WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbonate phosphate organic

  1. Trehalose 6-phosphate coordinates organic and amino acid metabolism with carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Carlos M; Feil, Regina; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Kölling, Katharina; Krause, Ursula; Höhne, Melanie; Encke, Beatrice; Plaxton, William C; Zeeman, Samuel C; Li, Zhi; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hoefgen, Rainer; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P) is an essential signal metabolite in plants, linking growth and development to carbon metabolism. The sucrose-Tre6P nexus model postulates that Tre6P acts as both a signal and negative feedback regulator of sucrose levels. To test this model, short-term metabolic responses to induced increases in Tre6P levels were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing the Escherichia coli Tre6P synthase gene (otsA) under the control of an ethanol-inducible promoter. Increased Tre6P levels led to a transient decrease in sucrose content, post-translational activation of nitrate reductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and increased levels of organic and amino acids. Radio-isotope ((14)CO2) and stable isotope ((13)CO2) labelling experiments showed no change in the rates of photoassimilate export in plants with elevated Tre6P, but increased labelling of organic acids. We conclude that high Tre6P levels decrease sucrose levels by stimulating nitrate assimilation and anaplerotic synthesis of organic acids, thereby diverting photoassimilates away from sucrose to generate carbon skeletons and fixed nitrogen for amino acid synthesis. These results are consistent with the sucrose-Tre6P nexus model, and implicate Tre6P in coordinating carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants. PMID:26714615

  2. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  3. Metal organic frameworks derived porous lithium iron phosphate with continuous nitrogen-doped carbon networks for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Gu, Junjie; Zhang, Jinli; Yu, Feng; Dong, Lutao; Nie, Ning; Li, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) nanoparticles embedded in the continuous interconnected nitrogen-doped carbon networks (LFP/N-CNWs) is an optimal architecture to fast electron and Li+ conduction. This paper, for the first time, reports a reasonable design and successful preparation of porous hierarchical LFP/N-CNWs composites using unique Fe-based metal organic framework (MIL-100(Fe)) as both template and starting material of Fe and C. Such nitrogen-doped carbon networks (N-CNWs) surrounding the lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles facilitate the transfer of Li+ and electrons throughout the electrodes, which significantly decreases the internal resistance for the electrodes and results in the efficient utilization of LiFePO4. The synthesized LFP/N-CNWs composites possess a porous structure with an amazing surface area of 129 m2 g-1, considerably enhanced electrical conductivities of 7.58 × 10-2 S cm-1 and Li+ diffusion coefficient of 8.82 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, thereby delivering excellent discharge capacities of 161.5 and 93.6 mAh·g-1 at 0.1C and 20C, respectively.

  4. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by phosphate rich organic matrix proteins and by single phosphoamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Shmuel; Weil, Simy; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a unique material produced naturally exclusively as a biomineral. It was demonstrated that proteins extracted from biogenic stable ACC induce and stabilize synthetic ACC in vitro. Polyphosphate molecules were similarly shown to induce amorphous calcium carbonate formation in vitro. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that biogenic ACC induction and stabilization is mediated by the phosphorylated residues of phosphoproteins. We show that extracellular organic matrix extracted from gastroliths of the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus induce stable ACC formation in vitro. The proteinaceous fraction of this organic matrix is highly phosphorylated and is incorporated into the ACC mineral phase during precipitation. We have identified the major phosphoproteins of the organic matrix and showed that they have high calcium binding capacity. Based on the above, in vitro precipitation experiments with single phosphoamino acids were performed, indicating that phosphoserine or phosphothreonine alone can induce the formation of highly stable ACC. The results indicate that phosphoproteins may play a major role in the control of ACC formation and stabilization and that their phosphoamino acid moieties are key components in this process. PMID:20416381

  5. Organic Carbonates: Efficient Extraction Solvents for the Synthesis of HMF in Aqueous Media with Cerium Phosphates as Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibenedetto, Angela; Aresta, Michele; di Bitonto, Luigi; Pastore, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We describe a process for the selective conversion of C6 -polyols into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in biphasic systems of organic carbonate/water (OC/W), with cerium(IV) phosphates as catalysts. Different reaction parameters such as the OC/W ratio, catalyst loading, reaction time, and temperature, were investigated for the dehydration of fructose. Under the best reaction conditions, a yield of 67.7 % with a selectivity of 93.2 % was achieved at 423 K after 6 h of reaction using [(Ce(PO4)1.5 (H2 O)(H3 O)0.5 (H2 O)0.5)] as the catalyst. A maximum yield of 70 % with the same selectivity was achieved after 12 h. At the end of the reaction, the catalyst was removed by centrifugation, the organic phase was separated from water and evaporated in vacuo (with solvent recovery), and solid 5-HMF was isolated (purity >99 %). The recovery and reuse of the catalyst and the relationship between the structure of the OC and the efficiency of the extraction are discussed. The OC/W system influences the lifetime of the catalysts positively compared to only water. PMID:26676974

  6. Effect of natural dissolved organic carbon on phosphate removal by ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate treatment of wetland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Robert G.; Sherwood, Lindsay J.; Richardson, Curtis J.

    2009-09-01

    The use of wetlands for the removal of excess N and P has become widespread. Some sensitive P-limited ecosystems, however, may require additional reductions in the concentration of P entering the system. It has been proposed that the treatment of wetlands through addition of ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate can augment the natural P removal mechanisms. However, high concentrations of natural dissolved organic matter may interfere with the removal of P by metal addition. We evaluated the doses of ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate necessary to reduce total P concentrations below 0.32 μM (10 μg/L) in water from the Northern Everglades, and we determined the effect of various concentrations (21, 38, and 60 mg/L) of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the removal of PO4 and total P. High concentrations of natural DOC inhibited both the short-term removal of PO4 and the longer-term removal of total P from the water column. Similar results were observed using 15 μM citric acid in an experiment to determine whether citric acid could effectively mimic the inhibition of phosphorus removal associated with natural DOC. Stoichiometry of these experiments indicates that the mechanism of natural DOC interference was not complexation of the metal ions by the DOC; we hypothesize that it could be adsorption to the terminal hydroxyl groups on a polynuclear Fe or Al colloid, effectively blocking the adsorption sites from a phosphate molecule. Also, the ability of citric acid to mimic the inhibitory effects also suggests that the results of the study are broadly applicable to wetland and other waters with high natural organic acid concentrations.

  7. Phosphorus release from phosphate rock and iron phosphate by low-molecular-weight organic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ren-kou; ZHU Yong-guan; David Chittleborough

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight(LMW) organic acids widely exist in soils, particularly in the rhizosphere. A series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the phosphorus release from rock phosphate and iron phosphate by Iow-molecular-weight organic acids.Results showed that citric acid had the highest capacity to solubilize P from both rock and iron phosphate. P solubilization from rock phosphate and iron phosphate resulted in net proton consumption. P release from rock phosphate was positively correlated with the pKa values. P release from iron phosphate was positively correlated with Fe-organic acid stability constants except for aromatic acids, but was not correlated with PKa. Increase in the concentrations of organic acids enhanced P solubilization from both rock and iron phosphate almost linearrly. Addition of phenolic compounds further increased the P release from iron phosphate. Initial solution pH had much more substantial effect on P release from rock phosphate than from iron phosphate.

