high COS vegetation uptake in summer, while the monthly variation of the Southern Hemisphere flux appears to be driven mostly by high oceanic fluxes of COS, CS2, and DMS in summer.

  4. Relationships between carbonyl sulfide (COS) and CO2 during leaf gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimler, Keren; Montzka, Stephen A; Berry, Joseph A; Rudich, Yinon; Yakir, Dan

    2010-06-01

    *Carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange in C(3) leaves is linked to that of CO(2), providing a basis for the use of COS as a powerful tracer of gross CO(2) fluxes between plants and the atmosphere, a critical element in understanding the response of the land biosphere to global change. *Here, we carried out controlled leaf-scale gas-exchange measurements of COS and CO(2) in representative C(3) plants under a range of light intensities, relative humidities and temperatures, CO(2) and COS concentrations, and following abscisic acid treatments. *No 'respiration-like' emission of COS or detectable compensation point, and no cross-inhibition effects between COS and CO(2) were observed. The mean ratio of COS to CO(2) assimilation flux rates, A(s)/A(c), was c. 1.4 pmol micromol(-1) and the leaf relative uptake (assimilation normalized to ambient concentrations, (A(s)/A(c))(C(a)(c)/C(a)(s))) was 1.6-1.7 across species and conditions, with significant deviations under certain conditions. Stomatal conductance was enhanced by increasing COS, which was possibly mediated by hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) produced from COS hydrolysis, and a correlation was observed between A(s) and leaf discrimination against C(18)OO. *The results provide systematic and quantitative information necessary for the use of COS in photosynthesis and carbon-cycle research on the physiological to global scales.

  5. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) as a tracer to constrain surface carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakir, Dan; Berkelhammer, Max; Miller, John; Montzka, Steve; Chen, Huilin

    2014-05-01

    provide additional constraints on the differential responses of photosynthesis and respiration, such as associated with C3 and C4 vegetation. Developing the use of COS as a powerful tracer of photosynthetic CO2 fluxes at all scales can help improve prediction of future responses of the terrestrial biosphere to changing environmental conditions. Key words Carbonyl sulfide, COS, Carbonic anhydrase, CA, ecosystem respiration, GPP, Biosphere-atmosphere interactions, soil COS uptake. References Asaf D, Rotenberg E, Tatarinov T, Dicken U, Montzka SA & Yakir D (2013) Ecosystem photosynthesis inferred from carbonyl sulfide flux measurements. Nature GeoScience, 6, 186-190; DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1730 Berry J, Wolf A, Campbell E, Baker I, Blake N, Blake D, Denning AS, Kawa SR, Montzka SA, Seibt UY, Stimler K, Yakir D Zhu Z (2013) A coupled model of the global cycles of carbonyl sulfide and CO2: A possible new window on the carbon cycle. J. Geophys. Res.: Biogeochem. 118, doi 10.1002/jgrg.20068, 2013 Stimler K, Berry JA, Montzka S, Yakir D (2011) Association between COS uptake and 18D during gas exchange in C3 and C4 leaves. Plant Physiol. Doi 10.1104/pp.111.176578

  6. An important missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Domestic coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qianqian; Zhang, Chenglong; Mu, Yujing; Cheng, Ye; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chengtang; Song, Min; Tian, Di; Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Junfeng; Xue, Chaoyang; Ye, Can

    2016-08-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions generated from prevailing domestic coal stoves fueled with raw bituminous coal were studied under alternation cycles of flaming and smoldering combustion. The measurements in the laboratory and the farmer's house indicated that COS and CO emissions mainly occurred under the condition of flame extinguishment after coal loading, whereas SO2 emissions were mainly generated through combustion with flame. The COS emission factors for the domestic stoves in the laboratory and the farmer's house were recorded as 0.57 ± 0.10 g COS kg-1 and 1.43 ± 0.32 g COS kg-1, being approximately a factor of 50 and 125 greater than that generated from coal power plants, respectively. Based on the COS emission factors measured in this study, COS emission from only domestic coal combustion in China would be at least 30.5 ± 5.6 Gg S yr-1 which was 1 magnitude greater than the current COS estimation from the total coal combustion in China.

  7. Understanding fog-plant interactions at the ecosystem scale using atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, M.; Stinecipher, J.; Zumkehr, A. L.; Berry, J. A.; Dawson, T. E.; Seibt, U.; Hilton, T. W.; Kulkarni, S.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Lu, Y.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem metabolism is thought to have powerful feedbacks with the climate system as well as direct impacts on individual taxa that rely on ecosystems for food, water, and shelter. Despite the importance of an ecosystem level understanding, climate change impacts on whole ecosystems remains highly uncertain. In particular, coastal fog-dominated regions are a blind spot for whole ecosystem measurements of the land-air-sea exchange of carbon, water, and energy. To address this critical knowledge gap, our inter-displicary team from the University of California's new Institute for the Study of Ecological Effects of Climate Impacts (ISEECI) has launched a next-generation monitoring program along a gradient of UC Natural Reserve System (NRS) sites. We leverage recent breakthroughs in atmospheric spectroscopy and mechanistic ecosystem models of carbonyl sulfide that provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore the sustainability of coastal systems. Here we present our next-generation monitoring and regional analysis across a North/South transect of UC-NRS sites that has the potential to provide a new window into fog-dominated ecosystems, both currently and under climate change scenarios.

  8. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Global change affects ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzmyes which are metabolizing the CO2, i.e. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase-Oxygenase (Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical adaptation of these enzymes to affect the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the adaption of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2 and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of adaption from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We could demonstrate that the COS compensation point, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise leading to higher input of this trace gas into the stratosphere and causing a higher energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space, thus counteracting the direct radiative forcing by the tropospheric COS.

  9. The Potential of Carbonyl Sulfide as a Tracer for Gross Primary Productivity at Flux Tower Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonquist, J.; Montzka, S. A.; Yakir, D.; Desai, A. R.; Dragoni, D.; Griffis, T. J.; Monson, R. K.; Munger, J. W.; Scott, R. L.; Bowling, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Regional/continental scale studies of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) seasonal dynamics and leaf level studies of plant OCS uptake have shown a close relationship to CO2 dynamics and uptake, suggesting potential for OCS as a tracer for gross primary productivity (GPP). Canopy CO2 and OCS differences (mole fraction within canopy minus that above canopy) at a temperate deciduous forest (Harvard Forest AmeriFlux site) were analyzed relative to net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and GPP, respectively. Canopy CO2 and OCS vertical gradients (CO2 and OCS differences divided by within and above canopy measurement height differences) were used to calculate ecosystem relative uptake (ERU; relative canopy OCS gradient divided by relative canopy CO2 gradient, where relative gradients are gradients normalized by above canopy mole fractions), from which GPP was estimated using an equation that assumes OCS follows the same physical pathway as CO2 into plant leaves and where GPP / NEE was proportional to OCS gradient / CO2 gradient. Additionally, canopy CO2 differences from five other AmeriFlux sites were analyzed, and OCS differences were projected from these differences (via an assumed ERU) to further evaluate OCS as a potential GPP tracer. At Harvard Forest, canopy CO2 differences were related to NEE (y = 0.041x + 0.046, r2 = 0.14, P ERU is potentially measurable with current grab-sample-based OCS measurement capabilities and may provide an alternative means of estimating GPP at flux tower sites.

  10. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between the atmosphere and various soils in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Using a dynamic enclosure, the exchange fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS between the atmosphere and 18 soils from 10 provinces in China were investigated. The emission or uptake of COS from the soils was highly dependent on the soil type, soil temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric COS mixing ratio. In general, with the only exception being paddy soils, the soils in this investigation acted as sinks for atmospheric COS under wide ranges of soil temperature and soil moisture. Two intensively investigated wheat soils and one forest soil, had optimal soil temperatures for COS uptake of around 15°C, and the optimal soil water content varied from 13 to 58%. The two paddy soils, exponentially COS emission fluxes increased with increasing soil temperature, and decreased COS emission fluxes with increased soil water content. However, negligible emission was found when the paddy soils were under waterlogging status. The observed compensation points for various soils were different and increased significantly with soil temperature. The laboratory simulation agreed with the preliminary field measurements for the paddy soil in Jiaxing, Zhejiang province.

  11. Forest fluxes of carbonyl sulfide: the balance between photosynthetic and soil uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commane, R.; Herndon, S. C.; McLaren, J.; McManus, J. B.; Meredith, L. K.; Munger, J. W.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that carbonyl sulfide (COS) can be used as a proxy for partitioning between photosynthetic uptake and respiratory emission of CO2, a balance which cannot be directly determined through the measurement of CO2 fluxes. COS is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the atmosphere, with a dominant sink in the terrestrial biosphere. COS is taken up by plants through photosynthesis, but is not respired. It is also lost via uptake to soils. However, in terrestrial ecosystems the magnitudes of soil vs. leaf uptake are not well resolved. We report data from direct, continuous measurements of COS using infrared laser absorption (3 std deviation of less than 10 ppt in 30 s), operated continuously since October, 2010 at Harvard Forest in Western Massachusetts. These data were collected in parallel with long term CO2 and H2 flux measurements. We present seasonal variations of the gradients and fluxes of COS through the forest canopy. Additionally, we investigate the relationship of COS with photosynthesis and soil processes through comparison with CO2 and H2 trace gases, respectively.

  12. Degradation and emission of carbonyl sulfide, an atmospheric trace gas, by fungi isolated from forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yoshihito; Ozawa, Rie; Kageyama, Kei; Katayama, Yoko

    2016-09-01

    Soil is thought to be important both as a source and a sink of carbonyl sulfide (COS) in the troposphere, but the mechanism affecting COS uptake, especially for fungi, remains uncertain. Fungal isolates that were collected randomly from forest soil showed COS-degrading ability at high frequencies: 38 out of 43 isolates grown on potato dextrose agar showed degradation of 30 ppmv COS within 24 h. Of these isolates, eight degraded 30 ppmv of COS to below the detection limit within 2 h. These isolates also showed an ability to degrade COS included in ambient air (around 500 pptv) and highly concentrated (12 500 ppmv) level, even though the latter is higher than the lethal level for mammals. COS-degrading activity was estimated by using ergosterol as a biomass index for fungi. Trichoderma sp. THIF08 had the highest COS-degrading activity of all the isolates. Interestingly, Umbelopsis/Mortierella spp. THIF09 and THIF13 were unable to degrade 30 ppmv COS within 24 h, and actually emitted COS during the cultivation in ambient air. These results indicate a fungal contribution to the flux of COS between the terrestrial and atmospheric environments.

  13. Assessing soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide to aid in ecosystem estimates of GPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M.; Rhew, R. C.; Campbell, J. E.; Hilton, T. W.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Zumkehr, A. L.; Berry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring the draw down of carbonyl sulfide (chemical formula: COS) over ecosystems can provide a new tool for estimating gross primary production (GPP) at important temporal and spatial scales. COS is a gas ubiquitous in the atmosphere that shares many characteristics with CO2: both are taken up by enzymes in plant leaves at a predictable ratio and in proportion to their ambient concentrations. While CO2 is simultaneously respired by soil and plant roots, the dominant flux of COS is foliar absorption. Previously, ecosystem soil fluxes of COS were thought to be negligible in the application of this COS-GPP proxy. Here we present new data describing controls on soil fluxes as a way to anticipate COS soil exchange over heterogeneous landscapes. Using soil samples from two agricultural sites in the Great Plains and one site in the Colorado Desert, we captured data from the extremes of ecosystem GPP in the United States. We then built a model describing COS soil fluxes with inputs of soil temperature and soil water content based on characterized soil behavior. This study provides an essential refinement in applying COS-GPP estimates over the continents.

  14. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between the atmosphere and various soils in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Geng, C.; Mu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, Z.; Wu, H.

    2010-02-01

    Using a dynamic enclosure, the exchange rates of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between the atmosphere and 18 soils from 12 provinces in China were investigated. The emission or uptake of COS from the soils was highly dependent on the soil type, soil temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric COS mixing ratio. In general, with the only exception being paddy soils, the soils in this investigation acted as sinks for atmospheric COS under wide ranges of soil temperature and soil moisture. Two intensively investigated wheat soils and one forest soil had optimal soil temperatures for COS uptake of around 15 °C, and the optimal soil water content varied from 13% to 58%. COS emission rates from the two paddy soils increased exponentially with increment of the soil temperature, and decreased with increasing the soil water content. However, negligible emission was found when the paddy soils were under waterlogging status. The observed compensation points for various soils were different and increased significantly with soil temperature. The laboratory simulation agreed with the preliminary field measurements for the paddy soil in Jiaxing, Zhejiang province.

  15. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between the atmosphere and various soils in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Using a dynamic enclosure, the exchange rates of carbonyl sulfide (COS between the atmosphere and 18 soils from 12 provinces in China were investigated. The emission or uptake of COS from the soils was highly dependent on the soil type, soil temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric COS mixing ratio. In general, with the only exception being paddy soils, the soils in this investigation acted as sinks for atmospheric COS under wide ranges of soil temperature and soil moisture. Two intensively investigated wheat soils and one forest soil had optimal soil temperatures for COS uptake of around 15 °C, and the optimal soil water content varied from 13% to 58%. COS emission rates from the two paddy soils increased exponentially with increment of the soil temperature, and decreased with increasing the soil water content. However, negligible emission was found when the paddy soils were under waterlogging status. The observed compensation points for various soils were different and increased significantly with soil temperature. The laboratory simulation agreed with the preliminary field measurements for the paddy soil in Jiaxing, Zhejiang province.

  16. Salt marsh vegetation as a carbonyl sulfide (COS) source to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Mary E.; Min, Dong-Ha; Rhew, Robert C.

    2013-07-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant and longest-lived reduced sulfur compound in the atmosphere; changes in its atmospheric concentration could significantly affect global climate and the biogeochemical sulfur cycle. The largest sink of COS in the troposphere is its destruction in plant leaves by the enzymes involved in photosynthesis. In this study, net fluxes of COS were measured from a coastal salt marsh on a subtropical barrier island on the Texas shore of the Gulf of Mexico. We find net emissions from sites with the common salt marsh plant Batis maritima compared to the net uptake from vegetated plots of most previously investigated biomes. The magnitude of the COS production from vegetated plots in this study was twice the emissions of soil-only salt marsh plots. This is the first time that emissions of COS have been found to be significantly enhanced by the presence of vegetation compared to soil alone. COS fluxes exceeded +110 pmol m-2 s-1 for non-inundated plots during daytime hours and were correlated with soil temperature at the depth of 5 cm. Tidal flooding inhibited soil COS exchange; however, we found continued net emissions from emergent B. maritima. This study suggests that emissions of COS resulted from interactions with the plants themselves, which would mean that B. maritima can mediate the production of atmospheric COS.

  17. Controlling variables for the uptake of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide by soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Teusch, N.; Kuhn, U.

    1999-05-01

    Soil samples from arable land were investigated for their exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) with the atmosphere under controlled conditions using dynamic cuvettes in a climate chamber. The investigated soil type acted as a significant sink for the trace gas COS. Atmospheric COS mixing ratios, temperature, and soil water content were found to be the physicochemical parameters controlling the uptake. Emission was never observed under conditions representative of a natural environment. The observed compensation point (i.e., an ambient concentration where the consumption and production balance each other and the net flux is zero) for the uptake was about 53 parts per trillion. Uptake rates ranged between 1.5 and 10.3 pmol m-2 s-1. The consumption of COS by the soil sample depended on the physiological activity of the microorganisms in the soil, as indicated by a clear optimum temperature and by a drastic inhibition in the presence of the enzyme inhibitor 6-ethoxy-2-benzothiazole-2-sulfonamide (EZ), a specific inhibitor for carbonic anhydrase.

  18. Carbonyl sulfide exchange on an ecosystem scale: soil represents a dominant sink for atmospheric COS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, U.; Ammann, C.; Wolf, A.; Meixner, F. X.; Andreae, M. O.; Kesselmeier, J.

    The soil/plant/atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) was investigated in an open oak woodland ecosystem at a rural site in northern California. Measurements of atmospheric concentrations of COS were made in June and in December 1994. We found a significant diel cycle with a drop of COS levels by approximately 150 ppt during the night in both seasons. The mean COS daytime background mixing ratios showed a distinct seasonal difference with 465±77 ppt in summer and 375±56 ppt in winter. The nighttime bulk COS flux into the ecosystem was estimated using a micrometeorological model. To address the observed depletion of COS during stable nocturnal boundary layer conditions, the potential of various ecosystem compartments to act as a sink for COS was investigated. Studies using dynamic enclosures flushed with ambient air excluded vegetation as an important sink during nighttime due to high stomatal resistance. Results from soil chamber measurements indicate that the soil can act as a dominant sink for atmospheric COS.

  19. The flux of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide between the atmosphere and a spruce forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS and carbon disulfide (CS2 were measured over a spruce forest in Central Germany using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA technique. A REA sampler was developed and validated using simultaneous measurements of CO2 fluxes by REA and by eddy correlation. REA measurements were conducted during six campaigns covering spring, summer, and fall between 1997 and 1999. Both uptake and emission of COS and CS2 by the forest were observed, with deposition occurring mainly during the sunlit period and emission mainly during the dark period. On the average, however, the forest acts as a sink for both gases. The average fluxes for COS and CS2 are  -93 ± 11.7 pmol m-2 s-1 and  -18 ± 7.6 pmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The fluxes of both gases appear to be correlated to photosynthetically active radiation and to the CO2 and chem{H_2O} fluxes, supporting the idea that the air-vegetation exchange of both gases is controlled by stomata. An uptake ratio COS/CO2 of 10 ± 1.7 pmol m mol-1 has been derived from the regression line for the correlation between the COS and CO2 fluxes. This uptake ratio, if representative for the global terrestrial net primary production, would correspond to a sink of 2.3 ± 0.5 Tg COS yr-1.

  20. Photooxidation of carbonyl sulfide in the presence of the typical oxides in atmospheric aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Hongbo; WANG; Xiao; CHEN; Jianmin

    2005-01-01

    Photooxidation of carbonyl sulfide (COS) under UV irradiation and the role of the oxides such as SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 were investigated by in situ FTIR in a long optical path cell. The major products were identified as SO2 and CO2 by means of IR spectra and GC-MS. SO2 was partially oxidized into SO42- on the surface of the oxides and interior wall of the reactor, which was determined by XPS. The photooxidation is pseudo first order with respect to COS, and the apparent rate constant is approximately 9.30×10-4·s-1. SiO2 and Al2O3 promote the photooxida- tion of COS significantly, but Fe2O3 has no obvious influence on the reaction. The reaction rates in the presence of the oxides or not, rank as: UV + SiO2 > UV + Al2O3 > UV, UV + Fe2O3. The potentiality of the oxides for promoting the photooxidation of COS implicates that the aerosol particles may contribute to the photooxidation of COS in the atmosphere.

  1. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix M.; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. Since a few years, quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS) are commercially available with the precision, sensitivity and time response suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. While there exist a handful of published reports on EC flux measurements in the recent literature, no rigorous investigation of the applicability of QCLAS for EC COS flux measurements has been carried out so far, nor have been EC processing and QA/QC steps developed for carbon dioxide and water vapor flux measurements within FLUXNET been assessed for COS. The aim of this study is to close this knowledge gap, to discuss critical steps in the post-processing chain of COS EC flux measurements and to devise best-practice guidelines for COS EC flux data processing. To this end we collected EC COS (and CO2, H2O and CO) flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland in Austria over the vegetation period 2015 with a commercially available QCLAS. We discuss various aspects of EC data post-processing, in particular issues with the time-lag estimation between sonic anemometer and QCLAS signals and QCLAS time series detrending, as well as QA/QC, in particular flux detection limits, random flux uncertainty, the interaction of various processing steps with common EC QA/QC filters (e.g. detrending and stationarity tests), u*-filtering, etc.

  2. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Ma, Qingxin

    2008-04-03

    The experimental determination of rate constants for atmospheric reactions and how these rate constants vary with temperature remain a crucially important part of atmosphere science. In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (COS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) has been investigated using a Knudsen cell reactor and a temperature-programmed reaction apparatus. We found that the adsorption and the heterogeneous reaction are sensitive to temperature. The initial uptake coefficients (gammat(Ini)) of COS on MgO decrease from 1.07 +/- 0.71 x 10-6 to 4.84 +/- 0.60 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 228 to 300 K, and the steady state uptake coefficients (gammat(SS)) increase from 5.31 +/- 0.06 x 10-8 to 1.68 +/- 0.41 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 240 to 300 K. The desorption rate constants (kdes) were also found to increase slightly with the enhancement of temperature. The empirical formula between the uptake coefficients, desorption rate constants and temperature described in the form of Arrhenius expression were obtained. The activation energies for the heterogeneous reaction and desorption of COS on MgO were measured to be 11.02 +/- 0.34 kJ.mol-1 and 6.30 +/- 0.81 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The results demonstrate that the initial uptake of COS on MgO is mainly contributed by an adsorption process and the steady state uptake is due to a catalytic reaction. The environmental implication was also discussed.

  3. Radiation and atmospheric circulation controls on carbonyl sulfide concentrations in the marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelhammer, M.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Cosgrove, A.; Peters, A. J.; Johnson, R.; Hayden, M.; Montzka, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    A potential closure of the global carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS) budget has recently been attained through a combination of remote sensing, modeling, and extended surface measurements. However, significant uncertainties in the spatial and temporal dynamics of the marine flux still persist. In order to isolate the terrestrial photosynthetic component of the global atmospheric OCS budget, tighter constraints on the marine flux are needed. We present 6 months of nearly continuous in situ OCS concentrations from the North Atlantic during the fall and winter of 2014-2015 using a combination of research vessel and fixed tower measurements. The data are characterized by synoptic-scale ˜100 pmol mol-1 variations in marine boundary layer air during transitions from subtropical to midlatitude source regions. The synoptic OCS variability is shown here to be a linear function of the radiation history along an air parcel's trajectory with no apparent sensitivity to the chlorophyll concentration of the surface waters that the air mass interacted with. This latter observation contradicts expectations and suggests a simple radiation limitation for the combined direct and indirect marine OCS emissions. Because the concentration of OCS in the marine boundary layer is so strongly influenced by an air parcel's history, marine and atmospheric concentrations would rarely be near equilibrium and thus even if marine production rates are held constant at a given location, the ocean-atmosphere flux would be sensitive to changes in atmospheric circulation alone. We hypothesize that changes in atmospheric circulation including latitudinal shifts in the storm tracks could affect the marine flux through this effect.

  4. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change forces ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzymes which are metabolizing CO2, i.e. ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical acclimation of these enzymes affecting the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the acclimation of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2, and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of acclimation from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We demonstrate that a compensation point, by definition, does not exist. Instead, we propose to discuss a point of uptake affinity (PUA. The results indicate that such a PUA, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and may cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems, at least as long as the enzyme acclimation to CO2 is not surpassed by an increase of atmospheric COS. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise causing an increase of the radiative forcing in the troposphere. However, this increase is counterbalanced by the stronger input of this trace gas into the stratosphere causing a stronger energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space (Brühl et al., 2012. These data are very preliminary but may trigger a discussion on COS uptake acclimation to foster measurements with modern analytical instruments.

  5. Quantifying Carbon-Climate Processes at the Regional Scale Using Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Elliott [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Berry, Joe [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States); Torn, Margaret [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); David, Billesbach [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Seibt, Ulrike [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-10-08

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) analysis has the potentially transformative capability for partitioning the regional carbon flux into respiration and photosynthesis components. This emerging approach is based on the observation that continental atmospheric CO2 gradients are dominated by net ecosystem fluxes while continental atmospheric COS gradients are dominated by photosynthesis-related plant uptake. Regional flux partitioning represents a critical knowledge gap due to a lack of robust methods for regional-scale flux partitioning and large uncertainties in forecasting carbon-climate feedbacks. Our completed project characterized the relationship between COS and CO2 surface fluxes using a novel measurement and modeling system in a winter wheat field at the U.S. Department of Energy?s Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement program Central Facility (DOE-ARM CF). The scope of this project included canopy flux measurements, soil flux measurements, regional atmospheric modeling, and analysis of COS and CO2 airborne observations at SGP. Three critical discoveries emerged from this investigation: (1) the new measurement system provided the first field evidence of a robust relationship between COS leaf fluxes and GPP; (2) a previously unknown seasonal soil source of COS was observed and characterized; (3) the regional atmospheric analysis of airborne measurements provided the first COS-based constraints on GPP parameterizations used in earth systems models. Dissemination of these results includes three publications [Billesbach et al., In Press; Campbell et al., In Preparation; Seibt et al., In Review], three presentations at the AGU Fall Meeting (2012), and four invited presentations to department seminars. We have leveraged this foundational project to continue our work on understanding carbon cycle processes at large scales through one funded project (DOE Lab Fee, 2012-2015) and one proposal that is under review (DOE/NASA/USDA/NOAA, 2014-2016).

  6. Soil-atmosphere carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange in a tropical rainforest at La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Maseyk, K. S.; Juarez, S.; Lett, C.; Seibt, U. H.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has recently been proposed as a promising tracer for partitioning ecosystem carbon assimilation due to the close analogy between leaf uptake processes of COS and CO2. This emerging framework requires accurate characterization of the source and sink components of COS, including soil fluxes. Here we present the first direct, continuous observations of soil COS fluxes for 4 months at a tropical rainforest, La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Three soil plots with contrasting water content were selected for chamber measurements. Our observations confirmed that soils are principally COS sinks, with daily mean COS fluxes averaged across all chambers ranging from -3 to 0 pmol m-2 s-1. When compared with net ecosystem COS uptake which peaks around -30 pmol m-2 s-1, their contributions should be considered in ecosystem COS balance. We did not find a temperature optimum, but soil COS uptake slightly increased with soil temperature, indicating biotic control on soil COS fluxes. Diurnal cycles of COS fluxes were observed during drying out periods after rain. The diel periodicity of COS fluxes was probably obscured by frequent raining at the site. Diffusional control of soil COS fluxes is shown from increasing soil COS uptake at lower soil water-filled pore space. These confirm that soil COS fluxes are mediated both by soil physical and biological factors. Using a depth-resolved diffusion-reaction model with data-driven enzyme activity parameterization, we simulated the COS fluxes from measured soil environmental variables, consistent with observations. This modeling scheme is useful for separating soil COS fluxes from net ecosystem COS fluxes, which lends support to the emergent COS-based approach of carbon flux partitioning.

  7. Do oceanic emissions account for the missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Sinikka; Marandino, Christa A.; von Hobe, Marc; Cortés, Pau; Simó, Rafel; Booge, Dennis; Quack, Birgit; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Ksionzek, Kerstin; Koch, Boris P.; Bracher, Astrid; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) has a large potential to constrain terrestrial gross primary production (GPP), one of the largest carbon fluxes in the carbon cycle, as it is taken up by plants in a similar way as CO2. To estimate GPP in a global approach, the magnitude and seasonality of sources and sinks of atmospheric OCS have to be well understood, to distinguish between seasonal variation caused by vegetation uptake and other sources or sinks. However, the atmospheric budget is currently highly uncertain, and especially the oceanic source strength is debated. Recent studies suggest that a missing source of several hundreds of Gg sulfur per year is located in the tropical ocean by a top-down approach. Here, we present highly-resolved OCS measurements from two cruises to the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean as a bottom-up approach. The results from these cruises show that opposite to the assumed ocean source, direct emissions of OCS from the tropical ocean are unlikely to account for the missing source. To reduce uncertainty in the global oceanic emission estimate, our understanding of the production and consumption processes of OCS and its precursors, dimethylsulfide (DMS) and carbon disulphide (CS2), needs improvement. Therefore, we investigate the influence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the photochemical production of OCS in seawater by considering analysis of the composition of DOM from the two cruises. Additionally, we discuss the potential of oceanic emissions of DMS and CS2 to closing the atmospheric OCS budget. Especially the production and consumption processes of CS2 in the surface ocean are not well known, thus we evaluate possible photochemical or biological sources by analyzing its covariation of biological and photochemical parameters.

  8. Continuous In-situ Measurements of Carbonyl Sulfide to Constrain Ecosystem Carbon and Water Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, B.; Kim, Y.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Noone, D. C.; Lai, C. T.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bible, K.; Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.; Still, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon and water are critical for examining the role of forested ecosystems in changing climates. A small but increasing number of studies have identified Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS) as a potential tracer for photosynthesis. OCS is hydrolyzed by an irreversible reaction in leaf mesophyll cells that is catalyzed by the enzyme, carbonic anhydrase. Leaf-level field and greenhouse studies indicate that OCS uptake is controlled by stomatal activity and that the ratio of OCS and CO2 uptake is reasonably constant. Existing studies on ecosystem OCS exchange have been based on laboratory measurements or short field campaigns and therefore little information on OCS exchange in a natural ecosystem over longer timescales is available. The objective of this study is to further assess the stability of OCS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis in an active forested ecosystem and also to assess its utility for constraining transpiration, since both fluxes are mediated by canopy stomatal conductance. An off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer (Los Gatos Research Inc.) was deployed at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington (45.8205°N, 121.9519°W). Canopy air was sampled from three heights to measure vertical gradients of OCS within the canopy, and OCS exchange between the forest and the atmosphere. Here we take advantage of simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopologues of H2O and CO2 at corresponding heights as well as NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) from eddy covariance measurements to compare GPP (Gross Primary Production) and transpiration estimates from a variety of independent techniques. Our findings seek to allow assessment of the environmental and ecophysicological controls on evapotranspiration rates, which are projected to change in coming decades, and are otherwise poorly constrained.

  9. Using NDACC column measurements of carbonyl sulfide to estimate its sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Marshall, Julia; Palm, Mathias; Deutscher, Nicholas; Roedenbeck, Christian; Warneke, Thorsten; Notholt, Justus; Baker, Ian; Berry, Joe; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Jones, Nicholas; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Lejeune, Bernard; Hannigan, James; Conway, Stephanie; Strong, Kimberly; Campbell, Elliott; Wolf, Adam; Kremser, Stefanie

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is taken up by plants during photosynthesis through a similar pathway as carbon dioxide (CO2), but is not emitted by respiration, and thus holds great promise as an additional constraint on the carbon cycle. It might act as a sort of tracer of photosynthesis, a way to separate gross primary productivity (GPP) from the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) that is typically derived from flux modeling. However the estimates of OCS sources and sinks still have significant uncertainties, which make it difficult to use OCS as a photosynthetic tracer, and the existing long-term surface-based measurements are sparse. The NDACC-IRWG measures the absorption of OCS in the atmosphere, and provides a potential long-term database of OCS total/partial columns, which can be used to evaluate OCS fluxes. We have retrieved OCS columns from several NDACC sites around the globe, and compared them to model simulation with OCS land fluxes based on the simple biosphere model (SiB). The disagreement between the measurements and the forward simulations indicates that (1) the OCS land fluxes from SiB are too low in the northern boreal region; (2) the ocean fluxes need to be optimized. A statistical linear flux model describing OCS is developed in the TM3 inversion system, and is used to estimate the OCS fluxes. We performed flux inversions using only NOAA OCS surface measurements as an observational constraint and with both surface and NDACC OCS column measurements, and assessed the differences. The posterior uncertainties of the inverted OCS fluxes decreased with the inclusion of NDACC data comparing to those using surface data only, and could be further reduced if more NDACC sites were included.

  10. Carbonyl sulfide exchange in soils for better estimates of ecosystem carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Whelan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbonyl sulfide (COS measurements are one of the emerging tools to better quantify gross primary production (GPP, the largest flux in the global carbon cycle. COS is a gas with a similar structure to CO2; COS uptake is thought to be a proxy for GPP. However, soils are a potential source or sink of COS. This study presents a framework for understanding soil-COS interactions. Excluding wetlands, most of the few observations of isolated soils that have been made show small uptake of atmospheric COS. Recently, a series of studies at an agricultural site in the central United States found soil COS production under hot conditions an order of magnitude greater than fluxes at other sites. To investigate the extent of this phenomenon, soils were collected from 5 new sites and incubated in a variety of soil moisture and temperature states. We found that soils from a desert, an oak savannah, a deciduous forest, and a rainforest exhibited small COS fluxes, behavior resembling previous studies. However, soil from an agricultural site in Illinois, > 800 km away from the initial central US study site, demonstrated comparably large soil fluxes under similar conditions. These new data suggest that, for the most part, soil COS interaction is negligible compared to plant uptake of COS. We present a model that anticipates the large agricultural soil fluxes so that they may be taken into account. While COS air-monitoring data are consistent with the dominance of plant uptake, improved interpretation of these data should incorporate the soil flux parameterizations suggested here.

  11. Carbonyl sulfide exchange in soils for better estimates of ecosystem carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Mary E.; Hilton, Timothy W.; Berry, Joseph A.; Berkelhammer, Max; Desai, Ankur R.; Campbell, J. Elliott

    2016-03-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) measurements are one of the emerging tools to better quantify gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux in the global carbon cycle. COS is a gas with a similar structure to CO2; COS uptake is thought to be a proxy for GPP. However, soils are a potential source or sink of COS. This study presents a framework for understanding soil-COS interactions. Excluding wetlands, most of the few observations of isolated soils that have been made show small uptake of atmospheric COS. Recently, a series of studies at an agricultural site in the central United States found soil COS production under hot conditions an order of magnitude greater than fluxes at other sites. To investigate the extent of this phenomenon, soils were collected from five new sites and incubated in a variety of soil moisture and temperature states. We found that soils from a desert, an oak savannah, a deciduous forest, and a rainforest exhibited small COS fluxes, behavior resembling previous studies. However, soil from an agricultural site in Illinois, > 800 km away from the initial central US study site, demonstrated comparably large soil fluxes under similar conditions. These new data suggest that, for the most part, soil COS interaction is negligible compared to plant uptake of COS. We present a model that anticipates the large agricultural soil fluxes so that they may be taken into account. While COS air-monitoring data are consistent with the dominance of plant uptake, improved interpretation of these data should incorporate the soil flux parameterizations suggested here.

  12. Variability of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide at a semi-arid urban site in western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Chinmay; Chandra, Naveen; Venkataramani, S; Lal, Shyam

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a major precursor for sulfate aerosols that play a critical role in climate regulation. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of COS measurements as a reliable means to constrain biospheric carbon assimilation. In a scenario of limited availability of COS data around the globe, we present gas-chromatographic measurements of atmospheric COS mixing ratios over Ahmedabad, a semi-arid, urban region in western India. These measurements, being reported for the first time over an Indian site, enable us to understand the diurnal and seasonal variation in atmospheric COS with respect to its natural, anthropogenic and photochemical sources and sinks. The annual mean COS mixing ratio over Ahmedabad is found to be 0.83±0.43ppbv, which is substantially higher than free tropospheric values for the northern hemisphere. Inverse correlation of COS with soil and skin temperature, suggests that the dry soil of the semi-arid study region is a potential sink for atmospheric COS. Positive correlations of COS with NO2 and CO during post-monsoon and the COS/CO slope of 0.78pptv/ppbv reveals influence of diesel combustion and tire wear. The highest concentrations of COS are observed during pre-monsoon; COS/CO2 slope of 44.75pptv/ppmv combined with information from air mass back-trajectories reveal marshy wetlands spanning over 7500km(2) as an important source of COS in Ahmedabad. COS/CO2 slopes decrease drastically (8.28pptv/ppmv) during post-monsoon due to combined impact of biospheric uptake and anthropogenic emissions.

  13. Diurnal Fluxes of Carbonyl Sulfide (COS) in a Subtropical Salt Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M.; Min, D. H.; Rhew, R. C.; Liu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheric sulfur budget has been greatly perturbed, with anthropogenic contributions exceeding natural emissions. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant, longest-lived reduced sulfur compound in the atmosphere, and COS concentration changes could have a significant effect on the global climate and the natural biogeochemical sulfur cycle. Measuring fluxes of COS presents a methodological challenge, and in situ measurements from terrestrial ecosystems are sparse. Terrestrial plants are considered to be the largest sink for COS in the troposphere, although specific species have been reported to act as sources. Here we describe production rates of COS from salt marsh plants on a Texas Gulf coast subtropical barrier island (27.8 °N, 97.1°W). In July 2009, static flux chamber measurements were performed on three sites over the course of 24 hours to capture the temporal and spatial variation of fluxes. Two of the sites were dominated by B. maritima, a common salt marsh plant, while one was a control plot with only marsh soil and no vegetation. Fluxes from the two sites were measured within an hour of each other and showed a very similar pattern with time, indicating that the COS emissions responded to the same environmental factors. Of the environmental parameters measured, fluxes correlated best with soil temperatures at 5 cm depth. The site with the drier of the two soils consistently yielded a 20-30% larger flux. The control plot produced an order of magnitude less COS, but still exhibited a positive flux. These results are part of an ongoing study on how subtropical salt marshes contribute to the global atmospheric sulfur budget.

  14. Carbonyl sulfide exchange in a temperate loblolly pine forest grown under ambient and elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. L.; Zhou, Y.; Russo, R. S.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.; Varner, R. K.; Sive, B. C.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetation, soil and ecosystem level carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange was observed at Duke Forest, a temperate loblolly pine forest, grown under ambient (Ring 1, R1) and elevated (Ring 2, R2) CO2. During calm meteorological conditions, ambient COS mixing ratios at the top of the forest canopy followed a distinct diurnal pattern in both CO2 growth regimes, with maximum COS mixing ratios during the day (R1=380±4 pptv and R2=373±3 pptv, daytime mean ± standard error) and minimums at night (R1=340±6 pptv and R2=346±5 pptv, nighttime mean ± standard error) reflecting a significant nighttime sink. Nocturnal vegetative uptake (-11 to -21 pmol m-2s-1, negative values indicate uptake from the atmosphere) dominated nighttime net ecosystem COS flux estimates (-10 to -30 pmol m-2s-1) in both CO2 regimes. In comparison, soil uptake (-0.8 to -1.7 pmol m-2 s-1) was a minor component of net ecosystem COS flux. In both CO2 regimes, loblolly pine trees exhibited substantial COS consumption overnight (50% of daytime rates) that was independent of CO2 assimilation. This suggests current estimates of the global vegetative COS sink, which assume that COS and CO2 are consumed simultaneously, may need to be reevaluated. Ambient COS mixing ratios, species specific diurnal patterns of stomatal conductance, temperature and canopy position were the major factors influencing the vegetative COS flux at the branch level. While variability in branch level vegetative COS consumption measurements in ambient and enhanced CO2 environments could not be attributed to CO2 enrichment effects, estimates of net ecosystem COS flux based on ambient canopy mixing ratio measurements suggest less nighttime uptake of COS in R2, the CO2 enriched environment.

  15. Sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide in an agricultural field in the Southern Great Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseyk, Kadmiel; Berry, Joseph A; Billesbach, Dave; Campbell, John Elliott; Torn, Margaret S; Zahniser, Mark; Seibt, Ulli

    2014-06-24

    Net photosynthesis is the largest single flux in the global carbon cycle, but controls over its variability are poorly understood because there is no direct way of measuring it at the ecosystem scale. We report observations of ecosystem carbonyl sulfide (COS) and CO2 fluxes that resolve key gaps in an emerging framework for using concurrent COS and CO2 measurements to quantify terrestrial gross primary productivity. At a wheat field in Oklahoma we found that in the peak growing season the flux-weighted leaf relative uptake of COS and CO2 during photosynthesis was 1.3, at the lower end of values from laboratory studies, and varied systematically with light. Due to nocturnal stomatal conductance, COS uptake by vegetation continued at night, contributing a large fraction (29%) of daily net ecosystem COS fluxes. In comparison, the contribution of soil fluxes was small (1-6%) during the peak growing season. Upland soils are usually considered sinks of COS. In contrast, the well-aerated soil at the site switched from COS uptake to emissions at a soil temperature of around 15 °C. We observed COS production from the roots of wheat and other species and COS uptake by root-free soil up to a soil temperature of around 25 °C. Our dataset demonstrates that vegetation uptake is the dominant ecosystem COS flux in the peak growing season, providing support of COS as an independent tracer of terrestrial photosynthesis. However, the observation that ecosystems may become a COS source at high temperature needs to be considered in global modeling studies.

  16. Soil uptake of carbonyl sulfide in subtropical forests with different successional stages in south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Wang, Xinming; Sheng, Guoying; Zhang, Deqiang; Zhou, Guoyi; Fu, Jiamo

    2007-04-01

    The uptake rates of carbonyl sulfide (COS) by soils in subtropical forests with different successional stages were measured using static chambers in Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve (DBR) in south China from July 2004 to March 2005. The three typical tropical forests studied included monsoon evergreen broad-leaf forest (BF), pine and broad-leaf mixed forest (MF) and pine forest (PF), representing forests with different succession stages in the region. COS exchange rates were also compared between the plots with litter-fall remaining (plots L) and those with litter-fall removed (plots S) in each forest. Results showed that these forest soils all acted as sinks for COS with exchange rates of -1.22 to -11.82 pmol m-2 s-1. The MF in the midsuccessional stage had significantly higher uptake rates, and the mean exchange rates in the BF, MF, and PF were -3.90, -4.77, and -3.65 pmol m-2 s-1, respectively. COS uptake rates at plots L were higher than those at plots S. Mean COS fluxes were significantly higher in March (-6.06 pmol m-2 s-1) than those in July (-3.60 pmol m-2 s-1), August (-3.82 pmol m-2 s-1), September (-3.45 pmol m-2 s-1), and October (-3.54 pmol m-2 s-1). Significant correlation was observed between the COS uptake rates and soil respiration rates or microbial biomass, indicating that microbial activity was an important factor controlling the soil uptake of COS. Significant correlations between COS fluxes and initial COS mixing ratios were only observed in the BF and MF. COS fluxes showed no correlation with soil temperature or water content alone in any of the three forests, but do correlate well with soil temperature and water content together in polynomial forms with an order of 2.

  17. Improving North American gross primary production (GPP) estimates using atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huilin; Montzka, Steve; Andrews, Arlyn; Sweeney, Colm; Jacobson, Andy; Miller, Ben; Masarie, Ken; Jung, Martin; Gerbig, Christoph; Campbell, Elliott; Abu-Naser, Mohammad; Berry, Joe; Baker, Ian; Tans, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the responses of gross primary production (GPP) to climate change is essential for improving our prediction of climate change. To this end, it is important to accurately partition net ecosystem exchange of carbon into GPP and respiration. Recent studies suggest that carbonyl sulfide is a useful tracer to provide a constraint on GPP, based on the fact that both COS and CO2 are simultaneously taken up by plants and the quantitative correlation between GPP and COS plant uptake. We will present an assessment of North American GPP estimates from the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model, the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model, and the MPI-BGC model through atmospheric transport simulations of COS in a receptor oriented framework. The newly upgraded Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) will be employed to compute the influence functions, i.e. footprints, to link the surface fluxes to the concentration changes at the receptor observations. The HYSPLIT is driven by the 3-hourly archived NAM 12km meteorological data from NOAA NCEP. The background concentrations are calculated using empirical curtains along the west coast of North America that have been created by interpolating in time and space the observations at the NOAA/ESRL marine boundary layer stations and from aircraft vertical profiles. The plant uptake of COS is derived from GPP estimates of biospheric models. The soil uptake and anthropogenic emissions are from Kettle et al. 2002. In addition, we have developed a new soil flux map of COS based on observations of molecular hydrogen (H2), which shares a common soil uptake term but lacks a vegetative sink. We will also improve the GPP estimates by assimilating atmospheric observations of COS in the receptor oriented framework, and then present the assessment of the improved GPP estimates against variations of climate variables such as temperature and precipitation.

  18. Vertical Profiles of Carbonyl Sulfide, Halocarbons, and Benzene Over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, S. A.; Calvert, P.; Hall, B.; Elkins, J. W.; Miller, L.; Watson, A.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P.

    2005-12-01

    A NOAA sampling program to measure vertical profiles of CO{_2}, CH{_4}, N{_2}O, and other gases within the lower atmosphere has been expanded to allow measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS), CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, chlorocarbons, bromocarbons, methyl iodide, and benzene. Bimonthly to monthly profiles for these gases have been obtained since September 2004 from flasks collected onboard aircraft at altitudes up to 8 km above sea level at 10 continental and 2 coastal sites in North America. The wide range of gases being measured aid in identifying many different influences on sampled air, such as combustion, input from the oceans, urban emissions, non-urban terrestrial emissions, uptake by vegetation and soils, and vertical mixing. Based upon co-elevated mixing ratios of halocarbons and carbon monoxide or halocarbons and C{_2}Cl{_4}, we anticipate that this sampling program has the potential to provide continental-scale emissions estimates for non-CO{_2} gases that are currently regulated, for example by the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol of Substance that Deplete the Ozone Layer, and for gases listed in the Kyoto Protocol that may be regulated in the future. In addition to the observation of urban pollution and burning plumes, strong and persistent vertical gradients have been observed that vary with season for COS, methyl halides, and chloroform. The results for COS are particularly dramatic, as they show substantially reduced mixing ratios in the continental boundary layer during the growing season. The spatial patterns and seasonality are qualitatively consistent with uptake of COS by photosynthetically active vegetation, though the relative importance of COS loss to soils is poorly constrained. These results will be compared to NOAA ground-based measurements that show strong seasonal variations for COS that are closely tied to those observed for CO{_2}, and the implications of these results on the hypothesis that COS could provide a proxy for gross vegetative

  19. Relationship of photosynthesis to atmospheric carbonyl sulfide for the North American growing season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. E.; Carmichael, G. R.; Chai, T.; Moen, J.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Tang, Y.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Vay, S. A.; Montzka, S. A.; Collatz, G. J.; Berry, J. A.; Schnoor, J. L.; Stanier, C. O.

    2007-12-01

    Projected changes in climate may reduce the uptake of atmospheric CO2 by terrestrial plants, creating a positive carbon-climate feedback. Our understanding of this feedback is primarily based on global photosynthesis models that were derived from leaf-scale models. It is difficult to validate photosynthesis models with atmospheric CO2 measurements because air depleted of CO2 by photosynthesis mixes with air enriched in CO2 by respiration. It was recently hypothesized that an independent assessment of photosynthesis models could be developed using atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) which is closely related to photosynthesis by COS plant uptake but only has small terrestrial ecosystem sources. Here we report a COS model-observation analysis that is supportive of modeled photosynthesis estimates for the North American growing season. We compared airborne measurements with an atmospheric model driven by COS plant uptake, soil sinks, ocean sources, and anthropogenic sources. The COS plant uptake was calculated by scaling modeled photosynthesis by the plant chamber-derived ratio of photosynthesis to COS plant uptake. Observed and simulated COS concentrations along the flightpaths showed remarkable agreement, both indicating a 13 percent tropospheric drawdown. Modeled COS concentrations were dominated by plant uptake, unlike previous COS models that did not account for the COS-photosynthesis relationship. The model-observation agreement for this plant dominated system corroborates the modeled photosynthesis estimates and the extrapolation of the photosynthesis-COS relationship from plant chamber experiments to our regional atmospheric analysis. We anticipate that our model- observation analysis will be a starting point for using the global observation network9 in a data assimilation framework to constrain climate-photosynthesis sensitivities.

  20. Constraining surface carbon fluxes using in situ measurements of carbonyl sulfide and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelhammer, M.; Asaf, D.; Still, C.; Montzka, S.; Noone, D.; Gupta, M.; Provencal, R.; Chen, H.; Yakir, D.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the processes that control the terrestrial exchange of carbon is critical for assessing atmospheric CO2 budgets. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is taken up by vegetation during photosynthesis following a pathway that mirrors CO2 but has a small or nonexistent emission component, providing a possible tracer for gross primary production. Field measurements of COS and CO2 mixing ratios were made in forest, senescent grassland, and riparian ecosystems using a laser absorption spectrometer installed in a mobile trailer. Measurements of leaf fluxes with a branch-bag gas-exchange system were made across species from 10 genera of trees, and soil fluxes were measured with a flow-through chamber. These data show (1) the existence of a narrow normalized daytime uptake ratio of COS to CO2 across vascular plant species of 1.7, providing critical information for the application of COS to estimate photosynthetic CO2 fluxes and (2) a temperature-dependent normalized uptake ratio of COS to CO2 from soils. Significant nighttime uptake of COS was observed in broad-leafed species and revealed active stomatal opening prior to sunrise. Continuous high-resolution joint measurements of COS and CO2 concentrations in the boundary layer are used here alongside the flux measurements to partition the influence that leaf and soil fluxes and entrainment of air from above have on the surface carbon budget. The results provide a number of critical constraints on the processes that control surface COS exchange, which can be used to diagnose the robustness of global models that are beginning to use COS to constrain terrestrial carbon exchange.

  1. Scaling from Flux Towers to Ecosystem Models: Regional Constraints on GPP from Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Naser, M.; Campbell, J.; Berry, J. A.; Seibt, U.; Maseyk, K. S.; Torn, M. S.; Biraud, S. C.; Fischer, M. L.; Billesbach, D. P.; Baker, I. T.; Collatz, G. J.; Chen, H.; Montzka, S. A.; Sweeney, C.

