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Sample records for carbonitrides

  1. Method of producing thermally stable uranium carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugajin, M.; Takahashi, I.

    1975-01-01

    A thermally stable uranium carbonitride can be produced by adding tungsten and/or molybdenum in the amount of 0.2 wt percent or more, preferably 0.5 wt percent or more, to a pure uranium carbonitride. (U.S.)

  2. Preparation and properties of molybdenum-tungsten-carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, M.; Ettmayer, P.; Kieffer, R.

    1982-01-01

    Molybdenum-tungsten-carbonitrides can be prepared by reacting prealloyed powders of Mo and W with carbon in the presence of nitrogen or ammonia. Single phase carbonitrides (Mo,W) (C,N) with the WC-type structure can be obtained. The nitrogen content of these carbonitrides increases with increasing molybdenum content. Flowing ammonia has a decarburizing effect, which has to be counterbalanced by an addition of a carbonaceous gas such as methane. Nitrogen instead of ammonia is equally effective and gives carbonitrides which have a nitrogen content only insignificantly lower than the carbonitrides obtained in flowing ammonia. The lattice parameters of the carbonitrides are found to slightly smaller than the lattice parameters of the corresponding carbides. (Author)

  3. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Lijie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N nanotubes was reported. Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm played an additional role of catalyst during the growth of nanotubes. The nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDX, and EELS. The results indicate that the synthesized B–C–N nanotubes exhibit a bamboo-like morphology and B, C, and N elements are homogeneously distributed in the nanotubes. A catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism was proposed for the growth of the nanotubes.

  4. Theoretical Investigations of the Hexagonal Germanium Carbonitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhai Yu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The structural, mechanical, elastic anisotropic, and electronic properties of hexagonal germanium carbonitride (h-GeCN are systematically investigated using the first-principle calculations method with the ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme in the frame of generalized gradient approximation in the present work. The h-GeCN are mechanically and dynamically stable, as proved by the elastic constants and phonon spectra, respectively. The h-GeCN is brittle because the ratio B/G and Poisson’s ratio v of the h-GeCN are less than 1.75 and 0.26, respectively. For h-GeCN, from brittleness to ductility, the transformation pressures are 5.56 GPa and 5.63 GPa for B/G and Poisson’s ratio v, respectively. The h-GeCN exhibits the greater elastic anisotropy in Young’s modulus and the sound velocities. In addition, the calculated band structure of h-GeCN reveals that there is no band gap for h-GeCN with the HSE06 hybrid functional, so the h-GeCN is metallic.

  5. Synthesis, sintering properties and thermal conductivity of uranium carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, R.A.M.

    1978-01-01

    An introduction to the applications and chemistry of uranium carbonitrides is given including the potential use as a nuclear fuel. The powder synthesis of UC, UN and mixtures of UC and UN by a cyclic process is described. The correlation between the composition ratio UN/(UC+UN) in the final product and the parameters of the process is only determined qualitatively. Batch synthesis of a powder does not lead to an increase of the content of metallic impurities and oxygen. The impurity level is determined by that of the starting uranium metal and the thermal conductivity of the sintered compacts of uranium carbonitrides are determined via the measurement of the thermal diffusivity at 1100-1700 K. (Auth.)

  6. Method of preparing uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, H.A.; McClusky, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Sintered uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies having a controlled final carbon-to-uranium ratio are prepared, in an essentially continuous process, from U 3 O 8 and carbon by varying the weight ratio of carbon to U 3 O 8 in the feed mixture, which is compressed into a green body and sintered in a continuous heating process under various controlled atmospheric conditions to prepare the sintered bodies. 6 claims, no drawings

  7. Carbonitrides in the system Ta-TaC-TaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzhaupt-Kleissl, H.J.

    1975-04-01

    Specimens have been prepared in the binary section TaC-TaN and the carbon-rich region of the Ta-TaC-TaN system by hot pressing and subsequent homogenisation. It was possible to prepare nitrogen-rich carbonitrides by homogenizing them at 1,800 0 C under a nitrogen-pressure of 50 at up to the composition of 70 mol% TaN/30 mol% TaC. Those carbonitrides containing less than 25 at% nitrogen could be prepared by homogenisation at 2,000 0 C under a nitrogen-pressure of 600 Torr. Subsequent ageing at temperatures of 1,200, 1,300 and 1,400 0 C in high vacuum as well as at 1 at nitrogen resulted in the appearance of precipitations of epsilon-TaN, β-Ta 2 (C,N) and of the zeta-phase. The type amount and shape of the precipitated phases are dependent on the ageing conditions and on the composition the specimens. Single phase specimens with compositions close to the non-metal deficient phase boundary as well as multi-phase carbonitrides with high nitrogen contents and very fine precipitates showed values of the Vickers-hardness up to 3,000 kp/mm 2 at room temperature. With regard to the hot hardness up to a temperature of 1,300 0 C specimens aged in high vacuum were superior to those which were only homogenized as well as to those aged under a nitrogen-pressure of 1 at. On an average the best hardness-values have been found at room temperature as well as at temperatures up to 1,300 0 C for carbonitrides consisting of 50 mol% TaC/50 mol% TaN after homogenisation and subsequent ageing for 40 h at 1,300 0 C. (orig.) [de

  8. Green Synthesis of Boron Carbonitride with High Capacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron carbonitrides (BCN have attracted great interest in superhard or energy storage materials. In this work, thin BCN sheets were synthesized at 250 °C by a facile and green solvothermal method. The structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Based on the results of electrochemical experiments, the thin BCN sheet exhibited excellent capacitance performance (343.1 F/g at a current density of 0.5 A/g and cycling stability (90%, which showed high potential applications in supercapacitors.

  9. Dissolving of Nb and Ti carbonitride precipitates in microalloyed steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjin Nie; Shanwu Yang; Shaoqiang Yuan; Xinlai He

    2003-01-01

    The dissolving behaviour of Nb and Ti carbonitride precipitates in microalloyed steels during isothermal holding at 1300℃ was investigated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum (EDX). It was found that all precipitates in Nb-Ti microalloyed steel are (Nb, Ti)(C,N). With holding time increasing, the atomic ratio of Nb/Ti in precipitates decrease gradually. These precipitates still existe even after holding for 48 h at 1300℃ while Nb(C,N) precipitates dissolve away in Nb microalloyed steel only after 4 h at the same temperature. These results show that formation and thermostability of precipitates are considerably influenced by interaction between Nb and Ti.

  10. Preparation and thermochemical stability of uranium-zirconium-carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouhsen, C.

    1975-08-01

    This investigation deals with the preparation and the thermochemical stability of uranium-zirconium-carbonitrides as well as with the mechanism of (U,Zr) (C,N)-preparation by carbothermic reduction of uranium-zirconium-oxide. Single-phase (U,Zr) (C,N)-solid solutions with U:Zr-propertions of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 were prepared from oxide powder. The thermochemical stability of the (U,Zr) (C,N)-solid solutions against carbon was measured for varying Zr- and N-contents and for several temperatures; the results indicate an increase of the uranium carbide stability potential by the formation of (U,Zr) (C,N)-solid solutions. The thermodynamic properties ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , and ΔS 0 were calculated and the correlation between the M(C,N)-lattice constant and the N-content was evaluated. Through an intensive investigation of the reaction mechanism, several different reaction paths were found; for each of them the characteristical diffusion of matter was explained by means of the microsections. It was shown that the Zr-concentration of the oxide reactant and the heating rate during the carbothermic reduction influence the species of the reaction product, especially the homogeneity of the (U,Zr) (C,N)-solid solution. (orig.) [de

  11. Internal carbonitriding behavior of Ni-V, Ni-Cr, and Ni-3Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, A.T.; Douglass, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Ni-2V, Ni-5V, Ni-12V, Ni-10Cr, Ni-20Cr, and Ni-3Nb alloys were carbonitrided in C 3 H 6 and NH 3 gas mixtures (bal H 2 ) over the range 700--1,000 C. Carbonitridation of Ni-12V and Ni-20Cr in C 3 H 6 /NH 3 /H 2 (1.5/1.5/97 v/o) and (1.5/10/88.5 v/o) produced duplex subscales consisting of near-surface nitrides with underlying carbides. Growth of each zone obeyed the parabolic rate law under most conditions. The presence of carbon generally did not effect the depth of the nitride zones compared to nitriding the alloys in NH 3 /H 2 (10/90 v/o). However, at 700 C, the nitride zones were deeper in the carbonitrided Ni-V alloys and Ni-20Cr. The presence of nitrogen generally increased the depth of the carbide zones in Ni-12V and Ni-20Cr compared to carburizing these alloys in C 3 H 6 /H 2 (1.5/98.5 v/o). VN, CrN, and NbN formed in Ni-V, Ni-Cr, and Ni-Nb alloys, respectively, whereas the underlying carbide layers contained V 4 C 3 in Ni-12V, Cr 3 C 2 above a zone of Cr 7 C 3 in Ni-20Cr, and NbC in Ni-3Nb. The solubilities and diffusivities of nitrogen and carbon in nickel were determined. Nitrogen and carbon each exhibited retrograde solubility with temperature in pure Ni in both carbonitriding environments. Nitrogen diffusion in nickel was generally lower in each carbonitriding mixture compared to nitrogen diffusion in a nitriding environment, except at 700 C when nitrogen diffusion was higher. Carbon diffusion in nickel was generally higher in the carbonitriding environments compared to carbon diffusion in a carburizing environment

  12. Carbonitriding of low alloy steels: Mechanical and metallurgical responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal' Maz Silva, W., E-mail: waltermateriais@me.com [Institut Jean Lamour – UMR CNRS–Université de Lorraine, 7198, Parc de Saurupt, Nancy 54011 (France); Institut de Recherche Technologique M2P, Metz 57070 (France); Dulcy, J., E-mail: jacky.dulcy@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour – UMR CNRS–Université de Lorraine, 7198, Parc de Saurupt, Nancy 54011 (France); Ghanbaja, J., E-mail: jaafar.ghanbaja@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour – UMR CNRS–Université de Lorraine, 7198, Parc de Saurupt, Nancy 54011 (France); Redjaïmia, A., E-mail: abdelkrim.redjaimia@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour – UMR CNRS–Université de Lorraine, 7198, Parc de Saurupt, Nancy 54011 (France); Michel, G., E-mail: gregory.michel@irt-m2p.fr [Institut de Recherche Technologique M2P, Metz 57070 (France); Thibault, S., E-mail: simon.thibault@safran.fr [Safran Tech, Magny les Hameaux (France); Belmonte, T., E-mail: thierry.belmonte@univ-lorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour – UMR CNRS–Université de Lorraine, 7198, Parc de Saurupt, Nancy 54011 (France)

    2017-05-02

    Metallurgical and mechanical responses of alloys 16NiCrMo13 and 23MnCrMo5 to the addition of carbon and/or nitrogen were investigated. Diffusion profiles of these interstitial elements were established by atmospheric pressure carburizing, austenitic nitriding, and a sequence of carburizing and nitriding – the carbonitriding. All treatments were performed at 1173 K under CO-H{sub 2} and/or NH{sub 3} based atmospheres. After enrichment, each sample was (i) room-temperature oil-quenched and (ii) immersed in boiling nitrogen prior to (iii) the stress relief treatment. Cross-section hardness profiles were evaluated after each of these steps. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) allowed for the determination of both carbon and nitrogen diffusion profiles after quenching. In order to estimate the fraction of nitrides formed during the enrichment of the alloys, these measured profiles were employed in the simulation of local equilibrium at each evaluated position. This allowed for the computation of total solid solution interstitial content, which was expressed in atomic fraction. Plots of as-quenched hardness against the square root of the computed interstitial content, i.e. the sum of solution carbon and the remaining nitrogen, show the complementary character of these elements in determining the mechanical properties of the materials prior to stress relief treatment. Tempering of carbon-nitrogen martensite resulted in hardness drop to a lesser degree than the one measured on carbon martensite with equivalent interstitial content. In order to investigate this behavior, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were performed. Results showed the precipitation of two morphologies of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} in the nitrogen-rich case and image analysis confirmed the simulated fraction of nitrides.

  13. Mathematical Modelling of Carbonitride Precipitation during Hot Working in Nb Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on thermodynamics and kinetics, precipitation behavior of microalloyed steels was analyzed. Deformation greatly promotes isothermal carbonitride precipitation and makes C-curve shift leftwards. The position and shape of C-curve also depend on the content of Nb and N. C-curve shifts leftwards a little when N content increases and the nose temperature is raised with increasing Nb content. Deformation shortened precipitation start time during continuous cooling, raised precipitation start temperature, accelerated precipitation kinetics of carbonitrides. With decreasing the finishing temperature and coiling temperature, the precipitates volume fraction increases and strength increment is raised during hot rolling. The simulated results are in agreementwith experiment results.

  14. Thermophysical and elastic properties of titanium carbonitrides containing molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tetsushi; Matsubara, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Ti,Me)(C,N) sintered bodies were prepared by hot-pressing. ► The thermophysical and elastic properties of the carbonitrides were evaluated. ► The porosities of the specimens were less than 1%. ► The Young’s modulus decreases with increasing Mo content. ► The Debye temperatures decrease with increasing Mo/W content. -- Abstract: Titanium carbonitride has good mechanical properties such as high hardness and high Young’s modulus. It is a major raw material for Ti(C,N)-based cermets, and their properties are strongly dependent on the properties of titanium carbonitrides. The thermophysical and elastic properties of the carbonitride need to be systematically investigated, so as to be used for designing cutting tools and wear-resistant tools. The thermophysical and elastic properties of (Ti,Me)(C,N) (Me = Mo. W) sintered bodies prepared by hot-pressing at 2200 °C were evaluated. The porosities of the specimens were less than 1%. The Young’s modulus decreased with increasing Mo, which seems to be the result of vacancy formation. The thermal expansion coefficient, the thermal conductivity and the Debye temperatures of (Ti,Me)(C,N) sintered bodies decreased with increasing Mo/W content

  15. Electrochemical study of lithium insertion into carbon-rich polymer-derived silicon carbonitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaspar, Jan; Mera, Gabriela; Nowak, Andrzej P.; Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena; Riedel, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the lithium insertion into carbon-rich polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic synthesized by the thermal treatment of poly(diphenylsilylcarbodiimide) at three temperatures, namely 1100, 1300, and 1700 o C under 0.1 MPa Ar atmosphere. At lower synthesis temperatures, the material is X-ray amorphous, while at 1700 o C, the SiCN ceramic partially crystallizes. Anode materials prepared from these carbon-rich SiCN ceramics without any fillers and conducting additives were characterized using cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometric charging/discharging. We found that the studied silicon carbonitride ceramics demonstrate a promising electrochemical behavior during lithium insertion/extraction in terms of capacity and cycling stability. The sample synthesized at 1300 o C exhibits a reversible capacity of 392 mAh g -1 . Our study confirms that carbon-rich SiCN phases are electrochemically active materials in terms of Li inter- and deintercalation.

  16. Fundamentals of liquid phase for modern cermets and functionally graded cemented carbonitrides (FGCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Lengauer, W.; Ettmayer, P.; Dreyer, K.; Daub, H.W.; Kassel, D.

    2001-01-01

    Metallurgical reactions and microstructure developments during sintering of modern cermets and functionally graded cemented carbonitrides (FGCC) were investigated by modern thermal and analytical methods such as mass spectrometer (MS), differential thermal analysis (DTA), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), dilatometer (DIL), microscopy and analytical electronic microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The complex phase reactions and phase equilibrium in the multi-component system Ti/Mo/W/Ta/Nb/C,N-Co/Ni were studied. The melting behaviors in the systems of TiC-WC/MoC-Ni/Co, TiC-TiN-WC-Co and TiCN-TaC-WC-Co have been established. By better understanding of the mechanisms that govern the sintering processing and metallurgical reactions, new cermets and different types of functionally graded cemented carbonitrides (FGCC) with desired microstructures and properties were developed and fabricated. (author)

  17. Tribological studies of nitrogen ion implantation induced overlayer coatings of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Srivastava, S.K.; Pandian, R.; Bahuguna, Ashok; Dhara, S.; Nair, K.G.M.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Composite phase of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase is observed on the N + ion implanted surface of steel. ► Advanced properties of implanted surface shows low friction coefficient of ∼0.05. ► High wear resistance 4.3 × 10 −8 mm 3 /Nm of N + implanted surface is obtained. -- Abstract: Morphology and microstructure of N + ion implanted 316 LN steel are found to modify with irradiated substrate temperature. At low temperature of 100 °C, self-similar micro-ripples are formed but at high temperature of 200 and 300 °C, micro-pores and blisters are observed on the implanted surface. Chemically modified surface is found to consist of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase. Such composite characteristic of implanted steel surface at irradiated substrate temperature of 300 °C shows improved tribological properties with low friction coefficient and high wear resistance

  18. Synthesis of zirconium guanidinate complexes and the formation of zirconium carbonitride via low pressure CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potts, S.E.; Carmalt, C.J.; Blackman, C.S.; Abou-Chabine, F.; Pugh, D.; Davies, H.O.

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of zirconium carbonitride have been deposited on glass at 600 °C from two novel guanidinate precursors: [ZrCp'{¿2-(iPrN)2CNMe2}2Cl] (1) and [ZrCp'2{¿2-(iPrN)2CNMe2}Cl] (2) (Cp' ) monomethylcyclopentadienyl). Both compounds 1 and 2 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  19. Anti-corrosion layer prepared by plasma electrolytic carbonitriding on pure aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jie; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Run; Wang, Bin; Hua, Ming; Xue, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PEC/N can be applied to low melting point metal. • The spectroscopic characterization of plasma discharge is investigated. • Electron concentration and electron temperature are evaluated for PEC/N. • Phase composition of the carbonitrided layer is determined. • PEC/N improves the corrosion resistance of aluminum greatly. - Abstract: In this paper, plasma electrolytic carbonitriding (PEC/N) method was applied to pure aluminum for the first time. The spectroscopic characterization of plasma discharge during PEC/N process was analyzed and the electron temperature was calculated in terms of optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed the discharge plasma was in local thermal equilibrium (LTE) state. Electron concentration and electron temperature were about 6 × 10 21 m −3 and 4000 K, respectively. The carbonitrided layer contained Al 4 C 3 , AlN and Al 7 C 3 N 3 phases. After PEC/N treatment, the corrosion resistance of pure aluminum was significantly improved, which was related to the formation of nitride phases. This work expands the application of plasma electrolysis technology on the surface modification of low melting point metal

  20. Anti-corrosion layer prepared by plasma electrolytic carbonitriding on pure aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jie; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Run; Wang, Bin; Hua, Ming [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Xue, Wenbin, E-mail: xuewb@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • PEC/N can be applied to low melting point metal. • The spectroscopic characterization of plasma discharge is investigated. • Electron concentration and electron temperature are evaluated for PEC/N. • Phase composition of the carbonitrided layer is determined. • PEC/N improves the corrosion resistance of aluminum greatly. - Abstract: In this paper, plasma electrolytic carbonitriding (PEC/N) method was applied to pure aluminum for the first time. The spectroscopic characterization of plasma discharge during PEC/N process was analyzed and the electron temperature was calculated in terms of optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed the discharge plasma was in local thermal equilibrium (LTE) state. Electron concentration and electron temperature were about 6 × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3} and 4000 K, respectively. The carbonitrided layer contained Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}, AlN and Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} phases. After PEC/N treatment, the corrosion resistance of pure aluminum was significantly improved, which was related to the formation of nitride phases. This work expands the application of plasma electrolysis technology on the surface modification of low melting point metal.

  1. Mean-square displacement of atomic complex in titanium carbonitrides TiCxNy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Sultanova, S.Kh.; Mukhtarova, N.N.; Tokhtashev, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The atomic mean-square displacement (MSD) is one of important characteristics of solids, and one can use it for determination of a number of other characteristics of substances. In this work the MSD of atomic complex were determined for a number of compositions of the cubic titanium carbonitrides TiC x N y using the neutron powder diffraction data. The error of MSD determination was less than 3 %. When determining intensity of diffraction maximum a correction for the thermal diffusion dispersion (TDD) was included in the neutron diffraction patterns. The contribution of TDD in the intensity of diffraction maxima was found to be less than the experiment error (no more than 1,5 %). Such small value of the TDD correction is explained by refractory of materials. The values of MSD in titanium carbonitrides for a number of compositions, determined by the neutron powder diffraction measurements, are given. It is shown, that the dependence of MSD on the concentration (C+N)/Ti has a complex character. With decrease of the total content of metalloids MSD decreases at first, reaching a minimum about concentration (C+N)/Ti≅0.80, and then increases. MSD consists of dynamic and static distortions, where the static distortions in the compounds with variable composition increase with increasing of deviation from stoichiometry. The above anomaly in the dependence of MSD on the total concentration of metalloids, apparently, point to prevalence of dynamic distortions over static ones and to complex character of concentration dependence of interatomic interactions in the titanium carbonitrides. This work was supported by the Supporting Fund for Fundamental Researches of Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 6-04)

  2. Peculiarities of Production of Chromium Carbonitride Nanopowder and Its Physical-Chemical Certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiryaeva, L S; Nozdrin, I V; Galevsky, G V

    2015-01-01

    Scientific and technological basics of plasma synthesis of chromium carbonitride have been developed, including analysis of the current production state and application of chromium carbon compounds, defining characteristics of three-jet plasma reactor, modeling- mathematical study of interaction of raw materials and plasma streams, prediction of technological parameters of plasma stream based on the modeling results, selection of optimal technological option, implementation of plasma-metallurgical technology of chromium nitride production, its physical-chemical certification and defining technical-economical production factors. (paper)

  3. Superconductive transition metal carbonitride fibers and method for the preparation thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economy, J.; Mason, J.H.; Smith, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    Fine diameter continuous multifilament superconductor yarns comprising niobium carbonitride may be prepared. The fibers of which the yarn is composed possess a very high transition temperature (T/sub c/ of 17 0 K) combined with a good upper critical field (H/sub c2/ of 125 kG) and critical current density (J/sub c/ of 10 5 amps/cm 2 at 40 kG). This invention provides excellent superconductor materials in the form of continuous fine diameter multifilament yarn. 9 claims

  4. Composition and optical properties tunability of hydrogenated silicon carbonitride thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, A.; Bousquet, A.; Mehdi, H.; Monier, G.; Robert-Goumet, C.; Thomas, L.; Belmahi, M.; Goullet, A.; Sauvage, T.; Tomasella, E.

    2018-06-01

    Radiofrequency reactive magnetron sputtering was used to deposit hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCxNy:H) at 400 °C by sputtering a silicon target under CH4 and N2 reactive gas mixture. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry revealed that the change of reactive gases flow rate (the ratio R = FN2/(FN2+FCH4)) induced a smooth chemical composition tunability from a silicon carbide-like film for R = 0 to a silicon nitride-like one at R = 1 with a large area of silicon carbonitrides between the two regions. The deconvolution of Fourier Transform InfraRed and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectrum highlighted a shift of the chemical environment of the deposited films corresponding to the changes seen by RBS. The consequence of these observations is that a control of refractive index in the range of [1.9-2.5] at λ = 633 nm and optical bandgap in the range [2 eV-3.8 eV] have been obtained which induces that these coatings can be used as antireflective coatings in silicon photovoltaic cells.

  5. Enhancement of bioactivity of titanium carbonitride nanocomposite thin films on steels with biosynthesized hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thampi VV

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available VV Anusha Thampi,1 P Dhandapani,2 Geetha Manivasagam, B Subramanian11Electrochemical Materials Science Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi, 2Corrosion and Materials Protection Division, Central Electrochemical Reserach Institute, Karaikudi, 3Centre for Bio-Materials Science and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, IndiaAbstract: Thin films of titanium carbonitride (TiCN were fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering on medical grade steel. The biocompatibility of the coating was further enhanced by growing hydroxyapatite crystals over the TiCN-coated substrates using biologically activated ammonia from synthetic urine. The coatings were characterized using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings was determined in simulated body fluid. In addition, hemocompatibility was assessed by monitoring the attachment of platelets on the coating using SEM. The wettability of the coatings was measured in order to correlate with biocompatibility results. Formation of a coating with granular morphology and the preferred orientation was confirmed by SEM and X-ray diffraction results. The hydroxyapatite coating led to a decrease in thrombogenicity, resulting in controlled blood clot formation, hence demonstrating the hemocompatibility of the coating.Keywords: titanium carbonitride thin films, magnetron sputtering, ureolytic bacteria, biocompatibility

  6. Quantitative mass spectrometry of decarburization and denitridation of cemented carbonitrides during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.; Lengauer, W.

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative quadrupole mass spectrometry of (Ti,W)C-based cemented carbonitrides was carried out in order to monitor the evolution of the gas species as a function of time and temperature during vacuum sintering. Solid standards and gas mixtures as well as precise flow control were employed for calibration. Upon integration of the outgassing rates the carbon and nitrogen evolutions and mass losses during sintering of raw hardmetal powder mixtures (WC, TiC, ...) and cemented carbonitrides could be quantified. Outgassing occurs in the range of temperatures 490-1480 o C. Nitrogen outgassing of (Ti,W)(C,N) was greater than that of Ti(C,N) due to the presence of W which increases the nitrogen activity in the solid causing a higher nitrogen equilibrium pressure. TiN showed a CO (0.2 wt %) and N 2 (0.5 wt %) weight loss only in the presence of the binder phase. For powder mixtures, it was observed that the amount of CO, CO 2 and N 2 liberated during vacuum sintering increased with the addition of cobalt in comparison with the same powders without binder phase. Nitrogen containing cermet alloys showed a greater loss of carbon than (Ti,W)C-based hardmetals. (author)

  7. Application of desirability function for optimizing the performance characteristics of carbonitrided bushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby John

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a product is generally characterized by more than one response variable. Hence the management often faces the problem of simultaneous optimization of many response variables. This study was undertaken to simultaneously optimize the surface hardness and case depth of carbonitrided bushes. Even though lots of literature has been published on various methodologies for tackling the multi-response optimization problem, the simultaneous optimization of heat treated properties of carbonitrided bushes are not reported yet. In this research the effect of four factors and two interactions on surface hardness and case depth of carbontirded bushes were studied using design of experiments. Based on the experimental results, the expected values of the heat treated properties of the bushes were estimated for all possible combination of factors. Then the best combination which, simultaneously optimized the response variables, was arrived at using desirability function. The study showed that the optimum combination obtained through desirability function approach not only minimized the variation around the targets of surface hardness and case depth but also was superior to the ones obtained by optimizing the response variables separately. Moreover this study provides a useful and effective approach to design the production process to manufacture bushes with customer specified surface hardness and case depth targets.

  8. Enhancement of bioactivity of titanium carbonitride nanocomposite thin films on steels with biosynthesized hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, V V Anusha; Dhandapani, P; Manivasagam, Geetha; Subramanian, B

    2015-01-01

    Thin films of titanium carbonitride (TiCN) were fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering on medical grade steel. The biocompatibility of the coating was further enhanced by growing hydroxyapatite crystals over the TiCN-coated substrates using biologically activated ammonia from synthetic urine. The coatings were characterized using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior of the coatings was determined in simulated body fluid. In addition, hemocompatibility was assessed by monitoring the attachment of platelets on the coating using SEM. The wettability of the coatings was measured in order to correlate with biocompatibility results. Formation of a coating with granular morphology and the preferred orientation was confirmed by SEM and X-ray diffraction results. The hydroxyapatite coating led to a decrease in thrombogenicity, resulting in controlled blood clot formation, hence demonstrating the hemocompatibility of the coating.

  9. The structure study of boron carbonitride films obtained by use of trimethylamine borane complex

    CERN Document Server

    Kosinova, M L; Fainer, N I; Maximovski, E A; Kuznetsov, F A

    2001-01-01

    Diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) was used to investigate crystalline structure and phase composition of thin films (1500-5000 A) of boron carbonitride. These films were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using nontraditional volatile single source precursor trimethylamine borane complex (CH sub 3) sub 3 N centre dot BH sub 3 and its mixture with ammonia. The effect of the gas ratio and substrate temperature on chemical and phase composition as well as the structure of the films were investigated. The XRD peculiarities of texture films and ways of increasing sensibility of measurements were considered. A possibility of the information density rise of the thin film XRD was shown due to application of different methods for recording diffraction patterns.

  10. Large-scale aligned silicon carbonitride nanotube arrays: Synthesis, characterization, and field emission property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, L.; Xu, Z.; Liu, K. H.; Wang, W. L.; Liu, S.; Bai, X. D.; Wang, E. G.; Li, J. C.; Liu, C.

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale aligned silicon carbonitride (SiCN) nanotube arrays have been synthesized by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using SiH 4 , CH 4 , and N 2 as precursors. The three elements of Si, C, and N are chemically bonded with each other and the nanotube composition can be adjusted by varying the SiH 4 concentration, as revealed by electron energy loss spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The evolution of microstructure of the SiCN nanotubes with different Si concentrations was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of field emission characteristics of the SiCN nanotubes on the composition has been investigated. With the increasing Si concentration, the SiCN nanotube exhibits more favorable oxidation resistance, which suggests that SiCN nanotube is a promising candidate as stable field emitter

  11. Possibilities of application of perfect solution model to calculation of equilibrium composition of complex carbonitrides and their solubility in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, M.I.; Popov, V.V.; Cheremnykh, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Using the Fe-Nb-V-C-N and Fe-Ti-V-C-N systems' low carbon steels, the earlier suggested model of perfect solid solutions has been experimentally researched. Also studied has been the feasibility to calculate the composition of carbonitrides in steels by the derived equations, that comprise, as parameters, products of respective compounds' solubility and coefficients of components interaction in iron-based solid solutions. A conclusion is drawn that perfect solutions models may be used adequately for complex carbonitrides like Nbsub(p)Vsub(1-p)Csub(q)Nsub(1-q) and Tisub(p)Vsub(1-p)Csub(q)Nsub(1-q) during the calculations of their equilibrium composition and solubility in steels

  12. Oxidation Behavior of Titanium Carbonitride Coating Deposited by Atmospheric Plasma Spray Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; He, Jining; Yan, Dianran; Liao, Hanlin; Zhang, Nannan

    2017-10-01

    As a high-hardness and anti-frictional material, titanium carbonitride (TiCN) thick coatings or thin films are increasingly being used in many industrial fields. In the present study, TiCN coatings were obtained by atmospheric plasma spray synthesis or reactive plasma spray. In order to promote the reaction between the Ti particles and reactive gases, a home-made gas tunnel was mounted on a conventional plasma gun to perform the spray process. The oxidation behavior of the TiCN coatings under different temperatures in static air was carefully investigated. As a result, when the temperature was over 700 °C, the coatings suffered from serious oxidation, and finally they were entirely oxidized to the TiO2 phase at 1100 °C. The principal oxidation mechanism was clarified, indicating that the oxygen can permeate into the defects and react with TiCN at high temperatures. In addition, concerning the use of a TiCN coating in high-temperature conditions, the microhardness of the oxidized coatings at different treatment temperatures was also evaluated.

  13. Shot-peening of carbonitrided steel: influence of the process on the mechanical state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses have a significant role in affecting engineering properties of materials and shot peening process is an effective production technique to ensure required residual stress levels. This paper presents an analysis of an orthogonal design of experiment to establish an empirical relationship between main parameters of shot peening process and residual stress profiles for a carbonitrided steel. The hardening / softening evolution of the material is followed using hardness and diffraction peak width. Four critical peening parameters, i.e. shot size, incident angle, exposure time, airblast pressure, have been chosen and the range of peening conditions are established by using the Taguchi technique. In this study, a shot velocity measurement system is used to obtain the on-line velocity during the peening process and the relationship between the maximum compressive residual stresses and the shot velocity is also developed. Analysis of the experimental data showed that it is possible to optimize the shot peening process by an effective control of process parameters.

