WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbonized blood deposited

  1. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  2. Atmospheric deposition of organic carbon via precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavorivska, Lidiia; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; DeWalle, David R.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the major pathway for removal of organic carbon (OC) from the atmosphere, affecting both atmospheric and landscape processes. Transfers of OC from the atmosphere to land occur as wet deposition (via precipitation) and as dry deposition (via surface settling of particles and gases). Despite current understanding of the significance of organic carbon inputs with precipitation to carbon budgets, transfers of organic matter between the atmosphere and land are not explicitly included in most carbon cycle models due to limited data, highlighting the need for further information. Studies regarding the abundance of OC in precipitation are relatively sparse, in part due to the fact that concentrations of organics in precipitation and their associated rates of atmospheric deposition are not routinely measured as a part of major deposition monitoring networks. Here, we provide a new data synthesis from 83 contemporary studies published in the peer reviewed literature where organic matter in precipitation was measured around the world. We compiled data regarding the concentrations of organic carbon in precipitation and associated rates of atmospheric deposition of organic carbon. We calculated summary statistics in a common set of units, providing insights into the magnitude and regional variability of OC in precipitation. A land to ocean gradient is evident in OC concentrations, with marine sites generally showing lower values than continental sites. Our synthesis highlights gaps in the data and challenges for data intercomparison. There is a need to concentrate sampling efforts in areas where anthropogenic OC emissions are on the rise (Asia, South America), as well as in remote sites suggesting background conditions, especially in Southern Hemisphere. It is also important to acquire more data for marine rainwater at various distances from the coast in order to assess a magnitude of carbon transfer between the land and the ocean. Our integration of

  3. Blood Compatibility Evaluations of Fluorescent Carbon Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Guo, Zhong; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Liu, Zonghua

    2015-09-02

    Because of their unique advantages, fluorescent carbon dots are gaining popularity in various biomedical applications. For these applications, good biosafety is a prerequisite for their use in vivo. Studies have reported the preliminary biocompatibility evaluations of fluorescent carbon dots (mainly cytotoxicity); however, to date, little information is available about their hemocompatibility, which could impede their development from laboratory to bedside. In this work, we evaluated the hemocompatibility of fluorescent carbon dots, which we prepared by hydrothermal carbonization of α-cyclodextrin. The effects of the carbon dots on the structure and function of key blood components were investigated at cellular and molecular levels. In particular, we considered the morphology and lysis of human red blood cells, the structure and conformation of the plasma protein fibrinogen, the complement activation, platelet activation, and in vitro and in vivo blood coagulation. We found that the carbon dots have obvious concentration-dependent effects on the blood components. Overall, concentrations of the fluorescent carbon dots at ≤0.1 mg/mL had few adverse effects on the blood components, but at higher doses, the carbon dots impair the structure and function of the blood components, causing morphological disruptions and lysis of red blood cells, interference in the local microenvironments of fibrinogen, activation of the complement system, and disturbances in the plasma and whole blood coagulation function in vitro. However, the carbon dots tend to activate platelets only at low concentrations. Intravenous administration of the carbon dots at doses up to 50 mg/kg did not impair the blood coagulation function. These results provide valuable information for the clinical application of fluorescent carbon dots.

  4. Deposition of amorphous carbon-silver composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zarco, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Rodil, S.E., E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.m [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2009-12-31

    Composites of amorphous carbon films and silver were deposited by co-sputtering, where the target (10 cm diameter) was of pure graphite with small inclusion of pure silver (less than 1 cm{sup 2}). The films were deposited under different powers, from 40 to 250 W, and different target-substrate distances. The substrate was earthed and rotated in order to obtain a uniform distribution of the silver content. The addition of the Ag piece into the target increased the deposition rate of the carbon films, which could be related to the higher sputter yield of the silver, but there seems to be also a contribution from a larger emission of secondary electrons from the Ag that enhances the plasma and therefore the sputtering process becomes more efficient. Scanning electron micrographs acquired using backscattered electrons showed that the silver was segregated from the carbon matrix, forming nanoparticles or larger clusters as the power was increased. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the silver was crystalline and the carbon matrix remained amorphous, although for certain conditions a peak attributed to fullerene-like structures was obtained. Finally, we used Raman spectroscopy to understand the bonding characteristics of the carbon-silver composites, finding that there are variations in the D/G ratio, which can be correlated to the observed structure and X-ray diffraction results.

  5. Hard Carbon Films Deposited under Various Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M.-K.; Chen, S.-C.; Wu, T. C.; Lee, Sanboh

    1998-03-01

    Using a carbon target ablated with an XeCl-excimer laser under various gas atmospheres at different pressures, hard carbon was deposited on silicon, iron and tungsten carbide substrates. The hardness, friction coefficient, and wear rate of the film against steel are better than pure substrate material, respectively, so that it has potential to be used as a protective coating for micromechanical elements. The influences of gas pressure, gas atmosphere, and power density of laser irradiation on the thermal stability of film were analyzed by means of Raman-spectroscope, time-of-flight method, and optical emission spectrum. It was found that the film deposited under higher pressure has less diamond-like character. The film deposited under rest gas or argon atmosphere was very unstable and looked like a little graphite-like character. The film deposited at high vacuum (10-5 mbar rest gas) was the most stable and looked like the most diamond-like character. The film deposited at higher power density was more diamond-like than that at lower power density.

  6. Rocky Mountain Carbonate Spring Deposit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Dustin Kyle

    Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia, and Hot Creek cold springs, British Columbia. The relict deposits are formed mainly of low-magnesium crystalline calcite contained in laterally continuous strata. Paleo-flow regimes were characterized by extensive sheet flow that increased the surface area of spring water exposed to the atmosphere. Calcite precipitated inorganically from spring water that attained CaCO3 supersaturation through agitation-induced CO2 degassing that was facilitated by elevated flow rates and a large surface area as spring water flowed down-slope. Thus, the deposits contain only minor amounts of detrital, mechanically deposited, and biogenic carbonate. Evaporation was only a minor contributor to CaCO3 supersaturation, mainly in quiescent environments. Photosynthetic CO2 removal did not measurably contribute to CaCO3 supersaturation. Calcite crystals precipitated in biotic facies formed from low to moderately supersaturated spring water, whereas abiotic dendrite crystals formed rapidly from highly supersaturated spring water. Calcite passively nucleated on cyanobacteria, bryophytes and macrophytes, and was probably facilitated by cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances. Cyanobacterial filaments and stromatolites are integral parts of all three deposits, whereas bryophytes were restricted to the Fall Creek and Hot Creek deposits. Diagenetic microbial degradation of crystalline calcite was common to all three deposits, but recrystallization was limited to the Fall Creek deposit. The amount and location of calcite precipitation relative to the vents was controlled by the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- in solution, and discharge volume fluctuations. Spring water with high [Ca2+] and [HCO 3-] precipitated large amounts of calcite proximal to the vents (e.g. Fairmont), whereas spring

  7. Fate of Organic Carbon Deposited in Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, T. G.; Rhoton, F. E.; Bennett, S. J.; Hudnall, W. H.

    2002-05-01

    Sedimentation of soil organic carbon (SOC) eroded from uplands and deposited in reservoirs could be an important mechanism for carbon sequestration provided that it is conserved during transport and burial and that uplands are not experiencing net loss. There are uncertainties in both these assumptions and gaining a better understanding of these processes is a key objective of ongoing carbon-cycle investigations. The U.S. Geological Survey, the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and Louisiana State University Agricultural Center are collaborating on an investigation of soils and sediments in the Yalobusha River Basin in Mississippi. Sediment cores were collected from upland soils and from Grenada Lake, a flood control reservoir, in the basin. Suspended sediments have been collected from the Yalobusha River and one of its tributaries upstream of the lake. We are measuring carbon mineralization potential in conjunction with carbon and nitrogen concentrations, 13C, mineralogy, and texture on sediments and upland soils to determine whether eroding SOC is conserved or oxidized during transport and burial. Differences in mineralization potential and other chemical and physical properties are used to infer net changes in the original eroding SOC. Autochthonous production of SOC within reservoirs could replace labile SOC oxidized during transport and burial thereby masking losses due to oxidation. Autochthonous sources can be evaluated by chemical and physical characterization of the sediments. Stable carbon isotope (13C) geochemistry provides a tool for distinguishing the two primary sources of organic carbon incorporated in lake sediments because allochthonous SOC from the surrounding watershed is, in general, less depleted in stable 13C than autochthonous SOC produced in the lake by aquatic organisms such as macrophytes and phytoplankton. The integration of the 13C signature recorded in the organic fraction of the lake sediments with total organic carbon, C/N ratio

  8. DEPOSITION CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES BY SURFATRON GENERATED DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Davydova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were deposited by surface wave discharge using various Ar/CH4/ CO2 gas mixture ratios. The morphology was controlled by adjusting of gas concentration and was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Also, the influence of the low temperature plasma treatment and process time on the wettability of the diamond films has been studied. The results indicate that for hydrogen termination of diamond surface indicate that the temperature as low as 400°C and treatment time of 15 min is sufficient to attain the p-type surface conductivity of diamond.

  9. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  10. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  11. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  12. Influence of deposited CNTs on the surface of carbon fiber by ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J. J.; Liu, F.; Deng, C.; Fang, L. C.; Li, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    The surface property of carbon fiber directly affects the interface performance between carbon fiber and matrix. To improve the surface property of carbon fiber, we proposed a simple method to prepare carbon nanotubes /carbon fiber hybrid fiber via ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Surface morphologies and surface functional group of carbon fibers were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), respectively. The results show that the deposition of carbon nanotubes changed the surface morphologies of carbon fibers and introduced polar groups (C=O and C-O) to carbon fiber surface. Comparing the results with EPD-only, ultrasonically assisted EPD increased the uniformity of carbon nanotubes coatings whereas only sparse and not uniformly deposition formed without ultrasonic.

  13. Analysis of Carbon Monoxide in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Benjamin P.; Stephens, Joseph C.

    2003-04-01

    Forensic tests used to perform the qualitative and quantitative analyses of carbon monoxide in blood are described. The qualitative test uses the diffusion of CO, which is released from blood by reaction with H2SO4, into a PdCl2 solution in a Conway cell and the resultant formation of a palladium mirror. The quantitative analysis is based on the absorption of visible light by carboxyhemoglobin at 541 nm and reduced hemoglobin at 555 nm. Both procedures are suitable for undergraduate chemistry experiments.

  14. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  15. Submesothelial deposition of carbon nanoparticles after toner exposition: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippou Stathis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inhalation of carbon nanoparticles (CNP from toner dust has been shown to have impact on the respiratory health of persons exposed. Office printers are known emitters of CNP. We report about a female open office worker who developed weight loss and diarrhoea. Laparoscopy done for suspected endometriosis surprisingly revealed black spots within the peritoneum. Submesothelial aggregates of CNP with a diameter of 31-67 nm were found by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in these tissue specimens. Colon biopsies showed inflammatory bowel disease with typically signs of Crohn disease, but no dust deposits. Transport of CNP via lymphatic and blood vessels after inhalation in the lungs has to be assumed. In this case respiratory symptoms were not reported, therefore no lung function tests were done. We have shown that workers with toner dust exposure from laser printers can develop submesothelial deposition of CNP in the peritoneum. Impact of toner dust exposure on the respiratory health of office workers, as suspected in other studies, has to be evaluated further.

  16. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Suschke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by tailoring the deposition parameters. The coatings show good promise for industrial use due to their high hardness, low friction and excellent adhesion to the surface of the samples.

  17. Deposition and tribological behaviour of sputtered carbon hard coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.; Camino, D.; Jones, A.H.S.; Teer, D.G. [Teer Coatings Ltd., Hartlebury (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-21

    The exceptional tribological properties of low deposition temperature sputtered carbon coatings (Graphit-iC coatings) have been recently reported. This paper describes the latest development of these coatings and particularly how, by an optimisation of the deposition parameters, it has been possible to obtain relative soft to very hard coatings with extremely low specific wear rates. The coatings have been deposited in a closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating (CFUBMSIP) installation. By applying the appropriate conditions of deposition, carbon coatings with hardness from 1500 to 4000 HV can be routinely deposited. Preliminary analytical results are presented in order to characterise such hard coatings: high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis are some of the different techniques used for this work. Finally, a number of the applications are reported with tribological test results. (orig.)

  18. Plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Mitev, D.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    In this study a novel plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure is constructed and characterized. A low power microwave discharge is used as a plasma source and working gas of Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. The substrate is heated by plasma flame and its temperature is in the range 600-700 C. The chemical composition of the plasma and the gas mixture effect on the concentration of the various particles in the plasma is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The emission spectrum of the plasma jet in Ar/H2/CH4 mixture shows the presence of carbon (Swan band) and an intensive line of CH (388 nm), which are necessary species for deposition of carbon nanostructures. Additional voltage in the range from -20 V to -100 V is applied in order to ensure the vertical growth of graphene walls. Results of deposited carbon nanostructures on metal substrate are shown.

  19. Increasing the Tensile Property of Unidirectional Carbon/Carbon Composites by Grafting Carbon Nanotubes onto Carbon Fibers by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Song; Kezhi Li; Hejun Li; Qiangang Fu

    2013-01-01

    Although in-situ growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers could greatly increase the matrix-dominated mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composites (C/Cs),it always decreased the tensile strength of carbon fibers.In this work,CNTs were introduced into unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) preforms by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and they were used to reinforce C/Cs.Effects of the content of CNTs introduced by EPD on tensile property of unidirectional C/Cs were investigated.Results demonstrated that EPD could be used as a simple and efficient method to fabricate carbon nanotube reinforced C/Cs (CNT-C/Cs) with excellent tensile strength,which pays a meaningful way to maximize the global performance of CNT-C/Cs.

  20. Catalyst deposition for the preparation of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of depositing islands of catalyst with a predetermined density, wherein in said method comprises the steps of: obtaining a diffusion barrier covered nano patterned surface comprising a plurality of plateaus, having a density of plateaus dependent on the predetermined density...... patterned surface is configured to ensure that no more than a single island of catalyst is formed on each plateau, so that a sub sequent growth of carbon nanotubes from the deposited islands result in that no more than a single carbon nanotube is grown from each plateau....

  1. Plasma Processes : Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Patil; K Ramachandran; N Venkatramani; M Pandey; R D'Cunha

    2000-11-01

    The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu–Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ∼ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  2. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  3. Hardness and stress of amorphous carbon film deposited by glow discharge and ion beam assisting deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, F C

    2000-01-01

    The hardness and stress of amorphous carbon films prepared by glow discharge and by ion beam assisting deposition are investigated. Relatively hard and almost stress free amorphous carbon films were deposited by the glow discharge technique. On the other hand, by using the ion beam assisting deposition, hard films were also obtained with a stress of the same order of those found in tetrahedral amorphous carbon films. A structural analysis indicates that all films are composed of a sp sup 2 -rich network. These results contradict the currently accepted concept that both stress and hardness are only related to the concentration of sp sup 3 sites. Furthermore, the same results also indicate that the sp sup 2 sites may also contribute to the hardness of the films.

  4. Nucleation and electrolytic deposition of lead on model carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cericola, D.; Spahr, M.

    2016-08-01

    There is a general consensus in the lead acid battery industry for the use of carbon additives as a functional component in the negative paste to boost the battery performance with regards to charge acceptance and cycle life especially for upcoming automotive and energy storage applications. Several mechanisms are discussed in the scientific literature and the affinity of the carbon surfaces to lead species seems to play a key role. With a set of experiments on model carbon electrodes we gave evidence to the fact that some carbon materials promote spontaneous nucleation of lead crystals. We propose a mechanism such that the carbon, as soon as in a lead containing environment, immobilizes some lead on its surface. Such immobilized lead acts as nucleation seed for the deposition of lead when a current is passed through the material. It is therefore possible to differentiate and select the carbon materials based on their ability to form nucleation seeds.

  5. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  6. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Depositional Landscapes of Bavaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegs, Stefanie; Schwindt, Daniel; Völkel, Jörg; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Erosion leads to redistribution and accumulation of soil organic matter (SOM) within agricultural landscapes. These fluvic and colluvic deposits are characterized by a highly diverse vertical structure and can contain high amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) over the whole soil profile. Depositional landscapes are therefore not only productive sites for agricultural use but also influence carbon dynamics which is of great interest with regard on the recent climate change debate. The aim of our study is to elucidate the spatial distribution of organic carbon stocks, as well as its depth function and the role of these landscapes as a reservoir for SOM. Therefore we compare two representative depositional landscapes in Bavaria composed of different parent materials (carbonate vs. granitic). We hypothesize that the soils associated with different depositional processes (fluvial vs. colluvial) differ in SOC contents and stocks, also because of different hydromorphic regimes in fluvic versus colluvic soil profiles. Sampling sites are located in the Alpine Foreland (quaternary moraines with carbonatic parent material) and the foothills of the Bavarian Forest (Granite with Loess) with the main soil types Fluvisols, Gleysols and Luvisols. At both sites we sampled twelve soil profiles up to 150 cm depth, six in the floodplain and six along a vertical slope transect. We took undisturbed soil samples from each horizon and analyzed them for bulk density, total Carbon (OC and IC) and total Nitrogen (N) concentrations. This approach allows to calculate total OC contents and OC stocks and to investigate vertical and horizontal distribution of OC stocks. It will also reveal differences in OC stocks due to the location of the soil profile in fluvic or colluvic deposition scenarios.

  7. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  8. Electroless deposition of Cu on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Dingsheng; LIU Yingliang

    2006-01-01

    Copper has been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and inside MWNTs by electroless deposition. The as-prepared Cu-MWNT composite materials have been characterized by X-ray diffractometer(XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurement. XRD analyses showed that Cu was a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. The average size of Cu was calculated by Scherrer's formula from XRD data, and it was11 nm. TEM revealed that Cu grains on the surface of MWNTs were uniform with the sizes of about 30-60 nm. The electrochemical measurement indicated that Cu-MWNT composite materials possessed fine electron conductivity.

  9. Decoding depositional sequences in carbonate systems: Concepts vs experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomar, Luis; Haq, Bilal U.

    2016-11-01

    Efficacy of sequence stratigraphic concepts in siliciclastic systems has been proven by successful applications in both academia and the industry over the past four decades. However, experience has demonstrated repeatedly that the relatively simple advective transportational approach of these models is less than successful when applied to the more complex carbonate systems and can lead to erroneous interpretations. Instead, an approach that includes the use of the changes in the biotic components of carbonate deposits to infer the sea-level trajectory and thereby placing it in the proper sequence framework is deemed to be more meaningful. This is exemplified with several well-studied examples that illustrate the variety of ways in which the biotic components can build carbonate platforms, and how these have changed through the ages prompted by biological evolution. This extended review discusses carbonate production, source to sink transportation influenced by sea-level changes, surface waves, as well as the less understood and under-appreciated internal waves, and the resulting variety of platforms that can be built by the interaction of these factors, as well as the changing patterns of biotic components with time. Their effect on the carbonate reservoir is considerable, understanding of which is the ultimate objective of carbonate research for applications in the industry. Key elements in the carbonate environments that differ from the siliciclastic systems are: 1) intrabasinal conditions (nutrients, salinity, temperature, water energy, transparency) are important controls on carbonate production and therefore also control in-situ accommodation and how it may be filled; 2) depositional accommodation can be both physical (controlled by hydrodynamics) and ecological (in the building-up above the base level mode); 3) because carbonates are products of biological activity, their production modes have been changing with time as their biotic components have evolved; 4

  10. Molten carbonate fuel cell reduction of nickel deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Zwick, Stanley A. (Darien, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A molten carbonate fuel cell with anode and cathode electrodes and an eleolyte formed with two tile sections, one of the tile sections being adjacent the anode and limiting leakage of fuel gas into the electrolyte with the second tile section being adjacent the cathode and having pores sized to permit the presence of oxygen gas in the electrolyte thereby limiting the formation of metal deposits caused by the reduction of metal compositions migrating into the electrolyte from the cathode.

  11. Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Soil Carbon Dynamics in Temperate Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginzburg Ozeri, Shimon

    Soils contain the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C). Understanding the factors regulating the decomposition and storage of soil organic matter (SOM) is essential for predictions of the C sink strength of the terrestrial environment in the light of global change. Elevated long-term nitrogen...... (N) deposition into forest ecosystems has been increasing globally and was hypothesized to raise soil organic C (SOC) stocks by increasing forest productivity and by reducing SOM decomposition. Yet, these effects of N deposition on forest SOC stocks are uncertain and largely based on observations...... edges were used to study the effects of varying N deposition load on SOC stocks and fluxes as well as on the temperature sensitivity of SOM respiration. In a third study, the effects of 20 years of continuous experimental N addition (35 kg N ha-1 year-1) on soil C budget were investigated. Our general...

  12. Production of carbon molecular sieves from palm shell through carbon deposition from methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Maedeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of production of carbon molecular sieve (CMS from palm shell as a waste lignocellulosic biomass was investigated. CMS samples were prepared through heat treatment processes including carbonization, physiochemical activation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD from methane. Methane was pyrolyzed to deposit fine carbon on the pore mouth of palm shell-based activated carbon to yield CMS. All the deposition experiments were performed at 800 ºC, while the methane flow rate (100, 200, 300 mL min-1 CH4 diluted in 500 mL min-1 N2 and deposition time (30 to 60 min were the investigated parameters. The textural characteristics of the CMSs were assessed by N2 adsorption. The largest BET surface area (752 m2 g-1, micropore surface area (902.2 m2 g-1 and micropore volume (0.3466 cm3 g-1 was obtained at the CH4 flow rate of 200 mL min-1 and deposition time of 30 min. However, prolonging the deposition time to 45 min yielded in a micropouros CMS with a narrow pore size distribution.

  13. Plasma-enhanced Deposition of Nano-Structured Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qiaoqin (杨巧勤); Xiao Chijin (肖持进); A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    By pre-treating substrate with different methods and patterning the catalyst, selective and patterned growth of diamond and graphitic nano-structured carbon films have been realized through DC Plasma-Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-HFCVD).Through two-step processing in an HFCVD reactor, novel nano-structured composite diamond films containing a nanocrystalline diamond layer on the top of a nanocone diamond layer have been synthesized. Well-aligned carbon nanotubes, diamond and graphitic carbon nanocones with controllable alignment orientations have been synthesized by using PE-HFCVD. The orientation of the nanostructures can be controlled by adjusting the working pressure. In a Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PECVD) reactor, high-quality diamond films have been synthesized at low temperatures (310 ℃~550 ℃) without adding oxygen or halogen gas in a newly developed processing technique. In this process, carbon source originates from graphite etching, instead of hydrocarbon. The lowest growth temperature for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films with a reasonable growth rate without addition of oxygen or halogen is 260 ℃.

  14. Factors Controlling Black Carbon Deposition in Snow in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, L.; Li, Q.; He, C.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) concentration in snow in the Arctic to BC emissions, dry deposition and wet scavenging efficiency using a 3D global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem driven by meteorological field GEOS-5. With all improvements, simulated median BC concentration in snow agrees with observation (19.2 ng g-1) within 10%, down from -40% in the default GEOS-Chem. When the previously missed gas flaring emissions (mainly located in Russia) are included, the total BC emission in the Arctic increases by 70%. The simulated BC in snow increases by 1-7 ng g-1, with the largest improvement in Russia. The discrepancy of median BC in snow in the whole Arctic reduces from -40% to -20%. In addition, recent measurements of BC dry deposition velocity suggest that the constant deposition velocity of 0.03 cm s-1 over snow and ice used in the GEOS-Chem is too low. So we apply resistance-in-series method to calculate the dry deposition velocity over snow and ice and the resulted dry deposition velocity ranges from 0.03 to 0.24 cm s-1. However, the simulated total BC deposition flux in the Arctic and BC in snow does not change, because the increased dry deposition flux has been compensated by decreased wet deposition flux. However, the fraction of dry deposition to total deposition increases from 16% to 25%. This may affect the mixing of BC and snow particles and further affect the radative forcing of BC deposited in snow. Finally, we reduced the scavenging efficiency of BC in mixed-phase clouds to account for the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process based on recent observations. The simulated BC concentration in snow increases by 10-100%, with the largest increase in Greenland (100%), Tromsø (50%), Alaska (40%), and Canadian Arctic (30%). Annual BC loading in the Arctic increases from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2 and the lifetime of BC increases from 9.2 to 16.3 days. This indicates that BC simulation in the Arctic is really sensitive to

  15. Synthesis of carbon molecular sieves by activation and coke deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Gandadhar, B. (Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    Carbon molecular sieves were synthesized from indigenous bituminous coal and coconut shell. After preliminary treatment, these materials were subjected to steam or carbon dioxide activation in the range 500-900[degree]C. In other experiments the raw materials were partly air-oxidized at [approximately] 200[degree]C, mixed with binder and extruded to cylindrical pellets, which were subjected to coke deposition by cracking of methane in the range 750-780[degree]C for 5-14 min. All the products were characterized by analysis of kinetic and equilibrium adsorption data. The molecular sieve performance was judged by the O[sub 2]/N[sub 2] uptake ratio. The best carbon molecular sieves, obtained by methane cracking at 780[degree]C at a flow of 100 ml min[sup -1] had an uptake ratio of 2.667. 11 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Horizontally Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Cole

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor has been developed to synthesis horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes. The width of the aligning sheath was modelled based on a collisionless, quasi-neutral, Child’s law ion sheath where these estimates were empirically validated by direct Langmuir probe measurements, thereby confirming the proposed reactors ability to extend the existing sheath fields by up to 7 mm. A 7 mbar growth atmosphere combined with a 25 W plasma permitted the concurrent growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes with electric fields of the order of 0.04 V μm−1 with linear packing densities of up to ~5 × 104 cm−1. These results open up the potential for multi-directional in situ alignment of carbon nanotubes providing one viable route to the fabrication of many novel optoelectronic devices.

  17. Characterization of Carbon Deposits Formed During Plasma Pyrolysis of Xinjiang Candle Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guilin; Meng, Yuedong; Shu, Xingsheng; Fang, Shidong

    2009-08-01

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The downward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted.

  18. Characterization of carbon deposits formed during plasma pyrolysis of Xinjiang candle coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G.L.; Meng, Y.D.; Shu, X.S.; Fang, S.D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2009-08-15

    Carbon deposits were formed on the reactor wall during plasma pyrolysis of the Xinjiang candle coal in our V-style plasma pyrolysis pilot-plant. The carbon deposits were studied using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. It was found that carbon deposits located at different parts in the reactor exhibited different microscopic patterns. The formation mechanism of the carbon deposits was deduced. The down ward increase in the graphitization degree of the carbon deposits was found and interpreted

  19. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon sequestration under atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Sinsabaugh; D.R. Zak; D.L. Moorhead

    2008-02-19

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter the processing and storage of organic carbon in soils. In 2000, we began studying the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on soil carbon dynamics in three types of northern temperate forest that occur across a wide geographic range in the Upper Great Lakes region. These ecosystems range from 100% oak in the overstory (black oak-white oak ecosystem; BOWO) to 0% overstory oak (sugar maple-basswood; SMBW) and include the sugar maple-red oak ecosystem (SMRO) that has intermediate oak abundance. The leaf litter biochemistry of these ecosystems range from highly lignified litter (BOWO) to litter of low lignin content (SMBW). We selected three replicate stands of each ecosystem type and established three plots in each stand. Each plot was randomly assigned one of three levels of N deposition (0, 30 & 80 kg N ha-1 y-1) imposed by adding NaNO3 in six equal increments applied over the growing season. Through experiments ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scales, we produced a conceptual framework that describes the biogeochemistry of soil carbon storage in N-saturated ecosystems as the product of interactions between the composition of plant litter, the composition of the soil microbial community and the expression of extracellular enzyme activities. A key finding is that atmospheric N deposition can increase or decrease the soil C storage by modifying the expression of extracellular enzymes by soil microbial communities. The critical interactions within this conceptual framework have been incorporated into a new class of simulations called guild decomposition models.

  20. Carbon dioxide and liver blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, R; Levitzky, M; Berkman, R

    1976-01-01

    This study was designed to determine blood flow to the liver during hypercapnia and combined hypercapnia-hypoxia with the portal vein and hepatic artery intact except for placement of an electromagnetic flow probe around these vessels. Twenty mongrel dogs weighing 30-45 kg were anesthetized with pentobarbital and flow probes and occluders were surgically implanted. Ten of these dogs were subjected to hypercapnia alone. During inspiration of 6% CO2 in room air, portal vein flow increased from 588 +/- 73 ml/min to 731 +/- 113 ml/min (p less than .05), while hepatic artery flow did not change significantly from its control mean of 221 +/- 38 ml/min. In the remaining dogs, inhalation of 6% O2 resulted in a reduction of portal blood flow within 30 min from 527 +/- 55 ml/min to 381 +/- 41 ml/min (p less than .01). Again, mean hepatic artery flow did not increase significantly above its control of 273 +/- 43 ml/min. Subsequent inhalation of 6% CO2 plus 6% O2 (combined hypercapniahypoxia) for 30 min in these same animals resulted in a significant increase of portal vein blood flow from 514 +/- 46 ml/min to 716 +/- 116 ml/min (p less than .05). Thus, hypercapnia alone increases total liver blood flow, primarily by an increase in portal vein flow. Hypoxia results in a decrease in portal vein flow. The superimposition of hypercapnia on hypoxia restores blood flow to a level close to that found with hypercapnia alone. Hypercapnia in the range of 63 +/- 4 mmHg PCO2 overwhelms the tendency toward a reduction of portal vein blood flow induced by an arterial PO2 of 42 +/- 5 mmHg in the presence of mild hypocapnia (PCO2 : 30.2 +/- 1 mmHg).

  1. Treatment of oil–water emulsions by adsorption onto activated carbon, bentonite and deposited carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Okiel; Mona El-Sayed; Mohamed Y. El-Kady

    2011-01-01

    Emulsified oil in waste water constitutes is a severe problem in the different treatment stages before disposed off in a manner that does not violate environmental criteria. One commonly used technique for remediation of petroleum contaminated water is adsorption. The main objective of this study is to examine the removal of oil from oil–water emulsions by adsorption on bentonite, powdered activated carbon (PAC) and deposited carbon (DC). The results gave evidence of the ability of the adsorb...

  2. Raman spectra of amorphous carbon films deposited by SWP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Liu, Weiguo; Hang, Lingxia; Su, Junhong; Fan, Huiqing

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous carbon film is one of the most important anti-reflection protective films coated on infrared optical components. In this paper, hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films were deposited by new type surface-wave-sustained plasma (SWP) source with a graphite target at various experiment parameters. The laser Raman spectroscopy at wavelength of 514 nm was used to investigate the structure and bonding of these carbon films. The results showed consanguineous correlations between the intensity ratio ID/IG and the experiment parameters such as microwave power, target voltage and gas pressure applied to the SWP source. Raman spectra proved the structure of these carbon films prepared by SWP technique is typical diamond-like carbon (DLC). The analysis on G peak position and intensity ratio ID/IG indicated that Raman shifts moves to low wavenumber and ID/IG decreases with the increasing of microwave power from 150 W to 330 W. These results means the formation of sp3 bond prefers higher microwave power. DLC films prepared at target voltage of -200 V have higher sp3 content than that of -350 V, moreover, an increase of gas pressure during experiments yields higher sp3 content at the microwave power below 270 W, whereas the change of sp3 content is slight with the various conditions when microwave power exceeds 270 W.

  3. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A., E-mail: campb001@umn.edu

    2015-08-31

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10{sup −3} Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm{sup 3}, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators.

  4. The Deposition of Gold Nanoparticles Onto Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the results of spectrophotometric, dynamic light scattering (DLS and microscopic (SEM studies of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs deposition on activated carbon (AC surface modified with primary (ethanolamine and secondary (diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine amines. It was found that this method is efficient for deposition of AuNPs from aqueous solution. However, nanoparticles change their morphology depending on the kind of amine used in experiments. On the AC surface modified with ethanolamine, the uniform spherical AuNPs were formed. In case of diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine application, the agglomerates of AuNPs are present. The diameter of individual AuNPs did not exceed 15 nm and was bigger as compared with the diameter of particles present in precursor solution (ca. 10 nm.

  5. Sputtering deposition and characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation focuses on experimental investigations of ultrathin, ultrasmooth amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited on Si(100) substrates by radio frequency (RF) sputtering and characterization of the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties and thermal stability of the films. Ultrathin a-C films of thickness 5--100 nm and typical root-mean-square roughness of 0.15--1 nm were deposited on ultrasmooth Si(100) substrates using pure argon as the sputtering gas. A low-pressure RF argon discharge model was used to analyze the plasma parameters in the film growth environment. These plasma parameters correlate the deposition conditions with the film growth processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface force microscopy (SFM) were used to characterize the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of the a-C films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the compositions and microstructures of the films. Sputter-etching measurements of the a-C films by energetic argon ion bombardment were used to study the surface binding energy of carbon atoms in a-C films deposited under different conditions. The dependence of film properties on deposition conditions was studied, and relations between nanomechanical and nanotribological properties were discussed in terms of a modified deformation index. The deformation and nanotribology mechanisms of the a-C films were compared with those of other films, such as TiC and Cr films (both 100 nm thick), and bulk Si(100). Reactive RF sputtering of nitrogenated amorphous carbon (a-CNx) films was investigated by introducing nitrogen into the a-C films during film growth by using an argon-nitrogen gas mixture as the sputtering gas. The alloying effect of nitrogen on the film growth and properties, such as hardness and surface energy, was studied and interpreted in terms of the changes in the plasma environment induced due to differences in the composition of the sputtering gas mixture. The thermal

  6. Formation of carbon deposits from coal in an arc plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, S.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, K. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

    2007-07-01

    The issue of deposited carbon (DC) on a reactor wall during the production of acetylene by the coal/arc plasma process is a potential obstacle for the industrialization process. The formation mechanism of DC is very difficult to reveal because the high complexity of coal and the volatile matter. Combining with quenching technique, the methane, liquid petroleum gas and benzene were employed as the model materials to roughly act as the light gas, chain and aromatic subcomponents of volatile matter, and then the reasonable formation mechanism of DC was subtly speculated accordingly.

  7. Electronic state of polyaniline deposited on carbon nanotube or ordered mesoporous carbon templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulusheva, L.G.; Fedorovskaya, E.O.; Okotrub, A.V.; Maximovskiy, E.A. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, 3 Acad. Lavrentiev ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, D.V. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Chen, Xiaohong; Song, Huaihe [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Polyaniline (PANI) has been deposited on a carbon template by chemical oxidation of aniline chloride in acidic aqueous medium using sodium persulfate as oxidant. Two kinds of templates were used: array of aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on silicon substrate and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) material. Electronic structure of composites was examined using near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Analysis of the spectra showed that PANI developed on the CNT surface is mainly protonated while it contains a marked amount of imine (=N-) nitrogen when deposited into the porous of OMC. Testing of electrochemical cell indicated enhancement of performance of composite electrodes as compared with unsupported PANI. XPS N 1s spectra of composites of PANI with OMC material (PANI/OMC) and aligned multiwall CNTs (PANI/CNT). (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Responses of Carbon Dynamics to Nitrogen Deposition in Typical Freshwater Wetland of Sanjiang Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen deposition (N-deposition on the carbon dynamics in typical Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland of Sanjiang Plain were studied by a pot-culture experiment during two continuous plant growing seasons. Elevated atmospheric N-deposition caused significant increases in the aboveground net primary production and root biomass; moreover, a preferential partition of carbon to root was also observed. Different soil carbon fractions gained due to elevated N-deposition and their response intensities followed the sequence of labile carbon > dissolved organic carbon > microbial biomass carbon, and the interaction between N-deposition and flooded condition facilitated the release of different carbon fractions. Positive correlations were found between CO2 and CH4 fluxes and liable carbon contents with N-deposition, and flooded condition also tended to facilitate CH4 fluxes and to inhibit the CO2 fluxes with N-deposition. The increases in soil carbon fractions occurring in the nitrogen treatments were significantly correlated with increases in root, aboveground parts, total biomass, and their carbon uptake. Our results suggested that N-deposition could enhance the contents of active carbon fractions in soil system and carbon accumulation in plant of the freshwater wetlands.

  9. Deposition of boron doped DLC films on TiNb and characterization of their mechanical properties and blood compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liza, Shahira; Hieda, Junko; Akasaka, Hiroki; Ohtake, Naoto; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Nagai, Akiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Diamond-like carbon (DLC) material is used in blood contacting devices as the surface coating material because of the antithrombogenicity behavior which helps to inhibit platelet adhesion and activation. In this study, DLC films were doped with boron during pulsed plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to improve the blood compatibility. The ratio of boron to carbon (B/C) was varied from 0 to 0.4 in the film by adjusting the flow rate of trimethylboron and acetylene. Tribological tests indicated that boron doping with a low B/C ratio of 0.03 is beneficial for reducing friction (μ = 0.1), lowering hardness and slightly increasing wear rate compared to undoped DLC films. The B/C ratio in the film of 0.03 and 0.4 exhibited highly hydrophilic surface owing to their high wettability and high surface energy. An in vitro platelet adhesion experiment was conducted to compare the blood compatibility of TiNb substrates before and after coating with undoped and boron doped DLC. Films with highly hydrophilic surface enhanced the blood compatibility of TiNb, and the best results were obtained for DLC with the B/C ratio of 0.03. Boron doped DLC films are promising surface coatings for blood contacting devices. PMID:28179961

  10. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  11. Studies on structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits in algae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kerkar, V.; Untawale, A.G.

    The structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits is studied in species of Halimeda, Udotea, Neomeris (Chlorophyta) and Padina (Phaeophyta). It was found that in Halimeda aragonite deposition takes place outside the cell wall...

  12. New Method of Depositing the Nanostructured Amorphous Carbon for Carbon Based Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fadzilah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured amorphous carbon (a-C solar cells were successfully deposited via a self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved efficiency ( of % for device deposited at 500°C, % for 450°C, and % for 400°C. Photoresponse characteristic was highlighted under illumination (AM 1.5 illuminations: 100 mW/cm2, 25°C, where conductivity increased when the sample was being hit by light. Transmittance spectrum exhibits a large transmittance value (85% and absorption coefficient value of  cm−1 at the visible range from 390 to 790 nm. The nanostructured a-C thin film deposited at higher temperature possesses lower transmittance due to higher absorption as a result of the higher content of sp2-bonded carbon atoms. From Tauc’s plot, optical band gap ( was determined, and decreased as deposition temperature increased (1.2 eV, 1.0 eV, 0.7 eV. On the other hand, FESEM images exhibited a nanostructured sized a-C with the particle size less than 100 nm. To the best of our knowledge, the presence of nanostructured particle of a-C by a self-prepared AACVD has not frequently been reported.

  13. Methods of Boron-carbon Deposited Film Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A.; Terentiev, V.; Voituk, A.; Zakharov, A.

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material for in-situ renewable protecting coating for tungsten tiles of the ITER divertor. It is necessary to develop a method of gasification of boron-carbon film which deposits during B4C sputtering. In this paper the results of the first stage investigation of gasification methods of boron-carbon films are presented. Two gasification methods of films are investigated: interaction with the ozone-oxygen mixture and irradiation in plasma with the working gas composed of oxygen, ethanol, and, in some cases, helium. The gasification rate in the ozone-oxygen mixture at 250 °C for B/C films with different B/C ratio and carbon fiber composite (CFC), was measured. For B/C films the gasification rate decreased with increasing B/C ratio (from 45 nm/h at B/C=0.7 to 4 nm/h at B/C=2.1; for CFC - 15 μm/h). Films gasification rates were measured under ion irradiation from ethanol-oxygen-helium plasma at different temperatures, with different ion energies and different gas mixtures. The maximum obtained removal rate was near 230 nm/h in case of ethanol-oxygen plasma and at 150°C of the sample temperature.

  14. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, David S; Lee, Roland; Hu Liangbing [Unidym Incorporated, 1244 Reamwood Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Heintz, Amy M; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven, E-mail: dhecht@gmail.com [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 {Omega}/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12 825 S cm{sup -1} and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  15. High conductivity transparent carbon nanotube films deposited from superacid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, David S; Heintz, Amy M; Lee, Roland; Hu, Liangbing; Moore, Bryon; Cucksey, Chad; Risser, Steven

    2011-02-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited from a chlorosulfonic superacid solution onto PET substrates by a filtration/transfer method. The sheet resistance and transmission (at 550 nm) of the films were 60 Ω/sq and 90.9% respectively, which corresponds to a DC conductivity of 12,825 S cm(-1) and a DC/optical conductivity ratio of 64.1. This is the highest DC conductivity reported for CNT thin films to date, and attributed to both the high quality of the CNT material and the exfoliation/doping by the superacid. This work demonstrates that CNT transparent films have not reached the conductivity limit; continued improvements will enable these films to be used as the transparent electrode for applications in solid state lighting, LCD displays, touch panels, and photovoltaics.

  16. Pronounced carbonate deposition in the Early Triassic Dienerian substage: Who was the carbonate producer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horacek, Micha; Brandner, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    At the Late Permian Mass Extinction (LPME) most marine carbonate producers were heavily affected or even terminated. After the event in several sections a "boundary clay" was deposited and in the Griesbachian microbialites have been reported from many marine sections, however, without causing substantial thicknesses. The Dienerian in many Tethyan sections, though, is characterized by a huge increase in sedimentation rate due to the deposition of limestone mud with only minor amounts of siliciclastic input. This is in contrast to the still missing "usual" (skeletal) carbonate producers that have not yet re-appeared after the extinction, and also in contrast to a steeply and constantly rising marine Sr-isotope curve. To us this pattern indicates short timed intense post-extinction acidification in some areas causing a strong decrease of carbonate precipitation and thus resulting in the sedimentation of the boundary clay. Post-extinction low sedimentation rate supported the extensive growth of microbialites, thrombolites and stromatolites on seafloors in the photic zone, resulting in the photosynthetic uptake of bicarbonate ions which induced carbonate biomineralisation within the microbial mats probably during still prevailing acidic ocean condition. In the Dienerian the ocean water pH must have returned to non-acidic conditions again due to biotic and probably mainly microbial activity, resulting in a thriving and carbonate precipitating planctic microbial community producing huge amounts of microcrystalline carbonate mud. As some sections already in the Griesbachian feature substantial accumulations of carbonate mud layers, there acidification might have lasted only for a shorter period. Burial of the mainly microbial biomass probably also resulted in the positive 13C isotope curve trend from the Griesbachian to the Dienerian-Smithian boundary. Our interpretation identifies the (marine) microbial community as one of the important and THE biotic factor influencing

  17. Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition enhances carbon sequestration in boreal soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaroufi, Nadia I; Nordin, Annika; Hasselquist, Niles J; Bach, Lisbet H; Palmqvist, Kristin; Gundale, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    It is proposed that carbon (C) sequestration in response to reactive nitrogen (Nr ) deposition in boreal forests accounts for a large portion of the terrestrial sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. While studies have helped clarify the magnitude by which Nr deposition enhances C sequestration by forest vegetation, there remains a paucity of long-term experimental studies evaluating how soil C pools respond. We conducted a long-term experiment, maintained since 1996, consisting of three N addition levels (0, 12.5, and 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) ) in the boreal zone of northern Sweden to understand how atmospheric Nr deposition affects soil C accumulation, soil microbial communities, and soil respiration. We hypothesized that soil C sequestration will increase, and soil microbial biomass and soil respiration will decrease, with disproportionately large changes expected compared to low levels of N addition. Our data showed that the low N addition treatment caused a non-significant increase in the organic horizon C pool of ~15% and a significant increase of ~30% in response to the high N treatment relative to the control. The relationship between C sequestration and N addition in the organic horizon was linear, with a slope of 10 kg C kg(-1) N. We also found a concomitant decrease in total microbial and fungal biomasses and a ~11% reduction in soil respiration in response to the high N treatment. Our data complement previous data from the same study system describing aboveground C sequestration, indicating a total ecosystem sequestration rate of 26 kg C kg(-1) N. These estimates are far lower than suggested by some previous modeling studies, and thus will help improve and validate current modeling efforts aimed at separating the effect of multiple global change factors on the C balance of the boreal region.

  18. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Czigány, Zsolt; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CNx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A "fullerene-like" (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CNx films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N2 pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp3-hybridized films to sp2 films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CNx films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  19. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Mark D., E-mail: martu@ifm.liu.se; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Czigány, Zsolt [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, RCNS, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-04-14

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CN{sub x}, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “fullerene-like” (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CN{sub x} films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N{sub 2} pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp{sup 3}-hybridized films to sp{sup 2} films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CN{sub x} films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  20. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  1. Isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen of carbonates of oil and gas-bearing deposits of Western Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golyshev, S.I.; Cherepnin, A.V.; Rozhnev, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    There is measured the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in 129 samples of carbonates and carbonate cements of oil and gas-bearing Paleozoic and Mezozoic deposits of Western Siberia. The isotopic composition of samples of marine deposits varies from -1.2 to +6.1% for carbon and from 19.8 to 29.1% for oxygen and has a mean isotopic composition of 1.9 to 24.8%. Catagenetic processes lead to lightening of the isotopic composition of secondary carbonate on the average by 5% for carbon and 9% for oxygen. The most intense lightening of isotopic composition is observed in samples disposed near oil and gas deposits.

  2. Carbon molecular sieves from bituminous coal by controlled coke deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Gangadhar, B. (Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) and zeolites are widely used as microporous sieving solids for gas and liquid separations. However, due to hydrophobicity, better thermal stability, and neutrality in both acidic and alkaline media, CMSs have definite advantages over zeolites. In the present work, an effort has been made to develop suitable process conditions for synthesizing CMSs from the locally available bituminous coal. The coal was crushed, milled, and agglomerated with sulfate pulp waste liquor (SPWL) or coal-tar pitch (CTP) as the binders, and then carbonized in nitrogen atmosphere at 800{degree}C for about 60 minutes. In order to narrow down the pore mouth sizes, acetylene and benzene were each cracked separately at 800{degree}C to facilitate the deposition of coke on the char. Acetylene and benzene were cracked for 3 to 10 minutes, and 10 to 30 minutes, respectively. Acetylene cracked samples did not show good separation, probably because of over-coking in deeper locations. In contrast benzene cracked samples were found to be highly suitable for CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} separation. The best result (i.e. uptake ratio of 39.9) was obtained for feed benzene entrainment in N{sub 2} of 1.27 x 10{sup -4} g/ml, cracking time of 30 minutes, and this ratio was more than 10 times that of non-coked sample. CMS samples produced using SPWL as binder showed poor O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} uptake ratios throughout (1 to 1.5), whereas samples with CTP as binder showed far more encouraging results, the best uptake ratio being 5.5 for benzene-nitrogen feed stream containing 3.508 x 10{sup -4} g/ml benzene and 5 minutes cracking time. This ratio is about 5.5 times more than that of uncoked sample. 4 tabs., 10 figs., 17 refs.

  3. Effects of Carbon Fiber Gas Pressure, Temperature and Deposition Distance on Thermo Fluids Phenomena in Vacuum Deposition Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A numerical analysis method (DSMC, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo)[l] was developed to simulate the molecular motion of rarefied gases. In the present paper, numerical approaches by the DSMC method have been carfled out. By the computation model of CC-40F carbon coater, the cylindrical deposition machine has axial symmetry; the flows inside the vacuum chamber were analyzed. The substrates were put on the bottom and the fiber near the ceiling in the computational domain. In the computational model, air and carbon molecules are working ones. The effects of the air gas pressure variation in the chamber, the effects of the deposition distance variation and the surface temperature variation of the carbon fiber on thermo fluids phenomena are discussed and visualized. Changing the number density of carbon and air, the temperature of the carbon and the velocity of the carbon in the chamber are discussed. With changing the surface temperature of the carbon fiber, qualitative assay of experiment and simulation result is in similar trend very well. The DSMC method is a forceful tool for the study of rarefied gas flow in vacuum deposition machine.

  4. Detection of lead ions in picomolar concentration range using underpotential deposition on silver nanoparticles-deposited glassy carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, R; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2011-09-30

    The efficacy of silver-deposited glassy carbon electrode for the determination of lead ions at the sub-nanomolar concentration ranges is investigated. The silver nanoparticles are electrodeposited on glassy carbon electrode using chronoamperometry and the electrode surface is characterized using SEM. Lead ions are detected in the region of underpotential deposition. The analysis is performed in square wave mode in the stripping voltammetry without the removal of oxygen. The detection limit of 10 pM has been obtained with a constant potential of -0.7 V during the electrodeposition step for a period of 50s. The interference of surfactants in the detection of lead ions is also studied.

  5. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  6. Site-specific carbon deposition for hierarchically ordered core/shell-structured graphitic carbon with remarkable electrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yingying; Wu, Zhangxiong; Qian, Xufang; Fang, Yin; Feng, Dan; Xia, Yongyao; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    A fascinating core-shell-structured graphitic carbon material composed of ordered microporous core and uniform mesoporous shell is fabricated for the first time through a site-specific chemical vapor deposition process by using a nanozeolite@mesostructured silica composite molecular sieve as the template. The mesostructure-directing agent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide in the shell of the template can be either burned off or carbonized so that it is successfully utilized as a pore switch to turn the shell of the template "on" or "off" to allow selective carbon deposition. The preferred carbon deposition process can be performed only in the inner microporous zeolite cores or just within the outer mesoporous shells, resulting in a zeolite-like ordered microporous carbon or a hollow mesoporous carbon. Full carbon deposition in the template leads to the new core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon with a nanographene-constructed framework for fast electron transport, a microporous nanocore with large surface area for high-capacity storage of lithium ions, a mesoporous shell with highly opened mesopores as a transport layer for lithium ions and electron channels to access inner cores. The ordered micropores are protected by the mesoporous shell, avoiding pore blockage as the formation of solid electrolyte interphase layers. Such a unique core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon material represents a newly established lithium ion storage model, demonstrating high reversible energy storage, excellent rate capability, and long cyclic stability.

  7. Influence of Blood Inertia on Vortex Enhancement in the Wake of Plaque Deposited Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Anwar Solangi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Flow of blood structure is presented in terms of stream line projections at different percentages of deposition against various Reynolds numbers. The impact of atherosclerosis is investigated on the vortex enhancement and intensity. The predicted results are computed in terms of stream function for quantifying the reattachment length and re-circulating flow rate of blood at various Reynolds numbers and different percentages of blockage. The results show that flow of blood is disturbs at the vicinity of blockage, especially in the down stream area that leads to the formation of vortexes. It is observed that the length of vortex increases along with the deposition levels as well as with increasing inertia .To solve the Navier-Stokes equations, together with the incompressibility constraints a semi-implicit time stepping procedure, namely Taylor- Galerkin/Pressure-correction finite element scheme has been employed.

  8. Camphor Tree Seed Kernel Oil Reduces Body Fat Deposition and Improves Blood Lipids in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing; Wang, Baogui; Gong, Deming; Zeng, Cheng; Jiang, Yihao; Zeng, Zheling

    2015-08-01

    The total and positional fatty acid composition in camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora) seed kernel oil (CKO) were analyzed, and for the first time, the effect of CKO on body fat deposition and blood lipids in rats was studied. The major fatty acids in CKO were determined to be decanoic acid (C10:0, 51.49%) and dodecanoic acid (C12:0, 40.08%), and uniformly distributed at Sn-1, 3, and Sn-2 positions in triglyceride (TG). Rats were randomly divided into control, CKO, lard, and soybean oil groups. At the end of the experiment, levels of blood lipids and the fats of abdomen in the rats were measured. The main organ were weighted and used for the histological examination. The results showed that body weight and fat deposition in CKO group were significantly lower than the lard and soybean groups. Moderate consumption of CKO was found to improve the levels of blood TG and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

  9. Electrophoretic deposition of iron catalyst on C-fiber textiles for the growth of carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2014-11-01

    In this study, carbon nanofibers synthesis has been conducted by chemical vapor deposition on C-fiber textiles coated with an iron catalyst via electrophoretic deposition. C-fiber textiles were oxidized with nitric acid before the iron catalyst was plated by electrophoretic deposition. Due to oxidation, the hydroxyl group was created on the C-fiber textiles and was used as an active site for iron catalyst deposition. It was verified that the iron catalyst was deposited on the C-fiber textiles, while current, voltage, and deposition time varied and the concentration of electrolyte was kept constant in electrophoretic deposition. After being deposited, the iron particles were dried in oven for 24 hours and reduced by hydrogen gas in a furnace. Ethylene gas was introduced for the growth of carbon nanofibers and the growth temperature was then varied to find the optimal growth temperature of the carbon nanofibers. Thus, the characteristics of carbon nanofibers were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It is verified that the iron particles were most evenly deposited at 0.1 A for 3 minutes. Carbon nanofibers grew to 150-200 nm most evenly at 600 degrees C via temperature variations in CVD.