    2012-12-01

    Process-level information on terrestrial carbon fluxes are typically observed at small spatial scales (e.g. eddy flux towers) but critical applications exist at much larger spatial scales (e.g. global ecosystem models). New methodologies are needed to fill this spatial gap. Recent work suggests that analysis of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) could fill this gap by providing constraints on GPP fluxes at large scales. This proposal is based on evidence that COS plant uptake is quantitatively related to photosynthesis and that COS plant uptake is the dominant COS budget flux influencing atmospheric concentrations over northern extratropical continents. Previous atmospheric analysis of COS has focused on continental or larger scales and only one ecosystem model. Here we explore the spatial and temporal COS variation within North America and their relationship to a range of ecosystem models using regional and global atmospheric transport models. Airborne COS observations are examined from the NOAA-ESRL network including 13 North American airborne sites and a total of 1,447 vertical profiles from years 2004 to 2012. In addition to COS plant uptake, we examined the influence of atmospheric transport treatments, boundary conditions, soil fluxes (mechanistic and empirical), and anthropogenic emissions. The atmospheric COS simulations were consistent with the primary observed spatial and temporal variations in the US mid-continent. This consistency is supportive of ecosystem models because the dominant input for these atmospheric COS simulations is ecosystem model GPP data. However, only the COS simulations driven by a subset of the ecosystem models were able to reproduce the observed COS seasonality in a semiarid cultivated region (ARM/SGP). This subset of ecosystem models produced GPP seasonality that was similar to eddy flux estimates, suggesting a role for COS observations in extending flux tower data to regional spatial scales.

  2. Ecosystem gross CO2 fluxes in a tropical rainforest estimated from carbonyl sulfide (COS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, U. H.; Maseyk, K. S.; Lett, C.; Juarez, S.; Sun, W.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a promising new tracer to constrain the gross CO2 fluxes of land ecosystems, particularly in tropical forests where CO2 flux partitioning is often problematic due to the absence of turbulent flow at night. Since vegetation COS and CO2 uptake during photosynthesis is closely coupled, the gross fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration can be quantified through the concurrent measurements of COS and CO2. We measured ecosystem COS and CO2 exchange over four months in a tropical rainforest at La Selva, Costa Rica. We observed a strong ecosystem uptake of COS with a diel signal that was similar but not identical to net CO2 fluxes. Soils at the site mostly acted as COS sinks, correlated with soil moisture. The COS and CO2 data were used to calculate canopy photosynthesis (approx. GPP) from net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) based on the empirical relationship of leaf relative uptake of COS and CO2. Mid-day COS-based GPP estimates ranged from -10 to -15 μmol m-2 s-1, compared to NEE of -5 to -10 μmol m-2 s-1. Ecosystem respiration, calculated as the difference of NEE and GPP, ranged from 5 to 10 μmol m-2 s-1, similar to previous estimates of 5 to 9 μmol m-2 s-1 from CO2 flux partitioning and respiration component measurements at the site. Our results support the application of COS as a new tool in ecosystem flux partitioning that may be particularly useful in tropical forests.

  3. Soil carbonyl sulfide fluxes in a Mediterranean ecosystem: insights from model-data fusion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Seibt, U. H.; Maseyk, K. S.; Lett, C.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is linked to biosphere components of the carbon cycle, due in large part to its hydrolysis by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). Stomatal diffusion models and observations at leaf and ecosystem scales have demonstrated the potential of COS as a tracer for Gross Primary Production (GPP). Although considered small relative to canopy COS fluxes, accurate knowledge of soil COS fluxes is required for the use of net ecosystem COS fluxes in carbon flux partitioning. However, extensive field measurements of soil COS fluxes are rare and process-based modeling is limited. Here we report continuous chamber measurements of soil COS fluxes in a Mediterranean ecosystem in the Santa Monica Mountains, California during April and early May 2013. Both COS uptake and emissions were observed, but the soil acted as a net sink in most conditions and was a net source only when soil temperatures were above 22 C. COS sink fluxes were positively correlated with soil water content and CO2 fluxes. COS uptake had a maximum at a temperature around 15 C. However, no single environmental variable could be correlated to COS fluxes with an r-square > 0.6. COS fluxes from soil chambers ranged from -9 to 2.5 pmol m-2 s-1. Leaf litter appeared to increase soil COS metabolic activity. We observed huge bursts of soil COS uptake induced by a precipitation event, probably due to enhanced soil microbial activity resulting from alleviated water limitation and a decrease in soil temperature towards the optimum. We used a soil gas exchange model coupled with CA enzyme kinetics to simulate the soil COS fluxes. Micrometeorological and soil data were used to drive the soil flux model. Model simulations indicated that diurnal and synoptic variations of COS fluxes were driven by soil temperature and water content, controlling both CA activity and diffusion. We suggest that multiple parameters need to be optimized to reduce uncertainties in models of soil COS fluxes at larger scales.

  4. Litter dominates surface fluxes of carbonyl sulfide in a Californian oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wu; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Seibt, Ulli

    2016-02-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a promising tracer for partitioning terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration from net carbon fluxes, based on its daytime co-uptake alongside CO2 through leaf stomata. Because ecosystem COS fluxes are the sum of plant and soil fluxes, using COS as a photosynthesis tracer requires accurate knowledge of soil COS fluxes. At an oak woodland in Southern California, we monitored below-canopy surface (soil + litter) COS and CO2 fluxes for 40 days using chambers and laser spectroscopy. We also measured litter fluxes separately and used a depth-resolved diffusion-reaction model to quantify the role of litter uptake in surface COS fluxes. Soil and litter were primarily COS sinks, and mean surface COS uptake was small (˜1 pmol m-2 s-1). After rainfall, uptake rates were higher (6-8 pmol m-2 s-1), and litter contributed a significant fraction (up to 90%) to surface fluxes. We observed rapid concurrent increases in COS uptake and CO2 efflux following the onset of rain. The patterns were similar to the Birch effect widely documented for soils; however, both COS and CO2 flux increases originated mainly in the litter. The synchronous COS-CO2 litter Birch effect indicates that it results from a rapid increase in litter microbial activity after rainfall. We expect that the drying-rewetting cycles typical for mediterranean and other semiarid ecosystems create a pronounced seasonality in surface COS fluxes. Our results highlight that litter uptake is an important component of surface COS exchange that needs to be taken into account in ecosystem COS budgets and model simulations.

  5. Disentangling Sources and Sinks of Carbonyl Sulfide in a Temperate Mountain Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Hammerle, A.; Kitz, F.; Spielmann, F.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur-containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. The use of COS as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis relies on the assumption that other sinks or sources of COS within an ecosystem are negligible, so that the COS exchange is through leaves only. Here we use concurrent COS and CO2 ecosystem-scale eddy covariance and soil chamber flux measurements together with within and above-canopy concentration profiles and an inverse Lagrangian analysis to disentangle sinks and sources of COS in a temperate mountain grassland. Preliminary results from the vegetation period 2015 suggest the soil at this grassland site to present a source of COS during daytime, which is corroborated by the inverse Lagrangian analysis which infers a COS source in the lowermost part of the canopy, while during nighttime the soil COS exchange is close to zero. At the ecosystem-scale a net uptake of COS was observed throughout the day, which in turn suggests (i) a sink for COS in the plant canopy during nighttime and (ii) a larger (compared to the net flux) gross uptake of COS by the plant canopy during daytime. Taken together our results suggest that using COS as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis may be less straight forward than previously thought and that further work is required to better understand the ecosystem-scale COS exchange and its drivers.

  6. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance: potential and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Brilli, Federico; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Xu, Xiaobin; Bingemer, Heinz; Hansel, Armin; Loreto, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The theoretical basis for the link between the leaf exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and water vapour (H(2)O) and the assumptions that need to be made in order to use COS as a tracer for canopy net photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance, are reviewed. The ratios of COS to CO(2) and H(2)O deposition velocities used to this end are shown to vary with the ratio of the internal to ambient CO(2) and H(2)O mole fractions and the relative limitations by boundary layer, stomatal and internal conductance for COS. It is suggested that these deposition velocity ratios exhibit considerable variability, a finding that challenges current parameterizations, which treat these as vegetation-specific constants. COS is shown to represent a better tracer for CO(2) than H(2)O. Using COS as a tracer for stomatal conductance is hampered by our present poor understanding of the leaf internal conductance to COS. Estimating canopy level CO(2) and H(2)O fluxes requires disentangling leaf COS exchange from other ecosystem sources/sinks of COS. We conclude that future priorities for COS research should be to improve the quantitative understanding of the variability in the ratios of COS to CO(2) and H(2)O deposition velocities and the controlling factors, and to develop operational methods for disentangling ecosystem COS exchange into contributions by leaves and other sources/sinks. To this end, integrated studies, which concurrently quantify the ecosystem-scale CO(2), H(2)O and COS exchange and the corresponding component fluxes, are urgently needed.

  7. Global carbonyl sulfide (OCS) measured by MIPAS/Envisat during 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthor, Norbert; Höpfner, Michael; Leyser, Adrian; Stiller, Gabriele P.; von Clarmann, Thomas; Grabowski, Udo; Kellmann, Sylvia; Linden, Andrea; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Krysztofiak, Gisèle; Walker, Kaley A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a global carbonyl sulfide (OCS) data set covering the period June 2002 to April 2012, derived from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) limb emission spectra measured with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on the ENVISAT satellite. The vertical resolution is 4-5 km in the height region 6-15 km and 15 at 40 km altitude. The total estimated error amounts to 40-50 pptv between 10 and 20 km and to 120 pptv at 40 km altitude. MIPAS OCS data show no systematic bias with respect to balloon observations, with deviations mostly below ±50 pptv. However, they are systematically higher than the OCS volume mixing ratios of the ACE-FTS instrument on SCISAT, with maximum deviations of up to 100 pptv in the altitude region 13-16 km. The data set of MIPAS OCS exhibits only moderate interannual variations and low interhemispheric differences. Average concentrations at 10 km altitude range from 480 pptv at high latitudes to 500-510 pptv in the tropics and at northern mid-latitudes. Seasonal variations at 10 km altitude amount to up to 35 pptv in the Northern and up to 15 pptv in the Southern Hemisphere. Northern hemispheric OCS abundances at 10 km altitude peak in June in the tropics and around October at high latitudes, while the respective southern hemispheric maxima were observed in July and in November. Global OCS distributions at 250 hPa (˜ 10-11 km) show enhanced values at low latitudes, peaking during boreal summer above the western Pacific and the Indian Ocean, which indicates oceanic release. Further, a region of depleted OCS amounts extending from Brazil to central and southern Africa was detected at this altitude, which is most pronounced in austral summer. This depletion is related to seasonally varying vegetative uptake by the tropical forests. Typical signatures of biomass burning like the southern hemispheric biomass burning plume are not visible in MIPAS data, indicating that this process is only a minor source of upper

  8. Soil emission and uptake of carbonyl sulfide at a temperate mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitz, Florian; Hammerle, Albin; Laterza, Tamara; Spielmann, Felix M.; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Flux partitioning, i.e. inferring gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration from the measured net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange, is one uncertainty in modelling the carbon cycle and in times where robust models are needed to assess future global changes a persistent problem. A promising new approach is to derive GPP by measuring carbonyl sulfide (COS), the most abundant sulfur-containing trace gas in the atmosphere, with a mean concentration of about 500 pptv in the troposphere. This is possible because COS and CO2 enter the leaf via a similar pathway and are processed by the same enzyme (carbonic anhydrase). A prerequisite to use COS as a proxy for canopy photosynthesis is a robust estimation of COS sources and sinks in an ecosystem. Past studies described soils either as a sink or source, depending on properties like soil temperature and soil water content. The main aim of this study was to quantify the soil COS exchange and its drivers of a temperate mountain grassland in order to aid the use of COS as tracer for canopy CO2 and water vapor exchange. We conducted a field campaign with a Quantum cascade laser at a temperate mountain grassland to estimate the soil COS fluxes under ambient conditions and while simulating a drought. We used self-built fused silica (i.e. light-transparent) soil chambers to avoid COS emissions from built-in materials and to assess the impact of radiation. Vegetation was removed within the chambers, therefor more radiation reached the soil surface compared to natural conditions. This might be the reason for highly positive fluxes during daytime more similar to agricultural study sites. To further investigate this large soil COS source we conducted within canopy concentration measurements near the soil surface and still recorded fluxes confirming the soil as a COS source during daytime. Results from the drought experiment suggested a strong impact of incoming radiation on soil COS fluxes followed by soil

  9. Soil water content plays an important role in soil-atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhigang; Behrendt, Thomas; Bunk, Rüdiger; Wu, Dianming; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is a quite stable gas in the troposphere and is transported up to the stratosphere, where it contributes to the sulfate aerosol layer (Crutzen 1976). The tropospheric concentration seems to be quite constant, indicating a balance between sinks and sources. Recent work by Sandoval-Soto et al. (2005) demonstrated the enormous strength of the vegetation sink and the urgent needs to understand the sinks and sources. The role of soils is a matter of discussion (Kesselmeier et al., 1999; Van Diest and Kesselmeier, 2008; Maseyk et al., 2014; Whelan et al., 2015). To better understand the influence of soil water content and OCS mixing ratio on OCS fluxes, we used an OCS analyzer (LGR COS/CO Analyzer 907-0028, Los Gatos, CA, USA) coupled with automated soil chamber system (Behrendt et al., 2014) to measure the OCS fluxes with a slow drying of four different types of soil (arable wheat soil in Mainz, blueberry soil in Waldstein, spruce soil in Waldstein and needle forest soil in Finland). Results showed that OCS fluxes as well as the optimum soil water content for OCS uptake varied significantly for different soils. The net production rates changed significantly with the soil drying out from 100% to about 5% water holding capacity (WHC), implying that soil water content play an important role in the uptake processes. The production and uptake processes were distinguished by the regression of OCS fluxes under different OCS mixing ratios. OCS compensation points (CP) were found to differ significantly for different soil types and water content, with the lowest CP at about 20% WHC, implying that when estimating the global budgets of OCS, especially for soils fluxes, soil water content should be taken into serious consideration. References Crutzen, P. J. 1976, Geophys. Res. Lett., 3, 73-76. Sandoval-Soto, L. et al., 2005, Biogeosciences, 2, 125-132. Kesselmeier, J. et al., 1999, J. Geophys. Res., 104, 11577-11584. Van Diest, H. and Kesselmeier, J. 2008

  10. Carbonyl sulfide hydrolysis in polar ice cores and the feasibility of recovering a paleoatmospheric history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicewonger, M. R.; Aydin, K. M.; Saltzman, E. S.; Fudge, T. J.; Waddington, E. D.; Verhulst, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere with a current tropospheric mean level of 484 parts per trillion [Montzka et al., 2007]. The major sources of COS are biomass burning, oceanic emissions of COS, and the atmospheric oxidation of precursor sulfur compounds CS2 and DMS emitted from the oceans and soils. The major losses of atmospheric COS are uptake by vegetation and soil. The uptake of COS by terrestrial vegetation provides a link between the global budget of COS and the carbon cycle. We measured COS in polar ice cores from four Antarctic sites: Taylor Dome, Siple Dome, South Pole, and West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide. The COS samples ranged in age from 0.2-42 ky BP. There are large differences between the measurements from the various sites during overlapping time periods. COS levels in ice from the warmer sites (Siple Dome and WAIS-D) are considerably lower than those from the colder sites (Taylor Dome and South Pole). This result suggests that the difference reflects COS loss to hydrolysis within the ice core bubbles. The kinetics of COS hydrolysis in aqueous solution have been studied, but there is no information about reaction rates in ice. A 1-dimensional heat and ice flow model was used to determine the temperature history for each ice core sample. Assuming a pseudo-first order Arrhenius rate equation for COS loss in ice, we can correct each ice core sample for post-depositional COS loss. The temperature histories are used with an objective minimization algorithm to determine the optimal kinetic parameters for COS loss to obtain agreement between ice core measurements from different sites. The results indicate that the ice core data from all sites can be reconciled with a single COS atmospheric history. The uncertainty in this history becomes large in warm ice at longer time scales. This study suggests that reconstructing paleoatmospheric COS will require measurements in ice cores from sites with cold surface temperatures

  11. Soil atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diest, H.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2008-04-01

    The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS) concentration, soil water content (WC) and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd) as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS), indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  12. Soil atmosphere exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Diest

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS concentration, soil water content (WC and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS, indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  13. Soil atmosphere exchange of Carbonyl Sulfide (COS regulated by diffusivity depending on water-filled pore space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Van Diest

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS between soil and the atmosphere was investigated for three arable soils from Germany, China and Finland and one forest soil from Siberia for parameterization in the relation to ambient carbonyl sulfide (COS concentration, soil water content (WC and air temperature. All investigated soils acted as significant sinks for COS. A clear and distinct uptake optimum was found for the German, Chinese, Finnish and Siberian soils at 11.5%, 9%, 11.5%, and 9% soil WC, respectively, indicating that the soil WC acts as an important biological and physical parameter for characterizing the exchange of COS between soils and the atmosphere. Different optima of deposition velocities (Vd as observed for the Chinese, Finnish and Siberian boreal soil types in relation to their soil WC, aligned at 19% in relation to the water-filled pore space (WFPS, indicating the dominating role of gas diffusion. This interpretation was supported by the linear correlation between Vd and bulk density. We suggest that the uptake of COS depends on the diffusivity dominated by WFPS, a parameter depending on soil WC, soil structure and porosity of the soil.

  14. A Novel Sulfided Mo/C Catalyst for Direct Vapor Phase Carbonylation of Methanol at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Peng

    2003-01-01

    The direct carbonylation of methanol, without any halide in the feed as a promoter, ispresented. A series of Mo catalysts supported on activated carbon, γ-Al2O3 and SiO2 were prepared.The results show that the support greatly affects the Mo catalyst in the direct vapor-phase carbonylationof methanol, and activated carbon is the best supports of the investigated supports. In addition, therelationships between adsorptions of NH3 and CO and carbonylation of methanol were investigated. A novelsulfided Mo/C catalyst had high activity and selectivity for the vapor phase carbonylation of methanol tomethyl acetate without the addition ofa CH3I promoter to the feed. The reaction conditions were optimizedat a reaction temperature of 573 K, a methanol concentration of 23 mol% and a carbon monoxide spacevelocity of 3,000 L/(kg.h). Under these optimal conditions a methanol conversion of 50%, carbonylationselectivity of 80 mol%, and space-time yield of 8.0 mol/(kg.h) were obtained. The active phase of thisnovel sulfided Mo/C catalyst is the non-crystalline phase, and the active component is present as MoS2.5on the surface of the activated carbon.

  15. Scaling up carbonyl sulfide (COS) fluxes from leaf and soil to the canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fulin; Yakir, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) with atmospheric concentrations around 500 ppt is an analog of CO2 which can potentially serve as powerful and much needed tracer of photosynthetic CO2 uptake, and global gross primary production (GPP). However, questions remain regarding the application of this approach due to uncertainties in the contributions of different ecosystem components to the canopy scale fluxes of COS. We used laser quantum cascade spectroscopy in combination with soil and branch chambers, and eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange fluxes of COS and CO2 (NEE) in citrus orchard during the driest summer month to test our ability to integrate the chamber measurements into the ecosystem fluxes. The results indicated that: 1) Soil fluxes showed clear gradient from continuous uptake under the trees in wet soil of up to -4 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~0.5 umol m-2s-1) to emission in dry hot and exposed soil between rows of trees of up to +3 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 emission of ~11 umol m-2s-1). In all cases a clear correlation between fluxes and soil temperature was observed. 2) At the leaf scale, midday uptake was ~5.5 pmol m-2s-1 (CO2 uptake of ~1.8 umol m-2s-1). Some nighttime COS uptake was observed in the citrus leaves consistent with nocturnal leaf stomatal conductance. Leaf relative uptake (LRU) of COS vs. CO2 was not constant over the diurnal cycle, but showed exponential correlation with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) during the daytime. 3) At the canopy scale mid-day summer flux reached -12.0 pmol m-2s-1 (NEE ~6 umol m-2s-1) with the diurnal patterns of COS fluxes following those of CO2 fluxes during the daytime, but with small COS uptake fluxes maintained also during the night when significant CO2 emission fluxes were observed. The canopy-scale fluxes always indicated COS uptake, irrespective of the soil emission effects. GPP estimates were consistent with conventional indirect estimates based on NEE and nocturnal measurements. Scaling up

  16. INHALATIONAL EXPOSURE TO CARBONYL SULFIDE (COS) PRODUCES BRAIN LESIONS AND ALTERED BRAINSTEM AUDITORY (BAER) AND SOMATOSENSORY (SEP) EVOKED POTENTIALS IN FISHCER 344N RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of the amount of carbonyl sulfide (COS) emissions and the lack of toxicological data, COS was listed in the Clean Air Act of 1990 as a Hazardous Air Pollutant. In 1999 COS was nominated by the US EPA to the National Toxicology Program for additional toxicological investig...

  17. 12 WEEK EXPOSURE TO CARBONYL SULFIDE PRODUCES BRAIN LESIONS AND CHANGES IN BRAINSTEM AUDITORY (BAER) AND SOMATOSENAORY (SEP) EVOKED POTENTIALS IN FISCHER 344N RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is a chemical intermediate in the production of pesticides and herbicides, is a metabolite of carbon disulfide, is produced by the combustion of organic material, and is found occurring in nature. COS was included in a Toxic Substances Control Act request f...

  18. Removal of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 stream using AgNO3-modified NaZSM-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjun; Wang; Shaoyun; Chen; Heng; Chen; Xingzhou; Yuan; Yongchun; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Removal of carbonyl sulfide(COS) from CO2 stream is significant for the production and utilization of food grade CO2. This study investigates the adsorption performance of Ag/NaZSM-5 as adsorbent prepared by incipient wetness impregnation for the removal of COS from a CO2 stream in a fixed-bed adsorption apparatus. Effects of various conditions on the preparation of adsorbent, adsorption and desorption were intensively examined. The results revealed that COS can be removed to below 1×10-9from a CO2stream(1000 ppm COS/CO2) using Ag/NaZSM-5(10 wt% AgNO3) with an adsorption capacity of 12.86 mg·g-1. The adsorbent can be fully regenerated using hot air at 450 C. The adsorption ability remained stable even after eight cycles of regeneration.

  19. Overcoming uncertainty with carbonyl sulfide-based GPP estimates: observing and modeling soil COS fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M.; Hilton, T. W.; Berry, J. A.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Desai, A. R.; Rastogi, B.; Campbell, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Significant carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange by soils limits the applicability of net ecosystem COS flux observations as a proxy for stomatal trace gas exchange. High frequency measurements of COS over urban and natural ecosystems offer a potential window into processes regulating the carbon and water cycle: photosynthetic carbon uptake and stomatal conductance. COS diffuses through plant stomata and is irreversibly consumed by enzymes involved in photosynthesis. In certain environments, the magnitude of soil COS fluxes may constitute one-quarter of COS uptake by plants. Here we present a way of anticipating conditions when anomalously large soil COS fluxes are likely to occur and be taken into account. Previous studies have pointed to either a tendency for soil uptake of COS from the atmosphere with a soil moisture optimum, or exponential COS production coincident with temperature. Data from field and laboratory studies were used to deconvolve the two processes. CO2 and COS fluxes were observed from forest, desert, grassland, and agricultural soils under a range of temperature and soil moisture conditions. We demonstrate how to estimate temperature and soil moisture impacts on COS soil production based on our cross-site incubations. By building a model of soil COS exchange that combines production and consumption terms, we offer a framework for interpreting the two disparate conclusions about soil COS exchange in previous studies. Such a construction should be used in ecosystem and continental scale modeling of COS fluxes to anticipate where the influence of soil COS exchange needs to be accounted for, resulting in greater utility of carbonyl sulfide as a tracer of plant physiological processes.

  20. Ionization of oriented carbonyl-sulfide molecules by intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrovski, Darko; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Filsinger, Frank; Meijer, Gerard; Küpper, Jochen; Holmegaard, Lotte; Kalhøj, Line; Nielsen, Jens H; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We present combined experimental and theoretical results on strong-field ionization of oriented carbonyl-sulphide molecules by circularly-polarized laser pulses. The obtained molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions show pronounced asymmetries perpendicular to the direction of the molecular electric dipole moment. These findings are explained by a tunneling model invoking the laser-induced Stark shifts associated with the dipoles and polarizabilities of the molecule and its unrelaxed cation.

  1. Enhancement effects of ultrasound assisted in the synthesis of NiAl hydrotalcite for carbonyl sulfide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Gao, Fengyu; Yu, Qingjun; Zhou, Yuansong; Wang, Jiangen; Huang, Yonghai; Yang, Zhongyu

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasonic effect in the synthesis of catalysts of NiAl oxides prepared starting from the coprecipitation method of a hydrotalcite structure was evaluated in this work. Removal of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature over the hydrotalcite-derived oxides was studied. The samples were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption/desorption techniques, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). It is found that hydrotalcite treated with ultrasonic has smaller average crystallite size and higher particle dispersion compared to hydrotalcite without ultrasonic treatment. As a result, mixed oxides derived from hydrotalcite treated with ultrasonic show more developed pore structure which is good for the physical adsorption of gaseous pollutant. The result of desulfuration test showed that removal efficiency of COS on the NiAl mixed oxides prepared by ultrasonic method (30min) is greater than that on the catalyst prepared without the ultrasonic irradiation assistance with the same aging time. One important reason for the high activity is that when the ultrasonic is used the number of weak basic sites (OH(-) groups) and moderate basic sites (M-O) was increased, whereas the number of strong basic sites (O(2-)) was decreased. Therefore, ultrasonic treatment promoted the COS hydrolysis and suppress the poisoning of the catalyst.

  2. Degradation of carbonyl sulfide by Actinomycetes and detection of clade D of β-class carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Kato, Hiromi; Higashide, Mitsuru; Nishimiya, Mami; Katayama, Yoko

    2016-09-25

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas and one of the sources of stratospheric aerosol contributing to climate change. Although one of the major sinks of COS is soil, the distribution of COS degradation ability among bacteria remains unclear. Seventeen out of 20 named bacteria belonging to Actinomycetales had COS degradation activity at mole fractions of 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) COS. Dietzia maris NBRC 15801(T) and Mycobacterium sp. THI405 had the activity comparable to a chemolithoautotroph Thiobacillus thioparus THI115 that degrade COS by COS hydrolase for energy production. Among 12 bacteria manifesting rapid degradation at 30 ppmv COS, Dietzia maris NBRC 15801(T) and Streptomyces ambofaciens NBRC 12836(T) degraded ambient COS (∼500 parts per trillion by volume). Geodermatophilus obscurus NBRC 13315(T) and Amycolatopsis orientalis NBRC 12806(T) increased COS concentrations. Moreover, six of eight COS degrading bacteria isolated from soils had partial nucleotide sequences similar to that of the gene encoding clade D of β-class carbonic anhydrase, which included COS hydrolase. These results indicate the potential importance of Actinomycetes in the role of soils as sinks of atmospheric COS.

  3. Ecosystem and soil fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and CO2 to constrain rates of gross photosynthesis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, U. H.; Maseyk, K. S.; Lett, C.; Sun, W.; Berry, J. A.; Billesbach, D. P.; Campbell, J.; Torn, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    A promising new approach to constrain biosphere-atmosphere carbon and water exchange is the use of carbonyl sulfide (COS). COS is taken up by leaves via the same pathway as CO2, leading to a close coupling of vegetation COS and CO2 fluxes during photosynthesis. It has been proposed that the gross fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration can be quantified through the concurrent measurements of COS and CO2. Using newly available instrumentation, we conducted field campaigns to quantify COS and CO2 exchange in the Southern Great Plains, OK, and in the Santa Monica mountains, CA. We found that soils can act as sinks or sources of COS, correlated with soil temperature and moisture. At the ecosystem scale, we observed a strong uptake of COS by the canopy with a diel signal that mirrored net CO2 fluxes. Combining soil and ecosystem data of COS and CO2, we demonstrate how soil COS fluxes can be taken into account when partitioning net ecosystem exchange into photosynthesis and respiration.

  4. Measurements of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide during the NASA Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation Project: Implications for the global COS budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James E.; Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide COS concentrations were measured by three analytical systems during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project. The three systems all used cryogenic sample preconcentration and gas chromatographic (GC) separation but differed in the method of detection. The FPD system used a flame photometric detector, the MS system used a mass selective detector, and the ECD-S system used a fluorinating catalyst followed by an electron capture detector. With the FPD system, we found a mean COS concentration of 510 ppt over the North Atlantic and 442 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. With the ECD-S system, we found a mean COS concentration of 489 ppt over the North Atlantic and 419 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. All three systems registered a latitudinal gradient in atmospheric COS of between 1.6 and 2.0 ppt per degree of latitude, with increasing COS concentrations northward which was similar to the gradient measured by Bingemer et al. (1990). It is difficult to reconcile the measured latitudinal concentration gradient with present theories of the global COS budget since the largest sink of COS is thought to be a flux to land plants, most of which are in the northern hemisphere.

  5. Carbonyl sulfide produced by abiotic thermal and photodegradation of soil organic matter from wheat field substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Mary E.; Rhew, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    sulfide (COS) is a reduced sulfur gas that is taken up irreversibly in plant leaves proportionally with CO2, allowing its potential use as a tracer for gross primary production. Recently, wheat field soil at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Lamont, Oklahoma, was found to be a measureable source of COS to the atmosphere. To understand the mechanism of COS production, soil and root samples were collected from the site and incubated in the laboratory over a range of temperatures (15-34°C) and light conditions (light and dark). Samples exhibited mostly COS net uptake from the atmosphere in dark and cool (COS emission was observed during dark incubations at high temperatures (>25°C), consistent with field observations, and at a lower temperature (19°C) when a full spectrum lamp (max wavelength 600 nm) was applied. Sterilized soil and root samples yielded only COS production that increased with temperature, supporting the hypothesis that (a) COS production in these samples is abiotic, (b) production is directly influenced by temperature and light, and (c) some COS consumption in soil and root samples is biotic.

  6. Carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide and carbon disulfide in the Pearl River Delta of southern China: Impact of anthropogenic and biogenic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H.; Simpson, I. J.; Ding, A. J.; Wang, T.; Saunders, S. M.; Wang, T. J.; Cheng, H. R.; Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.; Rowland, F. S.

    2010-10-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) such as carbonyl sulfide (OCS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and carbon disulfide (CS 2) impact radiative forcing, ozone depletion, and acid rain. Although Asia is a large source of these compounds, until now a long-term study of their emission patterns has not been carried out. Here we analyze 16 months of RSC data measured at a polluted rural/coastal site in the greater Pearl River Delta (PRD) of southern China. A total of 188 canister air samples were collected from August 2001 to December 2002. The OCS and CS 2 mixing ratios within these samples were higher in autumn/winter and lower in summer due to the influence of Asian monsoon circulations. Comparatively low DMS values observed in this coastal region suggest a relatively low biological productivity during summer months. The springtime OCS levels in the study region (574 ± 40 pptv) were 25% higher than those on other East Asia coasts such Japan, whereas the springtime CS 2 and DMS mixing ratios in the PRD (47 ± 38 pptv and 22 ± 5 pptv, respectively) were 3-30 times lower than elevated values that have been measured elsewhere in East Asia (Japan and Korea) at this time of year. Poor correlations were found among the three RSCs in the whole group of 188 samples, suggesting their complex and variable sources in the region. By means of backward Lagrangian particle release simulations, air samples originating from the inner PRD, urban Hong Kong and South China Sea were identified. The mean mixing ratio of OCS in the inner PRD was significantly higher than that in Hong Kong urban air and South China Sea marine air ( p 0.05). Using a linear regression method based on correlations with the urban tracer CO, the estimated OCS emission in inner PRD (49.6 ± 4.7 Gg yr -1) was much higher than that in Hong Kong (0.32 ± 0.05 Gg yr -1), whereas the estimated CS 2 and DMS emissions in the study region accounted for a very few percentage of the total CS 2 and DMS emission in China. These

  7. Mechanism of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide with typical components of atmospheric aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hongbo; WANG Xiao; CHEN Jianmin; YU Hongkun; XUE Huaxin; PAN Xunxi; HOU Huiqi

    2004-01-01

    The homogeneous reactions of earbonyl sulfide (COS) with OH and oxygen radicals have been studied thoroughly. However, the heterogeneous chemical processes involving COS and atmospheric particles are still not well understood. The reactivity of COS with atmospheric mineral oxides such as A12O3, CaO, SiO2, Fe2O3 and MnO2 has been explored. The gaseous and solid products of the reaction were identified by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy respectively.The mechanism and kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction are also discussed in detail. The results showed that COS can be catalytically oxidized on the surfaces of different atmospheric mineral oxides with the products of CO2, S and SO42-.The reactivity of the oxides with COS differs widely. A12O3 exhibits excellent reactivity, and Fe2O3 is inferior to it. CaO shows weak reactivity, while SiO2 and MnO2 nearly have no activity for the oxidation of COS. The absorbed oxygen and hydroxyls on the surfaces of the oxides are the main active sites in the conversion of COS. When O2 in the experimental system was much excessive, the catalytic oxidation on the surface of AI2O3 is a pseudo first order reaction with respect to COS. The acidity of A12O3 influences the reactivity significantly. The rate constants of the catalytic oxidation of COS on the surface of basic, neutral and acidic A12O3 are respectively 1.51xl0-4, 9.81x10-s and 3.06x10-6 s-1.

  8. Using Carbonyl Sulfide column measurements and a Chemical Transport Model to investigate variability in biospheric CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Petri, Christof; Palm, Mathias; Warneke, Thorsten; Baker, Ian; Berry, Joe; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Campbell, Elliott; Wolf, Adam; Deutscher, Nick; Notholt, Justus

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the CO2 processes on land is of great importance, because the terrestrial exchange drives the seasonal and interannual variability of CO2 in the atmosphere. Atmospheric inversions based on CO2 concentration measurements alone can only determine net biosphere fluxes, but not differentiate between photosynthesis (uptake) and respiration (production). Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) could provide an important additional constraint: it is also taken up by plants during photosynthesis but not emitted during respiration, and therefore is a potential means to differentiate between these processes. Solar absorption Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometry allows for the retrieval of the atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and OCS. Here, we investigate co-located and nearly simultaneous measurements of OCS and CO2 measured at 3 sites via FTIR spectrometers. These northern-hemispheric sites span a wide range of latitudes and all have multiple year time-series. The sites include Ny-Alesund (79°N), Bremen (53°N) and Paramaribo (6°N). We compare these measurements to simulations of OCS and CO2 using the GEOS-Chem model. The simulations are driven by different land biospheric fluxes of OCS and CO2 to match the seasonality of the measurements. The simple biosphere model (SiB-COS) are used in the study because it simultaneously calculates the biospheric fluxes of both OCS and CO2. The CO2 simulation with SiB fluxes agrees with the measurements better than a simulation using CASA. Comparison of the OCS simulations with different fluxes indicates that the latitudinal distribution of the OCS fluxes within SiB needs to be adjusted.

  9. Measurements of carbonyl sulfide in automotive emissions and an assessment of its importance to the global sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Alan; Henry, Bruce; Ragazzi, Ronald A.; Merrick, Michael; Stokes, Joseph; Pyzdrowski, Thad; Sams, Robert

    1992-09-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is thought to be the major precursor to the background stratospheric aerosol sulfate layer during nonvolcanic time periods. Long-term perturbations to this layer from increased OCS emissions could significantly influence the Earth's radiation budget, climate, and ozone levels. The present study was carried out in an effort to determine mass emission rates of OCS from automobiles, a potentially important global source of this gas. Studies were carried out on a variety of gasoline vehicles including those without catalytic converters, vehicles with older oxidation catalysts, and vehicles employing newer three-way catalysts. Preliminary measurements were also carried out on four diesel fuel cars and one medium-duty diesel fuel truck. Measurements of OCS were acquired by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and in most cases, measurements of CO were also acquired. Gasoline vehicles, which included some of the lowest and some of the highest CO emitters on the road today, revealed very high correlation between OCS and CO mass emission rates. The OCS-CO linear regression resulted in a slope of (5.8 ± 1.6) × 10-6 (gOCS/gCO) and a correlation coefficient of 0.92. Our preliminary diesel fuel measurements resulted in a corresponding slope 34.5 times larger. On the basis of these results we calculated a global OCS source strength for gasoline and diesel fuel vehicles of 0.0008 to 0.008 Tg yr-1. The upper limit is a factor of 100 to 600 times less important than the sum of all OCS sources. In contrast to the global scale, automotive emissions of OCS may be important on a local scale, particularly when attempting to measure background concentrations and associated small secular trends. Our OCS-CO ratios have been shown to be very useful in helping to delineate automotive sources from other sources.

  10. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS), a potential tracer of gross primary productivity, between grassland ecosystem components and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M.; Rhew, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange have been used as an independent constraint for estimates of gross primary productivity over terrestrial ecosystems and continents. CO2 is both taken up and released by plants, whereas COS is usually only consumed and at a predictable ratio to CO2. Most of the underlying theoretical assumptions of this method have been verified, however the problem of parsing leaf exchange from other terrestrial sources and sinks of COS is still under investigation. In ecosystems that experience distinct periods of growing and senescence, it is possible to assess COS fluxes in situ when no green plants are present and compare to measurements during the growing season. Taking advantage of this seasonal pattern, we have investigated COS exchange from March 2012 to March 2013 in a Mediterranean grassland outside of Santa Cruz, CA, U.S.A (37.0°N, 122°W). Through lab-based incubation experiments, we found that net COS uptake of grassland soil can be reduced by increased soil moisture. We evaluated this claim in the field with monthly field deployments of static flux chambers over the in-tact soil and plant system. In the dry summer, artificial rain amendments caused COS net uptake to decrease, sometimes leading to overall net production to the atmosphere, in agreement with lab experiments. During the wet growing season, water additions caused over 2x increase in COS uptake from the atmosphere. Contrary to what has been previously claimed, soil exchange of COS is not negligible in grassland ecosystems.

  11. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  12. A top-down approach of surface carbonyl sulfide exchange by a Mediterranean oak forest ecosystem in southern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belviso, Sauveur; Reiter, Ilja Marco; Loubet, Benjamin; Gros, Valérie; Lathière, Juliette; Montagne, David; Delmotte, Marc; Ramonet, Michel; Kalogridis, Cerise; Lebegue, Benjamin; Bonnaire, Nicolas; Kazan, Victor; Gauquelin, Thierry; Fernandez, Catherine; Genty, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    The role that soil, foliage, and atmospheric dynamics have on surface carbonyl sulfide (OCS) exchange in a Mediterranean forest ecosystem in southern France (the Oak Observatory at the Observatoire de Haute Provence, O3HP) was investigated in June of 2012 and 2013 with essentially a top-down approach. Atmospheric data suggest that the site is appropriate for estimating gross primary production (GPP) directly from eddy covariance measurements of OCS fluxes, but it is less adequate for scaling net ecosystem exchange (NEE) to GPP from observations of vertical gradients of OCS relative to CO2 during the daytime. Firstly, OCS and carbon dioxide (CO2) diurnal variations and vertical gradients show no net exchange of OCS at night when the carbon fluxes are dominated by ecosystem respiration. This contrasts with other oak woodland ecosystems of a Mediterranean climate, where nocturnal uptake of OCS by soil and/or vegetation has been observed. Since temperature, water, and organic carbon content of soil at the O3HP should favor the uptake of OCS, the lack of nocturnal net uptake would indicate that its gross consumption in soil is compensated for by emission processes that remain to be characterized. Secondly, the uptake of OCS during the photosynthetic period was characterized in two different ways. We measured ozone (O3) deposition velocities and estimated the partitioning of O3 deposition between stomatal and non-stomatal pathways before the start of a joint survey of OCS and O3 surface concentrations. We observed an increasing trend in the relative importance of the stomatal pathway during the morning hours and synchronous steep drops of mixing ratios of OCS (amplitude in the range of 60-100 ppt) and O3 (amplitude in the range of 15-30 ppb) after sunrise and before the break up of the nocturnal boundary layer. The uptake of OCS by plants was also characterized from vertical profiles. However, the time window for calculation of the ecosystem relative uptake (ERU) of OCS

  13. Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide in Binary Mixture of Diethylene Glycol Diethyl Ether and Water%羰基硫在二乙二醇二乙醚/水二元混合体系中的水解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新学; 刘迎新; 魏雄辉

    2005-01-01

    The solubility and hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide in binary mixture of diethylene glycol diethyl ether and water are studied as a function of composition. The use of an aqueous solution of diethylene glycol diethyl ether enhances the solubility and hydrolysis rate of carbonyl sulfide compared with that in pure water. The composition of the mixture with maximum hydrolysis rate varies with temperature. The thermophysical properties including density, viscosity, and surface tension as a function of composition at 20℃ under atmospheric pressure as well as liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data over the temperature range from 28℃ to 90℃ are also measured for the binary mixture.

  14. Sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide in a mountain grassland and relationships to the carbon dioxide exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Felix M.; Kitz, Florian; Hammerle, Albin; Gerdel, Katharina; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The trace gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been proposed as a tracer for canopy gross primary production (GPP), canopy transpiration and stomatal conductance of plant canopies in the last few years. COS enters the plant leaf through the stomata and diffuses through the intercellular space, the cell wall, the plasma membrane and the cytosol like CO2. It is then catalyzed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in a one-way reaction to H2S and CO2. This one-way flux into the leaf makes COS a promising tracer for the GPP. However there is growing evidence, that plant leaves aren't the only contributors to the ecosystem flux of COS. Therefor the COS uptake of soil microorganisms also containing CA and abiotic COS production might have to be accounted for when using COS as a tracer at the ecosystem scale. The overarching objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between the ecosystem-scale exchange of COS, CO2 and H2O and thus to test for the potential of COS to be used as a tracer for the plant canopy CO2 and H2O exchange. More specifically we aimed at quantifying the contribution of the soil to the ecosystem-scale COS exchange in order to understand complications that may arise due to a non-negligible soil COS exchange. In May 2015 we set up our quantum cascade laser (QCL) (Aerodyne Research Inc., MA, USA) at a temperate mountain grassland in Stubai Valley close to the village of Neustift, Austria. Our site lies at the valley bottom and is an intensively managed mountain grassland, which is cut 3-4 times a year. With the QCL we were able to measure concurrently the concentrations of COS, CO2, H2O (and CO) at a frequency of 10 Hz with minimal noise. This allowed us to conduct ecosystem-scale eddy covariance measurements. The eddy covariance flux measurements revealed that the COS uptake continues at night, which we confirmed was not caused by soil microorganisms, as the soil exchange was close to neutral during nighttime. Instead, the nocturnal COS uptake

  15. Sulfur K{beta} x-ray emission from carbonyl sulfide: Variations with polarization and excitation energy at the S K threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyano, K.E. [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Arp, U. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Southworth, S.H. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Meehan, T.E.; Walsh, T.R.; Larkins, F.P. [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, (Australia) 3052

    1998-04-01

    Sulfur K{beta} x-ray-emission spectra from carbonyl sulfide have been measured with resonant excitation at the sulfur K absorption threshold and compared with results of self-consistent field and singles-doubles configuration-interaction calculations. For excitation to the strong 4{pi} absorption resonance, a splitting of the main emission peak is interpreted in terms of influence of the 4{pi} electron on the final valence-hole states. The polarization selectivity of the emission spectrometer was used to distinguish emission polarized parallel versus perpendicular with respect to the polarization of the excitation radiation. The observed polarization dependence is consistent with the molecular symmetries of the calculated intermediate and final states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Optimized approach to retrieve information on atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) above the Jungfraujoch station and change in its abundance since 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Bernard; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Vollmer, Martin K.; Reimann, Stefan; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Christopher D.; Walker, Kaley A.; Servais, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an optimized retrieval strategy for carbonyl sulfide (OCS), using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar observations made at the high-altitude Jungfraujoch station in the Swiss Alps. More than 200 lines of the ν3 fundamental band of OCS have been systematically evaluated and we selected 4 microwindows on the basis of objective criteria minimizing the effect of interferences, mainly by solar features, carbon dioxide and water vapor absorption lines, while maximizing the information content. Implementation of this new retrieval strategy provided an extended time series of the OCS abundance spanning the 1995-2015 time period, for the study of the long-term trend and seasonal variation of OCS in the free troposphere and stratosphere. Three distinct periods characterize the evolution of the tropospheric partial columns: a first decreasing period (1995-2002), an intermediate increasing period (2002-2008), and the more recent period (2008-2015) which shows no significant trend. Our FTIR tropospheric and stratospheric time series are compared with new in situ gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) measurements performed by Empa (Laboratory for Air Pollution/Environmental Technology) at the Jungfraujoch since 2008, and with space-borne solar occultation observations by the ACE-FTS instrument on-board the SCISAT satellite, respectively, and they show good agreement. The OCS signal recorded above Jungfraujoch appears to be closely related to anthropogenic sulfur emissions.

  17. What Controls the Net Forest-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbonyl Sulfide? Results from 2 Years of Eddy Flux Measurements and SiB Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R. A.; Commane, R.; Baker, I. T.; Munger, J. W.; Saleska, S. R.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is currently a focus of ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based measurements as well as of model development, owing mainly to its potential use as a large-scale proxy for gross primary production (GPP). OCS is taken up by leaves and either taken up or emitted by soils, depending on the circumstances. Because OCS is destroyed by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase within the leaf rather than by any light-dependent reaction, the leaf uptake is expected to be related to the conductance of the diffusive pathway into the leaf (stomata + mesophyll + leaf boundary air layer) rather than to GPP directly, though GPP and the diffusive conductance are often strongly correlated. Here we use 2 years of eddy covariance measurements of the net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of OCS, along with measurements of the vertical profile of OCS within the forest, to investigate the controls on ecosystem-scale OCS uptake and emission. We compare the OCS measurements, and simultaneous CO2 isotope flux and profile measurements, to predictions from the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model, which has been used to simulate OCS and 13CO2 fluxes for both vegetation and soils but has not yet been systematically tested against these relatively novel tracers. We thereby address the key question: How can measurements of the net ecosystem-atmosphere OCS exchange contribute to empirical quantification of stomatal conductance and GPP and to improving process-based ecosystem models?

  18. Single-, double-, and triple-photoionization cross sections of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and ionic fragmentation of OCS+, OCS2+, and OCS3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, Toshio; Doi, Hiroyuki

    1993-01-01

    Single-, double-, and triple-photoionization processes of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) have been studied in the photon-energy region of 20-100 eV by use of time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a photoion-photoion coincidence method together with synchrotron radiation. The single (σ+), double (σ2+), and triple (σ3+) photoionization cross sections of OCS are determined; the double-photoionization cross section is found to be considerably larger at hν=60 eV, giving a ratio σ2+/σ+ of 0.34, than found from previous observations of other molecules (SO2 and CH4). The ratio is in close agreement with that for the isoelectronic zinc atom. Ionic fragmentation ratios of the parent OCS+ and OCS2+ ions are determined separately at the excitation energies where the single and double photoionization takes place concomitantly. The results show that both the (meta)stable OCS+ and OCS2+ ions amount to about 10-15 % at higher photon energies in the respective single- and double-photoionization processes. Ionic branching ratios and the partial cross sections for the individual ions produced from the parent OCS+ and OCS2+ ions are also presented. High-lying electronic states of the OCS+ and OCS2+ precursors are also observed.

  19. Evaluation of microwave irradiation for analysis of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, cyanogen, ethyl formate, methyl bromide, sulfuryl fluoride, propylene oxide, and phosphine in hay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yonglin; Mahon, Daphne

    2007-01-10

    Fumigant residues in hay were "extracted" by microwave irradiation. Hay, in gastight glass flasks, was placed in a domestic microwave oven, and fumigants were released into the headspace by microwave irradiation. Power settings for maximum release of fumigants were determined for carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon disulfide (CS(2)), cyanogen (C(2)N(2)), ethyl formate (EF), methyl bromide (CH(3)Br), sulfuryl fluoride (SF), propylene oxide (PPO), and phosphine (PH(3)). Recoveries of fortified samples were >91% for COS, CS(2), CH(3)Br, SF, PPO, and PH(3) and >76% for C(2)N(2) and EF. Completeness of extraction was assessed from the amount of fumigant retained by the microwaved hay. This amount was determined from further microwave irradiation and was always small (<5% of the amount obtained from the initial procedure). Limits of quantification were <0.1 mg/kg for COS, CS(2), C(2)N(2), EF, and PH(3) and <0.5 mg/kg for CH(3)Br, SF, and PPO. These low limits were essentially due to the absence of interference from solvents and no necessity to inject large-volume gas samples. The microwave method is rapid and solvent-free. However, care is required in selecting the appropriate power setting. The safety implications of heating sealed flasks in microwave ovens should be noted.