  14. Evaluation of activities of carbons in chemical equilibrium with uranium carbonitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Masahiro; Hirota, Masayuki; Miyake, Masanobu; Hamada, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    A mixture of uranium sesquinitride and carbon was prepared by the reaction of UC of UC 2 with N 2 in the temperature range from 700 to 1400degC. When the mixture of uranium sesquinitride and carbon is kept at temperatures above 1200degC in the atmosphere of N 2 at low pressure, the state where uranium carbonitride (UC 1-x N x ) and carbon are present together in chemical equilibrium will be established. A thermodynamic analysis suggests that, in the equilibrium state, the composition of UC 1-x N x is determined by the chemical activity of carbon, a c , which is related to the chemical potential of the carbon, μ c , by the equation, μ c = μ c deg + RT 1n a c . Here μ c deg refers to graphite, which is usually taken as the standard state of carbon (a c = 1). Mixtures of U 2 N 3 and carbon with several degrees of graphitization were heat-treated at 1400degC, and the composition of UC 1-x N x in the reaction product was determined. From these experimental results and the thermodynamic analysis, values of the activity of the carbon coexisting with UC 1-x N x were estimated. (author)

  15. Precipitation Behaviour of Carbonitrides in Ti-Nb-C-N Microalloyed Steels and an Engineering Application with Homogenously Precipitated Nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin WANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A thermodynamic model enabling calculation of equilibrium carbonitride composition and relative amounts as a function of steel composition and temperature has been developed previously based on the chemical equilibrium method. In the present work, actual carbonitride precipitation behaviour has been verified in the Ti-Nb-C-N microalloyed steels. The Ti microalloyed steel after refining with 0.012 % Nb exhibited highly improved tensile strength without sacrificing ductility. According to further detailed SEM and TEM analysis, the improved mechanical properties of Ti/Nb microalloyed steel could be attributed to the larger solubility of Nb and Ti, inducing fine dispersion of the carbonitrides with particle size of 2 – 10 nm in the ferrite matrix.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9622

  16. Synthesis of Zr-Si-O-N phases by carbonitriding reaction. Characterization of crystalline phases using the Rietveld method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzoni A.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium compounds are of great interest for ceramic application due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties. Zirconium phases of the system Zr-O-C-N were obtained using carbonitriding reactions of zircon mineral (ZrO2.SiO2, under different reaction conditions. The reaction products were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD using the Rietveld method. Silicon was employed as internal standard. Zirconium compounds formed were m-ZrO2 (monoclinic, beta"-zirconium oxynitride and a cubic Zr(C,N,O phase whose lattice parameter a o depends on the composition. The crystallite sizes of the three zirconium phases were determined also by XRD. The minority phases present are the ones of the Si-O-N-C system. The reaction conditions employed allows to obtain reaction products with low or without silicon content.

  17. Methods for and products of processing nanostructure nitride, carbonitride and oxycarbonitride electrode power materials by utilizing sol gel technology for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Oiang; Chu, Chung-tse; Zheng, Haixing

    2001-01-01

    Metal nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder with high surface area (up to 150 m.sup.2 /g) is prepared by using sol-gel process. The metal organic precursor, alkoxides or amides, is synthesized firstly. The metal organic precursor is modified by using unhydrolyzable organic ligands or templates. A wet gel is formed then by hydrolysis and condensation process. The solvent in the wet gel is then be removed supercritically to form porous amorphous hydroxide. This porous hydroxide materials is sintered to 725.degree. C. under the ammonia flow and porous nitride powder is formed. The other way to obtain high surface area nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder is to pyrolyze polymerized templated metal amides aerogel in an inert atmosphere. The electrochemical capacitors are prepared by using sol-gel prepared nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder. Two methods are used to assemble the capacitors. Electrode is formed either by pressing the mixture of nitride powder and binder to a foil, or by depositing electrode coating onto metal current collector. The binder or coating is converted into a continuous network of electrode material after thermal treatment to provide enhanced energy and power density. Liquid electrolyte is soaked into porous electrode. The electrochemical capacitor assembly further has a porous separator layer between two electrodes/electrolyte and forming a unit cell.

  18. Amorphous and nanocrystalline titanium nitride and carbonitride materials obtained by solution phase ammonolysis of Ti(NMe2)4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Andrew W.; Shebanova, Olga; Hector, Andrew L.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    Solution phase reactions between tetrakisdimethylamidotitanium (Ti(NMe 2 ) 4 ) and ammonia yield precipitates with composition TiC 0.5 N 1.1 H 2.3 . Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicates that decomposition of these precursor materials proceeds in two steps to yield rocksalt-structured TiN or Ti(C,N), depending upon the gas atmosphere. Heating to above 700 deg. C in NH 3 yields nearly stoichiometric TiN. However, heating in N 2 atmosphere leads to isostructural carbonitrides, approximately TiC 0.2 N 0.8 in composition. The particle sizes of these materials range between 4-12 nm. Heating to a temperature that corresponds to the intermediate plateau in the TGA curve (450 deg. C) results in a black powder that is X-ray amorphous and is electrically conducting. The bulk chemical composition of this material is found to be TiC 0.22 N 1.01 H 0.07 , or Ti 3 (C 0.17 N 0.78 H 0.05 ) 3.96 , close to Ti 3 (C,N) 4 . Previous workers have suggested that the intermediate compound was an amorphous form of Ti 3 N 4 . TEM investigation of the material indicates the presence of nanocrystalline regions x (C,N) y crystalline phases

  19. Plasma synthesis of titanium nitride, carbide and carbonitride nanoparticles by means of reactive anodic arc evaporation from solid titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesler, D.; Bastuck, T.; Theissmann, R.; Kruis, F. E.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma methods using the direct evaporation of a transition metal are well suited for the cost-efficient production of ceramic nanoparticles. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple setup for the production of titanium-ceramics by reactive anodic arc evaporation and the characterization of the aerosol as well as the nanopowder. It is the first report on TiC X N 1 − X synthesis in a simple anodic arc plasma. By means of extensive variations of the gas composition, it is shown that the composition of the particles can be tuned from titanium nitride over a titanium carbonitride phase (TiC X N 1 − X ) to titanium carbide as proven by XRD data. The composition of the plasma gas especially a very low concentration of hydrocarbons around 0.2 % of the total plasma gas is crucial to tune the composition and to avoid the formation of free carbon. Examination of the particles by HR-TEM shows that the material consists mostly of cubic single crystalline particles with mean sizes between 8 and 27 nm

  20. The evolution of primary and secondary niobium carbonitrides in AISI 347 stainless steel during manufacturing and long-term ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erneman, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Schwind, M. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, PB 74, SE-774 22 Avesta (Sweden); Andren, H.-O. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, J.-O. [AB Sandvik Materials Technology, R and D Centre, SE-81181 Sandviken (Sweden)]. E-mail: jan-olof.nilsson@sandvik.com; Wilson, A. [AB Sandvik Materials Technology, R and D Centre, SE-81181 Sandviken (Sweden); Agren, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-01-15

    Nb(C,N) precipitates were studied in a niobium-stabilised stainless steel (AISI 347) statically aged at 700 {sup o}C. Scanning electron microscopy and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy were used to determine the volume fraction and precipitate size of primary and secondary Nb(C,N) after ageing times between 0 and 70,000 h. The experimental data were correlated with simulations of Nb(C,N) formation based on the assumption that the process is controlled by diffusion. These simulations provide a rationale for the existence of two sets of niobium carbonitrides in commercial tubes of AISI 347. Growth of primary Nb(C,N) occurred essentially during manufacturing, with no significant growth at 700 {sup o}C. Rapid dissolution and re-precipitation of secondary Nb(C,N) occurred during manufacturing. Coarsening at 700 {sup o}C of secondary particles was modelled using the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory, which overestimated the coarsening rate. These problems were overcome with a model developed by the authors. This model takes both growth and coarsening into account.

  1. The evolution of primary and secondary niobium carbonitrides in AISI 347 stainless steel during manufacturing and long-term ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erneman, J.; Schwind, M.; Andren, H.-O.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Wilson, A.; Agren, J.

    2006-01-01

    Nb(C,N) precipitates were studied in a niobium-stabilised stainless steel (AISI 347) statically aged at 700 o C. Scanning electron microscopy and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy were used to determine the volume fraction and precipitate size of primary and secondary Nb(C,N) after ageing times between 0 and 70,000 h. The experimental data were correlated with simulations of Nb(C,N) formation based on the assumption that the process is controlled by diffusion. These simulations provide a rationale for the existence of two sets of niobium carbonitrides in commercial tubes of AISI 347. Growth of primary Nb(C,N) occurred essentially during manufacturing, with no significant growth at 700 o C. Rapid dissolution and re-precipitation of secondary Nb(C,N) occurred during manufacturing. Coarsening at 700 o C of secondary particles was modelled using the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory, which overestimated the coarsening rate. These problems were overcome with a model developed by the authors. This model takes both growth and coarsening into account

  2. Metal-free spin and spin-gapless semiconducting heterobilayers: monolayer boron carbonitrides on hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongzhe; Zhang, Hongyu; Sun, Yuanyuan; Ding, Yingchun; Chen, Jie; Du, Youwei; Tang, Nujiang

    2017-06-07

    The interfaces between monolayer boron carbonitrides and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) play an important role in their practical applications. Herein, we respectively investigate the structural and electronic properties of two metal-free heterobilayers constructed by vertically stacking two-dimensional (2D) spintronic materials (B 4 CN 3 and B 3 CN 4 ) on a h-BN monolayer from the viewpoints of lattice match and lattice mismatch models using density functional calculations. It is found that both B 4 CN 3 and B 3 CN 4 monolayers can be stably adsorbed on the h-BN monolayer due to the van der Waals interactions. Intriguingly, we demonstrate that the bipolar magnetic semiconductor (BMS) behavior of the B 4 CN 3 layer and the spin gapless semiconductor (SGS) property of the B 3 CN 4 layer can be well preserved in the B 4 CN 3 /BN and B 3 CN 4 /BN heterobilayers, respectively. The magnetic moments and spintronic properties of the two systems originate mainly from the 2p z electrons of the carbon atoms in the B 4 CN 3 and B 3 CN 4 layers. Furthermore, the BMS behavior of the B 4 CN 3 /BN bilayer is very robust while the electronic property of the B 3 CN 4 /BN bilayer is sensitive to interlayer couplings. These theoretical results are helpful both in understanding the interlayer coupling between B 4 CN 3 or B 3 CN 4 and h-BN monolayers and in providing a possibility of fabricating 2D composite B 4 CN 3 /BN and B 3 CN 4 /BN metal-free spintronic materials theoretically.

  3. Study of carbonitriding thermochemical treatment by plasma screen in active with pressures main austenitic stainless steels AISI 409 and AISI 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, M.S.; Oliveira, A.M.; Leal, V.S.; Sousa, R.R.M. de; Alves Junior, C.; Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Piaui; Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte

    2010-01-01

    The technique called Active Screen Plasma Nitriding (ASPN) is being used as an alternative once it offers several advantages with respect to conventional DC plasma. In this method, the plasma does not form directly in the sample's surface but on a screen, in such a way that undesired effects such as the edge effect is minimized. Stainless steels present not very satisfactory wearing characteristics. However, plasma carbonitriding has been used as to improve its resistance to wearing due to the formation of a fine surface layer with good properties. In this work, samples of stainless steel AISI 316L and AISI 409 were treated at pressures of 2.5 and 5 mbar. After the treatments they were characterized by microhardness, microscopy and Xray diffraction. Microscopy and hardness analysis showed satisfactory layers and toughness in those steels. (author)

  4. Polymer-Derived Silicoboron Carbonitride Foams for CO2 Capture: From Design to Application as Scaffolds for the in Situ Growth of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra, Fabien; Depardieu, Martin; Mouline, Zineb; Vignoles, Gérard L; Iwamoto, Yuji; Miele, Philippe; Backov, Rénal; Bernard, Samuel

    2016-06-06

    A template-assisted polymer-derived ceramic route is investigated for preparing a series of silicoboron carbonitride (Si/B/C/N) foams with a hierarchical pore size distribution and tailorable interconnected porosity. A boron-modified polycarbosilazane was selected to impregnate monolithic silica and carbonaceous templates and form after pyrolysis and template removal Si/B/C/N foams. By changing the hard template nature and controlling the quantity of polymer to be impregnated, controlled micropore/macropore distributions with mesoscopic cell windows are generated. Specific surface areas from 29 to 239 m(2)  g(-1) and porosities from 51 to 77 % are achieved. These foams combine a low density with a thermal insulation and a relatively good thermostructural stability. Their particular structure allowed the in situ growth of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) directly within the open-cell structure. MOFs offered a microporosity feature to the resulting Si/B/C/N@MOF composite foams that allowed increasing the specific surface area to provide CO2 uptake of 2.2 %. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Influence of carbon on structure stability, mechanical and tribological properties of β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 silicon carbonitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Hua, Guomin; Chen, Linbo; Li, Changsheng; Yang, Jianhong; Cheng, Xiaonong

    2018-05-01

    In this study, β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 Silicon Carbonitride was prepared by Self-Propagation High-Temperature Synthesis (SHS). And the influence of carbon on structure stability, mechanical and tribological properties of β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 were investigated. The results showed that the solubility of carbon in β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 was about 10 wt%, beyond which cubic-SiC segregated out of β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 to form β-Si3N4/cubic-SiC composite. Regarding influences of carbon concentration on mechanical properties, the hardness of β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 decreased from 1400 Hv to 1200 Hv with the increase of carbon concentration. Whereas, the fracture toughness of β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 increased from 6.5 MPa · m0.5 to 7.6 MPa · m0.5 with the increase of carbon concentration. The tribological property studies revealed the anti-wear performance of β-Si3(Cx,N1‑x)4 was enhanced by the increase of carbon concentration. The dominated wear mechanism could be attributed to the abrasive wear by fracture.

  6. Antibacterial and Tribological Performance of Carbonitride Coatings Doped with W, Ti, Zr, or Cr Deposited on AISI 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sun-Hui; Su, Yen-Liang; Lai, Yu-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Carbonitride (CNx) coatings have existed for several decades but are not well understood. Related studies have indicated that CNx coatings exhibit behaviors comparable to diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings. Metal-doped CNx coatings are expected to show superior performance to single CNx coatings. In this study, a CNx coating and a group of CNx coatings with 6 at. % metal doping (W, Ti, Zr, or Cr) were prepared on biograde AISI 316L stainless steel (SS316L) substrates, and they were then characterized and studied for antibacterial and wear performance. The microstructure, constituent phase, nanohardness, adhesion, surface roughness, and contact angle were evaluated. The antimicrobial test used Staphylococcus aureus and followed the Japanese Industrial Standard JIS Z 2801:2010. Finally, the wear behavior was assessed. The results showed that the CNx coating was a composite of amorphous CNx and amorphous C structures. The metal doping caused crystalline metal carbides/nitrides to form in the CNx coatings, which weakened their overall integrity. All the coatings showed antimicrobial ability for the SS316L samples. The CNx-Zr coating, the surface of which had the highest hydrophilicity, produced the best antibacterial performance. However, the CNx-Zr coating showed lower wear resistance than the CNx-W and CNx-Ti coatings. The CNx-Ti coating with a highly hydrophilic surface exhibited the lowest antibacterial ability. PMID:29039782

  7. Antibacterial and Tribological Performance of Carbonitride Coatings Doped with W, Ti, Zr, or Cr Deposited on AISI 316L Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hui Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonitride (CNx coatings have existed for several decades but are not well understood. Related studies have indicated that CNx coatings exhibit behaviors comparable to diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings. Metal-doped CNx coatings are expected to show superior performance to single CNx coatings. In this study, a CNx coating and a group of CNx coatings with 6 at. % metal doping (W, Ti, Zr, or Cr were prepared on biograde AISI 316L stainless steel (SS316L substrates, and they were then characterized and studied for antibacterial and wear performance. The microstructure, constituent phase, nanohardness, adhesion, surface roughness, and contact angle were evaluated. The antimicrobial test used Staphylococcus aureus and followed the Japanese Industrial Standard JIS Z 2801:2010. Finally, the wear behavior was assessed. The results showed that the CNx coating was a composite of amorphous CNx and amorphous C structures. The metal doping caused crystalline metal carbides/nitrides to form in the CNx coatings, which weakened their overall integrity. All the coatings showed antimicrobial ability for the SS316L samples. The CNx-Zr coating, the surface of which had the highest hydrophilicity, produced the best antibacterial performance. However, the CNx-Zr coating showed lower wear resistance than the CNx-W and CNx-Ti coatings. The CNx-Ti coating with a highly hydrophilic surface exhibited the lowest antibacterial ability.

  8. Irradiation behaviour of mixed uranium-plutonium carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides; Comportement a l'irradiation de carbures, nitrures et carbonitrures mixtes d'uranium et de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikailoff, H; Mustelier, J P; Bloch, J; Leclere, J; Hayet, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    In the framework of the research program of fast reactor fuels two irradiation experiments have been carried out on mixed uranium-plutonium carbides, nitrides and carbo-nitrides. In the first experiment carried out with thermal neutrons, the fuel consisted of sintered pellets sheathed in a stainless steel can with a small gap filled with helium. There were three mixed mono-carbide samples and the maximum linear power was 715 W/cm. After a burn-up slightly lower than 20000 MW day/tonne, a swelling of the fuel which had ruptured the cans was observed. In the second experiment carried out in the BR2 reactor with epithermal neutrons, the samples consisted of sintered pellets sodium bonded in a stainless steel tube. There were three samples containing different fuels and the linear power varies between 1130 and 1820 W/cm. Post-irradiation examination after a maximal burn-up of 1550 MW day/tonne showed that the behaviour of the three fuel elements was satisfactory. (authors) [French] Dans le cadre du programme d'etude des conibustiles pour reacteurs rapides, on a realise deux experiences d'irradiation de carbures, nitrures et carbonitrures mixtes d'uranium et de plutonium. Dans la premiere experience, faite en neutrons thermiques, le combustible etait constitue de,pastilles frittees gainees dans un tube d'acier inoxydable avec un faible jeu rempli d'helium. Il y avait trois echantillons de monocarbures mixtes, et la puissance lineaire maximale etait de 715 W/cm. Apres un taux de combustion legerement inferieur a 20 000 MWj/t, on a observe un gonflement des combustible qui a provoque, la rupture des gaines. Pans la seconde experience, realisee dans le reacteur BR2 en neutrons epithermiques, les echantillons etaient constitues de pastilles frittees gainees dans un tube d'acier avec un joint sodium. Il y avait trois echantillons contenant des combustibles differents, et la puissance lineaire variait de 1130 a 1820 W/cm. Les examens apres irradiation a un taux maximal de

  9. Study of carbonitriding thermochemical treatment by plasma screen in active with pressures main austenitic stainless steels AISI 409 and AISI 316L; Estudo do tratamento termoquimico de carbonitretacao por plasma em tela ativa com pressoes variaveis nos acos inoxidaveis austenitico AISI 316L e ferririco AISI 409

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, M.S.; Oliveira, A.M.; Leal, V.S.; Sousa, R.R.M. de; Alves Junior, C. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Maranhao (CEFET/MA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Piaui (CEFET/PI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (DF/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Labplasma

    2010-07-01

    The technique called Active Screen Plasma Nitriding (ASPN) is being used as an alternative once it offers several advantages with respect to conventional DC plasma. In this method, the plasma does not form directly in the sample's surface but on a screen, in such a way that undesired effects such as the edge effect is minimized. Stainless steels present not very satisfactory wearing characteristics. However, plasma carbonitriding has been used as to improve its resistance to wearing due to the formation of a fine surface layer with good properties. In this work, samples of stainless steel AISI 316L and AISI 409 were treated at pressures of 2.5 and 5 mbar. After the treatments they were characterized by microhardness, microscopy and Xray diffraction. Microscopy and hardness analysis showed satisfactory layers and toughness in those steels. (author)

  10. Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

    1987-02-25

    A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

  11. Properties of carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides based on Ti and Mo multicomponent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, J.; Markowski, J.; Prajzner, A.; Zdanowski, J. [Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland). Inst. Technologii Elektronowej

    1998-01-01

    Coating have been produced by bias activated reactive evaporation method (BARE) [1] on polished HSS steel and Corning glass substrates. Titanium and molybdenum were co-evaporated using a special two-hearth electron gun with separate Ti and Mo evaporation sources. Various chemical compositions were obtained by means of heating time control of respective materials. The working gases were nitrogen, acetylene and a 1:1 mixture of both. The investigation of properties of layers with various chemical compositions covered samples: TiC, TiCN, TiN, (Ti,Mo)C, (Ti,Mo)CN, (Ti,Mo)N, MoC, MoCN, MoN. The chemical film compositions were determined using the energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) method. Vickers hardness measurements were made. The structures of the deposited layers were examined by means of X-ray diffraction. The electrical measurements of the deposited layers covered resistivity ({rho}) and temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR). It has been found that the measurements of electrical properties may be very sensitive indicators of the layer composition and structure. (orig.) 5 refs.

  12. The role of terminations and coordination atoms on the pseudocapacitance of titanium carbonitride monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Cheng, Chuan; Fang, Peilin; Tang, Bin; Zhang, Jindou; Huang, Guoming; Cong, Xin; Zhang, Bao; Ji, Xiao; Miao, Ling

    2016-02-14

    Nowadays, MXenes have received extensive concern as a prominent electrode material of electrochemical capacitors. As two important factors to the capacitance, the influence of the intrinsical terminations (F, O and OH) and coordination atoms (C and N) is investigated using first-principles calculations. According to the density of states aligned with the standard hydrogen electrode, it turns out that a Ti3CNO2 monolayer is proven to show an obvious pseudocapacitive behavior, while the bare, F and OH terminated Ti3CN monolayers may only present electrochemical double layer characters in an aqueous electrolyte. Moreover, the illustration of molecular orbitals over the Fermi level are mainly contributed by the d-orbitals of Ti atoms coordinated with O and N atoms, indicating that the redox pseudocapacitance of the Ti3CNO2 monolayer is promoted by the coordination N atoms. Then the superiority of N bonded Ti atoms in accepting charges can be visualized through the charge population. Further, the larger ratio of C/N in the coordination environment of Ti atoms indicates that more electrons can be stored. Our investigation can give an instructional advice in the MXenes-electrode production.

  13. Favourable environmental factors for shaft furnace installation for gas carbonitriding and hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, H. (Solo-Industrieofenbau, Biehl-Bienne (Switzerland))

    In this lecture we do not primarily speak about the shaft furnace installation as one could think when reading the title - but about one quenching system - mounted over the shaft furnace installation. This quenching system permits a hardening in several mediums, without any formation of flames, smoke and vapour, and causes the surfaces of the pieces to be free of tinder. Moreover, the security for the work staff in the heat treatment shops are highly improved.

  14. Effect of nitrogen doping on titanium carbonitride-derived adsorbents used for arsenic removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jisun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soonjae [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Keunsu [Computational Science Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinhong [Samsung Electronics Co.Ltd.,(Maetan dong) 129, Samsung-ro Yeongtong-gu, Suwonsi, Gyeonggi-do 443-742, Repubilc of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Daegwon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Gu [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); An, Byungryul [Department of Civil Engineering, Sangmyung University, Cheonan, Chungnam 31066 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Hyup [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mizuseki, Hiroshi, E-mail: mizuseki@kist.re.kr [Computational Science Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae-Woo, E-mail: plead36@kist.re.kr [Center for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy and Environmental Engineering, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shinhoo, E-mail: shinkang@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • The N-doping can improve the As adsorption performance of carbon-based materials. • The material features high micro- and small meso-pores with exceptional surface area. • Pyrrolic N atoms distributed uniformly on the micropores act as adsorption sites. • The synthesis temperature affected pore properties and surface functional groups. - Abstract: Arsenic in water and wastewater is considered to be a critical contaminant as it poses harmful health risks. In this regard, to meet the stringent regulation of arsenic in aqueous solutions, nitrogen doped carbon-based materials (CN) were prepared as adsorbents and tested for the removal of arsenic ion from aqueous solutions. Nitrogen-doped carbon (CNs) synthesized by chlorination exhibited well-developed micro- and small meso-pores with uniform pore structures. The structure and characteristics of the adsorbents thus developed were confirmed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Among the CNs developed, CN700 exhibited high adsorption capacity for arsenic (31.08 mg/g). The adsorption efficiency for arsenic ion was confirmed to be affected by pyrrolic nitrogen and micro-pores. These results suggest that CNs are useful adsorbents for the treatment of arsenic, and in particular, CN700 demonstrates potential for application as an adsorbent for the removal of anionic heavy metals from wastewater and sewage.

  15. Optical and electrical characteristics of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition boron carbonitride thin films derived from N-trimethylborazine precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulyaeva, Veronica S., E-mail: veronica@niic.nsc.ru [Department of Functional Materials Chemistry, Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kosinova, Marina L.; Rumyantsev, Yurii M.; Kuznetsov, Fedor A. [Department of Functional Materials Chemistry, Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, Valerii G. [Laboratory of Physical Principles for Integrated Microelectronics, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kirienko, Viktor V. [Laboratory of Nonequilibrium Semiconductors Systems, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-02

    Thin BC{sub x}N{sub y} films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using N-trimethylborazine as a precursor. The films were deposited on Si(100) and fused silica substrates. The grown films were characterized by ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, capacitance–voltage and current–voltage measurements. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature (373–973 K) and gas phase composition were varied. Low temperature BC{sub x}N{sub y} films were found to be high optical transparent layers in the range of 300–2000 nm, the transmittance as high as 93% has been achieved. BC{sub x}N{sub y} layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9 depending on the synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • Thin BC{sub x}N{sub y} films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. • N-trimethylborazine was used as a precursor. • Low temperature BC{sub x}N{sub y} films were found to be high optical transparent layers (93%). • BC{sub x}N{sub y} layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9.

  16. Optical and electrical characteristics of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition boron carbonitride thin films derived from N-trimethylborazine precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulyaeva, Veronica S.; Kosinova, Marina L.; Rumyantsev, Yurii M.; Kuznetsov, Fedor A.; Kesler, Valerii G.; Kirienko, Viktor V.

    2014-01-01

    Thin BC x N y films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using N-trimethylborazine as a precursor. The films were deposited on Si(100) and fused silica substrates. The grown films were characterized by ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, capacitance–voltage and current–voltage measurements. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature (373–973 K) and gas phase composition were varied. Low temperature BC x N y films were found to be high optical transparent layers in the range of 300–2000 nm, the transmittance as high as 93% has been achieved. BC x N y layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9 depending on the synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • Thin BC x N y films have been obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. • N-trimethylborazine was used as a precursor. • Low temperature BC x N y films were found to be high optical transparent layers (93%). • BC x N y layers are dielectrics with dielectric constant k = 2.2–8.9

  17. Improvement of the Surface Hardness of Stainless Steel with the TitaniumCarbonitride Ti(CN) Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agus-Purwadi; Tri-Mardji Atmono; Widdi-Usada; Lely-Susita; Yunanto

    2000-01-01

    Fabrication of the T i (CN) thin films with methods of implantation and RFsputtering for improving the surfaces hardness of stainless steel (SS) hasbeen done. Some kinds of T i C thin films which made individually by varyingof RF sputtering power from 0 up to 160 watt are implanted by the nitrogenion beams on the doses and energy ion optimum of 6.107 x 10 17 ion/cm 2 and100 keV, also fabrication of T i (CN) thin films use RF sputtering method withT i target and reaction gases as argon, silene and nitrogen on the optimum ofsputtering parameter condition. The thin films yields are characterized byusing Microhardness Tester MX 170, obtained SS hardness which layered T i (CN)as 402.5 KHN from its initial of 215.54 KHN and 371.74 KHN (layered T i C), itmeans that the SS surface hardness improve 1.867 times cumulatively. From theX-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis yield showed that the microstructure ofT i (CN) films on the SS substrates are dominated by characteristic cubiccrystal structure with Miller plane orientation (111) on the scattering angleof 2 θ = 44 o . Morphology visualization of T i (CN) thin films crosssection on the SS substrate is realized by Spectroscopy Electron Microscope(SEM). (author)

  18. Molecular precursor derived silicon boron carbonitride/carbon nanotube and silicon oxycarbide/carbon nanotube composite nanowires for energy based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, Romil

    Molecular precursor derived ceramics (also known as polymer-derived ceramics or PDCs) are high temperature glasses that have been studied for applications involving operation at elevated temperatures. Prepared from controlled thermal degradation of liquid-phase organosilicon precursors, these ceramics offer remarkable engineering properties such as resistance to crystallization up to 1400 °C, semiconductor behavior at high temperatures and intense photoluminescence. These properties are a direct result of their covalent bonded amorphous network and free (-sp2) carbon along with mixed Si/B/C/N/O bonds, which otherwise can not be obtained through conventional ceramic processing techniques. This thesis demonstrates synthesis of a unique core/shell type nanowire structure involving either siliconboroncarbonitride (SiBCN) or siliconoxycarbide (SiOC) as the shell with carbon nanotube (CNT) acting as the core. This was made possible by liquid phase functionalization of CNT surfaces with respective polymeric precursor (e.g., home-made boron-modified polyureamethylvinylsilazane for SiBCN/CNT and commercially obtained polysiloxane for SiOC/CNT), followed by controlled pyrolysis in inert conditions. This unique architecture has several benefits such as high temperature oxidation resistance (provided by the ceramic shell), improved electrical conductivity and mechanical toughness (attributed to the CNT core) that allowed us to explore its use in energy conversion and storage devices. The first application involved use of SiBCN/CNT composite as a high temperature radiation absorbant material for laser thermal calorimeter. SiBCN/CNT spray coatings on copper substrate were exposed to high energy laser beams (continuous wave at 10.6 mum 2.5 kW CO2 laser, 10 seconds) and resulting change in its microstructure was studied ex-situ. With the aid of multiple techniques we ascertained the thermal damage resistance to be 15 kW/cm -2 with optical absorbance exceeding 97%. This represents one order of magnitude improvement over bare CNTs (1.4 kW/cm-2) coatings and two orders of magnitude over the conventional carbon paint (0.1 kW/cm -2) currently in use. The second application involved use of SiBCN/CNT and SiOC/CNT composite coatings as energy storage (anode) material in a Li-ion rechargeable battery. Anode coatings (~1mg/cm-2) prepared using SiBCN/CNT synthesized at 1100 °C exhibited high reversible (useable) capacity of 412 mAh/g -1 even after 30 cycles. Further improvement in reversible capacity was obtained for SiOC/CNT coatings with 686 mAh/g-1 at 40 cycles and approximately 99.6% cyclic efficiency. Further, post cycling imaging of dissembled cells indicated good mechanical stability of these anodes and formation of a stable passivating layer necessary for long term cycling of the cell. This improved performance was collectively attributed to the amorphous ceramic shell that offered Li storage sites and the CNT core that provided the required mechanical strength against volume changes associated with repeated Li-cycling. This novel approach for synthesis of PDC nanocomposites and its application based testing offers a starting point to carry out further research with a variety of PDC chemistries at both fundamental and applied levels.

  19. Plutonium diffusion in advanced fuels (U,Pu)(C,O) and (U,Pu)(C,N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Matzke, H.

    1983-01-01

    The self-diffusion of 238 Pu was measured in an oxicarbide (U,Pu)(C,O) and a carbonitride (U,Pu) (C,N). The activation enthalpies were 447 and 347 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The carbonitrides were confirmed to fall into three classes: carbide-like compositions with less than 30% nitrogen in the metalloid lattice, nitride-like composition with more than 70% nitrogen and with reduced atomic mobilities, and carbonitrides with about 50% nitrogen showing an intermediate behavior. The oxicarbide showed diffusion coefficients slightly larger than those of pure carbides

  20. P and Si functionalized MXenes for metal-ion battery applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2017-01-01

    MXenes are a family of two-dimensional materials, composed of early transition metal carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides, with great potential in energy storage systems, in particular in electrodes for Li, Na, K-ion batteries. However, so far

  1. Raising the Corrosion Resistance of Low-Carbon Steels by Electrolytic-Plasma Saturation with Nitrogen and Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmanov, S. A.; Grishina, E. P.; Belkin, P. N.; Kusmanova, Yu. V.; Kudryakova, N. O.

    2017-05-01

    Structural features of the external oxide layer and internal nitrided, carbonitrided and carburized layers in steels 10, 20 and St3 produced by the method of electrolytic plasma treatment are studied. Specimens of the steels are tested for corrosion in a naturally aerated 1-N solution of sodium chloride. The condition of the metal/sodium chloride solution interface is studied by the method of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the corrosion resistance of low-carbon steels can be raised by anode electrolytic-plasma saturation with nitrogen and carbon. Recommendations are given on the choice of carbonitriding modes for structural steels.

  2. Survey of post-irradiation examinations made of mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    Post-irradiation examinations on mixed carbide, nitride and carbonitride fuels irradiated in fast flux reactors Rapsodie and DFR were carried out during the seventies and early eighties. In this report, emphasis was put on the fission gas release, cladding carburization and head-end gaseous oxidation process of these fuels, in particular, of mixed carbides. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs

  3. MOCVD of zirconium oxide from the zirconium guanidinate complex |ZrCp′{2-(iPrN)2CNMe2}2Cl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackman, C.S.; Carmalt, C.J.; Moniz, S.J.A.; Potts, S.E.; Davies, H.O.; Pugh, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Parallel to successful studies into use of [ZrCp'{¿ 2-(iPrN)2CNMe2} 2Cl] as a precursor to the deposition of zirconium carbonitride via CVD the same precursor was utilised for the MOCVD of thin films of ZrO 2 using borosilicate glass substrates. The deposited films were of mixed phase; films

  4. Comparative study of the tribological behavior under hybrid lubrication of diamond-like carbon films with different adhesion interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R. P. C.; Lima-Oliveira, D. A.; Marciano, F. R.; Lobo, A. O.; Corat, E. J.; Trava-Airoldi, V. J.