  8. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  9. Interactions between organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers modify phosphate sorption processes in an acid soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sckefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Center, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

    2008-07-15

    To determine how organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers interact to modify P sorption processes, three phosphate fertilizers were applied to lignite- and compost-amended acid soil and incubated for either 3 or 26 days. The fertilizers applied were potassium dihydrogen phosphate, triple superphosphate, and diammonium phosphate (DAP). After 3 days of incubation, sorption of all three P sources was decreased in the lignite-amended treatments, whereas P sorption was increased in the compost-amended treatments. Increased incubation time (26 days) resulted in significantly decreased P sorption when DAP was added to lignite-amended treatments. Addition of triple superphosphate increased P sorption in lignite- and compost-amended treatments and decreased solution pH compared with DAP application. In addition to the effect of P source, differences in P sorption between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were driven by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment and fertilizer addition also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. It is proposed that the combination of lignite and DAP may contribute to decreased P sorption in acid soils, with the positive effects likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  10. Soil Organic Carbon Stock

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the carbon held within soil organic constituents (i.e., products produced as dead plants and animals decompose and the soil microbial...

  11. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  12. Hyperpolarised Organic Phosphates as NMR Reporters of Compartmental pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Rose; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Organic phosphate metabolites contain functional groups withpKa values near the physiologic pH range, yielding pH-dependet 13C chemical shift changes of adjacent quaternary carbon sites.Whenformed in defined cellular compartmentsfrom exogenoushyperpolarised13Csubstrates,metabolites thuscanyieldlo......Organic phosphate metabolites contain functional groups withpKa values near the physiologic pH range, yielding pH-dependet 13C chemical shift changes of adjacent quaternary carbon sites.Whenformed in defined cellular compartmentsfrom exogenoushyperpolarised13Csubstrates...

  13. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  14. Lanthanide carbonate-phosphate complexes of different ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously undescribed carbonate-phosphate complexes of lanthanides (Ln) have been derived. Their optical and luminescent properties have been stUdied. It is shown that the lanthanide ions may form in solutions highly charged anions preferably corresponding to formulas: [NdCO3(PO4)3]8-, [HoCO3(PO4)3]8- and [Er(CO3)2(PO4)]10-. The stability constants (Ksub(st)) of the resulting heteroligand complexes have been determined. A new version of the luminescent method of determining the composition of carbonate-phosphate complexes of Eu is suggested

  15. Biomineralization of uraninite and uranyl phosphate controlled by organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomineralization of uraninite (UO2) and uranyl phosphate minerals are both able to decrease the mobility of uranium in the environment. We examined biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate by Shewanella putrefaciens in the basic medium containing lactate as an electron donor, β- glycerolphosphate as a phosphorous source, and uranyl nitrate in the absence and presence of weak or strong complexing organic acids (WCOA or SCOA) under an anaerobic condition. In the basic medium, only biomineralization of UO2 was observed because of rapid reduction of U(VI). Biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate occurred in the media with WCOA, however the no biomineralization was occurred in the presence of SCOA. It is thought that formation of stable U(VI)-, and U(IV)- organic complexes prevents the biomineralization. These finding suggest that coexisting organic acids control the biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate minerals by microorganisms. (author)

  16. Investigation of the benzotriazole as addictive for carbon steel phosphating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studied the viability of substitution of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) for benzotriazole (BTAH) in the zinc phosphate bath (PZn+NaNO2) for phosphating of carbon steel (SAE 1010). The characterization of the samples was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optical Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition was evaluated by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated by Open Circuit Potential, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Anodic Potentiodynamic Polarization Curves in a 0.5 mol L-1 NaCl electrolyte. The experimental results showed that the phosphate layer obtained in the solution with benzotriazole (PZn+BTAH) presented better corrosion resistance properties than that obtained in sodium nitrite. The results demonstrated that the sodium nitrite NaNO2 can be replaced by benzotriazole (BTAH) in zinc phosphate baths. (author)

  17. Phosphate binding therapy in dialysis patients: focus on lanthanum carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail A Mohammed

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ismail A Mohammed, Alastair J HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, UKAbstract: Hyperphosphatemia is an inevitable consequence of end stage chronic kidney disease and is present in the majority of dialysis patients. Recent observational data has associated hyperphosphatemia with increased cardiovascular mortality among dialysis patients. Dietary restriction of phosphate and current dialysis prescription practices are not enough to maintain serum phosphate levels within the recommended range so that the majority of dialysis patients require oral phosphate binders. Unfortunately, conventional phosphate binders are not reliably effective and are associated with a range of limitations and side effects. Aluminium-containing agents are highly efficient but no longer widely used because of well established and proven toxicity. Calcium based salts are inexpensive, effective and most widely used but there is now concern about their association with hypercalcemia and vascular calcification. Sevelamer hydrochloride is associated with fewer adverse effects, but a large pill burden and high cost are limiting factors to its wider use. In addition, the efficacy of sevelamer as a monotherapy in lowering phosphate to target levels in severe hyperphosphatemia remains debatable. Lanthanum carbonate is a promising new non-aluminium, calcium-free phosphate binder. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated a good safety profile, and it appears well tolerated and effective in reducing phosphate levels in dialysis patients. Its identified adverse events are apparently mild to moderate in severity and mostly GI related. It appears to be effective as a monotherapy, with a reduced pill burden, but like sevelamer, it is significantly more expensive than calcium-based binders. Data on its safety profile over 6 years of treatment are now available.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, lanthanum

  18. Competitive sorption between glyphosphate and inorganic phosphate on clay minerals and low organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic phosphate may influence the adsorption of glyphosate to soil surface sites. It has been postulated that glyphosphate sorption is dominated by the phosphoric acid moiety, therefore, inorganic phosphate could compete with glyphosate for surface sorption sites. Sorption of glyphosate is examined in low organic carbon systems where clay minerals dominate the available adsorption sites using 32P-labeled phosphate and 14C-labeled glyphosate to track sorption. Glyphosate sorption was found to be strongly dependent on phosphate additions. Isotherms were generally of the L type, which is consistent with a limited number of surface sites. Most sorption on whole soils could be accounted for by sorption observed on model clays of the same mineral type as found in the soils. (author)

  19. Analysis of phosphate-accumulating organisms cultivated under different carbon sources with polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shui-li; LIU Ya-nan; JING Guo-lin; ZHAO Bing-jie; GUO Si-yuan

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the microbial communities of microorganisms cultivated under different carbon sources, three sequencing batch reactors were operated. They were supplied with sewage, glucose and sodium acetate as carbon sources respectively and showed high phosphorus removal performance. The results of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis(DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction-amplified (PCR) 16S rDNA fragments demonstrated that β-protebacteria, Actinomyces sp. and γ-protebacteria only exited in 1 # reactor. The microbiological diversity of 1 # reactor exceeded the other two reactors. Flavobacterium, Bacillales, Actinomyces, Actinobacteridae and uncultured bacteria(AF527584, AF502204, AY592749, AB076862, AJ619051, AF495454 and AY133070) could be detected in the biological phosphorus removal reactors.