  20. Optimized approach to retrieve information on the tropospheric and stratospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) vertical distributions above Jungfraujoch from high-resolution FTIR solar spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Bernard; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Servais, Christian; Duchatelet, Pierre; Demoulin, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), which is produced in the troposphere from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, is the most abundant gaseous sulfur species in the unpolluted atmosphere. Due to its low chemical reactivity and water solubility, a significant fraction of OCS is able to reach the stratosphere where it is converted to SO2 and ultimately to H2SO4 aerosols (Junge layer). These aerosols have the potential to amplify stratospheric ozone destruction on a global scale and may influence Earth's radiation budget and climate through increasing solar scattering. The transport of OCS from troposphere to stratosphere is thought to be the primary mechanism by which the Junge layer is sustained during nonvolcanic periods. Because of this, long-term trends in atmospheric OCS concentration, not only in the troposphere but also in the stratosphere, are of great interest. A new approach has been developed and optimized to retrieve atmospheric abundance of OCS from high-resolution ground-based infrared solar spectra by using the SFIT-2 (v3.91) algorithm, including a new model for solar lines simulation (solar lines often produce significant interferences in the OCS microwindows). The strongest lines of the ν3 fundamental band of OCS at 2062 cm-1 have been systematically evaluated with objective criteria to select a new set of microwindows, assuming the HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic parameters with an increase in the OCS line intensities of the ν3band main isotopologue 16O12C32S by 15.79% as compared to HITRAN 2000 (Rothman et al., 2008, and references therein). Two regularization schemes have further been compared (deducted from ATMOS and ACE-FTS measurements or based on a Tikhonov approach), in order to select the one which optimizes the information content while minimizing the error budget. The selected approach has allowed us to determine updated OCS long-term trend from 1988 to 2009 in both the troposphere and the stratosphere, using spectra recorded on a regular basis with

  1. Infrared spectra of two isomers of protonated carbonyl sulfide (HOCS+ and HSCO+) and t-HOCS in solid para-hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Masashi; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2016-10-01

    We report infrared (IR) spectra of HOCS+, HSCO+, t-HOCS, and other species produced on electron bombardment of a mixture of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and para-hydrogen (p-H2) during deposition at 3.2 K. After maintenance of the matrix in darkness for 15 h, the intensities of absorption features of HOCS+ at 2945.9 (ν1), 1875.3 (ν2), and 1041.9 (ν3) cm-1 and those of HSCO+ at 2506.9 (ν1) and 2074.2 (ν2) cm-1 decreased through neutralization with trapped electrons. Lines observed at 3563.4, 1394.8, and 1199.0 cm-1, which decreased slightly in intensity after maintenance in darkness and were nearly depleted after irradiation at 373 nm, are assigned to a t-HOCS radical. The corresponding spectra of their 13C- and D-isotopologues were observed. The IR spectra of HSCO+ and t-HOCS and those of modes ν2 and ν3 of HOCS+ are new. The assignments were made according to the expected chemical behavior and a comparison of experimental and calculated wavenumbers and 13C- and D-isotopic shifts. The wavenumber of the OH stretching mode (2945.9 cm-1) of HOCS+ in solid p-H2 is significantly red-shifted from that (3435.16 cm-1) reported for gaseous HOCS+; this shift is attributed to partial sharing of a proton between OCS and H2. The corresponding p-H2 induced shift is small in HSCO+ because of a much weaker interaction between HSCO+ and H2.

  2. A coupled model of the global cycles of carbonyl sulfide and CO2: A possible new window on the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joe; Wolf, Adam; Campbell, J. Elliott; Baker, Ian; Blake, Nicola; Blake, Don; Denning, A. Scott; Kawa, S. Randy; Montzka, Stephen A.; Seibt, Ulrike; Stimler, Keren; Yakir, Dan; Zhu, Zhengxin

    2013-06-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas that participates in some key reactions of the carbon cycle and thus holds great promise for studies of carbon cycle processes. Global monitoring networks and atmospheric sampling programs provide concurrent data on COS and CO2 concentrations in the free troposphere and atmospheric boundary layer over vegetated areas. Here we present a modeling framework for interpreting these data and illustrate what COS measurements might tell us about carbon cycle processes. We implemented mechanistic and empirical descriptions of leaf and soil COS uptake into a global carbon cycle model (SiB 3) to obtain new estimates of the COS land flux. We then introduced these revised boundary conditions to an atmospheric transport model (Parameterized Chemical Transport Model) to simulate the variations in the concentration of COS and CO2 in the global atmosphere. To balance the threefold increase in the global vegetation sink relative to the previous baseline estimate, we propose a new ocean COS source. Using a simple inversion approach, we optimized the latitudinal distribution of this ocean source and found that it is concentrated in the tropics. The new model is capable of reproducing the seasonal variation in atmospheric concentration at most background atmospheric sites. The model also reproduces the observed large vertical gradients in COS between the boundary layer and free troposphere. Using a simulation experiment, we demonstrate that comparing drawdown of CO2 with COS could provide additional constraints on differential responses of photosynthesis and respiration to environmental forcing. The separation of these two distinct processes is essential to understand the carbon cycle components for improved prediction of future responses of the terrestrial biosphere to changing environmental conditions.

  3. A new model for the global biogeochemical cycle of carbonyl sulfide - Part 1: Assessment of direct marine emissions with an oceanic general circulation and biogeochemistry model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launois, T.; Belviso, S.; Bopp, L.; Fichot, C. G.; Peylin, P.

    2014-08-01

    The global budget of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is believed to be at equilibrium because background air concentrations have remained roughly stable over at least the last decade. Since the uptakes of OCS by leaves (associated to photosynthesis) and soils have been revised significantly upwards recently, an equilibrated budget can only be obtained with a compensatory source of OCS. It has been assumed that the missing source of OCS comes from the low latitude ocean, following the incident solar flux. The present work uses parameterizations of major production and removal processes of organic compounds in the NEMO-PISCES Ocean General Circulation and Biogeochemistry Model to assess the marine source of OCS. In addition, the OCS photo-production rates computed with the NEMO-PISCES model were evaluated independently using UV absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (derived from satellite ocean color) and apparent quantum yields available in the literature. Our simulations show global direct marine emissions of COS in the range of 573-3997 Gg S yr-1, depending mostly on the quantification of the absorption rate of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The high estimates on that range are unlikely, as they correspond to a formulation that most likely overestimate photo-production process. Low and medium (813 Gg S yr-1) estimates derived from the NEMO-PISCES model are however consistent spatially and temporally with the suggested missing source of Berry et al. (2013), allowing thus to close the global budget of OCS given the recent estimates of leaf and soil OCS uptakes.

  4. A new model for the global biogeochemical cycle of carbonyl sulfide – Part 1: Assessment of direct marine emissions with an oceanic general circulation and biogeochemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Launois

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The global budget of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS is believed to be at equilibrium because background air concentrations have remained roughly stable over at least the last decade. Since the uptakes of OCS by leaves (associated to photosynthesis and soils have been revised significantly upwards recently, an equilibrated budget can only be obtained with a compensatory source of OCS. It has been assumed that the missing source of OCS comes from the low latitude ocean, following the incident solar flux. The present work uses parameterizations of major production and removal processes of organic compounds in the NEMO-PISCES Ocean General Circulation and Biogeochemistry Model to assess the marine source of OCS. In addition, the OCS photo-production rates computed with the NEMO-PISCES model were evaluated independently using UV absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (derived from satellite ocean color and apparent quantum yields available in the literature. Our simulations show global direct marine emissions of COS in the range of 573–3997 Gg S yr−1, depending mostly on the quantification of the absorption rate of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The high estimates on that range are unlikely, as they correspond to a formulation that most likely overestimate photo-production process. Low and medium (813 Gg S yr−1 estimates derived from the NEMO-PISCES model are however consistent spatially and temporally with the suggested missing source of Berry et al. (2013, allowing thus to close the global budget of OCS given the recent estimates of leaf and soil OCS uptakes.

  5. Infrared and microwave spectra of the acetylene-ammonia and carbonyl sulfide-ammonia complexes: a comparative study of a weak C-H···N hydrogen bond and an S···N bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunchen; Xu, Yunjie

    2011-08-21

    We report a combined high resolution infrared and microwave spectroscopic investigation of the acetylene-ammonia and carbonyl sulfide-ammonia complexes using a pulsed slit-nozzle multipass absorption spectrometer based on a quantum cascade laser and a pulsed nozzle beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, respectively. The ro-vibrational transitions of the acetylene-ammonia complex have been measured at 6 μm in the vicinity of the ν(4) band of ammonia for the first time. The previously reported pure rotational transitions have been extended to higher J and K values with (14)N nuclear quadrupole hyperfine components detected and analyzed. The spectral analysis reveals that acetylene binds to ammonia through a C-H···N weak hydrogen bond to form a C(3v) symmetric top, consistent with the previous microwave [Fraser et al., J. Chem. Phys., 1984, 80, 1423] and infrared spectroscopic study at 3 μm [Hilpert et al., J. Chem. Phys., 1996, 105, 6183]. A parallel study has also been carried out for the carbonyl sulfide-ammonia complex whose pure rotational and ro-vibrational spectra at 6 μm have been detected and analyzed for the first time. The spectral and the subsequent structural analyses, in conjunction with the corresponding ab initio calculation, indicate that the OCS-NH(3) complex assumes C(3v) symmetry with S pointing to N of NH(3), in contrast to the T-shaped geometries obtained for the isoelectronic N(2)O-NH(3) and CO(2)-NH(3) complexes.

  6. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) as a proxy for GPP: Complications derived from studies on the impact of CO2, soil humidity and sterilization on the OCS exchange between soils and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Behrendt, Thomas; Yi, Zhigang; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide is discussed to be used as a proxy for gross primary productivity (GPP) of forest ecosystems. However, soils may interfere. Soils play an important role in budgeting global and local carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes, yet the available data on the uptake and emission behavior of soils in conjunction with environmental factors is limited. The work of many authors has shown that the OCS exchange of soils depends on various factors, such as soil type, atmospheric OCS concentrations, temperature or soil water content (Kesselmeier et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, No. D9, 11577-11584, 1999; Van Diest & Kesselmeier, Biogeosciences, 5, 475-483, 2008; Masyek et al., PNAS, 111, No 25, 9064-9069, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1319132111, 2014; Whelan and Rhew, J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosciences., 120, 54-62, doi: 10.1002/2014JG002661, 2015) and the light dependent and obviously abiotic OCS production as reported by Whelan and Rhew (2015). To get a better constraint on the impact of some environmental factors on the OCS exchange of soils we used a new laser based integrated cavity output spectroscopy instrument (LGR COS/CO Analyzer Model 907-0028, Los Gatos, Mountain View, California, USA) in conjunction with an automated soil chamber system (as described in Behrendt et al, Biogeosciences, 11, 5463-5492, doi: 10.5194/bg-11-5463-2014, 2014). The OCS exchange of various soils under the full range of possible soil humidity and various CO2 mixing ratios was examined. Additionally OCS exchange of chloroform sterilized subsamples was compared to their live counterparts to illuminate the influence of microorganisms. Results were quite heterogeneous between different soils. With few exceptions, all examined soils show dependence between OCS exchange and soil humidity, usually with strongest uptake at a certain humidity range and less uptake or even emission at higher and lower humidity. Differences in CO2 mixing ratio also clearly impacts on OCS exchange, but trends for different soils

  7. Carbonyl compounds indoors in a changing climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brimblecombe Peter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Formic acid, acetic acid and formaldehyde are important compounds in the indoor environment because of the potential for these acids to degrade calcareous materials (shells, eggs, tiles and geological specimens, paper and corrode or tarnish metals, especially copper and lead. Carbonyl sulfide tarnishes both silver and copper encouraging the formation of surface sulfides. Results Carbonyls are evolved more quickly at higher temperatures likely in the Cartoon Gallery at Knole, an important historic house near Sevenoaks in Kent, England where the study is focused. There is a potential for higher concentrations to accumulate. However, it may well be that in warmer climates they will be depleted more rapidly if ventilation increases. Conclusions Carbonyls are likely to have a greater impact in the future.

  8. Towards understanding the variability in biospheric CO2 fluxes: using FTIR spectrometry and a chemical transport model to investigate the sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide and its link to CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding carbon dioxide (CO2 biospheric processes is of great importance because the terrestrial exchange drives the seasonal and inter-annual variability of CO2 in the atmosphere. Atmospheric inversions based on CO2 concentration measurements alone can only determine net biosphere fluxes, but not differentiate between photosynthesis (uptake and respiration (production. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS could provide an important additional constraint: it is also taken up by plants during photosynthesis but not emitted during respiration, and therefore is a potential mean to differentiate between these processes. Solar absorption Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR spectrometry allows for the retrievals of the atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and OCS from measured solar absorption spectra. Here, we investigate co-located and quasi-simultaneous FTIR measurements of OCS and CO2 performed at three selected sites located in the Northern Hemisphere. These measurements are compared to simulations of OCS and CO2 using a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem. The OCS simulations are driven by different land biospheric fluxes to reproduce the seasonality of the measurements. Increasing the plant uptake of Kettle et al. (2002a by a factor of three resulted in the best comparison with FTIR measurements. However, there are still discrepancies in the latitudinal distribution when comparing with HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations data spanning both hemispheres. The coupled biospheric fluxes of OCS and CO2 from the simple biosphere model (SiB are used in the study and compared to measurements. The CO2 simulation with SiB fluxes agrees with the measurements well, while the OCS simulation reproduced a weaker drawdown than FTIR measurements at selected sites, and a smaller latitudinal gradient in the Northern Hemisphere during growing season. An offset in the timing of the seasonal cycle minimum between SiB simulation and measurements is also seen. Using OCS as a

  9. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) in the Archean atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Danielache, Sebastian Oscar; Johnson, Matthew Stanley;

    2009-01-01

    ] and calculated isotope fractionation factor of SO2 photolysis as a function of wavelength. Using these results, we show that the estimated fractionation factors give mass independent distributions and are highly sensitive to the atmospheric concentrations of O2, O3, CO2, H2O, CS2, NH4, N2O, H2S, OCS and SO2...

  10. Validation of protein carbonyl measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustyniak, Edyta; Adam, Aisha; Wojdyla, Katarzyna;

    2015-01-01

    Protein carbonyls are widely analysed as a measure of protein oxidation. Several different methods exist for their determination. A previous study had described orders of magnitude variance that existed when protein carbonyls were analysed in a single laboratory by ELISA using different commercial...

  11. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between wheat soil and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The exchange of COS between wheat soil and atmosphere was investigated by using a dynamic enclosure. The investigated soil type acted as a significant sink for the trace gas COS. Atmospheric COS mixing ratios and temperature were found to be the physicochemical parameters controlling the uptake. The uptake reached maximum about 0.6×10-12 mol·g-1·h-1 at 15-20℃ under natural ambient atmospheric conditions. The measured uptake values agree well with that calculated by Guenther algorithm.

  12. Validation of protein carbonyl measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustyniak, Edyta; Adam, Aisha; Wojdyla, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Protein carbonyls are widely analysed as a measure of protein oxidation. Several different methods exist for their determination. A previous study had described orders of magnitude variance that existed when protein carbonyls were analysed in a single laboratory by ELISA using different commercial...... kits. We have further explored the potential causes of variance in carbonyl analysis in a ring study. A soluble protein fraction was prepared from rat liver and exposed to 0, 5 and 15min of UV irradiation. Lyophilised preparations were distributed to six different laboratories that routinely undertook...... protein carbonyl analysis across Europe. ELISA and Western blotting techniques detected an increase in protein carbonyl formation between 0 and 5min of UV irradiation irrespective of method used. After irradiation for 15min, less oxidation was detected by half of the laboratories than after 5min...

  13. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  14. Kinetics of the Double Carbonylation of Benzylchloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It is a multi-phase-catalyzed reaction to produce calcium phenylpyruvate by double carbonylation of benzylchloride. Based on the analysis of the reaction mechanism, a kinetic model of the carbonylation reaction was obtained. The model was verified through experiments in which the diffusion effect was neglected with the appropriate operation manner. But it is inevitable that the carbonylation process is controlled by diffusion as the autoclave scaling up.

  15. Study of decomposing carbonyl slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ai-liang; SUN Pei-mei; ZHAO Zhong-wei; LI Hong-gui; CHEN Xing-yu

    2006-01-01

    A new technology was put forward to deal with the carbonyl slag at low acidity and low oxygen pressure in the kettle.With the orthogonal experiments for analyzing the sequence of four factors and some single factor experiments for the best conditions. The best conditions are used for extracting nickel, cobalt and copper and enriching precious metals: the cupric ion concentration is 5 g/L; and pH=6; the sulfur coefficient is 1.4; the oxygen pressure is 0.08 MPa; the time bubbling oxygen is 20 min;the ratio of liquid to solid is 8:1; the leaching time is 2 h; the heating time is 2.5 h. The leaching rates of nickel and cobalt are more than 98% and that of copper is above 97%. Nickel and cobalt can be separated efficiently from copper and precious metals from the carbonyl slag. Moreover, its leaching liquor has less copper. Nickel and cobalt can be reclaimed only once. During the whole process,the leaching rates of Au and Ag are more than 99.9%, while other precious metals are still in the residue without any loss.

  16. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  17. Trifluoromethylation of Carbonyl Compounds with Sodium Trifluoroacetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In the presence of copper (Ⅰ) halide as catalyst, a variety of carbonyl compounds could be trifluoromethylated with sodium trifluoroacetate to give the corresponding alcohols in moderate to high yields.

  18. Ab Initio MO Studies on the Reaction Mechanism for Carbonyl Insertion Catalyzed by Carbonyl Cobalt Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ab initio method, under the effective core potential(ECP) approximation at HF/LANL2DZ level, has been employed to study the reaction mechanism of the carbonyl insertion of olefin hydroformylation catalyzed by a carbonyl cobalt HCo(CO)3. The two reaction paths have been discussed. The calculated potential energy barriers for the carbonyl migration and the ethyl group migration are 105.0 kJ/mol and 39.17 kJ/mol, respectively. The results indicate that the reaction path via ethyl migration is more energetically favorable than that via carbonyl insertion.

  19. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  20. Pattern of occurrence and occupancy of carbonylation sites in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are targets for modification by reactive oxygen species, and carbonylation is an important irreversible modification that increases during oxidative stress. While information on protein carbonylation is accumulating, its pattern is not yet understood. We have made a meta......-analysis of the available literature data (456 carbonylation sites on 208 proteins) to appreciate the nature of carbonylation sites in proteins. Of the carbonylated (Arg, Lys, Pro, and Thr – RKPT) amino acids, Lys is the most abundant, whereas Pro is the most susceptible and Thr is the least susceptible. The incidence...... of carbonylation is lower in the N-terminal part of the protein primary sequence. Although a significantly higher number of carbonylated sites occur in Arg-, Lys-, Pro- and Thr-rich regions of proteins, the hydropathy environment of carbonylated sites is not significantly different from potential carbonylation...

  1. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  2. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Observed hydrogen sulfide uptake rates in a biofilter treating waste air from a pig farm were too high to be explained within conventional limits of sulfide solubility, diffusion in a biofilm and bacterial metabolism. Clone libraries of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from the biofilter found no sulfide o...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  3. [Study on dynamics of hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide emission fluxes from Suaeda salsa marsh in the Yellow River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Hua; Guo, Hong-Hai; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhu, Zhen-Lin; Sun, Xiao-Qing

    2014-02-01

    The H2S and COS emission fluxes from Suaeda salsa marsh in the Yellow River estuary were measured using the static chamber and Chromatogram method during the growth season (May to October), the results showed that the seasonal and diurnal variations of H2S and COS emission fluxes were obvious, and Suaeda salsa marsh in the Yellow River estuary was the sources for both H2S and COS during the growth time, and the mean H2S and COS emission fluxes from Suaeda salsa marsh were 4.97 microg x (m2 x h)(-1) and 0.92 microg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively. Different environmental factors had different effects on the emission fluxes of H2S and COS from Suaeda salsa marsh, in which the SO4(2-) content and water content in the soil were the main factors that affected the H2S and COS emission fluxes, respectively. Sulfur gases emissions from Suaeda salsa marsh may be affected by many factors, such as plant, tide status and so on, so that should be further studied.

  4. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide ⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S.B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R.A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson’s A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. PMID:27738349

  5. Assaying the catalytic potential of transition metal sulfides for abiotic carbon fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, G. D.; Boctor, N. Z.; Brandes, J. A.; Filley, T. R.; Hazen, R. M.; Yoder, H. S.

    2004-05-01

    A suite of nickel, cobalt, iron, copper, and zinc containing sulfides are assayed for the promotion of a model carbon fixation reaction with relevance to local reducing environments of the early Earth. The assay tests the promotion of hydrocarboxylation (the Koch reaction) wherein a carboxylic acid is synthesized via carbonyl insertion at a metal-sulfide-bound alkyl group. The experimental conditions are chosen for optimal assay, i.e., high reactant concentrations and pressures (200 MPa) to enhance chemisorption, and high temperature (250°C) to enhance reaction kinetics. All of the metal sulfides studied, with the exception CuS, promote hydrocarboxylation. Two other significant reactions involve the catalytic reduction of CO to form a surface-bound methyl group, detected after nucleophilic attack by nonane thiol to form methyl nonyl sulfide, and the formation of dinonyl sulfide via a similar reaction. Estimation of the catalytic turnover frequencies for each of the metal sulfides with respect to each of the primary reactions reveals that NiS, Ni 3S 2, and CoS perform comparably to commonly employed industrial catalysts. A positive correlation between the yield of primary product to NiS and Ni 3S 2 surface areas provides strong evidence that the reactions are surface catalytic in these cases. The sulfides FeS and Fe (1-x)S are unique in that they exhibit evidence of extensive dissolution, thus, complicating interpretation regarding heterogeneous vs. homogeneous catalysis. With the exception of CuS, each of the metal sulfides promotes reactions that mimic key intermediate steps manifest in the mechanistic details of an important autotrophic enzyme, acetyl-CoA synthase. The relatively high temperatures chosen for assaying purposes, however, are incompatible with the accumulation of thioesters. The results of this study support the hypothesis that transition metal sulfides may have provided useful catalytic functionality for geochemical carbon fixation in a prebiotic

  6. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material.

  7. Carbonyl compounds generated from electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kanae; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Ohta, Kazushi; Inaba, Yohei; Nakagome, Hideki; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-10-28

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols) when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon.

  8. Carbonyl Compounds Generated from Electronic Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Bekki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon.

  9. Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M. Judith; Green, Peter G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured using an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde forcarbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for>_C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 ? 2000 ?g/L fuel for LDVs and 1.8 - 27000 mu g/L fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95percent of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88percent from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19percent of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37percent of POC emissions from three-way catalyst equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9percent depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas- and particle-phase under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the current study.

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrogen thiocarbonate for heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong

    2009-04-09

    In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy combined with derivative spectroscopy analysis, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis, and quantum chemical calculations were used to investigate the infrared absorbance assignment and the molecular structure of hydrogen thiocarbonate on magnesium oxide. The bands at 1283 and 1257 cm(-1), which had the typical characteristic of intermediate, were observed in experiments for the heterogeneous reaction of COS on MgO. On the basis of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy analysis and quantum chemical calculations, the band at 1283 cm(-1) was assigned to the v(s) band of bridged thiocarbonate which formed on the two neighboring Mg atoms in the (100) face of MgO crystal, and the band at 1257 cm(-1) was the v(s) band of monodentate thiocarbonate on MgO. The v(as)(OCO) band of thiocarbonates was invisible in the experiment due to their weak absorbance and the interruption of surface carbonate. The formation mechanism of thiocarbonates is proposed, which occurred through a nucleophilic attack of preadsorbed COS by surface -OH groups followed by hydrogen atom transfer from the -OH group to the sulfur atom of preadsorbed COS. The activation energy for the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction of bridged thiocarbonate was calculated to be 18.52 kcal x mol(-1) at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory.

  11. On the isotopic fingerprint exerted on carbonyl sulfide by the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Schmidt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic fractionation in OCS photolysis is studied theoretically from first principles. UV absorption cross sections for OCS, OC33S, OC34S, OC36S and O13CS are calculated using the time-depedent quantum mechanical formalism and recent potential energy surfaces for the lowest four singlet and lowest four triplet electronic states. The calculated isotopic fractionations as a function of wavelength are in good agreement with recent measurements by Hattori et al. (2011 and indicate that photolysis leads to only a small enrichment of 34S in the remaining pool of OCS. A simple stratospheric model is constructed taking into account the main stratospheric sink reactions of OCS and it is found that stratospheric removal overall slightly favors light OCS in constrast to the findings of Leung et al. (2002. These results show, based on isotopic considerations, that OCS is an acceptable source of background stratosperic sulfate aerosol in agreement with a recent model study of Brühl et al. (2012. The 13C isotopic fractionation due to photolysis of OCS is significant and will leave a strong signal in the pool of remaining OCS making it a candidate for tracing using the ACE-FTS and MIPAS data sets.

  12. Pressure-induced Transformations of Dense Carbonyl Sulfide to Singly Bonded Amorphous Metallic Solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minseob; Dias, Ranga; Ohishi, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Takehiro; Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-08-01

    The application of pressure, internal or external, transforms molecular solids into non-molecular extended network solids with diverse crystal structures and electronic properties. These transformations can be understood in terms of pressure-induced electron delocalization; however, the governing mechanisms are complex because of strong lattice strains, phase metastability and path dependent phase behaviors. Here, we present the pressure-induced transformations of linear OCS (R3m, Phase I) to bent OCS (Cm, Phase II) at 9 GPa an amorphous, one-dimensional (1D) polymer at 20 GPa (Phase III); and an extended 3D network above ~35 GPa (Phase IV) that metallizes at ~105 GPa. These results underscore the significance of long-range dipole interactions in dense OCS, leading to an extended molecular alloy that can be considered a chemical intermediate of its two end members, CO2 and CS2.

  13. Ionization of oriented carbonyl sulfide molecules by intense circularly polarized laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrovski, Darko; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer;

    2011-01-01

    of the molecular electric dipole moment. These findings are explained by a tunneling model invoking the laser-induced Stark shifts associated with the dipoles and polarizabilities of the molecule and its unrelaxed cation. The focus of the present article is to understand the strong-field ionization of one...

  14. Carbonyl Sulfide: is it AN Isotope of CO2 on Steroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J. A.; Campbell, J. E.; Baker, I. T.; Whelan, M.; Hilton, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of OCS in the atmosphere is very similar to that of CO2 and reminiscent of an isotopologue. It is stable, has a turnover time of a couple of years (similar to that of 18O in CO2). It can be measured with adequate accuracy - despite the fact that its abundance is one millionth that of CO2, but there is one dramatic difference. The seasonal variation in the concentration of OCS relative to its background concentration can be 6-10 fold larger than the corresponding variation in CO2 concentration. Furthermore there are large spatial gradients in atmospheric OCS, with the concentrations being generally lower over the continents than the ocean, and lower in the atmospheric boundary layer over vegetated surfaces than in the free troposphere. These gradients have been clearly resolved by flask sampling from aircraft and recently by satellite measurements. The dynamics of OCS are larger than any other conserved atmospheric gas and certainly dwarf isotopic gradients. There are strong differences in the kinetics of CO2 and OCS exchange with leaves (similar to an isotopic fractionation), but these are not responsible for the large atmospheric signals. The major driver of these gradients is a large spatial separation between the major sources of OCS (the tropical ocean) and the major sink (the terrestrial biosphere). This talk will review the biogeochemical cycle of OCS; the kinetics of its exchange with leaves and soils; the distribution of sources and sinks, and the local and large scale gradients of OCS concentration in the atmosphere.

  15. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance: potential and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Brilli, F.; Hörtnagl, L.; Xu, X.; Bingemer, H.; Hansel, A.; Loreto, F.

    2011-12-01

    We review the theoretical basis for the link between the leaf exchange of COS, CO2 and H2O and the assumptions that need to be made in order to use COS as a tracer for canopy net photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance. The ratios of COS to CO2 and H2O deposition velocities used to this end are shown to vary with the ratio of the internal to ambient CO2 and H2O mole fractions and the relative limitations by boundary layer, stomatal and internal conductance for COS. Back of the envelope calculations suggest these deposition velocity ratios to exhibit considerable variability, in accordance with available empirical literature data, a finding that challenges current parameterisations which treat these as vegetation specific constants. Due to the comparably more conservative nature of the internal to ambient CO2 mole fraction ratio we conclude that COS is a better tracer for CO2 than H2O. Using COS as a tracer for stomatal conductance is hampered by our present poor understanding of the leaf internal conductance to COS. Estimating canopy level CO2 and H2O fluxes requires disentangling leaf COS exchange from other sources/sinks of COS, in particular the soil. Some practical approaches to this end, in analogy to current practises of CO2 flux partitioning, are discussed. We conclude that future priorities for COS research should be to develop a better quantitative understanding of the variability in the ratios of COS to CO2 and H2O deposition velocities and the controlling factors and to develop operational methods for disentangling ecosystem COS exchange into contributions by leaves and other sources/sinks of COS. In order to test our present understanding of COS exchange and its relation to canopy photosynthesis and transpiration integrated studies are needed which concurrently quantify the ecosystem scale CO2, H2O and COS exchange and the corresponding component fluxes.

  16. Diffusivity and enzymatic activity control the exchange of carbonyl sulfide (COS) between soils and the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    van Diest, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Carbonylsulfid (COS) ist eines der stabilsten reduzierten schwefelhaltigen Spurengase in der Atmosphäre. In der gut durchmischten Troposphäre bewegt sich seine Konzentration um 500 ppt. COS spielt eine wichtige Rolle in der Produktion von stratosphärischem Aerosol und im Ozon Zyklus. Dieses Spurengas hat eine Vielfalt an natürlichen und anthropogenen Quellen, denen gleichstarke Senken, darunter die dominanten wie Vegetation und Boden, gegenüber stehen. Die Stärke der Senken ist trotz langjähr...

  17. Pollution survey of carbonyl compounds in train air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hao; ZHU Lizhong

    2007-01-01

    The train iS an important vehicle in China,but its air quality has important impacts on passengers' health.In this work,pollution from carbonyl compounds was measured in the air of six trains.The obiectives of this work were to investigate carbonyl compound levels in selected air from trains,identify their emission sources,and assess the intake of carbonyl compounds for passengers.The methods for sampling and analyzing 10 carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde,acetaldehyde,acrolein,acetone,propionalde hyde,crotonaldehyde,butyraldehyde,benzaldehyde,cyclo hexanone,and valeraldehyde in indoor air were proposed with the sampling efficiency,recovery,and detection limit being 92%-100%,91%-104%,and 0.26-0.82 ng/m3,respec tively.It was indicated that the total concentrations of carbonyl compounds were 0.159-0.2828 mg/m3 with the average concentration of 0.2330 mg/m3.The average concen trations of formaldehyde.acetaldehyde and acetone were 0.0922,0.0499,and 0.0580 mg/m3,accounting for 42.6%,21.4%.and 24.9% of the total concentrations of carbonyl compounds,respectively.The carbonyl compounds probably came from woodwork and cigarette smoking.The intake of carbonyl compounds for the passengers was approximately 0.043-0.076 mg/h.The carbonyl compounds in train air could be harmful to human health.

  18. Effect of hydrogen atoms on the structures of trinuclear metal carbonyl clusters: trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-mei; Wang, Chao-yang; Li, Qian-shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-05-18

    The structures of the trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 12, 11, 10, 9) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Optimization of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) gives the experimentally known structure in which all carbonyl groups are terminal and each edge of a central Mn(3) equilateral triangle is bridged by a single hydrogen atom. This structure establishes the canonical distance 3.11 A for the Mn-Mn single bond satisfying the 18-electron rule. The central triangular (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) unit is retained in the lowest energy structure of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(11), which may thus be derived from the H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) structure by removal of a carbonyl group with concurrent conversion of one of the remaining carbonyl groups into a semibridging carbonyl group to fill the resulting hole. The potential energy surface of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) is relatively complicated with six singlet and five triplet structures. One of the lower energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structures has one of the hydrogen atoms bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle and the other two hydrogen atoms bridging Mn-Mn edges. This H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure achieves the favored 18-electron configuration with a very short MnMn triple bond of 2.36 A. The other low energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure retains the (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) core of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) but has a unique six-electron donor eta(2)-mu(3) carbonyl group bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle similar to the unique carbonyl group in the known compound Cp(3)Nb(3)(CO)(6)(eta(2)-mu(3)-CO). For H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(9) a structure with a central (mu(3)-H)(2)Mn(3) trigonal bipyramid lies >20 kcal/mol below any of the other structures. Triplet structures were found for the unsaturated H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 11, 10, 9) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest lying singlet structures.

  19. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    indicating a possible role of sulfide in the sulfur nutrition beside the detoxification function. Our results suggest different adaptations of Z. marina to reduced sediments and sulfide intrusion ranging from bacterial and chemical reoxidation of sulfide to sulfate to incorporation of sulfide into organic...

  20. Characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Stella, Cinzia; Wang, Weiru; Schöneich, Christian; Gennaro, Lynn

    2014-05-20

    In the biotechnology industry, oxidative carbonylation as a post-translational modification of protein pharmaceuticals has not been studied in detail. Using Quality by Design (QbD) principles, understanding the impact of oxidative carbonylation on product quality of protein pharmaceuticals, particularly from a site-specific perspective, is critical. However, comprehensive identification of carbonylation sites has so far remained a very difficult analytical challenge for the industry. In this paper, we report for the first time the identification of specific carbonylation sites on recombinant monoclonal antibodies with a new analytical approach via derivatization with Girard's Reagent T (GRT) and subsequent peptide mapping with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Enhanced ionization efficiency and high quality MS(2) data resulted from GRT derivatization were observed as key benefits of this approach, which enabled direct identification of carbonylation sites without any fractionation or affinity enrichment steps. A simple data filtering process was also incorporated to significantly reduce false positive assignments. Sensitivity and efficiency of this approach were demonstrated by identification of carbonylation sites on both unstressed and oxidized antibody bulk drug substances. The applicability of this approach was further demonstrated by identification of 14 common carbonylation sites on three highly similar IgG1s. Our approach represents a significant improvement to the existing analytical methodologies and facilitates extended characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies and potentially other protein pharmaceuticals in the biotechnology industry.

  1. Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai; Murshid, Nimer; Wang, Xiaosong

    2015-04-01

    Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs) is difficult, mainly due to the instability of metal carbonyl complexes. Despite its challenge a number of MCMCOMs has been prepared by strategically using organometallic, organic, and polymer synthetic chemistry. Main contributions to this research field were reported by the groups of Tyler, Pannell, and Wang and are briefly summarized in this article.

  2. Bifunctional dendrons for multiple carbohydrate presentation via carbonyl chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of new dendrons of the generations 0, 1 and 2 with a double bond at the focal point and a carbonyl group at the termini has been carried out. The carbonyl group has been exploited for the multivalent conjugation to a sample saccharide by reductive amination and alkoxyamine conjugation.

  3. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-cheng Feng; Shu-ming Wen; Wen-juan Zhao; Qin-bo Cao; Chao L

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sul-fide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  4. Carbonyl-Olefin Exchange Reaction: Present State and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Radostina; Jossifov, Christo

    The carbonyl-olefin exchange reaction (COER) is a new reaction between carbonyl group and olefin double bond, which has a formal similarity with the olefin metathesis (OM) - one carbon atom in the latter is replaced with an oxygen atom. Till now the new reaction is performed successfully only when the two functional groups (carbonyl group and olefin double bond) are in one molecule and are conjugated. The α, β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (substituted propenones) are the compounds with such a structure. They polymerize giving substituted polyacetylenes. The chain propagation step of this polymerization is in fact the COER. The question arises: is it possible the COER to take place when the two functional groups are not in one molecule and are not conjugated, and could this reaction became an alternative of the existing carbonyl olefination reactions?

  5. Metal-free carbonylations by photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majek, Michal; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis of benzoates from aryl electrophiles and carbon monoxide is a prime example of a transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylation reaction which is widely applied in research and industrial processes. Such reactions proceed in the presence of Pd or Ni catalysts, suitable ligands, and stoichiometric bases. We have developed an alternative procedure that is free of any metal, ligand, and base. The method involves a redox reaction driven by visible light and catalyzed by eosin Y which affords alkyl benzoates from arene diazonium salts, carbon monoxide, and alcohols under mild conditions. Tertiary esters can also be prepared in high yields. DFT calculations and radical trapping experiments support a catalytic photoredox pathway without the requirement for sacrificial redox partners.

  6. Catalyst Initiation in the Oscillatory Carbonylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Novakovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium(II iodide is used as a catalyst in the phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction that has demonstrated oscillatory behaviour in both pH and heat of reaction. In an attempt to extract the reaction network responsible for the oscillatory nature of this reaction, the system was divided into smaller parts and they were studied. This paper focuses on understanding the reaction network responsible for the initial reactions of palladium(II iodide within this oscillatory reaction. The species researched include methanol, palladium(II iodide, potassium iodide, and carbon monoxide. Several chemical reactions were considered and applied in a modelling study. The study revealed the significant role played by traces of water contained in the standard HPLC grade methanol used.

  7. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide in signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2015-01-15

    For a long time hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) was considered a toxic compound, but recently H₂S (at low concentrations) has been found to play an important function in physiological processes. Hydrogen sulfide, like other well-known compounds - nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is a gaseous intracellular signal transducer. It regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis and the oxidative stress. Moreover, its functions include neuromodulation, regulation of cardiovascular system and inflammation. In this review, I focus on the metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (including enzymatic pathways of H₂S synthesis from l- and d-cysteine) and its signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. I also describe how hydrogen sulfide may be used as therapeutic agent, i.e. in the cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  10. Iron-Catalyzed Ortho C-H Methylation of Aromatics Bearing a Simple Carbonyl Group with Methylaluminum and Tridentate Phosphine Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Rui; Ilies, Laurean; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-08-17

    Iron-catalyzed C-H functionalization of aromatics has attracted widespread attention from chemists in recent years, while the requirement of an elaborate directing group on the substrate has so far hampered the use of simple aromatic carbonyl compounds such as benzoic acid and ketones, much reducing its synthetic utility. We describe here a combination of a mildly reactive methylaluminum reagent and a new tridentate phosphine ligand for metal catalysis, 4-(bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)phenyl)phosphanyl)-N,N-dimethylaniline (Me2N-TP), that allows us to convert an ortho C-H bond to a C-CH3 bond in aromatics and heteroaromatics bearing simple carbonyl groups under mild oxidative conditions. The reaction is powerful enough to methylate all four ortho C-H bonds in benzophenone. The reaction tolerates a variety of functional groups, such as boronic ester, halide, sulfide, heterocycles, and enolizable ketones.

  11. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of sulfided hexanuclear molybdenum cluster compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spink, D.

    1990-09-21

    Hexanuclear molybdenum clusters with mixed chloride and sulfide bridging ligands were prepared by reacting {alpha}-MoCl{sub 2} with sodium hydrosulfide in the presence of sodium butoxide. The resulting species, Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub (8-x)}S{sub x}{center dot}npy(x {congruent} 3.6, n {congruent} 4, py = pyridine), was pyrophoric and insoluble. The mixed sulfide chloride cluster species Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}{center dot}6OPEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub {approximately}5}Cl{sub {approximately}3}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} were isolated and characterized. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV/visible spectra were obtained for each fraction. The completely sulfided cluster, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3}, was prepared similarly and used in various experiments as a possible precursor to Chevrel phase materials of the type Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}or M{sub n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}. With the goal of removing all of the triethylphosphine ligands, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} was reacted with the transition metal carbonyls molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dicobalt octacarbonyl. Reaction on the molecular sulfide cluster with copper(I) chloride in toluene gave a completely insoluble product. The reaction of Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} with propylene sulfide gave a product whose infrared spectra showed only very weak peaks associated with coordinated triethylphosphine. The elemental analysis of this product fit the formula Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}5SPEt{sub 3}. Reactivity of the outer ligands of the Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}npy and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}(6{minus}x)PrNH{sub x} clusters were investigated. Crystalline Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6THT was recovered from the reaction of the n-propylamine derivative with THT. A crystal structure determination was done. 87 refs., 12 fig., 15 tabs.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Induced Carbon Dioxide Activation by Metal-Free Dual Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-03-18

    The role of metal free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and subsequent decomposition of resulting monothiolcarbonic acid in the gas phase has been explored. The results suggest that substituted amines and monocarboxylic type organic or inorganic acids via dual activation mechanisms promote both activation and decomposition reactions, implying that the judicious selection of a dual catalyst is crucial to the efficient C-S bond formation via CO2 activation. Considering that our results also suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 and H2S, these new insights may help in better understanding the coupling between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus.

  14. 16th Carbonyl Metabolism Meeting: from enzymology to genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maser Edmund

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 16th International Meeting on the Enzymology and Molecular Biology of Carbonyl Metabolism, Castle of Ploen (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, July 10–15, 2012, covered all aspects of NAD(P-dependent oxido-reductases that are involved in the general metabolism of xenobiotic and physiological carbonyl compounds. Starting 30 years ago with enzyme purification, structure elucidation and enzyme kinetics, the Carbonyl Society members have meanwhile established internationally recognized enzyme nomenclature systems and now consider aspects of enzyme genomics and enzyme evolution along with their roles in diseases. The 16th international meeting included lectures from international speakers from all over the world.

  15. A New HPLC Method to Determine Carbonyl Compounds in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new HPLC method was established to determine the carbonyl compounds in air. As the absorbent, 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2, 4-DNPH) reacted with carbonyls specifically, which form the corresponding 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones, then analyzed by HPLC. The chromatographic conditions, the recovery rate, stability of samples, reagent blank, sampling efficiency were all studied systematically. The results showed that this established method had high sensitivity and good selectivity compared with other analytical methods, and it can determine ten carbonyl compounds in air in 26 min simultaneously.

  16. Deposition of carbonyl sulphide to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczewski, S. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bel, J. N. B.

    Carbonyl sulphide (COS) is a trace constituent of the atmosphere and is also the main form in which 35S is released from CO 2-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of its deposition velocity ( Vg) are therefore important for validating radiological dose models and for interpreting the role of COS in the global S cycle. The Vg of [ 35S]COS to thin layers of several contrasting soils was measured in a through-flow fumigation system. Deposition velocity was not significantly affected by soil type, although deposition to moist soil was significantly greater ( P dried soils, mean values being 5.71 × 10 -6 ms -1 and 3.06 × 10 -6 ms -1, respectively. The results obtained are about three orders of magnitude smaller than published Vg values for SO 2 to similar soils, which suggests that uptake by soils is not a major sink for atmospheric COS. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that deposition to soil of [ 35S]COS from nuclear reactors is unlikely to contribute significantly to radiation dose from the food chain pathway. The reduction in Vg observed in heat-treated soils indicates a microbial involvement in uptake. However, it seems unlikely that microbial metabolism is the rate-controlling step, since stimulation of the microflora by the addition of nutrients did not increase COS deposition.

  17. Theoretical Estimate of Hydride Affinities of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Teng; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Aromatic carbonyl compounds are one type of the most important organic compounds, and the reductions ofthem by hydride agents such as LiAlH4 or NaBH4 are widely used in organic synthesis. The reactivity of carbonyl compounds generally increases in the following order: ketone < aldehyde, and amide < acid < ester < acid halide, which could be related to their hydride affinities (HA). In the previous paper, Robert[1] calculated the absolute HAof a series of small non-aromatic carbonyl compounds. In this paper, we use DFT method at B3LYP/6-311 + + G (2d, 2p)∥B3LYP/6-31 + G* level to estimate hydride affinities of five groups of aromatic carbonyl compounds. The detailed results are listed in Table 1.

  18. Carbonyl-Olefin Exchange Reaction and Related Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossifov, Christo; Kalinova, Radostina

    A new carbon—carbon double bond forming reaction (carbonyl olefin exchange reaction) mediated by transition metal catalytic systems has been discovered. The catalytic systems used (transition metal halides or oxohalides alone or in combination with Lewis acids) are active only in the case when the two reacting groups are in one molecules and are conjugated. In addition these systems accelerate other reactions which run simultaneously with the carbonyl olefin metathesis rendering a detailed investigation of the process very complicated.

  19. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2003-01-28

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the {alpha}-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress.

  20. Carbonyl species characteristics during the evaporation of essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Lai, Yen-Ming; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2010-06-01

    Carbonyls emitted from essential oils can affect the air quality when they are used in indoors, especially under poor ventilation conditions. Lavender, lemon, rose, rosemary, and tea tree oils were selected as typical and popular essential oils to investigate in terms of composition, thermal characteristics and fifteen carbonyl constituents. Based on thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, the activation energy was 7.6-8.3 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.7 and the frequency factor was 360-2838 min -1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, and propionaldehyde were the dominant carbonyl compounds, and their concentrations were 0.034-0.170 ppm. The emission factors of carbonyl compounds were 2.10-3.70 mg g -1, and acetone, propionaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde accounted for a high portion of the emission factor of carbonyl compounds in essential oil exhaust. Some unhealthy carbonyl species such as formaldehyde and valeraldehyde, were measured at low-temperature during the vaporization of essential oils, indicating a potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  1. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH, β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group. β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  2. Synthesis of furan from allenic sulfide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG LingLing; ZHANG Xiu; MA Jie; ZHONG ZhenZhen; ZHANG Zhe; ZHANG Yan; WANG JianBo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of furan derivatives from allenic sulfides. By the reaction with NaH.,β-Hydroxyl allenic sulfides were found to generate furan products in excellent yields with the removal of phenylthio group.β-Aldehyde allenic sulfides were found to give similar furan products with one more substituent when treated with additional nucleophilic reagents. β-ketone allenic sulfides can also cyclize to give furan derivatives with the promotion of P2O5.

  3. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-07

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  4. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  5. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  6. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  7. Stepwise construction of manganese-chromium carbonyl chalcogenide complexes: synthesis, electrochemical properties, and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Minghuey; Miu, Chia-Yeh; Huang, Kuo-Chih; Lee, Chung-Feng; Chen, Bao-Gun

    2011-08-15

    When trigonal-bipyramidal clusters, [PPN][E(2)Mn(3)(CO)(9)] (E = S, Se), were treated with Cr(CO)(6) and PPNCl in a molar ratio of 1:1:2 or 1:2:2 in 4 M KOH/MeCN/MeOH solutions, mono-Cr(CO)(5)-incorporated HE(2)Mn(3)-complexes [PPN](2)[HE(2)Mn(3)Cr(CO)(14)] (E = S, [PPN](2)[1a]; Se, [PPN](2)[1b]), respectively, were formed. X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that 1a and 1b were isostructural and each displayed an E(2)Mn(3) square-pyramidal core with one of the two basal E atoms externally coordinated with one Cr(CO)(5) group and one Mn-Mn bond bridged by one hydrogen atom. However, when the TMBA(+) salts for [E(2)Mn(3)(CO)(9)](-) were mixed with Cr(CO)(6) in a molar ratio of 1:1 in 4 M KOH/MeOH solutions and refluxed at 60 °C, mono-Cr(CO)(3)-incorporated E(2)Mn(3)Cr octahedral clusters [TMBA](3)[E(2)Mn(3)Cr(CO)(12)] (E = S, [TMBA](3)[2a]; Se, [TMBA](3)[2b]), respectively, were obtained. Clusters 2a and 2b were isostructural, and each consisted of an octahedral E(2)Mn(3)Cr core, in which each Mn-Mn or Mn-Cr bond of the Mn(3)Cr plane was semibridged by one carbonyl ligand. Clusters 1a and 1b (with [TMBA] salts) underwent metal core closure to form octahedral clusters 2a and 2b upon treatment with KOH/MeOH at 60 °C. In addition, 1a and 1b were found to undergo cluster expansion to form di-Cr(CO)(5)-incorporated HE(2)Mn(3)-clusters [HE(2)Mn(3)Cr(2)(CO)(19)](2-) (E = S, 3a; Se, 3b), respectively, upon the addition of 1 or 2 equiv of Cr(CO)(6) heated in refluxing CH(2)Cl(2). Clusters 3a and 3b were structurally related to clusters 1a and 1b, but with the other bare E atom (E = S, 3a; Se, 3b) further externally coordinated with one Cr(CO)(5) group. The nature, cluster transformation, and electrochemical properties of the mixed manganese-chromium carbonyl sulfides and selenides were systematically discussed in terms of the chalcogen elements, the introduced chromium carbonyl group, and the metal skeleton with the aid of molecular calculations at the BP86 level of the

  8. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  9. Determination of Carbonyl Compounds in Exhaled Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings on a quantitative evaluation of carbonyl levels in exhaled cigarette smoke from human subjects. The cigarettes evaluated include products with 5.0 mg ‘tar’, 10.6 mg ‘tar’ and 16.2 mg ‘tar’, where ‘tar’ is defined as the weight of total wet particulate matter (TPM minus the weight of nicotine and water, and the cigarettes are smoked following U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC recommendations. The measured levels of carbonyls in the exhaled smoke were compared with calculated yields of carbonyls in the inhaled smoke and a retention efficiency was obtained. The number of human subjects included a total of ten smokers for the 10.6 mg ‘tar’, five for the 16.2 mg ‘tar’, and five for the 5.0 mg ‘tar’ product, each subject smoking three cigarettes. The analyzed carbonyl compounds included several aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde and n-butyraldehyde, and two ketones (acetone and 2-butanone. The smoke collection from the human subjects was vacuum assisted. Exhaled smoke was collected on Cambridge pads pretreated with a solution of dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of the dinitrophenylhydrazones of the carbonyl compounds. The cigarette butts from the smokers were collected and analyzed for nicotine. The nicotine levels for the cigarette butts from the smokers were used to calculate the level of carbonyls in the inhaled smoke, based on calibration curves. These were generated separately by analyzing the carbonyls in smoke and the nicotine in the cigarette butts obtained by machine smoking under different puffing regimes. The comparison of the level of carbonyl compounds in exhaled smoke with that from the inhaled smoke showed high retention of all the carbonyls. The retention of aldehydes was above 95% for all three different ‘tar’ levels cigarettes. The ketones were retained with a

  10. New methodology for removing carbonyl compounds from sweet wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Mélanie; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Maillard, Bernard; Dubourdieu, Denis; Deleuze, Hervé

    2007-12-12

    Sweet white wines from botrytized grapes present high SO2 levels because of their high sulfur dioxide binding power. The objective of this work was to develop a new method for reducing this binding power by partially eliminating the carbonyl compounds naturally present in these wines that are responsible for this phenomenon. A selective liquid-solid removal technique was developed. Phenylsulfonylhydrazine was selected as the best candidate for removing carbonyl compounds. Its reactivity in the presence or absence of sulfur dioxide was verified in model media containing acetaldehyde, pyruvic acid, and 2-oxoglutaric acid, some of the main carbonyl compounds responsible for the SO2 binding power of sweet wines. The scavenging function was grafted on porous polymer supports, and its efficiency was evaluated in model wines. Dependent upon the supports used, different quantities of carbonyl compounds (over 90% in some cases) were removed in a few days. The presence of sulfur dioxide delayed removal without changing its quality. The results obtained showed that the method removed carbonyl compounds efficiently and was applicable to wines at any stage in winemaking.