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports the influence of the adhesion interlayer between stainless steel and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films in two different contact conditions: in dry air and deionized water. The water was the liquid used to understand the mechanism and chemical reactions of the tribolayer formation under boundary lubrication. The effect of silicon and carbonitride adhesion interlayer was investigated on uncoated and coated DLC films. The results show that DLC/DLC pairs using carbonitride in air (30% RH) showed 60% less friction coefficient and wear less than three orders of magnitude than DLC/DLC pairs using silicon as interlayer. In deionized water, DLC/DLC pairs using carbonitride as interlayer showed 31% less friction coefficient when compared to DLC/DLC pairs with silicon. Raman related the chemical and structural changes in the DLC films during sliding in air and in the presence of water. Scratch tests showed a critical load of 14 N and 33 N in DLC films with silicon and carbonitride, respectively.

  5. Metallographic preparation of sintered oxides, carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Arles, L.

    1967-12-01

    We describe the methods of polishing, attack and coloring used at the section of plutonium base ceramics studies. These methods have stood the test of experience on the uranium and plutonium carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides as well on the mixed uranium and plutonium oxides. These methods have been particularly adapted to fit to the low dense and sintered samples [fr

  6. The aging by precipitation of Nb (C,N) in extra low carbon content steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.C.; Kestenbach, H.-J.

    1982-01-01

    Carbonitride precipitation has been studied in a high-niobium acicular - ferrite - type steel. Interphase precipitation occurred only in those samples in which high transformation temperatures led to distinctly polygonal-ferrite microestructures. In this latter case, precipitation occurred during a subsequent aging treatment, with a strong tendency for heterogeneous nucleation on dislocations. (Author) [pt

  7. The solubility of solid fission products in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium. Part I: literature review on experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1977-01-01

    This review compiles the available data on the solubility of the most important non-volatile fission products in the carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides of uranium and plutonium. It includes some elements which are not fission products, but belong to a group of the Periodic Table which contains one or more fission products elements

  8. Effect of carbon on interstitial ordering and magnetic properties of ε-Fe2(N,C)1-z

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2017-01-01

    Hexagonal ε-iron nitride and ε-iron carbonitride phases are formed on nitriding and nitrocarburizing ofiron and steel surfaces and can exist in broad compositional ranges. Long-range nitrogen ordering andmagnetic properties for ε-iron nitrides and their dependence on composition have been the foc...

  9. Study on the performance of fuel elements with carbide and carbide-nitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchenko, Yu.M.; Davydov, E.F.; Maershin, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics, test conditions and basic results of material testing of fuel elements with carbide and carbonitride fuel irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor up to 3-10% burn-up at specific power rate of 55-70 kW/m and temperatures of the cladding up to 720 deg C are described. Increase of cladding diameter is stated mainly to result from pressure of swelling fuel. The influence of initial efficient porosity of the fuel on cladding deformation and fuel stoichiometry on steel carbonization is considered. Utilization of carbide and carbonitride fuel at efficient porosity of 20% at the given test modes is shown to ensure their operability up to 10% burn-up

  10. Study creep in 4340 steels with different microstructure and plasma carbon nitridation processing; Estudo de fluencia em acos 4340 com diferentes microestruturas e tratamento de carbonitretacao a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, A.J., E-mail: abdalla@ieav.cta.b [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados; Carrer, I.R.; Barboza, M.J.R.; Baggio-Scheid, V.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Moura Neto, C.; Reis, D.A.P. [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica

    2010-07-01

    From the AISI 4340 bars specimens were made-for-test of creep, they were subjected to different heat treatments for the formation of multiphase microstructures. After this initial treatment, a lot of the specimens were tested in creep. One second batch of specimens was treated with a plasma carbonitriding, and later, were also tested. The carbonitriding layer and microstructure were characterized with X-ray analysis, laser confocal microscopy and hardness testing. Tests showed that the hardness in the steel was reduced due to thermochemical treatment at 500 deg C. We observed variation in creep behavior due to different microstructures formed. After the plasma treatment, there was a considerable reduction in the rate of creep and an increase in the time required for fracture. (author)

  11. Study creep in 4340 steels with different microstructure and plasma carbon nitridation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, A.J.; Carrer, I.R.; Barboza, M.J.R.; Baggio-Scheid, V.H.; Moura Neto, C.; Reis, D.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    From the AISI 4340 bars specimens were made-for-test of creep, they were subjected to different heat treatments for the formation of multiphase microstructures. After this initial treatment, a lot of the specimens were tested in creep. One second batch of specimens was treated with a plasma carbonitriding, and later, were also tested. The carbonitriding layer and microstructure were characterized with X-ray analysis, laser confocal microscopy and hardness testing. Tests showed that the hardness in the steel was reduced due to thermochemical treatment at 500 deg C. We observed variation in creep behavior due to different microstructures formed. After the plasma treatment, there was a considerable reduction in the rate of creep and an increase in the time required for fracture. (author)

  12. Effects of Rare Earth on Behavior of Precipitation and Properties in Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林勤; 陈邦文; 唐历; 李联生; 朱兴元; 王怀斌

    2003-01-01

    The influence of rare earths on the behavior of precipitation of 14MnNb,X60 and 10MnV steels was studied by STEM, XRD, ICP and thermal simulation method. The main carbonitride precipitates are Nb(C, N),(Nb, Ti)(C, N)and V(C, N). In austenite RE delays the beginning of precipitation, and decreases the rate of precipitation. In ferrite RE promotes precipitation and increases the amount of equilibrium carbonitride precipitation. RE can make precipitates fine, globular and dispersed in the microalloyed steels. With the increase of the amount of RE in steel, the amount of precipitation increases. The promotion effect is weakened with excessive RE. RE has only little influence on the strength of microalloyed steel, but it can improve impact toughness effectively.

  13. End Uses Mechanical Properties Settled By The Modified Sintering Conditions Of The Metal Injection Molding Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marray, Tarek; Jaccquet, Philippe; Moinard-Checot, Delphine; Fabre, Agnes; Barrallier, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Most common mechanical applications require parts with specific properties as hard faced features. It is well known that treating parts under suitable atmospheres may improve hardness and strength yield of steels. Heat treatment process and more particularly thermo-chemical diffusion processes (such as carburizing or its variation: carbonitriding) can be performed to reach the industrial hardness profile requirements. In this work, a low-alloyed steel feedstock based on water soluble binder system is submitted to the MIM process steps (including injection molding, debinding and sintering). As-sintered parts are then treated under a low pressure carbonitriding treatment. This contribution focuses on preliminary results such as microstructural analyses and mechanical properties which are established at each stage of the process to determine and monitor changes.

  14. Functionally graded hardmetals and cermets: preparation, performance and production scale up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, K.; Kassel, D.; Daub, H.-W.; Berg, H. van den; Lengauer, W.; Garcia, J.; Ucakar, V.

    2001-01-01

    Sintering experiments were carried out to establish graded microstructures in hardmetals and cermets. The formation of these microstructural features was investigated as a function of nitrogen pressure, sintering temperature, sintering period and sintering profile. The nitrogen pressure influences the formation of carbonitride layers at the surface. Decreasing sintering temperature yields similar results as increasing nitrogen pressure. Upon prolonged sintering time a small growth of the outer carbonitride layer can only be obtained if a substantial WC grain growth is accepted. Variation of the sintering profile after dense sintering does not principally change the type of the graded microstructure. The laboratory experiments were scaled up in an industrial sinter/HIP furnace and showing good correspondence with each other. First turning cutting tests with different alloys show excellent performance in comparison to ungraded materials. (author)

  15. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN, with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  16. Zircon Carburation Studies as Intermediate Stage in the Zirconium Fabrication; Estudios encaminados a la carburacion del circon como etapa intermedia en la obtencion de circonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almagro Huertas, V; Saenz de Tejada Gonzalez, L.; Lopez Rodriguez, M

    1963-07-01

    Zirconium carbide and carbonitride mixtures were obtained by Kroll's method.Reaction products have been identified by micrography and X-ray diffraction analysis. The optimum graphite content in the initial charge for the carburation reaction has been studied. zirconium, silicon and carbon content in the final product has been controlled as a function of current in the furnace and reaction time.Further chlorination of the final product was performed successfully. (Author) 16 refs.

  17. New CrMoNiNb - based steel for nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottwald, M.; Gladis, R.; Walder, V.

    1977-01-01

    The technique of ferritic low-alloyed steel stabilization by niobium is used in improving its structural stability under elevated temperatures and in increasing resistance to decarburization in liquid sodium. The use of niobium as the stabilizing element, however, gives rise to problems stemming from low solubility of niobium carbide or niobium carbonitride. Undesirable niobium properties can be limited by observing the stoichiometric ratio of niobium and carbon and by observing the technological principles of the processing. (J.P.)

  18. Zircon Carburation Studies as Intermediate Stage in the Zirconium Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro Huertas, V.; Saenz de Tejada Gonzalez, L.; Lopez Rodriguez, M.

    1963-01-01

    Zirconium carbide and carbonitride mixtures were obtained by Kroll's method.Reaction products have been identified by micrography and X-ray diffraction analysis. The optimum graphite content in the initial charge for the carburation reaction has been studied. zirconium, silicon and carbon content in the final product has been controlled as a function of current in the furnace and reaction time.Further chlorination of the final product was performed successfully. (Author) 16 refs

  19. Planar, Polysilazane?Derived Porous Ceramic Supports for Membrane and Catalysis Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Konegger, Thomas; Williams, Lee F.; Bordia, Rajendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Porous, silicon carbonitride?based ceramic support structures for potential membrane and catalysis applications were generated from a preceramic polysilazane precursor in combination with spherical, ultrahigh?molecular weight polyethylene microparticles through a sacrificial filler approach. A screening evaluation was used for the determination of the impact of both porogen content and porogen size on pore structure, strength, and permeability characteristics of planar specimens. By optimizin...

  20. Zircon Carburation Studies as Intermediate Stage in the Zirconium Fabrication; Estudios encaminados a la carburacion del circon como etapa intermedia en la obtencion de circonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almagro Huertas, V.; Saenz de Tejada Gonzalez, L.; Lopez Rodriguez, M.

    1963-07-01

    Zirconium carbide and carbonitride mixtures were obtained by Kroll's method.Reaction products have been identified by micrography and X-ray diffraction analysis. The optimum graphite content in the initial charge for the carburation reaction has been studied. zirconium, silicon and carbon content in the final product has been controlled as a function of current in the furnace and reaction time.Further chlorination of the final product was performed successfully. (Author) 16 refs.

  1. Report on swelling of MX-type fuels 1973/76: Self-diffusion in MX-type nuclear fuels out-of-pile and in-pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.; Bradbury, M.H.

    1978-01-01

    Self-diffusion measurements of Pu-238 and U-233 have been carried out in a wide range of advanced nuclear fuels in the temperature region from 1200 to 2300 0 C. The materials studied varied in composition from carbides through carbonitrides to nitrides. In particular the effect on self-diffusion rates of factors such as non-metal/metal ratio, oxygen content increasing nitrogen contents, metallic impurity additions, the presence of second phases and fission products simulating 16, 10 and 3 a /o burn up has been established. Grain boundary diffusion rates were evaluated where possible. Carbon diffusion in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric UC and in a series of uranium carbonitride samples was also measured. The RADIF experiments (radiation induced diffusion) have provided results upon the effect of irradiation on the self-diffusion rates in the temperature range 150 to 1300 0 C. Each of the factors mentioned above is discussed in detail with special attention being given to the effects of non-metal/metal ratio, impurities and increasing the nitrogen content in carbonitride materials

  2. Nano- and Macro-wear of Bio-carbo-nitrided AISI 8620 Steel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Emmanuel Kwesi; Ampaw, Edward; Zebaze Kana, M. G.; Adetunji, A. R.; Olusunle, S. O. O.; Adewoye, O. O.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of nano- and macro-scale wear in a carbo-nitrided AISI 8620 steel. Carbo-nitriding is carried out using a novel method that involves the use of dried, cyanide-containing cassava leaves, as sources of carbon and nitrogen. These are used in a pack cementation that is used to diffuse carbon and nitrogen into case layers at intermediate temperatures [673.15 K, 723.15 K, 773.15 K, and 823.15 K (400 °C, 450 °C, 500 °C, and 550 °C)]. Nano- and macro-scale wear properties are studied in the case-hardened surfaces, using a combination of nano-scratch and pin-on-disk experiments. The measured wear volumes (at both nano- and macro-length scales) are shown to increase with decreasing pack cyaniding temperature. The nano- and macro-wear resistances are also shown to be enhanced by the in situ diffusion of carbon and nitrogen from cyanide-containing bio-processed waste. The underlying wear mechanisms are also elucidated via atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations of the wear tracks. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of hardened carbo-nitrided steel surfaces with improved wear resistance.

  3. Contribution to the study of the (U,Pu)C,N system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, R.

    1968-01-01

    The reactions of UC, PuC, (U,Pu)C, UC 2 and U(C 1-x O x ) with nitrogen at moderate temperatures (room temperature to 400 C) are described. The influence of the uptake of nitrogen by the powders necessary to sinter the carbides upon the nature of the final product has been investigated; it has been shown that the sintered carbides are hyper-stoichiometric. The reactions of carbon with UN, PuN and (U,Pu)N has also been studied. Under vacuum, carbon reacts on the nitrides at temperatures as low as 1100 C; nitrogen is replaced by carbon and the final product is a carbonitride. The reaction is: MN + x C → MN 1-x C x + x/2N 2 . The reaction is limited and the carbonitrides have a fixed composition in presence of M 2 C 3 or MC 2 ; hence it is impossible to produce pure MC using the reaction. The ternary diagram U-C-N, Pu-C-N and (U,Pu)C-N have been drawn. They show clearly that it is possible to obtain single phase carbonitrides in a wide domain of compositions. (author) [fr

  4. Preparation, structure and properties of hafnium compounds in the system Hf-C-N-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brundiers, G.D.

    1975-08-01

    Highly dense, homogenous and single phase hafnium carbonitride samples (with low oxygen content) were prepared in the whole concentration range of the ternary cubic carbonitrides. Stoichiometric hafnium oxicarbides were also prepared within the range of solubility. The procedure involved the hot pressing of powders of HfC, HfN, Hf, Hf-Oxide and carbon at temperatures of 3,000 0 C and pressures up to 550 kpf/cm 2 using a novel technique. Small single crystals of slightly substoichiometric HfN were also repared. The densification of the powders was studied as a function of the non-metal concentration. Carbonitrides with N/Hf ratio of 0.37 were prepared in a high temperature autoclave operating at medium pressures by the reaction of HfC with nitrogen. All the samples were characterized by density measurements, chemical, X-ray and metallographic analysis and in some cases with the aid of quantitative metallography and microprobe analysis. Typical properties investigated were lattice parameter, thermal expansion, microhardness and electrical resistivity as function of the non-metal content. For specific concentrations extreme values in the properties are attained. With the aid of the valence electron concentration (VEC) parameter, the properties can be correlated with the density of states of electrons at the Fermi level. (orig./HK) [de

  5. The effect of tempering on mechanical properties of 50Mn18Cr4WN retaining ring material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, M.C.; Guo, C.H.; Zheng, Z.Z.; Ma, Z.M.

    1990-01-01

    50Mn18Cr4WN is a retaining ring steel. It is strengthened by solution heat treatment and cold working. The process produces high macro residual stress. The retaining ring must be tempered for stress-relief. When the ring is sleeved, it is heated too. If the retaining ring is tempered, are the mechanical properties of the retaining ring damaged? The problem is described in the article. The tempering of testing pieces was carried out at several temperatures: 350degC, 400degC, 450degC, 500degC and 650degC. The tempering time was 3h. The yield point, tensile strength, elongation and reduction of area were determined by means of the tensile test. In the results, for temperatures between 350degC and 450degC, the yield point, tensile strength, elongation and reduction of area did not change notably. A stress corrosion cracking test was also carried out in a 3%Ni 4 NO 3 , 36%Ca(NO 3 ) 2 aqueous solution. K 1scc values after tempering at 450degC and without tempering were measured. The results showed that the K 1scc after tempering at 450degC decreased notably. Micrographs show that carbo-nitride precipitated. The precipitated carbo-nitride particles increased in size at the grain boundaries. The precipitated carbonitride particles increased in number at slip lines. It is clear that the precipitated particles lead to the increase of micro-cells and the micro-cells aggravated the stress corrosion cracking process. (orig.)

  6. Gas-phase mechanisms in the growth of ZrCyN1-y thin films by pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillmann, H.; Clerc, C.; Doebeli, M.; Willmott, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Superhard zirconium carbonitride films have been grown via pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation (PRCLA) using zirconium metal and a nitrogen- and carbon-containing gas pulse mixture. The control of stoichiometry was much simplified by using the thermally stable gas-phase species N 2 and CH 4 . The gas-phase processes are investigated using quadrupole mass spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. The excitation of the ablation plume depends intimately on the collision partner of the gas pulse, in particular on its density of states and the probability of energy transfer to internal degrees of freedom

  7. Defect structure in lithium-doped polymer-derived SiCN ceramics characterized by Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Emre; Mass, Valentina; Gembus, Armin; Schulz, Armin; Liebau-Kunzmann, Verena; Fasel, Claudia; Riedel, Ralf; Eichel, Rüdiger-A

    2009-07-21

    Lithium-doped polymer-derived silicon carbonitride ceramics (SiCN:Li) synthesized at various pyrolysis temperatures, have been investigated by means of multifrequency and multipulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine different defect states that may impact the materials electronic properties. In particular, carbon- and silicon-based 'dangling bonds' at elevated, as well as metallic networks containing Li0 in the order of 1 microm at low pyrolysis temperatures have been observed in concentrations ranging between 10(14) and 10(17) spins mg(-1).

  8. Wireless passive polymer-derived SiCN ceramic sensor with integrated resonator/antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yu, Yuxi; San, Haisheng; Wang, Yansong; An, Linan

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a passive wireless polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic sensor based on cavity radio frequency resonator together with integrated slot antenna. The effect of the cavity sensor dimensions on the Q-factor and resonant frequency is investigated by numerical simulation. A sensor with optimal dimensions is designed and fabricated. It is demonstrated that the sensor signal can be wirelessly detected at distances up to 20 mm. Given the high-temperature stability of the SiCN, the sensor is very promising for high-temperature wireless sensing applications.

  9. Micropurity in stainless steel making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, Z.

    1981-01-01

    New technologies were developed by the Vitkovice research institutes in response to high requirements for the quality of high-alloy steels for nuclear power, viz., duplex technology with double vacuum degassing at the DH unit and oxidation vacuum degassing using the VAKUVIT equipment. The steel produced shows low contents of impurities and high micropurity. A study was conducted into changes in carbon content and the formation of titanium nitrides and carbonitrides in austenitic steels during their production, and optimum technological parameters were found for eliminating their formation in forgings. (author)

  10. Thermodynamics of carbothermic synthesis of actinide mononitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Shirasu, Y.; Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    Carbothermic synthesis will be further applied to the fabrication of nitride fuels containing minor actinides (MA) such as neptunium, americium and curium. A thorough understanding of the carbothermic synthesis of UN will be beneficial in the development of the MA-containing fuels. Thermodynamic analysis was carried out for conditions of practical interest in order to better understand the recent fabrication experiences. Two types of solution phases, oxynitride and carbonitride phases, were taken into account. The Pu-N-O ternary isotherm was assessed for the modelling of M(C, N, O). With the understanding of the UN synthesis, the fabrication problems of Am-containing nitrides are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Nanostructured thin film coatings with different strengthening effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilov Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of articles on strengthening thin film coatings were analyzed and a lot of unusual strengthening effects, such as super high hardness and plasticity simultaneously, ultra low friction coefficient, high wear-resistance, curve rigidity increasing of drills with small diameter, associated with process formation of nanostructured coatings by the different thin film deposition methods were detected. Vacuum coater with RF magnetron sputtering system and ion-beam source and arc evaporator for nanostructured thin film coating manufacture are represented. Diamond Like Carbon and MoS2 thin film coatings, Ti, Al, Nb, Cr, nitride, carbide, and carbo-nitride thin film materials are described as strengthening coatings.

  12. Simulation of nanotubular forms of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L

    1999-01-01

    Data on the electronic and chemical structure of a new quasi-one-dimensional form of matter, viz., nanotubulenes, are generalised and systematised. Methods and approaches used in modern quantum chemistry for the simulation of the composition, structure, and properties of isolated tubulenes based on layered phases (graphite, boron nitride, boron carbide and boron carbonitride), nanotubular composites and nanotube crystals are described. The role of quantum theory in the development of the concepts of fundamental properties of substances in the nanotubular form and methods of their targeted modification is discussed. Prognostic potentials of theoretical models in solving material science problems are considered. The bibliography includes 197 references.

  13. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  14. Boundary and sub-boundary hardening in tempered martensitic 9Cr steel during long-term creep at 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    The boundary and sub-boundary hardening is shown to be the most important strengthening mechanism in creep of the 9% Cr steel base metal and welded joints. The addition of boron reduces the coarsening rate of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides along boundaries near prior austenite grain boundaries during creep, enhancing the boundary and sub-boundary hardening. This improves long-term creep strength of base metal. The enhancement of boundary and sub-boundary hardening is significantly reduced in fine-grained region of Ac{sub 3} HAZ simulated specimens of conventional steel P92. In NIMS 9Cr boron steel welded joints, the grain size and distribution of carbonitrides are substantially the same between the HAZ and base metal, where fine carbonitrides are distributed along the lath and block boundaries as well as along prior austenite grain boundaries. This is essential for the suppression of Type IV fracture in NIMS 9% Cr boron steel welded joints. Newly alloy-designed 9Cr steel with 160 ppm boron and 85 ppm nitrogen exhibits much higher creep rupture strength of base metal than P92 and also no Tpe-IV fracture in welded joints at 650 C. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Nb and Cu on the high temperature creep properties of a high Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu-Ho; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Huh, Joo-Youl; Park, Dae-Bum; Hong, Sung-Min; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Nb and Cu addition on the creep properties of a high Mn–N austenitic stainless steel was investigated at 600 and 650 °C. In the original high Mn–N steel, which was initially precipitate-free, the precipitation of M 23 C 6 (M = Cr, Fe) and Cr 2 N took place mostly on grain boudaries during creep deformation. On the other hand, the minor addition of Nb resulted in high number density of Z-phases (CrNbN) and MX (M = Nb; X = C, N) carbonitrides inside grains by combining with a high content of N, while suppressing the formation of Cr 2 N. The addition of Cu gave rise to the independent precipitation of nanometer-sized metallic Cu particles. The combination of the different precipitate-forming mechanisms associated with Z-phase, MX and Cu-rich precipitates turned out to improve the creep-resistance significantly. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the precipitation were discussed using thermo-kinetic simulations. - Highlights: • The creep rupture life was improved by Nb and Cu addition. • The creep resistance of the steel A2 in this study was comparable to that of TP347HFG. • The size of Z-phase and MX carbonitride did not change significantly after creep test. • The nanometer sized Cu-rich precipitate was observed after creep. • The predicted size of precipitates by MatCalc agreed well with measured size

  16. Oxygen adsorption and dissociation during the oxidation of monolayer Ti2C

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong

    2013-08-20

    Exfoliated two-dimensional early transition metal carbides and carbonitrides are usually not terminated by metal atoms but saturated by O, OH, and/or F, thus making it difficult to understand the surface structure evolution and the induced electronic modifications. To fill this gap, density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations are performed to capture the initial stage of the oxidation process of Ti2C, a prototypical example from the recently fabricated class of two-dimensional carbides and carbonitrides. It is shown that the unsaturated Ti 3d orbitals of the pristine Ti2C surface interact strongly with the approaching O2 molecules, resulting in barrierless O2 dissociation. The diffusion of the dissociated O atoms is also found to be very facile. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that both dissociation and diffusion are enhanced as the O2 coverage increases to 0.25 monolayer. For a coverage of less than 0.11 monolayer, the adsorbates lead to a minor modification of the electronic properties of Ti2C, while the modification is remarkable at 0.25 monolayer. The formed Ti2CO2 after O saturation is an indirect narrow gap semiconductor (0.33 eV) with high intrinsic carrier concentration at room temperature and high thermodynamic stability at intermediate temperature (e.g., 550 °C).

  17. Fabrication and characterization of MX-type fuels and fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, K.; Bartscher, W.; Benedict, U.; Gueugnon, J.F.; Kutter, H.; Sari, C.; Schmidt, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper summarizes the most important fabrication parameters and characterization of fuel and fuel pins obtained during the investigation of uranium-plutonium carbides, oxicarbides, carbonitrides and nitrides in the past years at the European Institute for Transuranium Elements at Karlsruhe. All preparation methods discussed are based on carbothermic reduction of a mechanical blend of uranium-plutonium oxide and carbon powder. General data for carbothermic reduction processes are discussed (influence of starting material, homogeneity, control of degree of reaction, etc). A survey of different preparation methods investigated is given. Limitations with respect to temperature and atmosphere for both carbothermic reduction processes and sintering conditions for the different compounds are summarized. A special preparation process for mixed carbonitrides with low nitrogen content (U,Pu)sub(1-x)Nsub(x) in the range 0.1 0 C to 1400 0 C by means of a modulated electron beam technique. A scheme is proposed, which allows to predict the thermal properties of MX fuels on the basis of their chemical composition and porosity. Preparation, preirradiation characterization and final controls of fuel test pins for pellet and vibrocompacted type of pins are described and the most important data summarized for all advanced fuels irradiated at Dounreay (DN1) and Rapsodie Fast Reactor (DN2) within the TU irradiation programme

  18. Investigation on the effect of chemical composition on the texture and bake hardening I F steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariman, M.; Motaghi, A.; Raygan, Sh.; Habibi Parsa, M.; Nili Ahmadabadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial free steels have good formability and also excellent deep draw ability. These features make them one of the applicable materials in automotive industry. Chemical composition and thermomechanical treatment used to process these steels have important role in final properties of them. In this study, the effect of chemical composition on texture, anisotropic properties and bake harden ability of these steels were investigated. The results showed that contribution of vanadium as a weak carbonitride former element with titanium as strong carbonitride former could change the texture of steels. Replacing titanium with vanadium caused harmful effect on mechanical properties. In this research deep drawing properties of five steels were compared based on I {111} / I{001} and I {111} / I{110} parameters. The results of bake harden ability test showed that there were critical limits for vanadium volume fractions above which bake harden properties was improved. It was shown that the bake harden properties of Nb-steels were better than that of Ti-steels. This was due to the better solution of Nb(C,N) compared to Ti(C,N). Addition of vanadium to Ti-steels may improve bake harden properties of I F steels

  19. Oxygen adsorption and dissociation during the oxidation of monolayer Ti2C

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong; Huang, Dan; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Exfoliated two-dimensional early transition metal carbides and carbonitrides are usually not terminated by metal atoms but saturated by O, OH, and/or F, thus making it difficult to understand the surface structure evolution and the induced electronic modifications. To fill this gap, density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations are performed to capture the initial stage of the oxidation process of Ti2C, a prototypical example from the recently fabricated class of two-dimensional carbides and carbonitrides. It is shown that the unsaturated Ti 3d orbitals of the pristine Ti2C surface interact strongly with the approaching O2 molecules, resulting in barrierless O2 dissociation. The diffusion of the dissociated O atoms is also found to be very facile. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that both dissociation and diffusion are enhanced as the O2 coverage increases to 0.25 monolayer. For a coverage of less than 0.11 monolayer, the adsorbates lead to a minor modification of the electronic properties of Ti2C, while the modification is remarkable at 0.25 monolayer. The formed Ti2CO2 after O saturation is an indirect narrow gap semiconductor (0.33 eV) with high intrinsic carrier concentration at room temperature and high thermodynamic stability at intermediate temperature (e.g., 550 °C).

  20. Preparation and characterization of nanocrystalline composites Mo-C-N hard films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, POB 1129, 230031 Hefei (China); Liu, T. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, POB 1129, 230031 Hefei (China); Fang, Q.F. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, POB 1129, 230031 Hefei (China)]. E-mail: qffang@issp.ac.cn; Liang, F.J. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, POB 1129, 230031 Hefei (China); Wang, J.X. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, POB 1129, 230031 Hefei (China)

    2006-05-01

    Molybdenum carbonitride (MoCN) films were deposited on Si (001) and stainless steel substrates by reactive direct-current magnetron sputtering with a molybdenum and graphite composite target. By changing the substrate temperature and the N{sub 2} / Ar ratio in the sputtering gas, it is found that good quality MoCN films can be deposited at substrate temperature of 300-400 deg. C under N{sub 2} partial pressure of 0.25-0.5 Pa with a total working pressure of 1 Pa. The structures of the films deposited at such conditions were determined by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis as nanocrystalline molybdenum carbonitride with a grain size of several ten nanometers was embedded in the amorphous matrix of C and CN {sub x}. The hardness of the MoCN films can reach 28 GPa, much higher than the value of MoC and MoN films alone.

  1. Nonmetallic inclusions in JBK-75 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, A.W.; Krenzer, R.W.; Doyle, J.H.; Riefenberg, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Stainless steel alloys that are chemically complex, such as A-286 or JBK-75, are designed to improve such high-temperature properties as strength. This is accomplished by precipitating secondary phases during aging. Such multicomponent systems, however, can also produce undesirable phases that are detrimental to forgeability and final mechanical properties. Cast segregation and numerous nonmetallic inclusions can have a degrading influence on the toughness and ductility of the alloy. Several different heats of A-286 and JBK-75 were studied, and titanium carbide and/or molybdenum carbide [(Ti, Mo)C] plus titanium carbide and/or titanium carbonitride Ti(C,N)-type phases were qualitatively identified as the major nonmetallic constituent in these alloys. The common procedure for rating the microcleanliness of steels does not classify such carbide or carbonitride phases and thus does not provide an appropriate means of controlling in-process inspection. The results of this study are discussed in terms of alternative methods for evaluating the microcleanliness of superalloys

  2. Point defects and transport properties in carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1984-01-01

    Carbides of transition metals and of actinides are interesting and technologically important. The transition-metal carbides (or carbonitrides) are extensively being used as hard materials and some of them are of great interest because of the high transition temperature for superconductivity, e.g. 17 K for Nb(C,N). Actinide carbides and carbonitrides, (U,Pu)C and (U,Pu)(C,N) are being considered as promising advanced fuels for liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors. Basic interest exists in all these materials because of their high melting points (e.g. 4250 K for TaC) and the unusually broad range of homogeneity of nonstoichiometric compositions (e.g. from UCsub(0.9) to UCsub(1.9) at 2500 K). Interaction of point defects to clusters and short-range ordering have recently been studied with elastic neutron diffraction and diffuse scattering techniques, and calculations of energies of formation and interaction of point defects became available for selected carbides. Diffusion measurements also exist for a number of carbides, in particular for the actinide carbides. The existing knowledge is discussed and summarized with emphasis on informative examples of particular technological relevance. (Auth.)

  3. Influence of non-metallic second phases on fatigue behaviour of high strength steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, L.; Elvira, R.; Garcia de Andoin, A.; Pizarro, R.; Bertrand, C.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the real effect of the inclusion type on fatigue life of ultra clean high strength steels mechanical components made of 100Cr6 steel were fatigue tested and fracture surfaces analysed to determine the origin of fatigue cracks.Two heats proceedings from different steelmaking routes were taken for the tests. The material were forged into ring shape components which were fatigue tested under compression-compression loads. Failures were analysed by SFEM (Scanning field Emission Microscopy), proving that most of failures at high loads were originated by manganese sulphides of small size (10-70 micros), while less than 40% of all fatigue cracks due to inclusions were caused by titanium carbonitrides and hard oxides. It has been demonstrated that once number and size of hard inclusions have been reduced, the hazardous effect of oxides and carbonitrides on the fatigue life decreases also. However, softer inclusions as manganese sulphides, currently considered as less hazardous, play a more relevant role as direct cause of fatigue failure and they should be taken into account in a deeper way in order to balance both machinability and fatigue life requirements in high strength steel components. (Author) 11 refs

  4. Influence of non-metallic second phases on fatigue behaviour of high strength steel components; Efecto de segundas fases no metalicas sobre el comportamiento a fatiga de componentes de acero con elevadas solicitaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, L.; Elvira, R.; Garcia de Andoin, A.; Pizarro, R.; Bertrand, C.

    2005-07-01

    To assess the real effect of the inclusion type on fatigue life of ultra clean high strength steels mechanical components made of 100Cr6 steel were fatigue tested and fracture surfaces analysed to determine the origin of fatigue cracks.Two heats proceedings from different steelmaking routes were taken for the tests. The material were forged into ring shape components which were fatigue tested under compression-compression loads. Failures were analysed by SFEM (Scanning field Emission Microscopy), proving that most of failures at high loads were originated by manganese sulphides of small size (10-70 micros), while less than 40% of all fatigue cracks due to inclusions were caused by titanium carbonitrides and hard oxides. It has been demonstrated that once number and size of hard inclusions have been reduced, the hazardous effect of oxides and carbonitrides on the fatigue life decreases also. However, softer inclusions as manganese sulphides, currently considered as less hazardous, play a more relevant role as direct cause of fatigue failure and they should be taken into account in a deeper way in order to balance both machinability and fatigue life requirements in high strength steel components. (Author) 11 refs.