  10. Effect of molecular weight on the electrophoretic deposition of carbon black nanoparticles in moderately viscous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Satyam; Panwar, Artee; Mead, Joey L; Barry, Carol M F

    2013-08-06

    Electrophoretic deposition from viscous media has the potential to produce in-mold assembly of nanoparticles onto three-dimensional parts in high-rate, polymer melt-based processes like injection molding. The effects of the media's molecular weight on deposition behavior were investigated using a model system of carbon black and polystyrene in tetrahydrofuran. Increases in molecular weight reduced the electrophoretic deposition of the carbon black particles due to increases in suspension viscosity and preferential adsorption of the longer polystyrene chains on the carbon black particles. At low deposition times (≤5 s), only carbon black deposited onto the electrodes, but the deposition decreased with increasing molecular weight and the resultant increases in suspension viscosity. For longer deposition times, polystyrene codeposited with the carbon black, with the amount of polystyrene increasing with molecular weight and decreasing with greater charge on the polystyrene molecules. This deposition behavior suggests that use of lower molecular polymers and control of electrical properties will permit electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles from polymer melts for high-rate, one-step fabrication of nano-optical devices, biochemical sensors, and nanoelectronics.

  11. Nitrogen deposition: how important is it for global terrestrial carbon uptake?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bala

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Global carbon budget studies indicate that the terrestrial ecosystems have remained a~large sink for carbon despite widespread deforestation activities. CO2-fertilization, N deposition and re-growth of mid-latitude forests are believed to be key drivers for land carbon uptake. In this study, we assess the importance of N deposition by performing idealized near-equilibrium simulations using the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4. In our equilibrium simulations, only 12–17% of the deposited Nitrogen is assimilated into the ecosystem and the corresponding carbon uptake can be inferred from a C : N ratio of 20:1. We calculate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere for CO2-fertilization, climate warming and N deposition as changes in total ecosystem carbon for unit changes in global mean atmospheric CO2 concentration, global mean temperature and Tera grams of Nitrogen deposition per year, respectively. Based on these sensitivities, it is estimated that about 242 PgC could have been taken up by land due to the CO2 fertilization effect and an additional 175 PgC taken up as a result of the increased N deposition since the pre-industrial period. Because of climate warming, terrestrial ecosystem could have lost about 152 PgC during the same period. Therefore, since preindustrial times terrestrial carbon losses due to warming may have been approximately compensated by effects of increased N deposition, whereas the effect of CO2-fertilization is approximately indicative of the current increase in terrestrial carbon stock. Our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of carbon storage to increased N deposition decreases beyond current levels, indicating climate warming effects on carbon storage may overwhelm N deposition effects in the future.

  12. Nitrogen deposition: how important is it for global terrestrial carbon uptake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, G.; Devaraju, N.; Chaturvedi, R. K.; Caldeira, K.; Nemani, R.

    2013-11-01

    Global carbon budget studies indicate that the terrestrial ecosystems have remained a large sink for carbon despite widespread deforestation activities. CO2 fertilization, N deposition and re-growth of mid-latitude forests are believed to be key drivers for land carbon uptake. In this study, we assess the importance of N deposition by performing idealized near-equilibrium simulations using the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4). In our equilibrium simulations, only 12-17% of the deposited nitrogen is assimilated into the ecosystem and the corresponding carbon uptake can be inferred from a C : N ratio of 20 : 1. We calculate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere for CO2 fertilization, climate warming and N deposition as changes in total ecosystem carbon for unit changes in global mean atmospheric CO2 concentration, global mean temperature and Tera grams of nitrogen deposition per year, respectively. Based on these sensitivities, it is estimated that about 242 PgC could have been taken up by land due to the CO2 fertilization effect and an additional 175 PgC taken up as a result of the increased N deposition since the pre-industrial period. Because of climate warming, the terrestrial ecosystem could have lost about 152 PgC during the same period. Therefore, since pre-industrial times terrestrial carbon losses due to warming may have been more or less compensated by effects of increased N deposition, whereas the effect of CO2 fertilization is approximately indicative of the current increase in terrestrial carbon stock. Our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of carbon storage to increased N deposition decreases beyond current levels, indicating that climate warming effects on carbon storage may overwhelm N deposition effects in the future.

  13. Patterned deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on self-assembled monolayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yitian; HU Yuanzhong; WANG Hui

    2006-01-01

    Patterned chemical template consisting of both amine- and methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers has been fabricated. The deposition of carbon nanotubes is carried out by immerging the patterned substrate into dimethylformamide (DMF) solution with suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs). SEM images show a successful patterned deposition that carbon nanotubes selectively deposit in the area with amino-terminated SAMs due to the strong attract force between the monolayer and the suspended CNTs. This experiment provides an opportunity for manipulating individual CNTs, and represents a significant step in development of CNTs-based nanodevices.

  14. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  15. Carbon, oxygen and boron isotopic studies of Huangbaishuwan witherite deposit at Ziyang and Wenyuhe witherite deposit at Zhushan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü; Zhicheng(吕志成); LIU; Congqiang(刘丛强); LIU; Jiajun(刘家军); ZHAO; Zhiqi(赵志琦)

    2003-01-01

    Being stratiform or stratoid, the Huangbaishuwan witherite deposit at Ziyang and the Wenyuhe witherite-barite deposit at Zhushan occur in the lower Lower Cambrian siliceous rocks and the orebodies are remarkably controlled by lithological character and petrography. Boron, carbon and oxygen isotopic studies of witherite, barytocalcite and calcite have shown that the carbon, involved in the formation of these minerals, was derived mainly from hydrocarbons and biogenetic gases resulting from degradation, polycondensation and dehydroxylation of bio-organic matter in sediments at the early stage of diagenesis; the boron was a mixture of boron in pore water and that released in the process of degradation of organic matter, with a minor amount of boron from cycling brines in the deep interior of the basin. Boron, carbon and oxygen isotopic studies unanimously demonstrated that witherite was precipitated in this sort of organic carbon-rich pore water medium during the early stage of diagenesis. Extensive occurrence of biodetritus and clastic texture in witherite ores strongly evidenced that Ba2+ was concentrated and settled down in the form of bio-barite on the seafloor as a result of biological processes, thereafter forming the initially enriched orebodies of barium deposits. Biological processes in seawater and early diagenesis in sediments are the major ore-forming mechanisms of witherite deposits in the region studied.

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  17. Carbon deposition in an SOFC fueled by tar-laden biomass gas: a thermodynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder; Hernández-Pacheco, Eduardo; Hutton, Phillip N.; Patel, Nikhil; Mann, Michael D.

    This work presents a thermodynamic analysis of the carbon deposition in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fueled by a biomass gasifier. Integrated biomass-SOFC units offer considerable benefits in terms of efficiency and fewer emissions. SOFC-based power plants can achieve a system efficiency of 70-80% (including heat utilization) as compared to 30-37% for conventional systems. The fuel from the biomass gasifier can contain considerable amounts of tars depending on the type of gasifier used. These tars can lead to the deposition of carbon at the anode side of SOFCs and affect the performance of the fuel cells. This paper thermodynamically studies the risk of carbon deposition due to the tars present in the feed stream and the effect various parameters like current density, steam, and temperature have on carbon deposition. Since tar is a complex mixture of aromatics, it is represented by a mixture of toluene, naphthalene, phenol, and pyrene. A total of 32 species are considered for the thermodynamic analysis, which is done by the Gibbs energy minimization technique. The carbon deposition is shown to decrease with an increase in current density and becomes zero after a critical current density. Steam in the feed stream also decreases the amount of carbon deposition. With the increase in temperature the amount of carbon first decreases and then increases.

  18. Surface treatment effect on Si (111) substrate for carbon deposition using DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aji, A. S., E-mail: aji.ravazes70@gmail.com; Sahdan, M. F.; Hendra, I. B.; Dinari, P.; Darma, Y. [Quantum Semiconductor and Devices Lab., Physics of Material Electronics Research Division, Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    In this work, we studied the effect of HF treatment in silicon (111) substrate surface for depositing thin layer carbon. We performed the deposition of carbon by using DC Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering with carbon pallet (5% Fe) as target. From SEM characterization results it can be concluded that the carbon layer on HF treated substrate is more uniform than on substrate without treated. Carbon deposition rate is higher as confirmed by AFM results if the silicon substrate is treated by HF solution. EDAX characterization results tell that silicon (111) substrate with HF treatment have more carbon fraction than substrate without treatment. These results confirmed that HF treatment on silicon Si (111) substrates could enhance the carbon deposition by using DC sputtering. Afterward, the carbon atomic arrangement on silicon (111) surface is studied by performing thermal annealing process to 900 °C. From Raman spectroscopy results, thin film carbon is not changing until 600 °C thermal budged. But, when temperature increase to 900 °C, thin film carbon is starting to diffuse to silicon (111) substrates.

  19. Aligned carbon nanotube, graphene and graphite oxide thin films via substrate-directed rapid interfacial deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Julio M; Tran, Henry D; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K; Kaner, Richard B

    2012-05-21

    A procedure for depositing thin films of carbon nanostructures is described that overcomes the limitations typically associated with solution based methods. Transparent and conductively continuous carbon coatings can be grown on virtually any type of substrate within seconds. Interfacial surface tension gradients result in directional fluid flow and film spreading at the water/oil interface. Transparent films of carbon nanostructures are produced including aligned ropes of single-walled carbon nanotubes and assemblies of single sheets of chemically converted graphene and graphite oxide. Process scale-up, layer-by-layer deposition, and a simple method for coating non-activated hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated.

  20. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  1. Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G., E-mail: ambrosone@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Rigato, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ferrero, S.; Virga, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films, composed of Si nanocrystallites embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon matrix, have been prepared by varying rf power in ultra high vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system using silane and methane gas mixtures diluted in hydrogen. In this paper we have studied the compositional, structural and electrical properties of these films as a function of rf power. It is shown that with increasing rf power the atomic densities of carbon and hydrogen increase while the atomic density of silicon decreases, resulting in a reduction in the mass density. Further, it is demonstrated that carbon is incorporated into amorphous matrix and it is mainly bonded to silicon. The study has also revealed that the crystalline volume fraction decreases with increase in rf power and that the films deposited with low rf power have a size distribution of large and small crystallites while the films deposited with relatively high power have only small crystallites. Finally, the enhanced transport properties of the nanostructured silicon carbon films, as compared to amorphous counterpart, have been attributed to the presence of Si nanocrystallites. - Highlights: • The mass density of silicon carbon films decreases from 2.3 to 2 g/cm{sup 3}. • Carbon is incorporated in the amorphous phase and it is mainly bonded to silicon. • Nanostructured silicon carbon films are deposited at rf power > 40 W. • Si nanocrystallites in amorphous silicon carbon enhance the electrical properties.

  2. Hall Measurements on Carbon Nanotube Paper Modified With Electroless Deposited Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwuoha Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotube paper, sometimes referred to as bucky paper, is a random arrangement of carbon nanotubes meshed into a single robust structure, which can be manipulated with relative ease. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to make the nanotube paper, and were subsequently modified with platinum using an electroless deposition method based on substrate enhanced electroless deposition. This involves the use of a sacrificial metal substrate that undergoes electro-dissolution while the platinum metal deposits out of solution onto the nanotube paper via a galvanic displacement reaction. The samples were characterized using SEM/EDS, and Hall-effect measurements. The SEM/EDS analysis clearly revealed deposits of platinum (Pt distributed over the nanotube paper surface, and the qualitative elemental analysis revealed co-deposition of other elements from the metal substrates used. When stainless steel was used as sacrificial metal a large degree of Pt contamination with various other metals was observed. Whereas when pure sacrificial metals were used bimetallic Pt clusters resulted. The co-deposition of a bimetallic system upon carbon nanotubes was a function of the metal type and the time of exposure. Hall-effect measurements revealed some interesting fluctuations in sheet carrier density and the dominant carrier switched from N- to P-type when Pt was deposited onto the nanotube paper. Perspectives on the use of the nanotube paper as a replacement to traditional carbon cloth in water electrolysis systems are also discussed.

  3. Hall measurements on carbon nanotube paper modified with electroless deposited platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Leslie; Ndungu, Patrick; Iwuoha, Emmanuel

    2009-09-18

    Carbon nanotube paper, sometimes referred to as bucky paper, is a random arrangement of carbon nanotubes meshed into a single robust structure, which can be manipulated with relative ease. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to make the nanotube paper, and were subsequently modified with platinum using an electroless deposition method based on substrate enhanced electroless deposition. This involves the use of a sacrificial metal substrate that undergoes electro-dissolution while the platinum metal deposits out of solution onto the nanotube paper via a galvanic displacement reaction. The samples were characterized using SEM/EDS, and Hall-effect measurements. The SEM/EDS analysis clearly revealed deposits of platinum (Pt) distributed over the nanotube paper surface, and the qualitative elemental analysis revealed co-deposition of other elements from the metal substrates used. When stainless steel was used as sacrificial metal a large degree of Pt contamination with various other metals was observed. Whereas when pure sacrificial metals were used bimetallic Pt clusters resulted. The co-deposition of a bimetallic system upon carbon nanotubes was a function of the metal type and the time of exposure. Hall-effect measurements revealed some interesting fluctuations in sheet carrier density and the dominant carrier switched from N- to P-type when Pt was deposited onto the nanotube paper. Perspectives on the use of the nanotube paper as a replacement to traditional carbon cloth in water electrolysis systems are also discussed.

  4. Effect of nickel introduced by electroplating on pyrocarbon deposition of carbon-fiber preforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Yancai; Shi Xiaohong; Li Hejun; Li Kezhi; Zhang Xin

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the deposition rate and microstructure of pyrocarbon, nickel was introduced by electroplating on carbon fibers and used as a catalyst during the deposition of pyro-carbon at 1000 ?C using methane as a precursor gas. The distribution of nickel catalyst and the microstructure of pyrocarbon were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman micro-spectrometry. Results show that nano-sized nickel particles could be well distributed on carbon fibers and the pyrocarbon deposited catalytically had a smaller d002 value and a higher graphitization degree compared with that without catalyst. In addition, the deposition rate of pyrocarbon in each hour was measured. The deposition rate of pyrocarbon in the first hour was more than 10 times when carbon cloth substrates were doped with nickel catalysts as compared to the pure carbon cloths. The pyrocarbon gained by rapid deposition may include two parts, which are generation directly on the nickel catalyst and formation with the carbon nanofibers as crystal nucleus.

  5. Deposition and characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films on rubber seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals. The wax removal and pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrates are proven to be cruci

  6. Soil aggregation and the stabilization of organic carbon as affected by erosion and deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Cammeraat, E.L.H.; Cerli, C.; Kalbitz, K.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of soil aggregation in determining the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) during erosion, transportation and deposition is poorly understood. Particularly, we do not know how aggregation contributes to the often-observed accumulation of SOC at depositional sites. Our objective was

  7. Deuterium Retention in the Co-Deposition Carbon Layers Deposited by Radio-Frequency Magnetron Sputtering in D2 Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Shi, Li-Qun; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Jian-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    Carbon is deposited on C and Si substrates by rf magnetron plasma sputtering in a D2 atmosphere. The deposited layers are examined with ion beam analysis and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The growth rates of the layers deposited on Si decrease with increasing substrate temperature, while increase significantly with the increase of D2 pressure. Meanwhile, the deuterium concentrations in the layers deposited on the Si substrates decrease from 30% to 2% and from 31% to 1% on the C substrates, respectively, when the substrate temperature varies from 350K to 900 K. Similarly, the D concentration in the layer on the Si substrates increases from 3.4% to 47%, and from 8% to 35% on the C substrates when the D2 pressure increases from 0.3Pa to 8.0Pa. D desorption characterized by TDS is mainly in the forms of D2, HD, HDO, CD4, and C2D4, and a similar release peak occurs at 645 K. The release peak of D2 molecules at 960K can be attributed to the escaped gas from the thin co-deposited deuterium-rich carbon layer in the form of C-D bonding.

  8. Interlaminar improvement of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via depositing mixture of carbon nanotubes and sizing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Cuiqin [Beijing Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Process and Technology for Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Julin, E-mail: julinwang@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Process and Technology for Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Tao [Beijing Institute of Ancient Architecture, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • COOH-CNTs can react with sizing agent, and the optimum reaction ratio was 1:20. • Carbon fibers were dipped into the mixture bath of CNTs and sizing agent. • SEM results indicate that fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. • ILSS was increased by 67.01% for the composites after the mixture coating process. • Single fibers tensile strength was maintained after the deposited process. - Abstract: The effects of deposition to carbon fibers surfaces with mixture of functionalized multi-walled carbon fibers (MWCNTs) and sizing agent were investigated. Relationships between CNTs and sizing agent were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Ubbelohde viscometer. The results revealed that CNTs could react with sizing agent at 120 °C, and optimal reaction occurs when mass ratio was about 1:20. Then, carbon fibers were immersed in mixed aqueous suspension of CNTs and sizing agent with the above ratio dispersed by ultrasonication. According to scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. The static contact angle tests indicated wetting performance between fibers and epoxy resin were improved after deposited procedures. Interlaminar shear strength was increased by 67.01% for fibers/epoxy resin composites after mixture deposited process. Moreover, the tensile strength of single fibers after depositing showed a slightly increase compared with that of fibers without depositing layer.

  9. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on nanostructured carbon electrodes grown by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Bardizza, Giorgio; Podesta, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Piseri, Paolo, E-mail: piseri@mi.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and CIMaINa (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Nanostructured porous films of carbon with density of about 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} and 200 nm thickness were deposited at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from carbon clusters formed in the gas phase. Carbon film surface topography, determined by atomic force microscopy, reveals a surface roughness of 16 nm and a granular morphology arising from the low kinetic energy ballistic deposition regime. The material is characterized by a highly disordered carbon structure with predominant sp2 hybridization as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy. The interface properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing KOH 1 M solution as aqueous electrolyte. An increase of the double layer capacitance is observed when the electrodes are heat treated in air or when a nanostructured nickel layer deposited by SCBD on top of a sputter deposited film of the same metal is employed as a current collector instead of a plain metallic film. This enhancement is consistent with an improved charge injection in the active material and is ascribed to the modification of the electrical contact at the interface between the carbon and the metal current collector. Specific capacitance values up to 120 F/g have been measured for the electrodes with nanostructured metal/carbon interface.

  10. Nitrogen and Carbon Dynamics Across Trophic Levels Along an Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissinger, B. D.; Bell, M. D.; Newingham, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition has altered soil biogeochemical processes and plant communities across the United States. Prior investigations have demonstrated these alterations; however, little is known about the effects of elevated nitrogen on higher trophic levels. Building upon previous research that revealed an atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient from the San Bernardino Mountains through Joshua Tree National Park in California, we investigated atmospheric nitrogen and its effects on soils, plants, and harvester ants. We measured nitrogen and carbon concentrations, along with carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, across trophic levels at eighteen urban and unpopulated sites along the deposition gradient. Carbon and nitrogen attributes were determined in atmospheric nitric acid, soil, Larrea tridentata and Ambrosia dumosa leaves, seeds from selected plant species, and ants. We predicted carbon and nitrogen ratios and isotopes to change in areas with higher nitrogen deposition and vary along the deposition gradient. Nitrogen (p=0.02) and carbon (p=0.05) concentrations, as well as C:N ratios (p=<0.001), significantly differed in Messor pergandei individuals among sites; however, no correlation was found between these carbon and nitrogen attributes and the nitrogen deposition gradient (%N r2=0.02, %C r2=0.007, C:N r2=0.02). The δ15N and δ13C values of the ants, leaf tissues, and seeds measured across the gradient follow similar patterns with r2 values all below 0.20. Our results suggest the current and previous rates of nitrogen deposition in this area are not enough to modify nitrogen and carbon concentrations and isotope values. Compensatory nitrogen cycling processes in the soil may reduce the effects of increased nitrogen on plants and thus higher trophic levels. Nitrogen and carbon dynamics across trophic levels might change after longer ecosystem exposure to elevated nitrogen; however, other abiotic and biotic factors are likely driving current

  11. Treatment of oil–water emulsions by adsorption onto activated carbon, bentonite and deposited carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Okiel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Emulsified oil in waste water constitutes is a severe problem in the different treatment stages before disposed off in a manner that does not violate environmental criteria. One commonly used technique for remediation of petroleum contaminated water is adsorption. The main objective of this study is to examine the removal of oil from oil–water emulsions by adsorption on bentonite, powdered activated carbon (PAC and deposited carbon (DC. The results gave evidence of the ability of the adsorbents to adsorb oil and that the adsorptive property of the three adsorbents (bentonite, PAC, and DC has been influenced by different factors. The effects of contact time, the weight of adsorbents and the concentration of adsorbate on the oil adsorption have been studied. Oil removal percentages increase with increasing contact time and the weight of adsorbents, and decrease with increasing the concentration of adsorbate. Equilibrium studies show that the Freunlich isotherm was the best fit isotherm for oil removal by bentonite, PAC, and DC. The data show higher adsorptive capacities by DC and bentonite compared to the PAC.

  12. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Hossein, E-mail: h.jamali@mut-es.ac.ir; Mozafarinia, Reza; Eshaghi, Akbar

    2015-10-15

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow ratio.

  13. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n=105) and cancer (n=75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC.

  14. A New Genetic Type of Gold Deposits-Meso-Epithermal Carbonate-Type Gold Deposits as Exemplified by the Baguamiao Suprlarge Gold Deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Gold deposits of the meso-epithermal carbonate type were first proposed based on the study of the Baguamiao gold deposit.This new type of gold deposits has many unique characteristics as follows:(1)Obviously strata-bound.The gold deposits are hosted in Middle Devonian turbidite formations;(2)Structrually controlled.Struc-ture is an important factor leading to metallogenesis of this type of gold deposits.The shape and distribution of orebodies are controlled by byittle-ductile shear zones;(3)Multi-stage wall-rock alteration.According to the characteristics of mineral assemblage,gold mineralization can be classified into three stages in association with various wall-rock al-terations.Wall-rock alterations closely genetically related to the gold mineralization are ankerization ,silicification,pyrrhotization and pyritization ;(4)Mineral compositions of the orebodies are mainly pyrrhotite,pyrite,marcasitolite,chalcopyrite,quartz,ankerite,and sericite.Gold mineralization is associated closely in space and time with iron sulfides;(5)Rare elements and REE in ores are low in contents relative to those of the crust.Au content varies from 1.91g/t to 11.15g/t ,averaging 5.5g/t;(6)Studies of sulfur,hydrogen,oxygen and carbon isotopes in main gangue minerals (quartz and ankerite)indicate that fluids and ore-forming materials came from deep-seated sources;(7)Three types of inclusions are recognized in terms of their composition and the vapor amounts of inclusions.The homogenization temperatures of inclusions range from 210℃to 310℃,averaging 230℃,showing that this type of gold deposits belongs to the meso-epithermal type;(8)Metallogenic age of this type of gold deposits is similar to that of the collision between the Yangtze Plate and the North China Plate,indicating that gold deposits of this type are genetically related to continental-margin plate activity.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  16. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  17. Chemical vapor deposition fabrication and characterization of silica-coated carbon fiber ultramicroelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Giolando, D M; Kirchhoff, J R

    1995-08-01

    Carbon fiber disk ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) with well-defined geometries were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques. Transparent silica films with thicknesses from 1 to 600 microns were deposited on the cylindrical length of 5 and 10 microns carbon fibers from a SiCl4, H2, and O2 ternary precursor system at 850-1150 degrees C or sequential deposition from Si(OEt)4 as a single source precursor at 700 degrees C followed by the SiCl4, H2, and O2 precursor system. Film thickness, film adhesion to the fiber substrate, and the overall dimensions of the silica-coated carbon fiber were studied and found to be a function of the precursor system, precursor concentrations, fiber diameter, deposition time, and fiber temperature. The silica films were found to be free of microcracks and characterized by a quality seal between the carbon fiber and the coating. As a result, the silica-coated disk UME exhibits an excellent electrochemical response without the need to use an epoxy sealant at the electrode tip. Furthermore, the deposition of hard and inert ceramic materials imparts durability to fragile carbon fibers and facilitates the handling of UMEs in microenvironments. Finally, the advantage of concentric deposition about the fibers to produce a disk UME in the center of an insulating plane was used to examine the effect of the thickness of the insulating coating on the limiting current response.

  18. Effect of nickel introduced by electroplating on pyrocarbon deposition of carbon-fiber preforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yancai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the deposition rate and microstructure of pyrocarbon, nickel was introduced by electroplating on carbon fibers and used as a catalyst during the deposition of pyrocarbon at 1000 °C using methane as a precursor gas. The distribution of nickel catalyst and the microstructure of pyrocarbon were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman micro-spectrometry. Results show that nano-sized nickel particles could be well distributed on carbon fibers and the pyrocarbon deposited catalytically had a smaller d002 value and a higher graphitization degree compared with that without catalyst. In addition, the deposition rate of pyrocarbon in each hour was measured. The deposition rate of pyrocarbon in the first hour was more than 10 times when carbon cloth substrates were doped with nickel catalysts as compared to the pure carbon cloths. The pyrocarbon gained by rapid deposition may include two parts, which are generation directly on the nickel catalyst and formation with the carbon nanofibers as crystal nucleus.

  19. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  20. Fabrication of Pt deposited on carbon nanotubes and performance of its polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new method of depositing nano-sized Pt particles on the surface of the carbon nano-tubes was introduced, and the performance of Pt/carbon nanotube compound on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells was measured. The experimental results show that the fine platinum particles (about 3 nm) were well dispersed on carbon nanotubes, which demonstrates the excellent catalytic properties of the Pt/CNTs compound in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  1. Influence of carbon nanotubes coatings onto carbon fiber by oxidative treatments combined with electrophoretic deposition on interfacial properties of carbon fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Jiang, Jianjun; Liu, Fa; Fang, Liangchao; Wang, Junbiao; Li, Dejia; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-12-01

    To improve the interfacial performance of carbon fiber (CF) and epoxy resin, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coatings were utilized to achieve this purpose through coating onto CF by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The influence of electrophoretically deposited CNTs coatings on the surface properties of CFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic contact angle analysis. The results indicated that the deposition of carbon nanotubes introduced some polar groups to carbon fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of carbon fibers. Surface wettability of carbon fibers may be significantly improved by increasing surface free energy of the fibers due to the deposition of CNTs. The thickness and density of the coatings increases with the introduction of pretreatment of the CF during the EPD process. Short beam shear test was performed to examine the effect of carbon fiber functionalization on mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites. The interfacial adhesion of CNTs/CF reinforced epoxy composites showed obvious enhancement of interlaminar shear strength by 60.2% and scanning electron microscope photographs showed that the failure mode of composites was changed after the carbon fibers were coated with CNTs.

  2. Dust deposition in an oligotrophic marine environment: impact on the carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By bringing new nutrients and particles to the surface ocean, atmospheric deposition impacts biogeochemical cycles. The extent to which those changes are modifying the carbon balance in oligotrophic environments such as the Mediterranean Sea that receives important Saharan dust fluxes is unknown. DUNE project provides the first attempt to evaluate the changes induced in the carbon budget of an oligotrophic system after simulated Saharan dust wet and dry deposition events. Here we report the results for the 3 distinct artificial dust seeding experiments in large mesocosms that were conducted in the oligotrophic waters of the Mediterranean Sea in summer 2008 and 2010. Simultaneous measurements of the metabolic rates (C fixation, C respiration in the water column have shown that the dust deposition did not change drastically the metabolic balance as the tested waters remained net heterotroph (i.e. net primary production to bacteria respiration ratio < 1 and in some cases the net heterotrophy was even enhanced by the dust deposition. Considering the different terms of the carbon budget, we estimate that it was balanced with a dissolved organic carbon (DOC consumption of at least 10% of the initial stock. This corresponds to a fraction of the DOC stock of the surface mixed layer that consequently will not be exported during the winter mixing. Although heterotrophic bacteria were found to be the key players in the response to dust deposition, net primary production increased about twice in case of simulated wet deposition (that includes anthropogenic nitrogen and a small fraction of particulate organic carbon was still exported. Our estimated carbon budgets are an important step forward in the way we understand dust deposition and associated impacts on the oceanic cycles. They are providing knowledge about the key processes (i.e. bacteria respiration, aggregation that need to be considered for an integration of atmospheric deposition in marine

  3. The preparation of 248CmF 3 deposits on self-supported carbon foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, W. S.; Petek, M.; Zevenbergen, L. A.

    1987-06-01

    Another target preparative technique was recently added to the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory's (IRML) capabilities for custom target fabrication. In support of super-heavy-ion physics experiments, methods and equipment were developed for the preparation of 248CmF 3 deposits on carbon foils. The starting material was obtained as either a chloride or nitrate solution, converted to the flouride, and evaporated on carbon foil substrates. Deposits ranging from 40 to 570 μg/cm 2 were prepared as a 12-mm-diam spot on 45- to 60-μg/cm 2 self-supported carbon foils. The deposits were then overcoated with approximately 10 μg/cm 2 of carbon to minimize contamination problems during target handling. The high cost of 248Cm ($100/μg) and its limited availability were the key constraints in the development of preparative technology beyond the inherent radioactivity of 248Cm.

  4. Rapid Carbonate Depositional Changes Following the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction:Sedimentary Evidence from South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Tian; Jinnan Tong; David Bottjer; Daoliang Chu; Lei Liang; Huyue Song; Haijun Song

    2015-01-01

    Various environmental changes were associated with the Permian-Triassic mass extinc-tion at 252.2 Ma. Diverse unusual sediments and depositional phenomena have been uncovered as re-sponses to environmental and biotic changes. Lithological and detailed conodont biostratigraphic cor-relations within six Permian-Triassic boundary sections in South China indicate rapid fluctuations in carbonate deposition. Four distinct depositional phases can be recognized:(1) normal carbonate depo-sition on the platform and slope during the latest Permian;(2) reduced carbonate deposition at the on-set of the main extinction horizon; (3) expanded areas of carbonate deposition during the Hindeodus changxingsensis Zone to the H. parvus Zone;and (4) persistent mud-enriched carbonate deposition in the aftermath of the Permian-Triassic transition. Although availability of skeletal carbonate was sig-nificantly reduced during the mass extinction, the increase in carbonate deposition did not behave the same way. The rapid carbonate depositional changes, presented in this study, suggest that diverse envi-ronmental changes played key roles in the carbonate deposition of the Permian-Triassic mass extinction and onset of its aftermath. An overview of hypotheses to explain these changes implies enhanced terres-trial input, abnormal ocean circulation and various geobiological processes contributed to carbonate saturation fluctuations, as the sedimentary response to large volcanic eruptions.

  5. Oxidation Protection Systems for Carbon-Carbon Composites Formed by Chemical Vapor Deposition and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-22

    transducer, ie. a more positive scaleI I 34 thickness of fairly continuous conversion layer carbon 10 , •O.0000 resina 0 0 Fiber O0c00.a 0 Bundlea • 06...thermal and oxidative environments. It should meet four main requirements: adequate adhesion between substrate and coating; maximum resistance to...resistance and good coating adhesion . (2) CVD Coatings I Currently, the most successful protective coating for carbon-carbon composite is CVD SiC. Coatings

  6. Deposition rate and morphology of carbon nanotubes at different positions in a CVD reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized through the catalytic decomposition of a ferroeene-xylene mixture in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor.The deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction was measured.The morphology of CNTs was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results showed that the deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction first increased and later decreased,the position achieving the maximum deposition rate was influenced by the operating conditions.The morphologies of CNTs also changed along the axial direction.

  7. Effects of nitrogen deposition on carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystems of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Dejun; Gurmesa, Geshere Abdisa

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition in China has increased greatly, but the general impact of elevated N deposition on carbon (C) dynamics in Chinese terrestrial ecosystems is not well documented. In this study we used a meta-analysis method to compile 88 studies on the effects of N deposition C cycling...... and rate of N addition. Overall, our findings suggest that 1) decreased below-ground plant C pool may limit long-term soil C sequestration; and 2) it is better to treat N-rich and N-limited ecosystems differently in modeling effects of N deposition on ecosystem C cycle....

  8. CONFORMATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF CARBON NANOFIBERS DEPOSITED ON FOAM Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bundles of pure carbon nanofibers were prepared by catalytic decomposition of acetylene on foam Ni. The morphological and structural characteristics of the carbon nanostructures, in the as-prepared state, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM). A special conformation of carbon nanofibers composed of segmented structures was found among the products by both SEM and TEM observations. Further HTEM ex amination indicated that the segments were stacked with well ordered graphite platelets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the filaments.

  9. Structure and phase composition of deposited tantalum-carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.; Alimzhan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Ion plasma sputtering and the subsequent codeposition of ultrafine tantalum and carbon particles were used to prepare coatings with 4.6-71.5 at % C. Structural studies of the coatings showed the existence of carbon solid solutions in β Ta at carbon contents to 4.6 at %, carbon solid solutions in α Ta at carbon contents of 4.6-10.3 at %, and direct synthesis of TaC at carbon contents of 44.7-71.5 at %. During heat treatments to 700°C, the substantial concentration widening of regions of the existence of Ta2C and TaC was found. The lattice parameters of hexagonal Ta2C and fcc TaC carbides were determined for composition ranges of the existence of phases during heating to 700°C. Upon heating above 600°C, the progressive transition of quasiamorphous Ta2C carbide into the crystalline Ta2C carbide was found to take place. The possibility of applying the direct synthesis of TaC carbide in engineering was noted.

  10. Atmospheric deposition of organic and black carbon to the global oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Elena; Dachs, Jordi; Duarte, Carlos M.; Simó, Rafel

    Atmospheric deposition of total organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) is lacking or not fully accounted in most current models of the global carbon cycling, specially those fluxes related to gas phase OC. Here, we develop and apply a methodology to estimate wet and dry deposition of total OC to the oceans, based on monthly satellite measurements of aerosol size distributions, wind speed, etc., and estimates of deposition for aerosols and organic compounds. The parameterization of dry deposition velocities account for the dependence of turbulent transport with aerosol diameter, wind speed and the formation of marine aerosol, etc. Gravitational settling is estimated as a function of wet particle diameter, thus including hygroscopic growth due to ambient humidity. Global dry deposition of aerosol OC is estimated to be 11 Tg C y -1 and wet deposition of particle and gaseous OC are estimated as 47 and 187 Tg C y -1, respectively. Due to their pulsing variability, wet deposition fluxes can be important locally and as a temporal source of OC to surface waters. Dry and wet deposition of black carbon to the global ocean are estimated to be 2 and 10 Tg C yr -1, respectively, with higher fluxes in the northern hemisphere and for inter-tropical regions. Finally, considerations on the potential magnitude of the hitherto neglected gross air-sea diffusive exchange fluxes of OC are discussed. Even though the magnitude and direction of these cannot be constrained here, evidence of its important role is given. This study, thus, shows that there is an important spatial and temporal variability in atmosphere-ocean exchanges of OC and BC at different scales, and calls for the need for further research on the important role that these exchanges play in the global carbon cycle.

  11. Prediction of Viscoelastic Behavior of Blood Flow in Plaque Deposited Capillaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Anwar Solangi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the viscoelastic behaviour of blood over low value of elasticity, to analyse the influence of inertia in the presence of elasticity. For viscoelastic fluids shear-thinning and strainsoftening PTT (Phan-Thien/Tanner constitutive model is employed to identify the influence of elasticity. The computational method adopted is based on a finite element semi-implicit time stepping Taylor- Galerkin/pressure-correction scheme. Simulations are conducted via atherosclerotic vessels along with various percentages of deposition at distinct values of Reynolds numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for recirculation flow structure and development of recirculation length to investigate the impact of atherosclerosis on partially blocked plaque deposited vessels.

  12. Preparation of carbon nanotubes with different morphology by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi av., 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansurov, Zulkhair [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi av., 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmoldin, S.Zh. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2010-04-15

    In this work we present a part of our results about the preparation of carbon nanotube with different morphologies by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition MPECVD. Well aligned, curly, carbon nanosheets, coiled carbon sheets and carbon microcoils have been prepared. We have investigated the effect of the different growth condition parameters such as the growth temperature, pressure and the hydrogen to methane flow rate ratio on the morphology of the carbon nanotubes. The results showed that there is a great dependence of the morphology of carbon nanotubes on these parameters. The yield of the carbon microcoils was high when the growth temperature was 700 C. There is a linear relation between the growth rate and the methane to hydrogen ratio. The effect of the gas pressure on the CNTs was also studied. Our samples were investigated by scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Carbon nanofiber growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model to describe the plasma-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) is proposed. Using the model, the plasma-related effects on the nanofiber growth parameters, such as the growth rate due to surface and bulk diffusion, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, the characteristic residence time and diffusion length of carbon atoms on the catalyst surface, and the surface coverages, have been studied. The dependence of these parameters on the catalyst surface temperature and ion and etching gas fluxes to the catalyst surface is quantified. The optimum conditions under which a low-temperature plasma environment can benefit the CNF growth are formulated. These results are in good agreement with the available experimental data on CNF growth and can be used for optimizing synthesis of related nanoassemblies in low-temperature plasma-assisted nanofabrication.

  14. Interlaminar improvement of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via depositing mixture of carbon nanotubes and sizing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cuiqin; Wang, Julin; Zhang, Tao

    2014-12-01

    The effects of deposition to carbon fibers surfaces with mixture of functionalized multi-walled carbon fibers (MWCNTs) and sizing agent were investigated. Relationships between CNTs and sizing agent were studied with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Ubbelohde viscometer. The results revealed that CNTs could react with sizing agent at 120 °C, and optimal reaction occurs when mass ratio was about 1:20. Then, carbon fibers were immersed in mixed aqueous suspension of CNTs and sizing agent with the above ratio dispersed by ultrasonication. According to scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations, fibers surfaces were coated with CNTs and sizing agent. The static contact angle tests indicated wetting performance between fibers and epoxy resin were improved after deposited procedures. Interlaminar shear strength was increased by 67.01% for fibers/epoxy resin composites after mixture deposited process. Moreover, the tensile strength of single fibers after depositing showed a slightly increase compared with that of fibers without depositing layer.

  15. Depositional environments inferred from variations of calcium carbonate, organic carbon, and sulfide sulfur: a core from southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A; Iyer, S.D.; Chauhan, O; PrakashBabu, C.

    The variations in CaCO3 and organic carbon and their inter-relationship in a core from the southeastern Arabian Sea (water depth 2,212 m) have been used to demarcate the Holocene/Pleistocene boundary; an increased terrigenous deposition during Late...

  16. A Model-Based Analysis of Nitrogen Deposition: Effects on Forest Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezi, S.; Medlyn, B. E.; Tonon, G.; Magnani, F.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last 150 years nitrogen deposition has increased, especially in the northern hemisphere, mainly due to the use of fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural practices. Although the impact of this increase on the terrestrial carbon cycle is still uncertain, it is likely that this large perturbation of the global nitrogen cycle will have important effects on carbon cycling, particularly via impacts on forest carbon storage. In the present work we investigated qualitatively the overall response of forest carbon sequestration to nitrogen deposition, and the relative importance of different mechanisms that bring about this response. For this purpose we used the G'DAY forest carbon-nitrogen cycling model (Comins and McMurtrie 1993), introducing some new assumptions which focus on the effect of nitrogen deposition. Specifically the new assumptions are: (i) foliar litterfall and specific leaf area (SLA) are functions of leaf nitrogen concentration; (ii) belowground C allocation is a function of net primary production (NPP); (iii) forest canopies can directly take up nitrogen; (iv) management of forests occurs; (v) leaching occurs only for nitrate nitrogen. We investigated the effect of each assumption on net ecosystem production (NEP), with a step increase in nitrogen deposition from a steady state of 0.4 gN m-2 yr-1 to 2 gN m-2 yr-1, and then running the old and new model versions for different nitrogen deposition levels. Our analysis showed that nitrogen deposition can have a large effect on forest carbon storage at ecosystem level. In particular the effect of the assumptions (ii), (iii) and (iv) seem to be of greater importance, giving rise to a markedly higher level of forest carbon sequestration than in their absence. On the contrary assumptions (i) and (v) seem not to have any particular effect on the NEP simulated. Finally, running the models for different levels of nitrogen deposition showed that estimating forest carbon exchange without taking into

  17. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes on 3-Amino-Propyl-Triethoxysilane (APTES Surface Functionalized Silicon Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theda Daniels-Race

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of uniform thin coatings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by electrophoretic deposition (EPD on semiconductor (silicon substrates with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES surface functionalization has been studied extensively in this report. The gradual deposition and eventual film formation of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs is greatly assisted by the Coulombic force of attraction existing between the positively charged –NH2 surface groups of APTES and the acid treated, negatively charged nanotubes migrating towards the deposition surfaces. The remarkable deposition characteristics of the CNT coatings by EPD in comparison to the dip coating method and the influence of isopropyl (IPA-based CNT suspension in the fabricated film quality has also been revealed in this study. The effect of varying APTES concentration (5%–100% on the Raman spectroscopy and thickness of the deposited CNT film has been discussed in details, as well. The deposition approach has eliminated the need of metal deposition in the electrophoretic deposition approach and, therefore, establishes a cost-effective, fast and entirely room temperature-based fabrication strategy of CNT thin films for a wide range of next generation electronic applications.

  18. Influence of bias on properties of carbon films deposited by MCECR plasma sputtering method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Chang-long; DIAO Dong-feng; S.Miyake; T.Matsumoto

    2004-01-01

    The mirror-confinement-type electron cyclotron resonance(MCECR) plasma source has high plasma density and high electron temperature. It is quite useful in many plasma processing, and has been used for etching and thin-film deposition. The carbon films with 40 nm thickness were deposited by MCECR plasma sputtering method on Si, and the influence of substrate bias on the properties of carbon films was studied. The bonding structure of the film was analyzed by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), the tribological properties were measured by the pin-on-disk(POD) tribometer, the nanohardness of the films was measured by the nanoindenter, and the deposition speed and the refractive index were measured by the ellipse meter. The better substrate bias was obtained, and the better properties of carbon films were obtained.

  19. Nanocomposite tantalum-carbon-based films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Wolski, K. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Donnet, C. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr; Fillit, R.Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Rogemond, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Subtil, J.L. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris 24, rue Lhomond 75231-Paris Cedex 5 (France); Laval, J.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, UPR5 CNRS-ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231-Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-01-03

    Nanostructured coatings of metal (tantalum) containing diamond-like carbon (a-C:Ta) have been prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films, containing 15 at.% tantalum, have been deposited by ablating sequentially graphite and metallic tantalum in vacuum conditions with an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. The coatings have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing angle X-ray diffraction, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy, scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. Evidence of metallic {alpha}-Ta and {beta}-Ta particles (diameter in the 100 nm range) and smaller quasi-amorphous tantalum clusters embedded in the carbonaceous matrix have been shown. A thin tantalum carbide interface between the carbon matrix and the top surface of the tantalum nodules has also been identified. The ability of femtosecond pulsed laser deposition to synthetize nanocomposite carbon-based films and to control their nanostructure is discussed.

  20. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  1. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  2. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition promotes carbon loss from peat bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Freeman, C.; Jones, T.; Rydin, H.; Limpens, J.; Fenner, N.; Ellis, T.; Gerdol, R.; Hajek, M.; Hajek, T.; Iacumin, P.; Kutnar, L.; Tahvanainen, T.; Toberman, H.

    2006-01-01

    Peat bogs have historically represented exceptional carbon (C) sinks because of their extremely low decomposition rates and consequent accumulation of plant remnants as peat. Among the factors favoring that peat accumulation, a major role is played by the chemical quality of plant litter itself, whi

  3. Pyrolytic deposition of nanostructured titanium carbide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob"edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Tatarskii, D. A.; Yunin, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured titanium carbide coatings have been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the MOCVD method with bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride precursor. The obtained TiC/MWCNT hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is established that a TiC coating deposits onto the MWCNT surface with the formation of a core-shell (MWSNT-TiC) type structure.

  4. Functionalization and Area-Selective Deposition of Magnetic Carbon-Coated Iron Nanoparticles from Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Widenkvist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A route to area-selective deposition of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles, involving chemical modification of the surface of the particles, is described. Partial oxidative etching of the coating introduces carboxylic groups, which then are esterified. The functionalized particles can be selectively deposited on the Si areas of Si/SiO2 substrates by a simple dipping procedure. Nanoparticles and nanoassemblies have been analyzed using SEM, TEM, and XPS.

  5. Evaluating the Contributions of Atmospheric Deposition of Carbon and Other Nutrients to Nitrification in Alpine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldani, K. M.; Mladenov, N.; Williams, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Colorado Front Range of the Rocky Mountains contains undeveloped, barren soils, yet in this environment there is strong evidence for a microbial role in increased nitrogen (N) export. Barren soils in alpine environments are severely carbon-limited, which is the main energy source for microbial activity and sustenance of life. It has been shown that atmospheric deposition can contain high amounts of organic carbon (C). Atmospheric pollutants, dust events, and biological aerosols, such as bacteria, may be important contributors to the atmospheric organic C load. In this stage of the research we evaluated seasonal trends in the chemical composition and optical spectroscopic (fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance) signatures of snow, wet deposition, and dry deposition in an alpine environment at Niwot Ridge in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to obtain a better understanding of the sources and chemical character of atmospheric deposition. Our results reveal a positive trend between dissolved organic carbon concentrations and calcium, nitrate and sulfate concentrations in wet and dry deposition, which may be derived from such sources as dust and urban air pollution. We also observed the presence of seasonally-variable fluorescent components that may be attributed to fluorescent pigments in bacteria. These results are relevant because atmospheric inputs of carbon and other nutrients may influence nitrification in barren, alpine soils and, ultimately, the export of nitrate to alpine watersheds.

  6. Carbonate replacement of lacustrine gypsum deposits in two Neogene continental basins, eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadón, P.; Rosell, L.; Talbot, M. R.

    1992-07-01

    Bedded nonmarine gypsum deposits in the Miocene Teruel and Cabriel basins, eastern Spain, are partly replaced by carbonate. The Libros gypsum (Teruel Graben) is associated with fossiliferous carbonate wackestones and finely laminated, organic matter-rich mudstones which accumulated under anoxic conditions in a meromictic, permanent lake. The gypsum is locally pseudomorphed by aragonite or, less commonly, replaced by calcite. Low δ 13C values indicate that sulphate replacement resulted from bacterial sulphate reduction processes that were favoured by anacrobic conditions and abundant labile organic matter in the sediments. Petrographic evidence and oxygen isotopic composition suggest that gypsum replacement by aragonite occurred soon after deposition. A subsequent return to oxidising conditions caused some aragonite to be replaced by diagenetic gypsum. Native sulphur is associated with some of these secondary gypsum occurrences. The Los Ruices sulphate deposits (Cabriel Basin) contain beds of clastic and selenitic gypsum which are associated with limestones and red beds indicating accumulation in a shallow lake. Calcite is the principal replacement mineral. Bacterial sulphate reduction was insignificant in this basin because of a scarcity of organic matter. Stable isotope composition of diagenetic carbonate indicates that gypsum replacement occurred at shallow burial depths due to contact with dilute groundwaters of meteoric origin. Depositional environment evidently has a major influence upon the diagenetic history of primary sulphate deposits. The quantity of preserved organic matter degradable by sulphate-reducing bacteria is of particular importance and, along with groundwater composition, is the main factor controlling the mechanism of gypsum replacement by carbonate.

  7. Ironstone deposits hosted in Eocene carbonates from Bahariya (Egypt)-New perspective on cherty ironstone occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, A. M.; Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives new insight into the genesis of cherty ironstone deposits. The research was centered on well-exposed, unique cherty ironstone mineralization associated with Eocene carbonates from the northern part of the Bahariya Depression (Egypt). The economically important ironstones occur in the Naqb Formation (Early Eocene), which is mainly formed of shallow marine carbonate deposits. Periods of lowstand sea-level caused extensive early dissolution (karstification) of the depositional carbonates and dolomitization associated with mixing zones of fresh and marine pore-water. In faulted areas, the Eocene carbonate deposits were transformed into cherty ironstone with preservation of the precursor carbonate sedimentary features, i.e. skeletal and non-skeletal grain types, thickness, bedding, lateral and vertical sequential arrangement, and karst profiles. The ore deposits are composed of iron oxyhydroxides, mainly hematite and goethite, chert in the form of micro- to macro-quartz and chalcedony, various manganese minerals, barite, and a number of subordinate sulfate and clay minerals. Detailed petrographic analysis shows that quartz and iron oxides were coetaneous and selectively replaced carbonates, the coarse dolomite crystals having been preferentially transformed into quartz whereas the micro-crystalline carbonates were replaced by the iron oxyhydroxides. A number of petrographic, sedimentological and structural features including the presence of hydrothermal-mediated minerals (e.g., jacobsite), the geochemistry of the ore minerals as well as the structure-controlled location of the mineralization suggest a hydrothermal source for the ore-bearing fluids circulating through major faults and reflect their proximity to centers of magmatism. The proposed formation model can contribute to better understanding of the genetic mechanisms of formation of banded iron formations (BIFs) that were abundant during the Precambrian.

  8. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride coatings on carbon fibers from borazine by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Junsheng, E-mail: charlesljs@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China); Zhang Changrui; Li Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, 410073 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings were deposited on carbon fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using borazine as single source precursor. The deposited coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperatures on growth kinetics, morphology, composition and structure of the coatings was investigated. In the low temperature range of 900 deg. C-1000 deg. C, the growth rate increased with increasing temperature complying with Arrhenius law, and an apparent active energy of 72 kJ/mol was calculated. The coating surface was smooth and compact, and the coatings uniformly deposited on individual fibers of carbon fiber bundles. The growth was controlled by surface reaction. At 1000 deg. C, the deposition rate reached a maximum (2.5 {mu}m/h). At the same time, the limiting step of the growth translated to be mass-transportation. Above 1100 deg. C, the growth rate decreased drastically due to the occurrence of gas-phase nucleation. Moreover, the coating surface became loose and rough. Composition and structure examinations revealed that stoichiometric BN coatings with turbostratic structure were obtained below 1000 deg. C, while hexagonal BN coatings were deposited above 1100 deg. C. A penetration of carbon element from the fibers to the coatings was observed.

  9. Bamboo and herringbone shaped carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres synthesized in direct current-plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Li; Wells, Torquil; El-Gomati, Mohamed

    2009-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes with different structures were catalytically synthesized on Ni coated SiO2/Si substrate in a Direct Current Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition system, in which C2H2 acted as the carbon source and NH3 as the etchant gas. A Scanning Electron Microscope study showed that carbon nanotubes were all vertically aligned with respect to the substrate, with diameters ranging from 10 nm to 200 nm. Different sizes of Ni catalyst particles were observed on the tips of carbon nanotubes. Transmission Electron Microscopy was used to study the morphology of the grown tubes and the results obtained show that the diameters and structures of these carbon nanotubes were closely correlated to the sizes and structures of the Ni nanoparticles. Two main structures namely bamboo shaped carbon nanotubes and herringbone shaped carbon nanofibres were found on the same sample. It is suggested that by controlling the pre-growth condition, desired structure of carbon nanotubes or carbon nanofibres could be produced for practical applications.

  10. Composition and Microstructure of Magnetron Sputtering Deposited Ti-containing Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ti-containing carbon films were deposited by using magnetron sputtering deposition. The composition and microstructure of the carbon films were characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that carbon films contain Ti 18 at pct; after Ti incorporation, the films consist of titanium carbide; C1s peak appears at 283.4 eV and it could be divided into 283.29 and 284.55 eV, representing sp2 and sp3, respectively, and sp2 is superior to sp3. This Ti-containing film with dominating sp2 bonds is nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, which could be proved by XRD and TEM.

  11. Deposition of carbon nitride films for space application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yu-Dong; Xu Chao; Wang Yi; Zhang Fu-Jia

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were prepared by electron-beam evaporation assisted with nitrogen ion bombardment and TiN/CNx composite films were by unbalanced dc magnetron sputtering, respectively. It was found that the sputtered films were better than the evaporated films in hardness and adhesion. The experiments of atomic oxygen action, cold welding, friction and wearing were emphasized, and the results proved that the sputtered TiN/CNx composite films were suitable for space application.

  12. Influence of dc bias on amorphous carbon deposited by pulse laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films were deposited on single-crystalline silicon and K9 glass by pulse laser ablation using different negative substrate bias. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the surface. Thickness and refractive index of the film deposited on K9 glass were measured by ellipsometry. Micro-hardness of films was measured relatively to single crystal silicon. All films deposited on silicon were analyzed by Raman spectra. All spectra were deconvoluted to three peaks. Line-width ratios varied similarly with bias voltage when the laser energy was kept invariant.