  20. The treatment of carbonated phosphates at Industries Chimiques du Senegal; Le traitement des phosphates carbonates aux industries chimiques du Senegal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Save, M. [BRGM, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-12-15

    Up to now, only siliceous phosphate ores were exploited, the calcareous ores being left in place. In order to increase its reserves, ICS contemplated the installation of a calcining plant in addition to its present treatment plant of siliceous ores. However, thanks to an important financial help from the French Fund for the World Environment, ICS asked the BRGM to develop an alternate treatment to avoid CO{sub 2} emissions in the atmosphere. The new process is based on selective flotation to separate carbonate particles from phosphate ones, the latter being concentrated and purified for fertilizer production. The carbonates will be sent to the tailing dam with clay and silica materials with a minimum environmental impact. Considering that ICS contemplates a substantial increase of its production, there is a saving involved of between 150 000 and 325 000 tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year. The process consists of attrition, silica inverse flotation and a direct carbonate flotation. Patents have been requested. Since 75% of the world phosphate reserves are sedimentary carbonates, the development of such a process based on flotation is of great interest. (author)

  1. ANTICORROSION PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COATINGS CONTAINING POLYPHENYLENEDIAMINE PHOSPHATE

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslav Kohl; Andréa Kalendová

    2015-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the synthesis of polyphenylenediamine, its description and determination of parameters whose knowledge is required for the formulation of organic coatings pigmented with this compound. Polyphenylenediamine phosphate was prepared by oxidation polymerization in acidic environment. Phosphoric acid was used as the doping acid. Based on the results, pigmented organic coatings containing polyphenylenediamine at volume concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 3%; 5%, and 10% wer...

  2. Total organic carbon analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  3. Application of phosphating techniques to aluminium and carbon steel surfaces using nitro guanidine as oxidizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate coatings are inorganic crystalline deposits laid down uniformly on properly prepared surfaces by a chemical reaction with the treated base metal. The reaction consists in dissolving some surface metal by acid attack and then causing surface neutralization of the phosphate solution with consequent precipitation of the phosphate coating. Phosphate coatings do not provide appreciable corrosion protection in themselves. They are useful mainly as a base for paints, ensuring good adherence of paint to steel and decreasing the tendency for corrosion to under cut the paint film at scratches or other defects. In this work firstly were realized phosphate on standard carbon steel, employing technical of cold phosphate (at 40 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 30 minutes) and hot phosphate (at 88 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 15 minutes), where with this last were obtained the best results. Both methods used phosphate solutions of Zn/Mn and using as catalyst Nitro guanidine. Aluminium surfaces were phosphate used solutions of Cr and as catalyst Sodium bi fluoride. The phosphating on this surface were realized at temperature of 50 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 10 minutes. In this work were obtained a new phosphate coatings on steel surfaces, these coatings were realized with a phosphate solution manufactured with the precipitates gathered during the hot phosphating on carbon steel. These coatings show excellent physical characteristics and of corrosion resistance. Were determined the physical testings of the coatings phosphate obtained on carbon steel and aluminium surfaces. These testing were: roughness, thickness, microhardness and adhesion. The best results were showed in carbon steel phosphate with precipitated solutions. The technical of analysis for activation with thermic neutrons was used to determine the phosphate coatings composition. Finally, corrosion testings were realized by means of two methods

  4. ANTICORROSION PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COATINGS CONTAINING POLYPHENYLENEDIAMINE PHOSPHATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Kohl

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work was aimed at the synthesis of polyphenylenediamine, its description and determination of parameters whose knowledge is required for the formulation of organic coatings pigmented with this compound. Polyphenylenediamine phosphate was prepared by oxidation polymerization in acidic environment. Phosphoric acid was used as the doping acid. Based on the results, pigmented organic coatings containing polyphenylenediamine at volume concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 3%; 5%, and 10% were formed. The effect of the conductive polymer on the organic coatings‘ corrosion properties was examined via accelerated corrosion tests. From the results of an accelerated corrosion test it follows that if added to an epoxy-ester coating, this pigment improves appreciably the coating‘s corrosion resistance, especially at low pigment volume concentrations.

  5. Capacitive, deionization with carbon aerogel electrodes: Carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the capacitive deionization (CDI) of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes has been developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system. Electricity is used instead. Water with various anions and cations is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, ions are electrostatically removed from the water and held in the electric double layers formed at the surfaces of electrodes. The water leaving the cell is purified, as desired. The effects of cell voltage on the electrosorption capacities for Na2SO4, Na3PO4, and Na2CO3 have been investigated and are reported here. Results for NaCl and NaNO3 have been reported previously. Possible applications for CDI are as a replacement for ion exchange processes which remove heavy metals and radioisotopes from process and waste water in various industries, as well as to remove inorganic ions from feedwater for fossil and nuclear power plants

  6. Biological phosphate removal using a degradable carbon source produced by hydrothermal treatment of excess sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Haraguchi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of reusing excess sludge treated by hydrothermal reaction for the purpose of improving the efficiency of the enhanced biological phosphate removal (EBPR process was investigated. Excess sludge from a fish-processing industry located in Japan was treated in high-temperature and high-pressure water, at a reaction temperature ranging from 200 to 400ºC, a pressure of 1.8 to 30MPa and a constant reaction time of 7 min. For the conditions tested, the results showed that when the reaction temperature was increased the content of readily biodegradable substrate in the total COD Cr increased. In addition, the amount of some volatile fatty acids (VFAs produced by the hydrothermal reaction increased as reaction temperature increased. From the phosphate release tests under anaerobic conditions, it was possible to demonstrate that not only the VFAs, but also the readily and slowly biodegradable substrates are used as potential carbon source by the phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs.

  7. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  8. Characterisation of Phosphate Accumulating Organisms and Techniques for Polyphosphate Detection: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Tarayre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate minerals have long been used for the production of phosphorus-based chemicals used in many economic sectors. However, these resources are not renewable and the natural phosphate stocks are decreasing. In this context, the research of new phosphate sources has become necessary. Many types of wastes contain non-negligible phosphate concentrations, such as wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, phosphorus is eliminated by physicochemical and/or biological techniques. In this latter case, a specific microbiota, phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs, accumulates phosphate as polyphosphate. This molecule can be considered as an alternative phosphate source, and is directly extracted from wastewater generated by human activities. This review focuses on the techniques which can be applied to enrich and try to isolate these PAOs, and to detect the presence of polyphosphate in microbial cells.

  9. Characterisation of Phosphate Accumulating Organisms and Techniques for Polyphosphate Detection: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarayre, Cédric; Nguyen, Huu-Thanh; Brognaux, Alison; Delepierre, Anissa; De Clercq, Lies; Charlier, Raphaëlle; Michels, Evi; Meers, Erik; Delvigne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate minerals have long been used for the production of phosphorus-based chemicals used in many economic sectors. However, these resources are not renewable and the natural phosphate stocks are decreasing. In this context, the research of new phosphate sources has become necessary. Many types of wastes contain non-negligible phosphate concentrations, such as wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, phosphorus is eliminated by physicochemical and/or biological techniques. In this latter case, a specific microbiota, phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), accumulates phosphate as polyphosphate. This molecule can be considered as an alternative phosphate source, and is directly extracted from wastewater generated by human activities. This review focuses on the techniques which can be applied to enrich and try to isolate these PAOs, and to detect the presence of polyphosphate in microbial cells. PMID:27258275

  10. Initiation of Yeast Sporulation by Partial Carbon, Nitrogen, or Phosphate Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Freese, Elisabeth Bautz; Chu, Martha I.; Freese, Ernst

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we show that partial deprivation of a carbon source, a nitrogen source, or phosphate in the presence of all other nutrients needed for growth initiates meiosis and sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae homothallic strain Y55. For carbon deprivation experiments, cells were grown in synthetic medium (pH 5.5) containing an excess of one carbon source and then transferred to the same medium containing different concentrations of the same carbon source. In the case of transfer to d...