  5. Boundary and sub-boundary hardening in high-Cr ferritic steels during long-term creep at 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, F. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The sub-boundary hardening is shown to be the most important strengthening mechanism in creep of the 9% Cr steel base metal and welded joints. The addition of boron reduces the coarsening rate of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides along boundaries near prior austenite grain boundaries during creep, enhancing the sub-boundary hardening. This improves long-term creep strength. The enhancement of boundary and subboundary hardening by fine distribution of precipitates along boundaries is significantly reduced in fine-grained region of Ac{sub 3} HAZ simulated specimens of conventional steels P92 and P122. In NIMS 9% Cr boron steel welded joints, the grain size and distribution of carbonitrides are substantially the same between the HAZ and base metal, where fine carbonitrides are distributed along the lath and block boundaries as well as along prior austenite grain boundaries. This is essential for the suppression of Type IV fracture in NIMS 9% Cr boron steel welded joints. (orig.)

  6. Very high laser-damage threshold of polymer-derived Si(B)CN-carbon nanotube composite coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, R; Feldman, A; Cromer, C; Lehman, J; Singh, G

    2013-04-10

    We study the laser irradiance behavior and resulting structural evolution of polymer-derived silicon-boron-carbonitride (Si(B)CN) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite spray coatings on copper substrate. We report a damage threshold value of 15 kWcm(-2) and an optical absorbance of 0.97 after irradiation. This is an order of magnitude improvement over MWCNT (1.4 kWcm(-2), 0.76), SWCNT (0.8 kWcm(-2), 0.65) and carbon paint (0.1 kWcm(-2), 0.87) coatings previously tested at 10.6 μm (2.5 kW CO2 laser) exposure. Electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests partial oxidation of Si(B)CN forming a stable protective SiO2 phase upon irradiation.

  7. Microstructure, Residual Stress, Corrosion and Wear Resistance of Vacuum Annealed TiCN/TiN/Ti Films Deposited on AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Composite titanium carbonitride (TiCN thin films deposited on AZ31 by DC/RF magnetron sputtering were vacuum annealed at different temperatures. Vacuum annealing yields the following on the structure and properties of the films: the grain grows and the roughness increases with an increase of annealing temperature, the structure changes from polycrystalline to single crystal, and the distribution of each element becomes more uniform. The residual stress effectively decreases compared to the as-deposited film, and their corrosion resistance is much improved owing to the change of structure and fusion of surface defects, whereas the wear-resistance is degraded due to the grain growth and the increase of surface roughness under a certain temperature.

  8. Application of electrochemical plasma techniques in surface engineering of iron based structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coaca, E.; Rusu, O.; Mihalache, M.; Minca, M.; Tacica, M.; Florea, S.; Oncioiu, G.; Andrei, V.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of austenitic stainless steels 304 L and 316 L was modified by various complex surface treatments: - plasma electrolytic carbo-nitriding by means of Plasma electrolytic saturation (PES); the saturation of cathodic surfaces with C, N was performed using suitable electrolytes (aqueous solutions of inorganic acids, appropriate salts containing the desired elements and certain organic compounds); -electrodeposition of Al from ChCl based Ionic Liquid. The coatings obtained in various experimental conditions have been investigated by means of electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion x-ray spectrometry, electrochemical techniques, and the properties of the thin films have been correlated with the microstructure and the composition of the surface layers which are strongly dependents of the different regimes of diffusion treatments. The preliminary results on Electrochemical Plasma Technology (EPT) treatments demonstrate that we can select the processing parameters for essential improvement of corrosion behaviour in some aggressive medium and high values of microhardness. (authors)

  9. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  10. Quality control of chemical heat treatment by the fractography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamarina, A.M.; Parygin, V.A.; Karpov, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    A fractographic investigation is carried out of fracture of a nitrided layer of 38KhMYuA steel and of cemented and cyanided layers of 12KhM3A steel. It is established that a fracture of the nitrided layer consists of three zones of crystalline facets: 1) a surface zone of fine crystalline facets located in a single plane and having the appearance of a white band (Σ-phase zone); 2) zone of acicular facets whose presence is due to the break-down of the carbonitride phase; 3) zone of large facets of boundary breakdown. The fractures of cemented and cyanided samples consist of multiple fine facets of multi-face shapes. It has been found that the depth and the microstructure of a diffusion layer in steel after chemothermal processing can be most rapidly and objectively evaluated by the fractographic method

  11. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of 17Cr-0.17N-0.43C-1.7 Mo Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, S. Chenna; Gangwar, Narendra Kumar; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; George, Koshy M.

    2015-04-01

    The microstructure and hardness of a nitrogen-containing martensitic stainless steel were investigated as a function of heat treatment using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, amount of retained austenite, and hardness measurement. The steel was subjected to three heat treatments: hardening, cryo treatment, and tempering. The hardness of the steel in different heat-treated conditions ranged within 446-620 HV. The constituents of microstructure in hardened condition were lath martensite, retained austenite, M23C6, M7C3, MC carbides, and M(C,N) carbonitrides. Upon tempering at 500 °C, two new phases have precipitated: fine spherical Mo2C carbides and needle-shaped Cr2N particles.

  12. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700/sup 0/C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625/sup 0/C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities.

  13. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700 0 C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625 0 C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities

  14. Mathematical modelling and TMCP simulation for optimisation of steel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwecki, T.

    2001-01-01

    Physically based mathematical models for prediction of steel behaviour and microstructure evolution in connection with thermal and thermomechanical controlled processing (TMCP) development in Swedish Institute for Metals Research are discussed. The models can be used for computer predictions of recrystallization and grain growth of austenite after deformation, precipitation or dissolution of microalloying carbonitride in austenite, flow stress during hot working, phase transformation behaviour during accelerated cooling as well as the final microstructure and mechanical properties. The database, which contains information about steel behaviour for a large number of HSLA steels, is also presented. Optimization of TMCP parameters for improving the properties of the steel are discussed in relation to the microstructure and mechanical properties. The effect of TMCP parameters (reheating temperature, rolling schedules and finish rolling temperature as well as accelerated control cooling) on steel properties was studied in laboratory scale. (author)

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of “Ravine-Like” BCN Compounds with High Capacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of “ravine-like” boron carbonitrides (abbreviation: BCN were synthesized by a green precursor pyrolysis method at different temperatures (about 700–1100 °C. The highest electrochemical performance of BCN-800 (Named BCN-temperature electrode was observed, because the “ravine-like” structure can significantly increase the contact area and improve the wettability between electrode and electrolyte. The BCN electrode exhibited ultrahigh specific capacitance 805.9 F/g (at a current density of 0.2 A/g, excellent rate capability, and good cycling stability (91% after 3000 cycles at a current density of 8 A/g, showing high potential applications in supercapacitors.

  16. Enhancement of strength properties of hot rolled 10KHSND steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasibov, A.G.; Popova, L.V.; Pikulin, S.A.; Globa, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    To find out the reasons of low hot rolling yield for 10KhSND steel sheets in mechanical properties, titanium effect in the range of 0.008-0.03% concentrations is studied. It is established that the titanium content in a solid solution is conserved within 0.003-0.005%, the rest of titanium is bound to carbonitrides Ti(C, N). It is shown that alloys with 0.025-0.03% titanium content possess the increased values of ultimate and yield strength the necessary level of impact strength and good wealdability. The good steel yield, when the titanium content is sustained at the given level, increases from 40 to 85%

  17. Tantalum oxide-based compounds as new non-noble cathodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Akimitsu; Tamura, Motoko; Matsuzawa, Koichi; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Ota, Ken-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum oxide-based compounds were examined as new non-noble cathodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Tantalum carbonitride powder was partially oxidized under a trace amount of oxygen gas at 900 o C for 4 or 8 h. Onset potential for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the specimen heat-treated for 8 h was 0.94 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode in 0.1 mol dm -3 sulfuric acid at 30 o C. The partial oxidation of tantalum carboniride was effective to enhance the catalytic activity for the ORR. The partially oxidized specimen with highest catalytic activity had ca. 5.25 eV of ionization potential, indicating that there was most suitable strength of the interaction of oxygen and tantalum on the catalyst surface.

  18. Characterization of phosphorus segregation in neutron-irradiated Russian pressure vessel steel weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Russell, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy characterization of three Russian pressure vessel steels has been performed. Field ion micrographs of several lath boundaries have indicated that they are decorated with a semicontinuous film of discrete brightly-imaging precipitates that were identified as molybdenum carbonitrides. In addition, extremely high phosphorus levels were measured at the lath boundaries. The phosphorus was found to be confined to an extremely narrow region indicative of monolayer type segregation. The phosphorus coverage determined from the atom probe results of the unirradiated materials agree with predictions based on McLean's equilibrium model of grain boundary segregation. The boundary phosphorus coverage of a neutron-irradiated weld material was significantly higher than in the unirradiated material. Ultrafine darkly-imaging copper- and phosphorus-enriched precipitates were also observed in the matrix of the neutron-irradiated material. (orig.)

  19. XPS, XRD and laser Raman analysis of surface modified of 6150 steel substrates for the deposition of thick and adherent diamond-like carbon coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, William de Melo; Carneiro, Jose Rubens Goncalves, E-mail: williammelosilva@gmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus [Associate Laboratory of Sensors and Materials, National Institute for Space Research, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    Although the 6150 steel has an excellent fatigue and impact resistance, it is unsuitable to operate it when the corrosion is a limited factor. We propose here a sequence of steel pre-treatment by carburizing, carbonitriding and nitriding in order to improve the poor adhesion between Diamond Like-Carbon coatings on steel. This sequence is our attempt to reduce the difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion of steel and DLC through the graded interface. This work demonstrates the quantitative analysis of the molecules present at surface using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystallographic structures are investigated by X-ray diffraction which shows the formation of carbides and nitride phases. Raman spectroscopy reveals the carburizing surface characteristics where DLC coating is nucleated and grown at the substrate. At the end of the analysis it is possible to verify which molecules and phases are formed on the steel surface interface after each step of pre-treatment. (author)

  20. Stress–rupture measurements of cast magnesium strengthened by in-situ production of ceramic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M. Chelliah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have introduced a polymer precursor into molten magnesium and then in-situ pyrolyzed to produce castings of metal matrix composites (P-MMCs containing silicon-carbonitride (SiCNO ceramic particles. Stress-rupture measurements of as-cast P-MMCs was performed at 350 °C (0.69TM to 450 °C (0.78TM under dead load condition corresponding to tensile stress of 2.5 MPa to 20 MPa. The time-to-fracture data were analyzed using the classical Monkman–Grant equation. The time-to-fracture is thermally activated and follows a power-law stress exponent exhibiting dislocation creep. Fractography analysis revealed that while pure magnesium appears to fracture by dislocation slip, the P-MMCs fail from the nucleation and growth of voids at the grain boundaries.

  1. Fabrication of nano-scaled polymer-derived SiAlCN ceramic components using focused ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Shao, Gang; Wang, Xingwei; An, Linan

    2013-09-01

    Fully dense polymer-derived amorphous silicoaluminum carbonitride (SiAlCN) ceramics were synthesized from polysilazane as preceramic precursors followed by a thermal decomposition process. The nanofabrication of amorphous SiAlCN ceramics was implemented with a focused ion beam (FIB). FIB conditions such as the milling rate, the beam current, and the number of passes were considered. It was found that nanopatterns with a feature size of less than 100 nm could be fabricated onto polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) precisely and quickly. Specific nanostructures of thin walls, nozzle, and gear have been fabricated as demonstrations, indicating that the FIB technique was a promising method to realize nanostructures on PDCs, especially for microelectromechanical system and micro/nano-sensor applications.

  2. Fabrication of nano-scaled polymer-derived SiAlCN ceramic components using focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Ye; Wang, Xingwei; Shao, Gang; An, Linan

    2013-01-01

    Fully dense polymer-derived amorphous silicoaluminum carbonitride (SiAlCN) ceramics were synthesized from polysilazane as preceramic precursors followed by a thermal decomposition process. The nanofabrication of amorphous SiAlCN ceramics was implemented with a focused ion beam (FIB). FIB conditions such as the milling rate, the beam current, and the number of passes were considered. It was found that nanopatterns with a feature size of less than 100 nm could be fabricated onto polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) precisely and quickly. Specific nanostructures of thin walls, nozzle, and gear have been fabricated as demonstrations, indicating that the FIB technique was a promising method to realize nanostructures on PDCs, especially for microelectromechanical system and micro/nano-sensor applications. (paper)

  3. Synthesis and high temperature stability of amorphous Si(B)CN-MWCNT composite nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, Romil; Singh, Gurpreet

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate synthesis of a hybrid nanowire structure consisting of an amorphous polymer-derived silicon boron-carbonitride (Si-B-C-N) shell with a multiwalled carbon nanotube core. This was achieved through a novel process involving preparation of a boron-modified liquid polymeric precursor through a reaction of trimethyl borate and polyureasilazane under atmospheric conditions; followed by conversion of polymer to glass-ceramic on carbon nanotube surfaces through controlled heating. Chemical structure of the polymer was studied by liquid-NMR while evolution of various ceramic phases was studied by Raman spectroscopy, solid-NMR, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirms presence of amorphous Si(B)CN coating on individual nanotubes for all specimen processed below 1400 degree C. Thermogravimetric analysis, followed by TEM revealed high temperature stability of the carbon nanotube core in flowing air up to 1300 degree C.

  4. Sorption activity investigation of ultrafine powders of high temperature melting point compounds in atmospheric pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudneva, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    A study is made in saturation with gas in the air for ultradispersed chromium carbonitride and boride powders synthesized in a nitrogen plasma jet according to three variants: from elements, from oxides, from chromium trichloride. It is established that in the air on temperature increasing the powders adsorb considerable amounts of oxygen and water vapor. This results in surface oxidation of powder particles and a loss in specific combination of properties. Preliminary vacuum heat treatment is shown to decrease sharply the rate of atmospheric gas adsorption. The quantity of adsorbed gases is dependent on a carbon monoxide concentration in a particle surface layer and the availability of adsorption centers. The number of such centers in the layer can be controlled by vacuum heat treatment conditions. The interaction of the powders with atmospheric gases is concluded to be of adsorption-diffusion nature [ru

  5. NbCN Josephson junctions with AlN barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, S.L.; Murduck, J.M.; Chan, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on niobium carbonitride (NbCN) Josephson circuits which operate over a wider temperature range than either niobium or niobium nitride circuits. Higher operating temperature places NbCN technology more comfortably within the range of closed cycle refrigerators, a key factor in aerospace applications. We have fabricated tunnel junctions from NbCN films with transition temperatures up to 18 Kelvin. High quality NbCN tunnel junction fabrication generally requires low stress films with roughness less than the barrier thickness (∼20 Angstrom). We have developed scanning tunneling microscopy as a tool for measuring and optimizing film smoothness. Junctions formed in situ with AIN tunneling barriers show reproducible I-V characteristics

  6. Precipitation behaviors of X70 acicular ferrite pipeline steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yu; Yi Sun; Qixiang Chen; Haitao Jiang; Lihong Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The morphology, structure, and chemical composition of precipitates in the final microstructure of Nb-V-Ti microalloyed X70 acicular ferrite pipeline steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Precipitates observed by TEM can be classified into two groups. The large precipitates are complex compounds that comprise square-shaped TiN precipitate as core with fine Nb-containing precipitate nucleated on pre-existing TiN precipitate as caps on one or more faces at high temperature. In contrast, the fine and spherical Nb carbides and/or carbonitrides precipitate heterogeneously on dislocations and sub-boundaries at low temperature. From the analysis in terms of thermodynamics, EDS and chemical composition of the steel, NbC precipitation is considered to be the predominant precipitation behavior in the tested steel under the processing conditions of this research.

  7. Evaluation of End Mill Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

  8. XPS, XRD and laser Raman analysis of surface modified of 6150 steel substrates for the deposition of thick and adherent diamond-like carbon coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, William de Melo; Carneiro, Jose Rubens Goncalves

    2013-01-01

    Although the 6150 steel has an excellent fatigue and impact resistance, it is unsuitable to operate it when the corrosion is a limited factor. We propose here a sequence of steel pre-treatment by carburizing, carbonitriding and nitriding in order to improve the poor adhesion between Diamond Like-Carbon coatings on steel. This sequence is our attempt to reduce the difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion of steel and DLC through the graded interface. This work demonstrates the quantitative analysis of the molecules present at surface using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystallographic structures are investigated by X-ray diffraction which shows the formation of carbides and nitride phases. Raman spectroscopy reveals the carburizing surface characteristics where DLC coating is nucleated and grown at the substrate. At the end of the analysis it is possible to verify which molecules and phases are formed on the steel surface interface after each step of pre-treatment. (author)

  9. The role of inclusions in the pitting behaviour of maraging steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.S.; Hussain, S.W.; Ashraf, H.

    1999-01-01

    The pitting characteristics of maraging steel in artificial seawater have been investigated electrochemically using the cyclic polarization technique. Pits were found to be associated with the inclusions present in steel. The hysteresis loop observed indicates that maraging steel has poor resistance to pitting in air saturated seawater. On examination of corroded surfaces under SEM, it is noted that the pits are always associated with inclusions, which are generally the carbonitrides of TiMo presents in maraging steel in varying quantities depending on the melting practice. In order to confirm that the pitting behavior is associated with inclusions, samples from clean maraging steel, having very low inclusion level, were tested. Such samples showed much less tendency for pitting. (author)

  10. Solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of Nb(C,N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.; Bresciani Filho, E.

    1983-01-01

    It was developed some equations to calculate the solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of NbC sub(0.87) or NbN. These equations were applied to steels with carbon, nitrogen and niobium content varying from 10 -3 to 1 wt %, and for 800-1300 0 C temperature range. The results obtained were compared with experimental data from literature, and showed a good agreement. Using those equations, it was developed an algorithm to calculate the solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of niobium carbonitride (NbC sub(x) N sub(y)). The results obtained by this method were compared with experimental data, and also showed a good agreement. (Author) [pt

  11. XPS, XRD and laser raman analysis of surface modified of 6150 steel substrates for the deposition of thick and adherent diamond-like carbon coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William de Melo Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the 6150 steel has an excellent fatigue and impact resistance, it is unsuitable to operate it when the corrosion is a limited factor. We propose here a sequence of steel pre-treatment by carburizing, carbonitriding and nitriding in order to improve the poor adhesion between Diamond Like-Carbon coatings on steel. This sequence is our attempt to reduce the difference between the coefficients of thermal expansion of steel and DLC through the graded interface. This work demonstrates the quantitative analysis of the molecules present at surface using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystallographic structures are investigated by X-ray diffraction which shows the formation of carbides and nitride phases. Raman spectroscopy reveals the carburizing surface characteristics where DLC coating is nucleated and grown at the substrate. At the end of the analysis it is possible to verify which molecules and phases are formed on the steel surface interface after each step of pre-treatment.

  12. Novel superhard films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shengjun; Chen Guanghua; Deng Jinxiang; Song Xuemei; Shao Lexi

    2001-01-01

    Superhard materials, defined as having a microhardness exceeding 40 GPa, have attracted extensive interest for decades. They are composed of compounds of group III, IV and/or V (carbides and nitrides) and elemental crystal (diamond). Except for diamond, all these materials can only be synthesized by artificial methods. Other interesting properties of these materials include their wide band gap, stability under high temperature and chemical inertness. Current research on these materials concentrates on diamond, cubic boron nitride (cBN), carbon nitride (C 3 N 4 , CN x ) boron carbonitride (BCN) and diamond-like carbon (DLC). A review is presented of the progress and future of these interesting materials, in connection with authors' recent studies on the synthesis and properties of wide band gap and superhard materials

  13. Electron beam freeforming of stainless steel using solid wire feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanjara, P.; Brochu, M.; Jahazi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The use of electron beam technology for freeforming build-ups on 321 stainless steel substrates was investigated in this work by using 347 stainless steel as a filler metal. The electron beam freeforming studies indicated that line build-ups could be deposited on the substrate material for optimized processing conditions and a slight linear thickening of the re-build occurred as a function of the deposited layer. The evolution in the formation of the Ti (C, N) (Nb, Ti) carbonitrides and Nb (C, N) precipitates was demonstrated to counteract the formation of detrimental Cr-carbides usually observed during welding stainless steels. The mechanical properties of the re-build were similar to the properties of the base metal, showing that homogeneous properties can be expected in the repaired components

  14. Specific detection of proteins using Nanomechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Wright, V.A.; Guthy, C.

    2008-01-01

    of probes onto their surfaces in order to enable the specificity of the detection. Such nanoresonator-based specific detection of proteins is here reported using streptavidin as target system, and immobilized biotin as probe. Nanomechanical resonators resistant to stiction were first realized from silicon...... carbonitride using a novel fabrication method. Vapor-phase deposition of mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane was performed, and an added mass of 2.22 +/- 0.07 fg/mu m(2) was measured. This linker molecule was used to attach biotin onto the devices, enabling the specific detection of streptavidin. A mass of 3.6 fg....../mu m(2) was attributed to the added streptavidin, corresponding to one molecule per 27 nm(2). The specificity of this recognition was confirmed by exposing the devices to a solution of streptavidin that was already saturated with biotin. An additional negative control was also performed by also...

  15. Effect of process time on structural and tribological properties of ferritic plasma nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakan, Mehmet; Alsaran, Akguen; Celik, Ayhan

    2004-06-15

    AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrocarburized at a gas mixture of 49%N{sub 2} + 49%H{sub 2} + 2%CO{sub 2}, for different process times (1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h), at a temperature of 570 deg. C. The structural, mechanical and tribological properties of nitrocarburized steel were analyzed using a X-ray diffraction, microhardness tester, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and pin-on-disk tribotester. The results have shown that the compound layer was composed of the {epsilon} and {gamma} iron carbonitrides. In addition, the compound layer included pores having a columnar structure. These pores are open to the surface. The nitrocarburizing process increases surface hardness, roughness and friction coefficient. The wear rate improves after plasma nitrocarburizing, and decreases with increasing surface hardness.

  16. Effect of process time on structural and tribological properties of ferritic plasma nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakan, Mehmet; Alsaran, Akguen; Celik, Ayhan

    2004-01-01

    AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrocarburized at a gas mixture of 49%N 2 + 49%H 2 + 2%CO 2 , for different process times (1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h), at a temperature of 570 deg. C. The structural, mechanical and tribological properties of nitrocarburized steel were analyzed using a X-ray diffraction, microhardness tester, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and pin-on-disk tribotester. The results have shown that the compound layer was composed of the ε and γ iron carbonitrides. In addition, the compound layer included pores having a columnar structure. These pores are open to the surface. The nitrocarburizing process increases surface hardness, roughness and friction coefficient. The wear rate improves after plasma nitrocarburizing, and decreases with increasing surface hardness

  17. Vibrational and mechanical properties of single layer MXene structures: a first-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Uğur; Özden, Ayberk; Perkgöz, Nihan K.; Ay, Feridun; Sevik, Cem

    2016-08-01

    MXenes, carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides of early transition metals are the new members of two dimensional materials family given with a formula of {{{M}}}n+1 X n . Recent advances in chemical exfoliation and CVD growth of these crystals together with their promising performance in electrochemical energy storage systems have triggered the interest in these two dimensional structures. In this work, we employ first principles calculations for n = 1 structures of Sc, Ti, Zr, Mo and Hf pristine MXenes and their fully surface terminated forms with F and O. We systematically investigated the dynamical and mechanical stability of both pristine and fully terminated MXene structures to determine the possible MXene candidates for experimental realization. In conjunction with an extensive stability analysis, we report Raman and infrared active mode frequencies for the first time, providing indispensable information for the experimental elaboration of MXene field. After determining dynamically stable MXenes, we provide their phonon dispersion relations, electronic and mechanical properties.

  18. TEM characterization of microstructure evolution of 12%Cr heat resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, D.; Prat, O.; Sauthoff, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Garcia, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kaysser-Pyzalla, A.R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Bochum Univ. (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A detailed characterization of the microstructure evolution of 12%Cr heat resistant steels at different creep times (100 MPa / 650 C / 8000 h) were carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The results of the microstructure analysis are correlated with the mechanical properties in order to investigate the influence of different precipitates (especially M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) on the creep strength of the alloys. Precipitation of Laves phase and Z-phase was observed after several hours creep time. Very few Z-phase of the type Cr(V,Ta)N nucleating from existing (V,Ta)(C,N) was observed. Both alloys show growth and coarsening of Laves phase, meanwhile the MX carbonitrides present a very slow growth and coarsening rate. Alloys containing Laves phase, MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates show best creep properties. (orig.)

  19. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  20. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  1. Structure, preparation and properties of refractory compounds and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleck, H.; Thuemmler, F.

    1977-01-01

    At the beginning of this report the possibilities of hardness optimization of refractory carbides are generally discussed. Three papers deal with TaC-basis refractories and hard metals. In particular, carbides with very low nonmetal/metal ratios and composites with hard phases formed by decomposition of tantalum carbonitrides are discussed. Another contribution reports investigations concerning the influence of the microstructure on the hardness of polycristaline mixed carbides. In a series of four papers, results are presented on the work of optimization conventional WC hard metals by introduction of a Fe,Co,Ni-binder: The influence of composition, carbon content and sintering conditions, as well as the wetting behaviour between carbides and binder metals are discussed. Phase relations in the refractory nitride and refractory nitride-binder metal systems as well as phase stabilities of ordered transition metal phases are reported in three papers, fundamental in character. Finally, the work concerning chemical analysis of refractory systems is described. (orig.) [de

  2. Microstructure and properties of 13Cr5Ni1Mo0.025Nb0.09V0.06N super martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.P.; Wang, L.J. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, C.M., E-mail: cmliu@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Subramanian, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, L8S-4L7 (Canada)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the microstructures of a commercial martenistic stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excess N content causes the occurrence of coarse carbo-nitride and Cr{sub 2}N. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation of microstructures with mechanical and corrosion properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The poor pitting resistance is due to Cr rich precipitates. - Abstract: The morphological microstructure, the density and dispersion of high angle boundaries, morphology and micro chemical composition of precipitates and the volume fraction of retained austenite of a commercial super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) normalized and tempered at various temperatures were characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the light of equilibrium phase diagram of the alloy calculated using Thermo-Calc software. The mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance were determined to correlate with microstructures. Two kinds of morphology of precipitate were observed in tempered commercial super martensitic stainless. Besides the globular Nb and V rich carbo-nitride precipitates, rod-like Cr rich nitrides were formed due to excess N content. While high density of high angle boundaries and precipitates contribute to strength properties, the dislocation softening of the matrix and retained austenite from tempering restore the ductility and impact toughness properties. The poor resistance to pitting corrosion is attributed to the occurrence of Cr rich precipitates. It is demonstrated that by lowering the nitrogen content and adding niobium, the Cr rich precipitates can be suppressed and the mechanical properties and resistance to pitting corrosion can be significantly improved.

  3. NMR studies of actinide carbide and nitride electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutard, Jean-Louis

    1976-12-01

    N.M.R. studies applied to 13 C and 15 N in the solid solutions ThCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), UCsub(1-x)Nsub(x) and in the compounds ThCsub(1-x) and U 2 C 3 , were undertaken to study carbon and nitrogen contribution to chemical bonds and magnetism. For THORIUM MONOCARBIDE AND CARBONITRIDE: ThCsub(1-x) and ThCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), the very strong orbital contribution to the frequency shift reveals an important covalent character of the valence band 6d metal and 2p metalloid states. The ThCsub(1-x) band structure stoichiometry variation is due to 6dγ metal states appearing at the Fermi level and is in-opposition to a rigid band model. A non-saturated bond mechanism is suggested. For URANIUM CARBONITRIDE: UCsub(1-x)Nsub(x), in the concentration range in which no magnetic order appears at low temperature (x<0.90), the results are in opposition to a localized 5f 2 configuration model, and show that the uranium fundamental state is non-magnetic. Nevertheless two qualitatively different behaviors exist: nitrogen concentration lower than 40%: and nitrogen concentration higher than 40%. A model is proposed to account for those domains: it relies on the 5f-2p hybridization parameter which is maximum on 2p band edge (UC) and almost nul for UN. For URANIUM SESQUICARBIDE: U 2 C 3 : the N.M.R. line observation at 4.2 K indicates a non-magnetic fundamental state although the magnetic susceptibility presents a maximum at 60 K. Spin fluctuations in 5f bands are proposed to describe the electronic properties of this compound. [fr

  4. Microstructural evolution of ASTM P91 after 100,000 hours exposure at 550 C and 600 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipolla, L.; Venditti, D.; Di Gianfrancesco, A. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali SpA, Rome (Italy); Caminada, S. [TenarisDalmine, Dalmine (Italy); Danielsen, H.K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-07-01

    ASTM A335 P91 samples were investigated after creep testing at 550 C and 600 C for over 10{sup 5} h. X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy were adopted to assess the microstructural evolution of the material in terms of precipitation changes during high temperature exposure. Mean equivalent diameters and average chemical compositions of MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates and Laves phases were assessed through the analysis of a large number of particles. Their growth and coarsening kinetics were determined at 600 C on many samples with increasing exposure times up to 100,000 hours. Also the presence of modified Z-phase, Cr(V, Nb)N, was investigated. The high microstructural stability of Grade 91 is related to the presence of fine and distributed MX carbonitrides, always present even after very long term temperature exposure. The mean size of MX carbonitrides remains almost constant and stays below 45 nm after 10{sup 5} h at 600 C. Although MX particles exhibit a Cr enrichment with increasing ageing times, indicating that they are absorbing Cr atoms from the surrounding matrix, their transformation into Z-phase is still at a very preliminary stage: only a few hybrid MX/Z particles and a few Z-phase precipitates were identified in the most aged sample after 10{sup 5} at 600 C. Coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} occurs during thermal exposure, but their average equivalent diameter, initially of 140 nm in the as-treated material, remains below 200 nm after 10{sup 5} h at 600 C. Laves particles form at grain boundaries after a relatively short time and soon become the largest precipitates. (orig.)

  5. Carbide precipitation kinetics in austenite of a Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jae-Gil; Park, June-Soo; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Young-Kook

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Carbide precipitation kinetic was fastest at 950 deg. C and accelerated by strain. → Nucleation sites for (Nb,Ti)C above 950 deg. C were mainly undissolved (Ti,Nb)(C,N). → Strain enabled (Nb,Ti)C to nucleate on all sides of (Ti,Nb)(C,N) above 950 deg. C. → Strain changed nucleation sites from (Ti,Nb)(C,N) to dislocations below 900 deg. C. → Strain also accelerated the change in particle composition to equilibrium one. - Abstract: The isothermal precipitation kinetics of carbides in both strain-free and strained austenite (γ) of a microalloyed steel were quantitatively investigated through the electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy. The (Nb,Ti)C carbides at the interfaces of the undissolved (Ti,Nb)(C,N) carbonitrides were observed at all temperatures in strain-free γ. However, for strain-induced precipitation, above 950 deg. C, the precipitation of (Nb,Ti)C carbides near the undissolved (Ti,Nb)(C,N) carbonitrides was predominant due to the recrystallization of strained γ. Meanwhile, the fine (Nb,Ti,V)C carbides were homogeneously precipitated in non-recrystallized γ at 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C, as well as near the undissolved (Ti,Nb)(C,N) particles. The electrical resistivity method was successfully used to quantitatively measure the isothermal precipitation kinetics of carbides in both strain-free and strained γ. The precipitation-time-temperature diagrams of the carbide in strain-free and strained γ, with nose temperatures of 950 deg. C, were generated and the precipitation kinetics were greatly accelerated by the applied strain.

  6. Microstructure and properties of 13Cr5Ni1Mo0.025Nb0.09V0.06N super martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.P.; Wang, L.J.; Liu, C.M.; Subramanian, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Characterization of the microstructures of a commercial martenistic stainless steel. ► Excess N content causes the occurrence of coarse carbo-nitride and Cr 2 N. ► Correlation of microstructures with mechanical and corrosion properties. ► The poor pitting resistance is due to Cr rich precipitates. - Abstract: The morphological microstructure, the density and dispersion of high angle boundaries, morphology and micro chemical composition of precipitates and the volume fraction of retained austenite of a commercial super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) normalized and tempered at various temperatures were characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the light of equilibrium phase diagram of the alloy calculated using Thermo-Calc software. The mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance were determined to correlate with microstructures. Two kinds of morphology of precipitate were observed in tempered commercial super martensitic stainless. Besides the globular Nb and V rich carbo-nitride precipitates, rod-like Cr rich nitrides were formed due to excess N content. While high density of high angle boundaries and precipitates contribute to strength properties, the dislocation softening of the matrix and retained austenite from tempering restore the ductility and impact toughness properties. The poor resistance to pitting corrosion is attributed to the occurrence of Cr rich precipitates. It is demonstrated that by lowering the nitrogen content and adding niobium, the Cr rich precipitates can be suppressed and the mechanical properties and resistance to pitting corrosion can be significantly improved.

  7. Structure of steel 8 CrMoNiNb 9 10 and its variations in long-term thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabritius, H.; Schnabel, E.