  13. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition growth of carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivan R. Singh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of various input parameters on the production of carbon nanostructures using a simple microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique has been investigated. The technique utilises a conventional microwave oven as the microwave energy source. The developed apparatus is inexpensive and easy to install and is suitable for use as a carbon nanostructure source for potential laboratory-based research of the bulk properties of carbon nanostructures. A result of this investigation is the reproducibility of specific nanostructures with the variation of input parameters, such as carbon-containing precursor and support gas flow rate. It was shown that the yield and quality of the carbon products is directly controlled by input parameters. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyse the carbon products; these were found to be amorphous, nanotubes and onion-like nanostructures.

  14. Theoretical Descriptions of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis in a Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lubej, M.; Plazl, I.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which carbon nanotubes nucleate and grow are still poorly understood. Understanding and mathematically describing the process is crucial for its optimization. This paper reviews different models which have been proposed to explain carbon nanotube growth in the chemical vapor deposition process. The review is divided into two sections, the first section describes some nucleation, growth and termination simulations based on molecular dynamics, and the second section describes ...

  15. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  16. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebrov, A.K., E-mail: rebrov@itp.nsc.ru; Emelyanov, A.A.; Yudin, I.B.

    2015-01-30

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well.

  17. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Dominant formation of the microsized carbon coils by a short time SF6 flow incorporation during the initial deposition stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Young-Chul; Yi, Soung Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    By SF6 gas incorporation for relatively short time during the initial deposition stage, carbon coils could be formed on nickel catalyst layer-deposited silicon oxide substrate using C2H2 and H2 as source gases under thermal chemical vapor deposition system. The characteristics (formation density and morphology) of as-grown carbon coils were investigated as a function of SF6 flow injection time. 5-min SF6 flow injection time is appropriate to produce the dominant microsized geometry for carbon coils without the appearance of the nanosized carbon coils. The geometry for the microsized carbon coils follows a typical double-helix structure and the shape of the rings constituting the coils is a flat-type. Fluorine's intrinsic etching characteristics for the nanosized carbon coils during the initial deposition stage seems to be the cause for the dominant formation of the microsized carbon coils in the case of 5-min SF6 flow injection time.

  19. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  20. Synthesis of carbon nanotube array using corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the features of atmospheric pressure and low temperature has been developed to synthesize the carbon nanotube array. The array was synthesized from methane and hydrogen mixture in anodic aluminum oxide template channels in that cobalt was electrodeposited at the bottom. The characterization results by the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the array consists of carbon nanotubes with the diameter of about 40 nm and the length of more than 4 -m, and the carbon nanotubes are mainly restrained within the channels of templates.

  1. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  2. Nanoscale Soldering of Positioned Carbon Nanotubes using Highly Conductive Electron Beam Induced Gold Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for controlled positioning of carbon nanotubes followed by highly conductive contacting of the nanotubes, using electron beam assisted deposition of gold. The positioning and soldering process takes place inside an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E...

  3. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  4. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  5. Energetic deposition of carbon in a cathodic vacuum arc with a biased mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moafi, A.; Lau, D. W. M.; Sadek, A. Z.; Partridge, J. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; McCulloch, D. G.

    2011-04-01

    Carbon films were deposited in a filtered cathodic vacuum arc with a bias potential applied to a conducting mesh mounted in the plasma stream between the source and the substrate. We determined the stress and microstructural properties of the resulting carbon films and compared the results with those obtained using direct substrate bias with no mesh. Since the relationship between deposition energy and the stress, sp2 fraction and density of carbon are well known, measuring these film properties enabled us to investigate the effect of the mesh on the energy and composition of the depositing flux. When a mesh was used, the film stress showed a monotonic decrease for negative mesh bias voltages greater than 400V, even though the floating potential of the substrate did not vary. We explain this result by the neutralization of some ions when they are near to or passing through the negatively biased mesh. The microstructure of the films showed a change from amorphous to glassy carbonlike with increasing bias. Potential applications for this method include the deposition of carbon films with controlled stress on low conductivity substrates to form rectifying or ohmic contacts.

  6. Electroless Ni-B deposition from an emulsified supercritical carbon dioxide bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hung-Yu; Chung, Sung-Ting; Chuang, Yan-Chi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Wen-Ta, E-mail: wttsai@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-01

    The electroless deposition of boron-containing Ni (EN-B) film from a supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) bath was introduced. The deposition rate in sc-CO{sub 2} bath was one order of magnitude lower than that at ambient pressure without the presence of sc-CO{sub 2}. A more uniform chemical composition of the EN-B film could be obtained if it was deposited in the sc-CO{sub 2} bath. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the as-deposited film was amorphous in nature, despite of the deposition condition. Deposition defects such as cracks and voids could be avoided if the deposition was conducted in the sc-CO{sub 2} bath. Crystallization and boride precipitation were found after heat treatment at 400 {sup o}C for 1 h. The EN-B film deposited from the sc-CO{sub 2} bath had a higher hardness as compared with that of the normal EN-B coating. A substantial increase in hardness was obtained due to boride precipitation.

  7. Gastric mucosal status susceptible to lanthanum deposition in patients treated with dialysis and lanthanum carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Shinichi; Suzuki, Syunji; Kubota, Kenji; Ohshima, Susumu; Satoh, Hideaki; Imada, Hiroki; Ueda, Yoshihiko

    2017-02-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a popular chemical which is administered for patients with end-stage kidney disease to reduce the absorption of phosphate, and lanthanum deposition in the gastroduodenal mucosa has recently been reported. The aim of this study was to assess whether any histologic changes of the gastric mucosa are related to the deposition of lanthanum. Twenty-four patients who revealed the histology of lanthanum deposition on gastroduodenal biopsy between 2011 and 2014 were included in the study, and their clinical records and gastroduodenal biopsies obtained from 2011 to 2015 were reviewed, adding the review of gastroduodenal biopsies before 2011 if possible. Analysis of the deposited materials by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was performed for a representative gastric biopsy. All patients were diagnosed as having renal insufficiency due to chronic kidney disease and treated with dialysis for more than 5 years, with confirmation of lanthanum carbonate use for 22 patients. Of 121 gastric biopsies and 10 duodenal ones between 2011 and 2015, 86 gastric biopsies (71.1%) and 3 duodenal biopsies (30%), respectively, revealed histology consistent with lanthanum deposition, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis for a representative case. The deposition tended to occur in the gastric mucosa with regenerative change, intestinal metaplasia, or foveolar hyperplasia (Pcarbonate is administered for patients with chronic kidney disease treated with dialysis.

  8. Interposition fixing structure of TiO2 film deposited on activated carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ping-feng; LUAN Yong; DAI Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    The immobilized photocatalyst, TiO2 film supported on activated carbon fibers (TiO2/ACFs) prepared with molecular adsorption-deposition (MAD), exhibits high stability in cyclic photodegradation runs. The interposition fixing structure between TiO2 film and carbon fiber was investigated by means of SEM-EDX, XRD, XPS and FTIR, and a model was proposed to explain this structure. With SEM examination of carbon fiber surface after removing the deposited TiO2 film, a residual TiO2 super-thin film was found to exist still. By determining surface groups on ACFs, titanium sulfate (Ti2(SO4)3) in burnt remainders of the TiO2/ACFs was thought to be formed with an interfacial reaction between TiO2 film and carbon fibers. These provide some evidence of firm attachment of TiO2 film to carbon fiber surface. In the consideration of characteristics of the MAD, the deposition mechanism of TiO2 film on ACFs was proposed, and the interposition fixing structure was inferred to intercrossedly form between TiO2 film and ACFs' surface. This structure leaded to firm attachment and high stability of the TiO2 film.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  10. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  11. Carbon deposition in CH4/CO2 operated SOFC: Simulation and experimentation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona, K.; Laurencin, J.; Fouletier, J.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.

    2012-07-01

    Due to their high operating temperatures, SOFCs can be directly fed with biogas, mainly composed of CH4 and CO2. In this work, experiments was performed with a classical Ni-YSZ cermet//YSZ//LSM cell fed either with a synthetic simulated biogas (CH4/CO2 ratio equal to 1 with 6% humidity), or with humidified H2. In both cases, the performances are found to be very similar, which confirms the ability of SOFCs to operate with internal reforming of biogas. Nevertheless, carbon formation in these operating conditions needs to be considered because of durability concerns. Thermodynamic calculations and modelling are carried out to evaluate the risk of carbon deposition depending on operating parameters. In the ternary diagram Csbnd Hsbnd O, the limits for carbon deposition are plotted, allowing the determination of “safe” operating conditions in terms of CH4 inlet flow rate and cell voltage. First experiments confirm these modelling results.

  12. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, X.L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma trea

  13. Kinetics of Carbon Deposition on Hexaaluminate LaNiAl11O19 Catalyst During CO2 Reforming of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanlin Xu; Shuyong Jia; Lina Zhao; Yurong Ren; Yan Liu; Yingli Bi; Kaiji Zhen

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the properties of carbon deposited on hexaaluminate LaNiAl11O19 catalyst were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in the meantime, the amount of carbon deposited on the catalyst, after both CH4 decomposition and CO2 reforming of CH4, was determined by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The rates of carbon deposited on the catalyst were also investigated and the apparent kinetic equation of CO2 reforming of CH4:carbon and the pressure ratio of CH4 and CO2.

  14. Controllable Deposition of Alloy Clusters or Nanoparticles Catalysts on Carbon Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K.; Ando, Y.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.

    2011-08-15

    We describe a simple method for controllably depositing Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles on carbon surfaces that is mediated by Pb or Cu adlayers undergoing underpotential deposition and stripping during Pt and Ru codeposition at diffusion-limiting currents. The amount of surface Pt atoms deposited largely reflects the number of potential cycles causing the deposition and stripping of the metal adlayer at underpotentials, the metal species used as a mediator, and the scan rate of the potential cycles. We employed electrochemical methanol oxidation to gain information on the catalyst's activities. The catalysts with large amounts of surface Pt atoms have relatively high methanol-oxidation activity. Catalysts prepared using this method enhance methanol-oxidation activity per electrode surface area, while maintaining catalytic activity per surface Pt atom; thus, the amount of Pt is reduced in comparison with conventional methanol-oxidation catalysts. The method is suitable for efficient synthesizing various bimetallic catalysts.

  15. Optical and Electrical Properties Evolution of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Films with Deposition Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xu-Li; LI Qing-Shan; KONG Xiang-He

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of graphite target at different substrate temperatures are reported. By varying the deposition temperature from 400 to 25℃, the film optical transparency and electrical resistivity increase severely. Most importantly, the transparency and resistivity properties of the DLC films can be tailored to approaching diamond by adjusting the deposition temperature, which is critical to many applications. DLC films deposited at low temperatures show excellent optical transmittance and high resistivity. Over the same temperature regime an increase of the spa bonded C content is observed using visible Raman spectroscopy, which is responsible for the enhanced transparency and resistivity properties.

  16. Chronic nitrogen deposition alters tree allometric relationships: implications for biomass production and carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Inés; Zak, Donald R; Burton, Andrew J; Pregitzer, Kurt S

    2016-04-01

    As increasing levels of nitrogen (N) deposition impact many terrestrial ecosystems, understanding the potential effects of higher N availability is critical for forecasting tree carbon allocation patterns and thus future forest productivity. Most regional estimates of forest biomass apply allometric equations, with parameters estimated from a limited number of studies, to forest inventory data (i.e., tree diameter). However most of these allometric equations cannot account for potential effects of increased N availability on biomass allocation patterns. Using 18 yr of tree diameter, height, and mortality data collected for a dominant tree species (Acer saccharum) in an atmospheric N deposition experiment, we evaluated how greater N availability affects allometric relationships in this species. After taking into account site and individual variability, our results reveal significant differences in allometric parameters between ambient and experimental N deposition treatments. Large trees under experimental N deposition reached greater heights at a given diameter; moreover, their estimated maximum height (mean ± standard deviation: 33.7 ± 0.38 m) was significantly higher than that estimated under the ambient condition (31.3 ± 0.31 m). Within small tree sizes (5-10 cm diameter) there was greater mortality under experimental N deposition, whereas the relative growth rates of small trees were greater under experimental N deposition. Calculations of stemwood biomass using our parameter estimates for the diameter-height relationship indicated the potential for significant biases in these estimates (~2.5%), with under predictions of stemwood biomass averaging 4 Mg/ha lower if ambient parameters were to be used to estimate stem biomass of trees in the experimental N deposition treatment. As atmospheric N deposition continues to increase into the future, ignoring changes in tree allometry will contribute to the uncertainty associated with aboveground carbon storage

  17. Large-scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Method and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Morinobu

    2005-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes consisting of rolled graphene layer built from sp2-units have attracted the imagination of scientists as one-dimensional macromolecules. Their unusual physical and chemical properties make them useful in the fabrication of nanocomposite, nanoelectronic device and sensor etc. In this study, the recent hot topics "highly pure and crystalline double walled carbon nanotubes" will be described because it is expected that these tubes are thermally and structurally stable, and also contain small-sized tubes (below 2 nm). Among the recent applications of carbon nanotubes, micro-catheter fabricated from high purity carbon nanotubes as filler and nylon as matrix exhibited quite low blood coagulation and also reduced thrombogenity. It is envisaged that carbon nanotubes will play an important role in the development of nano-technology in the near-future.

  18. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  19. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of the deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YuJun; DONG GuangNeng; MAO JunHong; XIE YouBai

    2008-01-01

    The deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film greatly affects its frictional properties. In this study, CH3 radicals are selected as source species to deposit hydrogenated DLC films for molecular dynamics simulation. The growth and structural properties of hydrogenated DLC films are investigated and elucidated in detail. By comparison and statistical analysis, the authors find that the ratio of carbon to hydrogen in the films generally shows a monotonously increasing trend with the increase of impact energy. Carbon atoms are more reactive during deposition and more liable to bond with substrate atoms than hydrogen atoms. In addition, there exists a peak value of the number of hydrogen atoms deposited in hydrogenated DLC films. The trends of the variation are opposite on the two sides of this peak point, and itbecomes stable when impact energy is greater than 80 eV. The average relative density also indicates a rising trend along with the increment of impact energy, while it does not reach the saturation value until impact energy comes to 50 eV. The hydrogen content in source species is a key factor to determine the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films. When the hydrogen content in source species is high, the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films is accordingly high.

  1. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical and experimental results. The thickness of a-C films deposited at different incidence angles was investigated in the light of Monte Carlo simulations, and the calculated depth profiles were compared with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The topography and structure of the a-C films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The film thickness decreased with the increase of the incidence angle, while the surface roughness increased and the content of tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3) decreased significantly with the increase of the incidence angle above 45° , measured from the surface normal. TEM, AFM, and XPS results indicate that the smoothest and thinnest a-C films with the highest content of sp 3 carbon bonding were produced for an incidence angle of 45°. The findings of this study have direct implications in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording, where ultrathin and smooth a-C films with high sp 3 contents are of critical importance. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. Chitosan Derivatives/Calcium Carbonate Composite Capsules Prepared by the Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Core/shell capsules composed of calcium carbonate whisker core (rod-like shape and chitosan/chitosansulfate shell were prepared by the layer-by-layer deposition technique. Two chitosan samples of different molecular weights (Mw=9.7×104 and 1.09×106g·mol-1 were used as original materials. Hollow capsules were also obtained by dissolution of the core in hydrochloric acid. Electron microscopy revealed that the surface of the shell is rather ragged associated with some agglomerates. The shell thickness l obeys a linear relation with respect to the number of deposited layers m as l=md+a(a>0. The values of d (thickness per layer were 4.0 and 1.0 nm for the higher and lower Mw chitosan materials, respectively, both of which are greater than the thickness of the monolayer. The results suggest that the feature of the deposition does not obey an ideal homogeneous monolayer-by-monolayer deposition mechanism. Shell crosslinked capsules were also prepared via photodimerization reaction of cinnamoyl groups after a deposition of cinnamoyl chitosan to the calcium carbonate whisker core. The degree of crosslink was not enough to stabilize the shell structure, and hollow capsule was not obtained.

  3. Mixed fuel strategy for carbon deposition mitigation in solid oxide fuel cells at intermediate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chao; Chen, Yubo; Wang, Wei; Ran, Ran; Shao, Zongping; Diniz da Costa, João C; Liu, Shaomin

    2014-06-17

    In this study, we propose and experimentally verified that methane and formic acid mixed fuel can be employed to sustain solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to deliver high power outputs at intermediate temperatures and simultaneously reduce the coke formation over the anode catalyst. In this SOFC system, methane itself was one part of the fuel, but it also played as the carrier gas to deliver the formic acid to reach the anode chamber. On the other hand, the products from the thermal decomposition of formic acid helped to reduce the carbon deposition from methane cracking. In order to clarify the reaction pathways for carbon formation and elimination occurring in the anode chamber during the SOFC operation, O2-TPO and SEM analysis were carried out together with the theoretical calculation. Electrochemical tests demonstrated that stable and high power output at an intermediate temperature range was well-maintained with a peak power density of 1061 mW cm(-2) at 750 °C. With the synergic functions provided by the mixed fuel, the SOFC was running for 3 days without any sign of cell performance decay. In sharp contrast, fuelled by pure methane and tested at similar conditions, the SOFC immediately failed after running for only 30 min due to significant carbon deposition. This work opens a new way for SOFC to conquer the annoying problem of carbon deposition just by properly selecting the fuel components to realize their synergic effects.

  4. Carbon materials as new nanovehicles in hot-melt drug deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicka, Agnieszka; Wiśniewski, Marek; Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Roszek, Katarzyna; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Bieniek, A.

    2013-09-01

    The application of commercially available carbon materials (nanotubes and porous carbons) for the preparation of drug delivery systems is studied. We used two types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and two activated carbons as potential materials in so-called hot-melt drug deposition (HMDD). The materials were first studied using Raman spectroscopy. Paracetamol was chosen as a model drug. The performed thermal analysis, kinetics, and adsorption-desorption studies revealed that nanoaggregates are formed between carbon nanotubes. In contrast, in pores of activated carbon we do not observe this process and the drug adsorption phenomenon mechanism is simply the filling of small pores. The formation of nanoaggregates was confirmed by the results of GCMC (grand canonical Monte Carlo) simulations and the study of the surface area on nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The application of carbon nanotubes in HMDD offers the possibility of controlling the rate of drug delivery. Performed MTT tests of nanotubes and drug-loaded nanotubes show that the observed decrease in cell viability number is caused by the influence of the cytostatic properties of nanotubes—they inhibit the proliferation of cells. The carbon nanotubes studied in this paper are essentially nontoxic.

  5. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, X. L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrate is proved to be crucial for the improvement of film performance due to enhanced interfacial adhesion. The columnar structure and the crack network formed during deposition e...

  6. Distribution and Orientation of Carbon Fibers in Polylactic Acid Parts Produced by Fused Deposition Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; W. Gutmann, Ingomar; Koch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the understanding of the fiber orientation by investigations in respect to the inner configuration of a polylactic acid matrix reinforced with short carbon fibers after a fused deposition modeling extrusion process. The final parts were analyzed by X-ray, tomography, and ......, and magnetic resonance imaging allowing a resolved orientation of the fibers and distribution within the part. The research contributes to the understanding of the fiber orientation and fiber reinforcement of fused deposition modeling parts in additive manufacturing....

  7. KINETICS OF DEPOSITION OF METAL IONS TO ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS (ACFs) WITH FLUIDIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The diffusion and mass transfer, reaction, integration and growth processes of the metalions on the activated carbon fibers (ACFs) are discussed. Based on the diffusion film theory, thediiffusion and the integration model are developed to describe the deposition processes of metal ionsfrom the solution to ACFs in the fiuidized beds. The model of heat transfer of this process isestablished to expound the important role-played in deposition processes by the influence of thereaction heat released at ACFs surface and the non-uniform temperature distribution caused byhydrodynamics.

  8. Patterned growth of single-walled carbon nanotube arrays from a vapor-deposited Fe catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, H B; Ristroph, T. G.; Schurmann, G. M.; King, G. M.; Yoon, J; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Golovchenko, Jene Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been grown on a variety of substrates by chemical vapor deposition using low-coverage vacuum-deposited iron as a catalyst. Ordered arrays of suspended nanotubes ranging from submicron to several micron lengths have been obtained on Si, SiO2,SiO2, Al2O3,Al2O3, and Si3N4Si3N4 substrates that were patterned on hundred nanometer length scales with a focused ion beam machine. Electric fields applied during nanotubegrowth allow the control of growth direction. Na...

  9. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors: Consideration of cost and chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zheng; Weizhong Qian; Chaojie Cui; Guanghui Xu; Mengqiang Zhao; Guili Tian; Fei Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this topic,we first discussed the requirement and performance of supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electrode,including specific surface area,purity and cost.Then we reviewed the preparation technique of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in relatively large scale by chemical vapor deposition method.Its catalysis on the decomposition of methane and other carbon source,the reactor type and the process control strategies were discussed.Special focus was concentrated on how to increase the yield,selectivity,and purity of SWNTs and how to inhibit the formation of impurities,including amorphous carbon,multiwalled CNTs and the carbon encapsulated metal particles,since these impurities seriously influenced the performance of SWNTs in supercapacitors.Wish it be helpful to further decrease its product cost and for the commercial use in supercapacitors.

  10. Carbon deposition and phase transformations in red mud on exposure to methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sushil, S. [Centre for Energy and Environment, TERI University, Darbari Seth Block, Habitat Place, Lodhi Road, New Delhi 110003 (India); Alabdulrahman, A.M. [King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Petroleum and Petrochemical Research Institute (PAPRI), PO Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Balakrishnan, M. [Centre for Energy and Environment, TERI University, Darbari Seth Block, Habitat Place, Lodhi Road, New Delhi 110003 (India); Batra, V.S., E-mail: vidyasb@teri.res.in [Centre for Energy and Environment, TERI University, Darbari Seth Block, Habitat Place, Lodhi Road, New Delhi 110003 (India); Blackley, R.A. [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Clapp, J.; Hargreaves, J.S.J.; Monaghan, A.; Pulford, I.D. [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Rico, J.L. [Laboratorio de Catalisis, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio E, CU, Morelia, Mich. C.P. 58060 (Mexico); Zhou, W. [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    A characterization study detailing the phase transformations and microstructural nature of the carbon deposited during methane decomposition over red mud has been undertaken. In situ XRD was carried out to study the phase transformation sequences of red mud during the reaction. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, BET surface area determination and CHN analysis were carried out to investigate the properties of the post-reaction samples. Exposure to methane with increasing temperature caused a stepwise reduction of iron oxides in red mud and promoted methane cracking leading to carbon deposition. The presence of carbon nanostructures was confirmed by HRTEM observations. The carbon formed was graphitic in nature and the spent red mud, rich in Fe and Fe{sub 3}C formed as a result of the reduction of the iron oxide, was magnetic in nature. The surface area of the material was enhanced upon reaction. In addition, reactivity comparisons between goethite and red mud were carried out to study the formation of carbon oxides during reaction.

  11. Carbon deposition and phase transformations in red mud on exposure to methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushil, S; Alabdulrahman, A M; Balakrishnan, M; Batra, V S; Blackley, R A; Clapp, J; Hargreaves, J S J; Monaghan, A; Pulford, I D; Rico, J L; Zhou, W

    2010-08-15

    A characterization study detailing the phase transformations and microstructural nature of the carbon deposited during methane decomposition over red mud has been undertaken. In situ XRD was carried out to study the phase transformation sequences of red mud during the reaction. Scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, BET surface area determination and CHN analysis were carried out to investigate the properties of the post-reaction samples. Exposure to methane with increasing temperature caused a stepwise reduction of iron oxides in red mud and promoted methane cracking leading to carbon deposition. The presence of carbon nanostructures was confirmed by HRTEM observations. The carbon formed was graphitic in nature and the spent red mud, rich in Fe and Fe(3)C formed as a result of the reduction of the iron oxide, was magnetic in nature. The surface area of the material was enhanced upon reaction. In addition, reactivity comparisons between goethite and red mud were carried out to study the formation of carbon oxides during reaction.

  12. Structural, electrical, and optical properties of diamondlike carbon films deposited by dc magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Lindquist, O. P. A.; Hellgren, N.; Hultman, L.; Holloway, B. C.

    2003-11-01

    The electrical and optical properties of diamondlike carbon films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering on Si substrates at room temperature have been measured as a function of the ion energy (Eion) and ion-to-carbon flux (Jion/JC). The results show that, in the ranges of 5 eV<=Eion<=85 eV and 1.1<=Jion/JC<=6.8, the presence of defective graphite formed by subplanted C and Ar atoms, voids, and the surface roughness, are the dominant influences on the resistivity and optical absorption.

  13. Polarization insensitive all-fiber mode-lockers functioned by carbon nanotubes deposited onto tapered fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Morimune, Keiyo; Set, Sze Y.; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    The authors demonstrate a nonblocked all-fiber mode locker operated by the interaction of carbon nanotubes with the evanescent field of propagating light in a tapered fiber. Symmetric cross section of the device with the randomly oriented nanotubes guarantees the polarization insensitive operation of the pulse formation. In order to minimize the scattering, the carbon nanotubes are deposited within a designed area around the tapered waist. The demonstrated passively pulsed laser has the repetition rate of 7.3MHz and the pulse width of 829fs.

  14. The treatment of a deposited lignite pyrolysis wastewater by adsorption using activated carbon and activated coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiessner, A.; Remmler, M.; Kuschk, P.; Stottmeister, U. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Remediation Research

    1998-07-31

    This paper investigated activated carbon and activated coke adsorption for the treatment of highly contaminated discoloured industrial wastewater with a wide molecular size distribution of organic compounds. Lignite pyrolysis wastewater from a filled open-cast coal mine was used for continuous and discontinuous experiments. The investigations were performed using water samples taken from various depths of the deposits ponds. A comparison of the capacities of the adsorption materials used showed, that because of its large number of macro and mesopores, activated coke is more suitable for wastewater treatment and in addition cheaper than activated carbon.

  15. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  16. Synthesis and oxidation behavior of boron-substituted carbon powders by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Boron-substituted carbon powder, BxC1-x with x up to 0.17, has been successfully synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The boron concentration in prepared BxC1-x samples can be controlled by varying the relative proportions of methane and diborane. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectrum confirm the successful synthesis of an amorphous BC5 compound, which consists of 10―20 nm particles with disk-like morphology. Thermogravimetry measurement shows that BC5 compound starts to oxidize ap-proximately at 620℃ and has a higher oxidation resistance than carbon.

  17. Modeling and simulation of NiO dissolution and Ni deposition in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Suk Woo; Choi, Hyung-Joon; Lim, Tae Hoon [Korea Institute of Science & Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Dissolution of NiO cathode into the electrolyte matrix is an important phenomena limiting the lifetime of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The dissolved nickel diffuses into the matrix and is reduced by dissolved hydrogen leading to the formation of metallic nickel films in the pores of the matrix. The growth of Ni films in the electrolyte matrix during the continuous cell operation results eventually in shorting between cathode and anode. Various mathematical and empirical models have been developed to describe the NiO dissolution and Ni deposition processes, and these models have some success in estimating the lifetime of MCFC by correlating the amount of Ni deposited in the matrix with shorting time. Since the exact mechanism of Ni deposition was not well understood, deposition reaction was assumed to be very fast in most of the models and the Ni deposition region was limited around a point in the matrix. In fact, formation of Ni films takes place in a rather broad region in the matrix, the location and thickness of the film depending on operating conditions as well as matrix properties. In this study, we assumed simple reaction kinetics for Ni deposition and developed a mathematical model to get the distribution of nickel in the matrix.

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites on titanium substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Yu; Neupane, Madhav Prasad; Park, Il Song [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Brain Korea, 21 Project, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min Ho, E-mail: lmh@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Brain Korea, 21 Project, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Tae Sung [Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Brain Korea, 21 Project, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Watari, Fumio; Uo, Motohiro [Biomedical, Dental Materials and Engineering, Department of Oral Health Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-08-30

    Carbon nanotubes-hydroxyapatite (CNTs-HA) composites were synthesized, using an in situ chemical method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HA particles were uniformly absorbed on the CNTs, with strong interfacial bonding. The CNTs-HA composites behaved like single composites when deposited on a titanium substrate by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). EPD was carried out at 10, 20 and 40 V, for 0.5 to 8 min at each voltage. Coating efficiency and weight increased with increasing deposition time, while the slope of the curves decreased, indicating a decrease in deposition rate. The CNTs-HA coating morphology was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed that decreasing the voltage used for deposition coatings could reduce cracking frequency. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies showed that the deposition coatings protected the titanium substrate from corroding in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, in vitro cellular responses to the CNTs-HA coatings were assessed to investigate the proliferation and morphology of osteoblast cell line.

  19. Novel electroless copper deposition on carbon fibers with environmentally friendly processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2010-08-15

    A novel electroless deposition (ELD) of copper (Cu) on carbon fibers (CFs) with environmentally friendly processes, silver (Ag) aerosol activation and subsequent nonformaldehyde Cu ELD, was developed. Spark-generated Ag aerosol nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm in mode diameter) were deposited (48.4 microg Ag/g CF in activation intensity) onto the surfaces of CFs. After annealing (at 220 degrees C in a nitrogen atmosphere), the catalytically activated CFs were placed into a solution for Cu ELD (at 82 degrees C). Homogeneous Cu coating (approximately 5.1 nm/min) on CFs was achieved with 90 min of deposition and the corresponding mass deposition rate and Cu grain size for 30-90 min of deposition had ranges of 0.25-1.14 mg Cu/g CF-min and 14.8-37.2 nm, respectively. The porosity of CFs decreased by depositing the Cu for 30-90 min, and the specific surface area and pore volume of CFs decreased from 1536 to 1399 m(2)/g and from 0.65 to 0.57 cm(3)/g, respectively.

  20. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  1. Direct Synthesis and Spectrum Analysis of CeO2 Nanoparticles Deposited on Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zuwei; HU Chenguo; XIONG Yufeng; XIA Chuanhui; LI Feiyun; WANG Xue

    2009-01-01

    A novel method of direct synthesis of CeO2 nanoparticles onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was developed with advantages of simplicity, ease of scale-up, and low costs.The size of CeO2 particles deposited on the MWNTs was less than 6 nm. SEM and TEM were em-ployed to analysis the CeO2 coated MWNTs, and the properties of FTIR spectrum and UV-vis ab-sorption spectrum were investigated. The functional groups on the MWNTs obtained by nitric acid treatment play an important role on the deposition of the CeO2 particles. The carbon nanotubes possess broadened UV absorption function after being coated with CeO2 nanopartilces.

  2. Low Temperature Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes via Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.R. Atiyan; D.R. Awang Biak; F. Ahmadun; I.S. Ahamad; F. Mohd Yasin; H. Mohamed Yusoff

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) below 600℃ using supporting catalyst chemical vapor deposition method was reported by many research groups. However, the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition received less attention due to imperfect nanotubes produced. In this work, the effects of varying the preheating temperature on the synthesis of CNT were investigated. The reaction temperature was set at 570℃. The preheating set temperature was varied from 150 to 400℃ at 50℃ interval. Three O-ring shape heating mantels were used as heating source for the preheater. In situ monitoring device was used to observe the temperature profile in the reactor. Benzene and ferrocene were used as the carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively. Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized when the preheating temperature was set at 400℃. When the preheating temperature was increased up to 400℃, both the length and the alignment of CNTs produced were improved.

  3. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  4. Deposition of calcium carbonate in karst caves: role of bacteria in Stiffe's cave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercole Claudia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria make a significant contribution to the accumulation of carbonate in several natural habitats where large amounts of carbonates are deposited. However, the role played by microbial communities in speleothem formation (stalactites, stalagmites etc. in caves is still unclear. In bacteria carbonate is formed by autotrophic pathways, which deplete CO2 from the environment, and by heterotrophic pathways, leading to active or passive precipitation. We isolated cultivable heterotrophic microbial strains, able to induce CaCO3 precipitation in vitro, from samples taken from speleothems in the galleries of Stiffe’s cave, L’Aquila, Italy. We found a large number of bacteria in the calcite formations (1 x 104 to 5 x 109 cells g-1. Microscopic examination, in laboratory conditions at different temperatures, showed that most of the isolates were able to form calcium carbonate microcrystals. The most crystalline precipitates were observed at 32°C. No precipitation was detected in un-inoculated controls media or in media that had been inoculated with autoclaved bacterial cells. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis showed that most of the carbonate crystals produced were calcite. Bacillus strains were the most common calcifying isolates collected from Stiffe’s Cave. Analysis of carbonate-solubilization capability revealed that the non-calcifying bacteria were carbonate solubilizers.

  5. Catalyst Deactivation Simulation Through Carbon Deposition in Carbon Dioxide Reforming over Ni/CaO-Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Major problem in CO2 reforming of methane (CORM process is coke formation which is a carbonaceous residue that can physically cover active sites of a catalyst surface and leads to catalyst deactivation. A key to develop a more coke-resistant catalyst lies in a better understanding of the methane reforming mechanism at a molecular level. Therefore, this paper is aimed to simulate a micro-kinetic approach in order to calculate coking rate in CORM reaction. Rates of encapsulating and filamentous carbon formation are also included. The simulation results show that the studied catalyst has a high activity, and the rate of carbon formation is relatively low. This micro-kinetic modeling approach can be used as a tool to better understand the catalyst deactivation phenomena in reaction via carbon deposition. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 10th May 2011; Revised: 16th August 2011; Accepted: 27th August 2011[How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, N.A.S. Amin, and D.H.W. Ling. (2011. Catalyst Deactivation Simulation Through Carbon Deposition in Carbon Dioxide Reforming over Ni/CaO-Al2O3 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 129-136. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.1213.129-136][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.1213.129-136 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/1213 ] | View in  |  

  6. Deposition of Silver Nanoparticles on Dendrimer Functionalized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The nanohybrids composed of silver nanoparticles and aromatic polyamide functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is successfully synthesized and tested for their antibacterial activity against different pathogens. Prior to deposition of silver nanoparticles, acid treated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) were successively reacted with p-phenylenediamine and methylmethacrylate to form series of NH2-terminated aromatic polyamide dendrimers on the surface of MWCNTs through Michael addition and am...

  7. Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes through Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王升高; 汪建华; 马志斌; 王传新; 满卫东

    2005-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized on glass by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases at the low temperature of 550 ℃. The experimental results show that both the self-bias potential and the density of the catalyst particles are responsible for the alignment of CNTs. When the catalyst particle density is high enough, strong interactions among the CNTs can inhibit CNTs from growing randomly and result in parallel alignment.

  8. A geochemical framework for retrieving the linked depositional and diagenetic histories of marine carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-02-01

    In modern shallow seawater carbonate platforms, successive changes in diagenetic zones are found as the result of a drop in sea level. Such a relationship is important in identifying diagenetic processes, in interpreting global carbon isotope shifts and in finding the reasons for positive correlations between C and O isotopes in marine carbonates. However, it is not readily recognized in ancient marine carbonates because evidence for sea level changes can be cryptic in the rock record. Because of the fall of sea level, fresh water may add to precipitating marine carbonates on continental substrates, resulting in geochemical mixtures between shallow seawater and fresh water. To resolve this issue, we carry out a combined study of rare earth elements and yttrium (REE + Y) and Csbnd O isotopes in Carboniferous-Triassic marine carbonates from the Lower Yangtze platform in China. The relationships between inter-REE + Y ratios such as Y/Ho vs. (Nd/Yb)PAAS for pure carbonates strongly indicate mixing between fresh water and shallow seawater. The REE + Y patterns for pure carbonates show temporal variations, reflecting changes in the proportion of fresh water addition into shallow seawater, which were likely due to changes in relative sea level. Changes in diagenetic zones indicated by the relationships between carbonate C and O isotopes as well as other evidence follow the changes in relative sea level suggested by the REE + Y patterns. Therefore, a combined study of the REE + Y and Csbnd O isotopes in marine carbonates can provide robust constraints on the changes in the linked depositional environments and diagenetic processes on continental substrates.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha P.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Jiang, Hua; Timmermans, Marina; Kaskela, Antti; Tolochko, Oleg V.; Kurochkin, Alexey V.; Karppinen, Maarit; Nisula, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of ZnO deposition on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the help of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was successfully demonstrated. The utilization of pristine SWCNTs as a support resulted in a non-uniform deposition of ZnO in the form of nanoparticles. To achieve uniform ZnO coating, the SWCNTs first needed to be functionalized by treating the samples in a controlled ozone atmosphere. The uniformly ZnO coated SWCNTs were used to fabricate UV sensing devices. An UV irradiation of the ZnO coated samples turned them from hydrophobic to hydrophilic behaviour. Furthermore, thin films of the ZnO coated SWCNTs allowed us switch p-type field effect transistors made of pristine SWCNTs to have ambipolar characteristics.

  10. Dolomitization of Carbonate Periplatform Deposit,Machari Formation (Middle to Late Cambrian),Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The petrography, the geochemistry and the burial history all constrain the origin and modification history of dolomites in an ancient periplatform carbonate slope deposit,the Machari Formation (late Miclclle to early Late Cambrian),Korea. The formation is mainly composed of rhythmic bedding. laminated to bedded lime mudstone alternating with argillaceous lime mudstone. The rhythmic bedding is a product of the deposition of offshore periplatform ooze and hemipelagic clay on a periplatform slope. This formation also shows minor and intermittent influx of other lithofacies including the bioclastic-peloidal packstone, peloidal wackestone, and intraclasts deposited as turbidites. Five types of dolomite occur in the Machari Formation, whose occurrence.texture and geochemistry provide an insight into origin and modification history.

  11. Characterization of hydrogenated and deuterated thin carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelica, D., E-mail: pantel@nipne.ro [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O.B. MG-6, 30 Reactorului St., RO 077125 Magurele (Romania); Ionescu, P.; Petrascu, H. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O.B. MG-6, 30 Reactorului St., RO 077125 Magurele (Romania); Nita, C.R. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O.B. MG-6, 30 Reactorului St., RO 077125 Magurele (Romania); University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Matei, E.; Rasoga, O. [National Institute for Materials Physics, 105 Atomistilor Str., RO 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Acsente, T.; Dinescu, G. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., RO 077125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-07-15

    Thin films of C layers were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates using three gaseous atmospheres: pure Ar, Ar + H{sub 2} and Ar + D{sub 2} mixtures. Scanning Electron Microscopy investigations showed that addition of D{sub 2} or H{sub 2} to main sputtering gas (Ar) leads to the enhancement of the deposition rate while the layer morphology remained columnar. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy measurements revealed the presence of D–C or H–C chemical bonds in the samples. Ion beam analysis measurements performed by simultaneous recording of the recoiled H and D ions, and of backscattered {sup 4}He confirmed the incorporation of hydrogen and deuterium in the deposited carbon thin films.

  12. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chih-Ho [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, 404 Taiwan (China); Chang, Yin-Yu, E-mail: yinyu@mail2000.com.tw [Department of Mechanical and Computer-Aided Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Huang, Heng-Li [School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ho-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mingdao University, Changhua, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-30

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  13. Modelling of carbon erosion and re-deposition for the EAST movable limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, XIE; Rui, DING; Junling, CHEN; Jizhong, SUN

    2017-04-01

    The movable limiter at the mid-plane of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with carbon coatings on the surface was exposed to edge plasma to study the material erosion and re-deposition. After the experiments, the carbon erosion and re-deposition is modelled using the 3D Monte Carlo code ERO. The geometry of the movable limiter, 3D configuration of the plasma parameters and electromagnetic fields under both limiter and divertor configurations have been implemented into the code. In the simulations, the main uncertain parameters such as carbon concentration ρ c in the background plasma and cross-field transport coefficient D ⊥ in the vicinity of surface according to the ‘funneling model’, have been studied in comparison with experiments. The parameter ρ c mainly influences the net erosion and deposition profiles of the two sides of the movable limiter, while D ⊥ mostly changes the profiles on the top surface. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB107004 and 2013GB105003), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11375010, 11675218 and 11005125), and the Sino-German Center for Research Promotion under contract No GZ769.

  14. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  15. Microstructural evolution in laser deposited nickel-titanium-carbon in situ metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopagoni, S. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Hwang, J.Y., E-mail: Junyeon.Hwang@unt.edu [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Singh, A.R.P.; Mensah, B.A.; Bunce, N. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Tiley, J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Scharf, T.W.; Banerjee, R. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: > Laser deposition of Ni-TiC composites with a relatively low volume fraction of refined homogeneously distributed carbide precipitates resulting from an in situ reaction between elemental titanium and carbon (graphite) within the molten nickel pool. > Detailed characterization of the Ni/TiC interface using high resolution TEM. > Evaluation of the microhardness and tribological properties of this novel in situ composite with comparisons to laser deposited pure Ni. - Abstract: Laser deposition of a mixture of elemental nickel, titanium, and carbon (graphite) powders via the laser engineered net shaping (LENS) process results in an in situ titanium carbide reinforced nickel metal matrix composites. The composites have been characterized in detail using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping), Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission (including high resolution) electron microscopy. Both primary and eutectic titanium carbides, observed in this composite, exhibited the FCC-TiC structure (NaCl-type). Detailed characterization of the nickel/titanium carbide interface was carried out using high resolution TEM with the orientation relationship between the phases being <1 0 0> TiC//<1 1 0> Ni and (0 0 2) TiC//(1-bar 11) Ni. Mechanical and tribological testing determined that the composites exhibited a relatively high hardness of 370 VHN and a steady-state friction coefficient of {approx}0.5, both improvements in comparison to LENS deposited pure Ni.

  16. Evaluation of blood compatibility of plasma deposited heparin-like films and SF6 plasma treated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanira Antunes Perrenoud

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In devices used in open-heart surgery and dialysis, blood must be continuously processed using extracorporeal circuits composed of peristaltic pumps and active components such as specific filters and oxygenators. Several procedures have been employed to avoid blood coagulation induced by contact with the artificial surfaces of such devices. Often heparin, a bioactive protein able to prevent clot formation, is employed. In this work, we have used heparin-containing gas plasmas to evaluate the possibility of depositing adherent anticoagulant films onto PVC and glass surfaces. The films were produced by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from heparin/isopropanol and heparin/hexamethyldisiloxane solutions. In addition, the effects of exposure to SF6 plasmas on the compatibility of such surfaces have also been investigated. The blood compatibility was evaluated through the determination of the density of platelets and fibrinogen and activated partial thromboplastin (APTT and prothrombin times (PT of human blood freshly collected and after contact for 2.5 hours with different surfaces. The deposited films were also characterized by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle and surface energy measurements. The coagulation time of blood, placed in contact with glass substrates coated by PECVD films of heparin/isopropanol mixtures, and in contact with SF6 plasma-treated PVC, increased by about 60 and 20%, respectively, compared to the values measured with untreated samples.

  17. In vitro Cyto and Blood Compatibility of Titanium Containing Diamond-Like Carbon Prepared by Hybrid Sputtering Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krishnasamy NAVANEETHA PANDIYARAJ; Jan HEEG; Andreas LAMPKA; Fabian JUNGE; Torsten BARFELS; Marion WIENECKE; Young Ha RHEE; Hyoung Woo KIM

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, diamond-like carbon films (DLC) have been given more attention in research in the biomedical industry due to their potential application as surface coating on biomedical materials such as metals and polymer substrates. There are many ways to prepare metal containing DLC films deposited on polymeric film substrates, such as coatings from car- bonaceous precursors and some means that incorporate other elements. In this study, we in- vestigated both the surface and biocompatible properties of titanium containing DLC (Ti-DLC) films. The Ti-DLC films were prepared on the surface of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film as a function of the deposition power level using reactive sputtering technique. The films' hydrophilicity was studied by contact angle and surface energy tests. Their surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their elemental chemical composition was analyzed using energy dispersive X-spectra (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Their blood and cell compatibility was studied by in vitro tests, including tests on platelet adhesion, thrombus formation, whole blood clotting time and osteoblast cell compatibility. Significant changes in the morphological and chemical composition of the Ti-DLC films were observed and found to be a function of the deposition level. These morphological and chemical changes reduced the interfacial tension between Ti-DLC and blood proteins as well as resisted the adhesion and activation of platelets on the surface of the Ti-DLC films. The cell compatibility results exhibited significant growth of osteoblast cells on the surface of Ti incorporated DLC film compared with that of DLC film surface.

  18. Physicochemical and Biological Investigation of Different Structures of Carbon Coatings Deposited onto Polyurethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Kaczorowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the thrombogenic properties of polyurethane that was surface modified with carbon coatings. Physicochemical properties of manufactured coatings were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Raman spectroscopy and contact angle measurement methods. Samples were examined by the Impact-R method evaluating the level of platelets activation and adhesion of particular blood cell elements. The analysis of antimicrobial resistance against E. coli colonization and viability of endothelial cells showed that polyurethane modified with use of carbon layers constituted an interesting solution for biomedical application.

  19. Liquid-Phase Deposition of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Using Cobalt Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani-Gamo, Mikka; Shibasaki, Takeshi; Gamo, Hidenori; Nakagawa, Kiyoharu; Ando, Toshihiro

    2007-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel catalytic method for synthesizing a wide variety of carbon nanomaterials in the organic liquid. The method enabled us to realize a simple, rapid, and high-purity growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in alcohol liquids. In this study, cobalt (Co) was used as a catalyst metal. In order to control the structure of carbon nanomaterials, we investigated the relationship between the growth conditions and the grown materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation revealed that the morphology of the grown carbon nanomaterials strongly depended on the reaction temperature. Under the reaction temperature in the range from 873 to 973 K, fibriform deposits were mainly obtained. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the fibriform deposits were CNTs. The amount of the supported Co catalyst affected the fine tubular structure of the CNTs. We found that the existence of the reaction temperature of 873 K during the reaction time was essential for growing a fibriform structure in this study. The longer duration time for the reaction temperature of 1127 K resulted in a higher crystal quality for CNTs. We also demonstrated that the Co catalyst thermal oxidation at 1173 K resulted in the growth of aligned CNTs with the higher density.

  20. The morphology of fecal and regurgitation artifacts deposited by the blow fly Lucilia cuprina fed a diet of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdle, Annalisa; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Mitchell, R John

    2013-07-01

    Fly feces and regurgitation deposits may be mistaken for bloodstain patterns at a crime scene, potentially compromising event reconstruction and/or misdirecting police resources. In some instances, these artifacts contain sufficient human biological material to generate a full DNA profile, sometimes 2 years after deposition. Clearly, it is important that investigators can make the distinction between artifacts and bloodstains. This study examined 6645 artifacts deposited on a smooth, nonporous surface after Lucilia cuprina were fed human blood. Artifacts were also compared with bloodstains on a variety of other surfaces. Both similarities and differences were found between artifacts and bloodstains, highlighting the need for an identification system to assist personnel with little training in bloodstain pattern analysis. The morphology of the artifacts has been described so that these deposits may be more clearly distinguished from bloodstains, targeted by crime scene personnel as potential sources of human DNA, and/or identified as potential evidence contaminants. Flowcharts have been devised to facilitate the analysis.

  1. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.

    2015-01-01

    of carbon deposition. The outlet gas composition at each current step was estimated based on the inlet gas composition and the reactant conversion using Faraday's law. The increase in voltage was observed at lower pCO/pCO2 ratios than that corresponding to the thermodynamic threshold for carbon formation......, the carbon formation threshold in an operating cell was investigated during electrolysis of an idealized reactant atmosphere of CO and CO2. The electrolysis current was gradually increased in steps until the cell voltage spontaneously increased, thereby indicating cell degradation and possibly the onset...... conditions for commercial systems. The effect would be even more severe on stack level, where the gas diffusion and temperature gradients are more pronounced. Initial results of the mitigation strategy of infiltrating CGO are negative, but increased performance prior to coking was observed....

  2. Direct Deposition of Bamboo-Like Carbon Nanotubes on Copper Substrates by Sulfur-Assisted HFCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Katar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Films of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes (BCNTs were grown directly on copper substrates by sulfur-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD. The effects of substrate temperature and growth time over the BCNT structure were investigated. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy (RS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and electron field emission (EFE studies. SEM and Raman characterization indicate a transition from the growth of microcrystalline diamond to the growth of a dense entangled network of carbon nanotubes or fibers as the substrate temperature is increased from 400 to 900°C that is accounted for by the base growth model. TEM images show that the nanotubes have regular arrays of nanocavities. These BCNTs show good electron field emission properties as other carbon films.

  3. In situ electron spectroscopic identification of carbon species deposited by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samano, E.C.; Gamietea, A.; Cota, L. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada; Soto, G. [IFUNAM, Ensenada (Mexico). Lab. de Ensenada]|[Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico). Programa de Posgrado en Fisica de Materiales

    1997-05-01

    Thin carbon films were grown on Si (111) substrates by ablating a graphite target utilizing an excimer pulsed laser in a UHV Riber {copyright} LDM-32 system. Two kinds of films were produced, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) type and a diamond-like carbon (DLC) type. A relationship of the films microstructure with laser power density and substrate conditions was observed. The HOPG films were homogeneous but the DLC films were heterogeneous, as shown by micrographs. The thin films are monitored and analyzed in situ during the first stages of the deposition process. The monitoring was done by RHEED and the characterization by several surface spectroscopic techniques, AES, XPS and EELS. The formation of a SiC interface was observed for both films due to the reaction of the first carbon species with the substrate surface.

  4. Carbon impurities on graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Jinglei; Fuhrer, Michael S., E-mail: michael.fuhrer@monash.edu [Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111, USA and School of Physics, Monash University, 3800 Victoria (Australia)

    2014-07-28

    We report nanocrystalline carbon impurities coexisting with graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on platinum. For certain growth conditions, we observe micron-size island-like impurity layers which can be mistaken for second graphene layers in optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The island orientation depends on the crystalline orientation of the Pt, as shown by electron backscatter diffraction, indicating growth of carbon at the platinum surface below graphene. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy indicates that in addition to uniform single-crystal graphene, our sample is decorated with nanocrystalline carbon impurities with a spatially inhomogeneous distribution. The impurity concentration can be reduced significantly by lowering the growth temperature. Raman spectra show a large D peak, however, electrical characterization shows high mobility (∼8000 cm{sup 2}/Vs), indicating a limitation for Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic quality of graphene.

  5. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Aerogels of High-Surface Area and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work carbon aerogels were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD. Ferrocene were employed as a source both of catalytic material (Fe and of carbon. Gaseous hydrogen and argon were used as reductant and carrier gas, respectively. The products of reaction were collected over alumina. The morphology and textural properties of the soot produced in the reaction chamber were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption (BET and BHJ methods. After the evaluation of the porous structure of the synthesized products, 780 ± 20 m2/g of SBET and 0.55 ± 0.02 cm3/g of VBJH were found. The presence of iron carbide and the partial oxidation of carbon nanostructures were revealed by XPS.

  6. High efficiency organic-electrolyte DSSC based on hydrothermally deposited titanium carbide-carbon counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towannang, Madsakorn; Kumlangwan, Pantiwa; Maiaugree, Wasan; Ratchaphonsaenwong, Kunthaya; Harnchana, Viyada; Jarenboon, Wirat; Pimanpang, Samuk; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2015-07-01

    Pt-free TiC based electrodes were hydrothermally deposited onto FTO/glass substrates and used as dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) counter electrodes. A promising efficiency of 3.07% was obtained from the annealed hydrothermal TiC DSSCs based on a disulfide/thiolate electrolyte. A pronounced improvement in performance of 3.59% was achieved by compositing TiC with carbon, compared to that of a Pt DSSC, 3.84%. TEM analysis detected that the TiC particle surfaces were coated by thin carbon layer (7 nm). The SAED pattern and Raman spectrum of TiC-carbon films suggested that the carbon layer was composed of amorphous and graphite carbon. The formation of graphite on the TiC nanoparticles plays a crucial role in enhancing the film's reduction current to 10.12 mA/cm2 and in reducing the film impedance to 237.63 Ω, resulting in a high efficiency of the TiC-carbon DSSC. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Stratigraphy and mineralogy of a carbonate-hosted gold deposit: Kings Mountain gold mine, NC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supplee, J.; Lapoint, D.; Feiss, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Kings Mountain Gold Mine, Cleveland Company, North Carolina, is unique in the Appalachians in that it is carbonate-hosted, with a distinctive ore mineralogy. The mine stratigraphy is upright, younging east to west. The basal unit is a volcanic to subvolcanic chlorite, feldspar, quartz-eye porphyry, cut by a silicic porphyry, interpreted as a shallow level intrusion. Above and gradational to the chloritic porphyry, unless separated by the intrusive silicic porphyry, is a sericitic, quartz-eye porphyry, probably a metatuff. A north-thinning, graphite schists is above the sericitic porphyry. Carbonates overlie the graphite schist except to the north where they are above the sericitic porphyry. The carbonates consist of basal and upper sequences separated by a sericite, quartz-eye schists (metatuff) which is capped by a chlorite-sericite-graphite schist. Mineralization occurs within each carbonate sequence. This is overlain by interbedded chlorite and graphite schists with two horizons of exhalative iron formation (I.F.). Above the I.F. is a thick sequence of sericitic chlorite schists (turbidites). The mineralized carbonates are pervasively silicified with a disseminated assemblage of pyrite, pyrrhotite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, gold, altaite (PbTe), tetrahedrite, and pyrargyrite in quartz and dolomite +/- fluorite gangue. We suggest that the mineralization is associated with hydrothermal activity during emplacement of the silicic porphyry and following carbonate diagenesis. Mineralization was syn- or post-depositional with respect to the I.F.