  11. An alternative method for monitoring carbonyls, and the development of a 24-port fully automated carbonyl sampler for PAMS program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, S.S.; Ugarova, L. [Atmospheric Analysis and Consulting, Ventura, CA (United States); Fernandes, C.; Guyton, J.; Lee, C.P. [Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have investigated the possibility of collecting different aldehydes and ketones on different sorbents such as silica gel, molecular sieve and charcoal followed by solvent extraction, DNPH derivatization and HPLC/UV analysis. Carbonyl collection efficiencies for these sorbents were calculated relative to a DNPH coated C{sub 18} sep-pak cartridge. From a limited number of laboratory experiments, at various concentrations, it appears that silica gel tubes can be used for sampling aldehydes (collection efficiencies {approximately} 1), whereas charcoal tubes are suitable for collecting ketones. Molecular sieve was found to be unsuitable for collecting most of the carbonyl studied. The authors also report the development of a fully automated 24-port carbonyl sampler specially designed for EPA`s PAMS program.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S...

  13. Redox Biochemistry of Hydrogen Sulfide*

    OpenAIRE

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-01-01

    H2S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of γ-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H2S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in γ-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxid...

  14. Sulfide intrusion and detoxification in seagrasses ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    Sulfide intrusion in seagrasses represents a global threat to seagrasses and thereby an important parameter in resilience of seagrass ecosystems. In contrast seegrasses colonize and grow in hostile sediments, where they are constantly exposed to invasion of toxic gaseous sulfide. Remarkably little...... strategies of seagrasses to sustain sulfide intrusion. Using stable isotope tracing, scanning electron microscopy with x-ray analysis, tracing sulfur compounds combined with ecosystem parameters we found different spatial, intraspecific and interspecific strategies to cope with sulfidic sediments. 1...... not present in terrestrial plants at that level. Sulfide is not necessarily toxic but used as sulfur nutrition, presupposing healthy seagrass ecosystems that can support detoxification mechanisms. Presence or absence of those mechanisms determines susceptibility of seagrass ecosystems to sediment sulfide...

  15. Age-related variations of protein carbonyls in human saliva and plasma: is saliva protein carbonyls an alternative biomarker of aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Yanyi; Liu, Hongchen; Che, Yuwei; Xu, Yingying; E, Lingling

    2015-06-01

    Free radical hypothesis which is one of the most acknowledged aging theories was developed into oxidative stress hypothesis. Protein carbonylation is by far one of the most widely used markers of protein oxidation. We studied the role of age and gender in protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma among 273 Chinese healthy subjects (137 females and 136 males aged between 20 and 79) and discussed the correlation between protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma. Protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma were, respectively, 2.391 ± 0.639 and 0.838 ± 0.274 nmol/mg. Variations of saliva and plasma different age groups all reached significant differences in both male and female (all p saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were found to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.6582 and r = 0.5176, all p saliva and plasma protein carbonyl levels (all p > 0.05). Saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were positively related (r = 0.4405, p saliva and plasma protein carbonyls/ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) ratios were proved to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.7796 and r = 0.6938, all p saliva protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio and plasma protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio were also correlated (r = 0.5573, p saliva protein carbonyls seem to be an alternative biomarker of aging while the mechanisms of protein carbonylation and oxidative stress and the relationship between saliva protein carbonyls and diseases need to be further investigated.

  16. α-Carbonyl Radical Cyclizatio n in Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA Chin-Kang; CHIU Rei-Torng; LIH Shinn-Horng; SANTHOSH K. C.; CHANG Ching-Jung; TSENG Wei-Hong; HO Wen-Yueh

    2001-01-01

    @@ Intramolecular radical cyclization reactions are now used routinely to synthesize carbocyclic and heterocyclic structures. We have reported that α-carbonyl radicals 1, generated from the corresponding iodo ketones or enones, underwent intramolecular radical cyclization smoothly to afford products 2.1, 2,3

  17. Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

  18. Comparing Carbonyl Chemistry in Comprehensive Introductory Organic Chemistry Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Donna J.; Kumar, Ravi; Ramasamy, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Learning the chemistry of compounds containing carbonyl groups is difficult for undergraduate students partly because of a convolution of multiple possible reaction sites, competitive reactions taking place at those sites, different criteria needed to discern between the mechanisms of these reactions, and no straightforward selection method…

  19. Efficient Nd Promoted Rh Catalysts for Vapor Phase Methanol Carbonylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Feng ZHANG; Qing Li QIAN; Ping Lai PAN; Yi CHEN; Guo Qing YUAN

    2005-01-01

    A Nd promoted-Rh catalysts supported on polymer-derived carbon beads for vapor-phase methanol carbonylation was developed. Rh-Nd bimetallic catalysts obviously have higher activity than that of supported Rh catalyst under similar reaction condition. The difference between the activity of above two catalyst systems is clearly caused by the intrinsic properties generated by the introduction of Nd.

  20. Contamination of coal benzol by carbonyl compound impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovleva, T.P.

    1985-03-01

    The origin of most carbonyl compounds in nitration-grade benzene produced from coke-oven crude benzole (causing problems in isopropylbenzene production) was concluded to be the piperylene fraction (a by-product of isoprene manufacture) used as an additive in the washing of the benzene with sulphuric acid.

  1. Metal-Diazo Radicals of α-Carbonyl Diazomethanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feifei; Xiao, Longqiang; Liu, Lijian

    2016-03-01

    Metal-diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes are new members of the radical family and are precursors to metal-carbene radicals. Herein, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-trapping, we detect diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes, induced by [RhICl(cod)]2, [CoII(por)] and PdCl2, at room temperature. The unique quintet signal of the Rh-diazo radical was observed in measurements of α-carbonyl diazomethane adducts of [RhICl(cod)]2 in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO). DFT calculations indicated that 97.2% of spin density is localized on the diazo moiety. Co- and Pd-diazo radicals are EPR silent but were captured by DMPO to form spin adducts of DMPO-N• (triplet-of-sextets signal). The spin-trapping also provides a powerful tool for detection of metal-carbene radicals, as evidenced by the DMPO-trapped carbene radicals (DMPO-C•, sextet signal) and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane-carbene adducts (MNP-C•, doublet-of-triplets signal). The transformation of α-carbonyl diazomethanes to metal-carbene radicals was confirmed to be a two-step process via metal-diazo radicals.

  2. Frustrated Lewis pairs-assisted reduction of carbonyl compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Ales; Pedersen, Martin Holst Friborg

    2015-01-01

    An alternative and robust method for the reduction of carbonyl groups by frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) is reported in this paper. With its very mild reaction conditions, good to excellent yields, absolute regioselectivity and the non-metallic character of the reagent, it provides an excellent tool...

  3. - Wave Spectrum of Carbonyl Diazide in Pursuit of Diazirinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-06-01

    Pyrolysis of carbonyl diazide (CO(N_3)_2) has been shown to give diazirinone (CON_2). While diazirione decomposes over the course of a few hours under terrestrial conditions, there is the possibility for it to exist in space. In the pursuit of obtaining a rotational spectrum for diazirinone, we have started with the rotational spectroscopy of its immediate precursor, carbonyl diazide. Carbonyl diazide is highly explosive, and requires careful synthesis. Spectra in the range of 260-360 GHz were collected at room temperature and at -60°C. Ab initio calculations at the CCSD/cc-pVDZ level predict that the conformation where both azide groups are syn to the carbonyl is preferred. A second conformation, where one azide is syn and one is anti, is calculated to lie about 2 kcal/ mol higher in energy. Pure rotational transitions for the ground state and multiple low-lying excited vibrational states of the syn- syn conformation are readily observed and assigned. X. Zeng, H. Beckers, H. Willner and J. F. Stanton, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 50 (2011), 1720-1723 A. M. Nolan, B. K. Amberger, B. J. Esselman, V. S. Thimmakondu, J. F. Stanton, R. C. Woods, and R. J. McMahon, Inorg. Chem. 51 (2012), 9846-9851

  4. New nitric oxide or hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarato, Loretta; Chegaev, Konstantin; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Borretto, Emily; Guglielmo, Stefano; Joseph, Sony; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2011-08-11

    A new series of (((R-oxy)carbonyl)oxy)methyl esters of aspirin (ASA), bearing nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) releasing groups, was synthesized, and the compounds were evaluated as new ASA co-drugs. All the products were quite stable in buffered solution at pH 1 and 7.4. Conversely, they were all rapidly metabolized, producing ASA and the NO/H(2)S releasing moiety used for their preparation. Consequent on ASA release, the compounds were capable of inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The simple NO/H(2)S donor substructures were able to relax contracted rat aorta strips, with a NO- and H(2)S-dependent mechanism, respectively, but they either did not trigger antiaggregatory activity or displayed antiplatelet potency markedly below that of the related co-drug. The new products might provide a safer and improved alternative to the use of ASA principally in its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic applications.

  5. Plasma protein carbonyl levels and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Pavel; Terry, Mary Beth; Gammon, Marilie D; Agrawal, Meenakshi; Zhang, Fang Fang; Ferris, Jennifer S; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Eng, Sybil M; Gaudet, Mia M; Neugut, Alfred I; Santella, Regina M

    2007-01-01

    To study the role of oxidative stress in breast cancer risk, we analysed plasma levels of protein carbonyls in 1050 cases and 1107 controls. We found a statistically significant trend in breast cancer risk in relation to increasing quartiles of plasma protein carbonyl levels (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.9-1.5; OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-2.0; OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1, for the 2(nd), 3(rd) and 4(th) quartile relative to the lowest quartile, respectively, P for trend = 0.0001). The increase in risk was similar for younger ( or = 15 grams/day for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1-4.7), and hormone replacement therapy use (HRT, OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-4.4 for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile). The multiplicative interaction terms were statistically significant only for physical activity and HRT. The positive association between plasma protein carbonyl levels and breast cancer risk was also observed when the analysis was restricted to women who had not received chemotherapy or radiation therapy prior to blood collection. Among controls, oxidized protein levels significantly increased with cigarette smoking and higher fruit and vegetable consumption, and decreased with alcohol consumption >30 grams per day. Women with higher levels of plasma protein carbonyl and urinary 15F(2t)-isoprostane had an 80% increase in breast cancer risk (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.6) compared to women with levels below the median for both markers of oxidative stress. In summary, our results suggest that increased plasma protein carbonyl levels may be associated with breast cancer risk.

  6. Optimized biotin-hydrazide enrichment and mass spectrometry analysis of peptide carbonyls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F.; Wojdyla, K; Jensen, O. N.;

    Irreversible cell damage through protein carbonylation is the result of reaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been coupled to many diseases. The precise molecular consequences of protein carbonylation, however, are still not clear. The localization of the carbonylated amino acid is ...

  7. A specific gas chromatographic detector for carbonyl compounds, based on polarography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, B; Risby, T H

    1969-07-01

    The evaluation of a specific gas Chromatographie detector for carbonyl compounds is described. This is based on the polarographic reduction of the Girard T hydrazone derivative which is formed when the carbonyl compound is absorbed in a buffered supporting electrolyte containing the carbonyl reagent. The detector was used to monitor the separation of a homologous series of alkanals.

  8. Low pressure carbonylation of benzyl chloride = Die carbonylierung von benzylchlorid bei niedrigen drücken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luggenhorst, H.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    For carbonylations, metal carbonyls, particularly cobalt and iron carbonyls, are often used as catalysts. These reactions take place under rather drastic reaction conditions, e.g. 200–300 °C and 60–100 MPa. In some patents it is stated that similar reactions using the same catalysts can also be carr

  9. THE EXCHANGE OF CARBONYL SULFIDE AND DIMETHYL SULFIDE BETWEEN LAWN AND ATMOSPHERE IN FALL%秋季COS和DMS在草坪与大气间的交换

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿春梅; 吴海; 牟玉静; 王美珍

    2004-01-01

    利用静态箱法研究了羰基硫(COS)和二甲基硫(DMS)在绿化草坪与大气之间的交换.在秋季,草坪对COS的吸收通量为0.75-14.5μg·m-2·h-1,对DMS的排放通量为0.05-0.35μg·m-2·h-1.COS和DMS的交换通量与环境温度、光照及初始浓度等因素有关,其中,周围大气COS的浓度对草坪吸收COS的影响最为明显.草坪对COS的吸收通量与DMS的排放通量呈正相关,相关系数(R2)大于0.7.此外,COS的垂直分布也表明草坪对COS具有明显的吸收作用.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide and vascular relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yan; TANG Chao-shu; DU Jun-bao; JIN Hong-fang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the vasorelaxant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in arterial rings in the cardiovascular system under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions and the possible mechanisms involved.Data sources The data in this review were obtained from Medline and Pubmed sources from 1997 to 2011 using the search terms "hydrogen sulfide" and ""vascular relaxation".Study selection Articles describing the role of hydrogen sulfide in the regulation of vascular activity and its vasorelaxant effects were selected.Results H2S plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular tone.The vasomodulatory effects of H2S depend on factors including concentration,species and tissue type.The H2S donor,sodium hydrosulfide (NarS),causes vasorelaxation of rat isolated aortic rings in a dose-dependent manner.This effect was more pronounced than that observed in pulmonary arterial rings.The expression of KATP channel proteins and mRNA in the aortic rings was increased compared with pulmonary artery rings.H2S is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases.Downregulation of the endogenous H2S pathway is an important factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases.The vasorelaxant effects of H2S have been shown to be mediated by activation of KATP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells and via the induction of acidification due to activation of the CI/HCO3 exchanger.It is speculated that the mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictive function of H2S in the aortic rings involves decreased NO production and inhibition of cAMP accumulation.Conclusion H2S is an important endogenous gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and acts as a modulator of vascular tone in the homeostatic regulation of blood pressure.

  11. Medical Functions of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gasomediator synthesized from L- and D-cysteine in various tissues. It is involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes. H(2)S exhibits antiatherosclerotic, vasodilator, and proangiogenic properties, and protects the kidney and heart from damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury. H(2)S donors may be natural or synthetic, and may be used for the safe treatment of a wide range of diseases. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the therapeutic function of H(2)S.

  12. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  13. Carbonyl compounds in gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaobing; Lewis, Alastair C

    2011-11-01

    Carbonyl compounds (carbonyls) are important constituents of cigarette smoke and some are toxic and may be carcinogenic or mutagenic to humans. In this study carbonyl emissions in the gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke were assessed by GC-MS with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH) derivatization. Seven brands of cigarettes and one brand of cigar common in the UK market and having differing nicotine, tar and carbon monoxide yields were investigated. Sixteen carbonyl components were identified in gaseous emissions and twenty in the particle phase. In the gaseous emissions, acetaldehyde presented as the predominant species, followed by formaldehyde, 2-propenal, and pentanal. In the particulate emissions, 1-hydroxy-2-propanone was the most abundant followed by formaldehyde, benzaldehyde, and 2,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Significant differences were found in carbonyl emissions among the brands of cigarettes. The gaseous carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 216-405 μg cigarette(-1) (μg cig(-1)) and the particulate carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 23-127 μg cig(-1). Positive correlations were found between the total emission of carbonyls, tar yield and carbon monoxide yield. Similar gas/particle (G/P) partitioning ratios of carbonyls were found among all cigarettes, which implies that G/P partitions of carbonyls in smoke mainly depend on the physical properties of the carbonyls. The gaseous carbonyl emissions were enhanced by 40% to 130% when some of the water, accounting for 8-12% of cigarettes in mass, was removed from the tobacco. Non-filtered cigarettes showed significantly higher carbonyl emissions compared to their filtered equivalents. Carbonyl particulate accounted for 11-19% by mass of total particulate matter from tobacco smoke. The cigar generated 806 μg cig(-1) gaseous and 141 μg cig(-1) particulate carbonyls, which is 2-4 times greater than the cigarettes.

  14. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  15. Carbonyl Alkyl Nitrates as Trace Constituents in Urban Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woidich, S.; Gruenert, A.; Ballschmiter, K.

    2003-04-01

    Organic nitrates, esters of nitric acid, significantly contribute to the entire pool of odd nitrogen (NOY) in the atmosphere. Organic nitrates are formed in NO rich air by degradation of alkanes and alkenes initiated by OH and NO3 radicals during daytime and nighttime, respectively. Bifunctional organonitrates like the alkyl dinitrates and hydroxy alkyl nitrates are formed primarily from alkenes. The two main sources for Alkenes are traffic emissions and naturally occurring terpenes. So far a broad spectrum of alkyl dinitrates and hydroxy alkyl nitrates including six different isoprene nitrates has been identified in urban and marine air (1-3). We report here for the first time about the group of C4 C7 carbonyl alkyl nitrates as trace constituents in urban air collected on the campus of the University of Ulm Germany, and in the downtown area of Salt Lake City, Utah. Air sampling was done by high volume sampling (flow rate 25 m3/h) using a layer of 100 g silica gel (particle diameter 0.2 - 0.5 mm) as adsorbent. The organic nitrates were eluted from the silica gel by pentane/acetone (4:1, w/w) and the extract was concentrated to a volume of 500 µL for a group separation using normal phase HPLC. Final analysis was performed by high resolution capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection as well as by mass selective detection in the (CH4)NCI mode using NO2- = m/e 46 as the indicator mass. The carbonyl alkyl nitrates were identified by self synthesized reference standards . So far we have identified eight non-branched a-carbonyl alkyl nitrates (vicinal carbonyl alkyl nitrates), two b-carbonyl alkyl nitrates and one g-carbonyl alkyl nitrate with carbon chains ranging from C4 to C7. The mixing ratios are between 0.05 and 0.30 ppt(v) for daytime samples and are two to three times higher for samples taken at night. (1) M. Schneider, O. Luxenhofer, Angela Deißler, K. Ballschmiter: 2C1-C15 Alkyl Nitrates, Benzyl Nitrate, and Bifunctional Nitrates

  16. Adsorption/desorption of low concentration of carbonyl sulfide by impregnated activated carbon under micro-oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqian; Qiu, Juan; Ning, Ping; Ren, Xiaoguang; Li, Ziyan; Yin, Zaifei; Chen, Wei; Liu, Wei

    2012-08-30

    Activated carbon modified with different impregnants has been studied for COS removal efficiency under micro-oxygen conditions. Activated carbon modified with Cu(NO(3))(2)-CoPcS-KOH (denoted as Cu-Co-KW) is found to have markedly enhanced adsorption purification ability. In the adsorption purification process, the reaction temperature, oxygen concentration, and relative humidity of the gas are determined to be three crucial factors. A breakthrough of 43.34 mg COS/g adsorbent at 60°С and 30% relative humidity with 1.0% oxygen is shown in Cu-Co-KW for removing COS. The structures of the activated carbon samples are characterized using nitrogen adsorption, and their surface chemical structures are analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Modification of Cu(NO(3))(2)-CoPcS-KOH appears to improve the COS removal capacity significantly, during which, SO(4)(2-) is presumably formed, strongly adsorbed, and present in the micropores ranging from 0.7 to 1.5 nm. TPD is used to identify the products containing sulfur species on the carbon surface, where SO(2) and COS are detected in the effluent gas generated from exhausted Cu-Co-KW (denoted Cu-Co-KWE). According to the current study results, the activated carbon impregnated with Cu(NO(3))(2)-CoPcS-KOH promises a good candidate for COS adsorbent, with the purified gas meeting requirements for desirable chemical feed stocks.

  17. Comparing forward and inverse models to estimate the seasonal variation of hemisphere-integrated fluxes of carbonyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, A. J.; Kuhn, U.; von Hobe, M.; Kesselmeier, J.; Liss, P. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2002-11-01

    A simple inverse model is proposed to deduce hemisphere-integrated COS flux based on published time series of total column COS. The global atmosphere is divided into two boxes representing the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and the total column COS data from several stations are used to calculate hemispheric COS loadings. The integrated flux within each hemisphere is calculated as a linear combination of a steady-state solution and time-varying perturbation. The nature of the time-varying perturbation is deduced using two different approaches: an analytic solution based on a cosine function that was fitted to the original total column COS measurement time series and a Simplex optimization with no underlying assumption about the functional form of the total column time series. The results suggest that there is a steady-state COS flux from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. There is a seasonal variation superimposed on this flux that in the Southern Hemisphere has a maximum rate of COS input into the atmosphere around January and a maximum rate of COS removal from the atmosphere around August--September. In the Northern Hemisphere, the maximum rate of COS input into the atmosphere is around May--June, and the maximum rate of COS removal is either August or January, depending on which station in the Northern Hemisphere is considered. The results of the inverse model are compared with the outcome of a forward approach on the temporal and spatial variation of the dominant global sources and sinks published earlier. In general, the deduced hemisphere-integrated flux estimates showed good agreement with the database estimates, though it remains uncertain whether COS removal from the atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere is dominated by plant and soil uptake in the boreal summer or by oceanic uptake in boreal winter.

  18. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  19. Phenolic carbonyls undergo rapid aqueous photodegradation to form low-volatility, light-absorbing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy D.; Kinney, Haley; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the aqueous photochemistry of six phenolic carbonyls - vanillin, acetovanillone, guaiacyl acetone, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone, and coniferyl aldehyde - that are emitted from wood combustion. The phenolic carbonyls absorb significant amounts of solar radiation and decay rapidly via direct photodegradation, with lifetimes (τ) of 13-140 min under Davis, CA winter solstice sunlight at midday (solar zenith angle = 62°). The one exception is guaiacyl acetone, where the carbonyl group is not directly connected to the aromatic ring: This species absorbs very little sunlight and undergoes direct photodegradation very slowly (τ > 103 min). We also found that the triplet excited states (3C*) of the phenolic carbonyls rapidly oxidize syringol (a methoxyphenol without a carbonyl group), on timescales of 1-5 h for solutions containing 5 μM phenolic carbonyl. The direct photodegradation of the phenolic carbonyls, and the oxidation of syringol by 3C*, both efficiently produce low volatility products, with SOA mass yields ranging from 80 to 140%. Contrary to most aliphatic carbonyls, under typical fog conditions we find that the primary sink for the aromatic phenolic carbonyls is direct photodegradation in the aqueous phase. In areas of significant wood combustion, phenolic carbonyls appear to be small but significant sources of aqueous SOA: over the course of a few hours, nearly all of the phenolic carbonyls will be converted to SOA via direct photodegradation, enhancing the POA mass from wood combustion by approximately 3-5%.

  20. Metal Carbonyl-Hydrosilane Reactions and Hydrosilation Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, A. R.

    2001-04-14

    Manganese carbonyl complexes serve as hydrosilation precatalysts for selectively transforming a carbonyl group into a siloxy methylene or a fully reduced methylene group. Substrates of interest include (1) aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, silyl esters, and esters, and (2) their organometallic acyl counterparts. Three relevant catalytic reactions are shown. Two types of manganese precatalysts have been reported: (a) alkyl and acyl complexes (L)(C0){sub 4}MnR [L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = COCH{sub 3}, COPh, CH{sub 3}] and (b) halides (CO){sub 5}MnX and [(CO){sub 4}MnX]{sub 2} (X = Br, I). The former promote hydrosilation and deoxygenation catalysis; the latter promote dehydrogenative silation of alcohols and carboxylic acids as well as hydrosilation and deoxygenation of some metallocarboxylic acid derivatives. In every case studied, these Mn precatalysts are far more reactive or selective than traditional Rh(I) precatalysts.

  1. Nuclear chemistry. Synthesis and detection of a seaborgium carbonyl complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, J; Yakushev, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Haba, H; Asai, M; Sato, T K; Brand, H; Di Nitto, A; Eichler, R; Fan, F L; Hartmann, W; Huang, M; Jäger, E; Kaji, D; Kanaya, J; Kaneya, Y; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kindler, B; Kratz, J V; Krier, J; Kudou, Y; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Miyashita, S; Morimoto, K; Morita, K; Murakami, M; Nagame, Y; Nitsche, H; Ooe, K; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Steiner, J; Sumita, T; Takeyama, M; Tanaka, K; Toyoshima, A; Tsukada, K; Türler, A; Usoltsev, I; Wakabayashi, Y; Wang, Y; Wiehl, N; Yamaki, S

    2014-09-19

    Experimental investigations of transactinoide elements provide benchmark results for chemical theory and probe the predictive power of trends in the periodic table. So far, in gas-phase chemical reactions, simple inorganic compounds with the transactinoide in its highest oxidation state have been synthesized. Single-atom production rates, short half-lives, and harsh experimental conditions limited the number of experimentally accessible compounds. We applied a gas-phase carbonylation technique previously tested on short-lived molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) isotopes to the preparation of a carbonyl complex of seaborgium, the 106th element. The volatile seaborgium complex showed the same volatility and reactivity with a silicon dioxide surface as those of the hexacarbonyl complexes of the lighter homologs Mo and W. Comparison of the product's adsorption enthalpy with theoretical predictions and data for the lighter congeners supported a Sg(CO)6 formulation.

  2. Emissions of Toxic Carbonyls in an Electronic Cigarette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthery William

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs provide a smoke-free alternative for inhalation of nicotine without the vast array of toxic and carcinogenic combustion products produced by tobacco smoke. Elevated levels of toxic carbonyls may be generated during vaporisation; however, it is unclear whether that is indicative of a fault with the device or is due to the applied conditions of the test. A device, designed and built at this facility, was tested to determine the levels of selected toxic carbonyls. The reservoir was filled with approximately 960 mg of an e-liquid formulation containing 1.8% (w/v nicotine. Devices were puffed 200 times in blocks of 40 using a standardised regime consisting of a 55 mL puff volume; 3 s puff duration; 30 s puff interval; square wave puff profile. Confirmatory testing for nicotine and total aerosol delivery resulted in mean (n = 8 values of 10 mg (RSD 12.3% and 716 mg (RSD 11.2%, respectively. Emissions of toxic carbonyls were highly variable yet were between < 0.1% and 22.9% of expected levels from a Kentucky Reference Cigarette (K3R4F puffed 200 times under Health Canada Intense smoking conditions. It has been shown that a device built to a high specification with relatively consistent nicotine and aerosol delivery emits inconsistent levels of carbonyls. The exposure is greatly reduced when compared with lit tobacco products. However, it was observed that as the reservoirs neared depletion then emission levels were significantly higher

  3. Iron(III)-catalysed carbonyl-olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Jacob R; Zimmerman, Paul M; Gianino, Joseph B; Schindler, Corinna S

    2016-04-27

    The olefin metathesis reaction of two unsaturated substrates is one of the most powerful carbon-carbon-bond-forming reactions in organic chemistry. Specifically, the catalytic olefin metathesis reaction has led to profound developments in the synthesis of molecules relevant to the petroleum, materials, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. These reactions are characterized by their use of discrete metal alkylidene catalysts that operate via a well-established mechanism. While the corresponding carbonyl-olefin metathesis reaction can also be used to construct carbon-carbon bonds, currently available methods are scarce and severely hampered by either harsh reaction conditions or the required use of stoichiometric transition metals as reagents. To date, no general protocol for catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis has been reported. Here we demonstrate a catalytic carbonyl-olefin ring-closing metathesis reaction that uses iron, an Earth-abundant and environmentally benign transition metal, as a catalyst. This transformation accommodates a variety of substrates and is distinguished by its operational simplicity, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group tolerance, and amenability to gram-scale synthesis. We anticipate that these characteristics, coupled with the efficiency of this reaction, will allow for further advances in areas that have historically been enhanced by olefin metathesis.

  4. Carbonylation of Ethene Catalysed by Pd(II-Phosphine Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Cavinato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with olefin carbonylation catalysed by Pd(II-phosphine complexes in protic solvents. In particular, the results obtained in the carbonylation with ethene are reviewed. After a short description of the basic concepts relevant to this catalysis, the review treats in greater details the influence of the bite angle, skeletal rigidity, electronic and steric bulk properties of the ligand on the formation of the products, which range from high molecular weight perfectly alternating polyketones to methyl propanoate. It is shown that the steric bulk plays a major role in directing the selectivity. Particular emphasis is given to the factors governing the very active and selective catalysis to methyl propanoate, including the mechanism of the catalytic cycles with diphosphine- and monophosphine-catalysts. A brief note on the synthesis of methyl propanoate using a “Lucite” type catalyst in ionic liquids is also illustrated. A chapter is dedicated to the carbonylation of olefins in aqueous reaction media. The nonalternating CO-ethene copolymerization is also treated.

  5. Iron(III)-catalysed carbonyl-olefin metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Jacob R.; Zimmerman, Paul M.; Gianino, Joseph B.; Schindler, Corinna S.

    2016-05-01

    The olefin metathesis reaction of two unsaturated substrates is one of the most powerful carbon-carbon-bond-forming reactions in organic chemistry. Specifically, the catalytic olefin metathesis reaction has led to profound developments in the synthesis of molecules relevant to the petroleum, materials, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. These reactions are characterized by their use of discrete metal alkylidene catalysts that operate via a well-established mechanism. While the corresponding carbonyl-olefin metathesis reaction can also be used to construct carbon-carbon bonds, currently available methods are scarce and severely hampered by either harsh reaction conditions or the required use of stoichiometric transition metals as reagents. To date, no general protocol for catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis has been reported. Here we demonstrate a catalytic carbonyl-olefin ring-closing metathesis reaction that uses iron, an Earth-abundant and environmentally benign transition metal, as a catalyst. This transformation accommodates a variety of substrates and is distinguished by its operational simplicity, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group tolerance, and amenability to gram-scale synthesis. We anticipate that these characteristics, coupled with the efficiency of this reaction, will allow for further advances in areas that have historically been enhanced by olefin metathesis.

  6. Sulfide oxidation as a process for the formation of copper-rich magmatic sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora C.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Ballhaus, Chris; Berndt, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Typical magmatic sulfides are dominated by pyrrhotite and pentlandite with minor chalcopyrite, and the bulk atomic Cu/Fe ratio of these sulfides is typically less than unity. However, there are rare magmatic sulfide occurrences that are dominated by Cu-rich sulfides (e.g., bornite, digenite, and chalcopyrite, sometimes coexisting with metallic Cu) with atomic Cu/Fe as high as 5. Typically, these types of sulfide assemblages occur in the upper parts of moderately to highly fractionated layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, a well-known example being the Pd/Au reef in the Upper Middle Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion. Processes proposed to explain why these sulfides are so unusually rich in Cu include fractional crystallization of Fe/(Ni) monosulfide and infiltration of postmagmatic Cu-rich fluids. In this contribution, we explore and experimentally evaluate a third possibility: that Cu-rich magmatic sulfides may be the result of magmatic oxidation. FeS-dominated Ni/Cu-bearing sulfides were equilibrated at variable oxygen fugacities in both open and closed system. Our results show that the Cu/Fe ratio of the sulfide melt increases as a function of oxygen fugacity due to the preferential conversion of FeS into FeO and FeO1.5, and the resistance of Cu2S to being converted into an oxide component even at oxygen fugacities characteristic of the sulfide/sulfate transition (above FMQ + 1). This phenomenon will lead to an increase in the metal/S ratio of a sulfide liquid and will also depress its liquidus temperature. As such, any modeling of the sulfide liquid line of descent in magmatic sulfide complexes needs to address this issue.

  7. Beads,Necklaces, Chains and Strings in Capping Carbonyl Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enos Masheija Kiremire

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to explain at length the close relationship between transition metal carbonyl clusters with main group clusters especially the boranes using the 14n and 4n rules. When the ‘shielding’ electrons are removed from a transition metal carbonyl cluster and becomes ‘naked’, it resembles a corresponding one in the main group elements. A an expanded table of osmium carbonyl clusters was constructed using the capping fragment Os(CO2(14n-2 and the fragment Os(CO3 (14n+0. The table reveals the fact that the known series such closo, nido and arachno are part and parcel of a wide range of series especially the capping series 14n+q, where q takes up negative multiple integers of two including 0 such as such = 0, -2,-4, -6, and so on. The linkage between capping series in transition metal carbonyl clusters has also been identified. Apart from the capping series generated in the table, there is another type of series where the skeletal cluster elements remained the same but the number of carbonyl ligands successively decreased. These types of series are referred to as stripping series. Mapping generating functions were also derived which produces any cluster formula or series required. Also the table shows that many clusters form utilizing some of its atoms as closo nucleus around which the larger ones are built and thus forming clusters within larger clusters. The table may be used to categorize a given cluster formula that falls within its range. Otherwise, using the 14n rule or 4n rule can be used for cluster classification. Furthermore, the table indicated that atoms, fragments and molecules can be classified into series. Through this approach of using series, Hoffmann’s important isolobal relationship of chemical species can splendidly be explained.Using the 14n rule and 4n rules creates a framework under which chemical species such as atoms, fragments, molecules and ions some of which may appear unrelated from main group

  8. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) resins) may be safely used as coatings or components...

  9. Carbonyl compounds in gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Xiaobing, E-mail: pangxbyuanj@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Lewis, Alastair C., E-mail: ally.lewis@york.ac.uk [National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-01

    Carbonyl compounds (carbonyls) are important constituents of cigarette smoke and some are toxic and may be carcinogenic or mutagenic to humans. In this study carbonyl emissions in the gas and particle phases of mainstream cigarette smoke were assessed by GC-MS with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH) derivatization. Seven brands of cigarettes and one brand of cigar common in the UK market and having differing nicotine, tar and carbon monoxide yields were investigated. Sixteen carbonyl components were identified in gaseous emissions and twenty in the particle phase. In the gaseous emissions, acetaldehyde presented as the predominant species, followed by formaldehyde, 2-propenal, and pentanal. In the particulate emissions, 1-hydroxy-2-propanone was the most abundant followed by formaldehyde, benzaldehyde, and 2,5-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Significant differences were found in carbonyl emissions among the brands of cigarettes. The gaseous carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 216-405 {mu}g cigarette{sup -1} ({mu}g cig{sup -1}) and the particulate carbonyl emissions varied in the range of 23-127 {mu}g cig{sup -1}. Positive correlations were found between the total emission of carbonyls, tar yield and carbon monoxide yield. Similar gas/particle (G/P) partitioning ratios of carbonyls were found among all cigarettes, which implies that G/P partitions of carbonyls in smoke mainly depend on the physical properties of the carbonyls. The gaseous carbonyl emissions were enhanced by 40% to 130% when some of the water, accounting for 8-12% of cigarettes in mass, was removed from the tobacco. Non-filtered cigarettes showed significantly higher carbonyl emissions compared to their filtered equivalents. Carbonyl particulate accounted for 11-19% by mass of total particulate matter from tobacco smoke. The cigar generated 806 {mu}g cig{sup -1} gaseous and 141 {mu}g cig{sup -1} particulate carbonyls, which is 2-4 times greater than the cigarettes. - Highlights: {yields} Carbonyl

  10. Adequate hydrogen sulfide, healthy circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jun-bao; CHEN Stella; JIN Hong-fang; TANG Chao-shu

    2011-01-01

    Previously,hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was considered to be a toxic gas.However,recently it was discovered that it could be produced in mammals and even in plants,throughtheproductionandmetabolismof sulfur-containing amino acids.In mammals,H2S is mainly catalyzed by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE),cystathionin-β-lyase (CBS) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) with the substrate of L-cysteine.Endogenous H2S exerts many important physiological and pathophysiological functions,including hypotensive action,vasorelaxation,myocardial dilation,inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation,and antioxidatve actions.Importantly,it plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension,pulmonary hypertension,atherosclerosis,myocardialinjury,angiogenesis,hyperhomocysteinemi aandshock.Therefore,H2S is now being considered to be a novel gasotransmitter after nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the regulation of circulatory system.

  11. Redox biochemistry of hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-07-16

    H(2)S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of gamma-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H(2)S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in gamma-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxidative phosphorylation while also exposing cytochrome c oxidase to this metabolic poison. This report focuses on the biochemistry of H(2)S biogenesis and clearance, on the molecular mechanisms of its action, and on its varied biological effects.

  12. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  13. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R.

    2017-01-01

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Additionally, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. While traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 degrees C.

  14. [Chemical Characteristics and Sources of Atmospheric Carbonyls During the 2014 Beijing APEC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-lang; Tan, Ji-hua; Guo, Song-jun; Ma, Yong-liang; He, Ke-bin

    2016-03-15

    Pollution characteristic and variation trend of atmospheric carbonyls were investigated in November during the 2014 Beijing APEC. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were the dominant carbonyls, accounting for 82.66% of total carbonyls, and especially, formaldehyde accounted for 40.12% of total carbonyls. Atmospheric concentrations of total carbonyls decreased by around 64.10% after the clean air policy was carried out during the Beijing APEC, and the variation trend of carbonyls showed a similar pattern to those of other pollutants like PM₂.₅ during the APEC. Strong correlations (R² of 0.67-0.98) were observed among formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone and total carbonyls during and after the APEC, indicating that they had similar sources; however, poor correlations (R² of -0.11-0.42 and 0.16-0.94, respectively) were observed before the APEC, implying different emission sources for ambient carbonyls. The calculated ratios of C1/C2, C2/C3 and OC/EC indicated that both vehicles and coal emissions were responsible for atmospheric carbonyls before the APEC, and emissions from coal burning were the major contributor to atmospheric carbonyls during and after the APEC, especially after the APEC.

  15. Indoor carbonyl compounds in an academic building in Beijing, China: concentrations and influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanjia JIANG; Pengyi ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Carbonyl compounds in indoor air are of great concern for their adverse health effects. Between February and May, 2009, concentrations of 13 carbonyl compounds were measured in an academic building in Beijing, China. Total concentration of the detected carbonyls ranged from 20.7 to 189.1 I.tg.m3, and among them acetone and formaldehyde were the most abundant, with mean concentrations of 26.4 and 22.6gg.m-3, respectively. Average indoor concentrations of other carbonyls were below I 0 gg. m~3. Principal component analysis identified a combined effect of common indoor carbonyl sources and ventilation on indoor carbonyl levels. Diurnal variations of the carbonyl compounds were investigated in one office room, and carbonyl concentrations tended to be lower in the daytime than at night, due to enhanced ventilation. Average concentrations of carbonyl compounds in the office room were generally higher in early May than in late February, indicating the influence of temperature. Carbo- nyl source emission rates from both the room and human occupants were estimated during two lectures, based on one-compartment mass balance model. The influence of human occupants on indoor carbonyl concentrations varies with environmental conditions, and may become signifi- cant in the case of a large human occupancy.

  16. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R

    2017-02-07

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Additionally, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. While traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 °C.

  17. Removal of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanagawa, T; Mikami, E.

    1989-01-01

    Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide were efficiently removed from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m and oxidized to sulfate stoichiometrically. More than 99.99% of dimethyl sulfide was removed when the load was less than 4.0 g of dimethyl sulfide per g (dry cell weight) per day.

  18. Hydrogen Sulfide Induces Oxidative Damage to RNA and DNA in a Sulfide-Tolerant Marine Invertebrate

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L.; Stein, Jenny R.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes ...

  19. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata

    2014-06-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well known toxic gas that is synthesized from the amino acids: cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) by three enzymes: cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Hydrogen sulfide, like carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule in different biological systems, including the cardiovascular system. Moreover, hydrogen sulfide plays a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. It modulates different elements of hemostasis (activation of blood platelet, and coagulation process) as well as proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the biological role and the therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. This review summarizes the different functions of hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis.

  1. [Fatal outcome of an hydrogen sulfide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querellou, E; Jaffrelot, M; Savary, D; Savry, C; Perfus, J-P

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of fatal outcome poisoning by massive exposure to hydrogen sulfide of a sewer worker. This rare event was associated with a moderate intoxication of two members of the rescue team. The death was due to asystole and massive lung oedema. Autopsy analysis showed diffuse necrotic lesions in lungs. Hydrogen sulfide is a direct and systemic poison, produced by organic matter decomposition. The direct toxicity mechanism is still unclear. The systemic toxicity is due to an acute toxicity by oxygen depletion at cellular level. It is highly diffusable and potentially very dangerous. At low concentration, rotten egg smell must trigger hydrogen sulfide suspicion since at higher concentration it is undetectable, making intoxication possible. In case of acute intoxication, there is an almost instantaneous cardiovascular failure and a rapid death. Hydrogen sulfide exposure requires prevention measures and more specifically the use of respiratory equipment for members of the rescue team.

  2. Mechanism of mechanical activation for sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hui-ping; CHEN Qi-yuan; YIN Zhou-lan; HE Yue-hui; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Structural changes for mechanically activated pyrite, sphalerite, galena and molybdenite with or without the exposure to ambient air, were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis(XRD), particle size analysis, gravimetrical method, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy(XPS) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM), respectively. Based on the above structural changes for mechanically activated sulfide ores and related reports by other researchers, several qualitative rules of the mechanisms and the effects of mechanical activation for sulfide ores are obtained. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and incomplete cleavage plane or extremely incomplete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with thermal instability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that a great amount of surface reactive sites are formed, and lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For brittle sulfide ores with excellent thermal stability, and complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation. The effects of mechanical activation are apparent. For sulfide ores with high toughness, good thermal stability and very excellent complete cleavage plane, the mechanism of mechanical activation is that lattice deformation happens during their mechanical activation, but the lattice deformation ratio is very small. The effects of mechanical activation are worst.

  3. Determination of Carbonyl Compounds in Cigarette Mainstream Smoke. The CORESTA 2010 Collaborative Study and Recommended Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intorp M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A recommended method has been developed and published by CORESTA, applicable to the quantification of selected carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, acetone, acrolein, methyl ethyl ketone, crotonaldehyde, propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde in cigarette mainstream smoke. The method involved smoke collection in impinger traps, derivatisation of carbonyls with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH, separation of carbonyl hydrazones by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and detection by ultra violet or diode array.

  4. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic detection of protein carbonyls derivatized with biotin-hydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinzi; Luo, Xiaoting; Jing, Siqun; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-04-15

    Protein carbonyls are protein oxidation products that are often used to measure the magnitude of protein oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen or reactive nitrogen species. Protein carbonyls have been found to be elevated during aging and in age-related diseases such as stroke, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present article, we provide detailed protocols for detection of mitochondrial protein carbonyls labeled with biotin-hydrazide followed by 2-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IEF)/SDS-PAGE and Western blotting probed with horse-radish peroxidase-conjugated streptavidin. The presented procedures can also be modified for detection of carbonylation of non-mitochondrial proteins.

  5. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F.; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Davies, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible protein oxidation correlated with oxidative stress, various diseases and ageing. Here we describe a peptide-centric approach for identification and characterisation of up to 14 different types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins. The modified residues...... in vitro metal ion-catalysed oxidation. Furthermore, we assigned 133 carbonylated sites in 36 proteins in native human plasma protein samples. The optimised workflow enabled detection of 10 hitherto undetected types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins: aldehyde and ketone modifications of leucine...

  6. Nano-Aluminum Powder Mediated Allylation of Carbonyl Compounds in Aqueous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shi-Zhen; LIU Jin

    2008-01-01

    A new and effective Barbier-Grignard allylation of aldehydes or ketones has been carried out with nano-aluminum powder in aqueous 0.1 mol·L-1 NH4Cl (aq.) under an atmosphere of nitrogen. Aromatic carbonyl compounds gave homoallylic alcohols in good yields. The effectiveness of reaction was strongly influenced by the steric environment surrounding the carbonyl group. Aliphatic carbonyl compounds proceeded in low yields. The dominant stereoisomer was an erythro-isomer when an ortho-hydroxyl carbonyl compound was reacted under such a reaction condition.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatt, Judith M.; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2S: (i) H2S accelerated the recovery of

  8. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  9. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  10. Reactive Carbonyl Species In Vivo: Generation and Dual Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna M. Semchyshyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive carbonyls are widespread species in living organisms and mainly known for their damaging effects. The most abundant reactive carbonyl species (RCS are derived from oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Chemical modification of proteins, nucleic acids, and aminophospholipids by RCS results in cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. In addition to their direct toxicity, modification of biomolecules by RCS gives rise to a multitude of adducts and cross links that are increasingly implicated in aging and pathology of a wide range of human diseases. Understanding of the relationship between metabolism of RCS and the development of pathological disorders and diseases may help to develop effective approaches to prevent a number of disorders and diseases. On the other hand, constant persistence of RCS in cells suggests that they perform some useful role in living organisms. The most beneficial effects of RCS are their establishment as regulators of cell signal transduction and gene expression. Since RCS can modulate different biological processes, new tools are required to decipher the precise mechanisms underlying dual effects of RCS.

  11. Glutathione Adduct Patterns of Michael-Acceptor Carbonyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawik, Christian; Rickmeyer, Christiane; Brehm, Martin; Böhme, Alexander; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2017-02-22

    Glutathione (GSH) has so far been considered to facilitate detoxification of soft organic electrophiles through covalent binding at its cysteine (Cys) thiol group, followed by stepwise catalyzed degradation and eventual elimination along the mercapturic acid pathway. Here we show that in contrast to expectation from HSAB theory, Michael-acceptor ketones, aldehydes and esters may form also single, double and triple adducts with GSH involving β-carbon attack at the much harder N-terminus of the γ-glutamyl (Glu) unit of GSH. In particular, formation of the GSH-N single adduct contradicts the traditional view that S alkylation always forms the initial reaction of GSH with Michael-acceptor carbonyls. To this end, chemoassay analyses of the adduct formation of GSH with nine α,β-unsaturated carbonyls employing high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry have been performed. Besides enriching the GSH adductome and potential biomarker applications, electrophilic N-terminus functio-nalization is likely to impair GSH homeostasis substantially through blocking the γ-glutamyl transferase catalysis of the first breakdown step of modified GSH, and thus its timely reconstitution. The discussion includes a comparison with cyclic adducts of GSH and furan metabolites as reported in literature, and quantum chemically calculated thermodynamics of hard-hard, hard-soft and soft-soft adducts.

  12. IRC analysis of methanol carbonylation reaction catalyzed by rhodium complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Maorong; FENG Wenlin; JI Yongqiang; LEI Ming

    2004-01-01

    In the reaction cycle for methanol carbonylation catalyzed by Rh complex, the structure geometries of the reactant, intermediates, transition states and product of each elemental reaction have been studied by using the energy gradient method at HF/LANL2DZ level, and the changes of their potential profiles have also been calculated. Through IRC analyses of the transition states for each elemental reaction, it is confirmed that the various structure geometries obtained are stationary points on the cycle reaction pathway of methanol carbonylation catalyzed by Rh complex, and the changes are given in energies and structure geometries of the reactant molecules along the reaction pathway of lowest energy. It has been proposed that the geometrical conversions of intermediates play an important role during the cycle reaction. Through analyses of structure geometries, it has been suggested that, in addition to cis- and trans- structure exchange linkage of catalysis reactive species, the two pathways, cis- and trans-cata- lyzed cycle reactions, can also be linked through geometrical conversion of intermediates, of which the activation energy is 49.79 kJ/mol. Moreover, the reductive elimination elemental reaction may be neither cis-cycle nor trans- one, showing that the cycle reaction can be achieved through various pathways. However different the pathway, the oxidative addition elemental reaction of CH3I is the rate-controlling step.