    1976-01-01

    On four casts of steel 8 CrMoNiNb 9 10 with about 0.06% C, 0.25; Si, 0.7% Mn, 0.012% N, 0.002 to 0.020% Al, 2.25% Cr, 0.94% Mo, 0.63 to 0.91% Nb and 0.67% Ni, transformation behaviour and structural changes during long-time annealing at 500 to 750 degC lasting up to 30,000 h were studied in unformed condition and after previous cold forming. The carbon content was largely bound in form of primary niobium carbonitrides so that during quenching and tempering low-carbon bainite was formed, or at very slow cooling a ferritic structure without pearlite. Martensite occurred only after fast cooling from temperatures above 1200 degC. Bainite exhibited a very high dislocation density and a large number of coherent niobium carbonitrides. During tempering, the precipitates overaged, and the dislocations started to arrange themselves to subgrain boundaries. Hardness and strength in quenched and tempered condition were essentially governed by dislocation density and size of subgrains. In the whole range of bainite transformation, they are only slightly dependent upon the cooling rate and hence upon the dimensions of the products. The structural changes which occurred in bainitic material during long-time aging and led to a ferritic structure in the final state were interpreted as recovery and recrystallization. In unformed and slightly formed material recrystallization led to a very coarse-grained structure. In highly formed material a very fine-grained structure was achieved by recrystallization. By a high degree of cold forming the recrystallization process was considerably promoted. With an annealing time of 10 5 h, no recrystallization is to be expected for unformed specimens of the studied cast up to 580 degC, but above 650 degC complete recrystallization. (author)

  8. Toughness of submerged arc weld metals of controlled rolled NB bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Shiga, A.; Kamada, A.; Tsuboi, J.

    1982-01-01

    The toughness and the hardness of reheated weld metals depend on the maximum reheating temperature. When the maximum reheating temperature is 500 to 700 0 C, the hardness of single pass weld metal increases and the toughness decreases because of fine Nb- and V-carbonitride precipitation. When the maximum reheating temperature is over 800 0 C, the hardness and the toughness remain almost unchanged. The stress relieving treatment of single pass weld metal at 600 0 C for 1 up to about 100 hours causes the increase in hardness and then decreases the hardness gradually. It needs over 500 hours to obtain the same hardness value as that of as-welded metal. The addition of Ti to weld metal is very effective to improve the toughness, however excess Ti increases the hardness of stress relieved weld metal by precipitating as fine Ti-carbonitride. Therefore Ti addition should be restricted within the lowest limit required to improve as-welded metal toughness. The optimum Ti content is about 0.020% in the case of weld metal of which oxygen content is 350 ppM or so. In multipass welding, the hardness of weld metal affected by subsequent weld heat cycle varies from pass to pass, because Nb and V content change with the passes as the result of the change in dilution from base metal. The most hardened zone is observed in the reheated first pass weld metal, in which Nb and V content are the highest. Good weld metal toughness would be obtained by lowering dilution from base metal and taking advantage of grain refinement by subsequent passes

  9. Contribution to the study of the (U,Pu)C,N system; Contribution a l'etude du systeme (U,Pu)C,N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzelli, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The reactions of UC, PuC, (U,Pu)C, UC{sub 2} and U(C{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) with nitrogen at moderate temperatures (room temperature to 400 C) are described. The influence of the uptake of nitrogen by the powders necessary to sinter the carbides upon the nature of the final product has been investigated; it has been shown that the sintered carbides are hyper-stoichiometric. The reactions of carbon with UN, PuN and (U,Pu)N has also been studied. Under vacuum, carbon reacts on the nitrides at temperatures as low as 1100 C; nitrogen is replaced by carbon and the final product is a carbonitride. The reaction is: MN + x C {yields} MN{sub 1-x}C{sub x} + x/2N{sub 2}. The reaction is limited and the carbonitrides have a fixed composition in presence of M{sub 2}C{sub 3} or MC{sub 2}; hence it is impossible to produce pure MC using the reaction. The ternary diagram U-C-N, Pu-C-N and (U,Pu)C-N have been drawn. They show clearly that it is possible to obtain single phase carbonitrides in a wide domain of compositions. (author) [French] On decrit les reactions avec l'azote de UC, PuC,(U,Pu)C,UC{sub 2} et U(C{sub 1-x}O{sub x}), par action directe de l'azote a temperature moderee (de l'ambiante a 450 C). On a etudie l'influence de la contamination par l'azote des poudres de carbures necessaires au frittage sur la nature des produits frittes; on a montre que les carbures frittes obtenus sont hyperstoechiometriques. On a etudie parallelement les reactions du carbone avec UN, PuN et (U,Pu)N. Sous vide le carbone reagit sur les nitrures des 1100 C: le carbone se substitue a l'azote; l'azote libere est elimine et le produit final est un carbonitrure. La reaction s'ecrit: MN + x C {yields} MN{sub 1-x}C{sub x} + x/2N{sub 2}. La reaction est limitee et les carbonitrures obtenus ont une composition limite fixe en presence des carbures superieurs M{sub 2}C{sub 3} et MC{sub 2}; il est donc impossible d'obtenir MC pur par cette reaction. Les diagrammes d'equilibre U-C-N, Pu-C-N et (U,Pu) C-N, ont

  10. Contribution to the study of the (U,Pu)C,N system; Contribution a l'etude du systeme (U,Pu)C,N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzelli, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    The reactions of UC, PuC, (U,Pu)C, UC{sub 2} and U(C{sub 1-x}O{sub x}) with nitrogen at moderate temperatures (room temperature to 400 C) are described. The influence of the uptake of nitrogen by the powders necessary to sinter the carbides upon the nature of the final product has been investigated; it has been shown that the sintered carbides are hyper-stoichiometric. The reactions of carbon with UN, PuN and (U,Pu)N has also been studied. Under vacuum, carbon reacts on the nitrides at temperatures as low as 1100 C; nitrogen is replaced by carbon and the final product is a carbonitride. The reaction is: MN + x C {yields} MN{sub 1-x}C{sub x} + x/2N{sub 2}. The reaction is limited and the carbonitrides have a fixed composition in presence of M{sub 2}C{sub 3} or MC{sub 2}; hence it is impossible to produce pure MC using the reaction. The ternary diagram U-C-N, Pu-C-N and (U,Pu)C-N have been drawn. They show clearly that it is possible to obtain single phase carbonitrides in a wide domain of compositions. (author) [French] On decrit les reactions avec l'azote de UC, PuC,(U,Pu)C,UC{sub 2} et U(C{sub 1-x}O{sub x}), par action directe de l'azote a temperature moderee (de l'ambiante a 450 C). On a etudie l'influence de la contamination par l'azote des poudres de carbures necessaires au frittage sur la nature des produits frittes; on a montre que les carbures frittes obtenus sont hyperstoechiometriques. On a etudie parallelement les reactions du carbone avec UN, PuN et (U,Pu)N. Sous vide le carbone reagit sur les nitrures des 1100 C: le carbone se substitue a l'azote; l'azote libere est elimine et le produit final est un carbonitrure. La reaction s'ecrit: MN + x C {yields} MN{sub 1-x}C{sub x} + x/2N{sub 2}. La reaction est limitee et les carbonitrures obtenus ont une composition limite fixe en presence des carbures superieurs M{sub 2}C{sub 3} et MC{sub 2}; il est donc impossible d'obtenir MC pur par cette reaction. Les diagrammes

  11. Preparation and sintering of Zr(C,N,O) phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamborenea, S.; Mazzoni, A.D.; Aglietti, E.F.

    2003-01-01

    The Zr(C,O,N) compounds form a great mono-phase zone belonging to the pseudoternary ZrO-ZrN-ZrC system.Theses phases have cubic crystalline structure with a o parameter depending on the C, O 2 and N 2 content.These phases have many potential applications in the manufacture of ceramic pieces utilizable as electronic conductors.The Zr (C,O,N) phases can be obtained from ZrO 2 by carbonitriding reactions: that is carbothermal reduction and simultaneous nitriding.In this work a series of experiences of carbonitriding of zirconia under different conditions (temperatures between 1400 and 1600degC, times of 120 min, carbon content between 20 and 40%) in order to obtain suitable powders to be sintered.The XRD analysis shows the Zr(C,O,N) as the main products and β -ZrON as the only secondary product in proportions depending on the obtaining conditions.The variables employed were the C content and the reaction temperature.The Zr(C,O,N) content varies between 40 and 90% and tends to increase with the temperature and the carbon content whereas the β -ZrON phase varies between the 40 and 10 % decreasing its proportion with temperature and the carbon content.The oxidation resistance of these phases was studied by DTA-TG tests in air.Results show complete oxidation reaction at ∼500degC in air.The sintering of these materials was made on disks obtained by pressing of powders of Zr(C,N,O) contents higher than 90%.Sintering was performed in nitrogen atmosphere and temperatures between 1450 and 1620degC.Disks were characterized by pycnometry and Hg volumeter.The densities obtained were between 5 and 6,6g/cm 3 with a tendency to increase with the Zr(C,N,O) phase content, the temperature and the sintering time.Sintered disks were characterized by dilatometry in N 2

  12. Effect of cobalt on microstructure and creep deformation behaviour of tempered martensitic 9% Cr steel for USC power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helis, L.; Toda, Y.; Abe, F. [NIMS, Tsukuba (Japan). Structural Metals Center; Hara, T. [NIMS, Tsukuba (Japan). Advanced Nano Characterization Center; Miyazaki, H. [NIMS, Tokyo (Japan). Materials Data Sheet Station

    2008-07-01

    Four ingots with chemical composition 9Cr-3W-0/5Co-0.2V-0.05Nb-0.08C-0.05N, varying in the amount of Co addition were studied. Creep tests were conducted at temperature of 923K. Steels with 3% and 5% Co showed creep resistance superior to those with 1% and 0% Co at stresses above 140MPa. On the other hand 5% Co steel showed a significant deterioration in long term creep properties at 80MPa. Calculation by Thermo-Calc. suggested and observation of microstructure before the creep test confirmed the presence of about 6% and 0.4% of delta-ferrite in Co free and 1% Co steel, respectively. ICP mass spectrometry measurement showed that the amount of precipitation in steels after heat treatment increased with increase in Co addition, especially significant gap was found between 1% and 3% Co steels. Distribution of precipitation was studied by SEM and TEM. Particles of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and MX carbonitrides preferentially precipitated around prior austenitic grain boundaries. Density of precipitation around these boundaries was found to depend on prior austenitic grain size, which is affected by the presence of anti o-ferrite and precipitation at normalizing temperature. Particles of Laves phase precipitated in the microstructure during the creep tests at 923K at all stresses. Its precipitation at the early stage was also enhanced by the addition of Co. It is known that creep properties of steels with fine grain deteriorate faster than those with coarse grains, due to the faster recovering during the keep at high temperatures. Combination of larger prior austenitic grains and higher precipitation contributes to the prolonged life of steels with higher amount of Co after testing at 923K and 160MPa. Deterioration in long term creep strength of steels with high amount of Co can be attributed to the precipitation Cr(V,Nb)N particles known as Z-phase, which is associated with dissolution of MX carbonitrides. (orig.)

  13. Effect of Reheating Temperature and Cooling Treatment on the Microstructure, Texture, and Impact Transition Behavior of Heat-Treated Naval Grade HSLA Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sk, Md. Basiruddin; Ghosh, A.; Rarhi, N.; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Chakrabarti, D.

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties [YS > 390 MPa, total elongation >16 pct and Charpy impact toughness of 78 J at 213 K (-60 °C)] for naval application, samples from a low-carbon microalloyed steel have been subjected to different austenitization (1223 K to 1523 K) (950 °C to 1250 °C) and cooling treatments (furnace, air, or water cooling). The as-rolled steel and the sample air cooled from 1223 K (950 °C) could only achieve the required tensile properties, while the sample furnace cooled from 1223 K (950 °C) showed the best Charpy impact properties. Water quenching from 1223 K (950 °C) certainly contributed to the strength but affected the impact toughness. Overall, predominantly ferrite matrix with fine effective grain size and intense gamma-fiber texture was found to be beneficial for impact toughness as well as impact transition behavior. Small size and fraction of precipitates (like TiN, Nb, and V carbonitrides) eliminated the possibility of particle-controlled crack propagation and grain size-controlled crack propagation led to cleavage fracture. A simplified analytical approach has been used to explain the difference in impact transition behavior of the investigated samples.

  14. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  15. Specific Features of Structural-Phase State and Properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel at Elevated Irradiation Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuleshova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers influence of elevated irradiation temperature on structure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel. The steel is investigated after accelerated irradiation at 300°C (operating temperature of VVER-1000-type RPV and 400°C supposed to be the operating temperature of advanced RPVs. Irradiation at 300°C leads to formation of radiation-induced precipitates and radiation defects-dislocation loops, while no carbide phase transformation is observed. Irradiation at a higher temperature (400°C neither causes formation of radiation-induced precipitates nor provides formation of dislocation loops, but it does increase the number density of the main initial hardening phase—of the carbonitrides. Increase of phosphorus concentration in grain boundaries is more pronounced for irradiation at 400°C as compared to irradiation at 300°C due to influence of thermally enhanced diffusion at a higher temperature. The structural-phase changes determine the changes of mechanical properties: at both irradiation temperatures irradiation embrittlement is mainly due to the hardening mechanism with some contribution of the nonhardening one for irradiation at 400°C. Lack of formation of radiation-induced precipitates at T = 400°C provides a small ΔTK shift (17°C. The obtained results demonstrate that the investigated 15Kh2NMFAA steel may be a promising material for advanced reactors with an elevated operating temperature.

  16. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  17. Solid solution cermet: (Ti,Nb)(CN)-Ni cermet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hanjung; Jung, Sun-A

    2014-11-01

    Solid solution powders without W, (Ti,Nb)(CN) powders with a B1 structure (NaCl like), were synthesized by high energy milling and carbothermal reduction in nitrogen. The range of molar ratios of Ti/Nb for forming complete (Ti,Nb)(CN) phase was broader than that of Ti/W for the (Ti,W)(CN) phase because carbide or carbonitride of Nb had a B1 crystal structure identical to Ti(CN) while WC had a hexagonal crystal structure. The results revealed that the hardness of (Ti,Nb)(CN)-Ni cermets was higher than that of (Ti,W)(CN)-Ni cermets. The lower density of the (Ti,Nb)(CN) powder contributed to the higher hardness compared to (Ti,W)(CN) because the volumetric ratio of (Ti,Nb)(CN) in the (Ti,Nb)(CN)-Ni cermets was higher than that of (Ti,Nb)(CN) in the (Ti,W)(CN)-Ni cermets at the same weight ratio of Ni. Additionally, it was assumed that intrinsic the properties of (Ti,Nb)(CN) could also be the cause for the high hardness of the (Ti,Nb)(CN)-Ni cermets.

  18. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS–SPM instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Fleming

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Using the recently developed SIMS–SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios. In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet.

  19. Effect of graphite content on magnetic and mechanical properties of TiC-TiN-Mo-Ni cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Man; Yang, Qingqing; Xiong, Weihao; Huang, Bin; Ruan, Linji; Mao, Qiao; Li, Shengtao

    2018-04-01

    TiC-10TiN-6Mo-xGr-yNi (mol%, Gr represents graphite, x = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and y = 15, 30) cermets were prepared by powder metallurgy method, in order to inverstigate the effect of Gr content on magnetic and mechanical properties of TiC-TiN-Mo-Ni cermets. Room-temperature (RT) saturation magnetization (Ms) and remanence (Mr) of cermets increased with increasing x. This was mainly attributed to that the total content of non-ferromagnetic carbonitride-forming elements Ti and Mo in Ni-based binder phase decreased with increasing x. At the same x, cermets for y = 15 had lower RT Ms and Mr than those for y = 30. Cermets containing more than 2 mol% Gr became ferromagnetic at RT. Bending strength of cermets first increased and then decreased with increasing x. It reached the maximum at x = 2, mainly due to high total content of solutes Ti and Mo in Ni-based binder phase, and moderate thickness of outer rim of Ti(C,N) ceramic grains. Hardness of cermets was not significantly affected by x, mainly due to the combined action of the decrease of the total content of Ti and Mo in binder phase and the increase of the volume fraction of ceramic grains. At the same x, cermets for y = 15 had lower bending strength and higher hardness than those for y = 30.

  20. Plastic behavior of medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel at temperatures near g « a transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilatometric techniques were used to build the continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagram for a medium carbon microalloyed steel; the microstructure and hardness were determined at different cooling rates. The mechanical behavior of the steel in the austenite field and at temperatures approaching austenite to ferrite transformation was measured by means of hot torsion tests under isothermal and continuous cooling conditions. The no recrystallization temperatures, Tnr, and start of phase transformation, Ar3, were determined under continuous cooling condition using mean flow stress vs. inverse of absolute temperature diagrams. Interruption of static recrystallization within the interpass time in the austenite field indicated that the start of vanadium carbonitride precipitation occurred under 860 °C. Austenite transformation was found to start at around 710 °C, a temperature similar to that measured by dilatometry, suggesting that interphase precipitation delays the transformation of deformed austenite. Pearlite was observed at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 600 °C, with the flow curves taking on a particular shape, i.e., stress rose sharply as strain was increased, reaching peak stress at low deformation, around 0.2, followed by an extensive softening region after peak stress.

  1. A Model to Simulate Titanium Behavior in the Iron Blast Furnace Hearth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bao-Yu; Zulli, Paul; Maldonado, Daniel; Yu, Ai-Bing

    2010-08-01

    The erosion of hearth refractory is a major limitation to the campaign life of a blast furnace. Titanium from titania addition in the burden or tuyere injection can react with carbon and nitrogen in molten pig iron to form titanium carbonitride, giving the so-called titanium-rich scaffold or buildup on the hearth surface, to protect the hearth from subsequent erosion. In the current article, a mathematical model based on computational fluid dynamics is proposed to simulate the behavior of solid particles in the liquid iron. The model considers the fluid/solid particle flow through a packed bed, conjugated heat transfer, species transport, and thermodynamic of key chemical reactions. A region of high solid concentration is predicted at the hearth bottom surface. Regions of solid formation and dissolution can be identified, which depend on the local temperature and chemical equilibrium. The sensitivity to the key model parameters for the solid phase is analyzed. The model provides an insight into the fundamental mechanism of solid particle formation, and it may form a basic model for subsequent development to study the formation of titanium scaffold in the blast furnace hearth.

  2. Microstructural characterization of 5-9% chromium reduced-activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaram, R. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The microstructures of a 9Cr-2W-0.25-0.1C (9Cr-2WV), a 9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa), a 7Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (7Cr-2WVTa), and a 5Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (5Cr-2WVTa) steel (all compositions are in weight percent) have been characterized by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy (APFIM). The matrix in all four reduced-activation steels was 100% martensite. In the two 9Cr steels, the stable precipitates were blocky M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and small spherical MC. The two lower-chromium steels contained blocky M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and small needle-shaped carbonitrides in addition to M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. AEM and APFIM analysis revealed that in the steels containing tantalum, the majority of the tantalum was in solid solution. The experimental observations were in good agreement with phases and compositions predicted by phase equilibria calculations.

  3. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-01-01

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  4. Mechanical properties of as-cast microalloyed steels produced via investment casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, H.; Rassizadehghani, J.; Norouzi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Tensile and room temperature Charpy V-notch impact tests were used to evaluate the variations in the as-cast mechanical properties of a low-carbon steel produced via shell mould investment casting and containing combinations of vanadium, niobium and titanium. Tensile results indicate that the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) have increased up to respectively 615 MPa and 770 MPa due to the fine-scale microalloy precipitates in the microalloyed samples. Room temperature impact test results show that while addition of vanadium individually has not changed the impact energy, Nb has decreased it considerably. However, examination of fracture surfaces reveals that all microalloyed samples have failed by transgranular cleavage. Based on the transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies, it seems that carbonitrides being greater than 50 nm in size and formed along prior austenite grain boundaries before γ transformation are responsible for the observed reduction in impact energies and brittle fracture. In comparison to sand mould casting, the yield and UTS obtained from investment casting are superior. Furthermore, although the impact energies of Nb-containing alloys are approximately the same as those obtained from sand moulds, the impact energy of the alloy containing only vanadium has improved considerably.

  5. Study of the Weldability of Austenitic PH Steel for Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziewiec A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of Transvarestraint test of a modern precipitation hardened steel X10CrNiCuNb18-9-3 with copper. For comparison, the results of tests of conventional steel without the addition of copper X5CrNi18-10 are presented. The total length of all cracks and the maximum length of cracks were measured. The study of microstructure (LM, SEM showed that the austenitic stainless steel X10CrNiCuNb18-9-3 is very prone to hot cracking. After performing the Transvarestraint tests three types of cracks were observed: solidification cracks occurring during crystallization, liquation cracks due to segregation in the heat affected zone (HAZ and surface cracks. Niobium carbonitrides dispersed in the bands of segregation are the reason of high susceptibility to liquation cracking. Segregation of copper occurring during solidification causes of surface cracking. A combined effect of copper and stresses contributes to formation of hot microcracks. These microcracks propagate to a depth of 20-30 μm.

  6. Precipitation Kinetics in a Nb-stabilized Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonne, M.; Graux, A.; Cazottes, S.; Danoix, F.; Cuvilly, F.; Chassagne, F.; Perez, M.; Massardier, V.

    2017-08-01

    The precipitation occurring in a Nb-stabilized ferritic stainless steel, containing initially Nb(C, N) carbonitrides and Fe3Nb3X precipitates, was investigated during aging treatments performed between 923 K and 1163 K (650 °C and 890 °C) by combining different techniques, (thermoelectric power (TEP), scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), and atom probe tomography (APT)), in order to determine the precipitation kinetics, the nature and morphology of the newly formed precipitates as well as the chemistry of the initial Fe3Nb3X precipitates, where X stands for C or N. The following composition was proposed for these precipitates: (Fe0.81 Cr0.19)3 (Nb0.85 Si0.08 Mo0.07)3 (N0.8 C0.2), highlighting the simultaneous presence of N and C in the precipitates. With regard to the precipitation in the investigated temperature range, two main phenomena, associated with a hardness decrease, were clearly identified: (i) the precipitation of Fe2Nb precipitates from the niobium initially present in solution or coming from the progressive dissolution of the Fe3Nb3X precipitates and (ii) the precipitation of the χ-phase at grain boundaries for longer aging times. From the TEP kinetics, a time-temperature-precipitation diagram has been proposed.

  7. The negative effect of Zr addition on the high temperature strength in alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Jang, Min-Ho; Kang, Jun-Yun; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a Zr addition on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties in Nb-containing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels was investigated using tensile tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. The TEM observation showed that a Zr addition led to the formation of a (Nb,Zr)(C,N) complex particle, which coarsened the Nb-rich carbonitride. Tensile tests were performed at an elevated temperature (700 °C), and both the tensile and yield strengths decreased with a Zr addition. This unexpected result of a Zr addition was due to the reduction of the precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. - Highlights: • The effect of Zr on high temperature strength in AFA steel containing Nb was studied. • Both the tensile and yield strengths of an AFA steel decreased with Zr-addition. • This is due to the reduction of precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. • Nb(C,N) and (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particles were precipitated in an AFA and Zr-added AFA steel. • The size of (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particle is much bigger than that of Nb(C,N) particle

  8. Effect of vacuum oxy-nitrocarburizing on the microstructure of tool steels: an experimental and modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolova Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermochemical treatments of tool steels improve the performance of the components with respect to surface hardness, wear and tribological performance as well as corrosion resistance. Compared to the conventional gas ferritic nitrocarburizing process, the original vacuum oxy-nitrocarburizing is a time-, cost-effective and environmentally-friendly gas process. Because of the oxidizing nature of the gas atmosphere, there is no need to perform subsequent post-oxidation.In this study, a vacuum oxynitrocarburizing process was carried out onto four tool steels (AISI H10, H11, H21 and D2 at 570 °C, after hardening and single tempering. The structural analysis of the compound and diffusion layers was performed by optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES methods. A largely monophase ε- layer is formed with a carbon accumulation at the substrate adjacent area. The overlaying oxides adjacent to the ε-carbonitride phase contained Fe3O4 (magnetite as a main constituent. A thermodynamic modelling approach was also performed to understand and optimize the process. The “Equilib module” of FactSage software which uses Gibbs energy minimization method, was used to estimate the possible products during vacuum oxynitrocarburising process.

  9. Calorimetric Investigation of Thermal Stability of 304H Cu (Fe-17.7Cr-9.3Ni-2.95Cu-0.91Mn-0.58Nb-0.24Si-0.1C-0.12N-Wt Pct) Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Subramanian, Raju; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Rai, Arun Kumar; Rengachari, Mythili; Saibaba, Saroja; Jayakumar, Tammana

    2016-12-01

    The sequence of phase instabilities that take place in a Fe-17.7Cr-9.3Ni-0.58Nb-2.95Cu-0.12N (wt pct) austenitic stainless steel (304H Cu grade) as a function of temperature has been investigated using dynamic calorimetry. The results obtained from this investigation are supplemented by Thermocalc-based equilibrium and Scheil-Gulliver nonequilibrium solidification simulation. The following phase transformation sequence is found upon slow cooling from liquid: L → L + γ → L + γ + MX → γ + MX + δ → γ +MX + M23C6 → γ + MX + M23C6 + Cu. Under slow cooling, the solidification follows austenite + ferrite (AF) mode, which is in accordance with Thermocalc prediction and Scheil-Gulliver simulation. However, higher cooling rates result in skeletal δ-ferrite formation, due to increased segregation tendency of Nb and Cr to segregate to interdendritic liquid. The solidification mode is found to depend on combined Nb + Cu content. Experimental estimates of enthalpy change associated with melting and secondary phase precipitation are also obtained. In addition a semi-quantitative study on the dissolution kinetics of M23C6 type carbides has also been investigated. The standard solution treatment at 1413 K (1140 °C) is found to be adequate to dissolve both Cu and M23C6 into γ-austenite; but the complete dissolution of MX type carbonitrides occurs near the melting region.

  10. New Insights into Understanding Irreversible and Reversible Lithium Storage within SiOC and SiCN Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Graczyk-Zajac

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Within this work we define structural properties of the silicon carbonitride (SiCN and silicon oxycarbide (SiOC ceramics which determine the reversible and irreversible lithium storage capacities, long cycling stability and define the major differences in the lithium storage in SiCN and SiOC. For both ceramics, we correlate the first cycle lithiation or delithiation capacity and cycling stability with the amount of SiCN/SiOC matrix or free carbon phase, respectively. The first cycle lithiation and delithiation capacities of SiOC materials do not depend on the amount of free carbon, while for SiCN the capacity increases with the amount of carbon to reach a threshold value at ~50% of carbon phase. Replacing oxygen with nitrogen renders the mixed bond Si-tetrahedra unable to sequester lithium. Lithium is more attracted by oxygen in the SiOC network due to the more ionic character of Si-O bonds. This brings about very high initial lithiation capacities, even at low carbon content. If oxygen is replaced by nitrogen, the ceramic network becomes less attractive for lithium ions due to the more covalent character of Si-N bonds and lower electron density on the nitrogen atom. This explains the significant difference in electrochemical behavior which is observed for carbon-poor SiCN and SiOC materials.

  11. Development of high nickel austenitic steels for the application to fast reactor cores, (I). Alloy design with the aid of the d-electrons concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Masahiko; Yukawa, Natsuo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Nomura, Shigeo; Okuda, Takanari; Harada, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    The design of high nickel austenitic steels for the core materials of the fast reactors was performed following the d-electrons concept devised on the basis of molecular orbital calculations of transition-metal based alloys. In this design two calculated parameters are mainly utilized. The one is the d-orbital energy level (Md) of alloying transition elements, and the other is the bond order (Bo) that is a measure of the covalent bond strength between atoms. Using the Md-bar - Bo-bar phase stability diagram accurate prediction become possible for the phase stability of the austenite phase and 5% swelling at 140 dpa for nickel ions. Here, Md-bar and Bo-bar are the compositional average of Md and Bo parameters, respectively. On the basis of the phase stability diagram and preliminary experiments, guidelines for the alloy design of carbo-nitrides precipitated high nickel austenitic steels were constructed. Following the guidelines several new austenitic steels were designed for the fast reactors core material. (author)

  12. Structure of MoCN films deposited by cathodic arc evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilewicz, A., E-mail: adam.gilewicz@tu.koszalin.pl [Koszalin University of Technology, Faculty of Technology and Education, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland); Jedrzejewski, R.; Kochmanska, A.E. [West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, 19 Piastów Ave., 70-313 Szczecin (Poland); Warcholinski, B. [Koszalin University of Technology, Faculty of Technology and Education, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland)

    2015-02-27

    Molybdenum carbonitride (MoCN) coatings were deposited onto HS6-5-2 steel substrate using pure Mo targets in mixed acetylene and nitrogen atmosphere by cathodic arc evaporation. The structural properties of MoCN coatings with different carbon contents (as an effect of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate) were investigated systematically. Phase and chemical composition evolution of the coatings were characterized both by the glancing angle of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and wavelength dispersive spectrometry, respectively. These analyses have been supplemented by estimates of grain sizes and stress in the coatings. The XRD results show that the increase in acetylene flow rate causes the formation of molybdenum carbide (MoC) hexagonal phase in the coatings, a reduction of grain size and an increase in internal stress. - Highlights: • MoN and MoCN coatings were deposited by cathodic arc evaporation in nitrogen atmosphere. • MoCN coatings were formed using different acetylene flow rates. • Phase composition evolution was observed. • Crystallite size and stress were calculated.

  13. Planar, Polysilazane-Derived Porous Ceramic Supports for Membrane and Catalysis Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konegger, Thomas; Williams, Lee F; Bordia, Rajendra K

    2015-10-01

    Porous, silicon carbonitride-based ceramic support structures for potential membrane and catalysis applications were generated from a preceramic polysilazane precursor in combination with spherical, ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene microparticles through a sacrificial filler approach. A screening evaluation was used for the determination of the impact of both porogen content and porogen size on pore structure, strength, and permeability characteristics of planar specimens. By optimizing both the composition as well as cross-linking parameters, maximum characteristic biaxial flexural strengths of 65 MPa and porosities of 42% were achieved. The evolution of an interconnected, open-pore network during thermal porogen removal and conversion of the preceramic polymer led to air permeabilities in the order of 10 -14 m 2 . The materials were further exposed to long-term heat treatments to demonstrate the stability of properties after 100 h at 800°C in oxidizing, inert, and reducing environments. The determined performance, in combination with the versatile preparation method, illustrates the feasibility of this processing approach for the generation of porous ceramic support structures for applications at elevated temperatures in a variety of fields, including membrane and catalysis science.

  14. New Insights into Understanding Irreversible and Reversible Lithium Storage within SiOC and SiCN Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena; Reinold, Lukas Mirko; Kaspar, Jan; Sasikumar, Pradeep Vallachira Warriam; Soraru, Gian-Domenico; Riedel, Ralf

    2015-02-24

    Within this work we define structural properties of the silicon carbonitride (SiCN) and silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) ceramics which determine the reversible and irreversible lithium storage capacities, long cycling stability and define the major differences in the lithium storage in SiCN and SiOC. For both ceramics, we correlate the first cycle lithiation or delithiation capacity and cycling stability with the amount of SiCN/SiOC matrix or free carbon phase, respectively. The first cycle lithiation and delithiation capacities of SiOC materials do not depend on the amount of free carbon, while for SiCN the capacity increases with the amount of carbon to reach a threshold value at ~50% of carbon phase. Replacing oxygen with nitrogen renders the mixed bond Si-tetrahedra unable to sequester lithium. Lithium is more attracted by oxygen in the SiOC network due to the more ionic character of Si-O bonds. This brings about very high initial lithiation capacities, even at low carbon content. If oxygen is replaced by nitrogen, the ceramic network becomes less attractive for lithium ions due to the more covalent character of Si-N bonds and lower electron density on the nitrogen atom. This explains the significant difference in electrochemical behavior which is observed for carbon-poor SiCN and SiOC materials.

  15. The influence of the pyrolysis temperature on the electrochemical behavior of carbon-rich SiCN polymer-derived ceramics as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinold, Lukas Mirko; Yamada, Yuto; Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena; Munakata, Hirokazu; Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Riedel, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Within this study we report on the impact of the pyrolysis temperature on the structural and electrochemical properties of the poly(phenylvinylsilylcarbodiimide) derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic. Materials pyrolysed at 800 °C and 1300 °C, SiCN 800 and SiCN 1300, are found amorphous. Raman spectroscopy measurements indicate the increase in ordering of the free carbon phase with increasing pyrolysis temperature which leads to lower capacity recovered by SiCN 1300. Significant hysteresis is found for materials pyrolysed at 800 °C during electrochemical lithium insertion/extraction. This feature is attributed to much higher hydrogen content in SiCN 800 sample. An aging of SiCN 800 reflected by a change of elemental composition upon contact to air and a strong film formation are attenuated at a higher pyrolysis temperature. Single particle microelectrode investigation on SiCN 800 and SiCN 1300 clarify different electrochemical behavior of the materials. Much lower charge transfer resistance of SiCN 1300 in comparison to SiCN 800 explains better high currents electrochemical performance. Lithium ions diffusion coefficient Dmin ranges from 3.2 10-9 cm2s-1 to 6.4 10-11 cm2s-1 and is independent on the potential.