  8. Fabrication of Pt deposited on carbon nanotubes and performance of its polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Junfeng

    2002-01-01

    [1]Zhao Jie, Lu Guangyuan, Deng Jianchun, Research and application progress of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, New Energy Sources(in Chinese), 1999, 21(8): 45-48.[2]Mao Zongqiang, Recent advances in proton exchange membrane fuel cell(PEMFC), New Energy Sources(in Chinese), 1999, 21(1): 7-10.[3]Niu, C., Sichel, E. K., Hoch, R. et al., High power electrochemical capacitors based on carbon nanotube electrodes [J], Appl. Phys. Lett., 1997, 70(11): 1480-1482.[4]Ma, R. Z., Liang, J., Wei, B. Q. et al., Study of electrochemical capacitors utilizing carbon nanotube electrodes[J], Journal of Power Sources, 1999, 84(1): 126-129.[5]Wang, Q. H., Setlur, A. A., Lauerhaas, J. M. et al., A nanotube-based field emission flat panel display, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1998, 72: 2912-2913.[6]Fan, S., Chapline, M. G., Franklin, N. R. et al., Self-oriented regular arrays of carbon nanotubes and their field emission properties, Science, 1999, 283(5401): 512-514.[7]Ebbesen, T. W., Ajayan, P. M., Large-scale synthesis of carbon nanotubles, Nature, 1992, 358: 220.[8]Rodriguez, N. M., Kim, M. S., Baker, R. T., Carbon nanofibers, A unique catalyst support medium, Phys. Chem., 1994, 98: 13108-13111.[9]Ang, L. M., Hor, T. S. A., Xu, G. Q. et al., Decoration of activated carbon nanotubes with copper and nickel, Carbon, 2000, 38: 363-372.[10]Che Guangli, Lakshmi, B. B., Fisher, E. R. et al., Carbon nanotubule membranes for electrochemical energy storage and production, Nature, 1998, 393: 346-349.[11]Chen Guiru, Xu Cailu, Mao Zongqiang et al., Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes, Chinese Science Bulletin, 2000, 45(2): 134-136.[12]Giordano, N., Passalacqua, E., Pingo, L. et al., Analysis of platinum particle size and oxygen reduction in phosphoric acid, Electrochimica Acta, 1991, 36(13): 1979-1984.[13]Yu Rongqing, Chen Luwei, Liu Qiping et al., Platinum deposition on carbon nanotubes via chemical modification, Chem. Mater

  9. Effects of sulfate deposition on pore water dissolved organic carbon, nutrients, and microbial enzyme activities in a northern peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Export of dissolved organic carbon from lakes and streams has increased throughout Europe and North America over the past several decades. One possible cause is altered deposition chemistry; specifically, decreasing sulfate inputs leading to changes in ionic strength and dissolve...

  10. Subalpine grassland carbon balance during 7 years of increased atmospheric N deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Matthias; Enderle, Jan; Bassin, Seraina

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution agents interact when affecting biological sinks for atmospheric CO2, e.g., the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of grassland ecosystems. Factors favoring plant productivity, like atmospheric N deposition, are usually considered to favor SOC storage. In a 7-year experiment in subalpine grassland under N- and O3-deposition treatment, we examined C fluxes and pools. Total N deposition was 4, 9, 14, 29 and 54 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (N4, N9, etc.); annual mean phytotoxic O3 dose was 49, 65 and 89 mmol m-2 projected leaf area. We hypothesized that between years SOC of this mature ecosystem would not change in control treatments and that effects of air pollutants are similar for plant yield, net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and SOC content, leading to SOC content increasing with N deposition. Cumulative plant yield showed a significant N and N × N effect (+38 % in N54) but no O3 effect. In the control treatment SOC increased significantly by 9 % in 7 years. Cumulative NEP did show a strong, hump-shaped response pattern to N deposition with a +62 % increase in N14 and only +39 % increase in N54 (N effect statistically not significant, N × N interaction not testable). SOC had a similar but not significant response to N, with highest C gains at intermediate N deposition rates, suggesting a unimodal response with a marginal (P = 0.09) N × N interaction. We assume the strong, pollutant-independent soil C sink developed as a consequence of the management change from grazing to cutting. The non-parallel response of SOC and NEP compared to plant yield under N deposition is likely the result of increased respiratory SOC losses, following mitigated microbial N-limitation or priming effects, and a shift in plant C allocation leading to smaller C input from roots.

  11. Impact of future Arctic shipping on high-latitude black carbon deposition (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, J. J.; Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Schmidt, A.

    2013-12-01

    The retreat of Arctic sea-ice has led to renewed calls to exploit Arctic shipping routes. The diversion of ship traffic through the Arctic will shorten shipping routes and possibly reduce global shipping emissions. However, deposition of black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted by additional Arctic ships could cause a reduction in the albedo of snow and ice, accelerating snow-melt and sea-ice loss. We use recently compiled Arctic shipping emission inventories for 2004 and 2050 together with a global aerosol microphysics model GLOMAP coupled to the chemical transport model TOMCAT to quantify the contribution of future Arctic shipping to high-latitude BC deposition. Emission rates of SOx (SO2 and SO4) and particulate matter (PM) were estimated for 2050 under both business-as-usual and high-growth scenarios. BC particles are assumed to be water-insoluble at emission but can become active in cloud drop formation through soluble material accumulation. After BC particles become cloud-active they are more efficiently wet scavenged, which accounts for 80% of modeled BC deposition. Current-day Arctic shipping contributes 0.3% to the BC mass deposited north of 60N (250 Gg). About 50% of modelled BC deposition is on open ocean, suggesting that current Arctic ship traffic may not significantly contribute to BC deposition on central Arctic sea ice. However, 6 - 8% of deposited BC on the west coast of Greenland originates from local ship traffic. Moreover, in-Arctic shipping contributes some 32% to high-latitude ship-sourced deposition despite accounting for less than 1.0% of global shipping emissions. This suggests that control of in-Arctic shipping BC emissions could yield greater decrease in high-latitude BC deposition than a similar control strategy applied only to the extra-Arctic shipping industry. Arctic shipping in 2050 will contribute less than 1% to the total BC deposition north of 60N due to the much greater relative contribution of BC transported from non-shipping sources

  12. Preparation of Diamond-like Carbon Films on the Surface of Ti Alloy by Electro-deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenglei SHEN; Hongwei WANG; Dijiang WEN

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, diamond-like carbon (DLC) fi[ms were deposited on Ti alloy by electro-deposition. DLC films were brown and composed of the compact grains whose diameter was about 400 nm. Examined by XPS, the main composition of the films was carbon. In the Raman spectrum, there were a broad peak at 1350 cm-1 and a broad peak at 1600 cm-1, which indicated that the films were DLC films.

  13. Characterization of microstructure and mechanical behavior of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, B.; Cao, D. M.; Meng, W. J.; Xu, J.; Tittsworth, R. C.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Doll, G. L.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.; The Timken Company

    2001-12-03

    We report on the characterization of microstructure and mechanical properties of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon (Ti-aC) coatings as a function of Ti composition. Ti-aC coatings have been deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition, in an industrial-scale four-target coating deposition system. The composition and microstructure of the Ti-aC coatings have been characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and hydrogen elastic recoil detection (ERD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At Ti compositions <4at.%, Ti atoms dissolve in an amorphous carbon (a-C) matrix. The dissolution limit of Ti atoms in an a-C matrix is determined to be between 4 and 8 at.%. At Ti compositions >8 at.%, XANES and EXAFS data indicate that the average Ti atomic bonding environment in Ti-aC coatings resembles that in cubic B1-TiC, consistent with TEM observation of precipitation of TiC nanocrystallites in the a-C matrix. Beyond the Ti dissolution limit, the Ti-aC coatings are nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an a-C matrix. A large scale, quasi one-dimensional composition modulation in the Ti-aC coatings was observed due to the particular coating deposition geometry. Elastic stiffness and hardness of the Ti-aC coatings were measured by instrumented nanoindentation and found to vary systematically as a function of Ti composition. Unlubricated friction coefficient of Ti-aC coatings against WC-Co balls was found to increase as the Ti composition increases. As Ti composition increases, the overall mechanical behavior of the Ti-aC coatings becomes more TiC-like.

  14. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  15. ZnO thin films on single carbon fibres fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, André; Engel, Sebastian; Sangiorgi, Nicola; Sanson, Alessandra; Bartolomé, Jose F.; Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2017-03-01

    Single carbon fibres were 360° coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films by pulsed laser deposition using a Q-switched CO2 laser with a pulse duration τ ≈ 300 ns, a wavelength λ = 10.59 μm, a repetition frequency frep = 800 Hz and a peak power Ppeak = 15 kW in combination with a 3-step-deposition technique. In a first set of experiments, the deposition process was optimised by investigating the crystallinity of ZnO films on silicon and polished stainless steel substrates. Here, the influence of the substrate temperature and of the oxygen partial pressure of the background gas were characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. ZnO coated carbon fibres and conductive glass sheets were used to prepare photo anodes for dye-sensitised solar cells in order to investigate their suitability for energy conversion devices. To obtain a deeper insight of the electronic behaviour at the interface between ZnO and substrate I-V measurements were performed.

  16. Controlled fluoridation of amorphous carbon films deposited at reactive plasma conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoffe Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the correlations between plasma parameters, gas ratios, and deposited amorphous carbon film properties is presented. The injection of a C4F8/Ar/N2 mixture of gases was successfully used in an inductively coupled plasma system for the preparation of amorphous carbon films with different fluoride doping at room-temperature, using silicon as a substrate. This coating was formed at low-pressure and low-energy using an inductively coupled plasma process. A strong dependence between the ratios of gases during deposition and the composition of the substrate compounds was shown. The values of ratios between Ar (or Ar+N2 and C4F8 - 1:1 and between N2 and Ar - 1:2 in the N2/Ar/C4F8 mixture were found as the best for low fluoridated coatings. In addition, an example of improving the etch-passivation in the Bosch procedure was described. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy options, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectivity were used for quantitative analysis of the deposited films.

  17. Measured black carbon deposition on the Sierra Nevada snow pack and implication for snow pack retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Hadley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon (BC deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition on the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  18. Measured black carbon deposition on the Sierra Nevada snow pack and implication for snow pack retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Hadley

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  19. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  20. Preferential soft-tissue preservation in the Hot Creek carbonate spring deposit, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Dustin K.; Jones, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The relict Holocene Hot Creek carbonate spring deposit in southeast British Columbia is characterized by excellent preservation of soft-tissue organisms (e.g. cyanobacteria), but poor preservation of organisms with hard-tissue (e.g. wood, diatoms). The deposit is formed mainly of calcified cyanobacteria, with fewer mineralized macrophytes (plants), bryophytes (mosses), wood, and diatoms. Cyanobacteria grew as solitary filaments ( Lyngbya) and as radiating hemispherical colonies ( Rivularia). Both were preserved by encrustation and encapsulation while alive, and as casts after filament death and decay. Sheath impregnation was rare to absent. Filament encrustation, whereby calcite crystals nucleated on, and grew away from the sheath exterior, produced moulds that replicated external filament morphology, but hastened filament decay. Filament encapsulation, whereby calcite nucleated in the vicinity of, and grew towards the encapsulated filament, promoted sheath preservation even after trichome decay. Subsequent calcite precipitation inside the hollow sheath generated sheath casts. The inability of mineralizing spring water to penetrate durable cell walls meant that bryophytes, macrophytes, and most wood was preserved by encrustation. Some wood resisted complete decay for several thousand years, and its lignified cell walls allowed rare permineralizations. Diatoms were not preserved in the relict deposit because the frustules were dissolved by the basic spring water. Amorphous calcium carbonate produced by photosynthetic CO 2 removal may have acted as nucleation sites for physicochemically precipitated calcite. Thus, metabolic activities of floral organisms probably initiated biotic mineralization, but continuous inorganic calcite precipitation on and in flora ensured that soft tissues were preserved.

  1. Global change and modern coral reefs: New opportunities to understand shallow-water carbonate depositional processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Pamela

    2005-04-01

    Human activities are impacting coral reefs physically, biologically, and chemically. Nutrification, sedimentation, chemical pollution, and overfishing are significant local threats that are occurring worldwide. Ozone depletion and global warming are triggering mass coral-bleaching events; corals under temperature stress lose the ability to synthesize protective sunscreens and become more sensitive to sunlight. Photo-oxidative stress also reduces fitness, rendering reef-building organisms more susceptible to emerging diseases. Increasing concentration of atmospheric CO 2 has already reduced CaCO 3 saturation in surface waters by more than 10%. Doubling of atmospheric CO 2 concentration over pre-industrial concentration in the 21st century may reduce carbonate production in tropical shallow marine environments by as much as 80%. As shallow-water reefs decline worldwide, opportunities abound for researchers to expand understanding of carbonate depositional systems. Coordinated studies of carbonate geochemistry with photozoan physiology and calcification, particularly in cool subtropical-transition zones between photozoan-reef and heterotrophic carbonate-ramp communities, will contribute to understanding of carbonate sedimentation under environmental change, both in the future and in the geologic record. Cyanobacteria are becoming increasingly prominent on declining reefs, as these microbes can tolerate strong solar radiation, higher temperatures, and abundant nutrients. The responses of reef-dwelling cyanobacteria to environmental parameters associated with global change are prime topics for further research, with both ecological and geological implications.

  2. Process of Energetic Carbon Atom Deposition on Si (001) Substrate by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于威; 滕晓云; 李晓苇; 傅广生

    2002-01-01

    The process of energetic C atom deposition on Si (001)-(2×1) is studied by the molecular dynamics method using the semi-empirical many-bond Tersoff potential. It is found that the incident energy of the carbon atom has an important effect on the collision process and its diffusion process on the substrate. Most of the incident energy of the carbon atom is transferred to the substrate atoms within the initial two vibration periods of substrate atoms and its value increases with the incident energy. The spreading distance and penetration depth of the incident atom increasing with the incident energy are also identified. The simulated results imply that an important effect of energy of incident carbon on the film growth at Iow substrate temperature provides activation energy for silicon carbide formation through the vibration enhancement of local substrate atoms. In addition, suppressing carbon atom inhomogeneous collection and dispensing with the silicon diffusion process may be effectively promoted by the spreading and penetration of the energetic carbon atom in the silicon substrate.

  3. Atomic layer deposition encapsulated activated carbon electrodes for high voltage stable supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kijoo; Cho, Moonkyu; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-28

    Operating voltage enhancement is an effective route for high energy density supercapacitors. Unfortunately, widely used activated carbon electrode generally suffers from poor electrochemical stability over 2.5 V. Here we present atomic layer deposition (ALD) encapsulation of activated carbons for high voltage stable supercapacitors. Two-nanometer-thick Al2O3 dielectric layers are conformally coated at activated carbon surface by ALD, well-maintaining microporous morphology. Resultant electrodes exhibit excellent stability at 3 V operation with 39% energy density enhancement from 2.5 V operation. Because of the protection of surface functional groups and reduction of electrolyte degradation, 74% of initial voltage was maintained 50 h after full charge, and 88% of capacitance was retained after 5000 cycles at 70 °C accelerated test, which correspond to 31 and 17% improvements from bare activated carbon, respectively. This ALD-based surface modification offers a general method to enhance electrochemical stability of carbon materials for diverse energy and environmental applications.

  4. High-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition of ferromagnetic ruthenium-containing carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khavrus, Vyacheslav O., E-mail: V.Khavrus@ifw-dresden.de; Ibrahim, E. M. M.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht [IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We report on the high-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of ruthenium nanoparticles (NPs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of gas-phase decomposition of acetonitrile and ruthenocene in a tubular quartz flow reactor at 950 Degree-Sign C and at elevated pressures (between 2 and 8 bar). The deposited material consists of Ru metal cores with sizes ranging between 1 and 3 nm surrounded by a carbon matrix. The high-pressure CCVD seems to be an effective route to obtain composite materials containing metallic NPs, Ru in this work, inside a nanostructured carbon matrix protecting them from oxidation in ambient air. We find that in contradiction to the weak paramagnetic properties characterizing bulk ruthenium, the synthesized samples are ferromagnetic as predicted for nanosized particles of nonmagnetic materials. At low pressure, the very small ruthenium catalyst particles are able to catalyze growth of SWCNTs. Their yield decreases with increasing reaction pressure. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements were used to analyze and confirm properties of the synthesized NPs and nanotubes. A discussion on the growth mechanism of the Ru-containing nanostructures is presented.

  5. Deposition, burial and sequestration of carbon in an oligotrophic, tropical lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alcocer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The amount of biogenic carbon that may be deposited, buried and eventually preserved (sequestered in the sediments of a tropical, oligotrophic lake, was evaluated based on i the temporal variation of the particulate organic carbon (POC concentration in the superficial sediments in the deep zone of lake Alchichica, Puebla, Mexico; and ii the POC accumulation and preservation in a 210Pb-dated sediment core from the lake. In lake Alchichica the POC concentration in the surficial sediments ranged between 12 and 60 mg POC g-1 (25 ± 12 mg POC g-1 dry weight. The magnitude of the sedimented POC in Alchichica was high and mostly of autochthonous origin. The POC concentrations recorded in the sediment core (16.6 to 31.6 mg g-1 dry weight were comparable to the concentration range observed in the surface sediment samples collected during the study period, which signaled a high POC preservation capacity in the sedimentary column of lake Alchichica. The POC fluxes, estimated from the 210Pb-dated sediment core, varied between 14.9 and 35.3 g m-2 year-1 within the past century; and the maximum POC losses through diagenesis during this period were estimated to be lower than 25%. This study concludes that deep tropical lakes, exemplified by lake Alchichica, accumulate and preserve most of the POC deposited, playing an important role in regional carbon balances.

  6. Nanomagnetic domains of chromium deposited on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Andrew C., E-mail: a.wright@glyndwr.ac.uk [Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Materials Science Research Center, Glyndwr University, Wrexham LL11 2AW (United Kingdom); Faulkner, Michael K., E-mail: m.faulkner@manchester.ac.uk [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Harris, Robert C.; Goddard, Alex; Abbott, Andrew P., E-mail: apa1@le.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    The drive to create ever smaller magnetic memory devices has led to the development of new nanomagnetic domains on surfaces. This paper reports the development of nano-chromium magnetic domains obtained using electrodeposition on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers arrays. Attempts to achieve this using conventional aqueous solutions were unsuccessful even after thin nickel underlayers were applied. The use of a novel electrolyte, a deep eutectic solvent, made from choline chloride: chromium (III) chloride enabled highly conformal overcoatings of chromium on individual bare carbon nanotubes to be obtained. Very high aspect ratio metal microstructures could be obtained by this novel technology. Magnetic imaging of the coated nanoarrays showed there to be clear magnetic character to the coating when the thin coatings were applied but this disappeared when the deposits were thicker and more contiguous. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoscale chromium deposited from non-aqueous electrolyte shows magnetic behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes conformally coated with chromium metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ionic liquid electrolyte superior to chromic acid for plating high aspect ratio structures.

  7. Irreversible membrane fouling abatement through pre-deposited layer of hierarchical porous carbons

    KAUST Repository

    Hamad, Juma

    2014-11-01

    In this work, dual-templated hierarchical porous carbons (HPCs), produced from a coupled ice-hard templating approach, are shown to be a highly effective solution to the commonly occurring problem of irreversible fouling of low-pressure membranes used for pre-treatment in wastewater reuse. For the first time, dual-templated HPCs, along with their respective counterparts - single-templated meso-porous carbon (MPCs) (without macropores) - are tested in terms of their fouling reduction capacity and ability to remove different effluent organic matter fractions present in wastewater and compared with a commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The synthesized HPCs provided exceptional fouling abatement, a 4-fold higher fouling reduction as compared to the previously reported best performing commercial PAC and ~2.5-fold better fouling reduction than their respective mesoporous counterpart. Thus, it is shown that not only mesoporosity, but macroporosity is also necessary to achieve high fouling reduction, thus emphasizing the need for dual templating. In the case of HPCs, the pre-deposition technique is also found to outperform the traditional sorbent-feed mixing approach, mainly in terms of removal of fouling components. Based on their superior performance, a high permeability (ultra-low-pressure) membrane consisting of the synthesized HPC pre-deposited on a large pore size membrane support (0.45μm membrane), is shown to give excellent pre-treatment performance for wastewater reuse application. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Synthesis and Characteristics of Diamond-like Carbon Films Deposited on Quartz Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄卫东; 丁鼎; 詹如娟

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on quartz substrate using pure CH4 in the surface wave plasma equipment. A direct current negative bias up to -90 V is applied to the substrate to investigate the bias effect on the film characteristics. Deposited films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques.There are two broad Raman peaks around 1340 cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 and the first one has a greater sp3 component with an increased bias. Infrared spectroscopy has three sp3 C-H modes at 2852 cm-1, 2926 cm- 1 and 2962 cm-1, respectively and also shows an intensity increase with the negative bias. Optical band gap is calculated from the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and the increased values with negative bias and deposition time are obtained. After a thermal anneal at about 500 ℃ for an hour to the film deposited under the bias of-90 V, we get an almost unchanged Raman spectrum and a peak intensity-reduced IR signal, which indicates a reduced H-content in the film. Meanwhile the optical band gap changed from 0.85 eV to 1.5 eV.

  9. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  10. Reading carbonate deposits from ancient water installations: why are they useful for geoarchaeology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürmelihindi, Gül; Passchier, Cees

    2016-04-01

    Water has always been a basic need of life, to remain alive and clean, and to irrigate fertile land, which provides food to people. While looking for a source of water suitable for their requirements, ancient civilizations considered three important factors: to have a reliable supply of water; in sufficient amount and quality; and at affordable costs to transport it to where it was needed. Water lifting and distribution devices were therefore selected and improved with these essential factors in mind. Our understanding of the development of water technology in ancient cultures is mainly based on archaeology and textural sources, focusing on details of the construction of water works and water machines, and on their location in individual settlements. However, the geographic distribution of water technology in Mediterranean and Middle East is poorly understood: both the local economical basis and palaeo-environmental conditions may have played a role in the choice of certain water technologies. As a consequence, some water-lifting devices, e.g. the bucket-chain and Archimedean screw, were only used where favorable conditions prevailed. The use of ancient water installations, however, cannot easily be studied from architectural remains alone: carbonate deposits in and around such installations can provide information, not only on their use but also on palaeo-environmental conditions during their functioning and on local economical conditions. This applies mostly to water installations of Roman or Medieval age. Since the Romans maintained their water technologies routinely, any thick carbonate deposit may give information on periods of economical hardship, too. Carbonate deposits (calcareous sinter) are presently mainly used to study palaeo-environmental changes from Roman aqueducts, but water lifting machines and water mills, which are commonly build of wood, can also be studied in this way. The Romans were the first to apply waterpower to several industrial

  11. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  12. Electrophoretically deposited multiwalled carbon nanotube based amperometric genosensor for E.coli detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Hema; Solanki, Shipra; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    This work reports on a sensitive and selective genosensor fabrication method for Escherichia coli (E.coli) detection. The functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) synthesized via chemical vapour deposition have been deposited electrophoretically onto indium tin oxide coated glass surface and have been utilized as matrices for the covalent immobilization of E.coli specific probe oligonucleotide that was identified from the 16s rRNA coding region of the E.coli genome. This fabricated functionalized MWCNT based platform sought to provide improved fundamental characteristics to electrode interface in terms of electro-active surface area and diffusion coefficient. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry revealed that this genosensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA in the concentration range of 10-7 to 10-12 M with a detection limit of 1×10-12 M.

  13. Uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonate deposits from Fara San Martino (Maiella, Italy: biostratigraphic remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bruni

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous limestone succession in the Maiella region of Italy has been investigated in a profile covering more than 400 m stratigraphical thickness at Fara San Martino. The succession mainly consists of peritidal limestones, intertidal and supratidal sequences being dominant, together with subtidal lagoonal facies. As a consequence, the microfossil assemblages are generally poorly developed, Microfossils occur within the subtidal lagoonal facies of this suite of restricted sediments. This feature led us to recognise five informal biostratigraphic intervals, which are facies related – instead of biozones, each of the intervals being characterized by specific micropaleontological associations. The occurrence and/or disappearance of some marker microfossils were used as references for separating these intervals. Based on these markers, the Uppermost Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous carbonate deposits from Maiella region may be correlated with similar deposits from the Apennines and from other regions in the perimediterranean area.

  14. Field emission from carbon films deposited by VHF CVD on difference substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, A A; Andronov, A N; Felter, T E; Ioffe, A F; Kosarev, A I; Shotov, M V; Vinogradov, A J

    1999-04-01

    As previously demonstrated, non-diamond carbon (NDC) films deposited at low temperatures 200-300 C on silicon tips reduced the threshold of field emission. In this paper we will present the results of the study of field emission from flat NDC films prepared by VHF CVD. Emission measurements were performed in a diode configuration at approximately 10{sup {minus}10} Torr. NDC films were deposited on ceramic and on c-Si substrates sputter coated with layers of Ti, Cu, Ni and Pt. The back contact material influences the emission characteristics but not as a direct correlation to work function. A model of field emission from metal-NDC film structures will be discussed.

  15. Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucha, H.; Raith, J.

    2009-04-01

    *Kucha H **Raith J *University of Mining and Metallurgy, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059 Krakow, Poland. ** University of Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics, A-8700 Leoben, Peter Tunner Str. 5, Austria Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits To date evaluation of bacterial processes in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits is largely based on sulphur isotope evidence. However, during a past few years, textural criteria, have been established, which support the bacterial origin of many of these deposits. This has received a strong support from micro-, and nano-textures of naturally growing bacterial films in a flooded tunnel within carbonates that host the Piquette Zn-Pb deposit (Druschel et al., 2002). Bacterial textures, micro- and nano textures found in carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits are: i)wavy bacterial films up to a few mm thick to up to a few cm long composed of peloids, ii)semimassive agglomeration of peloids in the carbonate matrix, and iii)solitary peloids dispersed in the carbonate matrix. Peloids are usually composed of a distinct 50-90um core most often made up of Zn-bearing calcite surrounded by 30-60um thick dentate rim composed of ZnS. Etching of Zn-carbonate cores reveals 1 - 2um ZnS filaments, and numerous 15 to 90nm large ZnS nano-spheres (Kucha et al., 2005). In massive ore composite Zn-calcite - sphalerite peloids are entirely replaced by zinc sulphide, and form peloids ghosts within banded sulphide layers. Bacterially derived micro- and nano-textures have been observed in the following carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits: 1)Irish-type Zn-Pb deposits. In the Navan deposit the basic sulphur is isotopically light bacteriogenic S (Fallick at al., 2001). This is corroborated by semimassive agglomerations of composite peloids (Zn-calcite-ZnS corona or ZnS core-melnikovite corona). Etching of Zn-calcite core reveals globular

  16. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  17. An Investigation on the Formation of Carbon Nanotubes by Two-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High density of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has been synthesized from agricultural hydrocarbon: camphor oil using a one-hour synthesis time and a titanium dioxide sol gel catalyst. The pyrolysis temperature is studied in the range of 700–900°C at increments of 50°C. The synthesis process is done using a custom-made two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The CNT characteristics are investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that structural properties of CNT are highly dependent on pyrolysis temperature changes.

  18. Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India: Sea level and environmental changes during the Late Quaternary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    of sea level rise and as a consequence sediment material was lost from the marginal areas. Abundant carbonate buildups were developed on some continental margins during times of slow or moderate sea level rise and these buildups now occur as relic... the platform lies off major rivers such as Narmada and Tapi, it contains<10% terrigenous material. The relic deposits on the carbonate platform are largely carbonate sands. Thin section studies indicate that some of these sands are Crustacean faecal...

  19. Peculiarities of Brain's Blood Flow : Role of Carbon Dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Gersten, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Among the major factors controlling the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the effect of PaCO2 is peculiar in that it violates autoregulatory CBF mechanisms and allows to explore the full range of the CBF. This research resulted in a simple physical model, with a four parameter formula, relating the CBF to PaCO2. The parameters can be extracted in an easy manner, directly from the experimental data. With this model earlier experimental data sets of Rhesus monkeys and rats were well fitted. Human data were also fitted with this model. Exact formulae were found, which can be used to transform the fits of one animal to the fits of another one. The merit of this transformation is that it enable us the use of rats data as monkeys data simply by rescaling the PaCO2 values and the CBF data. This transformation makes possible the use of experimental animal data instead of human ones.

  20. Nanoscale carbon tubules deposited in anodic aluminium oxide template:a study of soft x-ray transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li-Feng; Zhou Zhen-Ping; Yuan Hua-Jun; Ci Li-Jie; Liu Dong-Fang; Gao Yan; Wang Jian-Xiong; Wang Gang; Zhou Wei-Ya; Zhu Pei-Ping; Cui Ming-Qi; Zheng Lei; Zhu Jie; Zhao Yi-Dong; Song Li; Yan Xiao-Qin

    2004-01-01

    Well-aligned, catalyst-free nanoscale carbon tubules array was prepared by organic compound vapour deposition method using anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) as a template. The experiment of soft x-ray channelling in such carbon tubules array deposited in AAO template was performed at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The transmission of x-rays in carbon tubules array with AAO template support was found even higher than that in bare AAO template at high-energy part of energy spectrum though the porous area of the former was smaller than that of the latter. A qualitative explanation is presented to interpret our results.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes: a review on growth mechanism and mass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    This review article deals with the growth mechanism and mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Different aspects of CNT synthesis and growth mechanism are reviewed in the light of latest progresses and understandings in the field. Materials aspects such as the roles of hydrocarbon, catalyst and catalyst support are discussed. Many new catalysts and new carbon sources are described. Growth-control aspects such as the effects of temperature, vapor pressure and catalyst concentration on CNT diameter distribution and single- or multi-wall formation are explained. Latest reports of metal-catalyst-free CNT growth are considered. The mass-production aspect is discussed from the perspective of a sustainable CNT technology. Existing problems and challenges of the process are addressed with future directions.

  2. An operando surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) study of carbon deposition on SOFC anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Lee, Jung-pil; Ding, Dong; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Park, Soojin; Liu, Meilin

    2015-09-07

    Thermally robust and chemically inert Ag@SiO2 nanoprobes are employed to provide the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect for an in situ/operando study of the early stage of carbon deposition on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The enhanced sensitivity to carbon enables the detection of different stages of coking, offering insights into intrinsic coking tolerance of material surfaces. Application of a thin coating of gadolinium doped ceria (GDC) enhances the resistance to coking of nickel surfaces. The electrochemically active Ni-YSZ interface appears to be more active for hydrocarbon reforming, resulting in the accumulation of different hydrocarbon molecules, which can be readily removed upon the application of an anodic current. Operando SERS is a powerful tool for the mechanistic study of coking in SOFC systems. It is also applicable to the study of other catalytic and electrochemical processes in a wide range of conditions.

  3. Characterization of Transition-Metal Oxide Deposition on Carbon Electrodes of a Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chung Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to fabricate the composite electrodes of a supercapacitor, transition-metal oxide materials NiO and WO3 were deposited on carbon electrodes by electron beam evaporation. The influences of various transition-metal oxides, scan rates of cyclic voltammograms (CVs, and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests on the characteristics of supercapacitor were studied. The charge/discharge efficiency and the lifetime of the composite electrodes were also investigated. It was found that the composite electrodes exhibited more favorable capacitance properties than those of the carbon electrodes at high scan rates. The results revealed the promotion of the capacitance property of the supercapacitor with composite electrode and the improving of the decay property in capacitance at high scan rate. In addition, the charge/discharge efficiency is close to 100% after 5000 cycles, and the composite electrode retains strong adhesion between the electrode material and the substrate.

  4. Minerogenic System of Magnesian Nonmetallic Deposits in Early Proterozoic Mg-rich Carbonate Formations in Eastern Liaoning Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the early Proterozoic the Liryu Formation and Dashiqiao Formation of eastern Liaoning province, China, there are distributed Mg-rich carbonate rock formations, in which large to superlarge deposits of boron, magnesite, talc, Xiuyan jade etc. occur. The formation of these magnesian nonmetallic deposits was related to early Proterozoic evaporates; then these deposits underwent reworking of regional metamorphism and hydrothermal metasomatism during the Lüliang orogeny and tectono-magmatism during the Indosinian-Yanshanian. Among other things, the Mg-rich carbonates formations, minerogenetic structures and ore-forming fluids played a controlling role in the formation of the mineral deposits. The refore, it can be concluded that the mineral deposits are products of combined processes of the coupling of ore source field, fluid field, thermal field (energy field) and stress field under certain time-space conditions in the early Proterozoic and the late-stage superimposed reworking of tectono-magmatism.

  5. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  6. Plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon and fluorinated amorphous carbon and the resultant properties and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, Alexander David

    Researchers first created diamondlike carbon (DLC) 50 years ago, but it has only been the subject of intense research for the last decade. DLC is a highly stressed thin film that exists as a mixture of diamond like sp 3 and graphite like sp2 bonded carbon, with 0--50% H. Many believe that high intrinsic stress states are necessary to stabilize the carbon spa content responsible for the high hardness of DLC. This author's goals include fabricating high quality fluorinated amorphous carbon (FLAC) films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), exploring the relationships between the processing parameters and the dielectric value, as well as the related material properties which limit the useful application of FLAC. An improved understanding of the fundamentals behind FLAC processing may allow workers to improve upon the properties limiting its use, such as intrinsic stress, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity. DLC and FLAC film hardness ranged from 14--16 GP and 16--18 GPa respectively. Their film stress ranged from 800 MPa to a 10 GPa. A study of the thickness dependent properties showed that only films thicker than 200 nm were able to achieve stresses greater than approximately 1.6 GPa, the room temperature transition pressure of graphite to diamond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements also yielded different C sp3 contents for films of varying thickness deposited under the same conditions, helping to confirm a thickness dependence of film properties greater than 200 nm. Observation of the stress in real time during annealing of the films on Si wafers yielded activation energy values for the stress relief of DLC and FLAC as 0.11 and 0.24 eV respectively, and the CTE of DLC as 10.6 x 10-6 C-1. The stress relief mechanism consists of kinetically limited network arrangements that occur in highly stressed zones due heating, which are also the cause of the reduction in dielectric constant that occurs during rapid thermal annealing. Thermal

  7. Deposition and characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) based films for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Amila C.

    The advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has opened up lot of novel applications because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNTs are well known material for its exceptional electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal and chemical properties. A single-wall nanotube (SWNT) can be either semiconducting, metallic or semi-metallic, based on its chirality and diameter. SWNTs can be used in transistor device as active channels due to high electron mobility (~10000 cm2/(V s), electrical interconnects, nano-scale circuits, field-emission displays, light-emitting devices and thermal heat sinks due to low resistivity, high current density (~109A cm-2 ) and high thermal conductivity (~3500 W m-1). Further, their high Young's modulus and fracture stress is suitable for various sensing applications such as strain/pressure and use in chemical/biological sensors. This work mainly involves the deposition of CNT-based films following two different methods via a conventional microwave chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) and spinning CNT-composites, and explored the possibility of using CNT-based films in strain gauge applications. Deposited films are characterized and analyzed for their structure, microstructure, composition and electrical properties. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), X-ray Reflectivity (XRR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrical impedance measurement techniques are used to characterize the films prepared by both the above mentioned methods. The synthesis/deposition process is improved based on the observed films properties. A carbon nanotube forest grown on the Si (100) substrate with Ni as a catalyst using CVD system shows an amorphous nature due to loss of catalytic activity of Ni nano-islands. XPS and RBS data show Ni nano-particles diffused into the Si substrate and surface layer of Ni particles turns out to nickel silicide. The

  8. Bacterial adherence on fluorinated carbon based coatings deposited on polyethylene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terriza, A; Del Prado, G; Perez, A Ortiz; Martinez, M J; Puertolas, J A; Manso, D Molina; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R; Yubero, F; Barrena, E Gomez; Esteban, J, E-mail: antonia.terriza@icmse.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    Development of intrinsically antibacterial surfaces is of key importance in the context of prostheses used in orthopaedic surgery. In this work we present a thorough study of several plasma based coatings that may be used with this functionality: diamond like carbon (DLC), fluorine doped DLC (F-DLC) and a high fluorine content carbon-fluor polymer (CF{sub X}). The study correlates the surface chemistry and hydrophobicity of the coating surfaces with their antibacterial performance. The coatings were deposited by RF-plasma assisted deposition at room temperature on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) samples. Fluorine content and relative amount of C-C and C-F bond types was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hydrophobicity by water contact angle measurements. Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to non-coated and coated UHMWPE samples was evaluated. Comparisons of the adherence performance were evaluated using a paired t test (two materials) and a Kruskall Wallis test (all the materials). S. aureus was statistically significant (p< 0.001) less adherent to DLC and F-DLC surfaces than S. epidermidis. Both bacteria showed reduction of adherence on DLC/UHMWPE. For S. aureus, reduction of bacterial adherence on F-DLC/UHMWPE was statistically significant respect to all other materials.

  9. Optical properties of plasma deposited amorphous carbon nitride films on polymer substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, S.H., E-mail: abo_95@yahoo.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); El-Hossary, F.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); Gamal, G.A.; Kahlid, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, 83523 Qena (Egypt)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were deposited on polymer substrates using radio frequency (rf) plasma in a mixture of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) gasses. The samples were prepared at different rf plasma power (350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 W), at constant plasma exposure time of 10 min, and constant N{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio of 50%. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the prepared samples were examined using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis, respectively. The absence of the carbon nitride diffraction peaks confirms the amorphous nature of these films. The root mean square roughness of the films increased from 3.77 to 25.22 nm as the power increased from 350 to 550 W. The thickness and the deposition rate were found to increase with increasing plasma power. Over the whole studied wavelength range, from 200 to 2500 nm, the transmittance decreased with increasing plasma power. A shift in the onset of absorption towards higher wavelengths with increasing plasma power, indicating a decrease in the optical band gap, has been observed. The refractive index values were found to decrease while the extinction coefficient increased with increasing plasma power.

  10. Amorphous carbon-silicon heterojunctions by pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan; Yow, Ho-Kwang [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia); Tou, Teck-Yong, E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.m [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia)

    2009-07-31

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited at 10{sup -4} Pa on n-Si (Si-111) and p-Si (Si-100) substrates using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fundamental, second- and third-harmonic outputs. These unhydrogenated and undoped a-C films were characterized by visible and UV Raman spectroscopy which indicated the presence of substantial amount of sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon network depending on the laser wavelength. The bulk resistivity in the Au/a-C/indium tin oxide structure varied between (10{sup 9}-10{sup 13}) {Omega} cm - the lowest resistivity was obtained for films deposited by the fundamental laser output at 1064 nm while the highest value was by the third-harmonic laser output at 355 nm. All the a-C/Si heterostructures exhibited a nonlinear current density-voltage characteristic. Under light illumination, by taking into consideration the fill factor of {approx} 0.2 for a-C/n-Si, the conversion efficiency at the highest photovoltage and photocurrent, at an illumination density of 0.175 mW/cm{sup 2} was estimated to be {approx} 0.28%.

  11. Target-plane deposition of diamond-like carbon in pulsed laser ablation of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my

    2007-10-15

    In pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at 10{sup -6} Torr, diamond-like carbon (DLC) are deposited at laser wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm on substrates placed in the target-plane. These target-plane samples are found to contain varying sp{sup 3} content and composed of nanostructures of 40-200 nm in size depending on the laser wavelength and laser fluence. The material and origin of sp{sup 3} in the target-plane samples is closely correlated to that in the laser-modified HOPG surface layer, and hardly from the backward deposition of ablated carbon plume. The surface morphology of the target-plane samples shows the columnar growth and with a tendency for agglomeration between nanograins, in particular for long laser wavelength at 1064 nm. It is also proposed that DLC formation mechanism at the laser-ablated HOPG is possibly via the laser-induced subsurface melting and resolidification.

  12. Subalpine grassland carbon dioxide fluxes indicate substantial carbon losses under increased nitrogen deposition, but not at elevated ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Matthias; Obrist, Daniel; Novak, Kris; Giger, Robin; Bassin, Seraina; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition affect plant carbon (C) dynamics and may thus change ecosystem C-sink/-source properties. We studied effects of increased background O3 concentrations (up to ambient x 2) and increased N deposition (up to +50 kg ha-1 a-1) on mature, subalpine grassland during the third treatment year. During ten days and 13 nights, covering the vegetation period of 2006, we measured ecosystem-level CO2 exchange using a steady state cuvette. Light dependency of gross primary production (GPP) and temperature dependency of ecosystem respiration rates (Reco) were established. Soil temperature, soil water content, and solar radiation were monitored. Using Reco and GPP values, we calculated seasonal net ecosystem production (NEP), based on hourly averages of global radiation and soil temperature. Differences in NEP were compared to differences in soil organic C after five years of treatment. Under high O3 and with unchanged aboveground biomass, both mean Reco and GPP decreased throughout the season. Thus, NEP indicated an unaltered growing season CO2-C balance. Under high N treatment, with a +31% increase in aboveground productivity, mean Reco, but not GPP increased. Consequently, seasonal NEP yielded a 53.9 g C m-2 (± 22.05) C loss compared to control. Independent of treatment, we observed a negative NEP of 146.4 g C m-2 (±15.3). This C loss was likely due to a transient management effect, equivalent to a shift from pasture to hay meadow and a drought effect, specific to the 2006 summer climate. We argue that this resulted from strongly intensified soil microbial respiration, following mitigation of nutrient limitation. There was no interaction between O3 and N treatments. Thus, during the 2006 growing season, the subalpine grassland lost >2% of total topsoil organic C as respired CO2, with increased N deposition responsible for one-third of that loss.

  13. Fetal liver blood flow distribution: role in human developmental strategy to prioritize fat deposition versus brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M Godfrey

    Full Text Available Among primates, human neonates have the largest brains but also the highest proportion of body fat. If placental nutrient supply is limited, the fetus faces a dilemma: should resources be allocated to brain growth, or to fat deposition for use as a potential postnatal energy reserve? We hypothesised that resolving this dilemma operates at the level of umbilical blood distribution entering the fetal liver. In 381 uncomplicated pregnancies in third trimester, we measured blood flow perfusing the fetal liver, or bypassing it via the ductus venosus to supply the brain and heart using ultrasound techniques. Across the range of fetal growth and independent of the mother's adiposity and parity, greater liver blood flow was associated with greater offspring fat mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, both in the infant at birth (r = 0.43, P<0.001 and at age 4 years (r = 0.16, P = 0.02. In contrast, smaller placentas less able to meet fetal demand for essential nutrients were associated with a brain-sparing flow pattern (r = 0.17, p = 0.02. This flow pattern was also associated with a higher degree of shunting through ductus venosus (P = 0.04. We propose that humans evolved a developmental strategy to prioritize nutrient allocation for prenatal fat deposition when the supply of conditionally essential nutrients requiring hepatic inter-conversion is limited, switching resource allocation to favour the brain if the supply of essential nutrients is limited. Facilitated placental transfer mechanisms for glucose and other nutrients evolved in environments less affluent than those now prevalent in developed populations, and we propose that in circumstances of maternal adiposity and nutrient excess these mechanisms now also lead to prenatal fat deposition. Prenatal developmental influences play important roles in the human propensity to deposit fat.

  14. Deposition of Diamond-Like carbon Films by High-Intensity Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation at Various Substrate Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅显秀; 刘振民; 马腾才; 董闯

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on to Si substrates at substrate temperatures from 25℃to 400 ℃ by a high-intensity pulsed-ion-beam (HIPIB) ablation deposition technique. The formation of DLC is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. According to an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the concentration of spa carbon in the films is about 40% when the substrate temperature is below 300 ℃. With increasing substrate temperature from 25 ℃ to 400 ℃, the concentration of sp3 carbon decreases from 43% to 8%. In other words,sp3 carbon is graphitized into sp2 carbon when the substrate temperature is above 300 ℃. The results of xray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that, with increasing the substrate temperature, the surface roughness and the friction coefficient increase, and the microhardness and the residual stress of the films decrease.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation of sp3 hybridized bonds in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon deposition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yasuo; Horiguchi, Seishi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    The formation process of sp3 hybridized carbon networks (i.e., diamondlike structures) in hydrogenated diamondlike carbon (DLC) films has been studied with the use of molecular-dynamics simulations. The processes simulated in this study are injections of hydrocarbon (CH3 and CH) beams into amorphous carbon (a-C) substrates. It has been shown that diamondlike sp3 structures are formed predominantly at a subsurface level when the beam energy is relatively high, as in the "subplantation" process for hydrogen-free DLC deposition. However, for hydrogenated DLC deposition, the presence of abundant hydrogen at subsurface levels, together with thermal spikes caused by energetic ion injections, substantially enhances the formation of carbon-to-carbon sp3 bonds. Therefore, the sp3 bond formation process for hydrogenated DLC films essentially differs from that for hydrogen-free DLC films.

  16. Adhesion improvement of carbon-based coatings through a high ionization deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hultman, L.

    2012-06-01

    The deposition of highly adherent carbon nitride (CNx) films using a pretreatment with two high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) power supplies in a master-slave configuration is reviewed. SKF3 (AISI 52100) steel substrates were pretreated in the environment of a high ionized Cr+Ar plasma in order to sputter clean the surface and implant Cr metal ions. CNx films were subsequently deposited at room temperature by DC magnetron sputtering from a high purity C target in a N2/Ar plasma discharge. All processing was done in an industrial-scale CemeCon CC800 coating system. A series of depositions were obtained with samples pretreated at different bias voltages (DC and pulsed). The adhesion of CNx films, evaluated by the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C test, reaches strength quality HF1. Adhesion results are correlated to high resolution transmission electron microscopy observations confirming the formation of an optimal interfacial mixing layer of Cr and steel. The throwing power increase for HIPIMS coatings is associated to the higher ionization in the plasma discharge.

  17. Deposition of carbon nanotubes onto aramid fibers using as-received and chemically modified fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Uicab, O. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Gonzalez-Chi, P.I; Canché-Escamilla, G.; Duarte-Aranda, S. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburna de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Yazdani-Pedram, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile, S. Livingstone 1007, Independencia, Santiago (Chile); Toro, P. [Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Gamboa, F. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Mérida, Depto. de Física Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Mazo, M.A.; Nistal, A.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The surface of aramid fibers was functionalized by two acid treatments. • The treatment based on HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} reduced the mechanical properties of the fibers. • CNTs were deposited on the aramid fibers, reaching electrical conductivity. • Homogeneous CNT distribution was achieved by using pristine fibers or chlorosulfonic acid. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) oxidized by an acid treatment were deposited on the surface of as-received commercial aramid fibers containing a surface coating (“sizing”), and fibers modified by either a chlorosulfonic treatment or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. The surface of the aramid fiber activated by the chemical treatments presents increasing density of CO, COOH and OH functional groups. However, these chemical treatments reduced the tensile mechanical properties of the fibers, especially when the nitric and sulfuric acid mixture was used. Characterization of the MWCNTs deposited on the fiber surface was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy mapping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These characterizations showed higher areal concentration and more homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs over the aramid fibers for as-received fibers and for those modified with chlorosulfonic acid, suggesting the existence of interaction between the oxidized MWCNTs and the fiber coating. The electrical resistance of the MWCNT-modified aramid yarns comprising ∼1000 individual fibers was in the order of MΩ/cm, which renders multifunctional properties.

  18. An overview of black carbon deposition and its radiative forcing over the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Feng Dou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of the current understanding of the observations of black carbon (BC in snow and ice, and the estimates of BC deposition and its radiative forcing over the Arctic. Both of the observations and model results show that, in spring, the average BC concentration and the resulting radiative forcing in Russian Arctic > Canadian and Alaskan Arctic > Arctic Ocean and Greenland. The observed BC concentration presented a significant decrease trend from the Arctic coastal regions to the center of Arctic Ocean. In summer, due to the combined effects of BC accumulation and enlarged snow grain size, the averaged radiative forcing per unit area over the Arctic Ocean is larger than that over each sector of the Arctic in spring. However, because summer sea ice is always covered by a large fraction of melt ponds, the role of BC in sea ice albedo evolution during this period is secondary. Multi-model mean results indicate that the annual mean radiative forcing from all sources of BC in snow and ice over the Arctic was ∼0.17 W m−2. Wet deposition is the dominant removal mechanism in the Arctic, which accounts for more than 90% of the total deposition. In the last part, we discuss the uncertainties in present modeling studies, and suggest potential approaches to reduce the uncertainties.

  19. Diamondlike carbon deposition on plastic films by plasma source ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, T; Shinohara, M; Takagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Application of pulsed high negative voltage (approx 10 mu s pulse width, 300-900 pulses per second) to a substrate is found to induce discharge, thereby increasing ion current with an inductively coupled plasma source. This plasma source ion beam implantation (PSII) technique is investigated for the pretreatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin layer on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) film. Pretreatment of PET with N sub 2 and Ar plasma is expected to provide added barrier effects when coupled with DLC deposition, with possible application to fabrication of PET beverage bottles. PSII treatment using N sub 2 and Ar in separate stages is found to change the color of the PET film, effectively increasing near-ultraviolet absorption. The effects of this pretreatment on the chemical bonding of C, H, and O are examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DLC thin film was successfully deposited on the PET film. The surface of the DLC thin layer is observed to be smooth by scanning electron mic...

  20. Study of the effect of magnesium concentration on the deposit of allotropic forms of calcium carbonate and related carbon steel interface behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amor, Y., E-mail: yasser_ben@yahoo.f [Institut Superieur des Sciences et Technologies de l' Environnement de Borj-Cedria, B.P 1003, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Bousselmi, L. [Laboratoire Traitement et Recyclage des Eaux, B.P 273, Hammam-Lif, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Tribollet, B. [UPR 15 CNRS - Physique des liquides et Electrochimie, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Tour 22, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Triki, E. [Unite de recherche Corrosion et Protection des metalliques, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis, P.B. 37, 1002 Tunis, Belvedere (Tunisia)

    2010-06-30

    Different allotropic forms of calcium carbonate scales were electrochemically deposited on a carbon steel surface in artificial underground Tunisian water at -0.95 V{sub SCE} and various Mg{sup 2+} concentrations. Because of the importance of the diffusion process, the rotating disk electrode was used. The deposition kinetics were analyzed by chronoamperometry measurements and the calcareous layers were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical model proposed by Gabrielli was used to analyze the EIS measurements. Independent of the deposited allotropic form of calcium carbonate, the measurements showed that the oxygen reduction occurs in the pores formed between the CaCO{sub 3} crystals and the metallic surface.

  1. Adsorption and adhesion of blood proteins and fibroblasts on multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dedun; YUAN Li; YANG Ying; DENG XiangYun; Lü XiaoYing; HUANG Yan; CAO Zheng; LIU Hao; SUN XueLiang

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns the investigation of blood protein adsorption on carbon paper and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Mouse fibroblast cell adhesion and growth on MWCNTs was also studied. The results showed that fibrinogen adsorption on carbon paper was much lower than that on MWCNTs, which means that platelets readily aggregate on the surface of MWCNTs. Mouse fibroblast cells im-planted on MWCNTs tended to grow more prolifically than those implanted on carbon paper. The cell concentration observed on MWCNTs increased from 1.2×105/mL for a single day culture to 2×105/mL for a 7-day culture. No toxicity reaction was observed during the culturing period. These results indi-cated that MWCNTs possessed excellent tissue compatibility.