  13. Indium sulfide buffer/CIGSSe interface engineering: Improved cell performance by the addition of zinc sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allsop, N.A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: allsop@hmi.de; Camus, C. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Haensel, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Gledhill, S.E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lauermann, I. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lux-Steiner, M.C. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Fischer, Ch.-H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Department SE2, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-05-31

    Indium sulfide buffer layers deposited by the spray-ion layer gas reaction (Spray-ILGAR) technique are a viable alternative to the traditional cadmium sulfide buffer layer in thin film solar cells. In the present work we report on the results of manipulating the absorber/buffer interface between the chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} absorber (CIGSSe) and the indium sulfide buffer. It is shown that the deposition of a small amount of zinc sulfide at the absorber/buffer interface can be used to increase the open circuit voltage. A small but significant increase of 20 mV (up to 580 mV), as compared to the pure indium sulfide buffered cells is possible leading to an increase in the overall efficiency.

  14. Transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylation reactions of olefins and alkynes: a personal account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Fang, Xianjie; Wu, Lipeng; Jackstell, Ralf; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2014-04-15

    Carbon monoxide was discovered and identified in the 18th century. Since the first applications in industry 80 years ago, academic and industrial laboratories have broadly explored CO's use in chemical reactions. Today organic chemists routinely employ CO in organic chemistry to synthesize all kinds of carbonyl compounds. Despite all these achievements and a century of carbonylation catalysis, many important research questions and challenges remain. Notably, apart from academic developments, industry applies carbonylation reactions with CO on bulk scale. In fact, today the largest applications of homogeneous catalysis (regarding scale) are carbonylation reactions, especially hydroformylations. In addition, the vast majority of acetic acid is produced via carbonylation of methanol (Monsanto or Cativa process). The carbonylation of olefins/alkynes with nucleophiles, such as alcohols and amines, represent another important type of such reactions. In this Account, we discuss our work on various carbonylations of unsaturated compounds and related reactions. Rhodium-catalyzed isomerization and hydroformylation reactions of internal olefins provide straightforward access to higher value aldehydes. Catalytic hydroaminomethylations offer an ideal way to synthesize substituted amines and even heterocycles directly. More recently, our group has also developed so-called alternative metal catalysts based on iridium, ruthenium, and iron. What about the future of carbonylation reactions? CO is already one of the most versatile C1 building blocks for organic synthesis and is widely used in industry. However, because of CO's high toxicity and gaseous nature, organic chemists are often reluctant to apply carbonylations more frequently. In addition, new regulations have recently made the transportation of carbon monoxide more difficult. Hence, researchers will need to develop and more frequently use practical and benign CO-generating reagents. Apart from formates, alcohols, and metal

  15. A step-by-step protocol for assaying protein carbonylation in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Graziano; Clerici, Marco; Garavaglia, Maria Elisa; Giustarini, Daniela; Rossi, Ranieri; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2016-04-15

    Protein carbonylation represents the most frequent and usually irreversible oxidative modification affecting proteins. This modification is chemically stable and this feature is particularly important for storage and detection of carbonylated proteins. Many biochemical and analytical methods have been developed during the last thirty years to assay protein carbonylation. The most successful method consists on protein carbonyl (PCO) derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and consequent spectrophotometric assay. This assay allows a global quantification of PCO content due to the ability of DNPH to react with carbonyl giving rise to an adduct able to absorb at 366 nm. Similar approaches were also developed employing chromatographic separation, in particular HPLC, and parallel detection of absorbing adducts. Subsequently, immunological techniques, such as Western immunoblot or ELISA, have been developed leading to an increase of sensitivity in protein carbonylation detection. Currently, they are widely employed to evaluate change in total protein carbonylation and eventually to highlight the specific proteins undergoing selective oxidation. In the last decade, many mass spectrometry (MS) approaches have been developed for the identification of the carbonylated proteins and the relative amino acid residues modified to carbonyl derivatives. Although these MS methods are much more focused and detailed due to their ability to identify the amino acid residues undergoing carbonylation, they still require too expensive equipments and, therefore, are limited in distribution. In this protocol paper, we summarise and comment on the most diffuse protocols that a standard laboratory can employ to assess protein carbonylation; in particular, we describe step-by-step the different protocols, adding suggestions coming from our on-bench experience.

  16. Influences of characteristic meteorological conditions on atmospheric carbonyls in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaobing; Mu, Yujing; Lee, Xinqing; Zhang, Yujie; Xu, Zhu

    2009-08-01

    Atmospheric pollutants are controlled not only by their production rates but also by meteorological conditions. The influences of dust storm, sauna weather (haze with high temperature and high humidity), wet precipitation and wind speed on atmospheric carbonyls in Beijing were investigated. During a severe dust episode (April 17, 2006), the mixing ratios of carbonyls were significantly elevated to 13-27 ppbV from 7 to 13 ppbV in the previous non-dust days (April 15 and 16) with the increasing extents of 38-154%. The accumulating effect and the lower photolysis rate in the dust day may be responsible for the increases of carbonyls' levels. Additionally, the contribution from heterogeneous reactions occurring on dust particles to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde cannot be ruled out. During the period of typical sauna weather, the concentrations of atmospheric carbonyls increased to 18-60 ppbV from 10 to 17 ppbV before the sauna days. The air mass over Beijing during the sauna days was controlled by a subtropical anticyclone and the boundary layer became quite stable, which was beneficial to the rapid accumulation of air pollutants including carbonyls. Wet precipitation was found to be an effective removal process to the atmospheric carbonyls. After one-hour of rain in summer, the total concentrations of atmospheric carbonyls decreased to less than half of that before the rainfall. The similar temporal varying patterns of carbonyls and inorganic ions in rainwater indicated that carbonyls were mainly washed out from the atmosphere into rainwater as inorganic ions were. Strong wind could evidently dilute atmospheric carbonyls and a negative correlation was found between wind speeds and the concentrations of carbonyls in spring in Beijing.

  17. A study of the stability of cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide and cadmium sulfide copper-indium-diselenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, G.; Richard, N.; Gaines, G.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of high efficiency cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide solar cells were exposed to combinations of stresses designed to isolate and accelerate intrinsic degradation mechanisms. Stresses included elevated temperature, illumination intensity, and cell loading conditions. All stress exposures and tests were conducted in a benign (high purity argon) atmosphere. Two primary intrinsic modes of degradation were identified: degradation of the open circuit voltage under continuous illumination and nonzero loading was found to be self recovering upon interruption of illumination or upon shorting or reverse biasing the cells. It was attributed to traps in the depletion region. Recovery from decay of light generated current was not spontaneous but could be partially accomplished by annealing in a reducing (hydrogen) environment. It was attributed to changes in the stoichiometry of the copper sulfide under the influence of electric fields and currents.

  18. Sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, S. R.; Sridhar, R.; Toguri, J. M.

    1995-04-01

    The sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags were measured by a gas-slag equilibration technique under controlled oxygen and sulfur potentials similar to those encountered in the pyrometallurgical processing of nonferrous metals. The oxygen pressure range was from 10-9.5 to 10-11 MPa and the sulfur pressure range from 10-3 to 10-4.5 MPa, over a temperature range of 1473 to 1623 K. The slags studied were FeO-SiO2 at silica saturation and those with addition of CaO, MgO, and Al2O3 to determine their effect on sulfide capacities. For these slags, the sulfide capacities were found to vary from 10-3.3 to 10-5. The sulfide capacities increased with increasing temperature from 1473 to 1623 K. A comparison of the reported plant data on sulfur content of industrial slags shows good agreement with the present experimental results. The present data will be useful in estimating metal losses in slag due to metal sulfide entrainment in nonferrous smelters.

  19. Structural characteristics of green tea catechins for formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takeshi; Mori, Taiki; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Kaku, Maiko; Kusaka, Koji; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Aihara, Yoshiyuki; Furuta, Takumi; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Kan, Toshiyuki; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-07-15

    Catechins are polyphenolic antioxidants found in green tea leaves. Recent studies have reported that various polyphenolic compounds, including catechins, cause protein carbonyl formation in proteins via their pro-oxidant actions. In this study, we evaluate the formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin (HSA) by tea catechins and investigate the relationship between catechin chemical structure and its pro-oxidant property. To assess the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA, HSA was incubated with four individual catechins under physiological conditions to generate biotin-LC-hydrazide labeled protein carbonyls. Comparison of catechins using Western blotting revealed that the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA was higher for pyrogallol-type catechins than the corresponding catechol-type catechins. In addition, the formation of protein carbonyl was also found to be higher for the catechins having a galloyl group than the corresponding catechins lacking a galloyl group. The importance of the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring and the galloyl group was confirmed using methylated catechins and phenolic acids. These results indicate that the most important structural element contributing to the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA by tea catechins is the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring, followed by the galloyl group. The oxidation stability and binding affinity of tea catechins with proteins are responsible for the formation of protein carbonyl, and consequently the difference in these properties of each catechin may contribute to the magnitude of their biological activities.

  20. Iron(III)-Catalyzed Ring-Closing Carbonyl-Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saá, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis are summarized in this Highlight. Schindler and co-workers have reported that the environmentally benign FeCl3 catalyst promotes ring-closing carbonyl-olefin metathesis (RCCOM) in high yield under very mild conditions.

  1. Preparation and microwave shielding property of silver-coated carbonyl iron powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiao Guo, E-mail: xgcao@gdut.edu.cn [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong (China); Ren, Hao [Guangzhou Research Institute of O-M-E Technology, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Hai Yan [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is prepared by the electroless plating process. • The silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is a new kind of conductive filler. • The reflection and absorption dominate the shielding mechanism of the prepared powder. • Increasing the thickness of electroconductive adhesive will increase the SE. - Abstract: Electroless silver coating of carbonyl iron powder is demonstrated in the present investigation. The carbonyl iron powders are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) before and after the coating process. The relatively uniform and continuous silver coating is obtained under the given coating conditions. In this paper, the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding mechanism of the silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is suggested. The reflection of silver coating and absorption of carbonyl iron powder dominate the shielding mechanism of the silver-coated carbonyl iron powder. The silver-coated carbonyl iron powders are used as conductive filler in electroconductive adhesive for electromagnetic interference shielding applications. The effect of the thickness of electroconductive adhesive on the shielding effectiveness (SE) is investigated. The results indicate that the SE increases obviously with the increase of the thickness of electroconductive adhesive. The SE of the electroconductive adhesive with 0.35 mm thickness is above 38 dB across the tested frequency range.

  2. Impact of HVAC filter on indoor air quality in terms of ozone removal and carbonyls generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-Yu

    2014-06-01

    This study aims at detecting ozone removal rates and corresponding carbonyls generated by ozone reaction with HVAC filters from various building, i.e., shopping mall, school, and office building. Studies were conducted in a small-scale environmental chamber. By examining dust properties including organic carbon proportion and specific surface area of dusts adsorbed on filters along with ozone removal rates and carbonyls generation rate, the relationship among dust properties, ozone removal rates, and carbonyls generation was identified. The results indicate a well-defined positive correlation between ozone removal efficiency and carbonyls generation on filters, as well as a positive correlation among the mass of organic carbon on filters, ozone removal efficiency and carbonyls generations.

  3. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, R S P

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  4. Solar thermal extraction of copper from sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Guesdon, C.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2003-03-01

    With the aim to develop a solar-driven process for the extraction of copper from sulfide concentrates re-search on the decomposition of copper sulfides under inert atmospheres has been initiated. Thermogravimetric measurements on chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) revealed that copper is formed already at 1823 K. Chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}) also disintegrates at this temperature, although at a lower rate. Copper and iron have been identified in the solid residue. The results confirm the feasibility of copper extraction by direct decomposition of sulfides under atmospheric pressure. The decomposition under inert atmosphere prevents generation of SO{sub 2}, and is beneficial to the removal of volatile impurities. Chemical equilibrium calculations for CuFeS{sub 2} contaminated with enargite (Cu{sub 3}AsS{sub 4}) have shown that the absence of an oxidic slag allows for a complete evaporation of arsenic and subsequent separation. (author)

  5. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  6. Carbonyl mediated conductance through metal bound peptides: a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Trilisa M.; Dunietz, Barry D.

    2007-10-01

    Large increases in the conductance of peptides upon binding to metal ions have recently been reported experimentally. The mechanism of the conductance switching is examined computationally. It is suggested that oxidation of the metal ion occurs after binding to the peptide. This is caused by the bias potential placed across the metal-peptide complex. A combination of configurational changes, metal ion involvement and interactions between carbonyl group oxygen atoms and the gold leads are all shown to be necessary for the large improvement in the conductance seen experimentally. Differences in the molecular orbitals of the nickel and copper complexes are noted and serve to explain the variation of the improvement in conductance upon binding to either a nickel or copper ion.

  7. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  8. Direct Vapor Phase Carbonylation of Methanol over NiCl2/C Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Introduction The carbonylation of alcohols via homogenous catalysis is important in manufacturing acetic acid and higher carboxylic acids and their esters[1,2]. The main route to produce acetic acid is to make methanol carbonylated by means of the Monsanto and BP process in which a homogeneous rhodium catalyst is used. Although the homogeneous carbonylation of methanol is a highly selective process, it is affected by the disadvantages associated with a highly corrosive reaction medium due to the use of methyl iodide as the promoter, and the difficulty of the product separation[3]. The use of a heterogeneous catalyst seems very interesting and attractive to us[4], especially the direct vapor phase carbonylation of methanol without a halide promoter is of considerable importance and is strong incentive economically. There has, however, been very little success in finding either heterogeneous or homogeneous catalysts that can catalyze the reaction effectively without the addition of a promoter[5,6]. According to the known carbonylation mechanism[7,8], the methyl iodide directly carbonylates with CO to from MeCOI which interacts with methanol(MeOH) to produce methyl acetate(MeCOOMe) and HI, and then MeOH reacts with HI to from CH3I. In fact, this carbonylation reaction is the indirect catalytic carbonylation of methanol[9]. In this work, a novel catalyst for the direct vapor phase carbonylation of methanol without the addition of any halide in the feed as a promoter was investigated. Compared to the known liquid phase methanol carbonylation process, some advantages of this vapor phase reaction are as follows:

  9. Anti-Amoebic Properties of Carbonyl Thiourea Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizatul Akma Ibrahim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Thiourea derivatives display a broad spectrum of applications in chemistry, various industries, medicines and various other fields. Recently, different thiourea derivatives have been synthesized and explored for their anti-microbial properties. In this study, four carbonyl thiourea derivatives were synthesized and characterized, and then further tested for their anti-amoebic properties on two potential pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba, namely A. castellanii (CCAP 1501/2A and A. polyphaga (CCAP 1501/3A. The results indicate that these newly-synthesized thiourea derivatives are active against both Acanthamoeba species. The IC50 values obtained were in the range of 2.39–8.77 µg·mL‑1 (9.47–30.46 µM for A. castellanii and 3.74–9.30 µg·mL‑1 (14.84–31.91 µM for A. polyphaga. Observations on the amoeba morphology indicated that the compounds caused the reduction of the amoeba size, shortening of their acanthopodia structures, and gave no distinct vacuolar and nuclear structures in the amoeba cells. Meanwhile, fluorescence microscopic observation using acridine orange and propidium iodide (AOPI staining revealed that the synthesized compounds induced compromised-membrane in the amoeba cells. The results of this study proved that these new carbonyl thiourea derivatives, especially compounds M1 and M2 provide potent cytotoxic properties toward pathogenic Acanthamoeba to suggest that they can be developed as new anti-amoebic agents for the treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  10. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  11. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......, it was deduced that they were not deposited but instead grew within the deposit. The presence of unburned char particles within the deposits supports the concept that a reducing environment existed in the deposits. Two processes are proposed for explaining the existence of pyrrhotite crystals within a deposit...

  12. Use of biogenic sulfide for ZnS precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Veeken, A.; Weijma, J.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    A 600 ml continuously stirred tank reactor was used to assess the performance of a zinc sulfide precipitation process using a biogenic sulfide solution (the effluent of a sulfate-reducing bioreactor) as sulfide source. In all experiments, a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm was used to co

  13. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, J.B.; Graaff, M. de; Bosch, P.L. van den; Boelee, N.C.; Keesman, K.J.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concl

  14. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  15. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile Sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH

  16. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild;

    2015-01-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree...... such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers...... (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit...

  17. Comparison of Hydrogen Sulfide Analysis Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary and critique of common methods of hydrogen sulfide analysis is presented. Procedures described are: reflectance from silver plates and lead acetate-coated tiles, lead acetate and mercuric chloride paper tapes, sodium nitroprusside and methylene blue wet chemical methods, infrared spectrophotometry, and gas chromatography. (BL)

  18. Microbial Fuel Cells for Sulfide Removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabaey, K.; Sompel, van de S.; Maignien, L.; Boon, N.; Aelterman, P.; Clauwaert, P.; Schamphelaire, de L.; The Pham, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Verhaege, M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Verstraete, W.

    2006-01-01

    Thus far, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used to convert carbon-based substrates to electricity. However, sulfur compounds are ubiquitously present in organic waste and wastewater. In this study, a MFC with a hexacyanoferrate cathodic electrolyte was used to convert dissolved sulfide to eleme

  19. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... been confirmed. Well-control fluid means drilling mud and completion or workover fluid as appropriate... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Hydrogen Sulfide § 250.490 Hydrogen... section when conducting drilling, well-completion/well-workover, and production operations in zones...

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide in Preeclampsia : Potential Therapeutic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The thesis provide insights into the production and possible therapeutic effect of the gaseous molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in preeclampsia (PE). H2S is an important molecule in the (human) body. It is among others involved in blood pressure regulation, stimulation of vascular growth and modulati

  1. Nucleation of mercury sulfide by dealkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enescu, Mironel; Nagy, Kathryn L.; Manceau, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Metal sulfide minerals are assumed to form naturally at ambient conditions via reaction of a metallic element with (poly)sulfide ions, usually produced by microbes in oxygen-depleted environments. Recently, the formation of mercury sulfide (β-HgS) directly from linear Hg(II)-thiolate complexes (Hg(SR)2) in natural organic matter and in cysteine solutions was demonstrated under aerated conditions. Here, a detailed description of this non-sulfidic reaction is provided by computations at a high level of molecular-orbital theory. The HgS stoichiometry is obtained through the cleavage of the S-C bond in one thiolate, transfer of the resulting alkyl group (R’) to another thiolate, and subsequent elimination of a sulfur atom from the second thiolate as a thioether (RSR’). Repetition of this mechanism leads to the formation of RS-(HgS)n-R chains which may self-assemble in parallel arrays to form cinnabar (α-HgS), or more commonly, quickly condense to four-coordinate metacinnabar (β-HgS). The mechanistic pathway is thermodynamically favorable and its predicted kinetics agrees with experiment. The results provide robust theoretical support for the abiotic natural formation of nanoparticulate HgS under oxic conditions and in the absence of a catalyst, and suggest a new route for the (bio)synthesis of HgS nanoparticles with improved technological properties.

  2. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  3. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  4. Method for the Determination of Carbonyl Compounds in E-Cigarette Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, Jason W.; Wilkinson, Celeste T.; Wilkinson, James W.; Lipowicz, Peter J.; Skapars, James A.; Anderson, Adam; Miller, John H.

    2017-01-01

    Low levels of thermal degradation products such as carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, crotonaldehyde) have been reported in e-cigarette aerosols. The collection and analysis of e-cigarette aerosol carbonyls are often adapted from methods developed for tobacco cigarette smoke. These methodologies are often not sensitive enough to detect low carbonyl levels in e-cigarette aerosols. One objective of this work was to develop and validate a rapid, selective and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method optimized for analysis of carbonyls in e-cigarette aerosols. Aerosols were trapped in 20-puff collections, 4-s durations, 55-mL volumes, 30-s intervals, square wave puff profiles. Collection apparatus involved a linear smoking machine with Cambridge filter pad followed by a glass impinger containing acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. This method showed limits of quantitation and detection of 0.016 and 0.003 µg puff−1, respectively, and run time of 4 min. Six e-cigarettes were evaluated (five devices each). All contained measurable levels of carbonyls. Levels were mostly well below those in conventional cigarettes. However, for some e-cigarettes, formaldehyde levels were above those for tobacco cigarettes (highest at 14.1 µg puff−1). Temperatures related to carbonyl yields in e-cigarette aerosols were explored to better understand carbonyl formation: formation of formaldehyde is low at temperatures below 350°C. PMID:28087758

  5. Electroless plating preparation and electromagnetic properties of Co-coated carbonyl iron particles/polyimide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Zhou, Wancheng; Li, Rong; Qing, Yuchang; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-03-01

    To solve the serious electromagnetic interference problems at elevated temperature, one thin microwave-absorbing sheet employing Co-coated carbonyl iron particles and polyimide was prepared. The Co-coated carbonyl iron particles were successfully prepared using an electroless plating method. The microstructure, composition, phase and static magnetic properties of Co-coated carbonyl iron particles were characterized by combination of scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The electromagnetic parameters of Co-coated carbonyl iron particles/polyimide composite were measured in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, and the electromagnetic loss mechanism of the material-obtained was discussed. The microwave absorption properties of composites before and after heat treatment at 300 °C for 100 h were characterized in 2-18 GHz frequency range. It was established that composites based on Co-coated carbonyl iron demonstrate thermomagnetic stability, indicating that Co coating reduces the oxidation of carbonyl iron. Thus, Co-coated carbonyl iron particles/polyimide composites are useful in the design of microwave absorbers operating at temperatures up to 300 °C.

  6. Formation of Carbonyl and Carboxyl Groups on Cellulosic Pulps: Effect on Alkali Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Perrin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ozone bleaching generates carbonyl groups on the cellulose polymer when applied to unbleached kraft pulps. This suggests that pulp fully bleached with a totally chlorine-free (TCF sequence may contain more oxidized groups than standard elemental chlorine-free (ECF bleached pulp. A fully bleached pulp was treated with sodium hypochlorite to form oxidized groups (mostly carbonyls on the pure carbohydrates, which were investigated during subsequent alkaline treatment. Carbonyl groups had a strong impact on color development during alkaline treatment. Among the carbonyls, the keto groups were the most active. This was confirmed by the behavior of carbohydrate model compounds that contained aldehyde, keto, and/or carboxyl groups when subjected to alkaline conditions. A subsequent hydrogen peroxide (P stage effectively decreased the carbonyl content, which reduced yellowing during alkaline treatment. However, the oxidized cellulose was severely depolymerized. The addition of magnesium sulfate (Mg into the P stage minimized depolymerization while maintaining some of the carbonyls in the carbohydrates. It is proposed that Mg cations can hinder alkaline β-elimination, possibly by forming a complex with the carbonyl groups.

  7. Paraquat exposure and Sod2 knockdown have dissimilar impacts on the Drosophila melanogaster carbonylated protein proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanasamy, Suresh K; Simpson, David C; Martin, Ian; Grotewiel, Mike; Gronert, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to Paraquat and RNA interference knockdown of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) are known to result in significant lifespan reduction, locomotor dysfunction, and mitochondrial degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Both perturbations increase the flux of the progenitor ROS, superoxide, but the molecular underpinnings of the resulting phenotypes are poorly understood. Improved understanding of such processes could lead to advances in the treatment of numerous age-related disorders. Superoxide toxicity can act through protein carbonylation. Analysis of carbonylated proteins is attractive since carbonyl groups are not present in the 20 canonical amino acids and are amenable to labeling and enrichment strategies. Here, carbonylated proteins were labeled with biotin hydrazide and enriched on streptavidin beads. On-bead digestion was used to release carbonylated protein peptides, with relative abundance ratios versus controls obtained using the iTRAQ MS-based proteomics approach. Western blotting and biotin quantitation assay approaches were also investigated. By both Western blotting and proteomics, Paraquat exposure, but not Sod2 knockdown, resulted in increased carbonylated protein relative abundance. For Paraquat exposure versus control, the median carbonylated protein relative abundance ratio (1.53) determined using MS-based proteomics was in good agreement with that obtained using a commercial biotin quantitation kit (1.36).

  8. Variation of ambient carbonyl levels in urban Beijing between 2005 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wentai; Shao, Min; Wang, Ming; Lu, Sihua; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Bin; Yang, Yudong; Zeng, Limin; Chen, Zhongming; Chang, Chih-Chung; Zhang, Qian; Hu, Min

    2016-03-01

    Carbonyl compounds are important precursors of secondary air pollutants. With the rapid economic development and the implementation of stricter control measures in Beijing, the sources of carbonyls possibly changed. Based on measurement data obtained at an urban site in Beijing between 2005 and 2012, we investigated annual variations in carbonyl levels and sources during these years. In summer, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde levels decreased significantly at a rate of 9.1%/year and 7.2%/year, respectively, while acetone levels increased at a rate of 4.3%/year. In winter, formaldehyde levels increased and acetaldehyde levels decreased. We also investigated the factors driving the variation in carbonyls levels during summer by determination of emission ratios for carbonyls and their precursors, and calculation of photochemical formation of carbonyls. The relative declines for primary formaldehyde and acetaldehyde levels were larger than those for secondary formation. This is possibly due to the increasing usage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas which could result in the rise of carbonyl precursor emission ratios. The increase in acetone levels might be related to the rising solvent usage in Beijing during these years. The influences of these sources should be paid more attention in future research.

  9. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with sca......Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field...... with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most...

  10. Sulfide removal by moderate oxygenation of anaerobic sludge environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Zee, F.P.; Villaverde, S.; Polanco, F. [Valladolid Univ., Valladolid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Garcia, P.A.

    2004-07-01

    Treating wastewater through anaerobic bioreactors results in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The sulfide can be removed from the biogas by introducing air directly into the anaerobic bioreactor system. This study presents the results of batch experiments that provided a better insight into the fate of sulfur compounds and oxygen during microaerobic sulfide oxidation in granular sludge. It was shown that sulfide could be removed rapidly upon introduction of low amounts of oxygen to the sulfide-amended batch vials with granular sludge treating vinasse. Initially, the sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and polysulfide. Significant production of sulfate did not occur. The introduction of oxygen, however, could result in the growth of aerobic organic-chemical oxygen demand-oxidizing bacteria that compete with sulfide oxidation for oxygen. 6 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  11. FeCl3 -Catalyzed Ring-Closing Carbonyl-Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lina; Li, Wenjuan; Xi, Hui; Bai, Xiaohui; Ma, Enlu; Yan, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhiping

    2016-08-22

    Exploiting catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis is an ongoing challenge in organic synthesis. Reported herein is an FeCl3 -catalyzed ring-closing carbonyl-olefin metathesis. The protocol allows access to a range of carbo-/heterocyclic alkenes with good efficiency and excellent trans diastereoselectivity. The methodology presents one of the rare examples of catalytic ring-closing carbonyl-olefin metathesis. This process is proposed to take place by FeCl3 -catalyzed oxetane formation followed by retro-ring-opening to deliver metathesis products.

  12. Visible Light-Induced Carbonylation Reactions with Organic Dyes as the Photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jin-Bao; Qi, Xinxin; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Dyes can CO do it: Organic dyes and pigments are usually applied in textile dyeing, which can be dated back to the Neolithic period. Interestingly, the possibility to use organic dyes as photoredox catalysts has also been noticed by organic chemists and applied in organic synthesis. Carbonylation reactions as a powerful procedure in carbonyl-containing compound preparation have also been studied. In this manuscript, the recent achievements in using organic dyes as visible-light sensitizers in carbonylation chemistry are summarized and discussed.

  13. Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Aluminum Carbonyl Clusters in Helium Nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T.; Morrison, A. M.; Flynn, S. D.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    Helium nanodroplet isolation and a tunable quantum cascade laser are used to probe the fundamental CO stretch bands of Aluminum Carbonyl complexes, Al-(CO)N (n ≤ 5). The droplets are doped with single aluminum atoms via the resistive heating of an aluminum wetted tantalum wire. The downstream sequential pick-up of CO molecules leads to the rapid formation and cooling of Al-(CO)N clusters within the droplets. Near 1900 Cm-1, rotational fine structure is resolved in bands that are assigned to the CO stretch of a 2Π1/2 linear Al-CO species, and the asymmetric and symmetric CO stretch vibrations of a planar C2v Al-(CO)2 complex in a 2B1 electronic state. Bands corresponding to clusters with n ≥ 3 lack resolved rotational fine structure; nevertheless, the small frequency shifts from the n=2 bands indicate that these clusters consist of an Al-(CO)2 core with additional CO molecules attached via van-der-Waals interactions. A second n=2 band is observed near the CO stretch of Al-CO, indicating a local minimum on the n=2 potential consisting of an ``unreacted" Al-CO-(CO) cluster. The linewidth of this band is ˜0.5 cm-1, which is over 50 times broader than transitions within the Al-CO band. The additional broadening is consistent with a homogeneous mechanism corresponding to a rapid vibrational excitation induced reaction within the Al-CO-(CO) cluster to form the covalently bonded Al-(CO)2 complex. For the n=1,2 complexes, CCSD(T) calculations and Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analyses are carried out to investigate the nature of the bonding in these complexes. The NBO calculations show that both π ``back" donation (from the occupied aluminum p-orbital into the π antibonding CO orbital) and σ donation (from CO into the empty aluminum p-orbitals) play a significant role in the bonding, analogous to transition metal carbonyl complexes. The large redshift of the CO stretch vibrations is consistent with this bonding analysis.

  14. Thermal characterization of magnetically aligned carbonyl iron/agar composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Bleis, D; Vales-Pinzón, C; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2014-01-01

    Composites of magnetic particles into polymeric matrices have received increasing research interest due to their capacity to respond to external magnetic or electromagnetic fields. In this study, agar from Gelidium robustum has been chosen as natural biocompatible polymer to build the matrix of the magnetic carbonyl iron particles (CIP) for their uses in biomedical fields. Heat transfer behavior of the CIP-agar composites containing different concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% w/w) of magnetically aligned and non-aligned CIP in the agar matrix was studied using photothermal radiometry (PTR) in the back-propagation emission configuration. The morphology of the CIP-agar composites with aligned and non-aligned CIP under magnetic field was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed a dominant effect of CIP concentration over the alignment patterns induced by the magnetic field, which agrees with the behavior of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. Agar served as a perfect matrix to be used with CIP, and CIP-agar composites magnetically aligned at 20% CIP concentration can be considered as promising 'smart' material for hyperthermia treatments in the biomedical field.

  15. Photodecomposition of Molybdenum andTungsten Carbonyl Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamer A. Alwani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The photodecomposition of four different colored organometallic molybdenum and tungsten carbonyl complexes, i.e. [Mo(CO52LA] (complex I, [(Mo(CO3(bipy2LB] (complex II, [(W(CO3(tmen2LB] (complex III and [Mo(CO2LC]2 (complex I V where LA 2-phenyl-1,3-indandionebis(2-methyl anilines, LB 2-phenyl-1,3-indandione bis (4-hydroxy anilines and LCbis (2-hydroxo-benzalydine benzidine ion have been performed at 365 nm in chloroform at 25 °C under oxygen atmosphere. The absorbance spectrum of these complexes has been recorded with the time of irradiation in order to examine the kinetics of photodecomposition. The rate of the photodecomposition process was investigated and the relative values of the rate constants of dissociation (Kd for the first-order reaction are tabulated. The apparent rate constant of photodecomposition was found to be (8.33-11.50 × 10-5 s-1.

  16. Teratogenicity and embryotoxicity of nickel carbonyl in Syrian hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Shen, S.K.; Reid, M.C.; Allpass, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel carbonyl was administered to groups of pregnant hamsters by inhalation on days 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 of gestation. The dams were killed on day 15 of gestation, and the fetuses were examined for malformations. Exposure to Ni(CO)/sub 4/ on days 4 or 5 of gestation resulted in malformation in 5.5% and 5.8% of the progeny, respectively. Progeny included 9 fetuses with cystic lungs, 7 fetuses with exencephaly, 1 fetus with exencephaly plus fused rib and 1 fetus with anophthalmia plus cleft palate. Hemorrhages into serious cavities were found. In progeny of dams exposed to Ni(CO)/sub 4/ on days 6 or 7 of gestation, there was 1 fetus with fused ribs and there were 2 fetuses with hydronephrosis. In another experiment, pregnant hamsters were exposed to inhalation of Ni(CO)/sub 4/ on day 5 of gestation; these dams were permitted to deliver their litters and to nurse their pups. There was no significant difference in the average number of live pups in the Ni(CO)/sub 4/-exposed litters compared to control litters. Neonatal mortality was increased in Ni(CO)/sub 4/-exposed litters. This study demonstrates that Ni(CO)/sub 4/ is teratogenic and embryotoxic in Syrian hamsters.

  17. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schindler@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-15

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO{sub 2} and reduced to graphite to determine {sup 14}C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  18. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  19. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related models of oxidative stress and carbonyl stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himan Heidari

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus.

  20. A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material for electromagnetic wave absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Wu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Wang-Hua; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Fa; Yu, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2011-03-01

    A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material consisting of carbon fibers grown on micrometer-sized carbonyl iron sphere, was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of C2H2 and H2. The hollow-core carbon fibers (outer diameter: 140 nm and inner diameter: 40 nm) were composed of well-ordered graphene layers which were almost parallel to the long axis of the fibers. A composite (2 mm thick) consisting of the carbonyl iron/carbon fibers and epoxy resin demonstrated excellent electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Minimum reflection losses of -36 dB (99.95% of EM wave absorption) at 7.6 GHz and -32 dB (99.92% of EM wave absorption) at 34.1 GHz were achieved. The well-dispersed and network-like carbon fibers in the resin matrix affected the dielectric loss of the EM wave while the carbonyl iron affected the magnetic loss.

  1. Corrosion inhibition of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds on steel in acid medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jiancun; Weng Yongji; Salitanate; Feng Li; Yue Hong

    2009-01-01

    Corrosion inhibition of three α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds on N80 steel at high temperature and in concentrated acid medium was evaluated, and the inhibition mechanism was investigated.The results proved that both cinnamaidehyde and benzalacetone had an evident anticorrosion effect and could reduce the corrosion of steel effectively in acid medium, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with a benzene ring structure had good adsorption on steel surface.The experiments proved that polymerization of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds on the steel surface at a high temperature and in concentrated acid medium resulted in a good corrosion inhibiting effect, which was attributed to the structures of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds.

  2. Efficient and selective α-bromination of carbonyl compounds with N-bromosuccinimide under microwave

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Xiao-Yu

    2014-02-07

    A highly efficient method for the synthesis of α-halocarbonyl compounds has been achieved via selective monobromination of aromatic and aliphatic carbonyl compounds with N-bromosuccinimide catalyzed by p-toluenesulfonic acid under microwave irradiation within 30 min.

  3. Incorporating Cobalt Carbonyl Moieties onto Ethynylthiophene-Based Dithienylcyclopentene Switches. 1. Photochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, Emma C.; Areephong, Jetsuda; Cafolla, Attilio A.; Long, Conor; Browne, Wesley R.; Pryce, Mary T.; Feringa, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of dithienyl perhydro- and perfluorocyclopentene photochromic molecular switches appended with cobalt carbonyl binding 3-ethynylthiophene and phenyl-3-ethynylthiophene substituents are reported. Their photochromic properties, fatigue resistance, and the

  4. Sulfide, the first inorganic substrate for human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubern, Marc; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Nübel, Tobias; Blachier, François; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced inside the intestine and is known as a poison that inhibits cellular respiration at the level of cytochrome oxidase. However, sulfide is used as an energetic substrate by many photo- and chemoautotrophic bacteria and by animals such as the lugworm Arenicola marina. The concentrations of sulfide present in their habitats are comparable with those present in the human colon. Using permeabilized colonic cells to which sulfide was added by an infusion pump we show that the maximal respiratory rate of colonocyte mitochondria in presence of sulfide compares with that obtained with succinate or L-alpha-glycerophosphate. This oxidation is accompanied by mitochondrial energization. In contrast, other cell types not naturally exposed to high concentration of sulfide showed much lower oxidation rates. Mitochondria showed a very high affinity for sulfide that permits its use as an energetic substrate at low micromolar concentrations, hence, below the toxic level. However, if the supply of sulfide exceeds the oxidation rate, poisoning renders mitochondria inefficient and our data suggest that an anaerobic mechanism involving partial reversion of Krebs cycle already known in invertebrates takes place. In conclusion, this work provides additional and compelling evidence that sulfide is not only a toxic compound. According to our study, sulfide appears to be the first inorganic substrate for mammalian cells characterized thus far.

  5. Efficient alpha-Methylenation of Carbonyl Compounds in Ionic Liquids at Room Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Vale, JA; Zanchetta, DF; Moran, PJS; RODRIGUES, JAR

    2009-01-01

    The application of several 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) salt ionic liquids as solvent in the alpha-methylenation of carbonyl compounds at room temperature is reported. The ionic liquid [BMIM][NTf(2)] gave a clean reaction in a short time and good yields of several alpha-methylene carbonyl compounds. This ionic liquid was reused without affecting the reaction rates or yields over seven runs.

  6. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  7. Potential particulate pollution derived from UV-induced degradation of odorous dimethyl sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Qiao; Jianmin Chen; Xin Yang

    2011-01-01

    UV-induced degradation of odorous dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was carried out in a static White cell chamber with UV irradiation. The combination of in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer, gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS) technique, filter sampling and ion chromatographic (IC) analysis was used to monitor the gaseous and potential particulate products. During 240 min of UV irradiation, the degradation efficiency of DMS attained 20.9%, and partially oxidized sulfur-containing gaseous products, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbonyl sulfide (OCS), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO),dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) were identified by in situ FT-IR and GC-MS analysis, respectively.Accompanying with the oxidation of DMS, suspended particles were directly detected to be formed by WPS techniques. These particles were measured mainly in the size range of accumulation mode, and increased their count median diameter throughout the whole removal process. IC analysis of the filter samples revealed that methanesulfonic acid (MSA), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and other unidentified chemicals accounted for the major non-refractory compositions of these particles. Based on products analysis and possible intermediates formed, the degradation pathways of DMS were proposed as the combination of the O(1 D)- and the OH- initiated oxidation mechanisms. A plausible formation mechanism of the suspended particles was also analyzed. It is concluded that UV-induced degradation of odorous DMS is potentially a source of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere.

  8. Speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Robert G

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation constants for thioarsenite species have been determined in dilute solutions at 25°C, ΣH2S from 10-7.5 to 10-3.0 M, ΣAs from 10-5.6 to 10-4.8 M, and pH 7 and 10. The principal inorganic arsenic species in anoxic aquatic systems are arsenite, As(OH30, and a mononuclear thioarsenite with an S/As ratio of 3:1. Thioarsenic species with S/As ratios of 1 : 1,2 : 1, and 4 : 1 are lesser components in sulfidic solutions that might be encountered in natural aquatic environments. Thioarsenites dominate arsenic speciation at sulfide concentrations > 10-4.3 M at neutral pH. Conversion from neutral As(OH30 to anionic thioarsenite species may regulate the transport and fate of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments by governing sorption and mineral precipitation reactions.

  9. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  10. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  11. Measurement of airborne carbonyls using an automated sampling and analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Mauro; McLaren, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Based upon the well established method of derivitization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, an instrument was developed for ambient measurement of carbonyls with significantly improved temporal resolution and detection limits through automation, direct injection, and continuous use of a single microsilica DNPH cartridge. Kinetic experiments indicate that the derivitization reaction on the cartridge is fast enough for continuous measurements with 50 min air sampling. Reaction efficiencies measured on the cartridge were 100% for the carbonyls tested, including formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, acetone, and benzaldehyde. Transmission of the carbonyls through an ozone scrubber (KI) were in the range of 97-101%. Blank levels and detection limits were lower than those obtainable with conventional DNPH methods by an order of magnitude or greater. Mixing ratio detection limits of carbonyls in ambient air were 38-73 ppt for a 50 min air sample (2.5 L). The instrument made continuous measurements of carbonyls on a 2 h cycle over a period of 10 days during a field study in southwestern Ontario. Median mixing ratios were 0.58 ppb formaldehyde; 0.29 ppb acetaldehyde; 1.14 ppb acetone; and 0.45 ppb glyoxal. Glyoxal shows a significant correlation with ozone and zero intercept, consistent with a secondary source and minor direct source to the atmosphere. The method should easily be extendable to the detection of other low molecular weight carbonyls that have been previously reported using the DNPH technique.

  12. Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Lesions in Ulcerative Colitis and Associated Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has long been known as a pathogenic factor of ulcerative colitis (UC and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC, but the effects of secondary carbonyl lesions receive less emphasis. In inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide anion free radical (O2∙-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and hydroxyl radical (HO∙, are produced at high levels and accumulated to cause oxidative stress (OS. In oxidative status, accumulated ROS can cause protein dysfunction and DNA damage, leading to gene mutations and cell death. Accumulated ROS could also act as chemical messengers to activate signaling pathways, such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK, to affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. More importantly, electrophilic carbonyl compounds produced by lipid peroxidation may function as secondary pathogenic factors, causing further protein and membrane lesions. This may in turn exaggerate oxidative stress, forming a vicious cycle. Electrophilic carbonyls could also cause DNA mutations and breaks, driving malignant progression of UC. The secondary lesions caused by carbonyl compounds may be exceptionally important in the case of host carbonyl defensive system deficit, such as aldo-keto reductase 1B10 deficiency. This review article updates the current understanding of oxidative stress and carbonyl lesions in the development and progression of UC and CAC.

  13. Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S. A.; Tapavicza, E.; Furche, F.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2013-04-01

    Gas phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds, however the significance of direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived Henry's law parameters, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH) rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will not have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations of atmospherically relevant carbonyl compounds designed to estimate gas and aqueous phase extinction coefficients. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only three out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid, 3-oxobutanoic acid, and 3-oxopropanoic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking α, β conjugation, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected.

  14. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Jesper F; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Davies, Michael J; Jensen, Ole N; Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-03-06

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible protein oxidation correlated with oxidative stress, various diseases and ageing. Here we describe a peptide-centric approach for identification and characterisation of up to 14 different types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins. The modified residues are derivatised with biotin-hydrazide, enriched and characterised by tandem mass spectrometry. The strength of the method lies in an improved elution of biotinylated peptides from monomeric avidin resin using hot water (95°C) and increased sensitivity achieved by reduction of analyte losses during sample preparation and chromatography. For the first time MS/MS data analysis utilising diagnostic biotin fragment ions is used to pinpoint sites of biotin labelling and improve the confidence of carbonyl peptide assignments. We identified a total of 125 carbonylated residues in bovine serum albumin after extensive in vitro metal ion-catalysed oxidation. Furthermore, we assigned 133 carbonylated sites in 36 proteins in native human plasma protein samples. The optimised workflow enabled detection of 10 hitherto undetected types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins: aldehyde and ketone modifications of leucine, valine, alanine, isoleucine, glutamine, lysine and glutamic acid (+14Da), an oxidised form of methionine - aspartate semialdehyde (-32Da) - and decarboxylated glutamic acid and aspartic acid (-30Da).

  15. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  18. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  19. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.;

    2004-01-01

    experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...... differences in KLaH2S at pH values between 4.5 and 8.0 became larger as the turbulence level increased, whereas those at pH between 4.5 and 7.0 did not statistically show any change. At constant pH, KLaH2S/KLaO2 was observed not to be dependent on the turbulence range studied. KLaH2S/KLaO2 ratio was 0...

  20. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  1. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond in Biologically Active o-Carbonyl Hydroquinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Martínez-Cifuentes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IHBs play a central role in the molecular structure, chemical reactivity and interactions of biologically active molecules. Here, we study the IHBs of seven related o-carbonyl hydroquinones and one structurally-related aromatic lactone, some of which have shown anticancer and antioxidant activity. Experimental NMR data were correlated with theoretical calculations at the DFT and ab initio levels. Natural bond orbital (NBO and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP calculations were used to study the electronic characteristics of these IHB. As expected, our results show that NBO calculations are better than MEP to describe the strength of the IHBs. NBO energies (∆Eij(2 show that the main contributions to energy stabilization correspond to LPàσ* interactions for IHBs, O1…O2-H2 and the delocalization LPàπ* for O2-C2 = Cα(β. For the O1…O2-H2 interaction, the values of ∆Eij(2 can be attributed to the difference in the overlap ability between orbitals i and j (Fij, instead of the energy difference between them. The large energy for the LP O2àπ* C2 = Cα(β interaction in the compounds 9-Hydroxy-5-oxo-4,8, 8-trimethyl-l,9(8H-anthracenecarbolactone (VIII and 9,10-dihydroxy-4,4-dimethylanthracen-1(4H-one (VII (55.49 and 60.70 kcal/mol, respectively when compared with the remaining molecules (all less than 50 kcal/mol, suggests that the IHBs in VIII and VII are strongly resonance assisted.

  2. Metabolism of bupropion by carbonyl reductases in liver and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connarn, Jamie N; Zhang, Xinyuan; Babiskin, Andrew; Sun, Duxin

    2015-07-01

    Bupropion's metabolism and the formation of hydroxybupropion in the liver by cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) has been extensively studied; however, the metabolism and formation of erythro/threohydrobupropion in the liver and intestine by carbonyl reductases (CR) has not been well characterized. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the relative contribution of the two metabolism pathways of bupropion (by CYP2B6 and CR) in the subcellular fractions of liver and intestine and to identify the CRs responsible for erythro/threohydrobupropion formation in the liver and the intestine. The results showed that the liver microsome generated the highest amount of hydroxybupropion (Vmax = 131 pmol/min per milligram, Km = 87 μM). In addition, liver microsome and S9 fractions formed similar levels of threohydrobupropion by CR (Vmax = 98-99 pmol/min per milligram and Km = 186-265 μM). Interestingly, the liver has similar capability to form hydroxybupropion (by CYP2B6) and threohydrobupropion (by CR). In contrast, none of the intestinal fractions generate hydroxybupropion, suggesting that the intestine does not have CYP2B6 available for metabolism of bupropion. However, intestinal S9 fraction formed threohydrobupropion to the extent of 25% of the amount of threohydrobupropion formed by liver S9 fraction. Enzyme inhibition and Western blots identified that 11β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1 in the liver microsome fraction is mainly responsible for the formation of threohydrobupropion, and in the intestine AKR7 may be responsible for the same metabolite formation. These quantitative comparisons of bupropion metabolism by CR in the liver and intestine may provide new insight into its efficacy and side effects with respect to these metabolites.

  3. Sulfide scaling in low enthalpy geothermal environments; A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C. (Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France))

    1989-01-01

    A review of the sulfide scaling phenomena in low-temperature environments is presented. While high-temperature fluids tend to deposit metal sulfides because of their high concentrations of dissolved metals and variations of temperature, pressure and fluid chemistry, low temperature media are characterized by very low metal content but much higher dissolved sulfide. In the case of the goethermal wells of the Paris Basin, detailed studies demonstrate that the relatively large concentrations of chloride and dissolved sulfide are responsible for corrosion and consequent formation of iron sulfide scale composed of mackinawite, pyrite and pyrrhotite. The effects of the exploitation schemes are far less important than the corrosion of the casings. The low-enthalpy fluids that do not originate from sedimentary aquifers (such as in Iceland and Bulgaria), have a limited corrosion potential, and the thin sulfide film that appears may prevent the progress of corrosion.

  4. Oxidation and Precipitation of Sulfide in Sewer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. H.

    calibrated and validated against field data. In the extension to the WATS model, sulfur transformations were described by six processes: 1. Sulfide production taking place in the biofilm and sediments covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. Biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted...... on oxidation and precipitation of sulfide, which are considered important processes in the sulfur cycle in wastewater and biofilms of sewer networks. Based on experimental studies, it was the objective to establish kinetics and stoichiometry of oxidation and precipitation of sulfide and to integrate...... the processes in an already existing sewer process model, thereby improving its capabilities for prediction of sulfide buildup in wastewater and atmosphere of sewer networks. Accordingly, efforts were made to develop experimental procedures for estimation of model parameters. Sulfide oxidation in both...

  5. Organization of the human mitochondrial hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libiad, Marouane; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Vitvitsky, Victor; Martinov, Michael; Banerjee, Ruma

    2014-11-07

    Sulfide oxidation is expected to play an important role in cellular switching between low steady-state intracellular hydrogen sulfide levels and the higher concentrations where the physiological effects are elicited. Yet despite its significance, fundamental questions regarding how the sulfide oxidation pathway is wired remain unanswered, and competing proposals exist that diverge at the very first step catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR). We demonstrate that, in addition to sulfite, glutathione functions as a persulfide acceptor for human SQR and that rhodanese preferentially synthesizes rather than utilizes thiosulfate. The kinetic behavior of these enzymes provides compelling evidence for the flow of sulfide via SQR to glutathione persulfide, which is then partitioned to thiosulfate or sulfite. Kinetic simulations at physiologically relevant metabolite concentrations provide additional support for the organizational logic of the sulfide oxidation pathway in which glutathione persulfide is the first intermediate formed.