  16. Ultrahigh figure-of-merit for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride using ternary metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lunghao; Ceccato, R.; Raj, R.

    We report further increase in the figure-of-merit (FOM) for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4 than reported in an earlier paper [1], where a sub-nanometer layer of metal catalysts are deposited on carbon nanotube paper (CNT paper) that has been functionalized with polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic film. Ternary, Ru-Pd-Pt, instead of the binary Pd-Pt catalyst used earlier, together with a thinner CNT paper is shown to increase the figure-of-merit by up to a factor of six, putting is above any other known catalyst for hydrogen generation from NaBH 4. The catalysts are prepared by first impregnating the functionalized CNT-paper with solutions of the metal salts, followed by reduction in a sodium borohydride solution. The reaction mechanism and the catalyst efficiency are described in terms of an electric charge transfer, whereby the negative charge on the BH 4 - ion is exchanged with hydrogen via the electronically conducting SiCN/CNT substrate [1].

  17. Liquid phase interaction in TiC0,5N0,5-TiNi-Mo and TiC0,5N0,5-TiNi-Ti-Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askarova, L.Kh; Grigorov, I.G.; Zajnulin, Yu.G.

    1998-01-01

    Using the methods of X ray diffraction analysis, electron microscopy and X ray spectrum microanalysis a study was made into specific features of phase and structure formation in alloys TiC 0,5 N 0,5 -TiNi-Mo and TiC 0,5 N 0,5 -TiNi-Mo in the presence of a liquid phase at temperatures of 1380-1600 deg C. It is revealed that the physical and chemical processes taking place during the liquid-phase sintering result in the formation of a three-phase alloy consisting of nonstoichiometric titanium carbonitride TiC 0.5-x N 0.5-x , a molybdenum base solid solution of titanium, nickel and carbon Mo(Ti, Ni, C) and one of two intermetallic compounds, either TiNi or Ni 3 Ti. Metallic element concentration in individual phase constituents of the alloy is determined by means of X ray spectrum microanalysis

  18. Tribological performance evaluation of coated steels with TiNbCN subjected to tribo-chemical wear in Ringers solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero G, J.; Aperador, W.; Caicedo, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of generating solutions against the deterioration of the joint prostheses, it was studied the tribo-corrosive behavior of titanium niobium carbonitride (TiNbCN) deposited on stainless steel AISI 316 LVM using the technique of magnetron sputtering physical vapor deposition. The tests were performed in a balanced saline solution (Ringers solution) which represents the characteristics of the body fluids, using an equipment where the micro-abrasive wear is generated by the contact of micro particles in the system; the micro-abrasion-corrosion mechanism is described by means of the incorporation of an electrochemical cell consisting of three electrodes. Both the substrate and the coating, were subjected to micro-abrasive wear simultaneously with the electrochemical tests of Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); subsequently of the tests, the specimens were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy characterizing the surface morphology. It was observed that the coating presents an increase in its corrosion and wear resistance with the presence of a simulated biological fluid. The samples were characterized via X-ray diffraction. (Author)

  19. The role of healed N-vacancy defective BC2N sheet and nanotube by NO molecule in oxidation of NO and CO gas molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Parisa; Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Neyts, Erik C.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, the healing of N-vacancy boron carbonitride nanosheet (NV-BC2NNS) and nanotube (NV-BC2NNT) by NO molecule is studied by means of density functional theory calculations. Two different N-vacancies are considered in each of these structures in which the vacancy site is surrounded by either three B-atoms (NB) or by two B- and one C-atom (NBC). By means of the healed BC2NNS and BC2NNT as a support, the removal of two toxic gas molecules (NO and CO) are applicable. It should be noted that the obtained energy barriers of both healing and oxidizing processes are significantly lower than those of graphene, carbon nanotubes or boron nitride nanostructures. Also, at the end of the oxidation process, the pure BC2NNS or BC2NNT is obtained without any additional defects. Therefore, by using this method, we can considerably purify the defective BC2NNS/BC2NNT. Moreover, according to the thermochemistry calculations we can further confirm that the healing process of the NV-BC2NNS and NV-BC2NNT by NO are feasible at room temperature. So, we can claim that this study could be very helpful in both purifying the defective BC2NNS/BC2NNT while in the same effort removing toxic NO and CO gases.

  20. MXene–2D layered electrode materials for energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As promising candidates of power resources, electrochemical energy storage (EES devices have drawn more and more attention due to their ease of use, environmental friendliness, and high transformation efficiency. The performances of EES devices, such as lithium-ion batteries, sodium-ion batteries, and supercapacitors, depend largely on the inherent properties of electrode materials. On account of the outstanding properties of graphene, a lot of studies have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D materials. Over the past few years, a new exfoliation method has been utilized to successfully prepare a new family of 2D transition metal carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides, termed MXene, from layered precursors. Moreover, some unique EES properties of MXene have been discovered. With rapid research progress on this field, a timely account about the applications of MXene in the EES fields is highly necessary. In this article, the research progress on the preparation, electrochemical performance, and mechanism analysis of MXene is summarized and discussed. We also propose some personal prospects for the further development of this field. Keywords: MXene, 2D materials, Electrochemistry, Battery, Supercapacitor

  1. Kinetics of high-temperature oxidation of (Ti,Ta)(C,N)-based cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicardi, E.; Córdoba, J.M.; Gotor, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetic of high-temperature oxidation of (Ti,Ta)(C,N)-Co cermets was studied. • A parabolic oxidation kinetic was determined in cermets between 700 °C and 1200 °C. • This parabolic kinetic behaviour is due to the existence of a protective layer. • The protective layer formed was a complex Ti_xTa_1_−_xO_2 oxide with rutile structure. • The oxidation rate is controlled by the Ti and O_2 diffusion through the Ti_xTa_1_−_xO_2. - Abstract: The kinetics of the high-temperature oxidation of titanium–tantalum carbonitride-based cermets with different Ti/Ta ratios was studied. Isothermal oxidation tests were conducted under static air for 48 h at temperatures between 700 °C and 1200 °C. The oxidation satisfied the parabolic kinetics, characteristic of the existence of a protective oxide layer. The apparent activation energy suggests the rate-controlling process during oxidation is the simultaneous inward and outward diffusion of oxygen and titanium, respectively, through the formed protective layer, consisting mainly of a rutile phase. A higher Ta(V) content in the rutile decreased the oxygen diffusivity due to the reduction of oxygen vacancy concentration.

  2. High temperature oxidation resistance of (Ti,Ta)(C,N)-based cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicardi, E.; Córdoba, J.M.; Gotor, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cermets based on (Ti,Ta)(C,N) were oxidized in air between 800 and 1100 °C for 48 h. • The substitution of Ti by Ta resulted in a high resistance to oxidation. • A protective layer of cobalt titanates at the surface of cermets was observed. • A rutile phase in which some Ti"4"+ are replaced by Ta"5"+ was detected. • This replacement decelerated the oxygen diffusion into the cermets. - Abstract: Cermets based on titanium–tantalum carbonitride were oxidized in static air between 800 °C and 1100 °C for 48 h. The thermogravimetric and microstructural study showed an outstanding reduction in the oxidation of more than 90% when the Ta content was increased. In cermets with low Ta content, the formation of a thin CoO/Co_3O_4 outer layer tends to disappear by reacting with the underlying rutile phase, which emerges at the surface. However, in cermets with higher Ta content, the formation of an external titanate layer, observed even at a low temperature, appears to prevent the oxygen diffusion and the oxidation progression.

  3. Precipitation behavior and martensite lath coarsening during tempering of T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin-qing; Zhang, Dan-tian; Liu, Yong-chang; Ning, Bao-qun; Qiao, Zhi-xia; Yan, Ze-sheng; Li, Hui-jun

    2014-05-01

    Tempering is an important process for T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel from the viewpoint of microstructure control, as it facilitates the formation of final tempered martensite under serving conditions. In this study, we have gained deeper insights on the mechanism underlying the microstructural evolution during tempering treatment, including the precipitation of carbides and the coarsening of martensite laths, as systematically analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the precipitates was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate the formation of M3C (cementite) precipitates under normalized conditions. However, they tend to dissolve within a short time of tempering, owing to their low thermal stability. This phenomenon was substantiated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Besides, we could observe the precipitation of fine carbonitrides (MX) along the dislocations. The mechanism of carbon diffusion controlled growth of M23C6 can be expressed by the Zener's equation. The movement of Y-junctions was determined to be the fundamental mechanism underlying the martensite lath coarsening process. Vickers hardness was estimated to determine their mechanical properties. Based on the comprehensive analysis of both the micro-structural evolution and hardness variation, the process of tempering can be separated into three steps.

  4. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2 0 K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2 0 K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness

  5. Comportamiento de la descarga luminiscente anormal dependiendo de la atmósfera gaseosa en un sistema apto para tratamiento de materiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Sarmiento-Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of the DC glow discharge can be in stationary state or with flow of gas atmosphere, where the gas is between two electrodes. Applying a voltage between the electrodes above a certain threshold value or disruption value that depends on the type of gas, the geometric characteristics of the system, and atmosphere pressure, it is possible the generation and maintenance of gaseous discharge. The type of discharge may be classified according to the potential difference applied between the electrodes and the corresponding electrical current flowing through the system, being the abnormal glow discharge of particular interest. Reactive species generated in the glow discharge are used to generate physical and chemical interactions on a surface, which can be exploited for surface treatment and synthesis of materials such as nitriding, carbonitriding and polymerization, but also has great potential for application as a thermal source. The present work describes the set up of a furnace for materials treatment which works by the impact of active species from the negative column of low pressure glow discharge, using direct current. In this setup, the temperature is controlled as a function of gas pressure, type and gas proportions of the mixture in which the discharge is generated (Ar, N2 , H2 , aire, Ar/N2 , N2 /H2 , y Ar/H2 .

  6. Formation of Si-C-N ceramics from melamine-carbosilazane single source precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatnawi, Mazin; Al-Mansi, Wafaa; Arafa, Isam

    2008-01-01

    A series of melamine-carbosilazane pre-ceramic macromolecules (Mel-CSZs) were prepared by the condensation of melamine with different organochlorosilanes (R x SiCl 4-x where R is CH 3 /C 6 H 5 and x is 1, 2 or 3) using pyridine as a solvent under nitrogen atmosphere. These melamine-based carbosilazane macromolecules (Mel-CSZs) were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectrometry (MS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The backbone of the resulting Mel-CSZs consists of melamine and carbosilazane building blocks. Pyrolysis of these Mel-CSZs at 600 deg. C under nitrogen and vacuum afforded the corresponding silicon-based nonoxide carbonitride ceramics (Si-C-N). The microstructure and textural morphology of the resulting fine ceramic materials were examined using FT-IR, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Graphical abstract: Pyrolysis of the prepared melamine-organosilane macromolecules afforded Si-C-N ceramics with different textural morphology

  7. Behaviour of Z phase in 9–12%Cr steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Hald, John

    2006-01-01

    The literature on the behaviour of modified Z phase Cr(V,Nb)N in creep resistant martensitic 9–12%Cr steels is briefly reviewed. Ten different 9–12%Cr steels were investigated after prolonged exposure at 600–660uC; the modified Z phase was found in all of them. In steels with high Cr content (11......–12%), Z phase precipitates much faster than in 9%Cr steels. Precipitation of Z phase is associated with dissolution of MX carbonitrides, and causes a breakdown in long term creep strength in 9–12%Cr steels. High Cr steels show creep instabilities accompanied with Z phase precipitation, whereas low Cr...... steels show good long term creep stability. A niobium free CrVN variant of the modified Z phase was observed for the first time during the course of this work. The solution temperature of the Cr(V,Nb)N and CrVN modified Z phases was found to be close to 800uC for 11–12%Cr steels, much lower than the 1200...

  8. Effects of bias voltage and annealing on the structure and mechanical properties of WC0.75N0.25 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Y.D.; Hu, C.Q.; Wen, M.; Wang, C.; Liu, D.S.; Zheng, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of both bias voltage and annealing on the structure and mechanical properties of WC 0.75 N 0.25 thin films, deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrates by a direct current reactive magnetron sputtering system, in which the negative substrate bias voltage (V b ) was varied from floating (-1.6 V) to -200 V, and the deposited films were annealed at 800 deg. C for 2 h. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction analyses, along with the density-functional theory (DFT) calculations on the electronic structure, showed that WC 0.75 N 0.25 films were a single-phase of carbonitrides. After annealing, a significant decrease in hardness for the films was observed, being a result of point-defect annihilation as V b was in the range of floating to -120 V. However, when V b was in the range of -160 to -200 V, the hardness increased from ∼37 GPa for the as-deposited film to a maximum of ∼43 GPa for the annealed one. This increase in hardness after annealing might be attributed to age-hardening.

  9. Materials by design--exploiting the unique properties of pulsed laser deposition for the synthesis of novel hard materials and structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willmott, P.R.; Spillmann, H.

    2002-01-01

    Novel multilayer thin film structures with an (A-B-C-B) four-sublayer periodicity were synthesized using pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation. The layers were based on transition metal carbonitrides in which one sublayer (A=TiC x N 1-x ) was optimized for its high hardness, another (C=ZrC x N 1-x ) for its low frictional properties, and a third (B=VC x N 1-x ) which acted as a barrier to dislocation propagation. Control of growth and stoichiometry was facilitated by using thermally stable gases as sources for the carbon and nitrogen which were activated by collisions with the ablation plasma. It was discovered that the ablation yields of Ti, V, and Zr were almost identical, so that the sublayer thickness was directly proportional to the number of ablated shots per sublayer metal. The four-sublayer structures were harder (H-bar=35 GPa) than corresponding bilayer structures (H-bar=30 GPa) in which the VC x N 1-x sublayers were missing. Further improvements are expected by optimizing the sublayer ratios and the absolute period thickness

  10. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical propertiesof a Nb-microalloyed nano/ultrafine grained 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaei Baghbadorani, H., E-mail: h.samaeibaghbadorani@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fould Institute of Technology, Fouldshare 84916-63763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjati, P.; Rezaee, A.; Moallemi, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-11

    The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanical properties of a nano/ultrafine grained Nb-containing 201 austenitic stainless steel. For this purpose, 90% cold rolled sheets with fully martensitic microstructure were isothermally annealed at 900 °C for different times of 1 to 1800 s, leading to the reversion of strain- induced α′-martensite to austenite and significant grain refinement. Ferritescopy, X-ray diffractometery and optical/electron microscopy techniques along with hardness measurements and tensile tests were used to study the evolution in microstructure and mechanical properties in the course of annealing. It was found that heavy cold-rolling promoted formation of Nb-rich carbonitrides which effectively retarded the growth of fine reverted austenite grains. The obtained results showed that the complete transformation of martensite to austenite took about 60 s with the corresponding austenite grain size of about 90 nm. This sample had an ultrahigh yield strength of 1170 MPa, which was almost four times higher than that of the raw material and outstanding elongation of 37%. Further, the true stress–strain curves of the reversion annealed samples revealed two distinct uniform elongation stages (stage I and stage II), whereas, the onset of stage II was concurrent with pronounced strain hardening. This was related to the sharp increase in the formation of α′-martensite upon tensile straining.

  11. Mechanical behavior and stress effects in hard superconductors: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, C.C.; Easton, D.S.

    1977-11-01

    The mechanical properties of type II superconducting materials are reviewed as well as the effect of stress on the superconducting properties of these materials. The bcc alloys niobium-titanium and niobium-zirconium exhibit good strength and extensive ductility at room temperature. Mechanical tests on these alloys at 4.2 0 K revealed serrated stress-strain curves, nonlinear elastic effects and reduced ductility. The nonlinear behavior is probably due to twinning and detwinning or a reversible stress-induced martensitic transformation. The brittle A-15 compound superconductors, such as Nb 3 Sn and V 3 Ga, exhibit unusual elastic properties and structural instabilities at cryogenic temperatures. Multifilamentary composites consisting of superconducting filaments in a normal metal matrix are generally used for superconducting devices. The mechanical properties of alloy and compound composites, tapes, as well as composites of niobium carbonitride chemically vapor deposited on high strength carbon fibers are presented. Hysteretic stress-strain behavior in the metal matrix composites produces significant heat generation, an effect which may lead to degradation in the performance of high field magnets. Measurements of the critical current density, J/sub c/, under stress in a magnetic field are reported. Modest stress-reversible degradation in J/sub c/ was observed in niobium-titanium composites, while more serious degradation was found in Nb 3 Sn samples. The importance of mechanical behavior to device performance is discussed

  12. Effects of nickel and cobalt addition on creep strength and microstructure of the precipitation-strengthened 15Cr ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Masachika; Toda, Yoshiaki; Sawada, Kota; Kushima, Hideaki; Kimura, Kazuhiro [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Creep strength of 15Cr ferritic steel with ferrite matrix was increased by precipitation strengthening of intermetallic compounds. It was higher than those of 9-12Cr ferritic steels with a tempered martensitic microstructure strengthened by carbide and carbonitride. Addition of nickel was confirmed to improve Charpy impact toughness of the 15Cr steels, however, creep strength was slightly reduced by the addition of nickel. Microstructure of the 15Cr steel changes from ferrite single phase to dual phases of ferrite and martensite with the addition of nickel which is an austenite stabilizing element. The 15Cr steels investigated in the previous study, contain 3mass% of cobalt which is also an austenite stabilizing element, therefore, the influence of nickel and cobalt combination on mechanical properties and microstructure of the 15Cr-1Mo-6W-V-Nb steel is investigated in this study. Creep strength, Charpy impact toughness and microstructure of the steel were strongly influenced by the composition of nickel and cobalt. Design guideline of the 15Cr steel is discussed with respect to a role of microstructure and combination of nickel and cobalt addition. (orig.)

  13. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2017-01-17

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  14. Growth and characterization of stoichiometric BCN films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannan, Md. Abdul, E-mail: amannan75@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Unit, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Noguchi, Hideyuki; Kida, Tetsuya; Nagano, Masamitsu [Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Hirao, Norie; Baba, Yuji [Synchrotron Radiation Research Unit, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-05-31

    Hexagonal boron carbonitride (h-BCN) hybrid films have been synthesized on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using tris-(dimethylamino)borane as a single-source molecular precursor. The films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopic measurements. XPS measurement showed that the B atoms were bonded to C and N atoms to form the sp{sup 2}-B-C-N atomic hybrid chemical environment. The atomic composition estimated from the XPS of the typical sample was found to be almost B{sub 1}C{sub 1}N{sub 1}. NEXAFS spectra of the B K-edge and the N K-edge had the peaks due to the {pi}* and {sigma}* resonances of sp{sup 2} hybrid orbitals implying the existence of the sp{sup 2} hybrid configurations of h-BCN around the B atoms. The G band at 1592 and D band at 1352 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectra also suggested the presence of the graphite-like sp{sup 2}-B-C-N atomic hybrid bonds. The films consisted of micrometer scale crystalline structure of around 10 {mu}m thick has been confirmed by the field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Nitride fuels irradiation performance data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozak, D.E.; Thomas, J.K.; Peddicord, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An irradiation performance data base for nitride fuels has been developed from an extensive literature search and review that emphasized uranium nitride, but also included performance data for mixed nitrides [(U,Pu)N] and carbonitrides [(U,Pu)C,N] to increase the quantity and depth of pin data available. This work represents a very extensive effort to systematically collect and organize irradiation data for nitride-based fuels. The data base has many potential applications. First, it can facilitate parametric studies of nitride-based fuels to be performed using a wide range of pin designs and operating conditions. This should aid in the identification of important parameters and design requirements for multimegawatt and SP-100 fuel systems. Secondly, the data base can be used to evaluate fuel performance models. For detailed studies, it can serve as a guide to selecting a small group of pin specimens for extensive characterization. Finally, the data base will serve as an easily accessible and expandable source of irradiation performance information for nitride fuels

  16. Heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheremnykh, V.G.; Derevyankin, E.V.; Sakulin, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of two steels 13Kh1M1FA and 25Kh1M1FA is evaluated. It is shown that exposure time increase at heating temperatures below 1000 deg C up to 10h changes but slightly the size of the Cr-Mo-V ferritic grain of rotor steel cooled with 25 deg C/h rate. Heating up to 1000 deg C and above leads to substantial ferritic grain growth. The kinetics of ferritic grain growth is determined by the behaviour of phases controlling the austenitic grain growth, such as carbonitrides VCsub(0.14)Nsub(0.78) in 13Kh1M1FA steel and VCsub(0.18)Nsub(0.72) in 25Kh1M1FA steel. Reduction of carbon and alloying elements content in steel composition observed at the liquation over rotor length leads to a certain decrease of ferritic grain resistance to super heating

  17. TiCN thin films grown by reactive crossed beam pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Camps, E.; Romero, S.; Muhl, S.; Camps, I.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we used a crossed plasma configuration where the ablation of two different targets in a reactive atmosphere was performed to prepare nanocrystalline thin films of ternary compounds. In order to assess this alternative deposition configuration, titanium carbonitride (TiCN) thin films were deposited. Two crossed plasmas were produced by simultaneously ablating titanium and graphite targets in an Ar/N2 atmosphere. Films were deposited at room temperature onto Si (100) and AISI 4140 steel substrates whilst keeping the ablation conditions of the Ti target constant. By varying the laser fluence on the carbon target it was possible to study the effect of the carbon plasma on the characteristics of the deposited TiCN films. The structure and composition of the films were analyzed by X-ray Diffraction, Raman Spectroscopy and non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. The hardness and elastic modulus of the films was also measured by nanoindentation. In general, the experimental results showed that the TiCN thin films were highly oriented in the (111) crystallographic direction with crystallite sizes as small as 6.0 nm. It was found that the hardness increased as the laser fluence was increased, reaching a maximum value of about 33 GPa and an elastic modulus of 244 GPa. With the proposed configuration, the carbon content could be easily varied from 42 to 5 at.% by changing the laser fluence on the carbon target.

  18. Si- and Sn-containing SiOCN-based nanocomposites as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Synthesis, thermodynamic characterization and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Jochen; Albe, Karsten [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Materialmodellierung; Vrankovic, Dragoljub; Riedel, Ralf; Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Disperse Feststoffe; Cupid, Damian; Seifert, Hans J. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). IAM - Angewandte Werkstoffphysik

    2017-11-15

    Novel nanocomposites consisting of silicon/tin nanoparticles (n-Si/n-Sn) embedded in silicon carbonitride (SiCN) or silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) ceramic matrices are investigated as possible anode materials for Li-ion batteries. The goal of our study is to exploit the large mass specific capacity of Si/Sn (3 579 mAh g{sup -1}/994 mAh g{sup -1}), while avoiding rapid capacity fading due to the large volume changes of Si/Sn during Li insertion. We show that a large amount (∝30-40 wt.%) of disordered carbon phase is dispersed within the SiOC/SiCN matrix and stabilizes the Si/Sn nanoparticles with respect to extended reversible lithium ion storage. Silicon nanocomposites are prepared by mixing of a polymeric precursor with commercial and ''home-synthesized'' crystalline and amorphous silicon. Tin nanocomposites, in contrast, are prepared using a single precursor approach, which allows the in-situ generation of Sn nanoparticles homogeneously dispersed within the SiOC host. The best electrochemical stability along with capacities of 600 - 700 mAh g{sup -1} is obtained when amorphous/porous silicon is used. Mechanisms contributing to the increase of storage capacity and the cycle stability are clarified by analyzing elemental composition, local solid-state structures, intercalation hosts and Li-ion mobility. Our work is supplemented by first-principles based atomistic modeling and thermochemical measurements.

  19. Manufacturing technology development of plasma/ion nitriding for improvement of hardness of machine components and tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suprapto; Tjipto Sujitno; Saminto

    2015-01-01

    The manufacturing technology development of plasma/ion nitriding to improve of hardness of machine components and tools has been done. The development of this technology aims to improve device performance plasma nitriding double chamber and conducted with the addition of thermal radiation shield. Testing was done by testing for preheating operation (start-up), test operation for conditions nitriding and test for nitriding process. The results show that: the plasma nitriding device can be operated for nitriding process at the temperature of about 500 °C for 6 hours, using the thermal radiation shield obtained outside wall temperature of about 65 °C and shorten start-up time to about 60 minutes. The use of thermal radiation shield can also improve the efficiency of the electric power supply and increase the operating temperature for nitriding process. Test for nitriding obtained increase of hardness 1.33 times for the original camshaft (genuine parts) and 1.8 times for the imitation camshaft (imitation parts), the results are compared with after the tempering process at a temperature of 600 °C. For sample SS 304 was 2.45 times compared with before nitrided These results indicate that the development of manufacturing technology of plasma/ion nitriding to increase hardness of machine components and tools have been successfully able to increase the hardness, although still need to be optimized. Besides that, these devices can be developed to use for the process of carburizing and carbonitriding. (author)

  20. The Characteristics and Generating Mechanism of Large Precipitates in Ti-Containing H13 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, You; Cheng, Guoguang; Chen, Lie; Zhang, Yandong; Yan, Qingzhong

    2017-02-01

    The characteristics of large precipitates in H13 tool steel with 0.015wt% Ti were studied. The result shows that three types of phases larger than 1 μm exist in the as-cast ingot, that is, (Ti, V) (C, N) type phase, (V, Mo, Cr)C type phase and sulfide. (Ti, V) (C, N) type phase could be further classified as the homogeneous Ti-rich one and the Ti-V-rich one in which Ti/V ratio gradually changes. (V, Mo, Cr)C type phase contains the V-rich one and the Mo-Cr-rich one. The compositional characteristics in all of them have little relation with the cutting position or cooling rate. The precipitating process could be well described through calculation by Thermo-Calc software. During solidification, the primary phase (Ti, V)(C, N) first starts to precipitate in the form of Ti-rich carbonitride. With the development of solidification, the ratio of Ti decreases and that of V increases. Then the primary phase Ti-V-rich (Ti, V)(C, N) and V-rich (V, Mo, Cr)C appears successively. Mo-Cr-rich (V, Mo, Cr)C phase does not precipitate until the solidification process reaches to the end. Sulfide precipitates before (V, Mo, Cr)C type phase and it could act as the nucleus of (V, Mo, Cr)C.

  1. Tribological performance evaluation of coated steels with TiNbCN subjected to tribo-chemical wear in Ringers solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero G, J.; Aperador, W. [Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Volta Research Group, 101-80 Bogota (Colombia); Caicedo, J. C., E-mail: g.ing.materiales@gmail.com [Universidad del Valle, Tribology Polymers, Powder Metallurgy and Processing of Solid Recycled Research Group, Cali (Colombia)

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of generating solutions against the deterioration of the joint prostheses, it was studied the tribo-corrosive behavior of titanium niobium carbonitride (TiNbCN) deposited on stainless steel AISI 316 LVM using the technique of magnetron sputtering physical vapor deposition. The tests were performed in a balanced saline solution (Ringers solution) which represents the characteristics of the body fluids, using an equipment where the micro-abrasive wear is generated by the contact of micro particles in the system; the micro-abrasion-corrosion mechanism is described by means of the incorporation of an electrochemical cell consisting of three electrodes. Both the substrate and the coating, were subjected to micro-abrasive wear simultaneously with the electrochemical tests of Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); subsequently of the tests, the specimens were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy characterizing the surface morphology. It was observed that the coating presents an increase in its corrosion and wear resistance with the presence of a simulated biological fluid. The samples were characterized via X-ray diffraction. (Author)

  2. Effect of vanadium carbide on dry sliding wear behavior of powder metallurgy AISI M2 high speed steel processed by concentrated solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, C. [Materials Engineering. E.I.I., Universidad de Valladolid. C/Paseo del cauce 59, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Romero, A. [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales. Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales (INEI). Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Edificio Politécnico, Avda. Camilo José Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Herranz, G., E-mail: gemma.herranz@uclm.es [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales. Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales (INEI). Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Edificio Politécnico, Avda. Camilo José Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Blanco, Y.; Martin, F. [Materials Engineering. E.I.I., Universidad de Valladolid. C/Paseo del cauce 59, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Mixtures of AISI M2 high speed steel and vanadium carbide (3, 6 or 10 wt.%) were prepared by powder metallurgy and sintered by concentrated solar energy (CSE). Two different powerful solar furnaces were employed to sinter the parts and the results were compared with those obtained by conventional powder metallurgy using a tubular electric furnace. CSE allowed significant reduction of processing times and high heating rates. The wear resistance of compacts was studied by using rotating pin-on-disk and linearly reciprocating ball-on-flat methods. Wear mechanisms were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and chemical inspections of the microstructures of the samples. Better wear properties than those obtained by conventional powder metallurgy were achieved. The refinement of the microstructure and the formation of carbonitrides were the reasons for this. - Highlights: •Powder metallurgy of mixtures of M2 high speed steel and VC are studied. •Some sintering is done by concentrated solar energy. •Rotating pin-on-disk and linearly reciprocating ball-on-flat methods are used. •The tribological properties and wear mechanisms, under dry sliding, are studied.

  3. Interface description using computational methods and tribological characteristic of Ti N/Ti C films prepared by reactive pulse arc evaporation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devia N, D. M.; Gonzalez C, J. M.; Ruden M, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Ti N/Ti C bilayers have been deposited by Plasma Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition Technique - Reactive Pulsed Arc. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). From the signal treatment of the narrow XP S spectra and the XRD diffraction patterns, the formation of Ti N (titanium nitride), Ti C (titanium carbide) and Ti CN (titanium carbonitride) was confirmed, with fm-3m spatial group, corresponding to the Fcc phase of the synthesized compounds. The multilayer was simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) by the Unrestricted Hartree Fock method. Charge distributions and electron total density were obtained; finding bond formation at the interphase, electrical neutrality and system stability. Anomalies in the corners of the structures due to edge effect, simulation ideality and the no internal tension inclusion, intrinsic to the growing, are observed. The ball on disc tribometer was used to measure the friction and wear coefficient to verify the interface formation. (Author)

  4. Interface description using computational methods and tribological characteristic of Ti N/Ti C films prepared by reactive pulse arc evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devia N, D. M. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Manizales, Campus La Nubia, Manizales, Caldas (Colombia); Gonzalez C, J. M.; Ruden M, A., E-mail: dmdevian@utp.edu.co [Universidad del Valle, Edificio 349, espacio 1003, Ciudad Universitaria Melendez, Cali (Colombia)

    2013-10-01

    The Ti N/Ti C bilayers have been deposited by Plasma Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition Technique - Reactive Pulsed Arc. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). From the signal treatment of the narrow XP S spectra and the XRD diffraction patterns, the formation of Ti N (titanium nitride), Ti C (titanium carbide) and Ti CN (titanium carbonitride) was confirmed, with fm-3m spatial group, corresponding to the Fcc phase of the synthesized compounds. The multilayer was simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) by the Unrestricted Hartree Fock method. Charge distributions and electron total density were obtained; finding bond formation at the interphase, electrical neutrality and system stability. Anomalies in the corners of the structures due to edge effect, simulation ideality and the no internal tension inclusion, intrinsic to the growing, are observed. The ball on disc tribometer was used to measure the friction and wear coefficient to verify the interface formation. (Author)

  5. Surface Morphology and Hardness Analysis of TiCN Coated AA7075 Aluminium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, M. K.; Ganesha Prasad, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Successful titanium carbonitride (TiCN) coating on AA7075 plates using the PVD technique depends upon many variables, including temperature, pressure, incident angle and energy of the reactive ions. Coated specimens have shown an increase in their surface hardness of 2.566 GPa. In this work, an attempt to further augment the surface hardness and understand its effects on the surface morphology was performed through heat treatments at 500°C for different duration of times. Specimen's heat treated at 500°C for 1 h exhibited a maximum surface hardness of 6.433 GPa, corresponding to an increase of 92.07%. The XRD results showed the presence of Al2Ti and AlTi3N and indicate the bond created between them. Unit cell lattice parameters in the XRD data are calculated using Bragg's law. The SEM images exhibit increasing crack sizes as the heat treatment time is increased. From the studies, the heat treatment duration can be optimized to 1 h, which exhibited an augmented surface hardness, as further increases in durations caused a drop in the surface hardness. The heat treatment effectively modified the surface hardness. Equations providing the relationships that temperature and time have with the reaction parameters are presented.