  2. Adsorption and adhesion of blood proteins and fibroblasts on multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns the investigation of blood protein adsorption on carbon paper and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Mouse fibroblast cell adhesion and growth on MWCNTs was also studied. The results showed that fibrinogen adsorption on carbon paper was much lower than that on MWCNTs, which means that platelets readily aggregate on the surface of MWCNTs. Mouse fibroblast cells implanted on MWCNTs tended to grow more prolifically than those implanted on carbon paper. The cell concentration observed on MWCNTs increased from 1.2×105/mL for a single day culture to 2×105/mL for a 7-day culture. No toxicity reaction was observed during the culturing period. These results indicated that MWCNTs possessed excellent tissue compatibility.

  3. Atmospheric black carbon deposition and characterization of biomass burning tracers in a northern temperate forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, F.; Fraser, M. P.; Bird, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Aerosol black carbon (BC) is considered the second largest contributor to global warming after CO2, and is known to increase the atmosphere's temperature, decrease the albedo in snow/ice, and influence the properties and distribution of clouds. BC is thought to have a long mean residence time in soils, and its apparent stability may represent a significant stable sink for atmospheric CO2. Despite recent efforts to quantify BC in the environment, the quantification of BC deposition rates from the atmosphere to terrestrial ecosystems remains scarse. To better understand the contribution of atmospheric BC inputs to soils via dry deposition and its dominant emission sources, atmospheric fine particle (PM2.5) were collected at the University of Michigan Biological Station from July to September in 2010 and 2011. PM2.5 samples were analyzed for organic C, BC, and molecular markers including particulate sugars, carboxylic acids, n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and cholestane. Average atmospheric BC concentrations in northern Michigan were 0.048 ± 0.06 μg m-3 in summer 2010, and 0.049 ± 0.064 μg m-3 in summer 2011. Based on atmospheric concentrations, particulate deposition calculations, and documented soil BC, we conclude that atmospheric deposition is unlikely to comprise a significant input pathway for BC in northern forest ecosystem. The major organic tracers identified in fine particulates (e.g. levoglucosan and docosanoic acid) suggest that ambient PM2.5 concentrations were mainly influenced by biomass burning and epicuticular plant waxes. These results provide baseline data needed for future assessments of atmospheric BC in rural temperate forests.

  4. Research of special carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst for fuel cell through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from novel phthalocyanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yanchuan; YUE Jun; PAN Zhongxiao; XU Haitao; ZHANG Bing; HAN Fengmei; CHEN Lijuan; PENG Bixian; XIE Wenwei; QIAN Haisheng; YAN Tiantang

    2004-01-01

    The carbon nanobeads were prepared through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from phthaiocyanine. After surface's functionalization treatment of the carbon beads, the carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst was produced. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by SEM,TEM, Raman spectrum, EDS and XRD methods. Combining the carbonaceous paper spreaded up with the catalyst with Nafion membrane, we made MEA electrode. The discharge curves indicated that this carbon nanobeads supported Pt is a good fuel cell catalyst with excellent performance, high activity and sign of a long-time life.

  5. What are the active carbon species during graphene chemical vapor deposition growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Haibo; Tao, Xiao-Ming; Ding, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The dissociation of carbon feedstock is a crucial step for understanding the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. Using first-principles calculations, we performed a comprehensive theoretical study for the population of various active carbon species, including carbon monomers and various radicals, CHi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4), on four representative transition-metal surfaces, Cu(111), Ni(111), Ir(111) and Rh(111), under different experimental conditions. On the Cu surface, which is less active, the population of CH and C monomers at the subsurface is found to be very high and thus they are the most important precursors for graphene CVD growth. On the Ni surface, which is more active than Cu, C monomers at the subsurface dominate graphene CVD growth under most experimental conditions. In contrast, on the active Ir and Rh surfaces, C monomers on the surfaces are found to be very stable and thus are the main precursors for graphene growth. This study shows that the mechanism of graphene CVD growth depends on the activity of catalyst surfaces and the detailed graphene growth process at the atomic level can be controlled by varying the temperature or partial pressure of hydrogen.

  6. Multi scale study of carbon deposits collected in Tore-Supra and TEXTOR tokamaks; Etude multi echelle des depots carbones collectes dans les tokamaks Tore Supra et TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richou, M

    2007-06-15

    Tokamaks are devices aimed at studying magnetic fusion. They operate with high temperature plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or tritium. One of the major issue is to control the plasma-wall interaction. The plasma facing components are most often in carbon. The major drawback of carbon is the existence of carbon deposits and dust, due to erosion. Dust is potentially reactive in case of an accidental opening of the device. These deposits also contain H, D or T and induce major safety problems when tritium is used, which will be the case in ITER. Therefore, the understanding of the deposit formation and structure has become a main issue for fusion researches. To clarify the role of the deposits in the retention phenomenon, we have done different complementary characterizations for deposits collected on similar places (neutralizers) in tokamaks Tore Supra (France) and TEXTOR (Germany). Accessible microporous volume and pore size distribution of deposits has been determined with the analysis of nitrogen and methane adsorption isotherms using the BET, Dubinin-Radushkevich and {alpha}{sub s} methods and the Density Functional Theory (DFT). To understand growth mechanisms, we have studied the deposit structure and morphology. We have shown using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Raman micro-spectrometry that these deposits are non amorphous and disordered. We have also shown the presence of nano-particles (diameter between 4 and 70 nm) which are similar to carbon blacks: nano-particle growth occurs in homogeneous phase in the edge plasma. We have emphasised a dual growth process: a homogenous and a heterogeneous one. (author)

  7. The effect of heat- or ultra violet ozone-treatment of titanium on complement deposition from human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderbäck, Paula; Harmankaya, Necati; Askendal, Agneta; Areva, Sami; Lausmaa, Jukka; Tengvall, Pentti

    2010-06-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a well known metallic biomaterial extensively used in dental, orthopaedic-, and occasionally also in blood contacting applications. It integrates well to bone and soft tissues, and is shown upon blood plasma contact to activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and bind complement factor 3b. The material properties depend largely on those of the nm-thick dense layer of TiO(2) that becomes rapidly formed upon contact with air and water. The spontaneously formed amorphous Ti-oxide has a pzc approximately 5-6 and its water solubility is at the order of 1-2 micromolar. It is often subjected to chemical- and heat treatments in order to increase the anatase- and rutile crystallinity, to modify the surface topography and to decrease the water solubility. In this work, we prepared sol-gel derived titanium and smooth PVD titanium surfaces, and analysed their oxide and protein deposition properties in human blood plasma before and after annealing at 100-500 degrees C or upon UVO-treatment for up to 96 hours. The blood plasma results show that complement deposition vanished irreversibly after heat treatment at 250-300 degrees C for 30 minutes or after UVO exposure for 24 hours or longer. XPS and infrared spectroscopy indicated change of surface water/hydroxyl binding upon the heat- and UVO treatments, and increased Ti oxidation. XRD analysis confirmed an increased crystallinity and both control (untreated) and annealed smooth titanium displayed low XRD-signals indicating some nanocrystallinity, with predominantly anatase phase. The current results show that the behaviour of titanium dioxide in blood contact can be controlled through relatively simple means, such as mild heating and illumination in UV-light, which both likely irreversibly change the stoichiometry and structure of the outmost layers of titanium dioxide and its OH/H(2)O binding characteristics.

  8. Manipulating microstructures and electrical properties of carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel composite textiles with electrochemical deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Shi, Fei

    2017-04-01

    Since graphene and their composites play significant roles in the catalysts, energy storage, electronics and other fields, where electron transport is highly critical, here, we introduce reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in the carbon fiber (CF) networks for preparing a novel lightweight carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon the charaterizations on the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, and density, the presence of RGO nanosheets and nickel nanoparticles would substantially influence the related physical properties in the resulting composite textiles. Furthermore, the key parameters, including RGO loading, deposition time, current density and annealing temperature of carbon matrices, have been studied to understand their effects on the electrochemical deposition of nickel nanoparticles. Implication of the results suggests that the RGO interface is a unique medium for essentially promoting the electrochemical deposition kinetics and active sites for growing nickel nanoparticles, which indicates a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with the presence of graphene naonstructures.

  9. Antibacterial efficacy of advanced silver-amorphous carbon coatings deposited using the pulsed dual cathodic arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrino, J L; Anders, A; Albella, J M; Horton, J A; Horton, T H; Ayyalasomayajula, P R; Allen, M, E-mail: jlendrino@icmm.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) also referred as diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are well known to be a biocompatible material with good chemical in ertness; this makes it a strong candidate to be used as a matrix that embeds metallic elements with an antimicrobial effect. We have deposited as et of a-C:Ag films using a dual-cathode pulsed filtered cathodic arc source, the arc pulse frequency of the silver and graphite cathodes was controlled in order to obtain samples with various silver contents. In this study, we show the deposition of silver and carbon ions using this technique and analyze the advantages of incorporating silver into a-C by studying the antimicrobial properties against staphylococcus of samples deposited on Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V coupons and evaluated using 24-well tissue culture plates.

  10. Late Quaternary sea level and environmental changes from relic carbonate deposits of the western margin of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Purnachandra Rao; G Rajagopalan; K H Vora; F Almeida

    2003-03-01

    Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India occur as dolomite crusts, aragonite sands (pelletal / oolitic) and aragonite-cemented limestones, oyster shells, corals, encrusted coralline algal and foraminiferal-dominated nodules. The petrology and mineralogy of the deposits indicate that except for aragonite sands and foraminiferal nodules, the others were formed in shallow marine conditions and serve as sea level indicators. Radiocarbon dates were measured for 62 relic deposits covering the entire margin. The age of these deposits on the continental shelf off Cape Comorin and Mangalore, between 110 and 18m depth, ranges between 12, 610 14C yr BP and 6,390 14C yr BP. On the northwestern margin of India, especially on the carbonate platform (between 64 and 100 m), the age ranges from 17,250 to 6,730 14C yr BP. The relic deposits of the Gulf of Kachchh at depths between 35 and 25m are dated at 12,550-9,630 14C yr BP. The age vs. depth plot of the relic deposits further indicates that the Gulf of Kachchh was inundated much early, atleast by 15 ka, after the Last Glacial Maximum, and was subjected to uplift and subsidence during the Holocene. The carbonate platform subsided during the early Holocene. Some of the relic deposits between Cape Comorin and Mangalore plot on or, closely follow the glacio-eustatic sea level curve. Despite abundant siliciclastic flux discharged by the Narmada and Tapti during the early Holocene, the platform off these rivers is largely devoid of this flux and carbonate sedimentation continued until 6,700 14C yr BP. We suggest that the river-derived ediment flux diverted southwards under the influence of the SW monsoon current and, thereby, increased the turbidity on the shelf and slope southeast of the carbonate platform and facilitated the formation of deeper water foraminiferal nodules off Vengurla-Goa.

  11. Depositional ''cyclicity'' on carbonate platforms: Real-world limits on computer-model output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, S.K.; Neumann, A.C. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)); Rasmussen, K.A. (Northern Virginia Community Coll., Annandale, VA (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Computer-models which attempt to define interactions among dynamic parameters believed to influence the development of ''cyclic'' carbonate platform sequences have been popularized over the past few years. These models typically utilize vectors for subsidence (constant) and cyclical (sinusoidal) eustatic sea-level to create accommodation space which is filled by sedimentation (depth-dependent rates) following an appropriate lag time (non-depositional episode during initial platform flooding). Since these models are intended to reflect general principles of cyclic carbonate deposition, it is instructive to test their predictive utility by comparing typical model outputs with an actively evolving depositional cycle on a modern carbonate platform where rates of subsidence, eustatic sea-level and sediment accumulation are known. Holocene carbonate deposits across northern Great Bahama Bank provide such an ideal test-platform for model-data comparisons. On Great Bahama Bank, formation of accommodation space depends on eustatic sea-level rise because tectonic subsidence is very slow. Contrary to typical model input parameters, however, the rate of formation of accommodation space varies irregularly across the bank-top because irregular bank-top topography (produced by subaerial erosion and karstification) results in differential flooding of the platform surface. Results of this comparison indicate that typical computer-model input variables (subsidence, sea-level, sedimentation, lag-time) and output depositional geometries are poorly correlated with real depositional patterns across Great Bahama Bank. Since other modern carbonate platforms and ancient carbonate sequences display similarly complex stratigraphies, it is suggested that present computer-modeling results have little predictive value for stratigraphic interpretation.

  12. Synthesis of carbon-13 labelled carbonaceous deposits and their evaluation for potential use as surrogates to better understand the behaviour of the carbon-14-containing deposit present in irradiated PGA graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L.; Walker, S.; Bond, G.; Eccles, H.; Heard, P. J.; Scott, T. B.; Williams, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    The present work has used microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition to generate suitable isotopically labelled carbonaceous deposits on the surface of Pile Grade A graphite for use as surrogates for studying the behaviour of the deposits observed on irradiated graphite extracted from UK Magnox reactors. These deposits have been shown elsewhere to contain an enhanced concentration of 14C compared to the bulk graphite. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, ion beam milling with scanning electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to determine topography and internal morphology in the formed deposits. Direct comparison was made against deposits found on irradiated graphite samples trepanned from a Magnox reactor core and showed a good similarity in appearance. This work suggests that the microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique is of value in producing simulant carbon deposits, being of sufficiently representative morphology for use in non-radioactive surrogate studies of post-disposal behaviour of 14C-containing deposits on some irradiated Magnox reactor graphite.

  13. Effect of trans fatty acid intake on abdominal and liver fat deposition and blood lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Chabanova, E.; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2011-01-01

    abdominal and liver fat deposition.Objective:We examined the effect of a high intake of TFA as part of an isocaloric diet on whole-body, abdominal and hepatic fat deposition, and blood lipids in postmenopausal women.Methods:In a 16-week double-blind parallel intervention study, 52 healthy overweight...... postmenopausal women were randomized to receive either partially hydrogenated soybean oil providing 15.7 g day(-1) of TFA or a control oil with mainly oleic and palmitic acid. Before and after the intervention, body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, abdominal fat by magnetic resonance...... (MR) imaging, and liver fat by (1)H MR spectroscopy.Results:Compared with the control fat, TFA intake decreased plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol by 10%, increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol by 18% and resulted in an increased LDL/HDL-cholesterol ratio (baseline adjusted...

  14. Structural, nanomechanical and variable range hopping conduction behavior of nanocrystalline carbon thin films deposited by the ambient environment assisted filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Rawal, Ishpal; Tripathi, R.K. [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Srivastava, A.K. [Electron and Ion Microscopy, Sophisticated and Analytical Instruments, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India); Kumar, Mahesh [Ultrafast Opto-Electronics and Tetrahertz Photonics Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi - 110 012 (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline carbon thin films are grown by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc process. • Effect of gaseous environment on the properties of carbon films has been studied. • The structural and nanomechanical properties of carbon thin films have been studied. • The VRH conduction behavior in nanocrystalline carbon thin films has been studied. - Abstract: This paper reports the deposition and characterization of nanocrystalline carbon thin films by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique assisted with three different gaseous environments of helium, nitrogen and hydrogen. All the films are nanocrystalline in nature as observed from the high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) measurements, which suggests that the nanocrystallites of size ∼10–50 nm are embedded though out the amorphous matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies suggest that the film deposited under the nitrogen gaseous environment has the highest sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio accompanied with the highest hardness of ∼18.34 GPa observed from the nanoindentation technique. The film deposited under the helium gaseous environment has the highest ratio of the area under the Raman D peak to G peak (A{sub D}/A{sub G}) and the highest conductivity (∼2.23 S/cm) at room temperature, whereas, the film deposited under the hydrogen environment has the lowest conductivity value (2.27 × 10{sup −7} S/cm). The temperature dependent dc conduction behavior of all the nanocrystalline carbon thin films has been analyzed in the light of Mott’s variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism and observed that all the films obey three dimension VRH conduction mechanism for the charge transport.

  15. Composition and source identification of deposits forming in landfill gas (LFG) engines and effect of activated carbon treatment on deposit composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevimoğlu, Orhan; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-10-15

    Compositions of deposits forming on engines parts operated with landfill gas (LFG) were analyzed. The deposit compositions were compared before and after the installation of activated carbon system for treatment of LFG. Deposits forming on the spark plugs had significantly higher levels of calcium, chromium, and nickel in comparison to those forming on the engine heads. The LFG contained about 9.5 ± 0.4 mg/m(3) total siloxanes, majority of which were octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) (5.0 ± 0.2 mg/m(3)), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) (2.9 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)) and hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) (1.6 ± 0.1 mg/m(3)). The samples collected from the engine heads before the activated carbon treatment of LFG had significantly high levels of silicon (149,400 ± 89,900 mg/kg) as well as calcium (70,840 ± 17,750 mg/kg), sulfur (42,500 ± 11,500 mg/kg), and zinc (22,300 ± 7200 mg/kg). After the activated carbon treatment, silicon levels decreased significantly; however, deposits had higher sulfur content (104,560 ± 68,100 mg/kg) indicating that the activated carbon released some sulfur during treatment. The analyses indicate that zinc and calcium originated from the additives in the lube oil while lead, aluminum, copper, nickel, iron, chromium were due to the engine wear.

  16. REE geochemistry of auriferous quartz carbonate veins of Neoarchean Ajjanahalli gold deposit, Chitradurga schist belt, Dharwar Craton, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarangi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available REE composition of the carbonates of the auriferous quartz carbonate veins (QCVs of the Neoarchean Ajjanahalli gold deposit, Chitradurga schist belt, Dharwar Craton, is characterized by U-shaped chondrite normalized REE patterns with both LREE and HREE enrichment and a distinct positive Eu anomaly. As positive Eu anomaly is associated with low oxygen fugacity, we propose that the auriferous fluids responsible for gold mineralization at Ajjanahalli could be from an oxygen depleted fluid. The observed positive Eu anomaly is interpreted to suggest the derivation of the auriferous fluids from a mantle reservoir. The location of Ajjanahalli gold deposit in a crustal scale shear zone is consistent with this interpretation.

  17. Co-assembly of functional graphene and multiwall carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors by a vertical deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Cao, Xiaojian; Li, Zhenwei; Zhao, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanosized carbon materials with large specific surface areas, outstanding electrical conductivities, excellent mechanical properties, and other remarkable characteristics. Preparation of graphene oxide is by a redox method, followed by vertical deposition to prepare graphene oxide/carbon nanotube GO/CNT) composites. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology and microstructure of the materials. Electrodes were made by deposition of graphene oxide/carbon nanotube composites on an indium tin oxide glass slide, and its electrical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The GO/CNT composites exhibit excellent energy and power densities and are ideal materials for the preparation of supercapacitor electrodes.

  18. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the red blood cells of sea level and high altitude natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Caceda, R; Gamboa, A; Monge-C, C

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cell carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has not been studied in high altitude natives. Because CA is an intraerythocytic enzyme and high altitude natives are polycythemic, it is important to know if the activity of CA per red cell volume is different from that of their sea level counterparts. Blood was collected from healthy subjects living in Lima (150m) and from twelve subjects from Cerro de Pasco (4330m), and hematocrit and carbonic anhydrase activity were measured. As expected, the high altitude natives had significantly higher hematocrits than the sea level controls (p = 0.0002). No difference in the CA activity per milliliter of red cells was found between the two populations. There was no correlation between the hematocrit and CA activity.

  19. Critical elements in sediment-hosted deposits (clastic-dominated Zn-Pb-Ag, Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb, sedimentary rock-hosted Stratiform Cu, and carbonate-hosted Polymetallic Deposits): A review: Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Erin; Hitzman, Murray W.; Leach, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Some sediment-hosted base metal deposits, specifically the clastic-dominated (CD) Zn-Pb deposits, carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits, sedimentary-rock hosted stratiform copper deposits, and carbonate-hosted polymetallic (“Kipushi type”) deposits, are or have been important sources of critical elements including Co, Ga, Ge, and Re. The generally poor data concerning trace element concentrations in these types of sediment-hosted ores suggest that there may be economically important concentrations of critical elements yet to be recognized.

  20. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Yazdani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD. Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  1. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C...... cycling. However, the net effect on C fluxes between soils, inland waters and atmosphere remains uncertain. In this study, we determined SOC turnover in terrestrial and aquatic environments and indentified its major controls. A European gradient of agricultural sites was sampled, spanning a wide range...... soil properties (e.g. texture, aggregation, etc.), SOC quantity and quality. In a 16-week incubation experiment, SOC turnover was determined for conditions reflecting downslope soils or inland waters. Moreover, we studied the impact of labile C inputs (‘priming’) on SOC stability using 13C labeled...

  2. Tungsten-Carbon X-ray Multilayered Mirror Prepared by Photo-Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko

    1989-05-01

    A tungsten-carbon(W/C) X-ray multilayered mirror was prepared by photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) using a low-pressure mercury lamp and an argon-fluoride (ArF) excimer laser. The 40% reflectivity of this mirror was measured using a small-angle X-ray diffractometer with Cu-Kα radiation. This reflectivity is lower than the theoretical reflectivity of 80%. From observations of the transmission electron micrograph from this multilayered mirror, it seems that the reduction of the reflectivity was caused by the indistinct interfaces of the diffused films, and by the roughness of the films introduced by partial crystallization of the tungsten films.

  3. Deposition of calcium carbonate films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Laurie B.; Odom, Damian J.

    2000-03-01

    A polypeptide additive has been used to transform the solution crystallization of calcium carbonate to a solidification process of a liquid-phase mineral precursor. In situ observations reveal that polyaspartate induces liquid-liquid phase separation of droplets of a mineral precursor. The droplets deposit on the substrate and coalesce to form a coating, which then solidifies into calcitic tablets and films. Transition bars form during the amorphous to crystalline transition, leading to sectorization of calcite tablets, and the defect textures and crystal morphologies are atypical of solution grown crystals. The formation of nonequilibrium crystal morphologies using an acidic polypeptide may have implications in the field of biomineralization, and the environmentally friendly aspects of this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process may offer new techniques for aqueous-based processing of ceramic films, coatings, and particulates.

  4. Characteristics of copper meshes coated with carbon nanotubes via electrophoretic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu-Jong; Park, Jong-Seol; Hwang, Young-Jin; Park, Jin-Seok

    2016-09-01

    This study demonstrates the characteristics of a hybrid-type transparent electrode for touch screen panels, which was fabricated by coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on copper (Cu)-meshes. The surface morphologies, visible-range transmittance and reflectance, and chromatic properties, such as yellowness and redness, of the fabricated CNTs-coated Cu mesh electrodes were characterized as functions of their dimensions (line-to-line spacing, line width, and electrode thickness) and compared with those of the Cu-mesh electrodes without coating of CNTs. The experimental results showed that the coating of CNTs substantially reduced the reflectance of the Cu-mesh electrodes and also improved their chromatic properties with their transmittance and sheet resistance only slightly changed, subsequently indicating that the CNTs-coated Cu-mesh electrodes possessed desirable characteristics for touch screen panels.

  5. Deposition of gold nanoparticles onto thiol-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Rodolfo; Basiuk, Elena V; Santiago, Patricia; Basiuk, Vladimir A; Mireles, Edgar; Puente-Lee, Iván; Saniger, José M

    2005-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) functionalized with aliphatic bifunctional thiols (1,4-butanedithiol, 1,6-hexanedithiol, 1,8-octanedithiol, and 2-aminoethanethiol) through a direct solvent-free procedure. Small gold particles, with a narrow particle size distribution around 1.7 nm, were obtained on 1,6-hexanedithiol-functionalized MWNTs. For MWNTs functionalized with the aminothiol, the average Au particle size was larger, 5.5 nm, apparently due to a coalescence phenomenon. Gatan image filter (GIF) observations show that sulfur is at the nanotube surface with a non-homogeneous distribution. A higher sulfur concentration was observed around the gold nanoparticles' location.

  6. Modeling and optimization of atomic layer deposition processes on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Nuri; Chawla, Vipin; Edwards, Eve; Wood, Vanessa; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Many energy conversion and storage devices exploit structured ceramics with large interfacial surface areas. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays have emerged as possible scaffolds to support large surface area ceramic layers. However, obtaining conformal and uniform coatings of ceramics on structures with high aspect ratio morphologies is non-trivial, even with atomic layer deposition (ALD). Here we implement a diffusion model to investigate the effect of the ALD parameters on coating kinetics and use it to develop a guideline for achieving conformal and uniform thickness coatings throughout the depth of ultra-high aspect ratio structures. We validate the model predictions with experimental data from ALD coatings of VACNT arrays. However, the approach can be applied to predict film conformality as a function of depth for any porous topology, including nanopores and nanowire arrays.

  7. Co-sputter deposited nickel-copper bimetallic nanoalloy embedded carbon films for electrocatalytic biomarker detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Shunsuke; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Niwa, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    -mannitol, which should be detected with a low detection limit in urine samples for the diagnosis of severe intestinal diseases. With a Ni/Cu ratio of around 64/36, the electrocatalytic current per metal area was 3.4 times larger than that of an alloy film electrode with a similar composition (~70/30). This improved electrocatalytic activity realized higher stability (n = 60, relative standard deviation (RSD): 4.6%) than the alloy film (RSD: 32.2%) as demonstrated by continuous measurements of d-mannitol. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The concept of UBM co-sputtering for fabricating nanoalloy embedded carbon films. HRTEM images of the NiNP and Ni32Cu68 nanoalloy embedded carbon films. The experimental conditions for sputter deposition, HRTEM, HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDS measurements and continuous flow injection analysis. XPS analysis of the nanoalloy embedded carbon film. Repeated CVs of both the nanoalloy embedded carbon film and the alloy film. Amperometric detection of d-mannitol in the presence of chloride ions. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02287a

  8. Direct Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes STM Tips by Liquid Catalyst-Assisted Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Kuei Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and facile method to make carbon nanotube (CNT tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM is presented. Cobalt (Co particles, as catalysts, are electrochemically deposited on the apex of tungsten (W STM tip for CNT growth. It is found that the quantity of Co particles is well controlled by applied DC voltage, concentration of catalyst solution, and deposition time. Using optimum growth condition, CNTs are successfully synthesized on the tip apex by catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CA-MPECVD. A HOPG surface is clearly observed at an atomic scale using the present CNT-STM tip.

  9. Redox deposition of nanoscale metal oxides on carbon for next-generation electrochemical capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassin, Megan B; Chervin, Christopher N; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2013-05-21

    Transition metal oxides that mix electronic and ionic conductivity are essential active components of many electrochemical charge-storage devices, ranging from primary alkaline cells to more advanced rechargeable Li-ion batteries. In these devices, charge storage occurs via cation-insertion/deinsertion mechanisms in conjunction with the reduction/oxidation of metal sites in the oxide. Batteries that incorporate such metal oxides are typically designed for high specific energy, but not necessarily for high specific power. Electrochemical capacitors (ECs), which are typically composed of symmetric high-surface-area carbon electrodes that store charge via double-layer capacitance, deliver their energy in time scales of seconds, but at much lower specific energy than batteries. The fast, reversible faradaic reactions (typically described as "pseudocapacitance") of particular nanoscale metal oxides (e.g., ruthenium and manganese oxides) provide a strategy for bridging the power/energy performance gap between batteries and conventional ECs. These processes enhance charge-storage capacity to boost specific energy, while maintaining the few-second timescale of the charge-discharge response of carbon-based ECs. In this Account, we describe three examples of redox-based deposition of EC-relevant metal oxides (MnO2, FeOx, and RuO2) and discuss their potential deployment in next-generation ECs that use aqueous electrolytes. To extract the maximum pseudocapacitance functionality of metal oxides, one must carefully consider how they are synthesized and subsequently integrated into practical electrode structures. Expressing the metal oxide in a nanoscale form often enhances electrochemical utilization (maximizing specific capacitance) and facilitates high-rate operation for both charge and discharge. The "wiring" of the metal oxide, in terms of both electron and ion transport, when fabricated into a practical electrode architecture, is also a critical design parameter for

  10. New type of potassium deposit: Modal analysis and preparation of potassium carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Hongwen; FENG; Wuwei; MIAO; Shiding; WANG; Yingbin; TI

    2005-01-01

    A kind of dolomitic mudstone newly found in North China has high amounts of K2O up to 10wB% in average, and potassium reserve is at superior scale. Mineral assemblage of the potassium ore indicates a specific and complicated geological environment under which the potassium deposit formed. Modal analysis of the potassium host rock shows that the principal minerals in the ore include microcline, dolomite, and clay minerals such as illite, illite/smectite mixed layer, and kaolinite, attributable to a new type of insoluble potassium deposits in ore genesis. The experiments in this research demonstrated that with sodium carbonate as flux agent, the potassium ore could be decomposed with a proportion as high as 99.4% by calcinations at moderate temperature for no more than 1.5―2.0 h; more than 70% of K2O in the calcined materials were leached into the liquor, and by acidification reaction of the filter liquor, a large amount of impurities such as Fe3+, Ti4+, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ were removed with precipitation of alumino-silicious colloid residue, which makes it possible to prepare potassium carbonate of electronic grade from the filter liquor, whereas the alumino-silicious residue could be utilized to make mineral polymer, a new type of inorganic construction structural materials. The current research shows that industrial exploitation and comprehensive utilization of this new type of insoluble potassium resource are feasible both in economic benefits and environmental kindness with the fairly clean production process as sketched in this paper.

  11. Hierarchical composite structures prepared by electrophoretic deposition of carbon nanotubes onto glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Rider, Andrew N; Thostenson, Erik T

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotube/glass fiber hierarchical composite structures have been produced using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach for integrating the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into unidirectional E-glass fabric, followed by infusion of an epoxy polymer matrix. The resulting composites show a hierarchical structure, where the structural glass fibers, which have diameters in micrometer range, are coated with CNTs having diameters around 10-20 nm. The stable aqueous dispersions of CNTs were produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Ozone-oxidized CNTs were then chemically reacted with a polyethyleneimine (PEI) dendrimer to enable cathodic EPD and promote adhesion between the CNTs and the glass-fiber substrate. Deposition onto the fabric was accomplished by placing the fabric in front of the cathode and applying a direct current (DC) field. Microscopic characterization shows the integration of CNTs throughout the thickness of the glass fabric, where individual fibers are coated with CNTs and a thin film of CNTs also forms on the fabric surfaces. Within the composite, networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers, and the resulting composites exhibit good electrical conductivity and considerable increases in the interlaminar shear strength, relative to fiber composites without integrated CNTs. Mechanical, chemical and morphological characterization of the coated fiber surfaces reveal interface/interphase modification resulting from the coating is responsible for the improved mechanical and electrical properties. The CNT-coated glass-fiber laminates also exhibited clear changes in electrical resistance as a function of applied shear strain and enables self-sensing of the transition between elastic and plastic load regions.

  12. INFLUENCE OF THE SILICON INTERLAYER ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS DEPOSITED ON GLASS SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiler Antonio Lima Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films as a hard protective coating have achieved great success in a diversity of technological applications. However, adhesion of DLC films to substrates can restrict their applications. The influence of a silicon interlayer in order to improve DLC adhesion on glass substrates was investigated. Amorphous silicon interlayer and DLC films were deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from silane and methane, respectively. The bonding structure, transmittance, refraction index, and adherence of the films were also evaluated regarding the thickness of the silicon interlayer. Raman scattering spectroscopy did not show any substantial difference in DLC structure due to the interlayer thickness of the silicon. Optical measurements showed a sharp decrease of transmittance in the ultra-violet region caused by the fundamental absorption of the light. In addition, the absorption edge of transmittance shifted toward longer wavelength side in the ultra-violet region as the thickness of the silicon interlayer increased. The tribological results showed an increase of DLC adherence as the silicon interlayer increased, which was characterized by less cracks around the grooves.

  13. Deposition of carbon nanotubes onto aramid fibers using as-received and chemically modified fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Uicab, O.; Avilés, F.; Gonzalez-Chi, P. I.; Canché-Escamilla, G.; Duarte-Aranda, S.; Yazdani-Pedram, M.; Toro, P.; Gamboa, F.; Mazo, M. A.; Nistal, A.; Rubio, J.

    2016-11-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) oxidized by an acid treatment were deposited on the surface of as-received commercial aramid fibers containing a surface coating ("sizing"), and fibers modified by either a chlorosulfonic treatment or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. The surface of the aramid fiber activated by the chemical treatments presents increasing density of CO, COOH and OH functional groups. However, these chemical treatments reduced the tensile mechanical properties of the fibers, especially when the nitric and sulfuric acid mixture was used. Characterization of the MWCNTs deposited on the fiber surface was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy mapping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These characterizations showed higher areal concentration and more homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs over the aramid fibers for as-received fibers and for those modified with chlorosulfonic acid, suggesting the existence of interaction between the oxidized MWCNTs and the fiber coating. The electrical resistance of the MWCNT-modified aramid yarns comprising ∼1000 individual fibers was in the order of MΩ/cm, which renders multifunctional properties.

  14. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na

    2013-08-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of the plasmon excitation energy shift and through-thickness elemental concentration show a multilayered a-C film structure comprising an interface layer consisting of C, Si, and, possibly, SiC, a buffer layer with continuously increasing sp 3 fraction, a relatively thicker layer (bulk film) of constant sp 3 content, and an ultrathin surface layer rich in sp 2 hybridization. A detailed study of the C K-edge spectrum indicates that the buffer layer between the interface layer and the bulk film is due to the partial backscattering of C+ ions interacting with the heavy atoms of the silicon substrate. The results of this study provide insight into the minimum thickness of a-C films deposited by FCVA under optimum substrate bias conditions. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  15. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, J.P. van der [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Martinez-Martinez, D., E-mail: d.martinez.martinez@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Pei, Y.T., E-mail: y.pei@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rudolf, P. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes of the bias voltage. Raman measurements show a similar bonding regardless of the voltages used. A columnar growth and a tile-like microstructure of the DLC films were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Patch sizes can be correlated with the deposition conditions. The coefficient of friction (CoF) of DLC film coated HNBR was found to be much lower than that of the unprotected rubber, and more reduced for the DLC films with smaller patch sizes, which is explained by a better flexibility and conformity of the film during testing. In one of the samples, unexpected low CoF was observed, which was attributed to a modification of the mechanical properties of the rubber during the plasma treatment at high voltage. This issue was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated a modification of the cross linking in the rubber. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bias voltage does not vary the chemical bonding and surface morphology of films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film structure is patched, whose size depends on the etching and deposition voltages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frictional behavior can be correlated with the patch size of the films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis showed that rubber x-linking is modified by etching at high voltage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of rubber x-linking leads to a different frictional behavior.

  16. Depositional and diagenetic variability within the Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone: Implications for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, B.B.; Ochoa, R.I.; Wilkens, N.D.; Brophy, J.; Lovell, T.R.; Fischietto, N.; Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is the major target reservoir for ongoing geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations throughout the midwest United States. The potential CO2 reservoir capacity, reactivity, and ultimate fate of injected CO2 depend on textural and compositional properties determined by depositional and diagenetic histories that vary vertically and laterally across the formation. Effective and efficient prediction and use of the available pore space requires detailed knowledge of the depositional and diagenetic textures and mineralogy, how these variables control the petrophysical character of the reservoir, and how they vary spatially. Here, we summarize the reservoir characteristics of the Mount Simon Sandstone based on examination of geophysical logs, cores, cuttings, and analysis of more than 150 thin sections. These samples represent different parts of the formation and depth ranges of more than 9000 ft (>2743 m) across the Illinois Basin and surrounding areas. This work demonstrates that overall reservoir quality and, specifically, porosity do not exhibit a simple relationship with depth, but vary both laterally and with depth because of changes in the primary depositional facies, framework composition (i.e., feldspar concentration), and diverse diagenetic modifications. Diagenetic processes that have been significant in modifying the reservoir include formation of iron oxide grain coatings, chemical compaction, feldspar precipitation and dissolution, multiple generations of quartz overgrowth cementation, clay mineral precipitation, and iron oxide cementation. These variables provide important inputs for calculating CO2 capacity potential, modeling reactivity, and are also an important baseline for comparisons after CO2 injection. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  17. Strangelove Ocean and Deposition of Unusual Shallow-Water Carbonates After the End-Permian Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Caldeira, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The severe mass extinction of marine and terrestrial organisms at the end of the Permian Period (approx. 251 Ma) was accompanied by a rapid negative excursion of approx. 3 to 4 per mil in the carbon-isotope ratio of the global surface oceans and atmosphere that persisted for some 500,000 into the Early Triassic. Simulations with an ocean-atmosphere/carbon-cycle model suggest that the isotope excursion can be explained by collapse of ocean primary productivity (a Strangelove Ocean) and changes in the delivery and cycling of carbon in the ocean and on land. Model results also suggest that perturbations of the global carbon cycle resulting from the extinctions led to short-term fluctuations in atmospheric pCO2 and ocean carbonate deposition, and to a long-term (>1 Ma) decrease in sedimentary burial of organic carbon in the Triassic. Deposition of calcium carbonate is a major sink of river-derived ocean alkalinity and for CO2 from the ocean/atmosphere system. The end of the Permian was marked by extinction of most calcium carbonate secreting organisms. Therefore, the reduction of carbonate accumulation made the oceans vulnerable to a build-up of alkalinity and related fluctuations in atmospheric CO2. Our model results suggest that an increase in ocean carbonate-ion concentration should cause increased carbonate accumulation rates in shallow-water settings. After the end-Permian extinctions, early Triassic shallow-water sediments show an abundance of abiogenic and microbial carbonates that removed CaCO3 from the ocean and may have prevented a full 'ocean-alkalinity crisis' from developing.

  18. The Miocene Sommières basin, SE France: Bioclastic carbonates in a tide-dominated depositional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Jean-Yves; James, Noël P.

    2012-12-01

    The Miocene Sommières Basin in SE France is a semi-enclosed depression that was connected to the Mediterranean Sea by a flooded paleo-incised valley and then filled by a suite of sediments comprising carbonate grains coming from temperate factories that were largely deposited in tidal-dominated paleoenvironments. The strata are partitioned into two sequences that reflect repeated flooding of the incised valley system, one of several similar situations in this region of France. The carbonate grains are mostly bioclasts, namely from barnacles, bryozoans, coralline algae (encrusting, branching, and rhodoliths), echinoids, and benthic foraminifers (large and small) with ostracods, sponge spicules and planktic foraminifers prominent in muddy facies. Particles were produced by shallow water carbonate factories on hard substrates (valley walls in particular), associated with subaqueous dunes, and in deeper water basinal settings. Each depositional sequence is underlain by an eroded and bored hard surface that is progressively overlain by TST subaqueous tidal dunes or storm deposits that grade up, in one case, into HST marls (the HST of the upper sequence has been removed by erosion). The lower sequence is ebb tide dominated whereas the upper sequence is flood tide dominated. The succession is interpreted to represent a TST whose tidal currents were focused by the narrow valley and a HST that reflected flooding of the overbanks. This stratigraphic and depositional motif is comparable to that in other spatially separated Neogene paleovalleys that are filled with tide-dominated clastic carbonates in the region. Together with other recently documented similar systems, these limestones constitute an important new group of carbonate sand bodies in the carbonate depositional realm.

  19. Structural and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hellgren, N.; Czigány, Zs.; Twesten, R. D.; Luning, J.; Petrov, I.; Hultman, L.; Holloway, B. C.

    2003-07-01

    The microstructure, morphology, and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering were investigated for microelectromechanical systems applications. Film properties were found to vary markedly with the ion energy (Eion) and ion-to-carbon flux ratio (Jion/JC). Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed an amorphous microstructure. However, the presence of nanometer-sized domains at Eion~85 eV was detected. Film stresses, σ, which were compressive in all cases, ranged from 0.5 to 3.5 GPa and depended on the flux ratio as well as ion energy. The hardness (H), Young's moduli (ɛ), and elastic recovery (R) increased with Eion to maximum values of H=27 GPa, ɛ=250 GPa, and R=68% at Eion=85 eV and Jion/JC=4.4. However, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure and electron energy-loss spectrum analysis showed that the sp2/sp3 content of the films does not change with Eion or Jion/JC. The measured change in mechanical properties without a corresponding change in sp2/sp3 ratio is not consistent with any previously published models. We suggest that, in the ranges 5 eV <=Eion<=85 eV and 1.1 <=Jion/JC<=6.8, the presence of defective graphite formed by subplanted C and Ar atoms has the dominant influence on the mechanical properties of DLC films.

  20. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav R.; Harris, Alexander

    2015-10-06

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The manufacturing process may involve initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  1. Platinum-based electrocatalysts synthesized by depositing contiguous adlayers on carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2013-03-26

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means and the nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. Subsequent film growth may be performed via the initial quasi-underpotential deposition of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a more noble metal. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  2. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  3. Fabrication of a multifunctional carbon nanotube "cotton" yarn by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao-Hua; Li, Ya-Li; Feng, Jian-Min; Kang, Yan-Ru; Han, Shuai-Shuai

    2012-09-21

    A continuous cotton-like carbon nanotube fiber yarn, consisting of multiple threads of high purity double walled carbon nanotubes, was fabricated in a horizontal CVD gas flow reactor with water vapor densification by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous shrinking of the CNT sock-like assembly in the gas flow. This allows well controlled continuous winding of the dense thread inside the reactor. The CNT yarn is quite thick (1-3 mm), has a highly porous structure (99%) while being mechanically strong and electrically conductive. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous oxidation of the CNTs, offering the yarn oxygen-functionalized surfaces. The unique structure and surface of the CNT yarn provide it multiple processing advantages and properties. It can be mechanically engineered into a dense yarn, infiltrated with polymers to form a composite and mixed with other yarns to form a blend, as demonstrated in this research. Therefore, this CNT yarn can be used as a "basic yarn" for various CNT based structural and functional applications.

  4. Rare earth element geochemistry of shallow carbonate outcropping strata in Saudi Arabia: Application for depositional environments prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltom, Hassan A.; Abdullatif, Osman M.; Makkawi, Mohammed H.; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin A.

    2017-03-01

    The interpretation of depositional environments provides important information to understand facies distribution and geometry. The classical approach to interpret depositional environments principally relies on the analysis of lithofacies, biofacies and stratigraphic data, among others. An alternative method, based on geochemical data (chemical element data), is advantageous because it can simply, reproducibly and efficiently interpret and refine the interpretation of the depositional environment of carbonate strata. Here we geochemically analyze and statistically model carbonate samples (n = 156) from seven sections of the Arab-D reservoir outcrop analog of central Saudi Arabia, to determine whether the elemental signatures (major, trace and rare earth elements [REEs]) can be effectively used to predict depositional environments. We find that lithofacies associations of the studied outcrop (peritidal to open marine depositional environments) possess altered REE signatures, and that this trend increases stratigraphically from bottom-to-top, which corresponds to an upward shallowing of depositional environments. The relationship between REEs and major, minor and trace elements indicates that contamination by detrital materials is the principal source of REEs, whereas redox condition, marine and diagenetic processes have minimal impact on the relative distribution of REEs in the lithofacies. In a statistical model (factor analysis and logistic regression), REEs, major and trace elements cluster together and serve as markers to differentiate between peritidal and open marine facies and to differentiate between intertidal and subtidal lithofacies within the peritidal facies. The results indicate that statistical modelling of the elemental composition of carbonate strata can be used as a quantitative method to predict depositional environments and regional paleogeography. The significance of this study lies in offering new assessments of the relationships between

  5. Growth of Few-Layer Graphene on Sapphire Substrates by Directly Depositing Carbon Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Chao-Yang; TANG Jun; LIU Zhong-Liang; LI Li-Min; YAN Wen-Sheng; WEI Shi-Qiang; XU Peng-Shou

    2011-01-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber.The reflection high energy diffraction,Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample,which confirm the formation of graphene layers.The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2 nm and the layer number is about 2-3.The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated a-SiC surface.Graphene,a monolayer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms,is a quasi two-dimensional (2D) material.It has attracted great interest because of its distinctive band structure and physical properties.[1] Graphene can now be obtained by several different approaches including micromechanical[1] and chemical[2] exfoliation of graphite,epitaxial growth on hexagonal SiC substrates by Si sublimation in vacuum,[3] and CVD growth on metal substrates.[4] However,these preparation methods need special substrates,otherwise,in order to design microelectronic devices,the prepared graphene should be transferred to other appropriate substrates.Thus the growth of graphene on the suitable substrates is motivated.%Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. The reflection high energy diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample, which confirm the formation of graphene layers. The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2nm and the layer number is about 2-3. The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated α-SiC surface.

  6. The Anarraaq Zn-Pb-Ag and barite deposit, northern Alaska: Evidence for replacement of carbonate by barite and sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K.D.; Dumoulin, J.A.; Jennings, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Anarraaq deposit in northern Alaska consists of a barite body, estimated to be as much as 1 billion metric tons, and a Zn-Pb-Ag massive sulfide zone with an estimated resource of about 18 Mt at 18 percent Zn, 5.4 percent Pb, and 85 g/t Ag. The barite and sulfide minerals are hosted by the uppermost part of the Mississippian Kuna Formation (Ikalukrok unit) that consists of carbonaceous and siliceous mudstone or shale interbedded with carbonate. The amount of interbedded carbonate in the Anarraaq deposit is atypical of the district as a whole, comprising as much as one third of the section. The total thickness of the Ikalukrok unit is considerably greater in the area of the deposit (210 to almost 350 m) than to the north and south (maximum of 164 m). The mineralized zone at Anarraaq is lens shaped and has a relatively flat top and a convex base. It also ranges greatly in thickness, from a few meters to more than 100 m. Textures of some of the carbonate layers are distinctive, consisting of nodules within siliceous mudstone or layers interbedded with shale. Many of the layers contain calcitized sponge spicules or radiolarians in a carbonate matrix. Textures of barite and sulfide minerals mimic those of carbonate and provide unequivocal evidence that replacement of precursor carbonate was an important process. Barite and sulfide textures include either nodular, bladed grains of various sizes that resemble spicules (observed only with iron sulfides) or well-rounded forms that are replaced radiolarians. Mineralization at Anarraaq probably occurred in a fault-bounded Carboniferous basin during early diagenesis in the shallow subsurface. The shape and size of the mineralized body suggest that barite and sulfides replaced calcareous mass flow deposits in a submarine channel. The distribution of biogenic and/or early diagenetic silica may have served as impermeable barriers to the fluids, thereby focusing and controlling fluid flow through unreplaced carbonate layers

  7. Synthesis of Ag-doped hydrogenated carbon thin films by a hybrid PVD–PECVD deposition process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Majji Venkatesh; Sukru Taktak; Efstathios I Meletis

    2014-12-01

    Silver-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Ag-DLC) films were deposited on Si substrates using a hybrid plasma vapour deposition–plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PVD–PECVD) process combining Ag target magnetron sputtering and PECVD in an Ar–CH4 plasma. Processing parameters (working pressure, CH4/Ar ratio and magnetron current) were varied to obtain good deposition rate and a wide variety of Ag films. Structure and bonding environment of the films were obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies. Variation of processing parameters was found to produce Ag-doped amorphous carbon or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with a range of characteristics with CH4/Ar ratio exercising a dominant effect. It was pointed out that Ag concentration and deposition rate of the film increased with the increase in d.c. magnetron current. At higher Ar concentration in plasma, Ag content increased whereas deposition rate of the film decreased. FTIR study showed that the films contained a significant amount of hydrogen and, as a result of an increase in the Ag content in the hydrogenated DLC film, $sp^{2}$ bond content also increased. The TEM cross sectional studies revealed that crystalline Ag particles were formed with a size in the range of 2–4 nm throughout an amorphous DLC matrix.

  8. Late Quaternary sea level and environmental changes from relic carbonate deposits of the western margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Rajagopalan, G.; Vora, K.H.; Almeida, F.

    the entire margin. The age of these deposits on the continental shelf off Cape Comorin and Mangalore, between 110 and 18m depth, ranges between 12, 610 ¹4C yr BP and 6,390 ¹4C yr BP. On the northwestern margin of India, especially on the carbonate platform...

  9. High Throughput Nanofabrication of Silicon Nanowire and Carbon Nanotube Tips on AFM Probes by Stencil-Deposited Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engstrøm, Daniel Southcott; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni;

    2011-01-01

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer...

  10. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  11. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Xiong, X.; Huang, B. Y.; Li, G. D.; Zhang, H. B.; Xiao, P.; Chen, Z. K.; Zheng, X. L.

    2009-05-01

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl 4-C 3H 6-H 2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl 4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm 3 by Archimedes' principle.

  12. Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films by electrochemical deposition technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Pei-Zeng; Li Rui-Shan; Pan Xiao-Jun; Xie Er-Qing

    2013-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (ZnO-DLC) films have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in ambient conditions.The morphology,composition,and microstructure of the films have been investigated.The results show that the resultant films are hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films embedded with ZnO nanoparticles in wurtzite structure,and the content and size of the ZnO nanoparticles increase with increasing deposition voltage,which are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Raman,and transmission electron microscope (TEM).Furthermore,a possible mechanism used to describe the growth process of ZnO-DLC films by electrochemical deposition is also discussed.

  13. Effects of long and short carboxylated or aminated multiwalled carbon nanotubes on blood coagulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Meng

    Full Text Available In this work the effects of four different multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, including long carboxylated (L-COOH, short carboxylated (S-COOH, long aminated (L-NH(2 and short aminated (S-NH(2 ones, on the integrity of red blood cells, coagulation kinetics and activation of platelets were investigated with human whole blood. We found that the four MWCNTs induced different degrees of red blood cell damage as well as a mild level of platelet activation (10-25%. L-COOH and L-NH(2 induced a higher level of platelet activation than S-COOH and S-NH(2 respectively; meanwhile L-NH(2 caused marked reductions in platelet viability. The presence of the four MWCNTs led to earlier fibrin formation, L-NH(2 increased the clots hardness significantly, while L-COOH and S-NH(2 made the clots become softer. It was concluded that the four MWCNTs affected blood coagulation process and the clots mechanical properties; they also altered the integrity of the red blood cells and the viability of the platelets, as well as induced platelets activation. The effects of MWCNTs depended on the size and chemistry of the nanotubes and the type of cells they contacted.

  14. Diamond-like carbon films deposited on three-dimensional shape substrate model by liquid electrochemical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.Y. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Zhang, G.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian China (China); Zhao, Y.; Liu, D.D. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Cong, Y., E-mail: congyan@ciomp.ac.cn [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Buck, V. [Thin Film Technology Group, Faculty of Physics, University Duisburg-Essen and CeNIDE, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on three-dimensional (3D) shape substrate model by electrolysis of 2-propanol solution at low temperature (60 °C). This 3D shape model was composed of a horizontally aligned stainless steel wafer and vertically aligned stainless steel rods. Morphology and microstructure of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results suggested there were only differences in film uniformity and thickness for two kinds of samples. The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on horizontally aligned substrate were smooth and homogeneous. And the film thickness of DLC films gained on the vertical substrates decreased along vertical direction. It is believed that bubble formation could enhance nucleation on the wetted capillary area. This experiment shows that deposition of DLC films by liquid phase deposition on 3D shape conductive substrates is possible. - Highlights: • DLC film is expected to be deposited on complex surface/shape substrate. • DLC film is deposited on 3D shape substrate by liquid electrochemical method. • Horizontal substrate is covered by smooth and homogeneous DLC films. • Film thickness decreases along vertical direction due to boiling effect.

  15. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-10-09

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode–interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode–nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  16. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Nitin M.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Deepak, Francis L.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2015-11-01

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode-interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode-nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  17. Study on the carbonate ocelli-bearing lamprophyre dykes in the Ailaoshan gold deposit zone, Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Zhilong(黄智龙); LIU; Congqiang(刘丛强); XIAO; Huayun(肖化云); HAN; Runsheng(韩润生); XU; Cheng(许成); LI; Wenbo(李文博); ZHONG; Kunming(钟昆明)

    2002-01-01

    Three carbonate ocelli-bearing lamprophyre dykes have been found in the Laowangzhai and Beiya gold orefields in the northern sector of the Ailaoshan gold deposit zone, Yunnan Province. Ocelli in the lamprophyre dykes are carbonates composed mainly of dolomite and calcite. Their trace elements, REE and C isotopic compositions are characteristic of carbonatite and the main mineral assemblages, major elements, trace elements and REE in the matrix are similar to those in the carbonate ocelli-barren lamprophyre dykes in the orefields, which are calc-alkaline lamprophyres that derived from the fertile mantle. The results indicate that the carbonate ocelli-bearing lamprophyre dykes in this area were produced at the time when the Himalayan lamprophyre magma evolved to a relatively late stage of silicate-carbonate liquid immiscibility. In the process of magmatic evolution there took place magmatic degassing with CO2 and H2O as the dominant released gases.