  11. From energy-rich phosphate compounds to warfare agents: A review on the chemistry of organic phosphate compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Albino Giusti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry of the phosphorus-oxygen bond is widely used in biological systems in many processes, such as energy transduction and the storage, transmission and expression of genetic information, which are essential to living beings in relation to a wide variety of functions. Compounds containing this bond have been designed for many purposes, ranging from agricultural defense systems, in order to increase food production, to nerve agents, for complaining use in warfare. In this review, features related to the chemistry of organic phosphate compounds are discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of phosphate compounds in biochemical events and in nerve agents. To this aim, the energy-rich phosphate compounds are focused, particularly the mode of their use as energy currency in cells. Historical and recent studies carried out by research groups have tried to elucidate the mechanism of action of enzymes responsible for energy transduction through the use of biochemical studies, enzyme models, and artificial enzymes. Finally, recent studies on the detoxification of nerve agents based on phosphorous esters are presented, and on the utilization of chromogenic and fluorogenic chemosensors for the detection of these phosphate species.

  12. Initial performance of pineapple and utilization of rock phosphate applied in combination with organic compounds to leaf axils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marihus Altoé Baldotto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rock phosphates have low solubility in water, but good solubility in acid. The use of organic compounds together with these phosphorus sources applied to the basal leaf axils of pineapple can increase the solubility of this phosfate source and increase the P availability to the crop. A greenhouse experiment was conducted using Araxá rock phosphate (10 g in combination or not with solutions containing increasing concentrations of humic acids (0 to 40 mmol L-1 of carbon, with or without citric acid (0.005 mmol L-1, applied to basal leaf axils of pineapple cv. Pérola. Growth and nutritional characteristics of aerial plant parts were assessed. Growth rates of aerial parts and N, P, K, Ca and Mg contents increased curvilinearly with increasing concentration of carbon in the form of humic acids. Maximum values were found for the concentration of 9.3 mmol L-1 of carbon combined with 0.005 mmol L-1 of citric acid and natural phosphate.

  13. Synthesis, mechanical and biological characterization of ionic doped carbonated hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, S; Vieira, S I; Olhero, S M; Torres, P M C; Pina, S; da Cruz e Silva, O A B; Ferreira, J M F

    2011-04-01

    The influence of ionic substituents in calcium phosphates intended for bone and tooth replacement biomedical applications is an important research topic, owing to the essential roles played by trace elements in biological processes. The present study investigates the mechanical and biological evaluation of ionic doped hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate mixtures which have been prepared by a simple aqueous precipitation method. Heat treating the resultant calcium phosphates in a carbonated atmosphere led to the formation of ionic doped carbonated hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate mixtures containing the essential ions of biological apatite. The structural analysis determined by Rietveld refinement confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite as the main phase, together with a considerable amount of β-tricalcium phosphate. Such phase assemblage is essentially due to the influence of substituted ions during synthesis. The results from mechanical tests proved that carbonate substitutions are detrimental for the mechanical properties of apatite-based ceramics. In vitro proliferation assays of osteoblastic-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cell line) to powders revealed that carbonate incorporation can either delay or accelerate MC3T3 proliferation, although reaching the same proliferation levels as control cells after 2 weeks in culture. Further, the powders enable pre-osteoblastic differentiation in a similar manner to control cells, as indirectly measured by ALP activity and Type-I collagen medium secretion. PMID:21146640

  14. Intrinsically fluorescent carbon dots with tunable emission derived from hydrothermal treatment of glucose in the presence of monopotassium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng-Chun; Wang, Miao; Yong, Anna Marie; Wong, Siew Yee; Zhang, Xin-Hai; Tan, Happy; Chang, Alex Yuangchi; Li, Xu; Wang, John

    2011-11-14

    A facile method is developed to synthesize intrinsically fluorescent carbon dots by hydrothermal treatment of glucose in the presence of monopotassium phosphate. The fluorescence emission of the carbon dots thus produced is tunable by simply adjusting the concentration of monopotassium phosphate. PMID:21931886

  15. Soil organic carbon across scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Sharon M; Angers, Denis A; Holden, Nicholas M; McBratney, Alex B

    2015-10-01

    Mechanistic understanding of scale effects is important for interpreting the processes that control the global carbon cycle. Greater attention should be given to scale in soil organic carbon (SOC) science so that we can devise better policy to protect/enhance existing SOC stocks and ensure sustainable use of soils. Global issues such as climate change require consideration of SOC stock changes at the global and biosphere scale, but human interaction occurs at the landscape scale, with consequences at the pedon, aggregate and particle scales. This review evaluates our understanding of SOC across all these scales in the context of the processes involved in SOC cycling at each scale and with emphasis on stabilizing SOC. Current synergy between science and policy is explored at each scale to determine how well each is represented in the management of SOC. An outline of how SOC might be integrated into a framework of soil security is examined. We conclude that SOC processes at the biosphere to biome scales are not well understood. Instead, SOC has come to be viewed as a large-scale pool subjects to carbon flux. Better understanding exists for SOC processes operating at the scales of the pedon, aggregate and particle. At the landscape scale, the influence of large- and small-scale processes has the greatest interaction and is exposed to the greatest modification through agricultural management. Policy implemented at regional or national scale tends to focus at the landscape scale without due consideration of the larger scale factors controlling SOC or the impacts of policy for SOC at the smaller SOC scales. What is required is a framework that can be integrated across a continuum of scales to optimize SOC management. PMID:25918852

  16. Acidity controls on dissolved organic carbon mobility in organic soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Evans, Ch. D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Ostle, N.; Zielinski, P.; Cooper, M.; Peacock, M.; Clark, J.; Oulehle, Filip; Cooper, D.; Freeman, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 11 (2012), s. 3317-3331. ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : acidity * dissolved organic carbon * organic soil * peat * podzol * soil carbon * sulphur Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 6.910, year: 2012

  17. Could organic phosphorus compounds contaminate the analysis of phosphate oxygen isotopes in freshwater matrices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ceri; Surridge, Ben; Gooddy, Daren

    2014-05-01

    Variation in the stable isotope composition of oxygen within dissolved phosphate (δ18Op) represents a novel and potentially powerful environmental tracer, providing insights into the sources of phosphorus and the extent to which phosphorus from different sources is metabolised. The analysis of δ18Opwithin freshwater matrices requires isolation of the phosphate ion from possible sources of contaminant oxygen within the bulk matrix, prior to pyrolysis (usually of a silver phosphate precipitate) and analysis of the oxygen isotope composition. The majority of published research uses co-precipitation of phosphate with brucite (Mg(OH)2) as an initial step in the isolation of the phosphate ion. However, freshwater matrices also contain a wide range of organic phosphorus compounds, including adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and phosphonates such as 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid. In this paper, we initially examine the potential for co-precipitation of organic phosphorus compounds with brucite. Our data indicate that ATP, sodium pyrophosphate and inositol hexakisphosphate are almost entirely removed from solution through co-precipitation with brucite, whilst glucose-6-phosphate and 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid are less readily co-precipitated. Subsequently, we assessed the potential for acid-hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds during re-dissolution of the brucite precipitate, using a range of acid systems. Our data indicate that up to 17% of ATP and up to 5% of sodium pyrophosphate can be hydrolysed by concentrated acetic acid, yielding fresh phosphate ions in solution. Our findings have potentially significant implications for analysis of δ18Opbecause the fresh phosphate ions produced following acid hydrolysis will be subjected to inheritance and kinetic isotope fractionations, likely altering the bulk δ18Op within a freshwater sample.

  18. Solubilization of inorganic phosphate and production of organic acids by bacteria isolated from a Moroccan mineral phosphate deposit

    OpenAIRE

    Mardad, Illham; Serrano, Aurelio; Soukri, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Three efficient inorganic-phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) were isolated from a phosphate rock deposit of a Moroccan mine. The phosphate solubilization index of these isolates, determined in National Botanical Research Institute's phosphate (NBRIP) medium supplemented with tribasic calcium phosphate, ranging from 2.8 to 4.4. The medium pH dropped from 7.0 to 3.5 units after growth under continuous agitation for seven days. PSB6, the most efficient PSB, closely related to Enterobacter hor...