  6. Microstructural characterization of 5-9% chromium reduced-activation steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaram, R.; Klueh, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructures of a 9Cr-2W-0.25-0.1C (9Cr-2WV), a 9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa), a 7Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (7Cr-2WVTa), and a 5Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (5Cr-2WVTa) steel (all compositions are in weight percent) have been characterized by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy (APFIM). The matrix in all four reduced-activation steels was 100% martensite. In the two 9Cr steels, the stable precipitates were blocky M 23 C 6 and small spherical MC. The two lower-chromium steels contained blocky M 7 C 3 and small needle-shaped carbonitrides in addition to M 23 C 6 . AEM and APFIM analysis revealed that in the steels containing tantalum, the majority of the tantalum was in solid solution. The experimental observations were in good agreement with phases and compositions predicted by phase equilibria calculations

  7. Spray forming and mechanical properties of a new type powder metallurgy superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Chong-Lin; Ge Chang-Chun; Xia Min; Gu Tian-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The deposited billet of a new type powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy FGH4095M for use in turbine disk manufacturing has been fabricated using spray forming technology. The metallurgical quality of the deposited billet was analyzed in terms of density, texture, and grain size. Comparative research was done on the microstructure and mechanical properties between the flat disk preform prepared with hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and the same alloy forgings prepared with HIP followed by isothermal forging (IF). The results show that the density of the spray-formed and nitrogen-atomized deposit billet is above 99% of the theoretical density, indicating a compact structure. The grains are uniform and fine. The billet has weak texture with a random distribution in the spray deposition direction and perpendicular to the direction of deposition. A part of atomizing nitrogen exists in the preform in the form of carbonitride. Nitrogen-induced microporosity causes the density reduction of the preform. Compared with the process of HIP+IF, the superalloy FGH4095M after HIP has better mechanical properties at both room temperature and high temperature. The sizes of the γ′ phase are finer in microstructure of the preform after HIP in comparison with the forgings after HIP+IF. This work shows that SF+HIP is a viable processing route for FGH4095M as a turbine-disk material. (paper)

  8. MC Carbide Characterization in High Refractory Content Powder-Processed Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Stoichko; Chen, Wei; Huo, Jiajie; Feng, Qiang; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Sun, Eugene; Tin, Sammy

    2018-04-01

    Carbide precipitates in Ni-based superalloys are considered to be desirable phases that can contribute to improving high-temperature properties as well as aid in microstructural refinement of the material; however, they can also serve as crack initiation sites during fatigue. To date, most of the knowledge pertaining to carbide formation has originated from assessments of cast and wrought Ni-based superalloys. As powder-processed Ni-based superalloys are becoming increasingly widespread, understanding the different mechanisms by which they form becomes increasingly important. Detailed characterization of MC carbides present in two experimental high Nb-content powder-processed Ni-based superalloys revealed that Hf additions affect the resultant carbide morphologies. This morphology difference was attributed to a higher magnitude of elastic strain energy along the interface associated with Hf being soluble in the MC carbide lattice. The composition of the MC carbides was studied through atom probe tomography and consisted of a complex carbonitride core, which was rich in Nb and with slight Hf segregation, surrounded by an Nb carbide shell. The characterization results of the segregation behavior of Hf in the MC carbides and the subsequent influence on their morphology were compared to density functional theory calculations and found to be in good agreement, suggesting that computational modeling can successfully be used to tailor carbide features.

  9. Electron microscopy an indispensable tool for knowledge based design and development of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, Saroja

    2015-01-01

    Development of materials for core components such as clad and wrapper for the Indian sodium cooled fast reactors and the plasma facing components in the ITER program has been a continuous indigenous effort involving a close collaboration between the designer, materials researcher and industry. In recent times there has been an intensive effort to design and develop new radiation resistant and high temperature materials which include the advanced austenitic and ferritic steels. An elaborate TEM investigation of the 20% Cold Worked SS316 austenitic stainless steel wrapper exposed to different damage levels from the Fast Breeder Test Reactor at Kalpakkam provided an in depth understanding on the mechanism of evolution of radiation induced phase changes and voids. The identification of η and G phases with unique microchemistry at 40 and 83 dpa respectively and the consequent depletion of beneficial elements Ni and Si from the matrix, resulted in precipitate associated voids and a high degree of volumetric swelling. This knowledge provided the impetus to develop alloy D9 and its variants with higher Ni, Ti and optimum amounts of Si and P where precipitation of fine stable Ti carbides/carbonitrides and phosphides imparts superior strength while the matrix precipitate interfaces act as defect sinks to control void swelling

  10. Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of 26Cr-1Mo Ferritic Stainless Steels in Hot Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H. S.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Elongation measurements of 26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steels undergoing stress corrosion in boiling LiCl solution allow the induction period to be distinguished from the propagation period of cracks by the deviation of elongation from the logarithmic creep law. Localised corrosion cells are activated exclusively at slip steps by loading and developed into corrosion trenches. No cracks have developed from the corrosion trenches until the induction period is exceeded. The induction period is regarded as a time for localised corrosion cells to achieve a critical degree of occlusion for crack initiation. The repassivation rate of exposed metal by creep or emergence of slip steps decreases as the load increases and is very sensitive to the microstructural changes that affect slip tep height. The greater susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of either prestrained or grain coarsened 26Cr-1Mo alloy compared with that of mill annealed material results from a significant reduction of repassivation rate associated with the increased slip step height. The angular titanium carbonitrides particles dispersed in Ti-stabilized 26Cr-1Mo alloy have a detrimental effect on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking

  11. Structural and thermodynamic study of the system Th-C-N in the presence of excess graphite; the existence of a new hexagonal phase β 'ThCN' stable at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pialoux, A.

    1980-01-01

    The progressive reaction of nitrogen on the 'dicarbide' of thorium in the presence of excess graphite has been studied using X-ray diffractometry at high temperature (T 0 C) under controlled pressure (10 -3 0 C using measurements of crystalline parameters, equilibrium pressures and free enthalpies of standard formation of the various carbonitrides and nitrides observed. It is notably shown that the 'dicarbide' in stable at psub(N2)'s considerably weaker than those stated by Benz and Froxel, the nitrogen content of the γ Th C 2 ' cubic phase increasing furthermore with temperature. The new β 'ThCN' phase which does not quench crystallizes in the hexagonal system and in reattatched to the group space with P31 m, the various contractions of tis crystalline parameter Csub(β) is interpreted as a closing of the double bond of the C 2 pairs in this structure. The temperature of 1125 0 C is attributed to the new polymorphic transformation: β 'ThCN' hexagonal reversible α 'ThCN' monoclinic which appear to be of the martensitic type, the crystalline parameters of α'ThCN' being furthermore measured from 20 to 1125 0 C. (orig.)

  12. Guidelines for Synthesis and Processing of 2D Titanium Carbide (Ti3C2Tx MXene)

    KAUST Repository

    Alhabeb, Mohamed

    2017-08-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (MXenes) were discovered in 2011. Since the original discovery, more than 20 different compositions have been synthesized by the selective etching of MAX phase and other precursors and many more theoretically predicted. They offer a variety of different properties, making the family promising candidates in a wide range of applications, such as energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, water purification, electrocatalysis and medicine. These solution-processable materials have the potential to be highly scalable, deposited by spin, spray or dip coating, painted or printed, or fabricated in a variety of ways. Due to this promise, the amount of research on MXenes has been increasing, and methods of synthesis and processing are expanding quickly. The fast evolution of the material can also be noticed in the wide range of synthesis and processing protocols that determine the yield of delamination, as well as the quality of the 2D flakes produced. Here we describe the experimental methods and best practices we use to synthesize the most studied MXene, titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx), using different etchants and delamination methods. We also explain effects of synthesis parameters on the size and quality of Ti3C2Tx and suggest the optimal processes for the desired application.

  13. P and Si functionalized MXenes for metal-ion battery applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jiajie

    2017-04-10

    MXenes are a family of two-dimensional materials, composed of early transition metal carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides, with great potential in energy storage systems, in particular in electrodes for Li, Na, K-ion batteries. However, so far the capacities are not competitive. In this context, we investigate P and Si functionalized MXenes for metal-ion battery applications, using first-principles calculations, since P and Si provide reaction products with high ion content. Replacement of the F and OH ligands of Ti2C and V2C with P and Si is demonstrated to be feasible (energy barriers of less than 0.128 eV) and the ion diffusion barriers turn out to be less than 0.32 eV. Importantly, the Li, Na, and K capacities are predicted to be 1767 mAh g−1, 711 mAh g−1, and 711 mAh g−1, respectively, thus being much higher than in the case of F and OH functionalization.

  14. Synthesis of nanostructured multiphase Ti(C,N)/a-C films by a plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghareshabani, E.; Rawat, R.S.; Sobhanian, S.; Verma, R.; Karamat, S.; Pan, Z.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured multiphase Ti(C,N)/a-C films were deposited using a 3.3 kJ pulsed plasma focus device onto silicon (1 0 0) substrates at room temperature. The plasma focus device, fitted with solid titanium anode instead of usual hollow copper anode, was operated with nitrogen and Ar/CH 4 as the filling gas. Films were deposited with different number of shots, at 80 mm from top of the anode and at zero angular position with respect to anode axis. X-ray diffraction results show the diffraction peaks related to different compounds such as TiC 2 , TiN, Ti 2 CN, Ti and TiC 0.62 confirming the deposition of multiphase titanium carbo-nitride composite films on silicon. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the formation of Ti-C, C-N, Ti-N, Ti-O and C-C bonds in the films. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the nanostructure grains are agglomerates of smaller nanoparticles about 10-20 nm in size. Raman studies verify the formation of multiphase Ti(C,N) and also of amorphous graphite in the films. The maximum microhardness value of the composite film is 14.8 ± 1.3 GPa for 30 shots.

  15. 9-12% Cr heat resistant steels. Alloy design, TEM characterisation of microstructure evolution and creep response at 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas Jara, David

    2011-03-21

    This work was carried out aiming to design and characterise 9-12% Cr steels with tailormade microstructures for applications in fossil fuel fired power plants. The investigations concentrated in the design and characterisation of heat resistant steels for applications in high oxidising atmospheres (12% Cr) and 9% Cr alloys for components such as rotors (P91). ThermoCalc calculations showed to be a reliable tool for alloy development. The modeling also provided valuable information for the adjustment of the processing parameters (austenisation and tempering temperatures). Two 12% Cr heat resistant steels with a fine dispersion of nano precipitates were designed and produced supported by thermodynamic modeling (ThermoCalc). A detailed characterisation of the microstructure evolution at different creep times (100 MPa / 650 C / 8000 h) was carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The results of the microstructure analysis were correlated with the mechanical properties in order to investigate the influence of different precipitates (especially M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides) on the creep strength of the alloys. Precipitation of Laves phase and Z-phase was observed after several hundred hours creep time. Very few Z-phase of the type Cr(V,Ta)N nucleating from existing (V,Ta)(C,N) was observed. Both alloys show growth and coarsening of Laves phase, meanwhile the MX carbonitrides present a very slow growth and coarsening rate. Alloys containing Laves phase, MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates show best creep properties. The influence of hot-deformation and tempering temperature on the microstructure evolution on one of the designed 12% Cr alloys was studied during short-term creep at 80-250 MPa and 650 C. Quantitative determination of dislocation density and sub-grain size in the initial microstructure and after creep was investigated by STEM combined with the high-angle annular dark-field detector (HAADF). A correlation between microstructure

  16. 9-12% Cr heat resistant steels. Alloy design, TEM characterisation of microstructure evolution and creep response at 650 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas Jara, David

    2011-01-01

    This work was carried out aiming to design and characterise 9-12% Cr steels with tailormade microstructures for applications in fossil fuel fired power plants. The investigations concentrated in the design and characterisation of heat resistant steels for applications in high oxidising atmospheres (12% Cr) and 9% Cr alloys for components such as rotors (P91). ThermoCalc calculations showed to be a reliable tool for alloy development. The modeling also provided valuable information for the adjustment of the processing parameters (austenisation and tempering temperatures). Two 12% Cr heat resistant steels with a fine dispersion of nano precipitates were designed and produced supported by thermodynamic modeling (ThermoCalc). A detailed characterisation of the microstructure evolution at different creep times (100 MPa / 650 C / 8000 h) was carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The results of the microstructure analysis were correlated with the mechanical properties in order to investigate the influence of different precipitates (especially M 23 C 6 carbides) on the creep strength of the alloys. Precipitation of Laves phase and Z-phase was observed after several hundred hours creep time. Very few Z-phase of the type Cr(V,Ta)N nucleating from existing (V,Ta)(C,N) was observed. Both alloys show growth and coarsening of Laves phase, meanwhile the MX carbonitrides present a very slow growth and coarsening rate. Alloys containing Laves phase, MX and M 23 C 6 precipitates show best creep properties. The influence of hot-deformation and tempering temperature on the microstructure evolution on one of the designed 12% Cr alloys was studied during short-term creep at 80-250 MPa and 650 C. Quantitative determination of dislocation density and sub-grain size in the initial microstructure and after creep was investigated by STEM combined with the high-angle annular dark-field detector (HAADF). A correlation between microstructure evolution and creep

  17. Effects of niobium additions on the structure, depth, and austenite grain size of the case of carburized 0.07% C steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. A.; Bepari, M. M. A.

    1996-10-01

    Carbon (0.07%) steel samples containing about 0.04% Nb singly and in combination with nitrogen were carburized in a natural Titas gas atmosphere at a temperature of 1223 K (950 °C) and a pressure of about 0.10 MPa for 1/2 to 4 h, followed by slow cooling in the furnace. Their microstructures were studied by optical microscopy. The austenite grain size of the case and the case depths were determined on baseline samples of low-carbon steels and also on niobium and (Nb + N) microalloyed steel samples. It was found that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium alone or in combination with nitrogen decreased the thickness of cementite network near the surface of the carburized case of the steels. However, niobium in combination with nitrogen was more effective than niobium in reducing the thickness of cementite network. Niobium with or without nitrogen inhibited the formation of Widmanstätten cementite plates at grain boundaries and within the grains near the surface in the hypereutectoid zone of the case. It was also revealed that, when compared to the baseline steel, niobium decreased the case depth of the carburized steels, but that niobium with nitrogen is more effective than niobium alone in reducing the case depth. Niobium as niobium carbide (NbC) and niobium in the presence of nitrogen as niobium carbonitride, [Nb(C,N)] particles refined the austenite grain size of the carburized case, but Nb(C,N) was more effective than NbC in inhibiting austenite grain growth.

  18. Calculation and experimental investigation of multi-component ceramic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rother, M.

    1994-12-01

    This work shows a way to combine thermodynamic calculations and experiments in order to get useful information on the constitution of metal/non-metal systems. Many data from literature are critically evaluated and used as a basis for experiments and calculations. The following multi-component systems are treated: 1. Multi-component systems of 'ceramic' materials with partially metallic bonding (carbides, nitrides, oxides, borides, carbonitrides, borocarbides, oxinitrides of the 4-8th transition group metals) 2. multi-component systems of non-metallic materials with dominant covalent bonding (SiC, Si 3 N 4 , SiB 6 , BN, Al 4 C 3 , Be 2 C) 3. multi-component systems of non-metallic materials with dominant heteropolar bonding (Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 , BeO, SiO 2 , ZrO 2 ). The interactions between 1. and 2., 2. and 3., 1. and 3. are also considered. The latest commercially available programmes for the calculation of thermodynamical equilibria and phase diagrams are evaluated and compared considering their facilities and limits. New phase diagrams are presented for many presently unknown multi-component systems; partly known systems are completed on the basis of selected thermodynamic data. The calculations are verified by experimental investigations (metallurgical and powder technology methods). Altogether 690 systems are evaluated, 126 are calculated for the first time and 52 systems are experimentally verified. New data for 60 ternary phases are elaborated by estimating the data limits for the Gibbs energy values. A synthesis of critical evaluation of literature, calculations and experiments leads to new important information about equilibria and reaction behaviour in multi-component systems. This information is necessary to develop new stable and metastable materials. (orig./MM) [de

  19. Effect of welding thermal cycles on the structure and properties of simulated heat-affected zone areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel at a state after 100,000 h of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łomozik, Mirosław, E-mail: miroslaw.lomozik@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland); Hernas, Adam, E-mail: adam.hernas@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, 40-019 Katowice, Krasińskiego 8 str. (Poland); Zeman, Marian L., E-mail: marian.zeman@is.gliwice.pl [Instytut Spawalnictwa, Testing of Materials Weldability and Welded Constructions Department, 44-100 Gliwice, Bł. Czesława 16-18 (Poland)

    2015-06-18

    The article presents results of structural tests (light, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy) of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) creep-resisting steel after approximately 100,000 h of operation. It was ascertained that the parent metal of T91 steel is characterized by the microstructure of tempered martensite with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitates and few dispersive precipitates of MX-type niobium and vanadium carbonitrides. The most inconvenient change in T91 steel precipitate morphology due to long-term operation is the appearance of the Laves Fe{sub 2}Mo phase which along with M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide particles forms elongated blocks and conglomerates on grain boundaries. The article also presents results of tests related to the effect of simulated welding thermal cycles on selected properties of X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) grade steel at a state after approximately 100,000 h of operation. The tests involved the determination of the chemical composition of the steel tested as well as impact tests, hardness measurements and microscopic metallographic examination (based on light microscopy) of simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) areas for a cooling time (t{sub 8/5}) restricted within a range between 3 s and 120 s, with and without heat treatment. The tests revealed that, among other results, hardness values of simulated HAZ areas in X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91) steel do not guarantee cold crack safety of the steel at the state without additional heat treatment. It was also observed that simulated welding thermal cycles of cooling times t{sub 8/5}=3, 12, 60 and 120 s do not significantly affect the toughness and hardness of simulated HAZ areas of the steel tested.

  20. Principles of alloy design in high nitrogen 12% chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goecmen, A.; Ernst, P.; Holmes, P.

    1999-01-01

    12% chromium steels are hardened by a martensitic transformation and by precipitation reactions of the martensite during a subsequent tempering treatment. The original alloy design of these steels is based on the intensifying effect of C on the martensitic transformation hardening as well as on the effects of V and Mo on intensity and stability of carbide precipitation hardening reactions. Advanced alloy design of high carbon 12% chromium steels makes use of f.c.c.-MX type carbonitrides to improve grain refinement and tempering resistance, whereas alloying with about 0.05 wt.-% nitrogen already plays a decisive role. In this paper, new alloy design opportunities provided by high nitrogen are reviewed, which promise to achieve a best possible compromise between grain size limitation, particle hardening and particle stability of 12% chromium steels. The crucial effects of the solubility product of MX-type phases on grain coarsening resistance, precipitation hardening and particle stability are reviewed. The advantages of high nitrogen steels to improve these properties are rationalized to result from the lower solubility of nitrides compared with carbides. As an advantageous opportunity of the achievable higher grain coarsening resistance, the normalizing temperature in high nitrogen steels can be increased in order to increase the amount of the less soluble and thereby slow coarsening f.c.c.-nitrides. In addition, as a consequence of a higher normalizing temperature, the solubility gap of nitrides in the austenite is expanded, which in turn enables an effective precipitation hardening due to low soluble nitrides in the metastable austenite before the martensitic transformation

  1. Low cycle fatigue properties of CLAM steel at 823 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xue [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Lixin [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sha, Wei [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Shan, Yiyin, E-mail: yyshan@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-09-08

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is considered to be the main candidate material for the first wall components of future fusion reactors in China. In this paper, the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of CLAM steel is studied under fully reversed tension–compression loading at 823 K in air. Total strain amplitude was controlled from 0.14% to 1.8% with a constant strain rate of 2.4×10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. The corresponding plastic strain amplitude ranged from 0.023% to 1.613%. The CLAM steel displayed continuous softening to failure at 823 K. The relationship between strain, stress and fatigue life was obtained using the parameters obtained from fatigue tests. The LCF properties of CLAM steel at 823 K followed Coffin–Manson relationship. Furthermore, irregular serration was observed on the stress–strain hysteresis loops of CLAM steel tested with the total strain amplitude of 0.45–1.8%, which was attributed to the dynamic strain aging (DSA) effect. During continuous cyclic deformation, the microstructure and precipitate distribution of CLAM steel changed gradually. Many tempered martensitic laths were decomposed into subgrains, and the size and number of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide and MX carbonitride precipitates decreased with the increase of total strain amplitude. The response cyclic stress promoted the recovery of martensitic lath, while the thermal activation mainly played an important role on the growth of precipitates in CLAM steel at 823 K. In order to have a better understanding of high-temperature LCF behavior, the potential mechanisms controlling stress–strain response, DSA phenomenon and microstructure changes have also been evaluated.

  2. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  3. Influence of the initial metallurgical state and the austenizing conditions on the distribution of austenitc grain size of the martensitic-ferritic steel T91(9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaleta Gutierrez, N; Luppo, M.I; Danon, C.A; Garcia de Andres, C

    2006-01-01

    It is a known fact that the austenizing conditions (speed of heating to the austenite temperature and austenizing time) as well as the initial metallurgical state of the material strongly influence the distribution of austenitic grain size in steels. This distribution will be one of the parameters that will control the behavior of the material in a later transformation from the austenite -by continuous cooling or in the isothermal case - and this behavior will determine the product's final mechanical properties. Based on the published literature, we have studied the influence of the initial metallurgical state and the speed of heating to austenite on the distribution of austenitic grain size for a certain austenizing temperature and time for a martensitic-iron ASTM A213 grade T91 steel. Two-stage thermal cycles were designed for this, that is, tempering for a variable period of time at the industrial tempering temperature (780 o C) followed by the austenizing (1050 o C, 30 minutes) 'in situ'. We have analyzed the following as a whole: 1) the role of the stabilizing elements (Nb, V) that eventually control the anchoring of the austenitic grain boundary by carbide or carbonitride precipitation. Therefore, we have tried to vary the fraction of these elements present in solid solution by annealing before austenizing. 2) the role of the speed of heating to austenite. In this case, we have considered two different values (1 and 30 o C/s), previously reported as inferior and superior, respectively, to the speed of 'critical' heat needed to produce a distribution of heterogeneous austenitic grain size when the metallurgical state before the austenizing is quenched and tempered. Preliminary results suggest that a annealing stage after tempering in the plant and prior to eventual austenizing significantly reduces the influence of the heating to austenite speed in the development of a heterogeneous structure of austenitic grains (CW)

  4. Influence of microstructural development during annealing at 780oC on creep resistance of ferritic-martensitic T91 (9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cicco, H; Zavaleta Gutierrez, N; Marrero, J; Luppo, M.I; Danon, C.A

    2006-01-01

    Due to its good properties of creep resistance, toughness and rust resistance, martensitic-ferritic 9%Cr-1%Mo steels are widely used for the production of heating plant components, boilers, heat exchangers, piping and tubing, etc. The effectiveness in steels of MX carbonitrides such as (Nb,V) (C,N) on improving creep resistance at high temperatures is well known. Controlling the behavior of the MX phases to precipitation, during annealing, is essential for obtaining a stable microstructure that can resist high temperatures. This study investigates the relationship between creep resistance and the microstructural changes that occur at different annealing times at a temperature of 780 o C -used industrially during the production and post-welding- in T91 steel. Creep trials were carried out at 600 o C and 190 MPa, and the samples were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the latter including a facility for energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Based on its morphological characteristics, the MX precipitates are classified into three types, types I, II and III. Tempering time at 780 o C has been found to be one of the factors that determines which MX is dominant in the annealed steel. The presence of type MX-III, formed by the secondary precipitation of a VN particle adhering to a NbX, commonly called 'wing', seems to favor creep resistance in these steels. This type of of precipitate, then, fills an effective role in the anchoring of dislocations during creep (cw)

  5. Investigate of analysis for hydrogen contents in carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Awazu, Kaoru; Naramoto, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influences on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem to prepare the films with the reproducible property. We were measured two kinds of methods. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are established methods for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A spectrometer has been constructed for the determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43 MeV γ-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions 1 H( 15 N, α γ) 12 C at the 6.385 MeV. And the other measurement of hydrogen is GDOES (Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy), with its high sputtering rates, had been used previously for depth profiling analysis of thin films. The depth profiling analysis was carried out at an argon atmosphere by applying an RF of 13.56 MHz. The sampling time interval was 0.1 sec. The detailed hydrogen analysis was made on BCN (Boron Carbonitride) and DLC (Diamond-like Carbon) thin films. The BCN films were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition, in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B 4 C solid and nitrogen was supplied by implantation simultaneously. The DLC films were prepared by HPPC (Hybrid-pulse plasma coating) system. It was a new coating system that we developed which consists fundamentally of plasma CVD (chemical vapor deposition) and ion-mixing. In this paper, we reported the comparison of analysis for hydrogen contents between RNRA and GDOES. (author)

  6. Investigate of analysis for hydrogen contents in carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko [Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Awazu, Kaoru [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influences on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem to prepare the films with the reproducible property. We were measured two kinds of methods. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are established methods for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A spectrometer has been constructed for the determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43 MeV {gamma}-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, {alpha} {gamma}){sup 12}C at the 6.385 MeV. And the other measurement of hydrogen is GDOES (Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy), with its high sputtering rates, had been used previously for depth profiling analysis of thin films. The depth profiling analysis was carried out at an argon atmosphere by applying an RF of 13.56 MHz. The sampling time interval was 0.1 sec. The detailed hydrogen analysis was made on BCN (Boron Carbonitride) and DLC (Diamond-like Carbon) thin films. The BCN films were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition, in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B{sub 4}C solid and nitrogen was supplied by implantation simultaneously. The DLC films were prepared by HPPC (Hybrid-pulse plasma coating) system. It was a new coating system that we developed which consists fundamentally of plasma CVD (chemical vapor deposition) and ion-mixing. In this paper, we reported the comparison of analysis for hydrogen contents between RNRA and GDOES. (author)

  7. Biotribological behavior of Ag-ZrCxN1-x coatings against UHMWPE for joint prostheses devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon V, S; Sánchez-López, J C; Cavaleiro, A; Carvalho, S

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of zirconium carbonitrides (ZrCxN1-x) coatings with embedded silver nanoparticles, produced with the intention of achieving a material with enhanced multi-functional properties, including mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, tribological performance and antibacterial behavior suitable for their use in joint prostheses. The coatings were deposited by direct current (DC) reactive magnetron sputtering onto 316 L stainless steel, changing the silver content from 0 to 20 at% by modifying the current density applied to the targets. Different nitrogen and acetylene gas fluxes were used as reactive gases. The coatings revealed different mixtures of crystalline ZrCxN1-x, silver nanoparticles and amorphous carbon phases. The hardness of the films was found to be mainly controlled by the ratio between the hard (ZrCxN1-x) and soft (Ag and amorphous carbon) phases in the films, fluctuating between 7.4 and 20.4 GPa. The coefficient of friction, measured against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in Hank's balanced salt solution with 10 gL(-1) albumin, is governed by the surface roughness and hardness. The UHMWPE wear rates were in the same order of magnitude (between 1.4 and 2.0 × 10(-6)mm(3)N(-1)m(-1)), justified by the effect of the protective layer of albumin formed during the tests. The small differences were due to the hydrophobic/hydrophilic character of the surface, as well as to the silver content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Corrosion of vanadium and V 3Ti 1Si in flowing lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konys, J.

    1986-01-01

    A pumped Li loop fabricated from a titanium stabilized Type 316 steel was designed and constructed. At temperatures of about 823 K, experiments over a duration of more than 7500 h were performed. A magnetic trap had to be incorporated just before the flowmeter to avoid the precipitation of magnetic particles. Therefore it was possible to investigate the influence of the magnetic trap on the corrosion behaviour of V in flowing Li. The results are as follows: - The corrosion rate of V is about 14 μm/year and independent of the nitrogen content of Li. The corrosion rate of V 3Ti 1Si depends on the N concentration of Li. At about 30 wppm N in Li a vanadium-titanium-nitride is formed at the surface of the specimens. Hence, a low rate of 4 μm/year can be stated. - Both materials pick-up more N than C from Li, pure vanadium double as much nitrogen as the alloy V 3Ti 1Si. - N diffuses into the bulk of both materials, whilst C is bound near the surface. The hardening at the surface is due to the up-take of N. - The vanadium-carbonitride-, respectively the vanadium-titanium-nitride-layers have a strong influence on the weight loss and the up-take of non-metals. - The magnetic trap reduces the weight loss of vanadium in a significant way. The positive influence of the magnetic trap is supposed to be due to the reduction of the nitrogen content of Li. - The corrosion rates of the alloy V 3Ti 1Si show, that the dissolution due to V loss does not affect the lifetime of the alloy. The comparison with steels and nickle-base-alloys demonstrates the advantages of this material. Nevertheless, the purification of the Li and the control of its nonmetal-levels is indispensable. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Microstructural development and mechanical properties of iron based cermets processed by pressureless and spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvaredo, P.; Gordo, E.; Van der Biest, O.; Vanmeensel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Processing of Fe-based cermets by pressureless sintering and spark plasma sintering. ► Influence of carbon content on the sintering mechanism and hardness. ► The cermet phase diagram was calculated and permits to explain the microstructure. ► SPS provides ferritic matrix and different carbide distribution than CPS samples. ► Pressureless sintered samples contain retained austenite at room temperature. - Abstract: Iron-based cermets are an interesting class of metal-ceramic composites in which properties and the factors influencing them are to be explored. In this work the metal matrix contains Cr, W, Mo and V as alloying elements, and the hard phase is constituted by 50 vol% of titanium carbonitride (TiCN) particles. The work studies the influence of the C content and the processing method on the sinterability, microstructure and hardness of the developed cermet materials. For that purpose, cermet samples with different C content in the matrix (0 wt%, 0.25 wt%, 0.5 wt%, 1.0 wt%) were prepared by conventional pressureless sintering (CPS) and, in order to achieve finer microstructures and to reduce the sintering time, by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The density and hardness (HV30) of the processed materials was evaluated, while their phase composition and microstructure was characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The equilibrium phase diagram of the composite material was calculated by ThermoCalc software in order to elucidate the influence of the carbon content on the obtained phases and developed microstructures.

  10. Saturable Absorption in 2D Ti3 C2 MXene Thin Films for Passive Photonic Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yongchang; Chertopalov, Sergii; Maleski, Kathleen; Anasori, Babak; Hu, Longyu; Bhattacharya, Sriparna; Rao, Apparao M; Gogotsi, Yury; Mochalin, Vadym N; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2018-03-01

    MXenes comprise a new class of 2D transition metal carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides that exhibit unique light-matter interactions. Recently, 2D Ti 3 CNT x (T x represents functional groups such as OH and F) was found to exhibit nonlinear saturable absorption (SA) or increased transmittance at higher light fluences, which is useful for mode locking in fiber-based femtosecond lasers. However, the fundamental origin and thickness dependence of SA behavior in MXenes remain to be understood. 2D Ti 3 C 2 T x thin films of different thicknesses are fabricated using an interfacial film formation technique to systematically study their nonlinear optical properties. Using the open aperture Z-scan method, it is found that the SA behavior in Ti 3 C 2 T x MXene arises from plasmon-induced increase in the ground state absorption at photon energies above the threshold for free carrier oscillations. The saturation fluence and modulation depth of Ti 3 C 2 T x MXene is observed to be dependent on the film thickness. Unlike other 2D materials, Ti 3 C 2 T x is found to show higher threshold for light-induced damage with up to 50% increase in nonlinear transmittance. Lastly, building on the SA behavior of Ti 3 C 2 T x MXenes, a Ti 3 C 2 T x MXene-based photonic diode that breaks time-reversal symmetry to achieve nonreciprocal transmission of nanosecond laser pulses is demonstrated. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Reference binding energies of transition metal carbides by core-level x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy free from Ar+ etching artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Hultman, L.

    2018-04-01

    We report x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE's) for the widely-applicable groups IVb-VIb transition metal carbides (TMCs) TiC, VC, CrC, ZrC, NbC, MoC, HfC, TaC, and WC. Thin film samples are grown in the same deposition system, by dc magnetron co-sputtering from graphite and respective elemental metal targets in Ar atmosphere. To remove surface contaminations resulting from exposure to air during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, layers are either (i) Ar+ ion-etched or (ii) UHV-annealed in situ prior to XPS analyses. High resolution XPS spectra reveal that even gentle etching affects the shape of core level signals, as well as BE values, which are systematically offset by 0.2-0.5 eV towards lower BE. These destructive effects of Ar+ ion etch become more pronounced with increasing the metal atom mass due to an increasing carbon-to-metal sputter yield ratio. Systematic analysis reveals that for each row in the periodic table (3d, 4d, and 5d) C 1s BE increases from left to right indicative of a decreased charge transfer from TM to C atoms, hence bond weakening. Moreover, C 1s BE decreases linearly with increasing carbide/metal melting point ratio. Spectra reported here, acquired from a consistent set of samples in the same instrument, should serve as a reference for true deconvolution of complex XPS cases, including multinary carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides.

  12. Comparison of ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattah, M.; Mahboubi, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel carried out to improve the surface corrosion resistance. The gas composition for plasma nitriding was 85% N 2 -15% H 2 and that for plasma nitrocarburizing was 85% N 2 -12% H 2 -3% CO 2 . Both treatments were performed for 5 h, for different process temperatures of 570 and 620 o C for ferritic and austenitic plasma treatment, respectively. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and potentiodynamic polarization technique in 3.5% NaCl solution, were used to study the treated surfaces. The results of X-ray analysis revealed that with increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C for both treatments, the amount of ε phase decreased and γ' phase increased. Nitrocarburizing treatment resulted in formation of a more amount of ε phase with respect to nitriding treatment. However, the highest amount of ε phase was observed in the ferritic nitrocarburized sample at 570 o C. The sample nitrided at 620 o C exhibited the thickest layer. The potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that after plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing at 570 o C, corrosion potential increased with respect to the untreated sample due to the noble nitride and carbonitride phases formed on the surface. After increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C, corrosion potential decreased due to the less ε phase development in the compound layer and more porous compound layer formed at 620 o C with respect to the treated samples at 570 o C.