  6. Organometallic and Bioorganometallic Chemistry - Ferrocene and Metal Carbonyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čakić Semenčić, M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Organometallic chemistry deals with compounds containing metal-carbon bonds. Basic organometallics derived from the s- and p-block metals (containing solely σ-bonds were understood earlier, while organometallic chemistry of the d- and f-block has developed much more recently. These compounds are characterized by three types of M-C bonds (σ, π and δand their structures are impossible to deduce by chemical means alone; fundamental advances had to await the development of X-ray diffraction, as well as IR- and NMR-spectroscopy. On the other hand, elucidation of the structure of e. g. vitamin B12 and ferrocene (discovered in 1951 contributed to progress in these instrumental analytical methods, influencing further phenomenal success of transition-metal organometallic chemistry in the second half of the twentieth century. The most thoroughly explored fields of application of organometallics were in the area of catalysis, asymmetric synthesis, olefin metathesis, as well as organic synthesis and access to new materials and polymers.The most usual ligands bound to d- and f-metals are carbon monoxide, phosphines, alkyls, carbenes and arenes, and in this review the bonding patterns in the metal carbonyls and ferrocene are elaborated. The common characteristics of these two classes are two-component bonds. The CO-M bonds include (i donation from ligand HOMO to vacant M d-orbitals (σ-bond, and (ii back-donation from the filled M d-orbitals in the ligand LUMO (π-bond. Similar (but much more complicated ferrocene contains delocalized bonds consisting of electron donation from Cp to Fe (σ-bonds- and π-bonding and δ-back-bonding from metal to Cp. In such a way ferrocene, i. e. (η5-Cp2Fe contains 18 bonding electrons giving to this compound "superaromatic" properties in the sense of stability and electrophilic substitution. In contrast to benzenoid aromatic compounds reactions in two Cp-rings can occur giving homo- and heteroannularly mono-, two-… per

  7. Measurement of plasma hydrogen sulfide in vivo and in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xinggui; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Pardue, Sibile; Bir, Shyamal C.; Wang, Rui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide is known to regulate multiple cellular functions during normal and pathophysiological states. However, a paucity of concise information exists regarding quantitative amounts of hydrogen sulfide involved in physiological and pathological responses. This is primarily due to disagreement among various methods employed to measure free hydrogen sulfide. In this article, we describe a very sensitive method of measuring the presence of H2S in plasma down to nanom...

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THIN FILM CADMIUM SULFIDE SOLAR CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOLAR CELLS , *CADMIUM COMPOUNDS, FILMS, SULFIDES, VAPOR PLATING, VACUUM APPARATUS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, TITANIUM, COPPER COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, INDIUM, MOLYBDENUM, SILICON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ENERGY CONVERSION.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits the renal fibrosis of obstructive nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Wang, Fen; Li, Qian; Shi, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Hui-Fen; Peng, Hanjing; Shen, Hua-Ying; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has recently been found decreased in chronic kidney disease. Here we determined the effect and underlying mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide on a rat model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Compared with normal rats, obstructive injury decreased the plasma hydrogen sulfide level. Cystathionine-β-synthase, a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme, was dramatically reduced in the ureteral obstructed kidney, but another enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase was increased. A hydrogen sulfide donor (sodium hydrogen sulfide) inhibited renal fibrosis by attenuating the production of collagen, extracellular matrix, and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. Meanwhile, the infiltration of macrophages and the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the kidney were also decreased. In cultured kidney fibroblasts, a hydrogen sulfide donor inhibited the cell proliferation by reducing DNA synthesis and downregulating the expressions of proliferation-related proteins including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and c-Myc. Further, the hydrogen sulfide donor blocked the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts by inhibiting the transforming growth factor-β1-Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Thus, low doses of hydrogen sulfide or its releasing compounds may have therapeutic potentials in treating chronic kidney disease.

  10. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  11. Influence of iron on sulfide inhibition in dark biohydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Nakhla, George

    2012-12-01

    Sulfide impact on biohydrogen production using dark fermentation of glucose at 37 °C was investigated. Dissolved sulfide (S(2-)) at a low concentration (25mg/L) increased biohydrogen production by 54% relative to the control (without iron addition). Whereas on initial dissolved S(2-) concentration of 500 mg/L significantly inhibited the biohydrogen production with total cumulative biohydrogen decreasing by 90% compared to the control (without iron addition). At sulfide concentrations of 500 mg S(2-)/L, addition of Fe(2+) at 3-4 times the theoretical requirement to precipitate 100% of the dissolved S(2-) entirely eliminated the inhibitory effect of sulfide.

  12. Concentrations of formaldehyde and other carbonyls in environments affected by incense burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2002-10-01

    Burning incense to pay homage to deities is common in Chinese homes and temples. Air samples were collected and analyzed for carbonyls from a home and a temple in Hong Kong where incense burning occurs on a daily basis. Carbonyls in the air were trapped on a solid sorbent coated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine, followed by thermal desorption and subsequent GC/MS analysis. The carbonyls identified include formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 2-furfural, benzaldehyde, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal. The levels of the above carbonyls correlate with the intensity of the incense-burning activities. The total mixing ratios of the carbonyls in the temple exceed those in the ambient air outside the temple by 11-23 times. Formaldehyde is the most abundant species, contributing to approximately 55% of the total carbonyl mixing ratios in both the temple and the home environments during incense burning. The mixing ratio of formaldehyde ranges from 108 to 346 ppbv in the temple and averages 103 ppbv in the home during incense burning. These values exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guideline of 100 microg m(-3) (88 ppbv) for formaldehyde. The highest formaldehyde level in the temple exceeds the WHO guideline by 3 times at peak incense burning hours. The mixing ratio of acrolein in the temple ranges from 20 to 99 ppbv, approaching or exceeding the WHO air quality guideline of 50 microg m(-3) (22 ppbv) for acrolein. Our measurements indicate that incense burning significantly elevates the concentrations of a number of carbonyls, most notably formaldehyde and acrolein, in the surrounding environments. This study provides preliminary insights on indoor air quality problems created by incense burning.

  13. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in F344 rat hippocampus after 1-bromopropane exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhenlie [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan); Department of Toxicology, Guangdong Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Diseases, Guangzhou 510‐300 (China); Ichihara, Sahoko [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu 514‐8507 (Japan); Oikawa, Shinji [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514‐8507 (Japan); Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku, E-mail: gak@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and humans. Previous proteomic analysis of rat hippocampus implicated alteration of protein expression in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. To understand this role at the protein level, we exposed male F344 rats to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 week or 4 weeks by inhalation and quantitated changes in hippocampal protein carbonyl using a protein carbonyl assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Hippocampal reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl were significantly increased, demonstrating 1-BP-associated induction of oxidative stress and protein damage. MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identified 10 individual proteins with increased carbonyl modification (p < 0.05; fold-change ≥ 1.5). The identified proteins were involved in diverse biological processes including glycolysis, ATP production, tyrosine catabolism, GTP binding, guanine degradation, and neuronal metabolism of dopamine. Hippocampal triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activity was significantly reduced and negatively correlated with TPI carbonylation (p < 0.001; r = 0.83). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels were significantly elevated both in the hippocampus and plasma, and hippocampal AGEs correlated negatively with TPI activity (p < 0.001; r = 0.71). In conclusion, 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus seems to involve oxidative damage of cellular proteins, decreased TPI activity, and elevated AGEs. -- Highlights: ► 1-BP increases hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampal and plasma protein carbonyls. ► 1-BP increases TPI carbonylation and decreases TPI activity in the hippocampus. ► 1-BP increases hippocampal and plasma AGE levels.

  14. MEASURING METAL SULFIDE COMPLEXES IN OXIC RIVER WATERS WITH SQUARE WAVE VOLTAMMETRY. (R825395)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sulfide identification protocol was developed to quantify specific metal sulfides that could exist in river water. Using a series of acid additions, nitrogen purges, and voltammetric analyses, metal sulfides were identified and semiquantified in three specific gr...

  15. Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Microwave Heating for Hybrid Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Martínez-Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-n are excellent electron acceptor for hybrid solar cell applications. However, the particle size and properties of the CdS-n products depend largely on the synthesis methodologies. In this work, CdS-n were synthetized by microwave heating using thioacetamide (TA or thiourea (TU as sulfur sources. The obtained CdS-n(TA showed a random distribution of hexagonal particles and contained TA residues. The latter could originate the charge carrier recombination process and cause a low photovoltage (Voc, 0.3 V in the hybrid solar cells formed by the inorganic particles and poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT. Under similar synthesis conditions, in contrast, CdS-n synthesized with TU consisted of spherical particles with similar size and contained carbonyl groups at their surface. CdS-n(TU could be well dispersed in the nonpolar P3HT solution, leading to a Voc of about 0.6–0.8 V in the resulting CdS-n(TU : P3HT solar cells. The results of this work suggest that the reactant sources in microwave methods can affect the physicochemical properties of the obtained inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles, which finally influenced the photovoltaic performance of related hybrid solar cells.

  16. Toxicological analysis of 17 autopsy cases of hydrogen sulfide poisoning resulting from the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebashi, Kyoko; Iwadate, Kimiharu; Sakai, Kentaro; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Aoyagi, Miwako; Ochiai, Eriko; Nagai, Tomonori

    2011-04-15

    Although many cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning have been reported, in most of these cases, it resulted from the accidental inhalation of hydrogen sulfide gas. In recent years, we experienced 17 autopsy cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning due to the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, the concentrations of sulfide and thiosulfate in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and pleural effusion were examined using GC/MS. The sulfide concentrations were blood: 0.11-31.84, urine: 0.01-1.28, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.02-1.59 and pleural effusion: 2.00-8.59 (μg/ml), while the thiosulfate concentrations were blood: 0-0.648, urine: 0-2.669, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.004-0.314 and pleural effusion: 0.019-0.140 (μmol/ml). In previous reports, the blood concentration of thiosulfate was said to be higher than that of sulfide in hydrogen sulfide poisoning cases, although the latter was higher than the former in 8 of the 14 cases examined in this study. These results are believed to be strongly influenced by the atmospheric concentration of hydrogen sulfide the victims were exposed to and the time interval between exposure and death.

  17. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2015-11-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit with some uncertainty. It was concluded that the model could be applied for the purpose in mind.

  18. Fructose-Induced Carbonyl/Oxidative Stress in S. cerevisiae: Involvement of TOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valishkevych, Bohdana V; Vasylkovska, Ruslana A; Lozinska, Liudmyla M; Semchyshyn, Halyna M

    2016-01-01

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway first described in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly conserved in eukaryotes effector of cell growth, longevity, and stress response. TOR activation by nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, is well studied; however its interplay with carbohydrates and carbonyl stress is poorly investigated. Fructose is a more potent glycoxidation agent capable of producing greater amounts of reactive carbonyl (RCS) and oxygen species (ROS) than glucose. The increased RCS/ROS production, as a result of glycoxidation in vivo, is supposed to be involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress, metabolic disorders, and lifespan shortening of eukaryotes. In this work we aim to expand our understanding of how TOR is involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress caused by reducing monosaccharides. It was found that in fructose-grown compared with glucose-grown cells the level of carbonyl/oxidative stress markers was higher. The defects in the TOR pathway inhibited metabolic rate and suppressed generation of glycoxidation products in fructose-grown yeast.

  19. Mercury Sulfide Dimorphism in Thioarsenate Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    KASSEM, Mohammad; Sokolov, Anton; Cuisset, Arnaud,; Usuki, Takeshi; Khaoulani, Sohayb; Masselin, Pascal; Le Coq, David,; Feygenson, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Hannon, Alex,; Neuefeind, J. C.; Bychkov, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Crystalline mercury sulfide exists in two drastically different polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram: red chain-like insulator α-HgS, stable below 344 °C, and black tetrahedral narrow-band semiconductor β-HgS, stable at higher temperatures. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that these two mercury bonding pattern are present simultaneously in mercury thioarsenate glasses HgS-As2S3. The population and interconnectivity o...

  20. Diurnal changes in pore water sulfide concentrations in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum beds: the effects of seagrasses on sulfide dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee; Dunton

    2000-12-20

    The dynamics of the seagrass-sulfide interaction were examined in relation to diel changes in sediment pore water sulfide concentrations in Thalassia testudinum beds and adjacent bare areas in Corpus Christi Bay and lower Laguna Madre, Texas, USA, during July 1996. Pore water sulfide concentrations in seagrass beds were significantly higher than in adjacent bare areas and showed strong diurnal variations; levels significantly decreased during mid-day at shallow sediment depths (0-10 cm) containing high below-ground tissue biomass and surface area. In contrast, diurnal variations in sediment sulfide concentrations were absent in adjacent bare patches, and at deeper (>10 cm) sediment depths characterized by low below-ground plant biomass or when the grasses were experimentally shaded. These observations suggest that the mid-day depressions in sulfide levels are linked to the transport of photosynthetically produced oxygen to seagrass below-ground tissues that fuels sediment sulfide oxidation. Lower sulfide concentrations in bare areas are likely a result of low sulfate reduction rates due to low organic matter available for remineralization. Further, high reoxidation rates due to rapid exchange between anoxic pore water and oxic overlying water are probably stimulated in bare areas by higher current velocity on the sediment surface than in seagrass beds. The dynamics of pore water sulfides in seagrass beds suggest no toxic sulfide intrusion into below-ground tissues during photosynthetic periods and demonstrate that the sediment chemical environment is considerably modified by seagrasses. The reduced sediment sulfide levels in seagrass beds during photosynthetic periods will enhance seagrass production through reduced sulfide toxicity to seagrasses and sediment microorganisms related to the nutrient cycling.

  1. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  2. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2006-01-01

    summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However...

  3. Hydrogen sulfide: physiological properties and therapeutic potential in ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Eelke M; van Goor, Harry; Joles, Jaap A; Whiteman, Matthew; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has become a molecule of high interest in recent years, and it is now recognized as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the physiology of endogenous and exogenous H2 S, focusing upon the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide in models of hypoxia and ischaemia.

  4. A cleavable biotin tagging reagent that enables the enrichment and identification of carbonylation sites in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Chelsea M; Gronert, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The utility of a new, cleavable tag for identifying and enriching protein carbonyls is examined. Using a model system, human serum albumin modified with acrolein, the EZ-Link alkoxyamine-PEG4-SS-PEG4-biotin affinity tag, was tested for its ability to label protein carbonyls in proteomic analyses of protein carbonylation. The efficiency of the labeling was assayed and compared to standard biotin hydrazide reagents. The label was also tested in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) experiments. The quality of the fragmentation spectra was assessed and the relative detection efficiency of various modification sites was compared to standard biotin hydrazide reagents. Finally, the viability of using the label with streptavidin bead enrichment protocols in a standard proteomics workflow was probed.

  5. Synthesis of Carbazoles and Carbazole-Containing Heterocycles via Rhodium-Catalyzed Tandem Carbonylative Benzannulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wangze; Li, Xiaoxun; Yang, Ka; Zhao, Xian-liang; Glazier, Daniel A; Xi, Bao-min; Tang, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds are important constituents of pharmaceuticals and other materials. We have developed a series of Rh-catalyzed tandem carbonylative benzannulations for the synthesis of tri-, tetra-, and pentacyclic heterocycles from different types of aryl propargylic alcohols. These tandem reactions provide efficient access to highly substituted carbazoles, furocarbazoles, pyrrolocarbazoles, thiophenocarbazoles, and indolocarbazoles. While tricyclic heterocycles could be derived from vinyl aryl propargylic alcohols, tetra- and pentacyclic heterocycles were synthesized from diaryl propargylic alcohols. The tandem carbonylative benzannulation is initiated by a π-acidic rhodium(I) catalyst-mediated nucleophilic addition to alkyne to generate a key metal-carbene intermediate, which is then trapped by carbon monoxide to form a ketene species for 6π electrocyclization. Overall, three bonds and two rings are formed in all of these tandem carbonylative benzannulation reactions.

  6. Influence of the Dielectric Medium on the Carbonyl Infrared Absorption Peak of Acetylferrocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. López-Linares

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The solvent effect on the position of the carbonyl vibrational stretching ofacetylferrocene in aprotic media was studied in this work. The solvent-induced shifts in thisorganometallic compound were interpreted in terms of the alternative reaction field model(SCRF-MO proposed by Kolling. In contrast to the established trends for carbonyl groupsin organic systems, the results suggest that the continuum models for the reaction field arenot adequate and that the influence of dipolarity-polarizability described by aninhomogeneous coupling function θ (ε L(n 2 that assumes optical dielectric saturation isresponsible for the carbonyl band shift and, there is empirical evidence that the effect offield-induced intermolecular interaction on band shift, interpreted in terms of the van derWaals forces from the solvent, have a important contribution to this phenomena.

  7. Influence of carbonyl iron particle coating with silica on the properties of magnetorheological elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małecki, P.; Królewicz, M.; Hiptmair, F.; Krzak, J.; Kaleta, J.; Major, Z.; Pigłowski, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the influence of encapsulating carbonyl iron particles with various silica coatings on the properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) was investigated. A soft styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene thermoplastic elastomer was used as the composite’s polymer matrix. Spherical carbonyl iron powder (CIP) acted as the ferromagnetic filler. In order to improve the metal-polymer interaction, carbonyl iron particles were coated with two types of single and six types of double silica layers. The first layer was created through a TMOS or TEOS hydrolysis whereas the second one was composed of organosilanes. The mechanical properties of MREs containing 38.5 vol% of CIP were analysed under dynamic loading conditions. To investigate the magnetorheological effect in these composites, a 430 mT magnetic field, generated by an array of permanent magnets, was applied during testing. The results revealed that the magnetomechanical response of the MREs differs substantially, depending on the kind of particle coating.

  8. Influence of Water Salinity on Air Purification from Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybovych L.I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of «sliding» water drop motion in the air flow was performed in software package FlowVision. The result of mathematical modeling of water motion in a droplet with diameter 100 microns at the «sliding» velocity of 15 m/s is shown. It is established that hydrogen sulfide oxidation occurs at the surface of phases contact. The schematic diagram of the experimental setup for studying air purification from hydrogen sulfide is shown. The results of the experimental research of hydrogen sulfide oxidation by tap and distilled water are presented. The dependence determining the share of hydrogen sulfide oxidized at the surface of phases contact from the dimensionless initial concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air has been obtained.

  9. Mechanical properties of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, X. Y.; Gu, X. Y.; Wang, X. W.

    2017-01-01

    Gutta-percha is the isomer of caoutchouc and can be used to enhance the performance of asphalt. In this paper, the produce proceedings of gutta-percha sulfide and gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt are introduced. The performance indices of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt samples with different proportions are examined based on laboratory tests and the optimum ratio of gutta-percha and sulfur is decided.The micromechanism, temperature sensitivity, high and low temperature properties and viscoelasticity of the polymer modified asphalt are analyzed to discuss the modified mechanism and to decide the optimal polymer content. Low temperature bending tests are carried out to verify the low temperature performance of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt mixture. Research results showed that gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt has good low temperature performance and a promising application prospect in the cold regions.

  10. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  11. Hierarchical Architecturing for Layered Thermoelectric Sulfides and Chalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jood

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfides are promising candidates for environment-friendly and cost-effective thermoelectric materials. In this article, we review the recent progress in all-length-scale hierarchical architecturing for sulfides and chalcogenides, highlighting the key strategies used to enhance their thermoelectric performance. We primarily focus on TiS2-based layered sulfides, misfit layered sulfides, homologous chalcogenides, accordion-like layered Sn chalcogenides, and thermoelectric minerals. CS2 sulfurization is an appropriate method for preparing sulfide thermoelectric materials. At the atomic scale, the intercalation of guest atoms/layers into host crystal layers, crystal-structural evolution enabled by the homologous series, and low-energy atomic vibration effectively scatter phonons, resulting in a reduced lattice thermal conductivity. At the nanoscale, stacking faults further reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. At the microscale, the highly oriented microtexture allows high carrier mobility in the in-plane direction, leading to a high thermoelectric power factor.

  12. Effect of palladium on sulfide tarnishing of noble metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suoninen, E; Herø, H; Minni, E

    1985-10-01

    Electron spectroscopic studies of Au-Ag-Cu alloys of the type used for dental castings show that small additions (less than or equal to 3 wt%) of palladium reduce essentially the thickness of the sulfide layer formed on surfaces of samples treated in aqueous Na2S solutions. Relative to silver, palladium does not enrich in the sulfide, but statistically significant enrichment is found immediately below the sulfide layer. This enrichment probably takes place during the exposure of the substrate surface to atmosphere before the sulfiding treatment. The mechanism of the impeding effect of palladium on sulfiding is assumed to be a decrease in diffusion from the bulk alloy to the surface due to the enriched layer. The effect cannot be explained by changes in the electronic structure of the alloy due to palladium alloying.

  13. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate...... to the sediment-water interface and reduce the hydrogen sulfide flux to the water column. Modeling of pore water sulfide concentration profiles indicates that sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction in the uppermost 16 cm of sediment is sufficient to account for the total flux of hydrogen sulfide...... to the water column. However, the total pool of hydrogen sulfide in the water column is too large to be explained by steady state diffusion across the sediment-water interface. Episodic advection of hydrogen sulfide, possibly triggered by methane eruptions, may contribute to hydrogen sulfide in the water...

  14. Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfides as Biological Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Kimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST. The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT, which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP, is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR, sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN by sulfurating (sulfhydrating the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  15. Normal state of metallic hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    A generalized theory of the normal properties of metals in the case of electron-phonon (EP) systems with a nonconstant density of electron states has been used to study the normal state of the SH3 and SH2 phases of hydrogen sulfide at different pressures. The frequency dependence of the real Re Σ (ω) and imaginary ImΣ (ω) parts of the self-energy Σ (ω) part (SEP) of the Green's function of the electron Σ (ω), real part Re Z (ω), and imaginary part Im Z (ω) of the complex renormalization of the mass of the electron; the real part Re χ (ω) and the imaginary part Imχ (ω) of the complex renormalization of the chemical potential; and the density of electron states N (ɛ) renormalized by strong electron-phonon interaction have been calculated. Calculations have been carried out for the stable orthorhombic structure (space group Im3¯ m) of the hydrogen sulfide SH3 for three values of the pressure P = 170, 180, and 225 GPa; and for an SH2 structure with a symmetry of I4/ mmm ( D4 h1¯7) for three values of pressure P = 150, 180, and 225 GP at temperature T = 200 K.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as biological mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideo

    2014-10-09

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT), which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP), is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn) have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) by sulfurating (sulfhydrating) the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  17. First detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Vastel, C; Ceccarelli, C; Pearson, J

    2003-01-01

    This work was carried out with using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and presents the observational study of HDS and D2S towards a sample of Class 0 sources, and dense cores. We report the first detection of doubly deuterated hydrogen sulfide (D2S) in two dense cores and analyze the chemistry of these molecules aiming to help understand the deuteration processes in the interstellar medium. The observed values of the D2S/HDS ratio, and upper limits, require an atomic D/H ratio in the accreting gas of 0.1-1. The study presented in this Letter supports the hypothesis that formaldehyde, methanol and hydrogen sulfide are formed on the grain surfaces, during the cold pre-stellar core phase, where the CO depleted gas has large atomic D/H ratios. The high values for the D/H ratios are consistent with the predictions of a recent gas-phase chemical model that includes H3+ and its deuterated isotopomers, H2D+, D2H+ and D3+ (Roberts et al. 2003).

  18. Calculation of sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Romero-Serrano, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    The Reddy-Blander model for the sulfide capacities of slags has been modified for the case of acid slags and to include A12O3 and TiO2 as components. The model has been extended to calculate a priori sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags, from a knowledge of the thermodynamic activities of the component oxides, with no adjustable parameters. Agreement with measurements is obtained within experimental uncertainty for binary, ternary, and quinary slags involving the components SiO2-Al2O3-TiO2-CaO-MgO-FeO-MnO over wide ranges of composition. The oxide activities used in the computations are calculated from a database of model parameters obtained by optimizing thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data for oxide systems. Sulfur has now been included in this database. A computing system with automatic access to this and other databases has been developed to permit the calculation of the sulfur content of slags in multicomponent slag/metal/gas/solid equilibria.

  19. Ab initio determination of dark structures in radiationless transitions for aromatic carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei-Hai

    2008-03-01

    Mechanistic photodissociation of a polyatomic molecule has long been regarded as an intellectually challenging area of chemical physics, the results of which are relevant to atmospheric chemistry, biological systems, and many application fields. Carbonyl compounds play a unique role in the development of our understanding of the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and photophysics of polyatomic molecules and their photodissociation has been the subject of numerous studies over many decades. Upon irradiation, a molecule can undergo internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC) processes, besides photochemical and other photophysical processes. Transient intermediates formed in the IC and ISC radiationless processes, which are termed "dark", are not amenable to detection by conventional light absorption or emission. However, these dark intermediates play critical roles in IC and ISC processes and thus are essential to understanding mechanistic photochemistry of a polyatomic molecule. We have applied the multiconfiguration complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method to determine the dark transient structures involved in radiationless processes for acetophenone and the related aromatic carbonyl compounds. The electronic and geometric structures predicted for the dark states are in a good agreement with those determined by ultrafast electron diffraction experiments. Intersection structure of different electronic states provides a very efficient "funnel" for the IC or ISC process. However, experimental determination of the intersection structure involved in radiationless transitions of a polyatomic molecule is impossible at present. We have discovered a minimum energy crossing point among the three potential energy surfaces (S1, T1, and T2) that appears to be common to a wide variety of aromatic carbonyl compounds with a constant structure. This new type of crossing point holds the key to understanding much about radiationless processes after

  20. CALCULATION OF CONDITIONAL EQUILIBRIUM IN SERIAL MULTIPLE PRECIPITATION OF METAL SULFIDES WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE STREAM GENERATED FROM SODIUM SULFIDE: A DIDACTIC TOOL FOR CHEMISTRY TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bellová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is presented in textbooks as toxic, environmentally unacceptable species, however some positive effects in human metabolism were discovered in the last decades. It is important to offer students also some new information about this compound. As didactic tool in this case may serve serial precipitation of Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+ ions forming various colored sulfides in bubblers with chemically generated hydrogen sulfide stream. This experiment has strong and diverse color effect for enhancing the visual perception to motivate students to understand more abstract and complex information about hydrogen sulfide. It also may be helpful in analytical chemistry courses for conditional precipitation equilibrium teaching and calculations.

  1. Impaired cardiac SIRT1 activity by carbonyl stress contributes to aging-related ischemic intolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhu Gu

    Full Text Available Reactive aldehydes can initiate protein oxidative damage which may contribute to heart senescence. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 is considered to be a potential interventional target for I/R injury management in the elderly. We hypothesized that aldehyde mediated carbonyl stress increases susceptibility of aged hearts to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms with a focus on SIRT1. Male C57BL/6 young (4-6 mo and aged (22-24 mo mice were subjected to myocardial I/R. Cardiac aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2, SIRT1 activity and protein carbonyls were assessed. Our data revealed that aged heart exhibited increased endogenous aldehyde/carbonyl stress due to impaired ALDH2 activity concomitant with blunted SIRT1 activity (P<0.05. Exogenous toxic aldehydes (4-HNE exposure in isolated cardiomyocyte verified that aldehyde-induced carbonyl modification on SIRT1 impaired SIRT1 activity leading to worse hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R injury, which could all be rescued by Alda-1 (ALDH2 activator (all P<0.05. However, SIRT1 inhibitor blocked the protective effect of Alda-1 on H/R cardiomyocyte. Interestingly, myocardial I/R leads to higher carbonylation but lower activity of SIRT1 in aged hearts than that seen in young hearts (P<0.05. The application of Alda-1 significantly reduced the carbonylation on SIRT1 and markedly improved the tolerance to in vivo I/R injury in aged hearts, but failed to protect Sirt1(+/- knockout mice against myocardial I/R injury. This was verified by Alda-1 treatment improved postischemic contractile function recovery in ex vivo perfused aged but not in Sirt1(+/- hearts. Thus, aldehyde/carbonyl stress is accelerated in aging heart. These results provide a new insight that impaired cardiac SIRT1 activity by carbonyl stress plays a critical role in the increased susceptibility of aged heart to I/R injury. ALDH2 activation can restore this aging-related myocardial ischemic intolerance.

  2. Ab initio MO study of reaction mechanism for carbonyl migration of Co complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Ab initio method under the effective core potential (ECP) approximation is employed to study the reaction mechanism of carbonyl migration of the cycle of olefin hydroformylation catalyzed by a carbonyl cobalt HCo(CO)3 at Hartree-Fock (HF) level. The structures of the reactant, transition state and product for the reaction are determined. The energy of each stationary point is corrected at MP2/LAN2DZ//LANL2DZ+ZPE (zero-point energy) level. The calculated activation barrier is 28.89 kJ/mol.

  3. Formation and emissions of carbonyls during and following gas-phase ozonation of indoor materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poppendieck, D.G.; Hubbard, H.F.; Weschler, Charles J.;

    2007-01-01

    from 1 to 20 mg m(-2), with most of the carbonyls being of lower molecular weight (C-1-C-4). In contrast, total BOBP mass released from wood-based products ranged from 20 to 100 mg m(-2), with a greater fraction of the BOBPs being heavier carbonyls (C-5-C-9). The total BOBP mass released during...... relatively high BOBP releases. The greatest overall BOBP mass releases were observed for three materials that building occupants might have significant contact with: paper, office partition, and medium density fiberboard, e.g., often used in office furniture. These materials also exhibited extended BOBP...

  4. Particle growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic carbonyls on preexisting aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myoseon; Carroll, Brian; Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Aerosol growth by the heterogeneous reactions of different aliphatic and alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls in the presence/absence of acidified seed aerosols was studied in a 2 m long flow reactor (2.5 cm i.d.) and a 0.5-m3 Teflon film bag under darkness. For the flow reactor experiments, 2,4-hexadienal, 5-methyl-3-hexen-2-one, 2-cyclohexenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclopentenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclohexenone, and octanal were studied. The carbonyls were selected based on their reactivity for acid-catalyzed reactions, their proton affinity, and their similarity to the ring-opening products from the atmospheric oxidation of aromatics. To facilitate acid-catalyzed heterogeneous hemiacetal/acetal formation, glycerol was injected along with inorganic seed aerosols into the flow reactor system. Carbonyl heterogeneous reactions were accelerated in the presence of acid catalysts (H2SO4), leading to higher aerosol yields than in their absence. Aldehydes were more reactive than ketones for acid-catalyzed reactions. The conjugated functionality also resulted in higher organic aerosol yieldsthan saturated aliphatic carbonyls because conjugation with the olefinic bond increases the basicity of the carbonyl leading to increased stability of the protonated carbonyl. Aerosol population was measured from a series of sampling ports along the length of the flow reactor using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry of either an impacted liquid aerosol layer or direct reaction of carbonyls as a thin liquid layer on a zinc selenide FTIR disk was employed to demonstrate the direct transformation of chemical functional groups via the acid-catalyzed reactions. These results strongly indicate that atmospheric multifunctional organic carbonyls, which are created by atmospheric photooxidation reactions, can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation through acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions. Exploratory studies in 25- and 190-m3 outdoor chambers

  5. First application of supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis for continuous methanol carbonylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Jørgensen, Betina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A solid, silica-supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) rhodium iodide Monsanto-type catalyst system, [BMIM][Rh(CO)(2)I-2]-[BMIM]I -SiO2, exhibits excellent activity and selectivity towards acetyl products in fixed-bed, continuous gas-phase methanol carbonylation.......A solid, silica-supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) rhodium iodide Monsanto-type catalyst system, [BMIM][Rh(CO)(2)I-2]-[BMIM]I -SiO2, exhibits excellent activity and selectivity towards acetyl products in fixed-bed, continuous gas-phase methanol carbonylation....

  6. Photophysical properties of a synthetic, carbonyl-containing (N = 6+Cdbnd O) carotenoid analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.

    2014-05-01

    Retinyl-1 is a synthetic carotenoid analogue belonging to the retinal analogues family. It has six conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds with a carbonyl group conjugated to the π-electron system. Presence of the carbonyl group in vicinity of the conjugated carbon-carbon backbone leads to unique excited state properties that are extremely sensitive to solvent polarity and temperature. The simplicity of the synthesis of Retinyl-1 and ease of attachment to synthetic tetrapyrrole chromophores make Retinyl-1 attractive for use in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  7. Photophysical properties of a synthetic, carbonyl-containing (N=6+CO) carotenoid analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Retinyl-1 is a synthetic carotenoid analogue belonging to the retinal analogues family. It has six conjugated carbon–carbon double bonds with a carbonyl group conjugated to the π-electron system. Presence of the carbonyl group in vicinity of the conjugated carbon–carbon backbone leads to unique excited state properties that are extremely sensitive to solvent polarity and temperature. The simplicity of the synthesis of Retinyl-1 and ease of attachment to synthetic tetrapyrrole chromophores make Retinyl-1 attractive for use in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  8. POLYMER—SUPPORTED RHODIUM CATALYSTS FOR CARBONYLATION OF METHYL ACETATE TO ACETIC ANHYDRIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENDean; HUANGShizhuan; 等

    1993-01-01

    Two kinds of rhodium catalysts supported on cross-linked styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers containing bipyridine or o-phenylene diamine have been prepared and found to display high activity for methyl acetate carbonylation to form acetic anhydride,the activities are even higher than their homogeneous counterparts. XPS analysis was used to characterize the synthetic catalysts.The apparent activation parameters were determined to be Eα=73.3KJ/mol,ΔH≠=66.3KJ/mol,ΔS≠=-28.6eu.These parameters are very close to those in methanol carbonylation and imply to have analogous mechanism in both cases.

  9. Improvement on stability of square planar rhodium (Ⅰ) complexes for carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋华; 潘平来; 袁国卿; 陈新滋

    1999-01-01

    A series of square planar cis-dicarbonyl polymer coordinated rhodium complexes with uncoordinated donors near the central rhodium atoms for carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid are reported. Data of IR, XPS and thermal analysis show that these complexes are very stable. The intramolecular substitution reaction is proposed for their high stability. These complexes show excellent catalytic activity, selectivity and less erosion to the equipment for the methanol carbonylation to acetic acid. The distillation process may be used instead of flash vaporization in the manufacture of acetic acid, which reduces the investment on the equipment.

  10. Photopromoted carbonylation of olefins with carbon dioxide and labelling studies with 13CO2 and 13CH3OH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jingmei; GAO Dabin; HU Jiehan; ZHOU Guangyun; JIA Yingping; WANG Xiangsheng

    2003-01-01

    Photopromoted carbonylation of olefins with carbon dioxide can be completed in ambient conditions (room temperatures and atmospheric pressure) by Co(OAc)2 catalysis. It was found that in carbonyl carbons of methyl ester of aliphatic acid 50% is from CO2 and the other 50% from CH3OH by labelling experimental with 13CO2 and 13CH3OH.

  11. Enhanced antioxidation and electromagnetic properties of Co-coated flaky carbonyl iron particles prepared by electroless plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yingying, E-mail: zyzlchappy1989@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Zhou, Wancheng [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Li, Rong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); No. 603 Faculty, Xi’an Institute of High Technology, Xi’an 710025 (China); Mu, Yang; Qing, Yuchang [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Co-coated carbonyl iron particles were prepared by electroless plating method. • The obvious weight gain of carbonyl iron was deferred to 400 °C after Co-coated. • The permeability of the Co-coated particle composite kept almost invariable. • Co-coated carbonyl iron composite reserves a better absorption after heat treatment. - Abstract: Co was successfully coated on the surface of flaky carbonyl iron particles using an electroless plating method. The morphologies, composition, as well as magnetic, antioxidation and electromagnetic properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), thermogravimetric (TG) and microwave network analyzer. TG curve shows that the obvious weight gain of carbonyl iron was deferred from 300 to 400 °C after Co-coated. In contrast to raw carbonyl iron, the Co-coated carbonyl iron shows better stability on electromagnetic properties after 300 °C heat treatment for 10 h, demonstrating that the Co coating can act as the protection of carbonyl iron.

  12. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents.

  13. Green Synthesis and Regioselective Control of Sn/I2 Mediated Allylation of Carbonyl Compounds with Crotyl Halide in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Yan; ZHA,Zhang-Gen; ZHOU,Yu-Qing; WANG,Zhi-Yong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Barbier-type carbonyl allylation is particularly useful due to ease of operation and the availability and tractability of allylic substrates,[1] Metals such as indium, zinc and tin are often used as the mediator. Here we present a green approach toward the synthesis, that is, Sn/I2 mediated allylation of carbonyl compounds with crotyl halide in water.

  14. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is a target for TNBS-induced protein carbonylation in XS-106 dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Tae Hyung; Kim, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Hun; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Soo Chan; Lee, Sang-Kyou; Lee, Jaewon; Lee, Min-Geol

    2008-06-01

    ROS are produced in dendritic cells (DCs) during antigen presentation in contact hypersensitivity (CHS). As a result, ROS cause a number of nonenzymatic protein modifications, including carbonylation, which is the most widely used marker of oxidative stress. 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) is a well-characterized contact allergen that results in the formation of ROS. However, proteins that are carbonylated in DCs in response to TNBS have not been identified. To study ROS-dependent protein carbonylation in response to TNBS, we used the well-established mouse DC line, XS-106. We focused on the effects of TNBS on oxidation by examining selected oxidative markers. We identified TNBS-induced ROS and myeloperoxidase (MPO) proteins and demonstrated that the increase in ROS resulted in IL-12 production. The increase in oxidation was further confirmed by an oxidation-dependent increase in protein modifications, such as carbonylation. In fact, TNBS strongly induced carbonylation of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase in XS-106 DCs, as determined by MALDI-TOF analysis and 2-D Western blotting. ROS production and protein carbonylation were confirmed in human monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs). Furthermore, glutathione (GSH) decreased ROS and protein carbonylation in Mo-DCs. Carbonylation of ATP synthase in DCs may contribute to the pathophysiology of CHS.

  15. Regiospecific oxidation of an alkyl group of aromatic amine to carbonyl group by DDQ in aq.medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madhav S. Mane; Ravi S. Balaskar; Sandip N. Gavade; Pramod N. Pabrekar; Murlidhar S. Shingare; Dhananjay V. Mane

    2011-01-01

    The regiospecific oxidation of alkyl group of both sterically hindered and unhindered aromatic amine to corresponding carbonyl compound was done in aq. medium by using DDQ. The optimized reaction protocol was found to be most simple, high yielding and novel method for oxidation of alkyl group of aromatic amine in to its carbonyl compound.

  16. Synthesis of the [beta]-D-glucosyl ester of [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakas, A.; Magnus, V. (Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Horvat, S.; Sandberg, G. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-10-01

    An efficient, operationally simple synthetic approach to 1-O-([carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3'-ylacetyl)-[beta]-D-glucopyranose is described. The synthesis was carried out by fusing a fully benzylated 1-O-glucosylpseudourea intermediate with [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid, followed by hydrogenolytic removal of the protective groups. (Author).

  17. Synthesis of Diaryl Ethers, Diaryl Sulfides, Heteroaryl Ethers and Heteroaryl Sulfides under Microwave Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Feng; ZOU,Jiong; WANG,Quan-Rui; TAO,Feng-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Diaryl ether moiety is found in a pool of naturally occurring and medicinally important compounds.[1] As a consequent, considerable efforts have been devoted to the assembly of this framework.[2] Recently, we have developed a microwave heating version of the synthesis of diaryl ethers as well as aryl sulfides. Under our conditions, even the extremely electron-poor 4-nitrophenol works well and its reaction with 1-halo-4-nitrobenzenes produces 4-(nitrophenoxy)-benzonitriles in satisfactory yield. The scope of the present protocol has been expanded to hydroxylated six-membered heterocycles as well as 2-pyrimidinethiol with mildly activated aryl halides, affording heteroaryl ethers and respectively sulfides. The advantages of the present method include the wide substrate scope, no use of any metal catalysts, the ease of product isolation and high yields.

  18. Measurement of plasma hydrogen sulfide in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinggui; Pattillo, Christopher B; Pardue, Sibile; Bir, Shyamal C; Wang, Rui; Kevil, Christopher G

    2011-05-01

    The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide is known to regulate multiple cellular functions during normal and pathophysiological states. However, a paucity of concise information exists regarding quantitative amounts of hydrogen sulfide involved in physiological and pathological responses. This is primarily due to disagreement among various methods employed to measure free hydrogen sulfide. In this article, we describe a very sensitive method of measuring the presence of H₂S in plasma down to nanomolar levels, using monobromobimane (MBB). The current standard assay using methylene blue provides erroneous results that do not actually measure H₂S. The method presented herein involves derivatization of sulfide with excess MBB in 100 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.5, 0.1 mM DTPA) for 30 min in 1% oxygen at room temperature. The fluorescent product sulfide-dibimane (SDB) is analyzed by RP-HPLC using an eclipse XDB-C18 (4.6 × 250 mm) column with gradient elution by 0.1% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid in acetonitrile. The limit of detection for sulfide-dibimane is 2 nM and the SDB product is very stable over time, allowing batch storage and analysis. In summary, our MBB method is suitable for sensitive quantitative measurement of free hydrogen sulfide in multiple biological samples such as plasma, tissue and cell culture lysates, or media.

  19. Sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanchen Liu; Chen Wu; Xiaohong Zhou; David Z.Zhu; Hanchang Shi

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen sulfide in biofilms and sediments in sewer systems can cause severe pipe corrosions and health hazards,and requires expensive programs for its prevention.The aim of this study is to propose a new control strategy and the optimal condition for sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments.The study was carried out based on lab-scale experiments and batch tests using real sewer sediments.The intermittent nitrate dosing mode and the optimal control condition were investigated.The results indicated that the sulfide-intermittent-elimination strategy by nitrate dosing is advantageous for controlling sulfide accumulation in sewer sediment.The oxidation-reduction potential is a sensitive indicator parameter that can reflect the control effect and the minimum N/S (nitrate/sulfide)ratio with slight excess nitrate is necessary for optimal conditions ofefficient sulfide control with lower carbon source loss.The opth-nal control condition is feasible for the sulfide elimination in sewer systems.

  20. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa de San José 2055, San Luis Potosí 78216 (Mexico); Buitrón, Germán, E-mail: gbuitronm@ii.unam.mx [Laboratory for Research on Advanced Processes for Water Treatment, Unidad Académica Juriquilla, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd. Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Azo dyes were reduced efficiently by chemical and biogenic sulfide. ► Biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide. ► There was no competition between dyes and sulfate for reducing equivalents. ► Aromatic amines barely affected the sulfate-reducing process. -- Abstract: The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  1. Gallium sulfide and indium sulfide nanoparticles from complex precursors: Synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, D.P. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: duttadimple@yahoo.co.in; Sharma, G. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kulshreshtha, S.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2007-03-15

    Nanocrystalline gallium sulfide (Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}) and indium sulfide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) have been prepared by a two-step process. The first step involves metathesis reaction of trimethyl gallium/indium ether adduct (Me{sub 3}Ga/In.OEt{sub 2}) with 1,2-ethanedithiol (HSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}SH) resulting in the formation of a polymeric precursor. The precursor complex has been characterized using Ga/In analysis, IR, proton NMR and mass spectroscopy. The thermal behavior of both complexes has been studied using thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. In the second step, these precursor complexes have been pyrolysed in furnace under flowing nitrogen atmosphere whereupon they undergo thermodestruction to yield nanometer-sized particles of gallium/indium sulfide. The nanoparticles obtained were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The average size of the nanoparticles ranged from 10 to 12 nm for Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} and 20 to 22 nm for In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, respectively. This is the first report on use of a binary single source precursor to synthesize {beta}-Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles.

  2. Signaling of hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-02-10

    It has been almost two decades since the first demonstration of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a physiological mediator of cognitive function and vascular tone. H2S is physiologically important because it protects various organs from ischemia-reperfusion injury besides regulating inflammation, oxygen sensing, cell growth, and senescence. The production, metabolism, and regulation of H2S have been studied extensively. H2S modulates target proteins through sulfhydration (or sulfuration) or by the reduction of cysteine disulfide bonds. A large number of novel H2S-donating compounds are being developed owing to the therapeutic potential of H2S. Recently, polysulfides, rather than H2S, have been identified as molecules that sulfhydrate (or sulfurate) their target proteins.

  3. Structure of 4-methylpyridinium Hydrogen Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Martuch, Robert A.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    4-Methylpyridinium hydrogen sulfide, (C6H7NH)HS, M(sub r) = 127.21, consists of C6H7NH(+) cations and HS(-) anions. Z = 2 for the crystal with monoclinic space group Cm (#8), dimensions of a = 8.679(2) A, b = 7.964(1) A, and c = 4.860(2) A, an angle beta of 101.10(2) degrees, and a volume of V = 329.6(3) A(exp 3). R = 0.039 and R(sub w) = 0.048 for 385 reflections with F(sub o)(exp 2) greater than 3 sigma(F(sub o)(exp 2)) and 59 variables. Both the C6H7NH(+) cation and the HS(-) anion lie on crystallographic mirror planes with the N,S, two carbon atoms, and two hydrogen atoms positioned in the planes. The hydrogen atom of the HS(-) anion was not located.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide in a circumstellar envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukita, N.; Morris, M.

    1983-01-01

    A search for hydrogen sulfide in the cool circumstellar envelopes of 25 stars was made using the 1(10)-1(01) rotational line at 1.8 mm. It was detected in the bipolar nebula/OH maser OH231.8+4.2, an object having a high rate of mass loss. An approximate analysis indicates that 1/60 of the sulfur in this outflowing envelope is in the form of H2S, a fraction which may be similar to that in the atmosphere of the central star. In addition, the shape of the observed line profile is discussed in terms of a possible variation of the outflow velocity with latitude above the system's equatorial plane.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide in gastrointestinal and liver physiopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Mencarelli, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gas that can be formed by the action of two enzymes, cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS). H(2)S has been known for hundreds of years for its poisoning effect, however the idea that H(2)S is not only a poison, but can exert a physiological role in mammalian organisms, originates from the evidence that this gaseous mediator is produced endogenously. In addition to H(2)S synthesis by gastrointestinal tissue, the intestinal mucosa, particularly in the large intestine, is regularly exposed to high concentrations of H(2)S that are generated by some species of bacteria and through the reduction of unabsorbed intestinal inorganic sulphate. This review reports on the effects of H(2)S in the gastrointestinal tract and liver and provides information on the therapeutic applications of H(2)S-donating drugs.

  6. Efficient preparation of carbamates by Rh-catalysed oxidative carbonylation: unveiling the role of the oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturmendi, Amaia; Iglesias, Manuel; Munárriz, Julen; Polo, Victor; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2016-12-22

    The synthesis of a wide variety of carbamates from amines, alcohols and carbon monoxide has been achieved by means of a Rh-catalysed oxidative carbonylation reaction that uses Oxone as a stoichiometric oxidant. In-depth studies on the reaction mechanism shed light on the intimate role of Oxone in the catalytic cycle.

  7. Weak carbonyl-methyl intermolecular interactions in acetone clusters explored by IR plus VUV spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Jiwen [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Hu, Yongjun, E-mail: yjhu@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Xie, Min [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Bernstein, Elliot R. [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1872 (United States)

    2012-09-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbonyl overtone of acetone clusters is observed by IR-VUV spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetone molecules in the dimer are stacked with an antiparallel way. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of the acetone trimer and the tetramer are the cyclic structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbonyl groups would interact with the methyl groups in acetone clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These weak interactions are further confirmed by H/D substitution experiment. -- Abstract: Size-selected IR-VUV spectroscopy is employed to detect vibrational characteristics in the region 2850 {approx} 3550 cm{sup -1} of neutral acetone and its clusters (CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}){sub n} (n = 1-4). Features around 3440 cm{sup -1} in the spectra of acetone monomer and its clusters are assigned to the carbonyl stretch (CO) overtone. These features red-shift from 3455 to 3433 cm{sup -1} as the size of the clusters increases from the monomer to the tetramer. Based on calculations, the experimental IR spectra in the C=O overtone region suggest that the dominant structures for the acetone trimer and tetramer should be cyclic in the supersonic expansion sample. This study also suggests that the carbonyl groups interact with the methyl groups in the acetone clusters. These weak interactions are further confirmed by the use of deuterium substitution.

  8. Palladium-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Primary Amines in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金恒; 江焕峰; 陈鸣才

    2001-01-01

    The chemoselectity of the palladimm-catalyzed carbonylation of amines was affected by the addition of MeOH in supercritical carbon dioxide. The results show different selectivity in supercritical carbon dioxide CO2(sc) from that in alcohol.Methyl carbamate and its derivatives were obtained in high yields in CO2(sc).