  18. IgM natural autoantibodies against bromelain-treated mouse red blood cells recognise carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonusys, A M; Cox, K O; Steele, E J

    1991-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from mouse erythrocyte membranes is recognised as an autoantigen in Western blotting experiments with FUB 1, a murine IgM monoclonal antibody that binds both phosphatidylcholine and bromelain-treated mouse red blood cells (BrMRBC). Serum from mice stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-serum) also recognises CA. From SDS-PAGE, and blotting experiments with whole mouse erythrocytes, we found two closely spaced glycoprotein bands in the 30 kD region that reacted with both FUB 1 and LPS-serum. One of the molecular weight markers, bovine carbonic anhydrase which is of a molecular weight of about 30 kD, electrophoresed in the same 30 kD region also reacted with these antibodies. Carbonic anhydrases from a range of mammalian species were found to be crossreactive with FUB 1 and LPS-serum by Western blotting, whereas human glycophorin A and human asialoglycophorin were not recognised by the antibodies. FUB 1 specifically recognises both native and denatured bovine carbonic anhydrase in ELISA assays. The serological identity of the determinants of CA and BrMRBC was confirmed by specific absorption of both FUB 1 and LPS-serum with BrMRBC and normal mouse erythrocytes. We propose that a native autoantigenic epitope on erythrocytes may be revealed by the proteolytic action of bromelain and that this determinant is associated, at least in part, with carbonic anhydrase.

  19. Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Fe/ZnO-Palm Olein-Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazwan Afif Mohd Zobir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized using Fe/ZnO catalyst by a dual-furnace thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD method at 800–1000°C using nitrogen gas with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min as a gas carrier. Palm olein (PO, ferrocene in the presence of 0.05 M zinc nitrate, and a p-type silicon wafer were used as carbon source, catalyst precursor, and sample target, respectively. D, G, and G′ bands were observed at 1336–1364, 1559–1680, and 2667–2682 cm-1, respectively. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with the highest degree of crystallinity were obtained at around 8000°C, and the smallest diameter of about 2 nm was deposited on the silicon substrate at 1000°C.

  20. Parallel measurements of organic and elemental carbon dry (PM1, PM2.5) and wet (rain, snow, mixed) deposition into the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowska, Anita; Falkowska, Lucyna M

    2016-03-15

    Parallel studies on organic and elemental carbon in PM1 and PM2.5 aerosols and in wet deposition in various forms of its occurrence were conducted in the urbanised coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. The carbon load introduced into the sea water was mainly affected by the form of precipitation. Dry deposition load of carbon was on average a few orders of magnitude smaller than wet deposition. The suspended organic carbon was more effectively removed from the air with rain than snow, while an inverse relationship was found for elemental carbon. However the highest flux of water insoluble organic carbon was recorded in precipitation of a mixed nature. The atmospheric cleaning of highly dissolved organic carbon was observed to be the most effective on the first day of precipitation, while the hydrophobic elemental carbon was removed more efficiently when the precipitation lasted longer than a day.

  1. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Also, blood is either Rh-positive or Rh-negative. So if you have type A blood, it's either A positive or A negative. Which type you are is important if you need a blood transfusion. And your Rh factor could be important ...

  2. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period

    OpenAIRE

    Guoyong Yan; Yajuan Xing; Lijian Xu; Jianyu Wang; Wei Meng; Qinggui Wang; Jinghua Yu; Zhi Zhang; Zhidong Wang; Siling Jiang; Boqi Liu; Shijie Han

    2016-01-01

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration a...

  3. The effect of protein corona composition on the interaction of carbon nanotubes with human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Silvia H; Diduch, Lukas L; Tegegn, Tseday Z; Orecna, Martina; Strader, Michael B; Karnaukhova, Elena; Bonevich, John E; Holada, Karel; Simak, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are one of the most promising nanomaterials for use in medicine. The blood biocompatibility of CNT is a critical safety issue. In the bloodstream, proteins bind to CNT through non-covalent interactions to form a protein corona, thereby largely defining the biological properties of the CNT. Here, we characterize the interactions of carboxylated-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTCOOH) with common human proteins and investigate the effect of the different protein coronas on the interaction of CNTCOOH with human blood platelets (PLT). Molecular modeling and different photophysical techniques were employed to characterize the binding of albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG), γ-globulins (IgG) and histone H1 (H1) on CNTCOOH. We found that the identity of protein forming the corona greatly affects the outcome of CNTCOOH's interaction with blood PLT. Bare CNTCOOH-induced PLT aggregation and the release of platelet membrane microparticles (PMP). HSA corona attenuated the PLT aggregating activity of CNTCOOH, while FBG caused the agglomeration of CNTCOOH nanomaterial, thereby diminishing the effect of CNTCOOH on PLT. In contrast, the IgG corona caused PLT fragmentation, and the H1 corona induced a strong PLT aggregation, thus potentiating the release of PMP.

  4. Mn(II) deposition on anodes and its effects on capacity fade in spinel lithium manganate-carbon systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chun; Lu, Jun; Jeremy Kropf, A; Wu, Tianpin; Jansen, Andrew N; Sun, Yang-Kook; Qiu, Xinping; Amine, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Dissolution and migration of manganese from cathode lead to severe capacity fading of lithium manganate-carbon cells. Overcoming this major problem requires a better understanding of the mechanisms of manganese dissolution, migration and deposition. Here we apply a variety of advanced analytical methods to study lithium manganate cathodes that are cycled with different anodes. We show that the oxidation state of manganese deposited on the anodes is +2, which differs from the results reported earlier. Our results also indicate that a metathesis reaction between Mn(II) and some species on the solid-electrolyte interphase takes place during the deposition of Mn(II) on the anodes, rather than a reduction reaction that leads to the formation of metallic Mn, as speculated in earlier studies. The concentration of Mn deposited on the anode gradually increases with cycles; this trend is well correlated with the anodes rising impedance and capacity fading of the cell.

  5. Thermal effects on structure and photoluminescence properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Da; LI Qing-shan; WANG Jing-jing; ZHENG Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    Un-hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature.The Raman spectra,the absorption and the photoluminescence spectra were measured.The dependence of structure and photoluminescence properties on deposition temperature were studied in detail.The experimental results indicate that the sp2 sites form small clusters that consist of both olefinic chains and aromatic ring groups within the sp3 matrix.With raising deposition temperature,the optical band gaps increase from 1.87 to 2.85 eV.The main band of photoluminescence centered at around 700nm shifts to short wavelength,and the intensity of this band increases.The photoluminescence can be attributed to carrier localization within an increasing sp2 clusters.It was clarified that the DLC films are ordered with increasing deposition temperature.

  6. Effect of carbon and manganese on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong; Lu, Shanping

    2017-03-01

    Six 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals with different carbon and manganese contents have been studied to reveal the role of major elements, which guide for the design of welding consumables for reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel and meet for the requirements of accelerator driven systems-lead fusion reactors. The typical microstructure for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals is the lath martensite along with the fine stripe δ-ferrite. The chemical compositions influence the solidification sequence and therefore, change the δ-ferrite content in the deposited metal. The impact toughness for the 9Cr2WVTa deposited metals decreases remarkably when the δ-ferrite content is more than 5.2 vol%, also the impact toughness decreases owing to the high quenching martensite formation. Increasing the level of manganese addition, α phase of each alloy shifts to the bottom right according to the CCT diagram.

  7. Effect of substrate bias in nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films with embedded nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kumar, Sushil; Ishpal,; Srivastava, A.K.; Chouksey, Abhilasha; Tripathi, R.K.; Basu, A. [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer a-C: N films having nanoparticles were deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc (FCJCA) technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of negative substrate bias on the properties of a-C: N films embedded with nanoparticles have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of a-C: N films deposited by FCJCA technique have been compared with ta-C: N films deposited by FCVA process. - Abstract: The properties of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C: N) films with embedded nanoparticles, deposited using a filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique, are reported. X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal an amorphous structure, but on closer examination the presence of clusters of nanocarbon single crystals with d-spacing close to diamond cubic-phase have also been identified. The effect of substrate bias on the microstructure, conductivity, activation energy, optical band gap, optical constants, residual stress, hardness, elastic modulus, plastic index parameter, percentage elastic recovery and density of states of a-C: N films have been studied and the properties obtained are found to depend on the substrate bias.

  8. TRANSITION FROM CARBONATE PLATFORM TO PELAGIC DEPOSITION (MID JURASSIC- LATE CRETACEOUS, VOURINOS MASSIF, NORTHERN GREECE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLAOS CARRAS

    2004-03-01

    packstone and rudstone (facies H3. These features allow to recognise the following sequence of events: 1 development of a carbonate platform in the Middle and Late Jurassic; 2 its overthrusting onto the ophiolites and its emersion starting from latest Jurassic time, with erosion and deposition of laterites; 3 marine transgression on the Jurassic platform and on the ophiolites during the early Late Cretaceous, and 4 extensional tectonism and platform demise starting in the Cenomanian, with sedimentation of gravity flows and turbidity currents deposits from the Cenomanian to the Campanian- ?Maastrichtian.

  9. Oolitic sandbody depositional models and geometries, Mississippian of southwest Britain: implications for petroleum exploration in carbonate ramp settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchette, Trevor P.; Paul Wright, V.; Faulkner, Tom J.

    1990-07-01

    A 1000 m thick early Mississippian carbonate supersequence, the "Carboniferous Limestone" of southwest Britain, consists of three third-order depositional sequences. These comprise parasequences in various configurations, and the whole forms a carbonate ramp stack. Within this framework five major oolitic carbonate sandbodies developed: (a) Castell Coch Limestone, (b) Stowe Oolite, (c) Brofiscin Oolite, (d) Gully Oolite, and (e) High Tor Limestone. The depositional regime was storm- and wave-dominated throughout and the major sandbodies represent a range of progradational carbonate beaches, barriers and detached subtidal shoals. Analysis of the three-dimensional shapes and distribution of these five examples shows that they evolved to produce three major carbonate sandbody geometries: (a) strings, (b) sheets, and (c) wedges. These geometries are characterised using the five field examples and offered as a template which may assist in the exploration and reservoir modelling of petroleum-rich high-energy ramp systems. Progradation, for up to 40 km, of barrier islands (Stowe Oolite) and beach-ridge plains (Gully Oolite Formation) generated strings, and "thick" sheets individually up to 10-20 m thick. "Thin" shoreface-retreat carbonate packstone/grainstone sheets up to 5 m thick (High Tor limestone) developed during transgressions as veneers across flooding surfaces. These are comparable with sheet sands developed in siliciclastic shelf depositional systems. Progradation, for up to 30 km, and vertical aggradation of shoreline-detached oolite shoals (Castell Coch limestone, Brofiscin Oolite), generated basinwards-expanding or thinning wedges up to 30 m thick. Tectonically controlled stacking of strandplain sheets produced a composite carbonate sandbody up to 80 m thick (Gully Oolite). The intrinsic (sedimentary) and extrinsic (eustacy, tectonism, climate) factors which controlled these sandbody geometries are addressed. Establishing the positions of the sandbodies

  10. Genesis of Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag Deposits within Permian Carboniferous-Carbonate Rocks in Madina Regency, North Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakti Hamonangan Harahap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strong mineralized carbonate rock-bearing Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag-(Au ores are well exposed on the Latong River area, Madina Regency, North Sumatra Province. The ore deposit is hosted within the carbonate rocks of the Permian to Carboniferous Tapanuli Group. It is mainly accumulated in hollows replacing limestone in the forms of lensoidal, colloform, veins, veinlets, cavity filling, breccia, and dissemination. The ores dominantly consist of galena (126 000 ppm Pb and sphalerite (2347 ppm Zn. The other minerals are silver, azurite, covellite, pyrite, marcasite, and chalcopyrite. This deposit was formed by at least three phases of mineralization, i.e. pyrite and then galena replaced pyrite, sphalerite replaced galena, and pyrite. The last phase is the deposition of chalcopyrite that replaced sphalerite. The Latong sulfide ore deposits posses Pb isotope ratio of 206Pb/204Pb = 19.16 - 20.72, 207Pb/204Pb = 16.16 - 17.29, and 208Pb/204Pb = 42.92 - 40.78. The characteristic feature of the deposit indicates that it is formed by a sedimentary process rather than an igneous activity in origin. This leads to an interpretation that the Latong deposit belongs to the Sedimentary Hosted Massive Sulfide (SHMS of Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT. The presence of SHMS in the island arc such as Sumatra has become controversial. For a long time, ore deposits in the Indonesian Island Arc are always identical with the porphyry and hydrothermal processes related to arc magmatism. This paper is dealing with the geology of Latong and its base metal deposits. This work is also to interpret their genesis as well as general relationship to the regional geology and tectonic setting of Sumatra.

  11. Morphology and crystallinity control of ultrathin TiO2 layers deposited on carbon nanotubes by temperature-step atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Zhang, Yucheng; Li, Meng; Chawla, Vipin; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the chemically inert CNTs and appropriate control of the morphology of the TiO2 layer have not been achieved so far. Here, we report a new strategy to obtain ultrathin TiO2 coatings deposited by ``Temperature-step'' Atomic Layer Deposition (TS-ALD) with complete surface coverage of non-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and controlled morphology and crystallinity of the TiO2 film. This strategy consists of adjusting the temperature during the ALD deposition to obtain the desired morphology. Complete coverage of long non-functionalized MWCNTs with conformal anatase layers was obtained by using a low temperature of 60 °C during the nucleation stage followed by an increase to 220 °C during the growth stage. This resulted in a continuous and amorphous TiO2 layer, covered with a conformal anatase coating. Starting with the deposition at 220 °C and reducing to 60 °C resulted in sporadic crystal grains at the CNT/TiO2 interface covered with an amorphous TiO2 layer. The results were accomplished through an extensive study of nucleation and growth of titanium oxide films on MWCNTs, of which a detailed characterization is presented in this work.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the

  12. The Role Of The Biological Productivity Of The Forests Of The Carpathian National Nature Park In The Formation The Region's Carbon-Deposit Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Bokoch; R. Vasylyshyn

    2013-01-01

    The amount of phytomass and deposited carbon in forests of the Carpathian NNP and their contribution to the carbon budget of the region have been defined. Adapted and implemented methodology for calculating bioproductivity of tree stands by components of phytomass and depositing carbon was to find out their multifactorial dependencies on mensurational characteristics of stands, which are specified in the State forest inventory data. As the depending variable in modeling the dynamics of phytom...

  13. Adsorbed plasma proteins modulate the effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on neutrophils in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, Irina I; Mikhalchik, Elena V; Barinov, Nikolay A; Kostevich, Valeria A; Smolina, Natalia V; Klinov, Dmitry V; Sokolov, Alexey V

    2016-08-01

    Proteins adsorbed on a surface may affect the interaction of this surface with cells. Here, we studied the binding of human serum albumin (HSA), fibrinogen (FBG) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWCNTs) and evaluated the impact of PEG-SWCNT treated by these proteins on neutrophils in whole blood samples. Measurements of adsorption parameters revealed tight binding of proteins to PEG-SWCNTs. AFM was employed to directly observe protein binding to sidewalls of PEG-SWCNTs. Fluorescein-labeled IgG was used to ascertain the stability of PEG-SWCNT-IgG complexes in plasma. In blood samples, all plasma proteins mitigated damage of neutrophils observed just after blood exposure to PEG-SWCNTs, while only treatment of PEG-SWCNTs with IgG resulted in dose- and time-dependent enhancement of CNT-induced neutrophil activation and in potentiation of oxidative stress. Our study demonstrates the ability of adsorbed plasma proteins to influence neutrophil response caused by PEG-SWCNTs in whole blood.

  14. Effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on ecosystem carbon fluxes on the Sanjiang plain wetland in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N deposition across the globe may affect ecosystem CO2 exchanges and ecosystem carbon cycles. Additionally, it remains unknown how increased N deposition and N addition will alter the effects of elevated CO2 on wetland ecosystem carbon fluxes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Beginning in 2010, a paired, nested manipulative experimental design was used in a temperate wetland of northeastern China. The primary factor was elevated CO2, accomplished using Open Top Chambers, and N supplied as NH4NO3 was the secondary factor. Gross primary productivity (GPP was higher than ecosystem respiration (ER, leading to net carbon uptake (measured by net ecosystem CO2 exchange, or NEE in all four treatments over the growing season. However, their magnitude had interannual variations, which coincided with air temperature in the early growing season, with the soil temperature and with the vegetation cover. Elevated CO2 significantly enhanced GPP and ER but overall reduced NEE because the stimulation caused by the elevated CO2 had a greater impact on ER than on GPP. The addition of N stimulated ecosystem C fluxes in both years and ameliorated the negative impact of elevated CO2 on NEE. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this ecosystem, future elevated CO2 may favor carbon sequestration when coupled with increasing nitrogen deposition.

  15. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  16. Synthesis of thin films in boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary system by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Ratandeep Singh

    The Boron Carbon Nitorgen (B-C-N) ternary system includes materials with exceptional properties such as wide band gap, excellent thermal conductivity, high bulk modulus, extreme hardness and transparency in the optical and UV range that find application in most fields ranging from micro-electronics, bio-sensors, and cutting tools to materials for space age technology. Interesting materials that belong to the B-C-N ternary system include Carbon nano-tubes, Boron Carbide, Boron Carbon Nitride (B-CN), hexagonal Boron Nitride ( h-BN), cubic Boron Nitride (c-BN), Diamond and beta Carbon Nitride (beta-C3N4). Synthesis of these materials requires precisely controlled and energetically favorable conditions. Chemical vapor deposition is widely used technique for deposition of thin films of ceramics, metals and metal-organic compounds. Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) is especially interesting because of its ability to deposit materials that are meta-stable under the deposition conditions, for e.g. diamond. In the present study, attempt has been made to synthesize beta-carbon nitride (beta-C3N4) and cubic-Boron Nitride (c-BN) thin films by MPECVD. Also included is the investigation of dependence of residual stress and thermal conductivity of the diamond thin films, deposited by MPECVD, on substrate pre-treatment and deposition temperature. Si incorporated CNx thin films are synthesized and characterized while attempting to deposit beta-C3N4 thin films on Si substrates using Methane (CH4), Nitrogen (N2), and Hydrogen (H2). It is shown that the composition and morphology of Si incorporated CNx thin film can be tailored by controlling the sequence of introduction of the precursor gases in the plasma chamber. Greater than 100mum size hexagonal crystals of N-Si-C are deposited when Nitrogen precursor is introduced first while agglomerates of nano-meter range graphitic needles of C-Si-N are deposited when Carbon precursor is introduced first in the

  17. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients...

  18. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited by MFPUMST at different ratios of mixed gases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiyang Dai; Changyong Zhan; Hui Jiang; Ningkang Huang

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (-C:H) on -type (100) silicon wafers were prepared with a middle frequency pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (MFPUMST) at different ratios of methane–argon gases. The band characteristics, mechanical properties as well as refractive index were measured by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano-indentation tests and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It is found that the 3 fraction increases with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, and then decreases when Ar concentration exceeds 50%. The nano-indentation tests reveal that nano-hardness and elastic modulus of the films increase with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, while decreases with increasing Ar concentration from 50% to 86%. The variations in the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus could be interpreted due to different 3 fractions in the prepared -C:H films. The variation of refractive index with wavelength have the same tendency for the -C:H films prepared at different Ar concentrations, they decrease with increasing wavelength from 600 to 1700 nm. For certain wavelengths within 600–1700 nm, refractive index has the highest value at the Ar concentration of 50%, and it is smaller at the Ar concentration of 86% than at 17%. The results given above indicate that ratio of mixed gases has a strong influence on bonding configuration and properties of -C:H films during deposition. The related mechanism is discussed in this paper.

  19. Humidity Sensitivity of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks Deposited by Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Cui

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the humidity sensitivity of deposited multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT networks using ac dielectrophoresis (DEP between interdigitated electrodes (IDEs. MWCNTs dispersed in ethanol were trapped and enriched between IDEs on a Si/SiO2 substrate under a positive DEP force. After the DEP process, the ethanol was evaporated and the MWCNT network on a substrate with IDEs was put into a furnace for repeated thermal annealing. It was found that the resistance stability of the network was effectively improved through thermal annealing. The humidity sensitivity was obtained by measuring the resistance of the MWCNT network with different relative humidity at room temperature. The experimental results show the resistance increases linearly with increasing the relative humidity from 25% to 95% RH with a sensitivity of 0.5%/%RH. The MWCNT networks have a reversible humidity sensing capacity with response time and recovery time of about 3 s and 25 s, respectively. The resistance is dependent on temperature with a negative coefficient of about -0.33%/K in a temperature range from 293 K to 393 K.

  20. Carbon Deposition Onto Ni-Based Catalysts for Combined Steam/CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Park, Yoon Hwa; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-02-01

    The present study was performed to suppress carbon deposition by Ce and Fe onto Ni-based catalysts in combined steam/CO2 reforming of methane (CSCRM), which is a process for producing synthesis gas (H2:CO = 2:1) for gas-to-liquids (GTL). The catalytic reaction was evaluated at 900 degrees C and 20 bar with a reactant feed ratio CH4:CO2:H20:Ar = 1:0.8:1.3:1 and gas hourly space velocity GHSV = 25,000 h(-1). The Ce and Fe modified Ni/gamma-A120, catalyst was characterized by BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), H2 chemisorption, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and SEM. Ce- and Fe-modified Ni/Al2O3 catalysts exhibited remarkable activity and stability during the CSCRM over the course of 50 hours. It suggested that the Ni(12)-Ce(5)-Fe(5)/Al2O3 catalyst shows highly dispersed Ni particles with strong metal-to-support interaction (SMSI) as well as excellent catalytic activity.

  1. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  2. The impact of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration in European forests and forest soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Wim; Reinds, Gert Jan; Gundersen, Per;

    2006-01-01

    An estimate of net carbon (C) pool changes and long-term C sequestration in trees and soils was made at more than 100 intensively monitored forest plots (level II plots) and scaled up to Europe based on data for more than 6000 forested plots in a systematic 16 km x 16 km grid (level I plots). C...... pool changes in trees at the level II plots were based on repeated forest growth surveys At the level I plots, an estimate of the mean annual C pool changes was derived from stand age and available site quality characteristics. C sequestration, being equal to the long-term C pool changes accounting...... for CO2 emissions because of harvest and forest fires, was assumed 33% of the overall C pool changes by growth. C sequestration in the soil were based on calculated nitrogen (N) retention (N deposition minus net N uptake minus N leaching) rates in soils, multiplied by the C/N ratio of the forest soils...

  3. Large scale changes in 20th century black carbon deposition to Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bisiaux

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Refractory black carbon aerosols (rBC emitted by biomass burning (fires and fossil fuel combustion, affect global climate and atmospheric chemistry. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH, rBC is transported in the atmosphere from low latitudes to Antarctica and deposited to the polar ice sheet preserving a history of emissions and atmospheric transport. Here, we present two high-resolution Antarctic rBC ice core records drilled from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet divide and Law Dome on the periphery of the East Antarctic ice sheet. Separated by ~3500 km, the records span calendar years 1850–2001 and reflect the rBC distribution over the Indian and Pacific ocean sectors of the Southern Ocean. Highly correlated over the past 60 yr, the records show that coherent large-scale changes in SH rBC occurred at decadal to inter-annual time scales, notably in ENSO-like periodicities. Decadal trends in the records are similar to inventories of SH rBC emissions from grass fires and biofuels. The combined records suggest a large-scale reduction in rBC from 1950 to 1990 over the remote Southern Hemisphere.

  4. Quantitative Image Analysis of Ni-P Coatings Deposited on Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozera, R.; Bucki, J. J.; Sałacińska, A.; Bieliński, J.; Boczkowska, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers coated with different thicknesses of Ni-P coatings were studied. The coatings were deposited by electroless metallization lasting from 3 to 22 min and consisted of approximately 3 wt.% phosphorous. Computer quantitative image analysis was used to characterize the surface features and thickness of the coatings as a function of the time of metallization. The results showed that quantitative image analysis is a useful technique for the measurement of the coating thickness and can be used as a tool for obtaining an innovative description of the Ni-P coating morphology. The morphology of the coatings and their thicknesses were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The image analyses were performed using the proprietary software Micrometer, developed at the Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. The observations revealed that a specific feature of the coating topography is the hemispherical bulge of a diameter ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm. The thickness of the coatings increases linearly with the metallization time. The obtained results indicated that the methodology proposed in the present work can be successfully applied and possesses several advantages over the traditionally used weight measurements technique.

  5. Thermo-Electrochemical Cells Based on Carbon Nanotube Electrodes by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijin Qian; Mingxuan Cao; Fei Xie; Changkun Dong

    2016-01-01

    Drawbacks of low efficiency and high cost of the electrode materials have restricted the wide applications of the thermo-electrochemical cells (TECs). Due to high specific areas and electrical conductivities, the low cost multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are promising alternative electrode materials. In this work, the MWNT films of up to 16 cm2 were synthesized on stainless steel substrates by the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to make the thermo-electrochemical electrodes. MWNT electrodes based on TECs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the long-term stability tests with the potassium ferri/ferrocyanide electrolyte. The TECs reached the current density of 45.2 A m-2 and the maximum power density of 0.82 W m-2. The relative power conversion efficiency of the MWNT electrode is 50%higher than that for the Pt electrode. Meanwhile, the TECs was operated continuously for 300 h without performance degradation. With the priorities of low cost and simple fabrication, EPD-based MWNT TECs may become commercially viable.

  6. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, K., E-mail: ozeki@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, 162-1 Shirakata, Toukai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hirakuri, K.K. [Applied Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Ishizaka, Hatoyama, Hiki, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan); Masuzawa, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO{sub 2} films and DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO{sub 2}-coated and the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO{sub 2} coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO{sub 2} film was covered with the DLC film.

  7. Carbonate cementation in the late glacial outwash and beach deposits in northern Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Rattas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentary environments, morphology and formation of carbonate cement in the late glacial glaciofluvial outwash and beach deposits in northern Estonia are discussed. Cementation is observed in well-drained, highly porous carbonaceous debris-rich gravel and sand-forming, resistant ledges in otherwise unconsolidated sediments. The cemented units occur as laterally continuous layers or as isolated lenticular patches with thicknesses from a few centimetres to 3 m. The cement is found in two main morphologies: (1 cement crusts or coatings around detrital grains and (2 massive cement almost entirely filling interparticle pores and intraparticle voids. It is exclusively composed of low-Mg calcite with angular equant to slightly elongated rhombohedral and scalenohedral or prismatic crystals, which indicate precipitation from meteoric or connate fresh surface (glacial lake water and/or near-surface groundwater under low to moderate supersaturation and flow conditions. The absence of organic structures within the cement suggests that cementation is essentially inorganic. The cement exhibits both meteoric vadose and phreatic features and most probably occurred close to the vadose–phreatic interface, where the conditions were transitional and/or fluctuating. Cementation has mainly taken place by CO2-degassing in response to fluctuations in groundwater level and flow conditions, controlled by the Baltic Ice Lake water level, and seasonal cold and/or dry climate conditions.

  8. Negative Resistance Effect and Charge Transfer Mechanisms in the lon Beam Deposited Diamond Like Carbon Superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius VASILIAUSKAS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/nSi and DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi structures were fabricated by ion beam deposition using a closed drift ion source. Current-voltage (I-V characteristics of the multilayer samples were measured at room temperature. The main charge transfer mechanisms were considered. Unstable negative resistance effect was observed for some DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/nSi and DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi structures. In the case of the diamond like carbon superlattices fabricated on nSi it was observed only during the first measurement. In the case of the some DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi negative resistance "withstood" several measurements. Changes of the charge carrier mechanisms were observed along with the dissapear of the negative resistance peaks. It seems, that in such a case influence of the bulk related charge transfer mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel emission increased, while the influence of the contact limited charge transfer mechanisms such as Schottky emission decreased. Observed results were be explained by current flow through the local microconducting channels and subsequent destruction of the localized current pathways as a result of the heating by flowing electric current.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.240

  9. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  10. Diamond-like carbon films synthesized on bearing steel surface by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xi; TANG Bao-yin; WANG Lang-ping; WANG Xiao-feng; YU Yong-hao; SUN Tao; HU Li-guo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) on 9Cr18 bearing steel surface. Influences of working gas pressure and pulse width of the bias voltage on properties of the thin film were investigated. The chemical compositions of the as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The micro-hardness, friction and wear behavior, corrosion resistance of the samples were evaluated, respectively. Compared with uncoated substrates, micro-hardness results reveal that the maximum is increased by 88.7%. In addition, the friction coefficient decreases to about 0.1, and the corrosion resistance of treated coupons surface are improved significantly.

  11. Characterisation of three regimes of collapsing Arctic ice complex deposits on the SE Laptev Sea coast using biomarkers and dual carbon isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Laura; Vonk, Jorien; Charkin, Alexander; Kosmach, Denis; Dudarev, Oleg; Semiletov, Igor; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-01-01

    Arctic amplification of climate warming is intensifying the thaw and coastal erosion of the widespread and carbon-rich Siberian Ice Complex Deposits (ICD). Despite the potential for altering long-term carbon dynamics in the Arctic, the susceptibility of organic carbon (OC) to degradation as the ICD

  12. Catalytic Oxidation of Propylene, Toluene, Carbon Monoxide, and Carbon Black over Au/CeO2 Solids: Comparing the Impregnation and the Deposition-Precipitation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Aboukaïs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Au/CeO2 solids were prepared by two methods: deposition-precipitation (DP and impregnation (Imp. The prepared solids were calcined under air at 400°C. Both types of catalysts have been tested in the total oxidation of propylene, toluene, carbon monoxide, and carbon black. Au/CeO2-DP solids were the most reactive owing to the high number of gold nanoparticles and Au+ species and the low concentration of Cl- ions present on its surface compared to those observed in Au/CeO2-Imp solids.

  13. Study on Blood Compatibility of Carbon-Nitride Film Synthesized by Ion Beam Enhanced Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    StudyonBloodCompatibilityofCarbon┐NitrideFilmSynthesizedbyIonBeamEnhancedDeposition*HuangNanYangPingDepartmentofMaterialsEngi...

  14. Diamond-like carbon and ceramic materials as protective coatings grown by pulsed laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Perera Mercado, Yibran Argenis

    2004-01-01

    A rather large number of nitride, carbide, and oxide thin films are used as hard and wear-resistant coatings, for optical, corrosive, and refractory applications that are of crucial importance. Additional requirements place even more stringent conditions on the deposition processes. The properties of coatings deposited by pulsed laser deposition are determined by the deposition parameters, the composition of the PLD plasma and its ionization states, the substrate conditions, etc.. In this way...

  15. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.

    2015-01-01

    the onset of carbon deposition. The outlet gas composition at each current step was estimated based on the inlet gas composition and the reactant conversion using Faraday's law. The increase in voltage was observed at lower outlet pCO/pCO2 ratios than that corresponding to the expected thermodynamic......The carbon formation threshold in an operating cell was investigated during electrolysis of an idealized reactant atmosphere of CO and CO2. The electrolysis current was gradually increased in steps until the cell voltage spontaneously increased, thereby indicating cell degradation and possibly...

  16. Decomposition of Ethanol and Dimethyl Ether during Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bo; Xiang, Rong; Inoue, Taiki; Einarsson, Erik; Chiashi, Shohei; Shiomi, Junichiro; Miyoshi, Akira; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we investigated carbon feedstock decomposition conditions on the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by chemical vapor deposition. We simulated gas-phase thermal decomposition of ethanol and dimethyl ether (DME) at typical SWNT growth conditions using the chemical kinetic model, and confirmed the reaction trends and primary products using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Molar fractions were correlated against residence time in the reactor by adjusting the volumetric gas flow rate, and concentration profiles of reaction species were compared to the predicted decomposition mechanism. Signature peak intensities indicated concentrations of both ethanol and DME.

  17. Understanding of catalyst deactivation caused by sulfur poisoning and carbon deposition in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chao

    2011-12-01

    The present work was conducted to develop a better understanding on the catalyst deactivation in steam reforming of sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon fuels for hydrogen production. Steam reforming of Norpar13 (a liquid hydrocarbon fuel from Exxon Mobile) without and with sulfur was performed on various metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Ni) supported on different materials (Al2O3, CeO2, SiO2, MgO, and CeO2- Al2O3). A number of characterization techniques were applied to study the physicochemical properties of these catalysts before and after the reactions. Especially, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was intensively used to investigate the nature of sulfur and carbon species in the used catalysts to reveal the catalyst deactivation mechanism. Among the tested noble metal catalysts (Rh, Ru, Pt, and Pd), Rh catalyst is the most sulfur tolerant. Al2O3 and CeO2 are much better than SiO2 and MgO as the supports for the Rh catalyst to reform sulfur-containing hydrocarbons. The good sulfur tolerance of Rh/Al2O3 can be attributed to the acidic nature of the Al2O3 support and its small Rh crystallites (1-3 nm) as these characteristics facilitate the formation of electron-deficient Rh particles with high sulfur tolerance. The good catalytic performance of Rh/CeO2 in the presence of sulfur can be ascribed to the promotion effect of CeO2 on carbon gasification, which significantly reduced the carbon deposition on the Rh/CeO2catalyst. Steam reforming of Norpar13 in the absence and presence of sulfur was further carried out over CeO2-Al2O3 supported monometallic Ni and Rh and bimetallic Rh-Ni catalysts at 550 and 800 °C. Both monometallic catalysts rapidly deactivated at 550 °C, iv and showed poor sulfur tolerance. Although ineffective for the Ni catalyst, increasing the temperature to 800 °C dramatically improved the sulfur tolerance of the Rh catalyst. Sulfur K-edge XANES revealed that metal sulfide and organic sulfide are the dominant sulfur

  18. Active control over carbon deposition on diagnostic components and in remote areas of ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litnovsky, A.; Philipps, V.; Wienhold, P.; Matveeva, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Sergienko, G.; Schmitz, O.; Samm, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schulz, C.; Marot, L.; Romanyuk, A.; De Temmerman, G.; Laengner, M.; Breuer, U.; Stark, A.

    2011-01-01

    In future fusion devices like ITER deposition of impurities will likely occur in areas, remote from plasma and on the sensitive components of optical diagnostics, like mirrors and windows. Deposition in remote areas may lead to the tritium retention and therefore represent a safety issue. Deposition

  19. A Model-based Estimate of the Relative Importance of Climate warming, CO2-fertilization and Nitrogen Deposition to Global Terrestrial Carbon Uptake (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, G.; Narayanappa, D.; Chaturvedi, R.; Caldeira, K.; Nemani, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Global carbon budget studies indicate that the terrestrial ecosystems have remained a large sink for carbon in recent decades despite deforestation activities. Carbon uptake due to CO2- fertilization, N deposition and regrowth of mid-latitude forests are believed to be the key drivers. In this study, we assess the importance of N deposition by performing idealized near-equilibrium simulations using the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4). In our 1000-year equilibrium simulations, only 12-17% of the deposited Nitrogen is assimilated into the ecosystem and the corresponding carbon uptake can be inferred from a C:N ratio of 20:1. We calculate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere for CO2-fertilization, climate warming and N deposition as changes in total ecosystem carbon for unit changes in global mean atmospheric CO2 concentration, global mean temperature and Tera grams of Nitrogen deposition per year, respectively. Based on these sensitivities, it is estimated that about 242 PgC could have been taken up by land due to the CO2 fertilization effect and an additional 175 PgC taken up as a result of the increased N deposition since the pre-industrial period. Because of climate warming, terrestrial ecosystem could have lost about 152 PgC during the same period. Therefore, since preindustrial times terrestrial carbon losses due to warming may have been approximately compensated by effects of increased N deposition, whereas the effect of CO2-fertilization is approximately indicative of the current increase in terrestrial carbon stock. Our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of carbon storage to increased N deposition decreases beyond current levels, indicating climate warming effects on carbon storage may overwhelm N deposition effects in the future.

  20. The effect of substrate bias on titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: zhangxu@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China); Liang, Hong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China); Wu, Zhenglong [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University (China); Wu, Xiangying; Zhang, Huixing [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China)

    2013-07-15

    The titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films have been deposited on silicon substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology, the effects of substrate bias on composition, structures and mechanical properties of the films are studied by scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation. The results show that the Ti content, deposition rate and hardness at first increase and then decrease with increasing the substrate bias. Maximum hardness of the titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite film is 51 Gpa prepared at −400 V. The hardness enhancement may be attributed to the compressive stress and the fraction of crystalline TiC phase due to ion bombardment.

  1. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in

  2. Time-Resolved Observation of Deposition Process of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hanada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere wherein ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H composite films were grown on heated substrates. Time-resolved photographs of a plume that expanded from a laser-irradiation spot toward a substrate were taken using a high-speed ICCD camera equipped with narrow-bandpass filters. While the emissions from C atoms and C2 dimers lasted above the laser-irradiation spot on the target, the emission from C+ ions lasted above the substrate surface for approximately 7 microseconds, although the emission lifetime of species is generally approximately 10 nanoseconds. This implies that C+ ions actively collided with each other above the substrate surface for such a long time. We believe that the keys to UNCD growth in PLD are the supply of highly energetic carbon species at a high density to the substrate and existence of atomic hydrogen during the growth.

  3. Deposition and fate of organic carbon in floodplains along a tropical semi-arid lowland river (Tana River, Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omengo, Fred; Geeraert, Naomi; Boullion, Steven; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Inland organic carbon (OC) burial by sedimentation has recently been shown to be an important component in river catchment carbon(C) budget. However, data on OC burial by sedimentation are hitherto largely limited to temperate zones. We investigated the deposition and fate of sediment-associated OC in the floodplains of a tropical lowland Tana river (Kenya), between two main gauging stations (Garissa and Garsen). Freshly deposited surface sediments and sediment cores were sampled and analysed for OC and total nitrogen content, stable isotope signatures (δ13C) of OC, and grain size distribution. In addition, we incubated sediment cores to quantify CO2 production as a proxy of OC mineralization. The floodplain receives sediment with a relatively low OC content (1.56±0.42%), sediments are enriched with OC inputs from floodplain vegetation to levels above 3%. Sediment cores show a sharp decrease of OC with depth, from 3 - 12%C in the (sub) surface to less than 1%OC below ~60cm depth. Relatively high and deep OC mineralization rates (0.14±0.07mol CO2 kg-1C d-1) were recorded. We used our data to make a first assessment of the carbon burial efficiency of the Tana river floodplain: in contrast to what is observed in temperate environments, over 50% of carbon present in the top layers is lost in less than a century. While significant amounts of OC are deposited in the Tana river floodplain, the high post-depositional loss limits the long-term C sink.

  4. Mississippian clastic-to-carbonate transition in the northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska: Depositional cycles of the Endicott and Lisburne Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepain, D.L.; Crowden, R.K.; Watts, K.F. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The Ellesmerian sequence in northeastern Alaska consists of a thick succession of Mississippian to Lower Cretaceous platform carbonate and terrigenous clastic rocks. At the base of the Ellesmerian sequence, clastic rocks of the Endicott Group are the lower part of a major transgressive sequence that passes gradationally upward into carbonates of the Lisburne Group. In the Endicott Group, the basal Kekiktuk Conglomerate was deposited in fluvial and marginal marine environments. A broad suite of tidally influenced, shallow-marine environments are recorded in the overlying Kayak Shale. The transition into carbonate platform rocks of the Lisburne Group is recorded in a series of depositional cycles developed within the upper half of the Kayak Shale. In the lower beds of the transition, the depositional cycles are multiple upward-thickening and upward-coarsening successions composed of (1) organic-rich siltstone containing flaser-bedded and lenticular-bedded fine-grained sandstone, (2) fine-grained, ripple-laminated quartzarenite, and (3) an intensely bioturbated horizon of medium- to coarse-grained quartzarenite that contains scattered brachiopods, bryozoa, and crinoids. Each cycle is terminated by a sharp transgressive surface that consists of a thin shale drape. Near the top of the Kayak Shale, the coarse-grained horizons become increasingly replaced by wackestone, grainstone, and coralline boundstone. Despite the lithologic change, the vertical upward-thickening and upward-coarsening cycles continue in the basal limestone of the Lisburne Group. Repeated upward-shallowing episodes, followed by coastal onlap, are likely mechanisms for this cyclicity and suggests a genetic relation between both the clastic and carbonate depositional cycles.

  5. Zinc and sulfur isotope variation in sphalerite from carbonate-hosted zinc deposits, Cantabria, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašava, Jan; Tornos, Fernando; Chrastný, Vladislav

    2014-10-01

    We studied zinc and sulfur isotopes and the chemical composition of sphalerite samples from Picos de Europa (Aliva mine) and sphalerite and hydrozincite samples from La Florida mine, two carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits located in northern Spain; despite being close, they are hosted in carbonatic rocks of different ages, Lower Carboniferous and Lower Cretaceous, respectively. The two generations of sphalerite at Picos de Europa show different δ66Zn values (stage 1 sphalerite +0.24 per mil and stage 2 sphalerite from -0.75 to +0.08 per mil). Both generations also differ in the sulfur isotope composition (stage 1 has δ34S = +6.6 and stage 2 has δ34S = -0.9 to +2.9 per mil) and the chemical composition (stage 1 sphalerite, compared to stage 2 sphalerite, is significantly enriched in Pb, As, Mn, Sb, slightly enriched in Ag, Ni, and Cu and depleted in Co, Ga, Tl, Te, Ge, and Sn). We suggest that Zn isotope fractionation was controlled predominantly by pH and T changes. High Zn isotope values reflect rapid precipitation of sphalerite from higher-temperature acidic fluids that carried Zn mostly as chloride species after interaction with carbonate rocks while lower Zn isotope values most likely resulted from a longer precipitation process from fluid at higher pH and decreasing T that carried dominantly Zn sulfide species. At La Florida, sphalerite samples show light 66Zn-depleted signatures with δ66Zn values from -0.80 to -0.01 per mil (mostly between -0.80 and -0.24 per mil) and δ34S values from +10.7 to +15.7 per mil without any relationship between the δ66Zn and δ34S values. Here, the variation in Zn isotope values is interpreted as related to mixing of fluids from two reservoirs. The Zn was carried by a single deep-seated and higher T (~250-320 °C) fluid, and precipitation took place after mixing with a connate S-rich fluid in a system with mH2S > mZn2+ as a result of change in pH, T, and Zn predominant species. The light δ66Zn

  6. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell transplantation for delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong D

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dianrong Gong,1 Haiyan Yu,1 Weihua Wang,2 Haixin Yang,1 Fabin Han1,21Department of Neurology, 2Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, Liaocheng People's Hospital, The Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Stem cell transplantation is one of the potential treatments for neurological disorders. Since human umbilical cord stem cells have been shown to provide neuroprotection and promote neural regeneration, we have attempted to transplant the human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (hUCB-MNCs to treat patients with delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication (DEACOI. The hUCB-MNCs were isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood and were given to patients subarachnoidally. Physical examinations, mini-mental state examination scores, and computed tomography scans were used to evaluate the improvement of symptoms, signs, and pathological changes of the patient's brain before and after hUCB-MNC transplantation. A total of 12 patients with DEACOI were treated with hUCB-MNCs in this study. We found that most of the patients have shown significant improvements in movement, behavior, and cognitive function, and improved brain images in 1–4 months from the first transplantation of hUCB-MNCs. None of these patients have been observed to have any severe adverse effects. Our study suggests that the hUCB-MNC transplantation may be a safe and effective treatment for DEACOI. Further studies and clinical trials with more cases, using more systematic scoring methods, are needed to evaluate brain structural and functional improvements in patients with DEACOI after hUCB-MNC therapy.Keywords: human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells, transplantation, delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide intoxication, MMSE

  7. Microwave processing of epoxy resins and synthesis of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Liming

    Microwave processing of advanced materials has been studied as an attractive alternative to conventional thermal processing. In this dissertation, work was preformed in four sections. The first section is a review on research status of microwave processing of polymer materials. The second section is investigation of the microwave curing kinetics of epoxy resins. The curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 3, 3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) system under microwave radiation at 145 °C was governed by an autocatalyzed reaction mechanism. A kinetic model was used to describe the curing progress. The third section is a study on dielectric properties of four reacting epoxy resins over a temperature range at 2.45 GHz. The epoxy resin was DGEBA. The four curing agents were DDS, Jeffamine D-230, m-phenylenediamine, and diethyltoluenediamine. The mixtures of DGEBA and the four curing agents were stoichiometric. The four reacting systems were heated under microwave irradiation to certain cure temperatures. Measurements of temperature and dielectric properties were made during free convective cooling of the samples. The cooled samples were analyzed with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter to determine the extents of cure. The Davidson-Cole model can be used to describe the dielectric data. A simplified Davidson-Cole expression was proposed to calculate the parameters in the Davidson-Cole model and describe the dielectric properties of the DGEBA/DDS system and part of the dielectric data of the other three systems. A single relaxation model was used with the Arrhenius expression for temperature dependence to model the results. The evolution of all parameters in the models during cure was related to the decreasing number of the epoxy and amine groups in the reactants and the increasing viscosity of the reacting systems. The last section is synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of a gas mixture of

  8. Tissue biodistribution and blood clearance rates of intravenously administered carbon nanotube radiotracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravi; Pantarotto, Davide; Lacerda, Lara; Pastorin, Giorgia; Klumpp, Cédric; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2006-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are intensively being developed for biomedical applications including drug and gene delivery. Although all possible clinical applications will require compatibility of CNT with the biological milieu, their in vivo capabilities and limitations have not yet been explored. In this work, water-soluble, single-walled CNT (SWNT) have been functionalized with the chelating molecule diethylentriaminepentaacetic (DTPA) and labeled with indium (111In) for imaging purposes. Intravenous (i.v.) administration of these functionalized SWNT (f-SWNT) followed by radioactivity tracing using gamma scintigraphy indicated that f-SWNT are not retained in any of the reticuloendothelial system organs (liver or spleen) and are rapidly cleared from systemic blood circulation through the renal excretion route. The observed rapid blood clearance and half-life (3 h) of f-SWNT has major implications for all potential clinical uses of CNT. Moreover, urine excretion studies using both f-SWNT and functionalized multiwalled CNT followed by electron microscopy analysis of urine samples revealed that both types of nanotubes were excreted as intact nanotubes. This work describes the pharmacokinetic parameters of i.v. administered functionalized CNT relevant for various therapeutic and diagnostic applications. nanomedicine | blood circulation half-life | drug delivery | pharmacokinetics | nanotoxicology

  9. Microfabric analysis of Mn-carbonate laminae deposition and Mn-sulfide formation in the Gotland Deep, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ian T.; Kemp, Alan E. S.

    2002-05-01

    The manganese carbonate deposits of the anoxic Littorina sediments of the Gotland Deep have been commonly related to the periodic renewal of deep water by inflowing saline water from the North Sea. The use of scanning electron microscopy-based techniques allows identification of small-scale sedimentary and geochemical features associated with Mn-carbonate laminae, which has significant implications for models of Mn-carbonate formation. Varves occurring in the Littorina sequence contain up to four laminae that may be placed in a seasonal cycle, and kutnahorite laminae occur within varves only as a winter-early spring deposit. This kutnahorite laminae seasonality is in agreement with the seasonal distribution of major Baltic inflow events recorded in historical records, and a direct causal link between inflows and kutnahorite deposition is implied. Benthic foraminifera tests are found to be heavily encrusted in kutnahorite, implying that benthic recolonization during oxidation events occurs concurrently with kutnahorite formation. The relatively common occurrence of small (50 to 100 μm) hexagonal γ-Mn-sulfide pseudomorphs, associated with 13% of kutnahorite laminae studied, is reported in Gotland Deep sediments for the first time. Although Mn-sulfide crystals are not usually preserved in the sediment, the discovery of Mn-sulfide pseudomorphs suggests that initial formation of Mn-sulfide in the Gotland Deep may occur much more commonly during the process of kutnahorite formation than previous reports of Mn-sulfide occurrence have implied.

  10. Electrophoretic deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on porous anodic aluminum oxide using ionic liquid as a dispersing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, F.; Sohrabi, B.; Rahmanifar, M. S.; Jalali, A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs) have been arranged in nanochannels of anodic aluminum oxide template (AAO) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to make a vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) based electrode. Well ordered AAO templates were prepared by a two-step anodizing process by applying a constant voltage of 45 V in oxalic acid solution. The stabilized CNTs in a water-soluble room temperature ionic liquid (1-methyl-3-octadecylimidazolium bromide), were deposited in the pores of AAO templates which were conductive by deposition of Ni nanoparticles in the bottom of pores. In order to obtain ideal results, different EPD parameters, such as concentration of MWCNTs and ionic liquid on stability of MWCNT suspensions, deposition time and voltage which are applied in EPD process and also optimal conditions for anodizing of template were investigated. The capacitive performance of prepared electrodes was analyzed by measuring the specific capacitance from cyclic voltammograms and the charge-discharge curves. A maximum value of 50 Fg-1 at the scan rate of 20 mV s-1was achieved for the specific capacitance.

  11. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  12. Investigation of superfast deposition of metal oxide and Diamond-Like Carbon thin films by nanosecond Ytterbium (Yb+) fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbezov, V.; Sotirov, S.; Benkhouja, K.; Zawadzka, A.; Sahraoui, B.

    2013-11-01

    Metal oxide (MOx, M: titanium, magnesium) and Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) thin films were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at room temperature and low vacuum of 2 Pa for MOx and vacuum of 4 × 10-3 Pa for DLC films. A fiber based Ytterbium (Yb+) laser operating in the nanosecond regime at a repetition rate of 20 kHz was used as an ablation source. Dense and smooth thin films with a thickness from 120 to 360 nm and an area of up to 10 cm2 were deposited on glass and stainless steel substrates at high growth rates up to 2 nm/s for a laser intensity of 10-12 J/cm2. The thin films synthesis was compared for two fiber laser modes of operation, at a repetition rate of 20 kHz and with an additional modulation at 1 kHz. The morphology, chemical composition and structure of the obtained thin films were evaluated using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The morphology of the MOx thin films and the deposition rate strongly depend on the fiber laser mode of operation. Very smooth surfaces were obtained for the metal oxide thin films deposited at lower deposition rates in the modulation mode at 1 kHz. The effect of the substrate on the DLC film structure was studied. The films deposited on dielectric substrates were identified as typical tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC with high sp3 content. DLC films on metal substrates were found typical a-C amorphous carbon films with mixing sp2/sp3 bonds.

  13. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hienola

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The prediction skill of the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient (OVL; the common area under two probability distributions curves and Z score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions. The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low. The local and regional emissions of BC have a significant contribution, and the model tendency to flatten the observed BC is most likely dominated by the lack of domestic burning of biofuel in the emission inventories. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause of the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  14. Effect of silver nanoparticles deposited on micro/mesoporous activated carbons on retention of NO(x) at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkova, Svetlana; Deoki, Deeona; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2011-02-01

    Wood-based activated carbon was modified by deposition of silver using Tollens method. Adsorbents with various contents of silver were used to study NO(2) and NO (the product of NO(2) reduction by carbon) retention. The surface of the initial and exhausted materials was characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, XRD, SEM/EDX, FTIR and TA. The results indicated that with an increasing content of silver on the surface the capacities to retain NO(2) and NO increase until the plateau is reached. The performance depends on the dispersion of nanoparticles and their chemistry. Highly dispersed small silver metal particles promote formation of chelates with NO(2) and/or with NO. An excess of Tollens reagent results in formation of larger silver crystals and silver oxide nanoparticles. If sufficiently dispersed, they also enhance the retention of NO(2) via formation of nitrates deposited in the pore system. The surface of the carbon matrix is also active in NO(2) retention, providing the small pores and edges of graphene layers, where the reductions of NO(2)/oxidation of carbon take place.

  15. Conformal coating of Ni(OH)2 nanoflakes on carbon fibers by chemical bath deposition for efficient supercapacitor electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Alhebshi, Nuha

    2013-01-01

    A novel supercapacitor electrode structure has been developed in which a uniform and conformal coating of nanostructured Ni(OH)2 flakes on carbon microfibers is deposited in situ by a simple chemical bath deposition process at room temperature. The microfibers conformally coated with Ni(OH) 2 nanoflakes exhibit five times higher specific capacitance compared to planar (non-conformal) Ni(OH)2 nanoflake electrodes prepared by drop casting of Ni(OH)2 powder on the carbon microfibers (1416 F g-1vs. 275 F g-1). This improvement in supercapacitor performance can be ascribed to the preservation of the three-dimensional structure of the current collector, which is a fibrous carbon fabric, even after the conformal coating of Ni(OH)2 nanoflakes. The 3-D network morphology of the fibrous carbon fabric leads to more efficient electrolyte penetration into the conformal electrode, allowing the ions to have greater access to active reaction sites. Cyclic stability testing of the conformal and planar Ni(OH)2 nanoflake electrodes, respectively, reveals 34% and 62% drop in specific capacitance after 10 000 cycles. The present study demonstrates the crucial effect that electrolyte penetration plays in determining the pseudocapacitive properties of the supercapacitor electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Purification and characterization of double-wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, P.; Okazaki, T.; Sugai, T.; Kimura, J.; Kishi, N.; Sato, K.; Ozeki, Y.; Shinohara, H.