  13. Quantitative examination of carbide and sulphide precipitates in chemically complex steels processed by direct strip casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorin, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorin@deakin.edu.au [Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Geelong, Victoria, 3216 (Australia); Wood, Kathleen [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Bragg Institute, New South Wales, 2234, Menai (Australia); Taylor, Adam; Hodgson, Peter; Stanford, Nicole [Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Geelong, Victoria, 3216 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    A high strength low alloy steel composition has been melted and processed by two different routes: simulated direct strip casting and slow cooled ingot casting. The microstructures were examined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The formation of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C), manganese sulphides (MnS) and niobium carbo-nitrides (Nb(C,N)) was investigated in both casting conditions. The sulphides were found to be significantly refined by the higher cooling rate, and developed an average diameter of only 100 nm for the fast cooled sample, and a diameter too large to be measured with SANS in the slow cooled condition (> 1.1 μm). Slow cooling resulted in the development of classical Nb(C,N) precipitation, with an average diameter of 7.2 nm. However, after rapid cooling both the SANS and atom probe tomography data indicated that the Nb was retained in the matrix as a random solid solution. There was also some evidence that O, N and S are also retained in solid solution in levels not found during conventional processing. - Highlights: • The influence of cooling rate on microstructure is investigated in a HSLA steel. • SANS, TEM and APT are used to characterise the sulphides and Nb(C,N) precipitates. • The slow cooling rate result in the formation of Nb(C,N) precipitates. • The fast cooling rate results in a microstructure supersaturated in Nb, C and N. • The sulphides are 100 nm in the fast cooled sample and > 1 μm in the slow cooled one.

  14. Physical and chemical characterization of surfaces of nitrogen implanted steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncoffre, N.

    1986-01-01

    The studied steels are of industrial type (42CD4, 100C6, Z200C13). Very often, the low carbon steel XCO6 has been used as a reference material. The aim of the research is to understand and to explain the mechanisms of wear resistance to improvement. A good characterization of the implanted layer is thus necessary. It implies to establish the distribution profiles of the implanted ions to identify the chemical and structural state of the phases created during implantation as a function of various implantation parameters (dose, temperature). Temperature is the particularly parameter. Its influence is put in evidence both during implantation and during annealings under vacuum. Nitrogen distribution profiles are performed thanks to the non destructive 15 N(p,αγ) 12 C nuclear reaction. The chemical state of the Fe-N phases formed by implantation is determined using first Electron Conversion Moessbauer Spectroscopy and secondly, as a complement, using grazing angle X ray diffraction. The detected compounds are ε-nitrides, ε-carbonitrides, (N) - martensite and α-Fe 16 N 2 whose evolution is carefully followed versus temperature. The diffraction technique reveals a texture of the implanted layer. This preferentiel orientation is found to be temperature dependent but dose independent. The carbon presence at the surface is studied as a function of implantation conditions (vacuum, temperature, dose). Carbon profiling is obtained using α backscattering ( 12 C(α,α') reaction at 5,7 MeV). Thus is achieved a complete characterization of the implanted zone whose evolution as a function of implantation parameters (especially temperature) is correlated with tribological results [fr

  15. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang, E-mail: thaksang.byun@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Jeoung Han [Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The K{sub JQ} versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  16. Plasma-arc reactor for production possibility of powdered nano-size materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzhiyski, V; Mihovsky, M; Gavrilova, R

    2011-01-01

    Nano-size materials of various chemical compositions find increasing application in life nowadays due to some of their unique properties. Plasma technologies are widely used in the production of a range of powdered nano-size materials (metals, alloys, oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, carbonitrides, etc.), that have relatively high melting temperatures. Until recently, the so-called RF-plasma generated in induction plasma torches was most frequently applied. The subject of this paper is the developments of a new type of plasma-arc reactor, operated with transferred arc system for production of disperse nano-size materials. The new characteristics of the PLASMALAB reactor are the method of feeding the charge, plasma arc control and anode design. The disperse charge is fed by a charge feeding system operating on gravity principle through a hollow cathode of an arc plasma torch situated along the axis of a water-cooled wall vertical tubular reactor. The powdered material is brought into the zone of a plasma space generated by the DC rotating transferred plasma arc. The arc is subjected to Auto-Electro-Magnetic Rotation (AEMR) by an inductor serially connected to the anode circuit. The anode is in the form of a water-cooled copper ring. It is mounted concentrically within the cylindrical reactor, with its lower part electrically insulated from it. The electric parameters of the arc in the reactor and the quantity of processed charge are maintained at a level permitting generation of a volumetric plasma discharge. This mode enables one to attain high mean mass temperature while the processed disperse material flows along the reactor axis through the plasma zone where the main physico-chemical processes take place. The product obtained leaves the reactor through the annular anode, from where it enters a cooling chamber for fixing the produced nano-structure. Experiments for AlN synthesis from aluminium power and nitrogen were carried out using the plasma reactor

  17. Characterization of the corrosion behavior of an austenitic stainless steel for biomedical applications coated with Ti N, Ti CN And DLC PVD coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2006-01-01

    Metallic biomaterials must present a combination of properties such as corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and mechanical resistance. Austenitic stainless steels, especially AISI 316L combine these properties with the easy of fabrication at low cost. However, they are prone to corrosion in physiological solutions. Furthermore, their corrosion products may lead to infectious ou allergenic reactions in the tissues around the implant device. In the present work, coatings produced by physical vapour deposition (PVD) methods have been applied on the surface of a 316L stainless steel to increase its corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Three thin films were tested: titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbonitride (TiCN) and diamond-like carbon (DLC). These materials present high hardness, wear resistance and intrinsic biocompatibility that are key features when considering biomedical applications. The characterization of the electrochemical behavior of the stainless steel coated with the three different films showed that the presence of surface defects are deleterious to the corrosion resistance of the substrate. These defects were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The evolution of the electrochemical behavior of the coated steel was explained through a mechanism based on the experimental results obtained using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Two different passivation treatments were carried out on the stainless steel surface, either in sulfuric or nitric acid solutions, to increase its corrosion resistance. The results suggested que these treatments were not efficient, but may be modified to improve its performance. The electronic properties of the passive films of the non-passivated and passivated stainless steel were studied using the Mott-Schottky approach. The films presented a duplex character. Below the flat band potential the behavior is typical of a highly doped type-p semiconductor. Above the flat band potential is typical of a highly

  18. Development of new duplex treatments on 100Cr6steel combining Thermochemical Treatments, Laser Shock Peening and Physical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osés, J.; Fuentes, G. G.; Santo Domingo, S.; Miguel, I.; Gimeno, S.; Carreras, L.; Peyre, P.; Gorny, C.

    2017-01-01

    100Cr6 steel (AISI 52100) is one of the most used steel grades in the manufacturing of through hardening bearings mainly due to its properties: controlled impurities during steel making process, high hardenability and well known mechanical properties such as wear and fatigue resistance on clean environments. These characteristics play an important role on the performance of a bearing together with the bearing design, loads and environment. However, there is an increasing set of demanding applications where the above mentioned steel does not fulfil the required needs and thus, bearing manufacturers continuously work on the development of technologies to improve the bearing performance. Nowadays thermochemical treatments (TCT), such as carbonitriding are being applied to this steel in order to enhance the performance of such pieces in contaminated environment, where particles can produce defects on the raceway, increasing the onset of defects that eventually lead to premature fail. These treatments induce the formation of carbides and nitrides which are directly related to the enhancement of the wear resistance and also to increasing the amount of Retained Austenite (RA) in the surface which may have a beneficial effect as it delays the crack propagation on subsurface regions, then increasing bearing fatigue life. In this work, different TCTs have been applied to 100Cr6 steel flat samples. Using a tribometer (ball-on-disc configuration) and a grinding machine, surface and in-depth wear resistance measurements have been carried out, obtaining wear resistance profiles that have been correlated with the microstructure, microhardness profiles and RA content. The most promising TCT has been combined either with Laser Shock Peening (LSP) treatments or carbonaceous Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) coatings with the aim of improving not only the wear resistance but also the CoF of the duplex treated sample. The results obtained on flat samples are promising; the combination

  19. Surface Modification of MXenes: A Pathway to Improve MXene Electrode Performance in Electrochemical Energy Storage Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2017-12-31

    The recent discovery of layered transition metal carbides (MXenes) is one of the most important developments in two-dimensional (2D) materials. Preliminary theoretical and experimental studies suggest a wide range of potential applications for MXenes. The MXenes are prepared by chemically etching ‘A’-layer element from layered ternary metal carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides (MAX phases) through aqueous acid treatment, which results in various surface terminations such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine. It has been found that surface terminations play a critical role in defining MXene properties and affects MXene performance in different applications such as electrochemical energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, water purification, sensors and catalysis. Also, the electronic, thermoelectric, structural, plasmonic and optical properties of MXenes largely depend upon surface terminations. Thus, controlling the surface chemistry if MXenes can be an efficient way to improve their properties. This research mainly aims to perform surface modifications of two commonly studied MXenes; Ti2C and Ti3C2, via chemical, thermal or physical processes to enhance electrochemical energy storage properties. The as-prepared and surface modified MXenes have been studied as electrode materials in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs). In pursuit of desirable MXene surface, we have developed an in-situ room temperature oxidation process, which resulted in TiO2/MXene nanocomposite and enhanced Li-ion storage. The idea of making metal oxide and MXene nanocomposites was taken to the next level by combining a high capacity anode materials – SnO2 – and MXene. By taking advantage of already existing surface functional groups (–OH), we have developed a composite of SnO2/MXene by atomic layer deposition (ALD) which showed enhanced capacity and excellent cyclic stability. Thermal annealing of MXene at elevated temperature under different atmospheres was

  20. Mechanical properties and microstructure of long term thermal aged WWER 440 RPV steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolluri, M., E-mail: kolluri@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kryukov, A. [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation); Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hähner, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Petrosyan, V. [Armenian Scientific Research Institute for Nuclear Plant Operation (ARMATOM), 0027 Yerevan (Armenia); Sevikyan, G. [Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP), 0911, Metsamor, Armavir Marz (Armenia); Szaraz, Z. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-04-01

    The integrity assessment of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is essential for the safe and Long Term Operation (LTO) of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Hardening and embrittlement of RPV caused by neutron irradiation and thermal ageing are main reasons for mechanical properties degradation during the operation of an NPP. The thermal ageing-induced degradation of RPV steels becomes more significant with extended operational lives of NPPs. Consequently, the evaluation of thermal ageing effects is important for the structural integrity assessments required for the lifetime extension of NPPs. As a part of NRG's research programme on Structural Materials for safe-LTO of Light Water Reactor (LWR) RPVs, WWER-440 surveillance specimens, which have been thermal aged for 27 years (∼200,000 h) at 290 °C in a surveillance channel of Armenian-NPP, are investigated. Results from the mechanical and microstructural examination of these thermal aged specimens are presented in this article. The results indicate the absence of significant long term thermal ageing effect of 15Cr2MoV-A steel. No age hardening was detected in aged tensile specimens compared with the as-received condition. There is no difference between the impact properties of as-received and thermal aged weld metals. The upper shelf energy of the aged steel remains the same as for the as-received material at a rather high level of about 120 J. The T{sub 41} value did not change and was found to be about 10 °C. The microstructure of thermal aged weld, consisting carbides, carbonitrides and manganese-silicon inclusions, did not change significantly compared to as-received state. Grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus in long term aged weld is not significant either which has been confirmed by the absence of intergranular fracture increase in the weld. Negligible hardening and embrittlement observed after such long term thermal ageing is attributed to the optimum chemical composition of 15Cr2MoV-A for high

  1. The fuel to clad heat transfer coefficient in advanced MX-type fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caligara, F.; Campana, M.; Mandler, R.; Blank, H.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced fuels (mixed carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides) are characterised by a high thermal conductivity compared to that of oxide fuels (5 times greater) and their behaviour under irradiation (amount of swelling, fracture behaviour, restructuring) is far more sensitive to the design parameters and to the operating temperature than that of oxide fuels. The use of advanced fuels is therefore conditioned by the possibility of mastering the above phenomena, and the full exploitation of their favorable neutron characteristics depends upon a good understanding of the mutual relationships of the various parameters, which eventually affect the mechanical stability of the pin. By far the most important parameter is the radial temperature profile which controls the swelling of the fuel and the build-up of stress fields within the pin. Since the rate of fission gas swelling of these fuels is relatively large, a sufficient amount of free space has to be provided within the pin. This space originally appears as fabrication porosity and as fuel-to-clad clearance. Due to the large initial gap width and to the high fuel thermal conductivity, the range of the fuel operating temperatures is mainly determined by the fuel-to-clad heat transfer coefficient h, whose correct determination becomes one of the central points in modelling. During the many years of modelling activity in the field of oxide fuels, several theoretical models have been developed to calculate h, and a large amount of experimental data has been produced for the empirical adjustment of the parameters involved, so that the situation may be regarded as rather satisfactory. The analysis lead to the following conclusions. A quantitative comparison of experimental h-values with existing models for h requires rather sophisticated instrumented irradiation capsules, which permit the measurement of mechanical data (concerning fuel and clad) together with heat rating and temperatures. More and better well

  2. Single-source-precursor synthesis of dense SiC/HfC(x)N(1-x)-based ultrahigh-temperature ceramic nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qingbo; Xu, Yeping; Xu, Binbin; Fasel, Claudia; Guillon, Olivier; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Yu, Zhaoju; Riedel, Ralf; Ionescu, Emanuel

    2014-11-21

    A novel single-source precursor was synthesized by the reaction of an allyl hydrido polycarbosilane (SMP10) and tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(iv) (TDMAH) for the purpose of preparing dense monolithic SiC/HfC(x)N(1-x)-based ultrahigh temperature ceramic nanocomposites. The materials obtained at different stages of the synthesis process were characterized via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The polymer-to-ceramic transformation was investigated by means of MAS NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy as well as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with in situ mass spectrometry. Moreover, the microstructural evolution of the synthesized SiHfCN-based ceramics annealed at different temperatures ranging from 1300 °C to 1800 °C was characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Based on its high temperature behavior, the amorphous SiHfCN-based ceramic powder was used to prepare monolithic SiC/HfC(x)N(1-x)-based nanocomposites using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The results showed that dense monolithic SiC/HfC(x)N(1-x)-based nanocomposites with low open porosity (0.74 vol%) can be prepared successfully from single-source precursors. The average grain size of both HfC0.83N0.17 and SiC phases was found to be less than 100 nm after SPS processing owing to a unique microstructure: HfC0.83N0.17 grains were embedded homogeneously in a β-SiC matrix and encapsulated by in situ formed carbon layers which acted as a diffusion barrier to suppress grain growth. The segregated Hf-carbonitride grains significantly influenced the electrical conductivity of the SPS processed monolithic samples. While Hf-free polymer-derived SiC showed an electrical conductivity of ca. 1.8 S cm(-1), the electrical conductivity of the Hf-containing material was analyzed to be ca. 136.2 S cm(-1).

  3. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  4. Design of heat treatments for 9-12%Cr steels to optimise creep resistance for power plant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, P.F.; Sachadel, U.A.; Clarke, P.D. [Tata Steel Europe, Rotherham (United Kingdom). Swinden Technology Centre; CRD and T, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    Optimisation of the creep rupture properties of Steel 92 (9%Cr, 0.5%Mo, 2%W) by modification of heat treatment and C:N ratio has been studied. It was shown that a higher austenization temperature and double tempering at lower temperature can significantly extend creep life of the standard composition. The increase in austenization temperature from 1060 C and double tempering at 660 C/3h instead of single tempering at 780 C/2h resulted in the increase of stress rupture life from 1,734 to 6,179h at 650 C/110MPa. Even greater improvement in creep life was achieved by the combination of the modified heat treatment and decreased C:N ratio. In this case the creep life was extended to 10,255 h at 650 C/110MPa. A further increase in austenitization temperature to 1200 C for the decreased C:N ratio variant extended the rupture life to 17,118h. Initial results indicate that this modified heat treatment schedule does not result in notch brittle behaviour and most of the improvement in creep strength remains after a simulated post weld heat treatment at 740 C. The stress rupture programme is continuing and at 600 C test durations are approaching 60,000h. To explain the effect on rupture life thermodynamic calculations, microscopic investigations and a literature study were performed. Electron metallography investigations revealed that the lower tempering temperature resulted in a finer distribution of nano-size particles. Calculations show that increasing the austenitization temperature gave more dissolved B, N, C, Nb and V. The lower C:N ratio resulted in a higher atomic fraction of N in nano-size particles on subsequent tempering. Dissolved B should stabilize M{sub 23}M{sub 6} and dissolved N, C, Nv, and V should allow precipitation of a higher volume fraction of nano-size carbo-nitrides during tempering. Literature data suggest that lower tempering temperatures could also change their type from MX to M{sub 2}X. (orig.)

  5. Single-source-precursor synthesis of dense SiC/HfCxN1-x-based ultrahigh-temperature ceramic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qingbo; Xu, Yeping; Xu, Binbin; Fasel, Claudia; Guillon, Olivier; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Yu, Zhaoju; Riedel, Ralf; Ionescu, Emanuel

    2014-10-01

    A novel single-source precursor was synthesized by the reaction of an allyl hydrido polycarbosilane (SMP10) and tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(iv) (TDMAH) for the purpose of preparing dense monolithic SiC/HfCxN1-x-based ultrahigh temperature ceramic nanocomposites. The materials obtained at different stages of the synthesis process were characterized via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The polymer-to-ceramic transformation was investigated by means of MAS NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy as well as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with in situ mass spectrometry. Moreover, the microstructural evolution of the synthesized SiHfCN-based ceramics annealed at different temperatures ranging from 1300 °C to 1800 °C was characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Based on its high temperature behavior, the amorphous SiHfCN-based ceramic powder was used to prepare monolithic SiC/HfCxN1-x-based nanocomposites using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The results showed that dense monolithic SiC/HfCxN1-x-based nanocomposites with low open porosity (0.74 vol%) can be prepared successfully from single-source precursors. The average grain size of both HfC0.83N0.17 and SiC phases was found to be less than 100 nm after SPS processing owing to a unique microstructure: HfC0.83N0.17 grains were embedded homogeneously in a β-SiC matrix and encapsulated by in situ formed carbon layers which acted as a diffusion barrier to suppress grain growth. The segregated Hf-carbonitride grains significantly influenced the electrical conductivity of the SPS processed monolithic samples. While Hf-free polymer-derived SiC showed an electrical conductivity of ca. 1.8 S cm-1, the electrical conductivity of the Hf-containing material was analyzed to be ca. 136.2 S cm-1.A novel single-source precursor was synthesized by the reaction of an allyl hydrido

  6. On the stable eutectic solidification of iron–carbon–silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Alonso, Gorka; Larrañaga, Pello; Suarez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    austenite has different crystallographic orientation than the primary one. The solidification of the austenite/spheroidal graphite eutectic is divorced, with graphite spheroids growing on primary austenite dendrites. The eutectic austenite grows on the primary austenite and has the same crystallographic orientation. The result is large austenite (primary and eutectic) dendrites that incorporate numerous graphite spheroids. A eutectic grain cannot be defined. -- Graphical abstract: Fig. 1. Solidification of the eutectic in LG iron during continuous cooling. Quenching experiments at successive stages during solidification have been carried out to produce graphite morphologies ranging from lamellar to mixed compacted–spheroidal. It was confirmed that solidification of Mg containing irons started with the development of spheroidal graphite even at Mg levels as low as 0.013 mass%. Then, as solidification proceeds, when some spheroids developed one or more tails (tadpole graphite), the spheroidal-to-compacted graphite transition occurs. In hypoeutectic lamellar graphite iron, austenite/graphite eutectic grains can nucleate at the austenite/liquid interface or in the bulk of the liquid, depending on the sulfur content and on the cooling rate. A variety of substrates can act as nuclei, including Ti carbonitrides carbon-rich regions, or MnS. In eutectic irons the eutectic grains nucleate and grow mostly in the liquid. The eutectic austenite has different crystallographic orientation than the primary one (Fig. 1a, b). When graphite nucleation occurs on the primary austenite, several eutectic grains can nucleate and grow on the same dendrite (Fig. 1c, d). The primary austenite continues growing as eutectic austenite and therefore the two have the same crystallographic orientation. Thus, a final austenite grain may include several eutectic grains. The solidification of the austenite/spheroidal graphite eutectic is divorced, with graphite spheroids growing on primary austenite

  7. Fuel development for reactors of new generation in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odeychuk, N.P.

    2006-01-01

    elements development with fuel on a basis: Metal: uranium, alloys of uranium; Ceramic: uranium dioxide, thorium dioxide, uranium carbonitride, uranium oxycarbide, mixed oxide of uranium and thorium. The special attention is given to discussion of the basic technological schemes of reception of the fuel microspheres, coated particles and spherical fuel elements for HTGR. Features of reception carbongraphite materials and products by the methods of volumetric gas-phase condensation of porous preparations by pyrocarbon are considered. Results of investigations of the basic fuel elements characteristics and their components, materials and products with pyrocarbon binding, including in conditions of reactor irradiations are discussed. The review concerning the experience of the development the fuel elements with fuel based on metal uranium is given. In NSC KIPT constructions and manufacturing techniques of components for active zones of new perspective directions of atomic engineering are created and proved, also was laid the foundation for the base design and technological decisions for the fourth generation nuclear reactors

  8. Microstructure and properties of the heat-resistant chromium steel P91; Gefuege und Eigenschaften des warmfesten Chromstahls P91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlar, Stefanie

    2017-07-01

    The heat-resistant chromium steel X10CrMoVNb9-1 specified as P91 is based on its good properties at high temperatures and high mechanical Stresses as a potential material for use as reactor pressure vessel material in fourth generation nuclear reactors. Subject of this work was the characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of this material. For this purpose it was metallographically examined and technically important characteristic values were determined. Different etching methods and imaging techniques were used, with the method of oxalic acid etching newly applied to this material providing meaningful results. Tensile tests, hardness tests and notched bar impact tests provided mechanical-technological characteristics. The fracture mechanical behavior was determined by means of fracture mechanics tests on bending and compact tensile tests. The main focus was on the investigation of the applicability of the evaluation methods described in standards ASTM 1921 and ASTM 1820 for low alloy steels. The investigations showed that the P91 is expected to have a homogeneous martensitic structure consisting of annealed martensite with embedded carbides and carbonitrides. The location and size of the found carbides could be represented by the process of oxalic acid etching newly applied to this material. The mechanical-technological tests showed a good strength and toughness behavior typical for tempered steel. The application of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics and the yielding fracture mechanics made it possible to determine a reference temperature according to ASTM 1921-08a, but also showed that the evaluation methods and geometries described for this high-alloy steel in ASTM 1820-08 do not lead to valid material characteristics. In order to determine the suitability of this material for nuclear applications, the irradiation and creep behavior of the P91 should be characterized more precisely in further investigations. [German] Der als P91

  9. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    precipitation of titanium carbonitrides during laser surface alloying provided there was sufficient amount of dissolved titanium, carbon, and nitrogen in the liquid steel. This was confirmed experimentally by using a powder mixture of 431-martensitic steel, titanium carbide powder, and nitrogen shielding, during laser deposition to produce deposits exhibiting relatively high hardness (average surface hardness of 724 HV). The same approach was extended to direct diode laser processing and similar microstructures were attained. The above analysis was extended to develop an in-situ precipitation of Ti(CN) during laser deposition. The Ti addition was achieving by mixing the 431 martensitic steel powders with ferro-titanium. The dissolution of nitrogen was achieved by using 100% nitrogen shielding gas, which was indicated by thermodynamic analysis. Demonstrations were also conducted utilizing the tools developed during the program and resulted in several viable composite coating systems being identified. This included the use of TiC and ferro-titanium in martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material with and without the use of active N2 shielding gas, WC hard particles in a martensitic-grade stainless steel matrix material, WC and BN in a nickel-based matrix material, and WC in highly alloyed iron-based matrix. Although these demonstrations indicated the potential of forming composite coatings, in certain instances, the intended industrial applications involved unique requirements, such as coating of internal surfaces, which hindered the full development of the improved coating technology. However, it is believed that the addition of common hard particles, such as WC or TiC, to matrix material representing martensitic grades of stainless steel offer opportunities for improved performance at relatively low material cost.

  10. New electron-ion-plasma equipment for modification of materials and products surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Electron-ion-plasma treatment of materials and products, including surface clearing and activation, formation surface layers with changed chemical and phase structure, increased hardness and corrosion resistance; deposition of various functional coatings, has received a wide distribution in a science and industry. Widespread methods of ion-plasma modification of material and product surfaces are ion etching and activation, ion-plasma nitriding, arc or magnetron deposition of functional coatings, including nanostructured. The combination of above methods of surface modification allows essentially to improve exploitation properties of treated products and to optimize the characteristics of modified surfaces for concrete final requirements. For the purpose of a combination of various methods of ion-plasma treatment in a single work cycle at Institute of High Current Electronics of SB RAS (IHCE SB RAS) specialized technological equipment 'DUET', 'TRIO' and 'QUADRO' and 'KVINTA' have been developed. This equipment allow generating uniform low-temperature gas plasma at pressures of (0.1-1) Pa with concentration of (10 9 -10 11 ) cm -3 in volume of (0.1-1) m 3 . In the installations consistent realization of several various operations of materials and products treatment in a single work cycle is possible. The operations are preliminary heating and degassing, ion clearing, etching and activation of materials and products surface by plasma of arc discharges; chemicothermal treatment (nitriding) for formation of diffusion layer on a surface of treated sample using plasma of nonself-sustained low-pressure arc discharge; deposition of single- or multilayered superhard (≥40 GPa) nanocrystalline coatings on the basis of pure metals or their compounds (nitrides, carbides, carbonitrides) by the arc plasma-assisted method. For realization of the modes all installations are equipped by original sources of gas and metal plasma. Besides, in

  11. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine; Seal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the <2 mm-size fraction of surface composite slag material or crushed slag from at depth in piles 1 and 2 are mineralogically similar to the large surface slag fragments from those piles with the addition of phases such as feldspars, Fe oxides, and clay minerals that are either secondary weathering products or entrained from the underlying bedrock. Pile 3 slag contains mostly skeletal forsteritic olivine and Ti-bearing aluminian diopside, dendritic or fine-grained subhedral melilite, glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite–oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al2O3 (8.5–16.2 wt.%), CaO (8.2–26.2 wt.%), MgO (4.2–24.7 wt.%), and SiO2 (36.4–59.8 wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe2O3, K2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al2O3, CaO and S, and low in Fe2O3, K2O and SiO2

  12. Length change of the alloys Waspaloy and Inconel 718 after long-term annealing; Laengenaenderung der Legierungen Waspaloy und Inconel 718 nach Langzeitauslagerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzel, Svenja

    2016-07-01

    contraction at 450 C and 550 C therefore is only about -1,3.10{sup -4}. Temperatures of 650 C and above lead to formation of δ phase, which enhances the contraction to -2,6.10{sup -4} for standard heat treated samples. The reason for the lower impact of this effect for short-term heat treated sample could not fully be resolved in this work. A detailed investigation of the influence of γ'' phase an intense use of TEM techniques is necessary. Additionally, alloy Inconel 718 also shows low phase fractions of carbides and carbonitrides. Dissolution of (Ti,Nb)(C,N) has a bigger impact on contraction but is nearly stable while a slight decrease in (Nb,Ti)C content is measured. This causes a contraction of -0,6.10{sup -4}, which is way smaller than contraction caused by carbide dissolution in Waspaloy. This contributes to the reason, why overall contraction of Inconel 718 is less pronounced. The combination of several microstructural changes comprehensively explains the effect of contraction of Ni-based superalloys. The major part of the effect is caused by lattice parameter changes due to temperature dependent changes in stable phase fractions and compositions. The further minor contraction is referred to carbide transformation process.

  13. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine; Seal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the bearing aluminian diopside, dendritic or fine-grained subhedral melilite, glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite–oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al2O3 (8.5–16.2 wt.%), CaO (8.2–26.2 wt.%), MgO (4.2–24.7 wt.%), and SiO2 (36.4–59.8 wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe2O3, K2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al2O3, CaO and S, and low in Fe2O3, K2O and SiO2 compared to the other piles. In general, piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar to each other, whereas pile 3 is distinct – a conclusion that reflects their mineralogy. The similarities and differences among piles in terms of mineralogy and major element chemistry result from the different smelting conditions under which the slag formed and include the fuel source, the composition of the ore and flux, the type of

  14. Effects of alloying and processing modifications on precipitation and strength in 9%Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fast reactor cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippey, Kristin E.

    P92 was modified with respect to alloying and processing in the attempt to enhance high-temperature microstructural stability and mechanical properties. Alloying effects were modeled in ThermoCalcRTM and analyzed with reference to literature. ThermoCalcRTM modeling was conducted to design two low-carbon P92-like low-carbon alloys with austenite stabilized by alternative alloying; full conversion to austenite allows for a fully martensitic structure. Goals included avoidance of Z-phase, decrease of M23C6 phase fraction and maintained or increased MX phase fraction. Fine carbonitride precipitation was optimized by selecting alloying compositions such that all V and Nb could be solutionized at temperatures outside the delta-ferrite phase field. A low-carbon alloy (LC) and a low-carbon-zero-niobium alloy (0Nb) were identified and fabricated. This low-carbon approach stems from the increased creep resistance reported in several low-carbon alloys, presumably from reduced M23C6 precipitation and maintained MX precipitation [1], although these low-carbon alloys also contained additional tungsten (W) and cobalt (Co) compared to the base P92 alloy. The synergistic effect of Co and W on the microstructure and mechanical properties are difficult to deconvolute. Higher solutionizing temperatures allow more V and Nb into solution and increase prior austenite grain size; however, at sufficiently high temperatures delta-ferrite forms. Optimal solutionizing temperatures to maximize V and Nb in solution, while avoiding the onset of the delta ferrite phase field, were analyzed in ThermoCalcRTM. Optical microscopy showed ThermoCalc RTM predicted higher delta-ferrite onset temperatures of 20 °C in P92 alloys to nearly 50 °C in the designed alloys of the critical temperature. Identifying the balance where maximum fine precipitation is achieved and delta-ferrite avoided is a key factor in the design of an acceptable P92-like alloy for Generation IV reactor cladding. Processing was

  15. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    content rather than nitride. In addition, the reactivity of the transition metals of group IV-VI with the reactive template was investigated under a flow of N2 at different temperatures in the range of 1023 to 1573 K while keeping the weight ratio constant at 1:1. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr reacted with mpg-C3N4 at 1023 K to form nitride phase with face centered cubic structure. The nitride phase destabilized at higher temperature ≥1223 K through the reaction with the remaining carbon residue originated from the decomposition of the template to form carbonitride and carbide phases. Whereas, Mo and W produce a hexagonal structure of carbide irrespective of the applying reaction temperature. The tendency to form transition metal nitrides and carbides at 1023 K was strongly driven by the free energy of formation. The observed trend indicates that the free energy of formation of nitride is relatively lower for group IV and V transition metals, whereas the carbide phase is thermodynamically more favorable for group VI, in particular for Mo and W. The thermal stability of nitride decreases at high temperature due to the evolution of nitrogen gas. The electrocatalytic activities of the produced nanoparticles were tested for hydrogen evolution reaction in acid media and the results demonstrated that molybdenum carbide nanoparticles exhibited the highest HER current with over potential of 100 mV vs. RHE, among the samples prepared in this study. This result is attributed to the sufficiently small particle size (8 nm on average) and accordingly high surface area (308 m2 g-1). Also, the graphitized carbon layer with a thickness of 1 nm on its surface formed by this synthesis provides excellent electron pathway to the catalyst which will improve the rate of electron transfer reaction.

  16. Length change of the alloys Waspaloy and Inconel 718 after long-term annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinzel, Svenja

    2016-01-01

    formation of δ phase, which enhances the contraction to -2,6.10"-"4 for standard heat treated samples. The reason for the lower impact of this effect for short-term heat treated sample could not fully be resolved in this work. A detailed investigation of the influence of γ'' phase an intense use of TEM techniques is necessary. Additionally, alloy Inconel 718 also shows low phase fractions of carbides and carbonitrides. Dissolution of (Ti,Nb)(C,N) has a bigger impact on contraction but is nearly stable while a slight decrease in (Nb,Ti)C content is measured. This causes a contraction of -0,6.10"-"4, which is way smaller than contraction caused by carbide dissolution in Waspaloy. This contributes to the reason, why overall contraction of Inconel 718 is less pronounced. The combination of several microstructural changes comprehensively explains the effect of contraction of Ni-based superalloys. The major part of the effect is caused by lattice parameter changes due to temperature dependent changes in stable phase fractions and compositions. The further minor contraction is referred to carbide transformation process.