  19. Urban Tree Effects on Soil Organic Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Edmondson, J. L.; O'Sullivan, O.S.; R Inger; Potter, J.; Mchugh, N; Gaston, K.J.; Leake, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ~75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to ad...

  20. Some observations on phosphate based corrosion inhibitors in preventing carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the various types of phosphonic acid based inhibitors assayed, namely HEDP, ATMP and a commercial corrosion inhibitor (code named Betz), it was found that Betz has the maximum amount of organic phosphate followed by HEDP and ATMP. The corrosion rate studies show that Betz gives the highest inhibition efficiency followed by HEDP and ATMP. This shows that organic phosphate plays a significant role in corrosion protection. However, it was observed that due to synergestic effect, HEDP in the presence of Zn2+ gave a better corrosion protection than Betz. The results are discussed in the light of available literature. (author)

  1. Phosphate, inositol and polyphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Thomas M; Azevedo, Cristina; Kolozsvari, Bernadett; Wilson, Miranda S C; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2016-02-15

    Eukaryotic cells have ubiquitously utilized the myo-inositol backbone to generate a diverse array of signalling molecules. This is achieved by arranging phosphate groups around the six-carbon inositol ring. There is virtually no biological process that does not take advantage of the uniquely variable architecture of phosphorylated inositol. In inositol biology, phosphates are able to form three distinct covalent bonds: phosphoester, phosphodiester and phosphoanhydride bonds, with each providing different properties. The phosphoester bond links phosphate groups to the inositol ring, the variable arrangement of which forms the basis of the signalling capacity of the inositol phosphates. Phosphate groups can also form the structural bridge between myo-inositol and diacylglycerol through the phosphodiester bond. The resulting lipid-bound inositol phosphates, or phosphoinositides, further expand the signalling potential of this family of molecules. Finally, inositol is also notable for its ability to host more phosphates than it has carbons. These unusual organic molecules are commonly referred to as the inositol pyrophosphates (PP-IPs), due to the presence of high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds (pyro- or diphospho-). PP-IPs themselves constitute a varied family of molecules with one or more pyrophosphate moiety/ies located around the inositol. Considering the relationship between phosphate and inositol, it is no surprise that members of the inositol phosphate family also regulate cellular phosphate homoeostasis. Notably, the PP-IPs play a fundamental role in controlling the metabolism of the ancient polymeric form of phosphate, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP). Here we explore the intimate links between phosphate, inositol phosphates and polyP, speculating on the evolution of these relationships. PMID:26862212

  2. Utilization of glyphosate as phosphate source: biochemistry and genetics of bacterial carbon-phosphorous lyase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Zechel, David L; Jochimsen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    of a large group of chemicals, phosphonic acids or phosphonates, which are characterized by a carbon-phosphorus bond. This is in contrast to the general phosphorus compounds utilized and metabolized by microorganisms. Here phosphorus is found as phosphoric acid or phosphate ion, phosphoric acid esters......, or phosphoric acid anhydrides. The latter compounds contain phosphorus that is bound only to oxygen. Hydrolytic, oxidative, and radical-based mechanisms for carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage have been described. This review deals with the radical-based mechanism employed by the carbon-phosphorus lyase...

  3. Dynamics models of soil organic carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGLi-xia; PANJian-jun

    2003-01-01

    As the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon, soils interact strongly with atmosphere composition, climate, and land change. Soil organic carbon dynamics in ecosystem plays a great role in global carbon cycle and global change. With development of mathematical models that simulate changes in soil organic carbon, there have been considerable advances in understanding soil organic carbon dynamics. This paper mainly reviewed the composition of soil organic matter and its influenced factors, and recommended some soil organic matter models worldwide. Based on the analyses of the developed results at home and abroad, it is suggested that future soil organic matter models should be developed toward based-process models, and not always empirical ones. The models are able to reveal their interaction between soil carbon systems, climate and land cover by technique and methods of GIS (Geographical Information System) and RS (Remote Sensing). These models should be developed at a global scale, in dynamically describing the spatial and temporal changes of soil organic matter cycle. Meanwhile, the further researches on models should be strengthen for providing theory basis and foundation in making policy of green house gas emission in China.

  4. Effect of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium orthophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO43−/CO32− is calcium phosphate hydrate and hydroxylapatite (HAp), respectively. Molar ratios of PO43−/CO32− are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the crystallization of HAp. - Highlights: • Formation of different complexes from CO32−, PO43− and Ca2+ solutions at 60 °C. • Molar ratios of PO43−/CO32 cause changes in phase and size of synthesized products. • Addition of PO43 inhibited the activity of CO32− during bound with Ca2+. • The phase transformation was completed, when CO32− peaks disappeared in FTIR. • PO43−, CO32− and Ca2+ distributed heterogeneously on the surface of precipitation. - Abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been synthesized by a designed hydrothermal method. Effects of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium-orthophosphates were investigated. With X-ray diffraction measurement the synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO43−/CO32− is calcium phosphate hydrate at pH 9.0, and hydroxylapatite (HAp) at pH 8.0, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of product at the high ratio (1.8) of PO43−/CO32− shows that the CO32− peaks disappear, and the strong peaks at 1412 and 1460 cm−1 are assigned to the vibrations of PO43− in HAp. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of products at the low (0.15–0.6) to the high (1.2–1.8) ratios of PO43−/CO32− are obtained at 2.9 and 2.7 ppm, respectively. Molar ratios of PO43−/CO32− are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the formation and infiltration events of calcium-phosphate surface precipitates, and are subsequently enclosed during HAp formation

  5. Influence of surface treatment of carbon fibers on electrochemical crystallization of calcium phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Ke; HUANG Su-ping; ZHOU Ke-chao

    2005-01-01

    Electrodeposition technique was used to coat calcium phosphate on carbon fiber which can be used to reinforce hydroxyapatite. The differences between fibers treated with and without nitric acid in electrodeposition were evaluated. The X-ray diffractometry results show that CaHPO4·2H2O is obtained as the kind of calcium phosphate coating on carbon fiber. The scanning electron microscopy photographs and deposit kinetic curve indicate that the influences of the functional group attained by nitric acid treatment, the crystal morphology and crystallization of the coating layers on the fiber with and without treatment rate are obviously different. The functional group, especially the acidic group, can act as nucleation centers of electrochemical crystallization.

  6. Reactivity of basic zirconium sulfate during interaction with carbonate, oxalate and phosphate reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of potentiometry and chemical analysis are used to study basic zirconium sulfate (BZS) interaction with carbonate (Na2CO3, NaHCO3), phosphate (Na3PO4, Na2HPO4, NaH2PO4, H3PO4) and oxalate ((NH4)2C2O4xH2O) reagents. Depending on conditions two different BZS - BZS-1 and BZS-2 are obtained. It is shown that BZS reactivity is defined by the possibility of substitution of oxo- and hydroxoligands and is decreased by increase of its deposition temperature. BZS-1 interaction with carbonate and oxalate reagents takes place at 25 deg C without changing basicity, and with phosphate reagents with basicity decrease up to formation of monophosphate which basicity is about 20%. During BZC-2 interaction oxo- and hydroxo-groups may be completely substituted for acidoligands with formation of nonhydrolysed compounds

  7. Model protocells photochemically reduce carbonate to organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folsome, C.; Brittain, A.