  9. N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Palladium Complex Catalyzed Oxidative Carbonylation of Amines to Ureas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG,Shu-Zhan; PENG,Xin-Gao; LIU,Jian-Ming; SUN,Wei; XIA,Chun-Gu

    2007-01-01

    Palladium carbene shows high efficiency without any promoter on oxidative carbonylation of amines to ureas and a new type of palladium carbene complex containing both an aniline and an NHC ligands was found to be the active species for the reaction.

  10. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  11. The carbonylation of phenyl bromide and its derivatives under visible light irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Hui Zhong; Ying Na Cui; Shen Min Li; Ying Ping Jia; Jing Mei Yin

    2012-01-01

    The carbonylation of phenyl bromide catalyzed by Co(OAc)2 has been investigated with PhCOPh as a sensitizer under visible light in the presence of basic additive.With strong base CH3ONa,PhCOOCH3 is produced in 70% yield with 100% selectivity,the similar results are also obtained with a stronger base (CH3)3CONa.However,with another strong base NaOH,the yield of the ester is only 40%.On the other hand,with weak base NaOAc or (n-C4Hg)3N,phenyl bromide cannot be carbonylated.The results of carbonylation of the six substituted phenyl bromides suggest that the activities of o,m,p-BrC6H4CH3 are similar to phenyl bromide,while the activities of o,m,p-BrC6H4Cl are higher with the high yields (≥93%) of the corresponding chloro-esters.In addition,the relative position of bromine and chlorine or methyl on phenyl ring has little effect on the activity of the carbonylation.

  12. α-Carbonyl Radical Cyclization for the Total Synthesis of Natural Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHA Chin-Kang; CHIU Rei-Torng; LIH Shinn-Horng; SANTHOSH K. C.; CHANG Ching-Jung; TSENG Wei-Hong; HO Wen-Yueh

    2003-01-01

    @@ Intramolecular radical cyclization reactions are now used routinely to synthesize carbocyclic and heterocyclicstructures. We have reported that α-carbonyl radicals 1, generated from the corresponding iodo ketones or enones,underwent intramolecular radical cyclization smoothly to afford products 2. [1,2

  13. Oxalyl chloride as a practical carbon monoxide source for carbonylation reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen V F; Ulven, Trond

    2015-01-01

    A method for generation of high-quality carbon monoxide by decomposition of oxalyl chloride in an aqueous hydroxide solution is described. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated in the synthesis of heterocycles and for hydroxy-, alkoxy-, amino-, and reductive carbonylation reactions, in sev...

  14. Ketene as a Reaction Intermediate in the Carbonylation of Dimethyl Ether to Methyl Acetate over Mordenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Temel, Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented insight into the carbonylation of dimethyl ether over Mordenite is provided through the identification of ketene (CH2CO) as a reaction intermediate. The formation of ketene is predicted by detailed DFT calculations and verified experimentally by the observation of doubly deuterated ...

  15. Peculiar features of composition of carbonyl components of surface lipids in aquatic plants

    OpenAIRE

    І. О. Alexeevs’ka; V. M. Shepelenko; N. I. Shtemenko

    2006-01-01

    Carbonyl components content of aquatic plants’ surface lipids has been studied. High concentration of oxo-compounds in surface lipids of aquatic plants has been shown. It could reach 60 % of total value. Sufficient heterogeneity of surface lipids has been demonstrated. Unsaturated character of oxo-components in aquatic plants’ surface lipids has been assumed in the present work.

  16. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J.; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple...

  17. Preparation and characterization of carbonyl iron/glass composite absorber as matched load for isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongbao; Li, Yujiao; Qiu, Tai

    2012-09-01

    Composite absorbers made from 66 wt% carbonyl iron and 34 wt% low melting point glass powder were prepared by a pressureless sintering technique in a nitrogen atmosphere. Apparent porosity and bending strength of the as-prepared composites were investigated. The microstructure, heat resisting properties and electromagnetic properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry and vector network analyzer. The results show that the carbonyl iron/glass composite absorbers were difficult to densify. As the sintering temperature and soaking time increased, the apparent porosity first decreased and then increased, whereas the bending strength showed the opposite change. The composite absorber sintered at 520 °C for 40 min achieved the minimum apparent porosity of 13.08% and the highest bending strength of 52 MPa. Compared to the carbonyl iron/silicone rubber absorber, the carbonyl iron/glass composite absorber exhibited better heat resisting properties, and the initial oxidation temperature was increased about 200 °C. The composite absorber with a thickness of 1.25 mm showed a good microwave absorbing property in 8-12 GHz.

  18. Proteomic and carbonylation profile analysis of rat skeletal muscles following acute swimming exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Magherini

    Full Text Available Previous studies by us and other groups characterized protein expression variation following long-term moderate training, whereas the effects of single bursts of exercise are less known. Making use of a proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of acute swimming exercise (ASE on protein expression and carbonylation patterns in two hind limb muscles: the Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL and the Soleus, mostly composed of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibres, respectively. Carbonylation is one of the most common oxidative modifications of proteins and a marker of oxidative stress. In fact, several studies suggest that physical activity and the consequent increase in oxygen consumption can lead to increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS production, hence the interest in examining the impact of RONS on skeletal muscle proteins following ASE. Results indicate that protein expression is unaffected by ASE in both muscle types. Unexpectedly, the protein carbonylation level was reduced following ASE. In particular, the analysis found 31 and 5 spots, in Soleus and EDL muscles respectively, whose carbonylation is reduced after ASE. Lipid peroxidation levels in Soleus were markedly reduced as well. Most of the decarbonylated proteins are involved either in the regulation of muscle contractions or in the regulation of energy metabolism. A number of hypotheses may be advanced to account for such results, which will be addressed in future studies.

  19. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic plasma contains elevated levels of glucose and various low-molecular-weight carbonyl compounds derived from the metabolism of glucose and related materials. These compounds react with protein side chains (Arg, Lys, Cys, and His) to give glycated materials and advanced glycation end produ...

  20. Reductive Deoxygenation of Carbonyl to Methylene by LiAlH4/InBr3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Yan FU; Xue Mei ZHAO; Yao Feng YUAN; Ji Tao WANG

    2003-01-01

    The reductive deoxygenation of aldehydes and ketones into the corresponding alkanes isaccomplished by LiA1H4 in the presence of Lewis acid InBr3. It provides a convenient method tocomplete the transformation from carbonyl compounds to alkanes.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterizations, crystal structures and DFT studies of nalidixic acid carbonyl hydrazones derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamini, F. R. G.; Ribeiro, M. A.; Lancellotti, M.; Machado, D.; Miranda, P. C. M. L.; Cuin, A.; Formiga, A. L. B.; Corbi, P. P.

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the synthesis and characterization of the 1-ethyl-7-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbohydrazide (hzd) and six carbonyl hydrazones derivatives of the nalidixic with 1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethylidene (hpyrr), 1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylidene (h2imi), pyridin-2-ylmethylidene (h2py), pyridin-3-ylmethylidene (h3py), pyridin-4-ylmethylidene(h4py) and (2-hydroxyphenyl)methylidene (hsali). The carbonyl hydrazones were characterized by elemental and ESI-QTOF-MS analyses, IR and detailed NMR spectroscopic measurements. The 2D NMR experiments allowed the unambiguous assignment of the hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen atoms, which have not been reported for nalidixic acid carbonyl hydrazone derivatives so far. Crystal structures of hzd and the new carbonyl hydrazones h2imi, hpyrr and h3py were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Although the synthesis of hzd was reported decades ago, the hzd crystal structure have not been reported yet. Geometric optimizations of all the characterized structures were performed with the aid of DFT studies. Despite the fact that the hydrazones with 2-pyridine carboxylic acid (h2py) and salicyl aldehyde (hsali) were already reported by literature, a detailed spectroscopic study followed by DFT studies are also reported for such compounds in this manuscript. Antimicrobial studies of the compounds are also presented.

  2. Levels, sources and health risks of carbonyls and BTEX in the ambient air of Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujie Zhang; Yujing Mu; Junfeng Liu; Abdelwahid Mellouki

    2012-01-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of carbonyls and BTEX (benzene,toluene,ethylbenzene,m,p-xylene and o-xylene) were measured simultaneously at a same sampling site in Beijing from September 2008 to August 2010.The average concentrations of the total measured carbonyls during autumn,winter,spring,and summer were 37.7,31.3,39.7,50.5 μg/m3,respectively,and maximal values for their diurnal variations usually happened at noontime.In contrast to carbonyls,the average concentrations of the total measured BTEX during the four seasons were 27.2,31.9,23.2,19.1 μg/m3,respectively,and minimal values for their diurnal variations always occurred in the early afternoon.The average concentration for carbonyls increased about 24% from September 2008-August 2009 to September 2009-August 2010,for BTEX,increased about 15%.Integrated life time cancer risks for three carcinogens (benzene,formaldehyde and acetaldehyde) in Beijing exceeded the value of 1E-06,and the hazard quotient (HQ) of non-cancer risk of exposure to formaldehyde exceeded unity.

  3. The Solvent Mixture Sensitivity of Carbonyl Stretching Frequencies of 2-Pyrrolidinones and Related Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perjessy, A.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.; Blandamer, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    The carbonyl stretching frequencies of 1-substituted 2-pyrrolidinones and related compounds were measured in binary mixtures of hexane-CDCl3 and acetonitrile-D2O and plotted against the mole fraction of the less polar co-solvent The v(C=O) vs. mole fraction correlations enabled to recognize and assi

  4. Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog~droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S. A.; Tapavicza, E.; Furche, F.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Gas-phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds; however the significance of direct photolysis of these compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived effective Henry's law constants, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH) rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will (or will not) have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations designed to estimate gas- and aqueous-phase extinction coefficients of unstudied atmospherically relevant compounds found in d-limonene and isoprene secondary organic aerosol. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water-soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only two out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid and acetoacetic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking α,β-conjugation that were investigated, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected under typical atmospheric conditions.

  5. Study on the Carbonyl Iron Powder Based Nano-Composite Radar Wave Absorbing Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Dong-zhen; WANG Zhi-hui; LV Yan-hong; HU Chuan-xin; LI Wan-zhi; LIANG wen-ting; YAO Jun-min

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid development of stealth technique, carbonyl iron powder is regarded as an ideal radar absorbing material. In this paper, radar absorbing properties of carbonyl iron powder was investigated by using nano composite and macroscopic multi- layer composite approach. The machine- chemistry composite methods were employed during the experiment to produce nano composite absorbent. Two carbonyl iron powders named HP1, HP2 and nano powder named HP3 were employed. Absorbents were obtained by adding 10% HP3 powder with average size of 28 nm to the HP1 and HP2 carbonyl iron powders by weight respectively. By a series of composite techniques, sample plate with the radar absorbing coating was prepared. Compared with the single coating, the wave absorbing properties were significantly improved. The working band in which the wave reflectivity was less than 5 db was 4.8 ~ 18 GHz with the coating thickness of 1.0 mm. The lowest reflectivity was found to be 12.34 db at 8 GHz. The wave absorbing coating with thin thickness,broadband and strong absorbing properties was obtained.

  6. Chemo- and Stereoselective Reduction of Polyfunctional Carbonyl Compounds by Mucor rouxii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza P. Mangone

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Several polyfunctional carbonyl compounds, such as α- and β-ketoesters, were chemo- and stereoselectively reduced by Mucor rouxii cultures in water and in organic solvents. Results show that reductions can be carried out in a variety of organic solvents.

  7. NMR Studies of Structure-Reactivity Relationships in Carbonyl Reduction: A Collaborative Advanced Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincean, Simona; Smith, Sheila R.; Fritz, Michael; Lee, Byung Joo; Rizk, Zeinab

    2012-01-01

    An upper-division laboratory project has been developed as a collaborative investigation of a reaction routinely taught in organic chemistry courses: the reduction of carbonyl compounds by borohydride reagents. Determination of several trends regarding structure-activity relationship was possible because each student contributed his or her results…

  8. Hydration and hydrogen bonding of carbonyls in dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Victor V; Nuti, Francesca; Takaoka, Yuji; Chelli, Riccardo; Papini, Anna Maria; Righini, Roberto

    2006-07-26

    We combine two-color ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the hydration of carbonyl moieties in a dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer. Excitation with femtosecond infrared pulses of the OD stretching mode of heavy water produces a time dependent change of the absorption band of the phospholipid carbonyl groups. This intermolecular vibrational coupling affects the entire C=O band, thus suggesting that the optical inhomogeneity of the infrared response of carbonyl in phospholipid membranes cannot be attributed to the variance in hydration. Both the experimental and the theoretical results demonstrate that sn-1 carbonyl has a higher propensity to form hydrogen bonds with water in comparison to sn-2. The time-resolved experiment allows following the evolution of the system from a nonequilibrium localization of energy in the OD stretching mode to a thermally equilibrated condition and provides the characteristic time constants of the process. The approach opens a new opportunity for investigation of intermolecular structural relations in complex systems, like membranes, polymers, proteins, and glasses.

  9. Ketene as a Reaction Intermediate in the Carbonylation of Dimethyl Ether to Methyl Acetate over Mordenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Temel, Burcin;

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented insight into the carbonylation of dimethyl ether over Mordenite is provided through the identification of ketene (CH2CO) as a reaction intermediate. The formation of ketene is predicted by detailed DFT calculations and verified experimentally by the observation of doubly deuterated...

  10. [pi] Backbonding in Carbonyl Complexes and Carbon-Oxygen Stretching Frequencies: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is described that has illustrated the effect of various factors on [pi] backbonding to carbonyl ligands, where the students can view the molecular orbitals corresponding to the M-CO [pi] interaction as well as the competing interaction between the metal and co-ligands. The visual and hands-on nature of the modeling exercise has helped…

  11. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions.

  12. Modular Approach for Novel Nanostructered Polycondensates Enabled by the Unique Selectivity of Carbonyl Biscaprolactam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loontjens, Ton

    2003-01-01

    New enabling chemistries have been developed to produce novel well-defined polymeric materials through the additions of small amounts of reactive functional compounds to standard polymers during regular processing steps. We found that carbonyl biscaprolactam and its derivatives couple polymer chains

  13. Nanomaterials for the Selective Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Eduard; Brunet, Jérôme; Pauly, Alain; Ndiaye, Amadou; Varenne, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a focused review on the nanomaterials and associated transduction schemes that have been developed for the selective detection of hydrogen sulfide. It presents a quite comprehensive overview of the latest developments, briefly discusses the hydrogen sulfide detection mechanisms, identifying the reasons for the selectivity (or lack of) observed experimentally. It critically reviews performance, shortcomings, and identifies missing or overlooked important aspects. It identifies the most mature/promising materials and approaches for achieving inexpensive hydrogen sulfide sensors that could be employed in widespread, miniaturized, and inexpensive detectors and, suggests what research should be undertaken for ensuring that requirements are met. PMID:28218674

  14. Effect of radiation on wettability and floatability of sulfide minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility for modifying the wettability and floatability of sulfide minerals by electron beam irradiation has been studied experimentally. The wettability of crystalline pyrite and floatability of some sulfide as pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite and marmatite after irradiation were examined by flotation in a modified Hallimond tube. Experimental results show that the hydrophobicity of crystalline pyrite enhances with the increase of irradiation dose in a low dose range. And the flotation responses of sulfide minerals on irradiation dosevary with the mineral species and particle size. The floatability of minerals can be regulated by altering irradiation dose. An explanationfor the mechanism has been suggested based on the principle of radiation chemistry.

  15. Sulfide capacities of MnO-SiO2 slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramana G.; Blander, Milton

    1989-04-01

    Sulfide capacities of binary MnO-SiO2 slags at 1773 and 1923 K were calculated thermodynamically. Only known data, such as the standard free energy of formation of MnO and MnS and activities of MnO in the melt, are used in making calculations based on fundamental concepts. Excellent agreement is found between our calculations and published experimental data. Correlations of sulfide capacities, based on optical basicity using Pauling electronegativities or empirically deduced optical basicities, differ from the experimental data in both magnitude and concentration dependence. Our method provides useful predictions of sulfide capacities a priori.

  16. THE UPTAKE AND CONVERSION OF CARBONYL SULFIDE IN SOIL%羰基硫(COS)在土壤中的吸收与转化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊锋; 耿春梅; 牟玉静; 贺泓

    2004-01-01

    利用静态法研究了羰基硫(COS)在草坪土壤中的吸收与转化过程.土壤对COS的吸收速率与土壤的含水量和温度呈非线性关系,土壤吸收COS的最适宜温度为25℃,含水量为13%.在此条件下,大气COS的估算交换通量为1.84pmol·g-1(DW)·h-1或5.98pmol·m-2·s-1.采用GC-FID,FPD和IC对土壤吸收COS可能的转化产物进行了测定,结果表明,CO2和SO2-4为主要反应产物,其中约50%的COS最终转化为水溶性硫酸盐,约50%的COS可能转化为其它非挥发性含硫化合物(可能主要为FeS).

  17. Ab initio study on the mechanism of rhodium-complexcatalyzed carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI; Ming

    2001-01-01

    [1]Thomas, R., Cundari, T. R., Computational studies of transition metal-main group multiple bonding, Chem. Rev., 2000,100: 807.[2]Maricel Torrent, Miquel Sola, Gernot Frenking, Theoretical studies of some transition-metal-mediated reactions of industrial and synthetic importance, Chem. Rev., 2000, 100: 439.[3]Paulik, F. E., Roth, J. F., Catalysts for the low-pressure carbonylation of menthanol to acetic acid, Chem. Commun., 1968,24: 1578.[4]Jiang Hua, Diao Kaisheng, Pan Pinglai et al., A new class of rhodium complexes containing free donor atoms and their intramolecular substitution reaction, Chin. J. Chem., 2000, 18: 752.[5]Jiang Dazhi, Li Xiaobao, Wang Enlai, Synthesis Chemistry ofCarbonylation, Beijing: Chemical Technology Press, 1996.[6]Adamson, G. W., Daly, J. J., Forster, D., Reduction of iolocarbonyl rhodium ions with methyl iodide, structure of the rho-dium acetyl complex: [Me3PhN+], [Rh2I6-(Me(O)2(CO)2)]2-, J. Organomet. Chem., 1974, 71: C 17.[7]Forster, D., On the mechanism of a rhodium-complex-catalyzed carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, J. Am. Chem.Soc., 1976, 98: 846.[8]Hjortkjaer, J., Jensen, O. R., Rhodium complexes catalyzed methanol carbonylation, Ind. Eng. Chem. Prod. Dev., 1976, 15:46.[9]Jeffrey, P., Wadt, W. R., Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations, Potentials for the transition metalatoms Sc to Hg, J. Chem. Phys., 1995, 82: 270.[10]Frisch, M. J., Trunks, G. W., Schlegel, H. B. et al., Gaussian 94, Pittsburgh PA: Gaussian, Inc., 1995.[11]Lei Ming, Feng Wenlin, Xu Zhenfeng et al., A theoretical study on the key reactions of hydroformylation cycle by modi-fied carbonyl cobalt, Chemical Journal of Chinese University, 2001, 22: 455.[12]Lei Ming, Feng Wenlin, Xu Zhenfeng, Ab initio MO study on the reaction mechanism for carbonyl insertion catalyzed by the carbonyl cobalt complex, Chemical Research in Chinese University, 2000, 19:31.

  18. Micellar-mediated extractive spectrophotometric determination of hydrogen sulfide/sulfide through Prussian Blue reaction: application to environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangappa, Malingappa; Samrat, Devaramani

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive surfactant-mediated extractive spectrophotometric method has been developed, based on the reaction of ferric iron with sulfide to form ferrous iron and its subsequent reaction with ferricyanide to form Prussian Blue, to quantify trace levels of hydrogen sulfide/sulfide in environmental samples. The method obeys Beer's law in the concentration range 2-10 microg of sulfide in 25 mL of aqueous phase with molar absorptivity (epsilon) of 3.92 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). The colored species has been extracted into isoamyl acetate in the presence of a cationic surfactant i.e. cetylpyridinium chloride, to enhance the sensitivity of the method with epsilon value 5.2 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1). The relative standard deviation has been found to be 0.69% for 10 determinations at 4 microg of sulfide and the limit of detection was 0.009 microg mL(-1). The interference from common anions and cations has been studied. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of residual hydrogen sulfide in the laboratory fume hood as well as ambient atmospheric hydrogen sulfide in the vicinity of open sewer lines after fixing the analyte in ionic form using suitable trapping medium.

  19. Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangmanee, Thanapong

    The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. The high sulfide level in the biogas stream is not only poisonous to many novel metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes but also reduces the quality of methane to produce renewable energy. This study used an innovative, low-maintenance, low-cost biological sulfide removal technology to remove sulfides simultaneously from both gas and liquid phase. ORP (Oxidation-Reduction-Potential) was used as the controlling parameter to precisely regulate air injection to the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU). The microaeration technique provided just enough oxygen to partially oxidize sulfides to elemental sulfur without inhibiting methanogenesis. The SOU was equipped with a diffuser at the bottom for the dispersion of sulfide-laden biogas and injected air throughout the column. The SOU can be operated as a standalone unit or coupled with an anaerobic digester to simultaneously remove sulfide from the biogas and effluent. The integrated system was capable of reducing hydrogen sulfide in biogas from 2,450 to less than 2 ppmV with minimal sulfate production at the highest available sulfide loading rate of 0.24 kg/m3-day. More than 98% of sulfide removed was recovered as elemental sulfur. However, the standalone SOU was able to operate at high hydrogen sulfide loading of 1.46 kg/m 3-day at inlet sulfide concentration of 3000 ppmV and reduce the off-gas hydrogen sulfide concentrations to less than 10 ppmV. The experiment also revealed that the ORP controlled aeration was sensitive enough to prevent oxygen overdosing (dampening effect) during unexpected surges of aeration. Using generalized linear regression, a model predicting output H2S concentration based on input H2S concentrations, SOU medium heights, and biogas flow rates, was derived. With 95% confidence, output H2S concentration

  20. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in F344 rat hippocampus after 1-bromopropane exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik; Ichihara, Gaku

    2012-08-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and humans. Previous proteomic analysis of rat hippocampus implicated alteration of protein expression in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. To understand this role at the protein level, we exposed male F344 rats to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8h/day for 1 week or 4 weeks by inhalation and quantitated changes in hippocampal protein carbonyl using a protein carbonyl assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Hippocampal reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl were significantly increased, demonstrating 1-BP-associated induction of oxidative stress and protein damage. MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identified 10 individual proteins with increased carbonyl modification (p < 0.05; fold-change ≥ 1.5). The identified proteins were involved in diverse biological processes including glycolysis, ATP production, tyrosine catabolism, GTP binding, guanine degradation, and neuronal metabolism of dopamine. Hippocampal triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activity was significantly reduced and negatively correlated with TPI carbonylation (p < 0.001; r = 0.83). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels were significantly elevated both in the hippocampus and plasma, and hippocampal AGEs correlated negatively with TPI activity (p < 0.001; r = 0.71). In conclusion, 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus seems to involve oxidative damage of cellular proteins, decreased TPI activity, and elevated AGEs.

  1. Spatial distributions of airborne di-carbonyls in urban and rural areas in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, K. H.; Dai, Wen-Ting; Chan, C. S.; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Cao, Jun-Ji; Lee, S. C.; Ho, K. F.

    2017-04-01

    Gaseous glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations were characterized in nine cities of China during 2010-2011. The average summer (winter) glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations were 36.4-178.4 (12.3-241.4) and 67.8-359.4 (28.4-530.0) ng/m3, respectively. In summer, the highest average glyoxal concentration was in Guangzhou (GZ), while the lowest was in Shanghai (SH). In winter, Xiamen (XM) showed the highest average methylglyoxal concentration and Yantai (YT) reported the lowest. Both di-carbonyls showed distinct seasonal variations. The maximum average methylglyoxal concentration was approximately twice as much as glyoxal, which is consistent with the results of other studies. Glyoxal-to-methylglyoxal ratios showed that there was a consistent direct source of emissions in remote areas such as Qinghai Lake and Lhasa in both seasons (r ≥ 0.9). Pearson's correlation analysis suggested possible similar sources formation (R ≥ 0.7) for the two di-carbonyls in winter. Multiple linear regression analyses demonstrated that every 1 °C temperature increase could lead to a > 2% increase in the concentration of the di-carbonyls in both seasons. There was a greater percentage gain for glyoxal in winter than in summer for the same temperature increase. The northeast monsoon occurs in winter, and for every 1 ms- 1 increase in wind speed, > 20% of the di-carbonyls can be transferred out of China. This study is useful to understand about the secondary organic aerosol formation in the areas, the statistical analysis can provide information about the relationships between these carbonyls in atmosphere.

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Micro-Sensor for Biomass Fouling Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)is the leading chemical agent causing human fatalities following inhalation exposures. The overall aim of this project is to develop and...

  3. Nanostructured Metal Oxides and Sulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-02-03

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with high energy density and long cycle life are considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy-storage systems beyond routine lithium-ion batteries. Various approaches have been proposed to break down technical barriers in Li-S battery systems. The use of nanostructured metal oxides and sulfides for high sulfur utilization and long life span of Li-S batteries is reviewed here. The relationships between the intrinsic properties of metal oxide/sulfide hosts and electrochemical performances of Li-S batteries are discussed. Nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides hosts used in solid sulfur cathodes, separators/interlayers, lithium-metal-anode protection, and lithium polysulfides batteries are discussed respectively. Prospects for the future developments of Li-S batteries with nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides are also discussed.

  4. Selective adsorption of bacteria on sulfide minerals surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Chun-yun; WEI De-zhou; LIU Wen-gang; HAN Cong; GAO Shu-ling; WANG Yu-juan

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of bacteria on sulfide minerals surface was studied, and the selective adsorption mechanism of cells on the sulfide minerals was investigated by means of FTIR, UVS and XPS. The results show that the three strains of bacteria adsorbed more preferentially on pyrite than on other two sulfide minerals surface at neutral and alkaline pH conditions. FTIR and UVS of three strains of bacteria indicate that there are more functional groups on their surface, such as O-H, C=O, N-H, C-O, and the content of saccharide is more than that of protein. The state of every element on sulfide minerals surface was analyzed by XPS. The empty orbital number of electronic shell of metal ions on minerals surface is important in selective adsorption process, and some stable constants of metal coordinates can be used to explain the contribution of some groups in saccharide of cell wall to the selective adsorption.

  5. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  6. Optimization of biological sulfide removal in a CSTR bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Aliakbar; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush; Niazi, Ali; Sotoodeh, Hamidreza

    2012-08-01

    In this study, biological sulfide removal from natural gas in a continuous bioreactor is investigated for estimation of the optimal operational parameters. According to the carried out reactions, sulfide can be converted to elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, and polysulfide, of which elemental sulfur is the desired product. A mathematical model is developed and was used for investigation of the effect of various parameters on elemental sulfur selectivity. The results of the simulation show that elemental sulfur selectivity is a function of dissolved oxygen, sulfide load, pH, and concentration of bacteria. Optimal parameter values are calculated for maximum elemental sulfur selectivity by using genetic algorithm as an adaptive heuristic search. In the optimal conditions, 87.76% of sulfide loaded to the bioreactor is converted to elemental sulfur.

  7. An eco-friendly oxidation of sulfide compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAVINDRA B WAGH; SITARAM H GUND; JAYASHREE M NAGARKAR

    2016-08-01

    An improved green route has been developed for the oxidation of sulfide compounds. Albendazole is converted to ricobendazole or albendazole sulfone using H₂O₂ as an oxidant and H₂O as the solvent. High yields of the corresponding products were obtained by carrying out the reaction at room temperature. This synthetic method is environmentally clean and safe, operationally simple for the oxidation of other benzimidazole anthelmintics and various sulfide compounds.

  8. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Z. O. Lipatova; E. V. Kolobkova; V. A. Aseev

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been fou...

  9. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  10. Sulfide oxidation in fluidized bed bioreactor using nylon support material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varsha Midha; M K Jha; Apurba Dey

    2012-01-01

    A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor(FBBR)with nylon support particles was used to treat synthetic sulfide wastewater at different hydraulic retention time of 25,50 and 75 min and upflow velocity of 14,17 and 20 m/hr.The effects of upflow velocity,hydraulic retention time and reactor operation time on sulfide oxidation rate were studied using statistical model.Mixed culture obtained from the activated sludge,taken from tannery effluent treatment plant,was used as a source for microorganisms.The diameter and density of the nylon particles were 2-3 mm and 1140 kg/m3,respectively.Experiments were carried out in the reactor at a temperature of(30± 2)℃,at a fixed bed height of 16 cm after the formation of biofilm on the surface of support particles.Biofilm thickness reached(42±3)μm after 15 days from reactor start-up.The sulfide oxidation,sulfate and sulfur formation is examined at all hydraulic retention times and upflow velocities.The results indicated that almost 90%-92% sulfide oxidation was achieved at all hydraulic retention times.Statistical model could explain 94% of the variability and analysis of variance showed that upflow velocity and hydraulic retention time slightly affected the sulfide oxidation rate.The highest sulfide oxidation of 92% with 70% sulfur was obtained at hydraulic retention time of 75 min and upflow velocity of 14 m/hr.

  11. Sulfide oxidation in fluidized bed bioreactor using nylon support material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Varsha; Jha, M K; Dey, Apurba

    2012-01-01

    A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR) with nylon support particles was used to treat synthetic sulfide wastewater at different hydraulic retention time of 25, 50 and 75 min and upflow velocity of 14, 17 and 20 m/hr. The effects of upflow velocity, hydraulic retention time and reactor operation time on sulfide oxidation rate were studied using statistical model. Mixed culture obtained from the activated sludge, taken from tannery effluent treatment plant, was used as a source for microorganisms. The diameter and density of the nylon particles were 2-3 mm and 1140 kg/m3, respectively. Experiments were carried out in the reactor at a temperature of (30 +/- 2) degrees C, at a fixed bed height of 16 cm after the formation of biofilm on the surface of support particles. Biofilm thickness reached (42 +/- 3) microm after 15 days from reactor start-up. The sulfide oxidation, sulfate and sulfur formation is examined at all hydraulic retention times and upflow velocities. The results indicated that almost 90%-92% sulfide oxidation was achieved at all hydraulic retention times. Statistical model could explain 94% of the variability and analysis of variance showed that upflow velocity and hydraulic retention time slightly affected the sulfide oxidation rate. The highest sulfide oxidation of 92% with 70% sulfur was obtained at hydraulic retention time of 75 min and upflow velocity of 14 m/hr.

  12. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO;

    1991-01-01

    The depth distributions of O2 and H2S and of the activity of chemical or bacterial sulfide oxidation were studied in the chemocline of the central Black Sea. Relative to measurements from earlier studies, the sulfide zone had moved upwards by 20-50 m and was now (May 1988) situated at a depth of 81......-99 m. Oxygen in the water column immediately overlying the sulfide zone was depleted to undetectable levels resulting in a 20-30-m deep intermediate layer of O2- and H2S-free water. Radiotracer studies with S-35-labelled H2S showed that high rates of sulfide oxidation, up to a few micromoles per liter...... to a maximum of 200 nmol l-1 at the top of the sulfide zone. Sulfide oxidation was stimulated by particles suspended at the chemocline, probably by bacteria. Green phototrophic sulfur bacteria were abundant in the chemocline, suggesting that photosynthetic H2S oxidation took place. Flux calculations showed...

  13. Sulfide capacity of high alumina blast furnace slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Amitabh; Görnerup, Märten; Seetharaman, S.; Lahiri, A. K.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfide capacities of high alumina blast furnace slags were experimentally determined using the gas-slag equilibration technique. Two different slag systems were considered for the current study, namely, CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3 quaternary and CaO-SiO2-MgO-Al2O3-TiO2 quinary system. The liquid slag was equilibrated with the Ar-CO-CO2-SO2 gas mixture. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 1773 to 1873 K. The effects of temperature, basicity, and the MgO and TiO2 contents of slags on sulfide capacity were studied. As expected, sulfide capacity was found to increase with the increase in temperature and basicity. At the higher experimental temperature, titania decreases the sulfide capacity of slag. However, at the lower temperature, there was no significant effect of titania on the sulfide capacity of slag. Sulfide capacity increases with the increase in MgO content of slag if the MgO content is more than 5 pct.

  14. Oxidation does not (always) kill reactivity of transition metals: solution-phase conversion of nanoscale transition metal oxides to phosphides and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Brock, Stephanie L

    2010-11-17

    Unexpected reactivity on the part of oxide nanoparticles that enables their transformation into phosphides or sulfides by solution-phase reaction with trioctylphosphine (TOP) or sulfur, respectively, at temperatures of ≤370 °C is reported. Impressively, single-phase phosphide products are produced, in some cases with controlled anisotropy and narrow polydispersity. The generality of the approach is demonstrated for Ni, Fe, and Co, and while manganese oxides are not sufficiently reactive toward TOP to form phosphides, they do yield MnS upon reaction with sulfur. The reactivity can be attributed to the small size of the precursor particles, since attempts to convert bulk oxides or even particles with sizes approaching 50 nm were unsuccessful. Overall, the use of oxide nanoparticles, which are easily accessed via reaction of inexpensive salts with air, in lieu of organometallic reagents (e.g., metal carbonyls), which may or may not be transformed into metal nanoparticles, greatly simplifies the production of nanoscale phosphides and sulfides. The precursor nanoparticles can easily be produced in large quantities and stored in the solid state without concern that "oxidation" will limit their reactivity.

  15. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters.

  16. Dihydrogen Activation by Titanium Sulfide Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Zachary K.; Polse, Jennifer L.; Bergman*, Robert G.; Andersen*, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The titanocene sulfido complex Cp*2Ti(S)py (1, Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; py = pyridine) is synthesized by addition of a suspension of S8 to a toluene solution of Cp*2Ti-(CH2CH2) (2) and py. The rate of rotation of the pyridine ligand in solution was determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and the structure of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography. Complex 1 reacts reversibly with dihydrogen to give Cp*2Ti(H)SH (6) and py. Reaction of 1 with HD gives an equilibrium mixture of Cp*2Ti(D)SH and Cp*2Ti(H)SD; H2 and D2 are not formed in this reaction. 1D 1H NMR magnetization transfer spectra and 2D EXSY 1H NMR spectra of 6 in the presence of H2 show that in solution the H2, hydride, and hydrosulfido hydrogen atoms exchange. A four-center mechanism for this exchange is proposed. The EXSY studies show that the Ti–H and S–H hydrogens exchange with each other more rapidly than either of those hydrogens exchanges with external H2. A transient dihydrogen complex intermediate is proposed to explain this observation. The infrared spectrum of 6 shows an absorption assigned to the Ti–H stretching mode at 1591 cm−1 that shifts upon deuteration to 1154 cm−1. Reaction of 1 with trimethylsilane, diethylsilane, or dimethylsilane gives Cp*2-Ti(H)SSiMe3 (7), Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHEt2 (8), or Cp*2Ti(H)SSiHMe2 (9), respectively. The isotope effect for the reaction producing 7 has been measured, and a mechanism is proposed. Treatment of 1 with an additional equivalent of S8 results in the formation of the disulfide Cp*2Ti(S2) (4). Acetylene inserts into the Ti–S bond of 4 to produce the vinyl disulfide complex 5. The structures of 4 and 5 have been determined by X-ray diffraction. Compound 4 reacts with 2 in the presence of py to produce 1. Phosphines react with 4 in the presence of H2 to provide 6 and the corresponding phosphine sulfide. Reaction of hydrogen with 4 gives Cp*2-Ti(SH)2 (3). The reactions of 1 and 4 with dihydrogen provide a model for possible mechanisms of H2

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide--Mechanisms of Toxicity and Development of an Antidote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingjing; Chan, Adriano; Ali, Sameh; Saha, Arindam; Haushalter, Kristofer J; Lam, Wai-Ling Macrina; Glasheen, Megan; Parker, James; Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B; Patel, Hemal H; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; Lipton, Stuart A; Pilz, Renate B; Boss, Gerry R

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly toxic gas-second only to carbon monoxide as a cause of inhalational deaths. Its mechanism of toxicity is only partially known, and no specific therapy exists for sulfide poisoning. We show in several cell types, including human inducible pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons, that sulfide inhibited complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and induced apoptosis. Sulfide increased hydroxyl radical production in isolated mouse heart mitochondria and F2-isoprostanes in brains and hearts of mice. The vitamin B12 analog cobinamide reversed the cellular toxicity of sulfide, and rescued Drosophila melanogaster and mice from lethal exposures of hydrogen sulfide gas. Cobinamide worked through two distinct mechanisms: direct reversal of complex IV inhibition and neutralization of sulfide-generated reactive oxygen species. We conclude that sulfide produces a high degree of oxidative stress in cells and tissues, and that cobinamide has promise as a first specific treatment for sulfide poisoning.

  18. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits.

  19. Mitochondria and sulfide: a very old story of poisoning, feeding, and signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillaud, Frédéric; Blachier, François

    2011-07-15

    Sulfide is a molecule with toxicity comparable to that of cyanide. It inhibits mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase at submicromolar concentrations. However, at even lower concentrations, sulfide is a substrate for the mitochondrial electron transport chain in mammals, and is comparable to succinate. This oxidation involves a sulfide quinone reductase. Sulfide is thus oxidized before reaching a toxic concentration, which explains why free sulfide concentrations are very low in mammals, even though sulfide is constantly released as a result of cellular metabolism. It has been suggested that sulfide has signaling properties in mammals like two other gases, NO and CO, which are also cytochrome oxidase inhibitors. The oxidation of sulfide by mitochondria creates further complexity in the description/use of sulfide signaling in mammals. In fact, in the many studies reported in the literature, the sulfide concentrations that have been used were well within the range that affects mitochondrial activity. This review focuses on the relevance of sulfide bioenergetics to sulfide biology and discusses the case of colonocytes, which are routinely exposed to higher sulfide concentrations. Finally, we offer perspectives for future studies on the relationship between the two opposing aspects of this Janus-type molecule, sulfide.

  20. Anisotropic Optical Properties of Layered Germanium Sulfide

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Dezhi; Wang, Feijiu; Mohamed, Nur Baizura; Mouri, Shinichiro; Sandhaya, Koirala; Zhang, Wenjing; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohfuchi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have attracted much interest from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and device applications. The establishment of new functionalities in anisotropic layered 2D materials is a challenging but rewarding frontier, owing to their remarkable optical properties and prospects for new devices. Here, we report the anisotropic optical properties of layered 2D monochalcogenide of germanium sulfide (GeS). Three Raman scattering peaks corresponding to the B3g, A1g, and A2g modes with strong polarization dependence are demonstrated in the GeS flakes, which validates polarized Raman spectroscopy as an effective method for identifying the crystal orientation of anisotropic layered GeS. Photoluminescence (PL) is observed with a peak at around 1.66 eV that originates from the direct optical transition in GeS at room temperature. Moreover, determination of the polarization dependent characteristics of the PL and absorption reveals...

  1. Subnanometer Thin β-Indium Sulfide Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shinjita; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan

    2012-12-20

    Nanosheets are a peculiar kind of nanomaterials that are grown two-dimensionally over a micrometer in length and a few nanometers in thickness. Wide varieties of inorganic semiconductor nanosheets are already reported, but controlling the crystal growth and tuning their thickness within few atomic layers have not been yet explored. We investigate here the parameters that determine the thickness and the formation mechanism of subnanometer thin (two atomic layers) cubic indium sulfide (In2S3) nanosheets. Using appropriate reaction condition, the growth kinetics is monitored by controlling the decomposition rate of the single source precursor of In2S3 as a function of nucleation temperature. The variation in the thickness of the nanosheets along the polar [111] direction has been correlated with the rate of evolved H2S gas, which in turn depends on the rate of the precursor decomposition. In addition, it has been observed that the thickness of the In2S3 nanosheets is related to the nucleation temperature.

  2. Detection of thiol modifications by hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E; Pead, S; Whiteman, M; Wood, M E; Wilson, I D; Ladomery, M R; Teklic, T; Lisjak, M; Hancock, J T

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in both animals and plants. Many physiological events, including responses to stress, have been suggested to involve H2S, at least in part. On the other hand, numerous responses have been reported following treatment with H2S, including changes in the levels of antioxidants and the activities of transcription factors. Therefore, it is important to understand and unravel the events that are taking place downstream of H2S in signaling pathways. H2S is known to interact with other reactive signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). One of the mechanisms by which ROS and NO have effects in a cell is the modification of thiol groups on proteins, by oxidation or S-nitrosylation, respectively. Recently, it has been reported that H2S can also modify thiols. Here we report a method for the determination of thiol modifications on proteins following the treatment with biological samples with H2S donors. Here, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is used as a model system but this method can be used for samples from other animals or plants.

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Zhong Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1 is also one of the focuses of this review.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide and Cellular Redox Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yang; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular redox imbalance is mainly caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or weakness of the natural antioxidant defense system. It is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide array of human diseases. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now recognized as the third “gasotransmitters” and proved to exert a wide range of physiological and cytoprotective functions in the biological systems. Among these functions, the role of H2S in oxidative stress has been one of the main focuses over years. However, the underlying mechanisms for the antioxidant effect of H2S are still poorly comprehended. This review presents an overview of the current understanding of H2S specially focusing on the new understanding and mechanisms of the antioxidant effects of H2S based on recent reports. Both inhibition of ROS generation and stimulation of antioxidants are discussed. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of key proteins (e.g., p66Shc and Keap1) is also one of the focuses of this review. PMID:26881033

  5. Mercury Sulfide Dimorphism in Thioarsenate Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, M; Sokolov, A; Cuisset, A; Usuki, T; Khaoulani, S; Masselin, P; Le Coq, D; Neuefeind, J C; Feygenson, M; Hannon, A C; Benmore, C J; Bychkov, E

    2016-06-16

    Crystalline mercury sulfide exists in two drastically different polymorphic forms in different domains of the P,T-diagram: red chain-like insulator α-HgS, stable below 344 °C, and black tetrahedral narrow-band semiconductor β-HgS, stable at higher temperatures. Using pulsed neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction, we show that these two mercury bonding patterns are present simultaneously in mercury thioarsenate glasses HgS-As2S3. The population and interconnectivity of chain-like and tetrahedral dimorphous forms determine both the structural features and fundamental glass properties (thermal, electronic, etc.). DFT simulations of mercury species and RMC modeling of high-resolution diffraction data provide additional details on local Hg environment and connectivity implying the (HgS2/2)m oligomeric chains (1 ≤ m ≤ 6) are acting as a network former while the HgS4/4-related mixed agglomerated units behave as a modifier.

  6. The effects of varying humidity on copper sulfide film formation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Missert, Nancy A.; Barbour, John Charles; Sullivan, John Patrick; Copeland, Robert Guild; Campin, Michael J. (International Sematech, Austin, TX)

    2004-02-01

    Detailed experiments involving extensive high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed significant microstructural differences between Cu sulfides formed at low and high relative humidity (RH). It was known from prior experiments that the sulfide grows linearly with time at low RH up to a sulfide thickness approaching or exceeding one micron, while the sulfide initially grows linearly with time at high RH then becomes sub-linear at a sulfide thickness less than about 0.2 microns, with the sulfidation rate eventually approaching zero. TEM measurements of the Cu2S morphology revealed that the Cu2S formed at low RH has large sized grains (75 to greater than 150 nm) that are columnar in structure with sharp, abrupt grain boundaries. In contrast, the Cu2S formed at high RH has small equiaxed grains of 20 to 50 nm in size. Importantly, the small grains formed at high RH have highly disordered grain boundaries with a high concentration of nano-voids. Two-dimensional diffusion modeling was performed to determine whether the existence of localized source terms at the Cu/Cu2S interface could be responsible for the suppression of Cu sulfidation at long times at high RH. The models indicated that the existence of static localized source terms would not predict the complete suppression of growth that was observed. Instead, the models suggest that the diffusion of Cu through Cu2S becomes restricted during Cu2S formation at high RH. The leading speculation is that the extensive voiding that exists at grain boundaries in this material greatly reduces the flux of Cu between grains, leading to a reduction in the rate of sulfide film formation. These experiments provide an approach for adding microstructural information to Cu sulfidation rate computer models. In addition to the microstructural studies, new micro-patterned test structures were developed in this LDRD to offer insight into the point defect structure of Cu2S and to permit measurement of surface reaction

  7. Design and fabrication of microfluidic mixer from carbonyl iron–PDMS composite membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jiaxing

    2010-10-12

    This paper introduces a carbonyl iron-PDMS (CI-PDMS) composite magnetic elastomer in which carbonyl iron (CI) particles are uniformly distributed in a PDMS matrix. The CI particles and the PDMS were mixed at different weight ratios and tested to determine the influence of CI concentration. The magnetic and mechanical properties of the magnetic elastomers were characterized, respectively, by vibrating-sample magnetometer and by tensile testing using a mechanical analyzer. The elastomer was found to exhibit high magnetization and good mechanical flexibility. The morphology and deformation of the CI-PDMS membrane also were observed. A magnetically actuated microfluidic mixer (that is, a micromixer) integrated with CI-PDMS elastomer membranes was successfully designed and fabricated. The high efficiency and quality of the mixing makes possible the impressive potential applications of this unique CI-PDMS material in microfluidic systems. © Springer-Verlag 2010.

  8. The N-heterocyclic carbene chemistry of transition-metal carbonyl clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo

    2011-11-01

    In the last decade, chemists have dedicated many efforts to investigate the coordination chemistry of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs). Although most of that research activity has been devoted to mononuclear complexes, transition-metal carbonyl clusters have not escaped from these investigations. This critical review, which is focussed on the reactivity of NHCs (or their precursors) with transition-metal carbonyl clusters (mostly are of ruthenium and osmium) and on the transformations underwent by the NHC-containing species initially formed in those reactions, shows that the polynuclear character of these metallic compounds or, more precisely, the close proximity of one or more metal atoms to that which is or can be attached to the NHC ligand, is responsible for reactivity patterns that have no parallel in the NHC chemistry of mononuclear complexes (74 references).

  9. The kinetics and mechanism of dissociation of metal carbonyls in high infrared laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsam, Y.; Ronn, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    The method of laser induced dielectric breakdown has been used to study the dissociation of three metal carbonyls. Following non-resonant excitation by a TEA CO 2 laser, amorphous micro-metallic particles are deposited. The identity of the various species within a laser induced plasma for a series of related reactant molecules, has been determined using infrared and visible real time fluorescence techniques. Based upon the energetics of dissociation and the relative magnitudes of the rates of activation and deactivation for various collision partners of the plasma fluorescence, an energy transfer map as well as probable mechanisms are proposed. The kinetics of a variety of chemical reactions under plasma conditions are discussed in terms of elementary collision theory. It is shown that the internal vibration manifold of the metal carbonyls is equilibrated prior to the dissociation in agreement with the majority of laser induced multiphoton dissociation experiments.

  10. A catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid in gaseous phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘平来; 柳忠阳; 朱长城; 袁国卿

    1996-01-01

    A novel Rh/Ys catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid in gaseous phase is reported. The porous carbon beads (Ys) prepared from the carbonation of poly(vinylidene chloride) were used as the support. This catalyst has a specific surface area of 1 000 m2/g, high mechanical strength and thermal stability. The average diameter of the pore is in the range of 0.8 - 1.2nm. Experimental evidence showed that this catalyst was of high activity and selectivity, which could compare to those of the homogeneous catalyst from Monsanto. The catalytic rate could get to 900 g AcOH/g Rh·h during the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid. The fine spreading of Ph over the Ys surface is the key factor for the activity.

  11. Impact of lipid content and composition on lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in experimental fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Verónica; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2014-03-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of lipid content (∼4%, ∼10% and ∼15%) and composition (different lipid sources; animal fat and sunflower oil) on the oxidative stability of proteins and lipids in experimental fermented sausages. Increasing the lipid content of sausages enhanced the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation whereas the effect on the formation of specific carbonyls from protein oxidation was not so evident. Sausages manufactured with different lipid sources affected the susceptibility of lipids and proteins to oxidation as a likely result of the modifications in the fatty acid profile, as well as to the presence of antioxidant compounds. While the fatty acid profile had a major effect on the occurrence and extent of lipid oxidation, the presence of compounds with potential antioxidant activity may be more influential on the extent of protein carbonylation.

  12. Rheological properties of magnetorheological fluid prepared by gelatin-carbonyl iron composite particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Hua-jin; HUANG Hong-jun; ZHANG Ling-zhen; QI Jian-ying; CAO Shao-kun

    2005-01-01

    Gelatin-carbonyl iron composite particle was prepared by micro emulsion method. The analysis of scanning electron microscope(SEM) shows that the ultrafine particles are spheroids coated by gelatin, and the average sizes of particles are 3-10 μm. The specific saturation magnetization σs is 130.9 A·m2/kg, coercivity Hc is 0.823 A/m, and residual magnetism r is 4.98 Am2/kg for the composite particles. It is shown that the particles possess properties of soft magnetic. The yield stress of magnetorheological fluid(MRF) with composite particle reaches 70 kPa at 0.5 T magnetic induction. Magnetorheological effects are superior in lower magnetic field intensity and the subsidence stability of the MRF is excellent compared with pure carbonyl iron powder.