    2006-02-01

    Double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) have been selectively synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of alcohol over Fe/Co loaded mesoporous silica. The as-grown carbon nanotubes are purified using a multi-step process involving heat treatment in air followed by alkali and acid treatments. The nanotubes are characterized as-grown and after each step of the purification stage by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. It is observed that most of the mesoporous silica and metal particles have been removed from the as-grown nanotubes by these treatments. The carbon content of the nanotube material obtained after the purification is found to be more than 90 wt%.

  17. Physical and electrochemical properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes [CNTs] on a metal substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, Yong Hwan; Ha, Jong Keun; Cho, Kwon Koo; Kim, Hye Sung

    2012-01-05

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized on a Ni/Au/Ti substrate using a thermal chemical vapor deposition process. A Ni layer was used as a catalyst, and an Au layer was applied as a barrier in order to prevent diffusion between Ni and Ti within the substrate during the growth of carbon nanotubes. The results showed that vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes could be uniformly grown on the Ti substrate (i.e., metal substrate), thus indicating that the Au buffer layer effectively prevented interdiffusion of the catalyst and metal substrate. Synthesized carbon nanotubes on the Ti substrate have the diameter of about 80 to 120 nm and the length of about 5 to 10 μm. The Ti substrate, with carbon nanotubes, was prepared as an electrode for a lithium rechargeable battery, and its electrochemical properties were investigated. In a Li/CNT cell with carbon nanotubes on a 60-nm Au buffer layer, the first discharge capacity and discharge capacity after the 50th cycle were 210 and 80 μAh/cm2, respectively.

  18. Modification of pore size in activated carbon by benzene deposition and its effects on CH4/N2 separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-hua; CHE Yong-fang; LI Lan-ting; BAO Peng-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Anthracite coal was used as raw material to prepare activated carbons as the carbon support in the carbonization-activation process.Modification of the pore size of the activated carbon by chemical vapor deposition of carbon from benzene was examined.These samples were characterized by adsorption of N2 at 77 K and CH4 and N2 at 303 K.The microporosity of these samples was evaluated by the Dubinin-Astakhov Equation.The pore size distribution was obtained by the DFT method applied to the N2 adsorption data at 77 K.The separation selectivity was obtained by the Langmuir Equation.The surface morphology was characterized by an environmental scanning electron microscope.It was observed that all samples of carbon molecular sieves studied were microporous carbonaceous materials.CMS-2 prepared in the present study has a better N2/CH4 separation performance; it can satisfy the requirements of the pressure swing adsorption for concentrating CH4 from the N2/CH4 mixture gas.

  19. Sedimentary carbonate-hosted giant Bayan Obo REE-Fe-Nb ore deposit of Inner Mongolia, China; a cornerstone example for giant polymetallic ore deposits of hydrothermal origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Tatsumoto, M.; Junwen, Wang; Conrad, J.E.; McKee, E.H.; Zonglin, Hou; Qingrun, Meng; Shengguang, Huang

    1997-01-01

    on the ages of mineralization and the history of the deposit. Textural relations, differences in chemical composition, and 232Th/208Pb internal isochron ages of monazite and bastnaesite samples indicate that many episodes of REE mineralization occurred at Bayan Obo, ranging from about 555 Ma to about 398 Ma. Initial 208Pb/204Pb ratios suggest different sources of REE's for different generations of REE minerals. Relative ages of Fe mineralization were deduced from textural relationships of Fe minerals with other, dated mineral phases in the deposit. Most Nb mineralization was in the area of the West Orebodies and resulted in disseminated ore. Aeschynite, an early stage of Nb mineralization (438+-25.1 Ma), occurs with huanghoite and alkali amphiboles in veins. The 40Ar/39Ar ages of amphiboles, as well as petrographic textures, were used to distinguish three periods of regional metamorphism in the Bayan Obo mine area: (1) Late Proterozoic, about 890 Ma, which recrystallized H8 carbonate to marble and crystallized lineated alkali amphiboles along foliation planes in the marble; (2) Caledonian, about 425-395 Ma, which resulted in metamorphic and metasomatic-metamorphic alkali amphiboles; and (3) Hercynian, about 300 Ma, based on biotite 40Ar/39Ar analyses from biotite schist and folded banded ores. The 40Ar/39Ar ages of metasomatic alkali amphiboles also place time constraints on the hydrothermal history of the ore deposit. Metasomatic amphiboles represent periods of intense hydrothermal activity, which began as early as 1.26 Ga; that date is based on the age of amphibole from a vein that crosscuts the H6 quartzite that underlies the H8 dolostone marble. Although much of the metasomatic amphibole formed during periods that overlapped the peak period of REE mineralization of banded ores, REE and alkali amphibole phases generally occur in different mineral assemblages or are of very different ages in the same assemblage and, therefore, may have been derived from

  20. Interactions between nitrogen deposition, land cover conversion, and climate change determine the contemporary carbon balance of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Churkina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available European ecosystems are thought to take up large amounts of carbon, but neither the rate nor the contributions of the underlying processes are well known. In the second half of the 20th century, carbon dioxide concentrations have risen by more that 100 ppm, atmospheric nitrogen deposition has more than doubled, and European mean temperatures were increasing by 0.02 °C yr−1. The extents of forest and grasslands have increased with the respective rates of 5800 km2 yr−1 and 1100 km2 yr−1 as agricultural land has been abandoned at a rate of 7000 km2 yr−1. In this study, we analyze the responses of European land ecosystems to the aforementioned environmental changes using results from four process-based ecosystem models: BIOME-BGC, JULES, ORCHIDEE, and O-CN. The models suggest that European ecosystems sequester carbon at a rate of 56 TgC yr−1 (mean of four models for 1951–2000 with strong interannual variability (±88 TgC yr−1, average across models and substantial inter-model uncertainty (±39 TgC yr−1. Decadal budgets suggest that there has been a continuous increase in the mean net carbon storage of ecosystems from 85 TgC yr−1 in 1980s to 108 TgC yr−1 in 1990s, and to 114 TgC yr−1 in 2000–2007. The physiological effect of rising CO2 in combination with nitrogen deposition and forest re-growth have been identified as the important explanatory factors for this net carbon storage. Changes in the growth of woody vegetation are suggested as an important contributor to the European carbon sink. Simulated ecosystem responses were more consistent for the two models accounting for terrestrial carbon-nitrogen dynamics than for the two models which only accounted for carbon cycling and the effects of land cover change. Studies of the interactions of carbon-nitrogen dynamics with

  1. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W Arendash

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF

  2. Electromagnetic treatment to old Alzheimer's mice reverses β-amyloid deposition, modifies cerebral blood flow, and provides selected cognitive benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendash, Gary W; Mori, Takashi; Dorsey, Maggie; Gonzalez, Rich; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of "long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25-1.05 W/kg) by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg) mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21-27 month) Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature) during EMF "ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice) and slight body hyperthermia during "ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF treatment

  3. Formation of fouling deposits on a carbon steel surface from Colombian heavy crude oil under preheating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Pinto, D. A.; Cuervo Camargo, S. M.; Orozco Parra, M.; Laverde, D.; García Vergara, S.; Blanco Pinzon, C.

    2016-02-01

    Fouling in heat exchangers is produced by the deposition of undesired materials on metal surfaces. As fouling progresses, pressure drop and heat transfer resistance is observed and therefore the overall thermal efficiency of the equipment diminishes. Fouling is mainly caused by the deposition of suspended particles, such as those from chemical reactions, crystallization of certain salts, and some corrosion processes. In order to understand the formation of fouling deposits from Colombian heavy oil (API≈12.3) on carbon steel SA 516 Gr 70, a batch stirred tank reactor was used. The reactor was operated at a constant pressure of 340psi while varying the temperature and reaction times. To evaluate the formation of deposits on the metal surfaces, the steel samples were characterized by gravimetric analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). On the exposed surfaces, the results revealed an increase in the total mass derived from the deposition of salt compounds, iron oxides and alkaline metals. In general, fouling was modulated by both the temperature and the reaction time, but under the experimental conditions, the temperature seems to be the predominant variable that controls and accelerates fouling.

  4. A new perspective on structural and morphological properties of carbon nanotubes synthesized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salar Elahi, A.; Agah, K. Mikaili; Ghoranneviss, M.

    CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs.

  5. Different types of nitrogen deposition show variable effects on the soil carbon cycle process of temperate forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuhan; Guo, Peng; Liu, Jianqiu; Wang, Chunyu; Yang, Ning; Jiao, Zhenxia

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition significantly affects the soil carbon (C) cycle process of forests. However, the influence of different types of N on it still remained unclear. In this work, ammonium nitrate was selected as an inorganic N (IN) source, while urea and glycine were chosen as organic N (ON) sources. Different ratios of IN to ON (1 : 4, 2 : 3, 3 : 2, 4 : 1, and 5 : 0) were mixed with equal total amounts and then used to fertilize temperate forest soils for 2 years. Results showed that IN deposition inhibited soil C cycle processes, such as soil respiration, soil organic C decomposition, and enzymatic activities, and induced the accumulation of recalcitrant organic C. By contrast, ON deposition promoted these processes. Addition of ON also resulted in accelerated transformation of recalcitrant compounds into labile compounds and increased CO2 efflux. Meanwhile, greater ON deposition may convert C sequestration in forest soils into C source. These results indicated the importance of the IN to ON ratio in controlling the soil C cycle, which can consequently change the ecological effect of N deposition.

  6. Exogenous nutrients and carbon resource change the responses of soil organic matter decomposition and nitrogen immobilization to nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Wan, Song-Ze; Fang, Xiang-Min; Wang, Fang-Chao; Chen, Fu-Sheng

    2016-03-29

    It is unclear whether exogenous nutrients and carbon (C) additions alter substrate immobilization to deposited nitrogen (N) during decomposition. In this study, we used laboratory microcosm experiments and (15)N isotope tracer techniques with five different treatments including N addition, N+non-N nutrients addition, N+C addition, N+non-N nutrients+C addition and control, to investigate the coupling effects of non-N nutrients, C addition and N deposition on forest floor decomposition in subtropical China. The results indicated that N deposition inhibited soil organic matter and litter decomposition by 66% and 38%, respectively. Soil immobilized (15)N following N addition was lowest among treatments. Litter (15)N immobilized following N addition was significantly higher and lower than that of combined treatments during the early and late decomposition stage, respectively. Both soil and litter extractable mineral N were lower in combined treatments than in N addition treatment. Since soil N immobilization and litter N release were respectively enhanced and inhibited with elevated non-N nutrient and C resources, it can be speculated that the N leaching due to N deposition decreases with increasing nutrient and C resources. This study should advance our understanding of how forests responds the elevated N deposition.

  7. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten substrates from atomic fluxes of boron and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovskiy, Y.; Begrambekov, L.; Ayrapetov, A.; Gretskaya, I.; Grunin, A.; Dyachenko, M.; Puntakov, N.

    2016-09-01

    A device used for both coating deposition and material testing is presented in the paper. By using lock chambers, sputtering targets are easily exchanged with sample holder thus allowing testing of deposited samples with high power density electron or ion beams. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on tungsten samples. Methods of increasing coating adhesion are described in the paper. 2 μm boron carbide coatings sustained 450 heating cycles from 100 to 900 C. Ion beam tests have shown satisfactory results.

  8. Hydrological response to Black Carbon deposition in seasonally snow covered catchments in Norway using two different atmospheric transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, F.; Burkhart, J. F.; Pietikäinen, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC) has been shown to significantly impact snow melt through lowering the albedo of snow and increasing the absorption rate of short wave radiation. Yet few studies have investigated the effect of the enhanced melt on hydrological variability. BC sources for Norway are rather remote and deposition rates low. However, once deposited on snow even low concentrations of BC can have a detectable effect on the snow melt. Variations in snow melt have a direct impact on the snow cover duration and the timing and magnitude of peak outflow. In this study, we use two different atmospheric transport models (the Lagrangian transport and dispersion model FELXPART and the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM) and GAINS emissions to simulate deposition rates over Norway and Statkraft's Hydrologic Forecasting Toolbox (ShyFT) to simulate the impact of BC deposition on the seasonal snow melt. The Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model coupled to the snow routine of the hydrological model is used to determine the albedo of the snow as a function of the BC concentration in two snow layers. To investigate the impact range of BC on the seasonal snow melt, we simulate the catchment hydrology of catchments in south-east, south-west and northern Norway under the impact of deposition rates from both transport models, respectively. Comparing the deposition rates from the two transport models, we observe large differences in the seasonal cycle which in turn results in a significantly different response in the snow melt. Furthermore, we investigate the overall impact of BC deposition on the snow melt and duration on a catchment scale for both transport models.

  9. Studies of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on stainless steel substrate with Si/SiC intermediate layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Liu Gui-Chang; Wang Li-Da; Deng Xin-Lü; Xu Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on stainless steel substrates with Si/SiC intermediate layers by combining plasma enhanced sputtering physical vapour deposition (PEUMS-PVD) and microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW-ECRPECVD) techniques. The influence of substrate negative self-bias voltage and Si target power on the structure and nano-mechanical behaviour of the DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, and the film structural morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM). With the increase of deposition bias voltage, the G band shifted to higher wave-number and the integrated intensity ratio ID/IG increased. We considered these as evidences for the development of graphitization in the films. As the substrate negative self-bias voltage increased, particle bombardment function was enhanced and thesp3-bond carbon density reducing, resulted in the peak values of hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E). Silicon addition promoted the formation of sp3 bonding and reduced the hardness. The incorporated Si atoms substituted sp2- bond carbon atoms in ring structures, which promoted the formation of sp3-bond. The structural transition from C-C to C-Si bonds resulted in relaxation of the residual stress which led to the decrease of internal stress and hardness. The results of AFM indicated that the films was dense and homogeneous, the roughness of the films was decreased due to the increase of substrate negative self-bias voltage and the Si target power.

  10. Growth and Characterization of Carbon Nanofibers on Fe/C-Fiber Textiles Coated by Deposition-Precipitation and Dip-Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to synthesize carbon nanofibers on C-fiber textiles, by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Fe catalyst. The substrate, which was a carbon textile consisting of non-woven carbon fibers and attached graphite particles, was oxidized by nitric acid, before the deposition process. Hydroxyl groups were created on the C-fiber textile, due to the oxidization step. Fe(III) hydroxide was subsequently deposited on the oxidized surface of the C-fiber textile. To deposit ferric particles, two different methods were tested: (i) deposition-precipitation, and (ii) dip-coating. For the experiments using both types of catalyst deposition, the weight ratio of Fe to C-fiber textile was also varied. Ferric particles were reduced to iron after deposition, by using H2/N2 gas, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown by flowing ethylene gas. Properties of carbon nanofibers created like this were analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectoscopy (XPS), Thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and Raman spectroscopy. In the case of the deposition-precipitation method, the results show that the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 30-55 nm, at which the weight ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles were 1:30 and 1:70, respectively. When Fe particles were deposited by the dip-coating method, the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 25-30 nm, for the ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles of 1:10 and 1:30, respectively.

  11. Metallic nanoparticles deposited on carbon microspheres: novel materials for combinatorial electrochemistry and electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ronan; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Compton, Richard G

    2009-04-01

    This review deals with the preparation of metallic nanoparticles on glassy carbon microspheres and the use of these new hybrid materials for combinatorial electrochemistry and electroanalysis. First, the preparation of gold, silver and palladium nanoparticles on glassy carbon microspheres by a simple electroless procedure is described. Then, different types of electrodes modified with glassy carbon microspheres are described. These are: (i) glassy carbon electrodes modified by a composite film of glassy carbon microspheres and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, (ii) basal plane pyrolylic graphite electrodes modified by the abrasive attachment of glassy carbon microspheres and (iii) carbon-epoxy composite electrodes loaded with glassy carbon microspheres. The three types of electrode architectures described consist of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix and each of the electrode macrodisc surfaces actually correspond to a random metallic nanoelectrode array. Carbon-epoxy composite electrodes have good characteristics for their use as practical sensors. Furthermore, the use of several kinds of metallic nanoparticles allows the construction of a multi-analyte electrode and the screening of electroactive materials by following a combinatorial approach.

  12. Insights on Coral Adaptation from Polyp and Colony Morphology, Skeletal Density Banding and Carbonate Depositional Facies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlert, A. M.; Hill, C. A.; Piggot, A. M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2008-12-01

    densities were measured in vertical cross-sections of each whole corallum using standard X-ray techniques utilizing a calibrated step wedge to portray banding and overall density. The combination of the stereoscope and X-ray analyses across spatial and temporal gradients provide insight into how coral reef carbonate depositional facies are affected by changes in key environmental parameters, such as increased pollution, or changing photosynthetic activity with depth or sea surface temperature fluctuations.

  13. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  14. Atomic and Molecular Layer Deposition for Enhanced Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes and Development of Conductive Metal Oxide/Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Jonathan

    The performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are dependent on interfacial processes at the positive and negative electrodes. For example, the surface layers that form on cathodes and anodes are known to affect the kinetics and capacity of LIBs. Interfacial reactions between the electrolyte and the electrodes are also known to initiate electrolyte combustion during thermal runaway events that compromise battery safety. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD) are thin film deposition techniques based on sequential, self-limiting surface reactions. ALD and MLD can deposit ultrathin and conformal films on high aspect ratio and porous substrates such as composite particulate electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. The effects of electrode surface modification via ALD and MLD are studied using a variety of techniques. It was found that sub-nm thick coatings of Al2O 3 deposited via ALD have beneficial effects on the stability of LIB anodes and cathodes. These same Al2O3 ALD films were found to improve the safety of graphite based anodes through prevention of exothermic solid electrolyte interface (SEI) degradation at elevated temperatures. Ultrathin and conformal metal alkoxide polymer films known as "metalcones" were grown utilizing MLD techniques with trimethylaluminum (TMA) or titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and organic diols or triols, such as ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol (GL) or hydroquinone (HQ), as the reactants. Pyrolysis of these metalcone films under inert gas conditions led to the development of conductive metal oxide/carbon composites. The composites were found to contain sp2 carbon using micro-Raman spectroscopy in the pyrolyzed films with pyrolysis temperatures ≥ 600°C. Four point probe measurements demonstrated that the graphitic sp2 carbon domains in the metalcone films grown using GL and HQ led to significant conductivity. The pyrolysis of conformal MLD films to obtain conductive metal oxide/carbon composite films

  15. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on silver-nanoparticle-coated carbon-nanotube networks fabricated by electrophoretic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Anirban; Wang, Hao; Daniels-Race, Theda

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the efficiency of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) based porous substrates has been investigated for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications. The fabrication of uniform thin coatings of carbon nanotubes is accomplished by Electrophoretic Deposition (EPD) on organosilane functionalized silicon substrates. The deposition process exemplifies a fast, reproducible and single-step room temperature coating strategy to fabricate horizontally aligned porous CNT network. Surfactant stabilized AgNPs were deposited on the CNT networks by immersion coating. The acquired Raman spectra of Rhodamine6G (R6G) analyte examined on the fabricated Ag-CNT-Si substrates exhibited enhanced signal intensity values when compared to SERS-active planar AgNP-Si substrates. An overall enhancement factor of ˜109 was achieved for the tested analyte which enables pushing the limit of detection to 1 × 10-12 M (1 pM). The enhancement can be attributed to the large surface area offered by the AgNP-CNT porous network, which is expected to increase the number of effective "hot spots" for the SERS effect.

  16. Carbon deposition behaviour in metal-infiltrated gadolinia doped ceria electrodes for simulated biogas upgrading in solid oxide electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboviks, V.; Lomberg, M.; Maher, R. C.; Cohen, L. F.; Brandon, N. P.; Offer, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the attractive applications for reversible Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) is to convert CO2 into CO via high temperature electrolysis, which is particularly important for biogas upgrading. To improve biogas utility, the CO2 component can be converted into fuel via electrolysis. A significant issue for SOC operation on biogas is carbon-induced catalyst deactivation. Nickel is widely used in SOC electrodes for reasons of cost and performance, but it has a low tolerance to carbon deposition. Two different modes of carbon formation on Ni-based electrodes are proposed in the present work based on ex-situ Raman measurements which are in agreement with previous studies. While copper is known to be resistant towards carbon formation, two significant issues have prevented its application in SOC electrodes - namely its relatively low melting temperature, inhibiting high temperature sintering, and low catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation. In this study, the electrodes were prepared through a low temperature metal infiltration technique. Since the metal infiltration technique avoids high sintering temperatures, Cu-Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (Cu-CGO) electrodes were fabricated and tested as an alternative to Ni-CGO electrodes. We demonstrate that the performance of Cu-CGO electrodes is equivalent to Ni-CGO electrodes, whilst carbon formation is fully suppressed when operated on biogas mixture.

  17. Synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using CoMnMgO catalysts through catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Feng, Yan-Yan; Jiang, Cheng-Fa; Chu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The CoMgO and CoMnMgO catalysts are prepared by a co-precipitation method and used as the catalysts for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The effects of Mn addition on the carbon yield and structure are investigated. The catalysts are characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, and the synthesized carbon materials are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TG). TEM measurement indicates that the catalyst CoMgO enclosed completely in the produced graphite layer results in the deactivation of the catalyst. TG results suggest that the CoMnMgO catalyst has a higher selectivity for CNTs than CoMgO. Meanwhile, different diameters of CNTs are synthesized by CoMnMgO catalysts with various amounts of Co content, and the results show that the addition of Mn avoids forming the enclosed catalyst, prevents the formation of amorphous carbon, subsequently promotes the growth of CNTs, and the catalyst with decreased Co content is favorable for the synthesis of CNTs with a narrow diameter distribution. The CoMnMgO catalyst with 40% Co content has superior catalytic activity for the growth of carbon nanotubes.

  18. Stable Carbon Isotopic Compositions of Methylated-MTTC in Crude Oils from Saline Lacustrine Depositional Environment: Source Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Significantly high abundant methyl-MethylTrimethylTridecylChromans (MTTCs) have been detected in aromatic hydrocarbon fractions in crude oils from the Jizhong Depression and Jianghan Basin. The distribution of these compounds is dominated by methyl-MTTC and dimethylMTTC series, which indicate diagenetic products of a hypersaline depositional environment in the early stage and show a low degree of methylation. The occurrence of significantly high abundant methyl-MTTC depends mainly on good preservation conditions with a strongly reductive, hypersaline and water-columned depositional environment and subsequent non-intensive diagenetic transformations. The stable carbon isotopic compositions of the methyl-MTTCs and dimethyl-MTTCs in two samples are far different from the stable carbon isotopic composition of C30 hopane of apparent bacteria biogenesis (up to 4.11‰ and 5.75‰, respectively). This obviously demonstrates that the methyl-MTTC and dimethyl-MTTCs cannot be of bacteria origin, which is different from the previous point of view about non-photosynthetic bacteria products or possible bacteria-reworked products. On the contrary, the stable carbon isotopic compositions of methyi-MTTC and dimethyl-MTTCs in the two samples were similar to that of the samecarbon-numbered n-alkanes (nC27-nC28-nC29), which indicates that they share the same source origin. Especially in the crude oil from the Zhao61 well, stable carbon isotopic compositions are also similar to that of the same carbon-numbered steranes with ααα-20R isomer (mostly less than 0.4‰). In consideration of the results of previous studies on saline lake ecological sedimentation, the authors hold that the methyl-MTTC and dimethyl-MTTCs in the saline lake sediments should be of algal biogenesis origin.

  19. Carbon deposition during brittle rock deformation: Changes in electrical properties of fault zones and potential geoelectric phenomena during earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathez, E A; Roberts, J J; Duba, A G; Kronenberg, A K; Karner, S L

    2008-05-16

    To investigate potential mechanisms for geoelectric phenomena accompanying earthquakes, we have deformed hollow cylinders of Sioux quartzite to failure in the presence of carbonaceous pore fluids and investigated the resulting changes in electrical conductivity and carbon distribution. Samples were loaded at room temperature or 400 C by a hydrostatic pressure at their outer diameter, increasing pressure at a constant rate to {approx}290 MPa. Pore fluids consisted of pure CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and a 1:1 mixture of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, each with pore pressures of 2.0 to 4.1 MPa. Failure occurred by the formation of mode II shear fractures transecting the hollow cylinder walls. Radial resistivities of the cylinders fell to 2.9 to 3.1 M{Omega}-m for CO tests and 15.2 to 16.5 M{Omega}-m for CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} tests, compared with >23 M{Omega}-m for dry, undeformed cylinders. Carbonaceous fluids had no discernable influence on rock strength. Based on mapping using electron microprobe techniques, carbon occurs preferentially as quasi-continuous films on newly-formed fracture surfaces, but these films are absent from pre-existing surfaces in those same experiments. The observations support the hypothesis that electrical conductivity of rocks is enhanced by the deposition of carbon on fracture surfaces and imply that electrical properties may change in direct response to brittle deformation. They also suggest that the carbon films formed nearly instantaneously as the cracks formed. Carbon film deposition may accompany the development of microfracture arrays prior to and during fault rupture and thus may be capable of explaining precursory and coseismic geoelectric phenomena.

  20. Removal of carbon deposited film and hydrogen retention control by low temperature H–C–N reactive plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, A., E-mail: me121030@ec.t.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Takai, Y.; Uesugi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ishijima, T. [Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Masuzaki, S. [NIFS, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Control of tritium retention and its removal from the first wall of future fusion devices are the most crucial issues for safety and effective use of the fuel. Nitrogen injection into edge plasmas has been considered and tested as an effective method for suppression of carbon dust growth and reduction of hydrogen isotope inventory. In this paper we have investigated scavenger effects of nitrogen injected into H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} plasmas using a small helical device where low density (n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}) and low temperature (T{sub e} = 5–10 eV) hydrogen plasmas are generated in steady state condition like remote plasmas in fusion devices. It is shown from the comparison of the carbon film deposition and particle growth between those with and without N{sub 2} injection that the chemical erosion effects of nitrogen gas on the carbon film and particle growth strongly depends on the surface temperature. With increasing the surface temperature higher than ∼400 K, the nitrogen chemical erosion significantly works to reduce the hydrocarbon deposition.

  1. Isotope composition of bicarbonate carbon in bed waters of oil and gas deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golyshev, S.I.; Cherepnin, A.V.; Ivanov, V.G.; Manylova, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    A study is made of the isotope composition of bicarbonate carbon in bed waters of the Jurassic water complex in southeast West Siberia. It has been established that waters of empty and transcontour structures have isotope composition of carbon 5/sup 0//oo, while in waters which contact the hydrocarbon formations, the isotope composition of carbon is lighter on the average by 5-8/sup 0//oo. The isotope composition of bicarbonate carbon in bed waters reflects both the conditions for primary sedimentation, and secondary processes associated with organic matter transformation.

  2. Fluorine and boron co-doped diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion processing

    CERN Document Server

    He, X M; Peters, A M; Taylor, B; Nastasi, M

    2002-01-01

    Fluorine (F) and boron (B) co-doped diamond-like carbon (FB-DLC) films were prepared on different substrates by the plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) technique. A pulse glow discharge plasma was used for the PIIP deposition and was produced at a pressure of 1.33 Pa from acetylene (C sub 2 H sub 2), diborane (B sub 2 H sub 6), and hexafluoroethane (C sub 2 F sub 6) gas. Films of FB-DLC were deposited with different chemical compositions by varying the flow ratios of the C sub 2 H sub 2 , B sub 2 H sub 6 , and C sub 2 F sub 6 source gases. The incorporation of B sub 2 H sub 6 and C sub 2 F sub 6 into PIIP deposited DLC resulted in the formation of F-C and B-C hybridized bonding structures. The levels of the F and B concentrations effected the chemical bonding and the physical properties as was evident from the changes observed in density, hardness, stress, friction coefficient, and contact angle of water on films. Compared to B-doped or F-doped DLC films, the F and B co-doping of DLC during PIIP deposition...

  3. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan; He, Deyan

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  4. Intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like carbon films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武保; 王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 刘赤子; 杨思泽

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the structures, optical and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films are studied, which are prepared by a self-fabricated electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method at room temperature in the ambient gases of mixed acetylene and nitrogen. The morphology and microstructure of the processed film are characterized by the atomic force microscope image, Raman spectra and middle Fourier transform infrared transmittance spectra, which reveal that there is an intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like structure in the film and the film is mainly composed of sp3 CH, sp3 C-C, sp2 C=C, C=N and C60. The film micro-hardness and bulk modulus are measured by a nano-indenter and the refractive constant and deposition rate are also calculated.

  5. Processes of depositing platinum on carbon nanotubes and their effect on performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhui Li; Jun Ding; Junfeng Chen; Zongqiang Mao; Cailu Xu; Dehai Wu

    2004-01-01

    The ultrafine platinum nanoparticles deposited on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes (Pt/CNTs) were prepared by a chemical precipitation method and used as the catalyst of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The depositing process parameters such as the solution pH value, Pt content and treatment temperature were analyzed. The experimental results show that the optimum process parameters to prepare Pt/CNTs are the solution pH value of 7.0, the theoretical Pt content of 25% (mass fraction) and the heating temperature of 500℃, under the conditions the best performance of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be obtained and its voltage can reach 580 mV at a current density of 500 mA/cm2.

  6. Photothermal stress triggered by near infrared-irradiated carbon nanotubes promotes bone deposition in rat calvarial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Tsukasa; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Minoru; Kido, Hirofumi; Fukushima, Tadao

    2015-03-01

    The bone regenerative healing process is often prolonged, with a high risk of infection particularly in elderly and diseased patients. A reduction in healing process time usually requires mechanical stress devices, chemical cues, or laser/thermal therapies. Although these approaches have been used extensively for the reduction of bone healing time, the exact mechanisms involved in thermal stress-induced bone regeneration remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of optimal hyperthermia on rat calvarial defects in vivo and on osteogenesis in vitro. Photothermal stress stimulation was carried out using a new photothermal device, composed of an alginate gel including in carbon nanotubes and their irradiator with near-infrared light. Photothermal stress (15 min at 42℃, every day), trigged by near-infrared-induced carbon nanotube, promoted bone deposition in critical-sized calvarial defects compared with nonthermal stress controls. We recently reported that our novel DNA/protamine complex scaffold induces bone regeneration in calvarial defects. In this study, photothermal stress upregulated bone deposition in DNA/protamine-engrafted calvarial defects. Furthermore, photothermal stress significantly induced expression of osteogenic related genes in a time-dependent manner, including alkaline phosphatase, osterix, and osteocalcin. This was observed in DNA/protamine cells, which were expanded from regenerated tissue engrafted into the DNA/protamine scaffold, as well as in human MG63 preosteoblasts. In summary, this novel carbon nanotube-based photothermal stress approach upregulated expression of osteogenic-related genes in preosteoblasts, resulting in promotion of mineral deposition for enhanced bone repair.

  7. Effects of elevated nitrogen deposition on soil microbial biomass carbon in major subtropical forests of southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui WANG; Jiangming MO; Xiankai LU; Jinghua XUE; Jiong LI; Yunting FANG

    2009-01-01

    The effects of elevated nitrogen deposition on soil microbial biomass carbon (C) and extractable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in three types of forest of southern China were studied in November, 2004 and June, 2006. Plots were established in a pine forest (PF), a mixed pine and broad-leaved forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF) in the Dinghushan Nature Reserve. Nitrogen treatments included a control (no N addition), low N (50 kg N/(hm2.a)), medium N (100 kg N/ (hm2. a)) and high N (150 kg N/(hm2. a)). Microbial biomass C and extractable DOC were determined using a chloro-form fumigation-extraction method. Results indicate that microbial biomass C and extractable DOC were higher in June, 2006 than in November, 2004 and higher in the MEBF than in the PF or the MF. The response of soil microbial biomass C and extractable DOC to nitrogen deposition varied depending on the forest type and the level of nitrogen treatment. In the PF or MF forests, no significantly different effects of nitrogen addition were found on soil microbial biomass C and extractable DOC. In the MEBF, however, the soil microbial biomass C generally decreased with increased nitrogen levels and high nitrogen addition significantly reduced soil microbial biomass C. The response of soil extractable DOC to added nitrogen in the MEBF shows the opposite trend to soil microbial biomass C. These results suggest that nitrogen deposition may increase the accumulation of soil organic carbon in the MEBF in the study region.

  8. Coastal vulnerability to typhoon inundation in the Bay of Bangkok, Thailand? Evidence from carbonate boulder deposits on Ko Larn island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, James P.; Jankaew, Kruawun; Dunne, Kieran

    2015-11-01

    At the head of the Gulf of Thailand, the subsiding Chao Phraya delta and adjacent low-lying coastlines surrounding the Bay of Bangkok are at risk of coastal flooding. Although a significant marine inundation event has not been experienced in historical times, this work identifies coastal depositional evidence for high-energy waves in the past. On Ko Larn island in eastern Bay of Bangkok, numerous coastal carbonate boulders (CCBs) were discovered at elevations up to 4+ m above sea level, the largest weighing over 1.3 tonnes. For the majority of CCBs, their karstified appearance bears testimony to long periods of immobility since original deposition, whilst their geomorphic settings on coastal slopes of coarse blocky talus is helpful in recognising lifting (saltation) as the probable mode of wave transport. In the absence of local tsunamigenic potential, these CCBs are considered to be prehistoric typhoon deposits, presumably sourced from fringing coral reefs by high-energy wave action. Application of existing hydrodynamic flow transport equations reveals that 4.7 m/s and 7.1 m/s are the minimum flow velocities required to transport 50% and 100% of the measured CCBs, respectively. Such values are consistent with cyclone-impacted coastlines studied elsewhere in the tropical Asia-Pacific region. Overall, the evidence of elevated carbonate boulder deposits on Ko Larn implies that typhoons before the modern record may have entered the Bay of Bangkok. The recurrence of a similar event in future would have the potential to cause damaging marine inundation on surrounding low-lying coastlines.

  9. Optimal deposition conditions of TiN barrier layers for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes onto metallic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cespedes, J; Bertran, E [FEMAN Group, IN2UB, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martii Franques, 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Alvarez-Garcia, J [Centre de Recerca i Investigacio de Catalunya, S.A., Travessera de Gracia 108, Entressol, E-08012, Barcelona (Spain); Zhang, X; Hampshire, J [Teer Coatings Ltd, West Stone House, Berry Hill Industrial Estate, Droitwich, Worcestershire, WR9 9AS (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-21

    Plasma enhanced chemical deposition (PECVD) has proven over the years to be the preferred method for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanofibres (VACNTs and VACNFs, respectively). In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on metallic surfaces present a great potential for high power applications, including low resistance electrical contacts, high power switches, electron guns or supercapacitors. Nevertheless, the deposition of CNTs onto metallic substrates is challenging, due to the intrinsic incompatibility between such substrates and the metallic precursor layers required to promote the growth of CNTs. In particular, the formation of CNT films is assisted by the presence of a nanometric (10-100 nm) monolayer of catalyst clusters, which act as nucleation sites for CNTs. The nanometric character of the precursor layer, together with the high growth temperature involved during the PECVD process ({approx}700 deg. C), strongly favours the in-diffusion of the catalyst nanoclusters into the bulk of the metallic substrate, which results in a dramatic reduction in the nucleation of CNTs. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to coat the metallic substrate with a diffusion barrier layer, prior to the growth of the catalyst precursor. Unlike other conventional ceramic barrier layers, TiN provides high electrical conductivity, thus being a promising candidate for use as barrier material in applications involving low resistance contacts. In this work we investigate the anti-diffusion properties of TiN sputtered coatings and its potential applicability to the growth of CNTs onto copper substrates, using Fe as catalyst material. The barrier and catalyst layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the diffusivity of Fe into TiN. Morphological characterization of the CNTs coatings was performed on scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were

  10. Response of stable carbon isotope in epilithic mosses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xueyan, E-mail: liuxueyan@vip.skleg.c [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Xiao Huayun; Liu Congqiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Li Youyi; Xiao Hongwei; Wang Yanli [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquanlu, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Epilithic mosses are characterized by insulation from substratum N and hence meet their N demand only by deposited N. This study investigated tissue C, total Chl and delta{sup 13}C of epilithic mosses along 2 transects across Guiyang urban (SW China), aiming at testing their responses to N deposition. Tissue C and total Chl decreased from the urban to rural, but delta{sup 13}C{sub moss} became less negative. With measurements of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and delta{sup 13}CO{sub 2}, elevated N deposition was inferred as a primary factor for changes in moss C and isotopic signatures. Correlations between total Chl, tissue C and N signals indicated a nutritional effect on C fixation of epilithic mosses, but the response of delta{sup 13}C{sub moss} to N deposition could not be clearly differentiated from effects of other factors. Collective evidences suggest that C signals of epilithic mosses are useful proxies for N deposition but further works on physiological mechanisms are still needed. - Photosynthetic {sup 13}C discrimination of bryophytes might increase with elevated N deposition.

  11. Measurement of carbon deposit at to irradiate a target; Medicion del deposito de carbon al irradiar un blanco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales M, P.; Aguilera R, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Backscattering data obtained when bombarding a thin target of {sup 12} C deposited on a thick substrate of Ta are analyzed, with a ion beam of {sup 12} C for high fluences and different energy between 9.85 and 13 MeV. A variation in the thickness of the target is observed and is found its correlation with the fluence in the target. (Author)

  12. Assessment of carbon monoxide values in smokers: a comparison of carbon monoxide in expired air and carboxyhaemoglobin in arterial blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Mette F; Møller, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Smoking increases perioperative complications. Carbon monoxide concentrations can estimate patients' smoking status and might be relevant in preoperative risk assessment. In smokers, we compared measurements of carbon monoxide in expired air (COexp) with measurements of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb...

  13. The impact of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration by European forests and heathlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Solberg, S.; Dobbertin, M.; Sterba, H.; Laubhann, D.; Oijen, van M.; Evans, C.; Gundersen, P.; Kros, H.; Wamelink, W.; Reinds, G.J.; Sutton, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present estimated ranges in carbon (C) sequestration per kg nitrogen (N) addition in above-ground biomass and in soil organic matter for forests and heathlands, based on: (i) empirical relations between spatial patterns of carbon uptake and influencing environmental factors includi

  14. Synthesis of CNTs via chemical vapor deposition of carbon dioxide as a carbon source in the presence of NiMgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaedini, Ghazaleh, E-mail: jiny_ghazaleh@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Tasirin, Siti Masrinda [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Aminayi, Payam [Chemical and Paper Engineering, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI (United States)

    2015-10-25

    Carbon nanotubes were synthesized via the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, using Ni/MgO as a catalyst and CO{sub 2} as a nontoxic, abundant, and economical carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), along with the results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy, confirmed the successful formation of CNTs. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was performed to investigate the weight percentage of the present elements in the synthesized powder, and a significant yield of 27.38% was confirmed. The reaction mechanism was discussed, and the role of the carbon source, catalyst support, and presence of H{sub 2} in the reaction environment was elaborated. - Highlights: • CO{sub 2} was used as a nontoxic and economical carbon source for CNT production. • A novel Ni supported MgO has been synthesized and employed in the CVD process. • CNTs were produced with a significant yield of 27.38%.

  15. INTERACTION-MEDIATED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON ACICULAR SILICA-COATED α-Fe CATALYST BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixiang Wang; Guoqing Ning; Fei Wei; Guohua Luo

    2003-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with 20 nm outer diameter were prepared by chemical vapor deposition of ethylene using ultrafine surface-modified acicular α-Fe catalyst particles. The growth mechanism of MWNTs on the larger catalyst particles are attributed to the interaction between the Fe nanoparticles with the surface-modified silica layer. This interaction-mediated growth mechanism is illustrated by studying the electronic, atomic and crystal properties of surface-modified catalysts and MWNTs products by characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Raman spectra.

  16. Morphology of carbon nanotubes prepared via chemical vapour deposition technique using acetylene: A small angle neutron scattering investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Sen; K Dasgupta; J Bahadur; S Mazumder; D Sathiyamoorthy

    2008-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been utilized to study the morphology of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes prepared by chemical vapour deposition of acetylene. The effects of various synthesis parameters like temperature, catalyst concentration and catalyst support on the size distribution of the nanotubes are investigated. Distribution of nanotube radii in two length scales has been observed. The number density of the smaller diameter tubes was found more in number compared to the bigger one for all the cases studied. No prominent scaling of the structure factor was observed for the different synthesis conditions.

  17. Effect of acetylene flow rate on morphology and structure of carbon nanotube thick films grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhangyi; SUN Zhuo; GUO Pingsheng; CHEN Yiwei

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown on nickel foil substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with acetylene and hydrogen as the precursors. The morphology and structure of CNTs depending on the acetylene flow rate were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a Raman spectrometer,respectively.The effect of acetylene flow rate on the morphology and structure of CNT films was investigated.By increasing the acetylene flow rate from 10 to 90 sccm (standard cubic centimeter perminute),the yield and the diameter of CNTs increase.Also, the defects and amorphous phase in CNT films increase with increasing acetylene flow rate.

  18. A high-resolution palaeoenvironmental record from carbonate deposits in the Roman aqueduct of Patara, SW Turkey, from the time of Nero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cornelis; Sürmelihindi, Gül; Spötl, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    An inscription on the supporting wall of the inverted siphon of the aqueduct of the ancient Roman city of Patara, SW Turkey, explains how the wall collapsed during an earthquake and was subsequently restored. Carbonate deposits formed inside the aqueduct channel show cyclic stable isotope changes representing 17 years of deposition. This sequence, together with the text of the inscription, allows dating the earthquake to 68 AD and the original inauguration of the aqueduct to the winter of 51/52 AD. Thus, the carbonate deposits represent a high-resolution record of palaeotemperature and precipitation for SW Turkey covering the complete reign of the Emperor Nero. The period shows a cooling and drying trend after an initial warm and more humid period, interrupted by a few anomalous years. These 2 cm of calcite highlight the significance of carbonate deposits in ancient water supply systems as a high-resolution archive for palaeoclimate, palaeoseismology and archaeology.

  19. A vapor-liquid-solid model for chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kaili; Feng, Chen; Liu, Kai; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a variety of morphologies have been successfully synthesized, there is no clear physical picture of the growth process. Correspondingly, the growth mechanism is still not clear up to now. Here we suggest a VLS model for the growth process of CNTs, which involves a liquid or liquid-like state catalyst. The basic idea is that, due to the high thermal conductivity and nanometer size of the catalyst and the fast diffusion of carbon atoms in it, both the temperature and the carbon atom distribution across it are uniform. The supersaturation level can be expressed as a function of the carbon concentration and temperature, which determines the nucleation dynamics and growth kinetics. Based on this model, the growth rate equation was obtained to describe the growth kinetics of carbon nanotubes, which shows good accordance with the experimental results.

  20. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  1. Effect of TiO2 deposition on the mechanical properties of a carbon-fiber-reinforced bismaleimide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Jang; Chunhua, Cao; Jie, Wu

    2013-07-01

    In order to improve the mechanical properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced bismaleimide (CF/BMI) composites, TiO2 was deposited on the carbon fibers. The short-beam shear and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Both raw and TiO2-coated CFs were utilized for their fabrication. The tensile strength of the composites, both with raw and TiO2-coated fibers, grew with increasing filler content. The tensile strength of the CF/BMI composites with treated fibers, at all mixing ratios, was found to be by 18% higher than that of the composites with untreated ones. The surface morphologies of fracture surfaces of the composites were recorded using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to gain information about the interfacial fiber-matrix adhesion in the composites.

  2. Evaluation of ultramafic deposits in the Eastern United States and Puerto Rico as sources of magnesium for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie; Bruce Lipin; Melissa Fite; Steve Chipera; Dale Counce; Emily Kluk; Hans Ziock

    2000-04-01

    In this report, the authors evaluate the resource potential of extractable magnesium from ultramafic bodies located in Vermont, the Pennsylvania-Maryland-District-of-Columbia (PA-MD-DC) region, western North Carolina, and southwestern Puerto Rico. The first three regions occur in the Appalachian Mountains and contain the most attractive deposits in the eastern United States. They were formed during prograde metamorphism of serpentinized peridotite fragments originating from an ophiolite protolith. The ultramafic rocks consist of variably serpentinized dunite, harzburgite, and minor iherzolite generally containing antigorite and/or lizardite as the major serpentine minor phases. Chrysotile contents vary from minor to major, depending on occurrence. Most bodies contain an outer sheath of chlorite-talc-tremolite rock. Larger deposits in Vermont and most deposits in North Carolina contain a core of dunite. Magnesite and other carbonates are common accessories. In these deposits, MgO ranges from 36 to 48 wt % with relatively pure dunite having the highest MgO and lowest H{sub 2}O contents. Ultramafic deposits in southwestern Puerto Rico consist of serpentinized dunite and harzburgite thought to be emplaced as large diapirs or as fragments in tectonic melanges. They consist of nearly pure, low-grade serpentinite in which lizardite and chrysotile are the primary serpentine minerals. Chlorite is ubiquitous in trace amounts. Magnesite is a common accessory. Contents of MgO and H{sub 2}O are rather uniform at roughly 36 and 13 wt %. Dissolution experiments show that all serpentinites and dunite-rich rocks are soluble in 1:1 mixtures of 35% HCl and water by volume. The experiments suggest that low-grade serpentinites from Puerto Rico are slightly more reactive than the higher grade, antigorite-bearing serpentinites of the Appalachian Mountains. The experiments also show that the low-grade serpentinites and relatively pure dunites contain the least amounts of undesirable

  3. Physical properties of ultrafast deposited micro- and nanothickness amorphous hydrogenated carbon films for medical devices and prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, T; Sullivan, I L; Saied, S O; Bosch, R C; Bijker, M D

    2007-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with diamond-like structures have been formed on different substrates at very low energies and temperatures by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process employing acetylene as the precursor gas. The plasma source was of a cascaded arc type with argon as the carrier gas. The films grown at very high deposition rates were found to have a practical thickness limit of approximately 1.5 microm, above which delamination from the substrate occurred. Deposition on silicon (100), glass, and plastic substrates has been studied and the films characterized in terms of sp3 content, roughness, hardness, adhesion, and optical properties. Deposition rates of up to 20 nm/s have been achieved at substrate temperatures below 100 degrees C. A typical sp3 content of 60-75 per cent in the films was determined by X-ray-generated Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The hardness, reduced modulus, and adhesion of the films were measured using a MicroMaterials NanoTest indenter/scratch tester. Hardness was found to vary from 4 to 13 GPa depending on the admixed acetylene flow and substrate temperature. The adhesion of the film to the substrate was significantly influenced by the substrate temperature and whether an in situ d.c. cleaning was employed prior to the deposition process. The hydrogen content in the film was measured by a combination of the Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. From the results it is concluded that the films formed by the process described here are ideal for the coating of long-term implantable medical devices, such as prostheses, stents, invasive probes, catheters, biosensors, etc. The properties reported in this publication are comparable with good-quality films deposited by other PECVD methods. The advantages of these films are the low ion energy and temperature of deposition, ensuring that no damage is done to sensitive substrates, very high

  4. Atmospheric deposition as a source of carbon and nutrients to barren, alpine soils of the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mladenov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Many alpine areas are experiencing intense deglaciation, biogeochemical changes driven by temperature rise, and changes in atmospheric deposition. There is mounting evidence that the water quality of alpine streams may be related to these changes, including rising atmospheric deposition of carbon (C and nutrients. Given that barren alpine soils can be severely C limited, we evaluated the magnitude and chemical quality of atmospheric deposition of C and nutrients to an alpine site, the Green Lake 4 catchment in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Using a long term dataset (2002–2010 of weekly atmospheric wet deposition and snowpack chemistry, we found that volume weighted mean dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations were approximately 1.0 mg L−1and weekly concentrations reached peaks as high at 6–10 mg L−1 every summer. Total dissolved nitrogen concentration also peaked in the summer, whereas total dissolved phosphorus and calcium concentrations were highest in the spring. Relationships among DOC concentration, dissolved organic matter (DOM fluorescence properties, and nitrate and sulfate concentrations suggest that pollutants from nearby urban and agricultural sources and organic aerosols derived from sub-alpine vegetation may influence high summer DOC wet deposition concentrations. Interestingly, high DOC concentrations were also recorded during "dust-in-snow" events in the spring. Detailed chemical and spectroscopic analyses conducted for samples collected in 2010 revealed that the DOM in many late spring and summer samples was less aromatic and polydisperse and of lower molecular weight than that of winter and fall samples and, therefore, likely to be more bioavailable to microbes in barren alpine soils. Bioavailability experiments with different types of atmospheric C sources are needed to better evaluate the substrate quality of atmospheric C inputs. Our C budget estimates for the Green Lake 4 catchment suggest

  5. Amorphous silicon carbon films prepared by hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor/sputtering deposition system: Effects of r.f. power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Maisarah Abdul, E-mail: nurmaisarahrashid@gmail.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Gani, Siti Meriam Ab. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat [Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul, E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-02-01

    Silicon carbon films were deposited using a hybrid radio frequency (r.f.) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)/sputtering deposition system at different r.f. powers. This deposition system combines the advantages of r.f. PECVD and sputtering techniques for the deposition of silicon carbon films with the added advantage of eliminating the use of highly toxic silane gas in the deposition process. Silicon (Si) atoms were sputtered from a pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) target by argon (Ar) ions and carbon (C) atoms were incorporated into the film from C based growth radicals generated through the discharge of methane (CH{sub 4}) gas. The effects of r.f. powers of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150 W applied during the deposition process on the structural and optical properties of the films were investigated. Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the silicon carbon films contain amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) and amorphous carbon (a-C) phases. The r.f. power showed significant influence on the C incorporation in the film structure. The a-C phases became more ordered in films with high C incorporation in the film structure. These films also produced high photoluminescence emission intensity at around 600 nm wavelength as a result of quantum confinement effects from the presence of sp{sup 2} C clusters embedded in the a-SiC and a-C phases in the films. - Highlights: ► Effects of radio frequency (r.f.) power on silicon carbon (SiC) films were studied. ► Hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition/sputtering technique was used. ► r.f. power influences C incorporation in the film structure. ► High C incorporation results in higher ordering of the amorphous C phase. ► These films produced high photoluminescence emission intensity.

  6. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies of carbonate deposits from the Tolfa Mountains mining district (Latium, central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, U.; Ferrini, V.; O'Neil, J.R.; Batchelder, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope analyses were made of representative samples of calcite and quartz from the carbonate deposits in the Tolfa Mountains mining district. Measurements were also made of hydrogen isotope compositions, filling temperatures and salinities of fluid inclusions in these minerals. There are three stages of mineralization at Tolfa. In stage I, characterized by calc-silicate hornfels, the carbonates have relatively high ?? 18O values of 14.5 to 21.6 suggesting a rather low water/rock ratio. ??13C values of -0.3 to 2.1 indicate that appreciable decarbonation or introduction of deep-seated carbon did not occur. Stage II is marked by phanerocrystalline carbonates; ?? 18O values of 13.1 to 20.0 and ??13C values of 0.7 to 5.0 identify them as hydrothermal veins rather than marbles. ?? D values of -56 to -50 for inclusion fluids suggest a possible magmatic component to the hydrothermal fluid. Filling temperatures of coarse-grained samples of Calcite II are 309?? to 362?? C with a salinity range of 5.3 to 7.1 weight percent NaCl. Calculated ??18O values of 11-12 for these fluids are again indicative of low water/rock ratios. The sparry calcites of stage III have ??18O and ??13C values of 8.1 to 12.9 and -1.7 to 3.2, respectively. ?? D values of inclusion fluids are -40 to -33, clearly heavier than in earlier stages and similar to values of modern local ground waters. A salinity measurement of link with associated carbonates. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Climate change, forest management and nitrogen deposition influence on carbon sequestration in forest ecosystems in Russia: simulation modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Alexander; Kudeyarov, Valery; Shanin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    forest fires, with selective cuttings and with clear cuttings) coupled with two climatic ones (stable climate and the scenario of climate change) were applied. Additionally, simulations were carried out at different levels on nitrogen deposition. The main sources of uncertainties were analyzed using Monte-Carlo procedure. Modelling showed that the most carbon accumulation was observed under natural development scenario. Fires resulted in significant losses in soil organic matter and tree biomass throughout direct and indirect carbon dioxide emissions. Other scenarios showed decrease in carbon pools, the most in scenario with clear cuttings due to timber removal and burning of felling residues. Increased nitrogen deposition from the atmosphere resulted in increased growth rate of trees and, therefore, in increased litter flow. Higher nitrogen content in litter had an additional positive effect on mineralization rate. Climate change also accelerated the decomposition processes in soil and led to the increased carbon dioxide emission. The increased income of plant residues to soil resulted in increased soil organic matter content in mineral soil. Conversely, climate change led to the decrease of organic matter content in organic soil horizons. The net effect of these processes is the increase in total soil organic matter.