    1981-06-11

    Synthetic cell-sized organic microstructures effect the long-wavelength uv photosynthesis of organic products from carbonate. Formaldehyde is the most abundant photoproduct and water is the major proton donor for this reduced form of carbon. We show here that these results for model phase-bounded systems are consistent with the postulate that metabolism of progenitors to the earliest living cells could have been, at least in part, photosynthetic.

  8. Single step signal group-imidazole labeling of organic phosphate groups under aqueous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compounds and methods for single step, covalent labeling of the phosphate group of an organic substance under aqueous conditions are described. The labeling compound includes any kind of detectable signal group covalently bound to an imidazole moiety, which can be imidazole or a substituted imidazole. A preferred labeling compound has the formula shown in the accompanying diagram. 4 figs

  9. Single step signal group-imidazole labeling of organic phosphate groups under aqueous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang

    1996-01-01

    Compounds and methods for single step, covalent labeling of the phosphate group of an organic substance under aqueous conditions are described. The labeling compound includes any kind of detectable signal group covalently bound to an imidazole moiety, which can be imidazole or a substituted imidazole. A preferred labeling compound has the formula ##STR1##

  10. Electrochemical determination of phenol at natural phosphate modified carbon paste electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik EL OUAFY; Abdelilah CHTAINI; Hassan OULFAJRITE; Rachida NAJIH

    2014-01-01

    A Cyclic voltammetry (VC) and Square Wave Voltammetry methods for the determination of trace amounts of phenol at carbon paste electrode modified with Natural Phosphate (NP-CPE) is proposed. The results showed that the NP-CPE exhibited excellent electro catalytic activity to phenol. The concentration of phenol and measuring solution pH was investigated. This electrochemical sensor shows an excellent performance for detecting phenol. The sensor was successfully applied to the determination ...

  11. Lanthanum carbonate vs conventional phosphate binders for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in maintenance hemodialysis patients: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect and safety of lanthanum carbonate vs conventional phosphate binders for hyperphosphatemia in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis.Methods According to the collaborative search strategy,MEDLINE (1996 to 2012.12) ,EBCO

  12. Adsorption of organic substances to activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption systems using activated carbon as an almost universal adsorbent for organic substances are widely applied for purifying exhaust air. The possibilities, limits and measures for an optimum design of activated carbon processes are given from the point of view of the plant designed and under the aspects of the present laws for environmental control. (orig.)

  13. Magnesium carbonate for phosphate control in patients on hemodialysis. A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tzanakis, Ioannis P.; Papadaki, Antonia N.; Wei, Mingxin; Kagia, Stella; Spadidakis, Vlassios V.; Kallivretakis, Nikolaos E.; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2008-01-01

    Background Magnesium salts bind dietary phosphorus, but their use in renal patients is limited due to their potential for causing side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) as a phosphate-binder in hemodialysis patients. Methods Forty-six stable hemodialysis patients were randomly allocated to receive either MgCO3 (n = 25) or calcium carbonate (CaCO3), (n = 21) for 6 months. The concentration of Mg in the dialysate bath was 0.30 ...

  14. Supported phosphate and carbonate salts for heterogeneous catalysis of triglycerides to fatty acid methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Stephanie Lynne

    Fatty acid methyl esters made from vegetable oil, or biodiesel, have been identified as a substitute for diesel derived from crude oil. Biodiesel is currently made using a homogeneous base catalyst to perform the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol to generate fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). The use of a homogeneous catalyst necessitates additional purification of the product and byproducts before sale, and the catalyst is consumed and discarded. The development of a heterogeneous basic catalyst for the production of FAME is desirable. Tribasic phosphate salts and dibasic carbonate salts are active for the production of FAME but generally operate as homogeneous catalysts. Supporting these phosphate and carbonate salts on mesoporous MCM-41, microporous silica gel, and nonporous a-alumina proved successful to greater or lesser degrees depending on the identity of the support and pretreatment of the support. Although these salts were supported and were active for the production of FAME from canola oil, they proved to be operating as homogeneous catalysts due to leaching of the active species off the surface of the support. Further investigation of the active species present in the tribasic phosphate catalysts identified the active support as orthophosphate, and NMR studies revealed the phosphorus to be present as orthophosphate and diphosphate in varying proportions in each catalyst. Evaluation of the acid-washing support pretreatment process revealed that the exposure of the support to acid plays a large role in the development of activity on the surface of the catalyst, but manipulation of these parameters did not prevent leaching of the active site off the surface of the catalyst. Alternate methods of support pretreatment were no more effective in preventing leaching. Tribasic phosphate supported on silica gel is not effective as a heterogeneous catalyst for FAME production from triglycerides because of the lack of stability of the phosphate on the

  15. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  16. Influence of boron doped carbon nanotubes on electric and electromagnetic properties of phosphate composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents a study of the possibility to develop the multifunctional composite materials based on the electromagnetically absorbing nonfired, mechanically strong and heat-resistant phosphate ceramics. The potentialities of using pure and boron doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and B-MWCNTs, respectively) as functional additives to the phosphate matrix were investigated. It was found that a length of MWCNT is the determining factor for the electrical conductivity and high-frequency conductivity of the composite. Growth of the intrinsic conductivity of boron-containing MWCNTs, compared to their undoped counterparts, has no significant influence on the possible resistance decrease of the composite on their basis in the static mode and also on its ability to electromagnetic shielding. This is due to a small length of B-MWCNTs and hence much greater concentrations required to achieve the percolation threshold than those studied (up to 1,5 wt. %). On the contrary, the use of long pure MWCNTs in small concentrations has a tremendous impact on the electromagnetic properties of the phosphate composite: on introduction of 1,5 wt. % of MWCNTs one can observe increase in the conductivity by 13 orders of magnitude, and the composite MWCNTs/phosphate 1 mm thick is opaque to microwave radiation. Taking into account the interest in using the boron-doped MWNT also as neutron-absorbing materials, it is essential to improve the synthesis methods of B-MWCNTs with the aim of increasing their length. (authors)

  17. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  18. Fachtagung 'carbon-nanophysics': carbon based organic optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent developments on carbon based organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic diodes (OPVs) and photoactive organic field effect transistors (photOFETs) are discussed. The photophysics of such devices is based on the photoinduced charge and/or energy transfer interactions between donor type semiconducting conjugated materials and acceptor type conjugated molecules such as Buckminster-fullerene, C60. Furthermore, organic/inorganic nanoparticle based 'hybrid' devices will be discussed. This talk gives an overview of materials' aspect, charge-transport, and device physics of organic diodes and field-effect transistors. Due to the compatibility of carbon/ hydrogen based organic semiconductors with organic biomolecules and living cells there can be a great opportunity to integrate such organic semiconductor devices (biOFETs) with the living organisms. In general, bio/life sciences and information technology can be bridged in an advanced cybernetic approach using organic semiconductor devices embedded in bio-life sciences. This field of bio-organic electronic devices is proposed to be an important mission of organic semiconductor devices. (author)

  19. Carbon allocation in underground storage organs

    OpenAIRE

    Turesson, Helle

    2014-01-01

    By increasing knowledge of carbon allocation in underground storage organs and using the knowledge to improve such crops, the competitiveness of these types of storage organs can be strengthened. Starch is the most common storage compound in tubers and roots, but some crops accumulate compounds other than starch. This thesis examined representative underground storage organs accumulating starch, oil and sugars. These were: the oil-accumulating nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus), a half-grass whic...

  20. Effect of Nutrient/Carbon Supplements on Biological Phosphate and Nitrate Uptake by Protozoan Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpor, O. B.; Momba, M. N. B.; Okonkwo, J.