  13. Microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatization for gaseous carbonyl analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaobing; Lewis, Alastair C; Ródenas-García, Milagros

    2013-06-28

    We present a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatization technique for the analysis of gaseous carbonyl compounds using O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) as the derivatizing reagent. The novel microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatization technique has been developed to measure nmol per mole (ppbv) mixing ratios of gaseous carbonyl compounds, which are of particular importance to atmospheric chemistry. The technique utilised a planar glass microreactor comprising three inlets and one outlet, gas and fluid splitting and combining channels, mixing junctions, and a 2.0m long, 620μm internal diameter reaction microchannel. The microreactor integrated three functions, providing: (1) a gas and liquid mixer and reactor, (2) reagent heating, and (3) sample pre-concentration. The concentration of derivatization solution, the volumetric flow rates of the incoming gas sample and PFBHA solution, and the temperature of the microreactor were optimised to achieve a near real-time measurement. The enhanced phase contact area-to-volume ratio and the high heat transfer rate in the microreactor resulted in a fast and high efficiency derivatization reaction, generating an effluent stream which was ready for direct introduction to GC-MS. Good linearity was observed for eight carbonyl compounds over the measurement ranges of 1-500ppbv when they were derivatized under optimal reaction conditions. The method detection limits (MDLs) were below 0.10nmolmol(-1) for most carbonyls in this study, which is below or close to their typical concentrations in clean ambient air. The performance of the technique was assessed by applying the methodology to the quantification of glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY) formed during isoprene photo-oxidation in an outdoor photoreactor chamber (EUPHORE). Good agreements between GLY and MGLY measurements were obtained comparing this new technique with Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR), which provides support for the potential effectiveness of

  14. Influence of shape anisotropy on microwave complex permeability in carbonyl iron flakes/epoxy resin composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Fu-Sheng; Qiao Liang; Zhou Dong; Zuo Wen-Liang; Yi Hai-Bo; Li Fa-Shen

    2008-01-01

    To explore the mechanism of carbonyl iron flake composites for microwave complex permeability, this paper investigates the feature of the flakes. The shape anisotropy was certified by the results of the magnetization hysteresis loops and the Mossbauer spectra. Furthermore, the shape anisotropy was used to explain the origin of composite microwave performance, and the calculated results agree with the experiment. It is believed that the shape anisotropy dominates microwave complex permeability, and the natural resonance plays main role in flake.

  15. Carbonylative Heck Reactions Using CO Generated ex Situ in a Two-Chamber System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermange, Philippe; Gøgsig, Thomas; Lindhardt, Anders Thyboe;

    2011-01-01

    A carbonylative Heck reaction of aryl iodides and styrene derivatives employing a two-chamber system using a stable, crystalline, and nontransition metal based carbon monoxide source is reported. By applying near-stoichiometric amounts of the carbon monoxide precursor, an effective exploitation o...... of the hazardous CO gas is obtained affording chalcone derivatives in good yields. Application to isotope labeling, incorporating 13CO, was further established....

  16. Coupling Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds Mediated by Gallium Metal in Aqueous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪志勇; 袁仕祯; 查正根; 张祖德

    2003-01-01

    A simple and effective pinacol coupling of various aromatic aldehydes mediated by gallium in good yields has been carried out. The reaction is highly effective in water in the prurience of KOH or HCl and was strongly affected by the steric environ-ment surrounding the carbonyl group. Aliphaflc aldehydes, ke-tones and aromatic ketones appear inert under the same reac-tion conditions.

  17. Influence of carbonyl stress on rheological alterations of blood materials and decarbonylation effect of glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭密军; 蔡建光; 贺洪; 龚萍; 李国林; 汤婷; 朱泽瑞; 印大中

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various toxic carbonyls such as malondialdehyde(MDA),a secondary product of lipid peroxidation,and other aldehydes on rheological parameters and their relationship with aging-associated alterations were studied.Both MDA and glutaraldehyde(Glu) in different concentrations significantly increase viscosity,plastic viscosity and yield stress of human plasma and erythrocyte suspensions.MDA(20 mmol/L) reduces sharply the typical fluorescence of proteins(excitation 280 nm/emission 350 nm),and produces age pigment-like fluorescence with a strong emission peak at 460 nm when excites at 395 nm by only being incubated for some hours.In contrast,Glu decreases merely the fluorescence of proteins without producing age pigment-like fluorescence.These data suggest interestingly that the MDA-induced gradual protein cross linking seems to form from different mechanisms compared to the fast rheological changes of blood materials which may take place either in acute and chronic diseases or during aging.On the other hand,MDA induces various deleterious alterations of erythrocytes whereas glutathione(GSH) inhibits the MDA-related carbonyl stress in a concentration-dependent manner.The results indicate that carbonyl-amino reaction exists in the blood widely and GSH has the ability to interrupt or reverse this reaction in a certain way.It implies that carbonyl stress may be one of the important factors in blood stasis and suggests a theoretical and practical approach in anti-stresses and anti-aging.

  18. Formation of Small Gas Phase Carbonyls from Heterogeneous Oxidation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Gao, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are emitted into the atmosphere from gas and diesel powered vehicles, cooking, plants, and marine biota. Field measurements have suggested that FAs, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), could make up an important contribution to the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols. Due to the existence of carbon-carbon double bonds in their molecules, PUFA are believed to be highly reactive towards atmospheric oxidants such as OH and NO3 radicals and ozone, which will contribute to aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity. Previous work from our group has shown that small carbonyls formed from the heterogeneous reaction of linoleic acid (LA) thin films with gas-phase O3. It is known that the formation of small carbonyls in the atmosphere is not only relevant to the atmospheric budget of volatile organic compounds but also to secondary organic aerosol formation. In the present study, using an online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) we again investigated carbonyl formation from the same reaction system, i.e. the heterogeneous ozonolysis of LA film. In addition to the previously reported carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA), a source of reactive oxygen species that is mutagenic, has been identified as a product for the first time. Small dicarbonyls, e.g. glyoxal, are expected to be formed from the further oxidation of MDA. In this presentation, the gas-phase chemistry of MDA with OH radicals using a newly built Teflon chamber in our group will also be presented.

  19. Characterization of Carbonyl Compounds in the Ambient Air of an Industrial City in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ok Baek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize spatial and temporal variations of carbonyl compounds in Gumi city, where a number of large electronic-industrial complexes are located. Carbonyl samples were collected at five sites in the Gumi area: three industrial, one commercial, and one residential area. Sampling was carried out throughout a year from December 2003 to November 2004. At one industrial site, samples were taken every six days, while those of the other sites were for seven consecutive days in every season. Each sample was collected for 150 minutes and at intervals of three times a day (morning, afternoon, and evening. A total of 476 samples were analyzed to determine 15 carbonyl compounds by the USEPA TO-11A (DNPH-cartridge/HPLC method. In general, acetaldehyde appeared to be the most abundant compound, followed by formaldehyde, and acetone+acrolein. Mean concentrations of acetaldehyde were two to three times higher in the industrial sites than in the other sites, with its maximum of 77.7 ppb. In contrast, ambient levels of formaldehyde did not show any significant difference between the industrial and non-industrial groups. Its concentrations peaked in summer probably due to the enhanced volatilization and photochemical reactivity. These results indicate significant emission sources of acetaldehyde in the Gumi industrial complexes. Mean concentrations of organic solvents (such as acetone+acrolein and methyl ethyl ketone were also significantly high in industrial areas. In conclusion, major sources of carbonyl compounds, including acetaldehyde, are strongly associated with industrial activities in the Gumi city area.

  20. The intramolecular charge transfer state in carbonyl-containing polyenes and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Fuciman, Marcel; LaFountain, Amy M; Wagner, Nicole L; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2010-09-30

    Numerous femtosecond time-resolved optical spectroscopic experiments have reported that the lifetime of the low-lying S(1) state of carbonyl-containing polyenes and carotenoids decreases with increasing solvent polarity. The effect becomes even more pronounced as the number of double bonds in the conjugated π-electron system decreases. The effect has been attributed to an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state coupled to S(1), but it is still not clear what the precise molecular nature of this state is, and how it is able to modulate the spectral and dynamic properties of polyenes and carotenoids. In this work, we examine the nature of the ICT state in three substituted polyenes: crocetindial, which contains two terminal, symmetrically substituted carbonyl groups in conjugation with the π-electron system, 8,8'-diapocarotene-8'-ol-8-al, which has one terminal conjugated carbonyl group and one hydroxyl group, and 8,8'-diapocarotene-8,8'-diol, which has two terminal, symmetrically positioned, hydroxyl groups but no carbonyls. Femtosecond time-resolved optical spectroscopic experiments on these molecules reveal that only the asymmetrically substituted 8,8'-diapocarotene-8'-ol-8-al exhibits any substantial effect of solvent on the excited state spectra and dynamics. The data are interpreted using molecular orbital theory which shows that the ICT state develops via mixing of the low-lying S(1) (2(1)A(g)-like) and S(2) (1(1)B(u)-like) excited singlet states to form a resultant state that preferentially evolves in polar solvent and exhibits a very large (∼25 D) dipole moment. Molecular dynamics calculations demonstrate that the features of the ICT state are present in ∼20 fs.

  1. Catalytic Addition of Simple Alkenes to Carbonyl Compounds Using Group 10 Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chun-Yu; Schleicher, Kristin D; Jamison, Timothy F

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances using nickel complexes in the activation of unactivated monosubstituted olefins for catalytic intermolecular carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions with carbonyl compounds, such as simple aldehydes, isocyanates, and conjugated aldehydes and ketones, are discussed. In these reactions, the olefins function as vinyl- and allylmetal equivalents, providing a new strategy for organic synthesis. Current limitations and the outlook for this new strategy are also discussed.

  2. Synthesis and Insecticidal Activity of Novel N-Pyridylpyrazole Carbonyl Thioureas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝雷; 马翼; 熊丽霞; 李正名

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel N-pyridylpyrazole carbonyl thioureas were designed and synthesized. Their structures were characterized by melting points, 1H NMR, IR and elemental analysis or HRMS. The bioassay tests indicated that some of these compounds exhibited moderate insecticidal activity against Mythirnna separata Walker and Culex pipiens pallens. Among 17 compounds, 5n and 5p showed 100% larvicidal activity against Mythimna separata Walker at the test concentration of 100 mg/L.

  3. Kinetic studies on vapor phase carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid over Rh/Ys catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳忠阳; 潘平来; 朱长城; 袁国卿

    1997-01-01

    A novel catalyst Rh/Ys for the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid with CH3I as the promoter shows excellent activity and selectivity.The reaction is kinetically controlled.The reaction rate is in proportion to the concentration of Rh and CH3I but has nothing to do with those of CH3OHH and CO.The surface active energy is Ea ~51.02 kJ/mol.A mechanism is also proposed.

  4. Yttrium (III chloride catalyzed Mannich reaction: An efficient procedure for the synthesis of β-amino carbonyl compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Yekkirala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yttrium (III chloride catalyzed Mannich reaction of aldehydes with ketones and amines in acetonitrile at reflux temperature to give various β-amino carbonyl compounds in very good yields.

  5. Antagonism between lipid-derived reactive carbonyls and phenolic compounds in the Strecker degradation of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rosa M; Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    The Strecker-type degradation of phenylalanine in the presence of 2-pentanal and phenolic compounds was studied to investigate possible interactions that either promote or inhibit the formation of Strecker aldehydes in food products. Phenylacetaldehyde formation was promoted by 2-pentenal and also by o- and p-diphenols, but not by m-diphenols. This is consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to be converted into reactive carbonyls and produce the Strecker degradation of the amino acid. When 2-pentenal and phenolic compounds were simultaneously present, an antagonism among them was observed. This antagonism is suggested to be a consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to either react with both 2-pentenal and phenylacetaldehyde, or compete with other carbonyl compounds for the amino acids, a function that is determined by their structure. All these results suggest that carbonyl-phenol reactions may be used to modulate flavor formation produced in food products by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls.

  6. Mitochondrial ascorbate-glutathione cycle and proteomic analysis of carbonylated proteins during tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vidal, O; Camejo, D; Rivera-Cabrera, F; Konigsberg, M; Villa-Hernández, J M; Mendoza-Espinoza, J A; Pérez-Flores, L J; Sevilla, F; Jiménez, A; Díaz de León-Sánchez, F

    2016-03-01

    In non-photosynthetic tissues, mitochondria are the main source of energy and of reactive oxygen species. Accumulation of high levels of these species in the cell causes damage to macromolecules including several proteins and induces changes in different metabolic processes. Fruit ripening has been characterized as an oxidative phenomenon; therefore, control of reactive oxygen species levels by mitochondrial antioxidants plays a crucial role on this process. In this work, ascorbate-glutathione cycle components, hydrogen peroxide levels and the proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins were analyzed in mitochondria isolated from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit at two ripening stages. A significant increase on most ascorbate-glutathione cycle components and on carbonylated proteins was observed in mitochondria from breaker to light red stage. Enzymes and proteins involved in diverse cellular and mitochondrial metabolic pathways were identified among the carbonylated proteins. These results suggest that protein carbonylation is a post-translational modification involved in tomato fruit ripening regulation.

  7. Synthesis and absorbing mechanism of two-layer microwave absorbers containing polycrystalline iron fibers and carbonyl iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qingwei; Zhang, Mingang; Zhang, Cunrui; Qian, Tianwei

    2013-04-01

    Polycrystalline iron fibers were fabricated by α-FeOOH fiber precursors. Two-layer microwave absorber had been prepared by as-prepared polycrystalline iron fibers and carbonyl iron. The structure, morphology and properties of the composites were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Network Analyzer. The complex permittivity and reflection loss (dB) of the composites were measured employing vector network analyzer model PNA 3629D vector in the frequency range between 30 and 6000 MHz. The thickness effect of the carbonyl iron layer on the microwave loss properties of the composites was investigated. A possible microwave-absorbing mechanism of polycrystalline iron fibers/carbonyl iron composite was proposed. The polycrystalline iron fibers/carbonyl iron composite can find applications in suppression of electromagnetic interference, and reduction of radar signature.

  8. A carnosine intervention study in overweight human volunteers: bioavailability and reactive carbonyl species sequestering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzoni, Luca; de Courten, Barbora; Garzon, Davide; Altomare, Alessandra; Marinello, Cristina; Jakubova, Michaela; Vallova, Silvia; Krumpolec, Patrik; Carini, Marina; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2016-06-01

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide able to react with reactive carbonyl species, which have been recently associated with the onset and progression of several human diseases. Herein, we report an intervention study in overweight individuals. Carnosine (2 g/day) was orally administered for twelve weeks in order to evaluate its bioavailability and metabolic fate. Two carnosine adducts were detected in the urine samples of all subjects. Such adducts are generated from a reaction with acrolein, which is one of the most toxic and reactive compounds among reactive carbonyl species. However, neither carnosine nor adducts have been detected in plasma. Urinary excretion of adducts and carnosine showed a positive correlation although a high variability of individual response to carnosine supplementation was observed. Interestingly, treated subjects showed a significant decrease in the percentage of excreted adducts in reduced form, accompanied by a significant increase of the urinary excretion of both carnosine and carnosine-acrolein adducts. Altogether, data suggest that acrolein is entrapped in vivo by carnosine although the response to its supplementation is possibly influenced by individual diversities in terms of carnosine dietary intake, metabolism and basal production of reactive carbonyl species.

  9. Purification and characterization of a novel carbonyl reductase with high stereo-selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming; XU Yan; MU Xiaoqing; XIAO Rong

    2007-01-01

    A novel NADPH-dependent carbonyl reductase was separated from Candida parapsilosis CCTCC 203011.The enzyme gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE),which was purified through ammonium sulfate,Diethylamino Ethanol (DEAE) sepharose Fast flow (FF),phenyl-sepharose FF and blue sepharose FF chromatography from cell-free extract.The molecular mass of the enzyme was about 30 kDa.The optimum pH and temperature for reduction were 4.5℃ and 35℃,respectively.The Cu2+ had strong restrictive effect on enzyme activity.In addition,the carbonyl reductase was an enzyme with high substrate specificity and stereo-selectivity,and showed high asymmetric reduction activity towards α-hydroxyacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloro acetoacetate.For the asymmetric reduction of α-hydroxyacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloro acetoacetate,(S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol and (R)-ethyl 4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate were produced by the purified enzyme,with the 100% and 94.3% e.e.value,respectively.Therefore,the enzyme could be one of the effective biocatalysts for asymmetric synthesis of chiral alcohols.The amino acid sequences of one peptide from the purified enzyme were analyzed by LC-MASS-MASS,and the carbonyl reductase showed some identity to the hypothetical protein CaO 19.10414 reported.

  10. Effect of fiber material on ozone removal and carbonyl production from carpets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbass, Omed A.; Sailor, David J.; Gall, Elliott T.

    2017-01-01

    Indoor air quality is affected by indoor materials such as carpets that may act as sources and/or sinks of gas-phase air pollutants. Heterogeneous reactions of ozone with carpets may result in potentially harmful products. In this study, indoor residential carpets of varying fiber types were tested to evaluate their ability to remove ozone, and to assess their role in the production of carbonyls when exposed to elevated levels of ozone. Tests were conducted with six types of new unused carpets. Two sets of experiments were conducted, the first measured ozone removal and ozone deposition velocities, and the second measured primary carbonyl production and secondary production as a result of exposure to ozone. The tests were conducted using glass chambers with volume of 52 L each. Air exchange rates for all tests were 3 h-1. The ozone removal tests show that, for the conditions tested, the polyester carpet sample had the lowest ozone removal (40%), while wool carpet had the greatest ozone removal (65%). Most carpet samples showed higher secondary than primary carbonyl emissions, with carpets containing polypropylene fibers being a notable exception. Carpets with polyester fibers had both the highest primary and secondary emissions of formaldehyde among all samples tested. While it is difficult to make blanket conclusions about the relative air quality merits of various carpet fiber options, it is clear that ozone removal percentages and emissions of volatile organic compounds can vary drastically as a function of fiber type.

  11. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpene and short-chained carbonyl compounds from Eucalyptus spp. in southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Anthony J.; Adams, Mark A.; Bleby, Tim M.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Steigner, Dominik; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    Eucalypts are among the highest emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds, yet there is relatively little data available from field studies of this genus. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes and the short-chained carbonyls formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were determined from four species ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus grandis, and Eucalytpus viminalis) in Australia. A smaller comparative study was conducted on E. camaldulensis in south-eastern Australia. Carbonyl emissions, reported here for the first time from eucalypts, were generally comparable with rates reported for other species, with diurnal emissions peaking at about 4, 75 and 34 nmol m -2 min -1 for acetone, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde respectively. There was wide variation in diurnal isoprene and monoterpene emissions between species, but under standard conditions, isoprene emissions were much lower than previous reports. Conversely, standard emission rates of monoterpenes were as much as six times greater than previous reports for some species. Emission of each carbonyl was correlated with its ambient concentration across different species, but more weakly related to temperature. Acetaldehyde emission in particular was significantly correlated with transpiration, but not with sap flow or with ethanol concentrations in xylem sap, suggesting fermentation within the leaf and stomatal conductance are primary controlling processes. Differences in acetaldehyde exchange velocities between sites, in addition to transpiration differences, suggest stomata may indeed exert long term emission regulation, in contrast to compounds for which no biological sink exists.

  12. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods.

  13. Cranberry phytochemicals inhibit glycation of human hemoglobin and serum albumin by scavenging reactive carbonyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Hanwei; Wang, Wei; Khoo, Christina; Taylor, James; Gu, Liwei

    2011-08-01

    Protein glycation caused by sugars and reactive carbonyls is a contributing factor to diabetic complications, aging, and other chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of cranberry phytochemicals on protein glycation. Cranberries, purified to yield sugar-free phytochemical powder, were fractionated into ethyl acetate and water fractions. Water fraction was further separated into water fraction I, II, and III on a Sephadex LH-20 column. Cranberry phytochemical powder and its fractions significantly inhibited the formation of glycated hemoglobin. The concentrations of cranberry phytochemicals required to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (EC(50)) in albumin-glucose assay were lower than that of aminoguanidine except for water fraction I. Cranberry phytochemicals inhibited glycation of human serum albumin mediated by methylglyoxal, but the EC(50) were higher than that of aminoguanidine. Carbonyl scavenging assay showed that water fraction II scavenged 89.3% of methylglyoxal at 6 h of reaction. Fractions enriched with procyanidins showed higher antiglycation activities, suggesting procyanidins were the major active components. The hypothesis whether cranberry procyanidins scavenged reactive carbonyls by forming adducts was tested. Epicatechin was used as a model compound to react with methylglyoxal and glyoxal at pH 7.4. Five adducts were detected and their structures were tentatively identified using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

  14. Seasonal behavior of carbonyls and source characterization of formaldehyde (HCHO) in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, K. H.; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Louie, Peter K. K.; Chan, C. S.; Lee, S. C.; Hu, Di; Chan, P. W.; Lee, Jeffrey Chi Wai; Ho, K. F.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO) is an intermediate and a sensitive indicator for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) oxidation, which drives tropospheric ozone production. Effective photochemical pollution control strategies demand a thorough understanding of photochemical oxidation precursors, making differentiation between sources of primary and secondary generated HCHO inevitable. Spatial and seasonal variations of airborne carbonyls based on two years of measurements (2012-2013), coupled with a correlation-based HCHO source apportionment analysis, were determined for three sampling locations in Hong Kong (denoted HT, TC, and YL). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the two most abundant compounds of the total quantified carbonyls. Pearson's correlation analysis (r > 0.7) implies that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde possibly share similar sources. The total carbonyl concentration trends (HT urban > rural). A regression analysis further quantifies the relative primary HCHO source contributions at HT (∼13%), TC (∼21%), and YL (∼40%), showing more direct vehicular emissions in urban than rural areas. Relative secondary source contributions at YL (∼36%) and TC (∼31%) resemble each other, implying similar urban source contributions. Relative background source contributions at TC could be due to a closed structure microenvironment that favors the trapping of HCHO. Comparable seasonal differences are observed at all stations. The results of this study will aid in the development of a new regional ozone (O3) control policy, as ambient HCHO can enhance O3 production and also be produced from atmospheric VOCs oxidation (secondary HCHO).

  15. Synthesis of 3-[(N-Carboalkoxy)ethylamino]-indazole-dione Derivatives and Their Biological Activities on Human Liver Carbonyl Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Berhe, Solomon; Slupe, Andrew; Luster, Choice; Charlier, Henry A.; Warner, Don L.; Zalkow, Leon H.; Burgess, Edward M.; Enwerem, Nkechi M.; Bakare, Oladapo

    2009-01-01

    A series of indazole-dione derivatives were synthesized by the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of appropriate substituted benzoquinones or naphthoquinones and N-carboalkoxyamino diazopropane derivatives. These compounds were evaluated for their effects on human carbonyl reductase. Several of the analogs were found to serve as substrates for carbonyl reductase with a wide range of catalytic efficiencies, while four analogs display inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 3 – 5 μM...

  16. Spatial distributions of and diurnal variations in low molecular weight carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater, and the controlling factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuhiko, E-mail: takedaq@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Katoh, Shinya; Mitsui, Yumi; Nakano, Shinichi [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Nakatani, Nobutake [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Department of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Rakuno Gakuen University, 582 Bunkyodai-Midorimachi, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Sakugawa, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, 1-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    We studied the spatial distributions of and the diurnal variations in four low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and glyoxal, in coastal seawater. The samples were taken from the coastal areas of Hiroshima Bay, the Iyo Nada, and the Bungo Channel, western Japan. The formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and glyoxal concentrations were higher in the northern part of Hiroshima Bay than at offshore sampling points in the Iyo Nada and the Bungo Channel. These three compounds were found at much higher concentrations in the surface water than in deeper water layers in Hiroshima Bay. It is noteworthy that propionaldehyde was not detected in any of the seawater samples, the concentrations present being lower than the detection limit (1 nanomole per liter (nM)) of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system we used. Photochemical and biological experiments were performed in the laboratory to help understand the characteristic distributions and fates of the LMW carbonyl compounds. The primary process controlling their fate in the coastal environment appears to be their biological consumption. The direct photo degradation of propionaldehyde, initiated by ultraviolet (UV) absorption, was observed, although formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not degraded by UV irradiation. Our results suggest that the degradation of the LMW carbonyl compounds by photochemically formed hydroxyl radicals is relatively insignificant in the study area. Atmospheric deposition is a possible source of soluble carbonyl compounds in coastal surface seawater, but it may not influence the carbonyl concentrations in offshore waters. - Highlights: • Low molecular weight (LMW) carbonyl compounds in coastal seawater were determined. • Photochemical productions of LMW carbonyl compounds in seawater were observed. • LMW carbonyl compounds were largely consumed biologically. • Photochemical degradation was relatively insignificant in the study area.

  17. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production in a porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, M.J.; Wofford, N.Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Sublette, K.L. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The ability of a sulfide- and glutaraldehyde-tolerant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans (strain F) to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa natural gas storage facility was investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F, and the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200-460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70-110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate, and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3800 pM, and then decreased to about 1100 {mu}M after 5 wk. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160-330 {mu}M. Nitrate consumption (5 mM) and high concentrations (101-1011 cells/mL) of strain F were detected in the test core system. An accumulation of biomass occurred in the influent lines during 2 mo of continuous operation, but only a small increase in injection pressure was observed. These studies showed that inoculation with strain F was needed for effective control of sulfide production, and that significant plugging or loss of injectivity owing to microbial inoculation did not occur. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Species-specific enzymatic tolerance of sulfide toxicity in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole M; Maricle, Brian R

    2015-03-01

    Toxic effects of sulfide come from a poisoning of a number of enzymes, especially cytochrome c oxidase, which catalyzes the terminal step in mitochondrial aerobic respiration. Despite this, some estuarine plants live in sulfide-rich sediments. We hypothesized estuarine and flooding-tolerant species might be more tolerant of sulfide compared to upland species, and this was tested by measures of root cytochrome c oxidase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities in extracts exposed to sulfide. Enzyme activities were measured in 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 μM sodium sulfide, and compared among 17 species of plants. Activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were both reduced by increasing sulfide concentration, but cytochrome c oxidase was more sensitive to sulfide compared to alcohol dehydrogenase. Activities of cytochrome c oxidase were reduced to near zero at 5-10 μM sulfide whereas alcohol dehydrogenase activities were only reduced by about 50% at 10 μM sulfide. All species were sensitive to increasing sulfide, but to different degrees. Cytochrome c oxidase in flooding-sensitive species was decreased to near zero activity at 5 μM sulfide, whereas activities in some flooding-tolerant species were still detectable until 15 μM sulfide. Cytochrome c oxidase activities in some estuarine species were low even in the absence of sulfide, perhaps an adaptation to avoid sulfide vulnerability in their native, sulfide-rich habitat. This illustrates the potent metabolic effects of sulfide, and this is the first demonstration of varying sensitivities of cytochrome c oxidase to sulfide across organisms, making these data of novel importance.

  19. Influence of dissolved organic matter on the complexation of mercury under sulfidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carrie L; Mason, Robert P; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Heyes, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    The complexation of Hg under sulfidic conditions influences its bioavailability for microbial methylation. Neutral dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes are readily available to Hg-methylating bacteria in culture, and thermodynamic models predict that inorganic Hg-sulfide complexes dominate dissolved Hg speciation under natural sulfidic conditions. However, these models have not been validated in the field. To examine the complexation of Hg in natural sulfidic waters, octanol/water partitioning methods were modified for use under environmentally relevant conditions, and a centrifuge ultrafiltration technique was developed. These techniques demonstrated much lower concentrations of dissolved Hg-sulfide complexes than predicted. Furthermore, the study revealed an interaction between Hg, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and sulfide that is not captured by current thermodynamic models. Whereas Hg forms strong complexes with DOM under oxic conditions, these complexes had not been expected to form in the presence of sulfide because of the stronger affinity of Hg for sulfide relative to its affinity for DOM. The observed interaction between Hg and DOM in the presence of sulfide likely involves the formation of a DOM-Hg-sulfide complex or results from the hydrophobic partitioning of neutral Hg-sulfide complexes into the higher-molecular-weight DOM. An understanding of the mechanism of this interaction and determination of complexation coefficients for the Hg-sulfide-DOM complex are needed to adequately assess how our new finding affects Hg bioavailability, sorption, and flux.

  20. Time and dose effects of cigarette smoke and acrolein on protein carbonyl formation in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avezov, K; Reznick, A Z; Aizenbud, D

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is an important environmental source of human exposure to a highly toxic and chemically active α,β-unsaturated aldehyde: acrolein. It is capable of causing protein carbonylation and dysfunction, especially in oral tissues of smokers, constantly exposed to CS toxic constituents. The foremost damage is considered to be cumulative, but even a short exposure can be potentially harmful. The objectives of the current study were to examine the short time and dose effects of direct CS and acrolein exposure on intracellular protein carbonylation in epithelial cells. HaCaT-keratinocytes were exposed to different doses of acrolein and whole phase CS using a unique smoking simulator apparatus that mimics the exposure in smokers. The rate of intracellular protein carbonyl modification was examined 10-60 min after the exposure by Western blot. In addition, the effect of pre-incubation with a thiol scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was also assessed. We found that intracellular protein carbonyls increased as fast as 10 min after CS exposure and their concentration doubled after 20 min, with a slight elevation afterwards. Also, carbonyl levels increased gradually as CS and acrolein doses were elevated. Addition of 1 mM NAC neutralized part of the damage. We conclude that CS and acrolein intracellular protein carbonylation is dose- and time- dependent. Even a short time exposure to CS and its aldehydic constituents can be potentially harmful.

  1. Interaction of hydrogen sulfide with ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanghua; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2010-07-01

    1. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a signalling gasotransmitter. It targets different ion channels and receptors, and fulfils its various roles in modulating the functions of different systems. However, the interaction of H(2)S with different types of ion channels and underlying molecular mechanisms has not been reviewed systematically. 2. H(2)S is the first identified endogenous gaseous opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Through the activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, H(2)S lowers blood pressure, protects the heart from ischemia and reperfusion injury, inhibits insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells, and exerts anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive and anti-apoptotic effects. 3. H(2)S inhibited L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes but stimulated the same channels in neurons, thus regulating intracellular Ca(2+) levels. H(2)S activated small and medium conductance K(Ca) channels but its effect on BK(Ca) channels has not been consistent. 4. H(2)S-induced hyperalgesia and pro-nociception seems to be related to the sensitization of both T-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPV(1) channels. The activation of TRPV(1) and TRPA(1) by H(2)S is believed to result in contraction of nonvascular smooth muscles and increased colonic mucosal Cl(-) secretion. 5. The activation of Cl(-) channel by H(2)S has been shown as a protective mechanism for neurons from oxytosis. H(2)S also potentiates N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor-mediated currents that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity for learning and memory. 6. Given the important modulatory effects of H(2)S on different ion channels, many cellular functions and disease conditions related to homeostatic control of ion fluxes across cell membrane should be re-evaluated.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide and nervous system regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Cheng-fang; TANG Xiao-qing

    2011-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current status and progress in studies on the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in regulation of neurotoxicity,neuroprotection,and neuromodulator,as well as its therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative disorders.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed published in English from 2001 to August 2011.The search terms were “hydrogen sulfide”,“neuron”,and “neurodegenerative disorders”.Study selection Articles regarding the regulation of neuronal function,the protection against neuronal damage and neurological diseases,and their possible cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with H2S were selected.Results The inhibited generation of endogenous H2S is implicated in 1-methy-4-phenylpyridinium ion,6-OHDA,and homocysteine-triggered neurotoxicity.H2S elicits neuroprotection in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease models as well as protecting neurons against oxidative stress,ischemia,and hypoxia-induced neuronal death.H2S offers anti-oxidant,anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects,as well as activates ATP-sensitive potassium channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels.H2S regulates the long-term potentiation (LTP) and GABAB receptors in the hippocampus,as well as intracellular calcium and pH homeostasis in neurons and glia cells.Conclusions These articles suggest that endogenous H2S may regulate the toxicity of neurotoxin.H2S not only acts as a neuroprotectant but also serves as a novel neuromodulator.

  3. Electrical properties of seafloor massive sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Giovanni; Hannington, Mark; Bairlein, Katharina; Hördt, Andreas; Jegen, Marion; Petersen, Sven; Laurila, Tea

    2016-06-01

    Seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits are increasingly seen as important marine metal resources for the future. A growing number of industrialized nations are involved in the surveying and sampling of such deposits by drilling. Drill ships are expensive and their availability can be limited; seabed drill rigs are a cost-effective alternative and more suitable for obtaining cores for resource evaluation. In order to achieve the objectives of resource evaluations, details are required of the geological, mineralogical, and physical properties of the polymetallic deposits and their host rocks. Electrical properties of the deposits and their ore minerals are distinct from their unmineralized host rocks. Therefore, the use of electrical methods to detect SMS while drilling and recovering drill cores could decrease the costs and accelerate offshore operations by limiting the amount of drilling in unmineralized material. This paper presents new data regarding the electrical properties of SMS cores that can be used in that assessment. Frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity in the frequency range between 0.002 and 100 Hz was examined in order to potentially discriminate between different types of fresh rocks, alteration and mineralization. Forty mini-cores of SMS and unmineralized host rocks were tested in the laboratory, originating from different tectonic settings such as the intermediate-spreading ridges of the Galapagos and Axial Seamount, and the Pacmanus back-arc basin. The results indicate that there is a clear potential to distinguish between mineralized and non-mineralized samples, with some evidence that even different types of mineralization can be discriminated. This could be achieved using resistivity magnitude alone with appropriate rig-mounted electrical sensors. Exploiting the frequency-dependent behavior of resistivity might amplify the differences and further improve the rock characterization.

  4. Chemical dosing for sulfide control in Australia: An industry survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganigue, Ramon; Gutierrez, Oriol; Rootsey, Ray; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2011-12-01

    Controlling sulfide (H(2)S) production and emission in sewer systems is critical due to the corrosion and malodour problems that sulfide causes. Chemical dosing is one of the most commonly used measures to mitigate these problems. Many chemicals have been reported to be effective for sulfide control, but the extent of success varies between chemicals and is also dependent on how they are applied. This industry survey aims to summarise the current practice in Australia with the view to assist the water industry to further improve their practices and to identify new research questions. Results showed that dosing is mainly undertaken in pressure mains. Magnesium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and nitrate are the most commonly used chemicals for sewers with low flows. In comparison, iron salts are preferentially used for sulfide control in large systems. The use of oxygen injection has declined dramatically in the past few years. Chemical dosing is mainly conducted at wet wells and pumping stations, except for oxygen, which is injected into the pipe. The dosing rates are normally linked to the control mechanisms of the chemicals and the dosing locations, with constant or profiled dosing rates usually applied. Finally, key opportunities for improvement are the use of mathematical models for the selection of chemicals and dosing locations, on-line dynamic control of the dosing rates and the development of more cost-effective chemicals for sulfide control.

  5. Do garlic-derived allyl sulfides scavenge peroxyl radicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, Riccardo; Pedulli, Gian Franco

    2008-03-21

    The chain-breaking antioxidant activities of two garlic-derived allyl sulfides, i.e. diallyl disulfide (1), the main component of steam-distilled garlic oil, and allyl methyl sulfide (3) were evaluated by studying the thermally initiated autoxidation of cumene or styrene in their presence. Although the rate of cumene oxidation was reduced by addition of both 1 and 3, the dependence on the concentration of the two sulfides could not be explained on the basis of the classic antioxidant mechanism as with phenolic antioxidants. The rate of oxidation of styrene, on the other hand, did not show significant changes upon addition of either 1 or 3. This unusual behaviour was explained in terms of the co-oxidant effect, consisting in the decrease of the autoxidation rate of a substrate forming tertiary peroxyl radicals (i.e. cumene) upon addition of little amounts of a second oxidizable substrate giving rise instead to secondary peroxyl radicals. The relevant rate constants for the reaction of ROO(.) with 1 and 3 were measured as 1.6 and 1.0 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, fully consistent with the H-atom abstraction from substituted sulfides. It is therefore concluded that sulfides 1 and 3 do not scavenge peroxyl radicals and therefore cannot be considered chain-breaking antioxidants.

  6. Solubility and permeation of hydrogen sulfide in lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cuevasanta

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S is mainly known for its toxicity but has recently been shown to be produced endogenously in mammalian tissues and to be associated with physiological regulatory functions. To better understand the role of biomembranes in modulating its biological distribution and effects; we measured the partition coefficient of H(2S in models of biological membranes. The partition coefficients were found to be 2.1±0.2, 1.9±0.5 and 2.0±0.6 in n-octanol, hexane and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine liposome membranes relative to water, respectively (25°C. This two-fold higher concentration of H(2S in the membrane translates into a rapid membrane permeability, P(m = 3 cm s(-1. We used a mathematical model in three dimensions to gain insight into the diffusion of total sulfide in tissues. This model shows that the sphere of action of sulfide produced by a single cell expands to involve more than 200 neighboring cells, and that the resistance imposed by lipid membranes has a significant effect on the diffusional spread of sulfide at pH 7.4, increasing local concentrations. These results support the role of hydrogen sulfide as a paracrine signaling molecule and reveal advantageous pharmacokinetic properties for its therapeutic applications.

  7. Solubility and permeation of hydrogen sulfide in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Denicola, Ana; Alvarez, Beatriz; Möller, Matías N

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is mainly known for its toxicity but has recently been shown to be produced endogenously in mammalian tissues and to be associated with physiological regulatory functions. To better understand the role of biomembranes in modulating its biological distribution and effects; we measured the partition coefficient of H(2)S in models of biological membranes. The partition coefficients were found to be 2.1±0.2, 1.9±0.5 and 2.0±0.6 in n-octanol, hexane and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine liposome membranes relative to water, respectively (25°C). This two-fold higher concentration of H(2)S in the membrane translates into a rapid membrane permeability, P(m) = 3 cm s(-1). We used a mathematical model in three dimensions to gain insight into the diffusion of total sulfide in tissues. This model shows that the sphere of action of sulfide produced by a single cell expands to involve more than 200 neighboring cells, and that the resistance imposed by lipid membranes has a significant effect on the diffusional spread of sulfide at pH 7.4, increasing local concentrations. These results support the role of hydrogen sulfide as a paracrine signaling molecule and reveal advantageous pharmacokinetic properties for its therapeutic applications.

  8. Simultaneous removal of sulfide, nitrate and acetate under denitrifying sulfide removal condition: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xijun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Aijie; Guo, Wanqian; Zhou, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: djlee@ntu.edu.tw [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Ren, Nanqi, E-mail: rnq@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Model evaluation applied to case study 1: (A-G) S{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N, NO{sub 2}{sup −}-N, and Ac{sup −}-C profiles under initial sulfide concentrations of 156.2 (A), 539 (B), 964 (C), 1490 (D), 342.7 (E), 718 (F), and 1140.7 (G) mg L{sup −1}. The solid line represents simulated result and scatter represents experimental result. -- Highlights: • This work developed a mathematical model for DSR process. • Kinetics of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between denitrifiers were studied. • Kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting. • The model described kinetic behaviors of DSR processes over wide parametric range. -- Abstract: Simultaneous removal of sulfide (S{sup 2−}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and acetate (Ac{sup −}) under denitrifying sulfide removal process (DSR) is a novel biological wastewater treatment process. This work developed a mathematical model to describe the kinetic behavior of sulfur–nitrogen–carbon and interactions between autotrophic denitrifiers and heterotrophic denitrifiers. The kinetic parameters of the model were estimated via data fitting considering the effects of initial S{sup 2−} concentration, S{sup 2−}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio and Ac{sup −}-C/NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N ratio. Simulation supported that the heterotrophic denitratation step (NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction to NO{sub 2}{sup −}) was inhibited by S{sup 2−} compared with the denitritation step (NO{sub 2}{sup −} reduction to N{sub 2}). Also, the S{sup 2−} oxidation by autotrophic denitrifiers was shown two times lower in rate with NO{sub 2}{sup −} as electron acceptor than that with NO{sub 3}{sup −} as electron acceptor. NO{sub 3}{sup −} reduction by autotrophic denitrifiers occurs 3–10 times slower when S{sup 0} participates as final electron donor compared to the S{sup 2−}-driven pathway. Model simulation on continuous-flow DSR reactor suggested that the adjustment of

  9. Thermodynamics of Complex Sulfide Inclusion Formation in Ca-Treated Al-Killed Structural Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yin-tao; He, Sheng-ping; Chen, Gu-jun; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Controlling the morphology of the sulfide inclusion is of vital importance in enhancing the properties of structural steel. Long strip-shaped sulfides in hot-rolled steel can spherize when, instead of the inclusion of pure single-phase MnS, the guest is a complex sulfide, such as an oxide-sulfide duplex and a solid-solution sulfide particle. In this study, the inclusions in a commercial rolled structural steel were investigated. Spherical and elongated oxide-sulfide duplex as well as single-phase (Mn,Ca)S solid solution inclusions were observed in the steel. A thermodynamic equilibrium between the oxide and sulfide inclusions was proposed to understand the oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion formation. Based on the equilibrium solidification principle, thermodynamic discussions on inclusion precipitation during the solidification process were performed for both general and resulfurized structural steel. The predicted results of the present study agreed well with the experimental ones.

  10. Investigation of chemical suppressants for inactivation of sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the effective control method of spontaneous combustion in the mining of sulfide ore deposits, This paper presents the testing results of several selected chemicals (water glass, calcium chloride, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide and their composites) as oxidation suppressants for sulfide ores. A weight increment scaling method was used to measure suppressant performance, and this method proved to be accurate, simple and convenient. Based on a large number of experiments, the test results show that four types of chemical mixtures demonstrate a good performance in reducing the oxidation rate of seven active sulfide ore samples by up to 27% to 100% during an initial 76 d period. The mixtures of water glass mixed with calcium chloride and magnesium oxide mixed with calcium chloride can also act as fire suppressants when used with fire sprinkling systems.

  11. Altered Sulfide (H2S) Metabolism in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H2S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H2S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed “gasotransmitters.” This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H2S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H2S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H2S has still to be achieved. PMID:23284046

  12. Altered sulfide (H(2)S) metabolism in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H(2)S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H(2)S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed "gasotransmitters." This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H(2)S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H(2)S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H(2)S has still to be achieved.

  13. Metal sulfide electrodes and energy storage devices thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Woodford, William Henry; Li, Zheng; Carter, W. Craig

    2017-02-28

    The present invention generally relates to energy storage devices, and to metal sulfide energy storage devices in particular. Some aspects of the invention relate to energy storage devices comprising at least one flowable electrode, wherein the flowable electrode comprises an electroactive metal sulfide material suspended and/or dissolved in a carrier fluid. In some embodiments, the flowable electrode further comprises a plurality of electronically conductive particles suspended and/or dissolved in the carrier fluid, wherein the electronically conductive particles form a percolating conductive network. An energy storage device comprising a flowable electrode comprising a metal sulfide electroactive material and a percolating conductive network may advantageously exhibit, upon reversible cycling, higher energy densities and specific capacities than conventional energy storage devices.

  14. Conspicuous veils formed by vibrioid bacteria on sulfidic marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We describe the morphology and behavior of a hitherto unknown bacterial species that forms conspicuous veils (typical dimensions, 30 by 30 mm) on sulfidic marine sediment. The new bacteria were enriched on complex sulfidic medium within a benthic gradient chamber in oxygen-sulfide countergradients......, but the bacteria have so far not been isolated in pure culture, and a detailed characterization of their metabolism is still lacking. The bacteria are colorless, gram-negative, and vibrioid-shaped (1.3- to 2.5- by 4- to 10-µm) cells that multiply by binary division and contain several spherical inclusions of poly......, forming a cohesive whitish veil at the oxic-anoxic interface. Bacteria attached to the veil kept rotating and adapted their stalk lengths dynamically to changing oxygen concentrations. The joint action of rotating bacteria on the veil induced a homogeneous water flow from the oxic water region toward...

  15. Extraction of Nanosized Cobalt Sulfide from Spent Hydrocracking Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Kosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes used for the extraction of metals (Co, Mo, and Al from spent hydrotreating catalysts were investigated in this study. A detailed mechanism of the metal extraction process is described. Additionally, a simulation study was performed to understand the sulfidizing mechanism. The suggested separation procedure was effective and achieved an extraction of approximately 80–90%. In addition, the sulfidization mechanism was identified. This sulfidizing process for Co was found to involve an intermediate, the structure of which was proposed. This proposed intermediate was confirmed through simulations. Moreover, the activities of the spent and the regenerated catalyst were examined in the cracking of toluene. The modification of the spent catalyst through the use of different iron oxide loadings improved the catalytic activity.

  16. Mechanism of sulfide effect on viscosity of HPAM polymer solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康万利; 周阳; 王志伟; 孟令伟; 刘述忍; 白宝君

    2008-01-01

    The effect of sulfide on HPAM solution viscosity was studied using BROOKFIELD DV-II viscometer,and the interaction mechanism was discussed.The HPAM solution viscosity was investigated through fully reducing sulfide by the addition of hydrogen peroxide oxidation,and the mechanism of increasing polymer viscosity was investigated.The experimental results also show that there is a critical concentration of 15 mg/L.Below it,the loss rate of HPAM solution viscosity increases more rapidly,but becomes slowly above the critical concentration.A theoretical guidance for oilfields to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water by eliminating sulfide,and it is also importance to prepare polymer solution using sewage-water and save fresh water.

  17. Morphology and thermal studies of zinc sulfide and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuntokun, Jejenija; Ajibade, Peter A., E-mail: pajibade@ufh.ac.za

    2016-09-01

    Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes of 1-cyano-1-carboethoxyethylene-2,2-dithiolato–κS,S’–bis (N,N-dimethylthiourea–κS) have been synthesized and characterized with analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were thermolysed in hexadecylamine at 200 °C to prepare ZnS and CdS nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD). TEM images showed spherically shaped nanoparticles, whose sizes are in the range 4.33–7.21 nm for ZnS and 4.95–7.7 nm CdS respectively and XRD confirmed cubic crystalline phases for the nanoparticles. The optical band gap energy evaluated from the absorption spectra are 2.88 eV (430 nm) and 2.81 eV (440 nm) for the ZnS and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The as-prepared metal sulfide nanoparticles were further incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to give ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA composites. The polymer nanocomposites were studied to investigate their morphology and thermal properties relative to the pure PVA. XRD diffractions indicated that the crystalline phases of the nanoparticles and the sizes in PVA matrices remained unaltered. Infra-red spectra studies revealed interactions between the PVA and the metal sulfide nanoparticles and TGA studies show that the ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA nanocomposites exhibit better thermal stability than the pure PVA.

  18. Morphology and thermal studies of zinc sulfide and cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuntokun, Jejenija; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Zn(II) and Cd(II) metal complexes of 1-cyano-1-carboethoxyethylene-2,2-dithiolato-κS,S'-bis(N,N-dimethylthiourea-κS) have been synthesized and characterized with analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were thermolysed in hexadecylamine at 200 °C to prepare ZnS and CdS nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD). TEM images showed spherically shaped nanoparticles, whose sizes are in the range 4.33-7.21 nm for ZnS and 4.95-7.7 nm CdS respectively and XRD confirmed cubic crystalline phases for the nanoparticles. The optical band gap energy evaluated from the absorption spectra are 2.88 eV (430 nm) and 2.81 eV (440 nm) for the ZnS and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The as-prepared metal sulfide nanoparticles were further incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to give ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA composites. The polymer nanocomposites were studied to investigate their morphology and thermal properties relative to the pure PVA. XRD diffractions indicated that the crystalline phases of the nanoparticles and the sizes in PVA matrices remained unaltered. Infra-red spectra studies revealed interactions between the PVA and the metal sulfide nanoparticles and TGA studies show that the ZnS/PVA and CdS/PVA nanocomposites exhibit better thermal stability than the pure PVA.

  19. High conducting oxide--sulfide composite lithium superionic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chengdu; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Dudney, Nancy J.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Rondinone, Adam Justin

    2017-01-17

    A solid electrolyte for a lithium-sulfur battery includes particles of a lithium ion conducting oxide composition embedded within a lithium ion conducting sulfide composition. The lithium ion conducting oxide composition can be Li.sub.7La.sub.3Zr.sub.2O.sub.12 (LLZO). The lithium ion conducting sulfide composition can be .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 (LPS). A lithium ion battery and a method of making a solid electrolyte for a lithium ion battery are also disclosed.

  20. Altered Sulfide (H2S) Metabolism in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H2S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H2S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed “gasotransmitters.” This review will cover th...