  8. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Dispersion Methods Affect Their Aggregation, Deposition, and Biomarker Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    To systematically evaluate how dispersion methods affect the environmental behaviors of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), MWNTs were dispersed in various solutions (e.g., surfactants, natural organic matter (NOM), and etc.) via ultrasonication (SON) and long-term stirring (LT...

  9. Effect of Palagonite Dust Deposition on the Automated Detection of Carbonate Vis/NIR Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Martha S.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Castano, Rebecca; Bornstein, Benjamin; Greenwood, James

    2004-01-01

    Currently Mars missions can collect more data than can be returned. Future rovers of increased mission lifetime will benefit from onboard autonomous data processing systems to guide the selection, measurement and return of scientifically important data. One approach is to train a neural net to recognize spectral reflectance characteristics of minerals of interest. We have developed a carbonate detector using a neural net algorithm trained on 10,000 synthetic Vis/NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra. The detector was able to correctly identify carbonates in the spectra of 30 carbonate and noncarbonate field samples with 100% success. However, Martian dust coatings strongly affect the spectral characteristics of surface rocks potentially masking the underlying substrate rock. In this experiment, we measure Vis/NIR spectra of calcite coated with different thicknesses of palagonite dust and evaluate the performance of the carbonate detector.

  10. Deepwater carbonate deposition in response to re-flooding of carbonate bank and atoll-tops at glacial terminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorry, Stéphan J.; Droxler, André W.; Francis, Jason M.

    2010-08-01

    The late Quaternary has experienced large glacial/interglacial climatic variations and related 10's to 100 meters high-amplitude sea level fluctuations at Milankovich frequencies from 10's to 100 kyr during which carbonate platform tops have been exposed and re-flooded in many occasions. This study focuses on the accumulation of calci-turbidites, the aragonite onset/sharp increase in fine sediments and their timing in deep basins adjacent to carbonate platforms. A particular emphasis is developed on the occurrence of the first gravity flow event and aragonite onset/sharp increase and their linkage to the initial re-flooding of the platform tops during deglaciations. Three basins adjacent to isolated platforms in the Bahamas, the Northern Nicaragua Rise, and the Gulf of Papua, were selected to represent pure carbonate versus mixed systems, in quiescent versus tectonically active settings, and various carbonate bank top morphologies, ranging from atoll to relatively deeply and narrowly flooded flat top banks. In spite of these differences, each record illustrates a clear relationship between the timing of platform top re-flooding and initiation of significant carbonate export by gravity flows and low-density plumes into the surrounding basins. The concept of "re-flooding window" is introduced to characterize the prolific period of time during which bank and atoll-tops are flooded enough to produce large export of bank-derived aragonite and of calci-turbidites in adjacent basins. According to our datasets, the main re-flooding windows have occurred mainly on the last part of the sea level rise at each glacial termination (T), those periods being marked by some of the highest rates of sea level rise. The analysis of a long-piston core from the earthquakes-prone Walton Basin (Northern Nicaragua Rise) demonstrates that sea level, not seismic activities, played a major role as trigger mechanism for the initiation of gravity flows since the last four glacial

  11. Effect of acetic acid on electrochemical deposition of carbon-nitride thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemical deposition method was employed to prepare CNx thin film from methanol-urea solution,and it was shown that adding a little acetic acid in the solution significantly affected the deposition process.After optimizing the experiment conditions,we obtained polycrystalline grains with sizes of about 3―7μm on the faces of single crystal silicon.X-ray diffraction spectrua indicate that the grains are mainly composed of cubic phase mixed with a small amount of β and α phases.

  12. Growth of carbon nanofibers in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, Igor; Ostrikov, Kostya; Tam, Eugene

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model describing the plasma-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers with metal catalyst particles on top is proposed. Using the model, the plasma-related effects on the nanofiber growth parameters such us the surface diffusion growth rate, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, the characteristic residence time and diffusion length of carbon on the catalyst surface, and the surface coverages, have been studied. It has been found how these parameters depend on the catalyst surface temperature and ion and etching gas fluxes to the catalyst surface. The optimum conditions under which a low-temperature plasma environment can benefit the carbon nanofiber growth are formulated. It has been also found how the plasma environment affects the temperature distribution over the length of the carbon nanofibers. Conditions when the temperature of the catalyst nanoparticles is higher than the temperature of the substrate holder are determined. The results here are in a good agreement with the available experimental data on the carbon nanofiber growth and can be used for optimizing synthesis of nanoassemblies in low-temperature plasma-assisted nanofabrication.

  13. Intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell employing reformed effective biogas: Power generation and inhibition of carbon deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Michihiro; Iwami, Makoto; Goto, Kenta; Iwamoto, Kazuhito; Morimoto, Koki; Shiraishi, Makoto; Takatori, Kenji; Takeuchi, Mizue; Nishimoto, Shunsuke; Kameshima, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-01

    A power generation system consisting of an intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) and an external reformer for biogas is developed, and its performance is investigated for advanced use of effective biogas. The IT-SOFC is fueled with syngas produced via biogas reforming, and is successfully operated at 600 and 700 °C using Ni0.8Cu0.2 alloy/gadolinia-doped ceria electrolyte (Ni0.8Cu0.2/GDC) cermet anodes and a LaAlO3 supported-Ni (Ni/LaAlO3) catalyst. The Ni/LaAlO3 catalyst stably exhibits high reforming performance for effective biogas at 800 °C for 27 h, and carbon deposition on the catalyst is prevented. The electrochemical performance of the Ni0.8Cu0.2/GDC cermet anode using syngas fuel possessing a H2:CO ratio of approximately 3:1 is comparable to the performance achieved with H2 fuel; the anode remains stable after 24 h of operation at 700 °C without interruption and is unaffected by carbon deposition.

  14. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N•ha‑1•yr‑1. IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations.

  15. Debris reduction for copper and diamond-like carbon thin films produced by magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, Y Y; Vick, D; Fedosejevs, R

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of debris reduction using magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition (MGPLD) is reported here. KrF laser pulses (248 nm) of 100 mJ energy were focused to intensities of 6x10 sup 9 W/cm sup 2 onto the surface of a copper or a carbon source target and a magnetic field of 0.3 T as used to steer the plasma around a curved arc of 0.5 m length to the deposition substrate. Debris counts were compared for films produced by the MGPLD and conventional PLD (nonguided) techniques. A significant reduction in particulates of size greater than 0.1 mu m was achieved using MGPLD. For the copper films, particulate count was reduced from 150 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 50 particulates/cm sup 2 /nm and for diamond-like carbon thin films particulate count was reduced from 25 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 1200 particles/cm sup 2 /nm.

  16. Facies analysis and paleoenvironmental interpretation of Piacenzian carbonate deposits from the Guitar Formation of Car Nicobar Island, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K. Ghosh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Facies characterization of Piacenzian (late Pliocene carbonate sediments of the Guitar Formation in Car Nicobar Island, India and the subsequent integration of paleoecological data have been applied to interpret the paleoenvironment of the coralline algal-reef deposits. Thin-section analysis reveals that Amphiroa, Corallina and Jania are the dominant geniculate corallines, while Lithothamnion, Mesophyllum, Phymatolithon, Lithophyllum, Spongites and Lithoporella are the major non-geniculate corallines contributing to the sedimentary facies. Numerous small and larger benthic foraminifera also dominate the biogenic assemblages. Corals, barnacle shells, echinoid spines, fragments of bryozoans, mollusks and ostracodes are the subordinate constituents. Grainstones dominate the studied facies while packstones and boundstones (with wackestone elements are the sub-lithofacies showing a fair representation. Six carbonate facies presenting a complete reef complex have been distinguished that were deposited in shallow intertidal, back-reef shelf/lagoon, reef and deeper fore-reef shelf settings. Evidences of coralline algal and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, taphonomic signatures of abrasion and fragmentation, grain size, angularity and encrustation indicate a shallow to relatively deeper bathymetric horizon of approximately 10–60 m that corresponds to a regime of high to moderate hydrodynamic conditions.

  17. Nickel-based anode with water storage capability to mitigate carbon deposition for direct ethanol solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Su, Chao; Ran, Ran; Zhao, Bote; Shao, Zongping; Tade, Moses O; Liu, Shaomin

    2014-06-01

    The potential to use ethanol as a fuel places solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) as a sustainable technology for clean energy delivery because of the renewable features of ethanol versus hydrogen. In this work, we developed a new class of anode catalyst exemplified by Ni+BaZr0.4Ce0.4Y0.2O3 (Ni+BZCY) with a water storage capability to overcome the persistent problem of carbon deposition. Ni+BZCY performed very well in catalytic efficiency, water storage capability and coking resistance tests. A stable and high power output was well maintained with a peak power density of 750 mW cm(-2) at 750 °C. The SOFC with the new robust anode performed for seven days without any sign of performance decay, whereas SOFCs with conventional anodes failed in less than 2 h because of significant carbon deposition. Our findings indicate the potential applications of these water storage cermets as catalysts in hydrocarbon reforming and as anodes for SOFCs that operate directly on hydrocarbons.

  18. Controllable preparation of a nano-hydroxyapatite coating on carbon fibers by electrochemical deposition and chemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Zhao, Xueni; Wang, Wanying; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Li; He, Fuzhen; Yang, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    A nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) coating with appropriate thickness and morphology similar to that of human bone tissue was directly prepared onto the surfaces of carbon fibers (CFs). A mixed solution of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, and hydrogen peroxide (NHSH) was used in the preparation process. The coating was fabricated by combining NHSH treatment and electrochemical deposition (ECD). NHSH treatment is easy to operate, produces rapid reaction, and highly effective. This method was first used to induce the nucleation and growth of HA crystals on the CF surfaces. Numerous O-containing functional groups, such as hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups, were grafted onto the CF surfaces by NHSH treatment (NHSH-CFs); as such, the amounts of these groups on the functionalized CFs increased by nearly 8- and 12-fold, respectively, compared with those on untreated CFs. After treatment, the NHSH-CFs not only acquired larger specific surface areas but retained surfaces free from serious corrosion or breakage. Hence, NHSH-CFs are ideal depositional substrates of HA coating during ECD. ECD was successfully used to prepare a nano-rod-like HA coating on the NHSH-CF surfaces. The elemental composition, structure, and morphology of the HA coating were effectively controlled by adjusting various technological parameters, such as the current density, deposition time, and temperature. The average central diameter of HA crystals and the coating density increased with increasing deposition time. The average central diameter of most HA crystals on the NHSH-CFs varied from approximately 60 nm to 210 nm as the deposition time increased from 60 min to 180 min. Further studies on a possible deposition mechanism revealed that numerous O-containing functional groups on the NHSH-CF surfaces could associate with electrolyte ions (Ca(2+)) to form special chemical bonds. These bonds can induce HA coating deposition and improve the interfacial bonding strength between the HA

  19. Cenomanian-Turonian Bentonites of the Boquillas Formation, Texas, USA: keys to understanding Carbonate Shelf deposition in a Greenhouse Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Steve; Eldrett, James; Ma, Chao; Minisini, Daniel; Macaulay, Calum; Ozkan, Aysen; Kelly, Amy

    2016-04-01

    The Boquillas Formation (Fm.) (equivalent to the Eagle Ford Group) was deposited at the Southern end of the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway (KWIS) and the northwestern margin of the Gulf of Mexico Carbonate Shelf (passive margin) in a starved retroarc foreland basin setting during part of the Cenomanian and Turonian Stages (CT; 97-90 Ma). The Boquillas Fm. includes several Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE) marked by global Carbon Isotope Excursions (CIE) and trace metal anomalies. Here we provide a robust zircon U/Pb geochronologic framework used to accurately interpret and predict variability in facies distribution. The Boquillas Fm. consists of a succession of cyclic marlstone and limestone beds and over 300 bentonites deposited in a distal, restricted, suboxic setting mostly below storm wave base. Bentonites are generally homogenous clay-rich layers 1-10 cm thick (average 5 cm, up to 1 m) showing sharp contacts and strong yellow-orange mineral fluorescence under UV light. In addition to detailed logging of roadcuts, two research wells drilled behind outcrops, Shell IONA-1 and Shell INNES-1, recovered >330 m of continuous core from the Austin Chalk at surface through the Boquillas and Buda Limestone Fm. The bentonites form ~5% of the 60-111 m thick Boquillas Fm. intervals and are interpreted as distal pyroclastic fall deposits from large volume (>10-100 km3) Plinian eruptions from calderas associated with the subduction-related Western North American Cordilleran magmatic arc. Some of the Boquillas Fm. bentonites can be correlated using cores, petrophysical logs, geochemistry, and biostratigraphy for more than 1000 km to the north within the Western Interior Seaway at the CT global stratotype (GSSP) section at Pueblo, CO as well as many other sections in the KWIS. This contribution integrates new high-precision zircon U/Pb TIMs age data (2σ as low as 0.05 Myr) from both core and outcrop samples with independent proxies derived from sedimentology, biostratigraphy

  20. Structurally colored carbon fibers with controlled optical properties prepared by a fast and continuous electrophoretic deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhifu; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang

    2013-08-07

    Structurally colored fiber was fabricated by an electrophoretic deposition method under a circinate electric field. These fibers exhibit structural color, based on the external field-assembly of charged PMMA microspheres on the surface of the electroconductive carbon fiber, with reflectance spectra stretch-tunable in the 430-608 nm, which are determined by the lattice constants of the photonic crystals. Also, the influence of applied voltage, deposition time and electroconductivity on the number of deposited layers and efficiency were studied. In addition, we further developed a horizontal and continuous process to fabricate a long range structurally colored fiber. And the method is a drastic acceleration in comparison with the gravity sedimentation technique that needs weeks or even months, and it would be fast and facile for the further study of structural color on the surface of the fiber. The process may be used to simulate the conventional fiber coloration process. Such elastically tuned structurally colored fibers are of interest for many applications.

  1. Carbon films embedded by nickel nanoparticles: The effect of deposition time on Berthelot-type hopping conduction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalouji, Vali; Asareh, Nastaran; Hashemizadeh, Seyed Ali; Solaymani, Shahram

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the electrical conductivity of carbon films embedded by nickel nanoparticles at different deposition times 50, 90, 180 and 600 s over a temperature range from 50 to 500 K was studied. The conductivity data in the temperature range T > 300 K shows the extended state conduction mechanism. The tunneling through a thermally vibrating barrier in the temperature range 50-150 K is described by the Berthelot-type conduction mechanism. It can be seen that the films deposited at 180 s have maximum conductivity and the Berthelot temperature is about 53.5 K. Due to the vibrations of Ni ions in the tetrahedral, sites the extents of the carrier wave function are lower than in the octahedral complexes sites which have maximum values of about 2.16 × 10^{-7} cm and 1.85 × 10^{-7} cm in the octahedral-metal stretching vibrations and intrinsic stretching vibrations of the metal ions at the tetrahedral site, respectively. On the other hand, the average distance between the sites in both vibrations at 180 s deposition modes have minimum values of 2.02 × 10^{-7} cm and 1.72 × 10^{-7} cm.

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanotube-nickel nanocomposites using atomic layer deposition for high-performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taejin; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hangil; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Eunkyoung; Park, Jusang; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-15

    A useful strategy has been developed to fabricate carbon-nanotube-nickel (CNT-Ni) nanocomposites through atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Ni and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of functionalized CNTs. Various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were used to characterize the morphology and the structure of as-prepared samples. It was confirmed that the products possess uniform Ni nanoparticles that are constructed by finely controlled deposition of Ni onto oxygen or bromine functionalized CNT surface. Electrochemical studies indicate that the CNT-Ni nanocomposites exhibit high electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation in alkaline solutions, which enables the products to be used in enzyme-free electrochemical sensors for glucose determination. It was demonstrated that the CNT-Ni nanocomposite-based glucose biosensor offers a variety of merits, such as a wide linear response window for glucose concentrations of 5 μM-2 mM, short response time (3 s), a low detection limit (2 μM), high sensitivity (1384.1 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), and good selectivity and repeatability.

  3. Personal black carbon exposure influences ambulatory blood pressure: air pollution and cardiometabolic disease (AIRCMD-China) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Sun, Zhichao; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Yang, Fumo; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Brook, Jeffrey R; Sun, Qinghua; Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Fan, Zhongjie

    2014-04-01

    Few prospective studies have assessed the blood pressure effect of extremely high air pollution encountered in Asia's megacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between combustion-related air pollution with ambulatory blood pressure and autonomic function. During February to July 2012, personal black carbon was determined for 5 consecutive days using microaethalometers in patients with metabolic syndrome in Beijing, China. Simultaneous ambient fine particulate matter concentration was obtained from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center and the US Embassy. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate variability were measured from day 4. Arterial stiffness and endothelial function were obtained at the end of day 5. For statistical analysis, we used generalized additive mixed models for repeated outcomes and generalized linear models for single/summary outcomes. Mean (SD) of personal black carbon and fine particulate matter during 24 hours was 4.66 (2.89) and 64.2 (36.9) μg/m(3). Exposure to high levels of black carbon in the preceding hours was associated significantly with adverse cardiovascular responses. A unit increase in personal black carbon during the previous 10 hours was associated with an increase in systolic blood pressure of 0.53 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of 0.37 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.89 and 0.10-0.65 mm Hg, respectively), a percentage change in low frequency to high frequency ratio of 5.11 and mean interbeat interval of -0.06 (95% confidence interval, 0.62-9.60 and -0.11 to -0.01, respectively). These findings highlight the public health effect of air pollution and the importance of reducing air pollution.

  4. Crossing the blood-brain-barrier with transferrin conjugated carbon dots: A zebrafish model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanghao; Peng, Zhili; Dallman, Julia; Baker, James; Othman, Abdelhameed M; Blackwelder, Patrica L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-09-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) in biological systems remains a major medical challenge due to the tight junctions between endothelial cells known as the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Here we use a zebrafish model to explore the possibility of using transferrin-conjugated carbon dots (C-Dots) to ferry compounds across the BBB. C-Dots have previously been reported to inhibit protein fibrillation, and they are also used to deliver drugs for disease treatment. In terms of the potential medical application of C-Dots for the treatment of CNS diseases, one of the most formidable challenges is how to deliver them inside the CNS. To achieve this in this study, human transferrin was covalently conjugated to C-Dots. The conjugates were then injected into the vasculature of zebrafish to examine the possibility of crossing the BBB in vivo via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. The experimental observations suggest that the transferrin-C-Dots can enter the CNS while C-Dots alone cannot.

  5. Carbon losses from pyrolysed and original wood in a forest soil under natural and increased N deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Maestrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM plays an important role as a stable carbon (C sink in the terrestrial ecosystems. However, uncertainties remain about in situ turnover rates of PyOM in soil, the main processes leading to PyOM C and nitrogen (N losses from the soil, and the role of N availability in PyOM cycling in soils. We measured PyOM and native soil organic carbon losses from the soil as carbon dioxide and dissolved organic carbon (DOC using additions of highly 13C-labelled PyOM (2.03 atom % and its precursor pinewood during one year in a temperate forest soil. The field experiment was carried out under ambient and increased mineral N deposition (+60 kg N ha−1 yr−1. The results showed that after one year: (1 0.5% of PyOM-C and 22% of wood-C were mineralized as CO2, leading to an estimate of minimum turnover time of 191 and 4 yr respectively, (2 the quantity of PyOM and wood lost as dissolved organic carbon was negligible (0.0004 ± 0.0003% and 0.022 ± 0.007 respectively; and (3 N additions decreased cumulative PyOM mineralization by 43%, but did not affect cumulative wood mineralization and did not affect the loss of DOC from PyOM or wood. We conclude that mineralization to CO2 was the main process leading to PyOM losses during the first year of decomposition in a forest soil, and that N addition can decrease PyOM C cycling while leaving unaltered wood C cycling.

  6. Bright carbonate deposits as evidence of aqueous alteration on (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, M. C.; Raponi, A.; Ammannito, E.; Ciarniello, M.; Toplis, M. J.; McSween, H. Y.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Marchi, S.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Fonte, S.; Formisano, M.; Frigeri, A.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; McFadden, L. A.; Pieters, C. M.; Jaumann, R.; Schenk, P.; Mugnuolo, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-08-01

    The typically dark surface of the dwarf planet Ceres is punctuated by areas of much higher albedo, most prominently in the Occator crater. These small bright areas have been tentatively interpreted as containing a large amount of hydrated magnesium sulfate, in contrast to the average surface, which is a mixture of low-albedo materials and magnesium phyllosilicates, ammoniated phyllosilicates and carbonates. Here we report high spatial and spectral resolution near-infrared observations of the bright areas in the Occator crater on Ceres. Spectra of these bright areas are consistent with a large amount of sodium carbonate, constituting the most concentrated known extraterrestrial occurrence of carbonate on kilometre-wide scales in the Solar System. The carbonates are mixed with a dark component and small amounts of phyllosilicates, as well as ammonium carbonate or ammonium chloride. Some of these compounds have also been detected in the plume of Saturn’s sixth-largest moon Enceladus. The compounds are endogenous and we propose that they are the solid residue of crystallization of brines and entrained altered solids that reached the surface from below. The heat source may have been transient (triggered by impact heating). Alternatively, internal temperatures may be above the eutectic temperature of subsurface brines, in which case fluids may exist at depth on Ceres today.

  7. In-Operando Raman Characterization of Carbon Deposition on SOFC Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Maher, R. C.

    2013-10-06

    Carbon formation within nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes exposed to carbonaceous fuels typically leads to reduced operational lifetimes and performance, and can eventually lead to catastrophic failure through cracking and delamination. In-situ Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a powerful characterization tool for the investigation of the dynamics of physical processes occurring within operational SOFCs in real time. Here we investigate the dynamics of carbon formation on a variety of nickel-based SOFC anodes as a function of temperature, fuel and electrical loading using Raman spectroscopy. We show that the rate of carbon formation throughout the SOFC anode can be significantly reduced through a careful consideration of the SOFC anode material, design and operational conditions. © The Electrochemical Society.

  8. Redox Deposition of Nanoscale Metal Oxides on Carbon for Next-Generation Electrochemical Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    for 2 V manganese oxide/ activated carbon hybrid capacitor. Electrochem. Solid State Lett. 2002, 5, A227–A230. 62 Khomenko, V.; Raymundo-Pi~ nero , E.; B...Acta 2006, 51, 6510–6520. 65 Khomenko, V.; Raymundo-Pi~ nero , E.; Frackowiak, E.; Beguin, F. High-voltage asymmetric supercapacitors operating in...Pi~ nero , E.; Beguin, F. Adjustment of electrodes potential window in an asymmetric carbon/MnO2 supercapacitor. J. Power Sources 2011, 196, 580–586.

  9. Polymer-Assisted Direct Deposition of Uniform Carbon Nanotube Bundle Networks for High Performance Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Hellstrom, Sondra L.

    2009-06-23

    Flexible transparent electrodes are crucial for touch screen, flat panel display, and solar cell technologies. While carbon nanotube network electrodes show promise, characteristically poor dispersion properties have limited their practicality. We report that addition of small amounts of conjugated polymer to nanotube dispersions enables straightforward fabrication of uniform network electrodes by spin-coating and simultaneous tuning of parameters such as bundle size and density. After treatment in thionyl chloride, electrodes have sheet resistances competitive with other reported carbon nanotube based transparent electrodes to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  10. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Methane to Carbon Nanotubes: Copper Promoted Effect of Ni/MgO Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts were prepared by sol-gel method and used as the catalysts for synthesis of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The effect of Cu on the carbon yield and structure was investigated, and the effects of calcination temperature and reaction temperature were also investigated. The catalysts and synthesized carbon materials were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results showed that the addition of Cu promoted the reduction of nickel species, subsequently improving the growth and yield of CNTs. Meanwhile, CNTs were synthesized by the Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts with various calcination temperatures and reaction temperatures, and results suggested that the obtained CNTs on Ni-Cu/MgO catalyst with the calcination temperature of 500°C and the reaction temperature of 650°C were of the greatest yield and quantity of 927%.

  11. Purification of carbon nanotubes from cathode deposit by means of different oxidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikazaki, Fumikazu; Uchida, Kunio; Ohshima, Satoshi; Kuriki, Yasunori [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Two purification methods of nanotubes from a cathode deposit by an arc plasma were conducted by means of different oxidation rates of various graphites. One was chemical and the other physical method. Both could purify nanotubes at their optimum conditions. In the former, the catalytic oxidation was used of graphitic materials by copper. Copper supported graphite was prepared by the intercalation of copper chloride and by the reduction to metal copper. The catalytic oxidation decomposed the graphite at 773 K. The temperature was 200 K lower than the oxidation temperature of graphite, which enabled purification. In the latter, dispersion, comminution and filtration of a cathode deposit in ethanol were used to separate coarse graphite. The rate of weight loss by oxidation increased with the decrease of size of the graphite. Nanotubes were more slowly oxidized from the edges than the graphite of the same size. This could purify nanotubes.

  12. Purification of carbon nanotubes from cathode deposit by means of different oxidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikazaki, F.; Uchida, K.; Ohshima, S. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Two purification methods of nanotubes from a cathode deposit by an arc plasma were conducted by means of different oxidation rates of various graphites. One was chemical and the other physical method. Both could purify nanotubes at their optimum conditions. In the former, the catalytic oxidation was used of graphite materials by copper. Copper supported graphite was prepared by the intercalation of copper chloride and by the reduction to metal copper. The catalytic oxidation decomposed the graphite at 773 K and less. The temperature was significantly lower than the oxidation temperature former reported of graphite, which enabled purification. In the latter, dispersion, comminution and filtration of a cathode deposit in ethanol were used to separate coarse graphite. The rate of weight loss by oxidation increased with the decrease of size of the graphite. Nanotubes were more slowly oxidized from the edges than the graphite of the same size. This could purify nanotubes.

  13. Electro-Deposition Pt Catalysts Supported on Carbon-Nanotubes for Methanol Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hailin Song; Peixia Yang; Xiaoyu Wen; Maozhong An; Jinqiu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the properties of supporting Pt catalysts for methanol oxidation, carbon⁃nanotubes are used by electrochemical deposition method. Different deposition turns, different cyclic voltammetry scanning speeds and processing time with ascorbic acid are investigated in this paper. The micrographs of Pt/CNTs catalysts are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, the electro⁃catalytic properties of Pt/CNTs catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by cycle voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The results show that the size of platinum will be greater with the faster scanning speed. After dissolution in ascorbic acid, Pt nano⁃particles disperse uniformly. The obtained Pt/CNTs catalysts show a high electro⁃catalytic activity and stability.

  14. Investigation on single walled carbon nanotube thin films deposited by Langmuir Blodgett method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishalli,, E-mail: vishalli-2008@yahoo.com; Dharamvir, Keya [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K. [Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala (India)

    2015-05-15

    Langmuir Blodgett is a technique to deposit a homogeneous film with a fine control over thickness and molecular organization. Thin films of functionalized SWCNTs have been prepared by Langmuir Blodgett method. The good surface spreading properties of SWCNTs at air/water interface are indicated by surface pressure-area isotherm and the monolayer formed on water surface is transferred onto the quartz substrate by vertical dipping. A multilayer film is thus obtained in a layer by layer manner. The film is characterized by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and FTIR.AFM shows the surface morphology of the deposited film. UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy shows the characteristic peaks of semiconducting SWCNTs. The uniformity of LB film can be used further in understanding the optical and electrical behavior of these materials.

  15. Carbon isotope curve and iridium anomaly in the Albian-Cenomanian paleoceanic deposits of the Eastern Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, D. P.; Savelyeva, O. L.; Palechek, T. N.; Pokrovsky, B. G.

    2012-04-01

    We studied Albian-Cenomanian paleoceanic carbonate-siliceous deposits of the Kamchatsky Mys Peninsula (Eastern Kamchatka, Russia). They are deposited in association with pillow-basalts and hyaloclastites. The thickness of the studied section is about 10 m. The deposits are represented mainly by rhythmical intercalation of red-brown radiolarian jaspers, pink nannoplankton limestones as well as siliceous limestones. In the middle and upper parts of the section there are two beds enriched by organic carbon. The largest organic matter contents in this beds amount to 68%. The calculated values of the hydrogen and oxygen indexes indicate that the carbonaceous beds consist of marine organic matter. The accumulation of the carbonaceous beds reflects oxygen depletion in intermediate oceanic waters (ocean anoxic events, OAE). The structure of the studied section emphasizes its similarity to the contemporary deposits recovered by ODP and DSDP sites on Hess and Shatsky Rises. Two orders of rhythmicity were observed in the section. The rhythmicity of the first order (average thickness of a rhythm is 5-7 cm) is an alternation of reddish brown radiolarian jaspers and pink nannofossil limestones. The rhythmicity of the second order is characterized by an increase in thickness of the jasper or limy layer in every 4th-5th rhythm of the first order and marked by an elevation of the silica content in calcareous layers. The rhythmicity formation can be attributed to fluctuation of astronomical parameters (Milankovitch cycles) with periods of 21 and 100 kyr. The character of atmospheric circulation and ocean currents served as transmission link. The section was sampled layerwise and more than 100 samples were taken. The radiolarians were extracted from the samples of jaspers and siliceous limestones lying between carbonaceous beds. The educed radiolarian complexes allowed us to define the age of the deposits as Cenomanian. For more detailed dating of members of the section we have

  16. Mechanism of carbon deposit/removal in methane dry reforming on supported metal catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagaoka, K.; Seshan, K.; Lercher, J.A.; Aika, A.; Iglesia, E.; Spivey, J.J.; Fleisc, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    The greater resistance to coke deposition for Pt/ZrO2 compared to Pt/Al2O3 in the CH4/CO2 reaction has been attributed to the higher reactivity of coke with CO2 on Pt/ZrO2 [1]. Hence, in this communication, the reaction of coke derived from methane (CHx: which is an intermediated in the reforming re

  17. LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

  18. Fabrication of Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts by Deposition of Iron Nanocrystals on Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casavola, Marianna; Hermannsdoerfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels; Dugulan, A. Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of supported catalysts consisting of colloidal iron oxide nanocrystals with tunable size, geometry, and loadinghomogeneously dispersed on carbon nanotube (CNT) supportsis described herein. The catalyst synthesis is performed in a two-step approach. First, colloidal iron and iron oxid

  19. Influence of thin film nickel pretreatment on catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiggelaar, R.M.; Thakur, D.B.; Nair, H.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel and other metal nanoparticles are known to be active as catalysts in the synthesis of carbon nanofibers. In this paper we investigate how dewetting and break-up of nickel thin films depends on film thickness, film–substrate interaction and pretreatment conditions. This is evaluated for films

  20. A critical evaluation of depositional parameters controlling the variability of organic carbon in Arabian Sea sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.; PrakashBabu, C.; Mascarenhas, A.

    as compared to that of the slope of the Arabian Peninsula and no organic enrichment is found on other continental slopes of the Arabian Sea although an equally intense oxygen minima impinge on the floor of the slope. Such a variability of organic carbon...

  1. Short and long-term impacts of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Du, E.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon to nitrogen response of forest ecosystems depends on the possible occurrence of nitrogen limitation versus possible co-limitations by other drivers, such as low temperature or availability of phosphorus. A combination of nitrogen retention estimates and stoichiometric scaling is used to i

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Technique Overview and Application to Carbon Deposition Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Maher, R. C.

    2013-07-30

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful characterization tool for improving the understanding of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), capable of providing direct, molecularly specific information regarding the physical and chemical processes occurring within functional SOFCs in real time. In this paper we give a summary of the technique itself and highlight ex situ and in situ studies that are particularly relevant for SOFCs. This is followed by a case study of carbon formation on SOFC Ni-based anodes exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) using both ex situ and in situ Raman spectroscopy combined with computational simulations. In situ measurements clearly show that carbon formation is significantly reduced for polarized SOFCs compared to those held at open circuit potential (OCP). Ex situ Raman mapping of the surfaces showed clear variations in the rate of carbon formation across the surface of polarized anodes. Computational simulations describing the geometry of the cell showed that this is due to variations in gas access. These results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy in combination with traditional characterization tools, to provide detailed understanding of critical processes occurring within functional SOFCs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Void space structure in carbonate deposits of the Voronezh Horizon in the Pripyat trough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazenkina, G.A.; Demidovich, L.A.

    1977-05-01

    Change characteristics in void space were identified by studying the void space of carbonate rock-collectors on model-counterparts and by petrographic studies. The rock in the anticline sections of local structures have the most complex structure. Mixed types of collectors predominate here. 1 table, 2 figures, 2 references.

  4. Protective Sliding Carbon-Based Nanolayers Prepared by Argon or Nitrogen Ion-Beam Assisted Deposition on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vlcak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and the surface properties of samples coated by carbon-based nanolayer were investigated in an effort to increase the surface hardness and reduce the coefficient of friction of the Ti6Al4V alloy. Protective carbon-based nanolayers were fabricated by argon or nitrogen ion-beam assisted deposition at ion energy of 700 eV on Ti6Al4V substrates. The Raman spectra indicated that nanolayers had a diamond-like carbon character with sp2 rich bonds. The TiC and TiN compounds formed in the surface area were detected by X-ray diffraction. Nanoscratch tests showed increased adhesion of a carbon-based nanolayer deposited with ion assistance in comparison with a carbon nanolayer deposited without ion assistance. The results showed that argon ion assistance leads to greater nanohardness than a sample coated by a carbon-based nanolayer with nitrogen ion assistance. A more than twofold increase in nanohardness and a more than fivefold decrease in the coefficient of friction were obtained for samples coated by a carbon-based nanolayer with ion assistance, in comparison with the reference sample.

  5. Ultrasensitive electroanalysis of low-level free microRNAs in blood by maximum signal amplification of catalytic silver deposition using alkaline phosphatase-incorporated gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yanmei; Sun, Zongzhao; Zhang, Ning; Qi, Wei; Li, Shuying; Chen, Lijun; Wang, Hua

    2014-10-21

    An ultrasensitive sandwich-type analysis method has been initially developed for probing low-level free microRNAs (miRNAs) in blood by a maximal signal amplification protocol of catalytic silver deposition. Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) were first synthesized and in-site incorporated into alkaline phosphatase (ALP) to form the ALP-AuNCs. Unexpectedly, the so incorporated AuNCs could dramatically enhance the catalysis activities of ALP-AuNCs versus native ALP. A sandwiched hybridization protocol was then proposed using ALP-AuNCs as the catalytic labels of the DNA detection probes for targeting miRNAs that were magnetically caught from blood samples by DNA capture probes, followed by the catalytic ligation of two DNA probes complementary to the targets. Herein, the ALP-AuNC labels could act as the bicatalysts separately in the ALP-catalyzed substrate dephosphorylation reaction and the AuNCs-accelerated silver deposition reaction. The signal amplification of ALP-AuNCs-catalyzed silver deposition was thereby maximized to be measured by the electrochemical outputs. The developed electroanalysis strategy could allow for the ultrasensitive detection of free miRNAs in blood with the detection limit as low as 21.5 aM, including the accurate identification of single-base mutant levels in miRNAs. Such a sandwich-type analysis method may circumvent the bottlenecks of the current detection techniques in probing short-chain miRNAs. It would be tailored as an ultrasensitive detection candidate for low-level free miRNAs in blood toward the diagnosis of cancer and the warning or monitoring of cancer metastasis in the clinical laboratory.

  6. Cerebral blood flow and carbon dioxide reactivity in children with bacterial meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwal, S.; Stringer, W.; Tomasi, L.; Schneider, S.; Thompson, J.; Perkin, R. (Loma Linda Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    We examined total and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) by stable xenon computed tomography in 20 seriously ill children with acute bacterial meningitis to determine whether CBF was reduced and to examine the changes in CBF during hyperventilation. In 13 children, total CBF was normal (62 +/- 20 ml/min/100 gm) but marked local variability of flow was seen. In five other children, total CBF was significantly reduced (26 +/- 10 ml/min/100 gm; p less than 0.05), with flow reduced more in white matter (8 +/- 5 ml/min/100 gm) than in gray matter (30 +/- 15 ml/min/100 gm). Autoregulation of CBF appeared to be present in these 18 children within a range of mean arterial blood pressure from 56 to 102 mm Hg. In the remaining two infants, brain dead within the first 24 hours, total flow was uniformly absent, averaging 3 +/- 3 ml/min/100 gm. In seven children, CBF was determined at two carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) levels: 40 (+/- 3) mm Hg and 29 (+/- 3) mm Hg. In six children, total CBF decreased 33%, from 52 (+/- 25) to 35 (+/- 15) ml/min/100 gm; the mean percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was 3.0%. Regional variability of perfusion to changes in PCO2 was marked in all six children. The percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was similar in frontal gray matter (3.1%) but higher in white matter (4.5%). In the seventh patient a paradoxical response was observed; total and regional CBF increased 25% after hyperventilation. Our findings demonstrate that (1) CBF in children with bacterial meningitis may be substantially decreased globally, with even more variability noted regionally, (2) autoregulation of CBF is preserved, (3) CBF/CO2 responsitivity varies among patients and in different regions of the brain in the same patient, and (4) hyperventilation can reduce CBF below ischemic thresholds.

  7. A high-resolution palaeoenvironmental record from carbonate deposits in the Roman aqueduct of Patara, SW Turkey, from the time of Nero

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelis Passchier; Gül Sürmelihindi; Christoph Spötl

    2016-01-01

    An inscription on the supporting wall of the inverted siphon of the aqueduct of the ancient Roman city of Patara, SW Turkey, explains how the wall collapsed during an earthquake and was subsequently restored. Carbonate deposits formed inside the aqueduct channel show cyclic stable isotope changes representing 17 years of deposition. This sequence, together with the text of the inscription, allows dating the earthquake to 68 AD and the original inauguration of the aqueduct to the winter of 51/...

  8. PENGARUH KATALIS Co DAN Fe TERHADAP KARAKTERISTIK CARBON NANOTUBES DARI GAS ASETILENA DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN PROSES CATALYTIC CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION (CCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available EFFECT OF Co AND Fe ON CARBON NANOTUBES CHARACTERISTICS FROM ACETYLENE USING CATALYTIC CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION (CCVD PROCESS. Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs is one of the most well known nano-technology applications which the most of attracting the attention of researchers, because it has more advantages than other materials. The application of the CNT has extended into various aspects, such as electronics, materials, biology and chemistry. This research uses a system of Catalytic Chemical Vapour Deposition (CCVD, which aims to determine the influence of Co and Fe as a catalyst and zeolite 4A as a support catalyst with acetylene gas (C2H2 as carbon source in the synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs. In this experiment, used the ratio of acetylene gas and flow rate of N2 gas is 1:1 by weight of the catalyst Co/Zeolite and Fe/Zeolite amounted to 0.5 grams at the operating temperature of 700oC for 20 minutes. N2 gas serves to minimize the occurrence of oxidation reaction (explosion when operating. From analysis result by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM shows the CNTs formed a type of MWNT with different of diameter size and product weight, depending on the size of the active component concentration on the catalyst. The larger of active components produced CNTs with larger diameter, whereas product weight syntheses result smaller. Use of the catalyst Fe/Zeolite produce CNTs with a diameter larger than the catalyst Co/Zeolite.  Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs merupakan salah satu aplikasi nanoteknologi yang paling terkenal dan banyak menarik perhatian para peneliti, karena memiliki beberapa kelebihan daripada material lainnya. Aplikasi dari CNT telah merambah ke berbagai aspek, seperti bidang elektronika, material, biologi dan kimia. Penelitian ini menggunakan sistem Catalytic Chemical Vapour Deposition (CCVD yang bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh variasi Cobalt (Co dan Ferrum (Fe sebagai katalis dan zeolit tipe 4A sebagai penyangga katalis dengan gas

  9. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on whole blood cyanide concentrations in carbon monoxide intoxicated patients from fire accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hilsted, Linda;

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) may be important components of smoke from fire accidents. Accordingly, patients admitted to hospital from fire accidents may have been exposed to both HCN and CO. Cyanide (CN) intoxication results in cytotoxic hypoxia leading to organ dysfunction...... and animal experiments have shown that in rats exposed to CN intoxication, HBO can increase the concentration of CN in whole blood....

  10. Update and critical appraisal of combined timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the effect on ocular blood flow in glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Adam M; Harris, Alon; Siesky, Brent; Rusia, Deepam; Williamson, Kathleen M; Shoshani, Yochai

    2010-04-26

    Topical hypotensive therapy with both timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors has been shown to be efficacious at reducing intraocular pressure. Many prospective studies have also suggested that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors augment ocular blood flow and vascular regulation independent of their hypotensive effects. Although consistent in their findings, these studies must be cautiously interpreted due to the limitations of study design and specific blood flow imaging modalities. The purpose of this review is to appraise and critically evaluate the current body of literature investigating the effects of combined treatment with topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and timolol in patients with glaucoma with respect to ocular blood flow, visual function, and optic nerve head structure.

  11. Insights into mechanisms governing forest carbon response to nitrogen deposition: a model–data comparison using observed responses to nitrogen addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Q. Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In many forest ecosystems, nitrogen (N deposition enhances plant uptake of carbon dioxide, thus reducing climate warming from fossil fuel emissions. Therefore, accurately modeling how forest carbon (C sequestration responds to N deposition is critical for understanding how future changes in N availability will influence climate. Here, we use observations of forest C response to N inputs along N deposition gradients and at five temperate forest sites with fertilization experiments to test and improve a global biogeochemical model (CLM-CN 4.0. We show that the CLM-CN plant C growth response to N deposition was smaller than observed and the modeled response to N fertilization was larger than observed. A set of modifications to the CLM-CN improved the correspondence between model predictions and observational data (1 by increasing the aboveground C storage in response to historical N deposition (1850–2004 from 14 to 34 kg C per additional kg N added through deposition and (2 by decreasing the aboveground net primary productivity response to N fertilization experiments from 91 to 57 g C m−2 yr−1. Modeled growth response to N deposition was most sensitive to altering the processes that control plant N uptake and the pathways of N loss. The response to N deposition also increased with a more closed N cycle (reduced N fixation and N gas loss and decreased when prioritizing microbial over plant uptake of soil inorganic N. The net effect of all the modifications to the CLM-CN resulted in greater retention of N deposition and a greater role of synergy between N deposition and rising atmospheric CO2 as a mechanism governing increases in temperate forest primary production over the 20th century. Overall, testing models with both the response to gradual increases in N inputs over decades (N deposition and N pulse additions of N over multiple years (N fertilization allows for greater understanding of the mechanisms governing C–N coupling.

  12. Structural and mechanical properties of amorphous carbon films deposited by the dual plasma technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaohui Wang; Xu Zhang; Xianying Wu; Huixing Zhang; Xiaoji Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Direct current metal filtered cathodic vacuum are (FCVA) and acetylene gas (C2H2) were wielded to synthesize Ti-containing amorphous carbon films on Si (100). The influence of substrate bias voltage and acetylene gas on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the films were investigated. The results show that the phase of TiC in the (111) preferential crystallo-graphic orientation exists in the film, and rite main existing pattern of carbon is sp2. With increasing the acetylene flow rate, the con-tents of Ti and TiC phase of the film gradually reduce; however, the thickness of the film increases. When the substrate bias voltage reaches -600 V, the internal stress of the film reaches 1.6 GPa. The micro-hardness and elastic modulus of the film can reach 33.9 and 237.6 GPa, respectively, and the friction coefficient of the film is 0.25.

  13. Diamond-like carbon formation for various positions by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: ssyap@mmu.edu.my; Tou, Teck-Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2005-07-30

    Pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite target was carried out by an Nd-YAG laser with {lambda} = 1064 nm and fluence in the range of 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The plume was produced by focusing the laser beam and rastering over a 6.5 mm x 6.5 mm area on the graphite target. The substrates were placed at two positions: on-axis position facing the target and off-axis position in the target plane with 2 mm offset from the ablation site. Diamond-like carbon was formed on the substrates at both positions and on the ablated area as detected by Raman spectroscopy. Rough and granular surface was observed for the samples placed in the target plane and smooth diamond-like carbon films for the samples placed facing the target as observed by SEM and optical microscopy.

  14. Optical and morphological properties of porous diamond-like-carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Baroni, M. P. M. A.; Conceição, M. Ventura; Rosa, R. R.; Persson, C.; Arwin, H.; Silva Jr., E.F. da; Roman, L.S.; Nakamura, O.; I. Pepe; Silva, A. Ferreira da

    2006-01-01

    RESTRITO Porous diamond-like-carbon (PDLC) thin films obtained on silicon substrate by DC low energy magnetron sputtering have been investigated by photoluminescence, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, photoacoustic and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The absorption features observed for these films show similarities with those of porous silicon (PS) as well as in the performed gradient structural pattern classification of the SFM porosity, by means of the computational GPA-flyby enviro...

  15. Evaluation of carbon monoxide in blood samples from the second health and nutrition survey. Progress report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radford, E.P.

    1976-01-01

    This is a study of carbon monoxide (CO) in the blood of human subjects participating in the Second National Health and Nutrition Survey (HANES II), a detailed study of health indicators in sample populations of many communities throughout the U.S. The purpose of this aspect of the survey is to evaluate the levels of blood carboxyhemoglobin in normal individuals of all ages in typical U.S. communities, from whom accurate histories and clinical studies are available. This report gives results of the first of three years of analyses. A careful calibration of the analytical method has been completed, and more than 3000 blood samples have been analyzed. Although smoking histories are not yet available to permit evaluation of carboxyhemoglobin in non-smokers, in children under 12 years of age, blood COHb has been found to be consistently low, with less than 3% greater than 1.5% COHb. These preliminary results suggest that urban exposure to carbon monoxide among the general population is not now significant in the U.S., at least during the period of these early examinations.

  16. Inhibition of calcium carbonate deposition on stainless steel using olive leaf extract as a green inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoud, Roumaissa; Kahoul, Abdelkrim; Naamoune, Farid

    2017-01-01

    The antiscale properties of the aqueous extract of olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves as a natural scale inhibitor for stainless steel surface in Hammam raw water were investigated using chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques in conjunction with a microscopic examination. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the scale deposited over the pipe walls consists of pure CaCO3 calcite. The CA, in accordance with electrochemical impedance spectra and scanning electron microscopy, shows that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing extract concentration. This efficiency is considerably reduced as the temperature is increased.

  17. Direct writing of carbon nanotube patterns by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on a transparent substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.B. [Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, M.S. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, S.H., E-mail: shjeong@gist.ac.kr [Department of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    Dot array and line patterns of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully grown by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) on a transparent substrate at room temperature. In the proposed technique, a Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser with a wavelength of 532 nm irradiates the backside of multiple catalyst layers (Ni/Al/Cr) through a transparent substrate to induce a local temperature rise, thereby allowing the direct writing of dense dot and line patterns of MWCNTs below 10 {mu}m in size to be produced with uniform density on the controlled positions. In this LCVD method, a multiple-catalyst-layer with a Cr thermal layer is the central component for enabling the growth of dense MWCNTs with good spatial resolution.

  18. Growth process and mechanism of a multi-walled carbon nanotube nest deposited on a silicon nanoporous pillar array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Weifen, E-mail: gingerwfj@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Mathematics and Information Science, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, No. 36 Beihuan Road, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Jian Lv; Yang Xiaohui [Department of Mathematics and Information Science, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, No. 36 Beihuan Road, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Li Xinjian [Department of Physics and Laboratory of Material Physics, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2010-03-01

    A large scale nest array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NACNTs) was grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Through observing its macro/micromorphology and structure, ascertaining the catalyst component and its locations at different growth time by hiring field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, and selected area electron diffraction, the growth process was deduced. Its thermal properties were also investigated by using a thermogravimetric analyzer. Our experiments demonstrated that the CNTs growth by means of root-growth mechanism at the initial growth stage, then a continuous growth process with its tip open is suggested, finally, a schematic growth model of NACNT/Si-NPA was presented.

  19. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  20. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleutel, S.; Vandenbruwane, J.; de Schrijver, A.; Wuyts, K.; Moeskops, B.; Verheyen, K.; de Neve, S.

    2009-12-01

    Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders, Belgium, under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB) stand, a corsican pine (CP) stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN), and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST) for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand) caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67-84%) of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution) than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg ha-1 yr-1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP). Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N yr-1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9-28% to total dissolved N (TDN) leaching. The relative contribution to TDN leaching from DON loss from SB and CP was mainly determined by (large) differences in DIN leaching. The large TDN leaching losses are alarming, especially in the CPN stand that

  1. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleutel, S.; Vandenbruwane, J.; de Schrijver, A.; Wuyts, K.; Moeskops, B.; Verheyen, K.; de Neve, S.

    2009-07-01

    Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB) stand, a corsican pine (CP) stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN), and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST) for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand) caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67-84%) of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution) than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg N ha-1 yr-1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP). Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N ha-1 yr-1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9-28% to total dissolved N (TDN) leaching. DON loss from SB and CP was not much higher than from unpolluted forests, and its relative contribution to TDN leaching was mainly determined by (large) differences in DIN leaching. The large TDN leaching losses

  2. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sleutel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB stand, a corsican pine (CP stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN, and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67–84% of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg N ha−1 yr−1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP. Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N ha−1 yr−1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9–28% to total dissolved N (TDN leaching. DON loss from SB and CP was not much higher than from unpolluted forests, and its relative contribution to TDN leaching was mainly determined by

  3. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sleutel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders, Belgium, under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB stand, a corsican pine (CP stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN, and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67–84% of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg ha−1 yr−1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP. Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N yr−1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9–28% to total dissolved N (TDN leaching. The relative contribution to TDN leaching from DON loss from SB and CP was mainly determined by (large differences in DIN leaching. The large TDN leaching

  4. Deposition and fate of organic carbon in floodplains along a tropical semiarid lowland river (Tana River, Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omengo, Fred O.; Geeraert, Naomi; Bouillon, Steven; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Inland waters organic carbon (OC) burial by sedimentation has recently been shown to be an important component in river catchment carbon (C) budgets. However, data on OC burial by sedimentation are hitherto largely limited to temperate zones. We investigated the deposition and fate of sediment-associated OC in the floodplains of the tropical lowland Tana River (Kenya), between two main gaging stations (Garissa and Garsen). Freshly deposited surface sediments and sediment cores were sampled and analyzed for OC, total nitrogen content, stable isotope signatures (δ13C) of OC, and grain size distribution. In addition, we incubated sediment cores to quantify CO2 production as a proxy for OC mineralization. While the floodplain receives sediment with a relatively low OC content (1.56 ± 0.42%), sediments are enriched with OC inputs from floodplain vegetation to levels above 3%. Sediment cores show a sharp decrease of OC with depth, from 3 to 12% OC in the (sub) surface to less than 1% OC below approximately 60 cm depth. Relatively elevated OC mineralization rates (0.14 ± 0.07 mol. CO2 kgC-1 d-1) were recorded. We used these data to make a first assessment of the C burial efficiency of the Tana River floodplain. In contrast to what is observed in temperate environments, over 50% of C present in the top layers is lost in less than a century. While significant amounts of OC are buried in the Tana River floodplain, the high rates of postdepositional loss limit the development of a long-term C sink within this tropical floodplain.

  5. Solid-State 13C NMR Spectroscopy Applied to the Study of Carbon Blacks and Carbon Deposits Obtained by Plasma Pyrolysis of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair C. C. Freitas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was used in this work to analyze the physical and chemical properties of plasma blacks and carbon deposits produced by thermal cracking of natural gas using different types of plasma reactors. In a typical configuration with a double-chamber reactor, N2 or Ar was injected as plasma working gas in the first chamber and natural gas was injected in the second chamber, inside the arc column. The solid residue was collected at different points throughout the plasma apparatus and analyzed by 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy, using either cross polarization (CP or direct polarization (DP, combined with magic angle spinning (MAS. The 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra of a number of plasma blacks produced in the N2 plasma reactor showed two resonance bands, broadly identified as associated with aromatic and aliphatic groups, with indication of the presence of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing groups in the aliphatic region of the spectrum. In contrast to DP experiments, only a small fraction of 13C nuclei in the plasma blacks are effectively cross-polarized from nearby 1H nuclei and are thus observed in spectra recorded with CP. 13C NMR spectra are thus useful to distinguish between different types of carbon species in plasma blacks and allow a selective study of groups spatially close to hydrogen in the material.

  6. Ultrathin MnO2 nanoflakes deposited on carbon nanotube networks for symmetrical supercapacitors with enhanced performance