    This study was aimed at investigating the effect of nine different nutrient/carbon supplements in mixed liquor on nutrient uptake ability of three wastewater protozoan isolates, which have previously been screened for phosphate and nitrate uptake efficiency. The results revealed that over 50% of phosphate was removed in the presence of sodium acetate, glucose or sucrose. Similarly, nitrate uptake of over 60% was observed in the presence of sodium acetate, sodium succinate, glucose or sucrose. These trends were common in all the isolates. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal in the mixed liquor was only found to be significantly removed in mixed liquors that were supplemented with glucose, sucrose or sodium succinate. In the presence of sodium acetate, COD was observed to increase. The findings of this investigation have revealed that nutrient uptake and COD removal by the test protozoan isolates may be dependent primarily on the initial nutrient supplement in mixed liquor.

  1. Uranium Distribution in Some Carbonate and Phosphate Rocks Using Fission Track Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated geochemical and petrological procedure was used to investigate the controls on uranium distribution in some carbonate, phosphate and other sedimentary rocks. The fission track registration technique, along with geochemical analysis of uranium was applied to effectively locate, evaluate and identify the patterns of uranium distribution within these rocks and their constituents. Differences in the density of the tracks were found in isotropic and anisotropic grains of coprolite, ovulite, glauconite, calcite and cellophane, as well as, apatite and other phosphatic particles. The variations in uranium concentrations seem to be related to more than one type of uranium incorporation mechanism, particularly caused by syngenetic and epigenetic processes. It was concluded that the obtained variations in U content are due to a combination of sedimentological, textural, geochemical, physiochemical and a few other controls and mechanisms

  2. Organic carbon in Antarctic snow: spatial trends and possible sources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, R.; Mahalinganathan, K.; Thamban, M.; Nair, S.

    Organic carbon records in Antarctic snow are sparse despite the fact that it is of great significance to global carbon dynamics, snow photochemistry, and air–snow exchange processes. Here, surface snow total organic carbon (TOC) along with sea...

  3. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous iron phosphates on carbon nanotubes as cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-aqueous approach was developed to synthesize iron phosphate cathode materials by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Deposition of iron phosphate thin films was achieved on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) by combining ALD subcycles of Fe2O3 (ferrocene-ozone) and POx (trimethyl phosphate-water) at 200 – 350 °C. The thickness of iron phosphate thin films depends linearly on the ALD cycle, indicating their self-limiting growth behavior. The growth per cycle of iron phosphate thin films was determined to be ∼ 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.5 Å, at 200, 250, 300, and 350 °C, respectively. Characterization by SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques revealed uniform and conformal coating of amorphous iron phosphates on the surface of NCNTs. XANES analysis confirmed Fe−O−P bonding in the iron phosphates prepared by ALD. Furthermore, electrochemical measurement verified the high electrochemical activity of the amorphous iron phosphate as a cathode material in lithium-ion batteries. It is expected that the amorphous iron phosphate prepared by this facile and cost-effective ALD approach will find applications in the next generation of lithium-ion batteries and thin film batteries as either cathode materials or surface coating materials

  4. Reburial of fossil organic carbon in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Dickens, Angela F.; Gélinas, Yves; Masiello, Caroline A.; Wakeham, Stuart; Hedges, John I.

    2004-01-01

    Marine sediments act as the ultimate sink for organic carbon, sequestering otherwise rapidly cycling carbon for geologic timescales. Sedimentary organic carbon burial appears to be controlled by oxygen exposure time in situ, and much research has focused on understanding the mechanisms of preservation of organic carbon. In this context, combustion-derived black carbon has received attention as a form of refractory organic carbon that may be preferentially preserved in soils and sediments. How...

  5. Calcium Carbonate versus Sevelamer Hydrochloride as Phosphate Binders after Long-Term Disease Progression in 5/6 Nephrectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Törmänen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to compare the effects of calcium carbonate and sevelamer-HCl treatments on calcium-phosphate metabolism and renal function in 5/6 nephrectomized (NX rats so that long-term disease progression preceded the treatment. After 15-week progression, calcium carbonate (3.0%, sevelamer-HCl (3.0%, or control diets (0.3% calcium were given for 9 weeks. Subtotal nephrectomy reduced creatinine clearance (−40%, plasma calcidiol (−25%, and calcitriol (−70% and increased phosphate (+37%, parathyroid hormone (PTH (11-fold, and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23 (4-fold. In NX rats, calcium carbonate diet increased plasma (+20% and urinary calcium (6-fold, reduced plasma phosphate (−50% and calcidiol (−30%, decreased creatinine clearance (−35% and FGF 23 (−85%, and suppressed PTH without influencing blood pH. In NX rats, sevelamer-HCl increased urinary calcium (4-fold and decreased creatinine clearance (−45%, PTH (−75%, blood pH (by 0.20 units, plasma calcidiol (−40%, and calcitriol (−65%. Plasma phosphate and FGF-23 were unchanged. In conclusion, when initiated after long-term progression of experimental renal insufficiency, calcium carbonate diet reduced plasma phosphate and FGF-23 while sevelamer-HCl did not. The former induced hypercalcemia, the latter induced acidosis, while both treatments reduced vitamin D metabolites and deteriorated renal function. Thus, delayed initiation influences the effects of these phosphate binders in remnant kidney rats.

  6. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants. PMID:18593217

  7. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shao-Xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC conte...

  8. On organic soil carbon and CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Bohn, Hinrich L.

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation of virgin lands released about 150 times 1012 kg of carbon as CO2 to the atmosphere during the last 100 years, at rates of 1 to 2 times 1012 kg/yr. These rates exceeded the CO2 evolved from fossil fuel combustion until the mid-1960s. Soil organic carbon, in organic and mineral soils, may play a considerable role in the CO2 cycle and in controlling the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1978.tb00863.x

  9. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-xian WANG; Xiao-jun LI; Xin-qiang LIANG; Qi-xiang LUO; Fang FAN; Ying-xu CHEN; Zu-zhang LI; Huo-xi SUN; Tian-fang DAI; Jun-nan WAN

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC)sequestration.We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China.The experiment included eight treatments:(1) check,(2) PK,(3) NP,(4) NK,(5) NPK,(6) 7F:3M (N,P,K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N),(7) 5F:5M (N,P,K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N),(8) 3F:7M (N,P,K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N).Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment.The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha.The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check.Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers.The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues.Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization.Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC.

  10. Fertilization increases paddy soil organic carbon density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-xian; Liang, Xin-qiang; Luo, Qi-xiang; Fan, Fang; Chen, Ying-xu; Li, Zu-zhang; Sun, Huo-xi; Dai, Tian-fang; Wan, Jun-nan; Li, Xiao-jun

    2012-04-01

    Field experiments provide an opportunity to study the effects of fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. We sampled soils from a long-term (25 years) paddy experiment in subtropical China. The experiment included eight treatments: (1) check, (2) PK, (3) NP, (4) NK, (5) NPK, (6) 7F:3M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+30% organic N), (7) 5F:5M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+50% organic N), (8) 3F:7M (N, P, K inorganic fertilizers+70% organic N). Fertilization increased SOC content in the plow layers compared to the non-fertilized check treatment. The SOC density in the top 100 cm of soil ranged from 73.12 to 91.36 Mg/ha. The SOC densities of all fertilizer treatments were greater than that of the check. Those treatments that combined inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments had greater SOC densities than those receiving only inorganic fertilizers. The SOC density was closely correlated to the sum of the soil carbon converted from organic amendments and rice residues. Carbon sequestration in paddy soils could be achieved by balanced and combined fertilization. Fertilization combining both inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments is an effective sustainable practice to sequestrate SOC. PMID:22467369

  11. Trehalose 6-phosphate is required for the onset of leaf senescence associated with high carbon availability.

    OpenAIRE

    Wingler, A.; Delatte, T. L.; O Hara, L. E.; Primavesi, L. F.; Jhurreea, D.; Paul, M. J.; Schluepmann, H.

    2012-01-01

    Trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) is an important regulator of plant metabolism and development. T6P content increases when carbon availability is high, and in young growing tissue, T6P inhibits the activity of Snf1-related protein kinase (SnRK1). Here, strong accumulation of T6P was found in senescing leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), in parallel with a rise in sugar contents. To determine the role of T6P in senescence, T6P content was altered by expressing the bacterial T6P synthase g...

  12. Effect of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium orthophosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliassi, Mohammad Daoud, E-mail: eliassi2007@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhao, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming on Loess Plateau, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yangling 712100 (China); Tan, Wen Feng, E-mail: wenfeng.tan@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate and hydroxylapatite (HAp), respectively. Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the crystallization of HAp. - Highlights: • Formation of different complexes from CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and Ca{sup 2+} solutions at 60 °C. • Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2} cause changes in phase and size of synthesized products. • Addition of PO{sub 4}{sup 3} inhibited the activity of CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} during bound with Ca{sup 2+}. • The phase transformation was completed, when CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappeared in FTIR. • PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and Ca{sup 2+} distributed heterogeneously on the surface of precipitation. - Abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been synthesized by a designed hydrothermal method. Effects of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium-orthophosphates were investigated. With X-ray diffraction measurement the synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate at pH 9.0, and hydroxylapatite (HAp) at pH 8.0, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of product at the high ratio (1.8) of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} shows that the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappear, and the strong peaks at 1412 and 1460 cm{sup −1} are assigned to the vibrations of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in HAp. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of products at the low (0.15–0.6) to the high (1.2–1.8) ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are obtained at 2.9 and 2.7 ppm, respectively. Molar ratios of PO

  13. Mg-Enriched Engineered Carbon from Lithium-Ion Battery Anode for Phosphate Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xingming; Yao, Ying; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Cunzhong; Chen, Renjie; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2016-02-10

    Three Mg-enriched engineered carbons (mesocarbon microbeads, MCMB) were produced from lithium-ion battery anode using concentrated nitric acid oxidization and magnesium nitrate pretreatment. The obtained 15%Mg-MCMB, 30%Mg-MCMB, and 40%Mg-MCMB have magnesium level of 10.19, 19.13, and 19.96%, respectively. FTIR spectrum shows the functional groups present on the oxidized MCMB including OH, C=O, C–H, and C–O. XRD, SEM-EDX, and XPS analyses show that nanoscale Mg(OH)2 and MgO particles were presented on the surface of the Mg-MCMB samples, which could serve as the main adsorption mechanism as to precipitate phosphate from aqueous solutions. The sorption experiments indicate that Mg modification dramatically promotes MCMB’s phosphate removal ability and phosphate removal rates reach as high as 95%. Thus, modification of the spent LIBs anode could provide a novel direction of preparing wastewater adsorbent and develop an innovative way to achieve sustainable development.

  14. Zirconium-based metal organic frameworks: Highly selective adsorbents for removal of phosphate from water and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate is one of the most concerning compounds in wastewater streams and a main nutrient that causes eutrophication. To eliminate the phosphate pollution, Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are proposed in this study as adsorbents to remove phosphate from water. The zirconium-based MOF, UiO-66, was selected as representative MOF given its exceptional stability in water. To investigate the effect of an amine functional group, UiO-66-NH2 was also prepared using an amine-substituted ligand. The adsorption kinetics and isotherm reveal that UiO-66-NH2 exhibited higher adsorption capacities than UiO-66 possibly due to the amine group. However, the interaction between phosphate and zirconium sites of UiO MOFs might be the primary factor accounting for the phosphate adsorption to UiO MOFs. UiO MOFs also exhibited a high selectivity towards phosphate over other anions such as bromate, nitrite and nitrate. Furthermore, UiO MOFs were found to adsorb phosphate and to completely remove diluted phosphate in urine. We also found that UiO MOFs could be easily regenerated and re-used for phosphate adsorption. These findings suggest that UiO MOFs can be effective and selective adsorbents to remove phosphate from water as well as urine. - Highlights: • UiO-66 as the first type of MOFs was used to remove phosphate from water and urine. • The amine group in UiO MOFs was found to enhance the phosphate adsorption. • UiO-66 exhibited a high adsorption selectivity towards phosphate over other anions. • UiO-66 could be easily regenerated and re-used with 85% regeneration efficiency

  15. Zirconium-based metal organic frameworks: Highly selective adsorbents for removal of phosphate from water and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew, E-mail: linky@nchu.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shen-Yi [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Jochems, Andrew P. [New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources and New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Phosphate is one of the most concerning compounds in wastewater streams and a main nutrient that causes eutrophication. To eliminate the phosphate pollution, Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are proposed in this study as adsorbents to remove phosphate from water. The zirconium-based MOF, UiO-66, was selected as representative MOF given its exceptional stability in water. To investigate the effect of an amine functional group, UiO-66-NH2 was also prepared using an amine-substituted ligand. The adsorption kinetics and isotherm reveal that UiO-66-NH2 exhibited higher adsorption capacities than UiO-66 possibly due to the amine group. However, the interaction between phosphate and zirconium sites of UiO MOFs might be the primary factor accounting for the phosphate adsorption to UiO MOFs. UiO MOFs also exhibited a high selectivity towards phosphate over other anions such as bromate, nitrite and nitrate. Furthermore, UiO MOFs were found to adsorb phosphate and to completely remove diluted phosphate in urine. We also found that UiO MOFs could be easily regenerated and re-used for phosphate adsorption. These findings suggest that UiO MOFs can be effective and selective adsorbents to remove phosphate from water as well as urine. - Highlights: • UiO-66 as the first type of MOFs was used to remove phosphate from water and urine. • The amine group in UiO MOFs was found to enhance the phosphate adsorption. • UiO-66 exhibited a high adsorption selectivity towards phosphate over other anions. • UiO-66 could be easily regenerated and re-used with 85% regeneration efficiency.

  16. [The effect of oxygen on the (32)P-labelling of polyphosphates and organic phosphates in Ankistrodesmus braunii in the light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, W R

    1970-09-01

    Short time incorporation of (32)P was carried out with synchronised algae (young cells) depleted of phosphate. For the separation and determination of the acid-insoluble phosphate fractions of the cells an improved fractionation procedure was applied. In order to exclude competition by carbon dioxide all experiments were done in the absence of CO2.Compared with nitrogen, CO2-free air produces an increase in the labelling of phosphorylated compounds in the light. In strong white light, at high pH, air effects a remarkable increase of (32)P in the acid-insoluble phosphate (P u), mainly in inorganic polyphosphates (P ul), whereas the total phosphate uptake remains almost unchanged. The increase in labelling of acid-insoluble phosphate is, therefore, accompanied by a substantial decrease in the labelling of acid-soluble compounds (P l). In weak white light or in far-red light, at low pH even in strong white or red light, an increase of phosphate uptake and an increased labelling of the acid-stable organic acid-soluble fraction (P os) is observed instead. The effect of oxygen increases somewhat with increasing light intensity up to light saturation, and it increases markedly with increasing oxygen concentration.An essential contribution by oxidative phosphorylation to this oxygen effect can be ruled out on account of its much higher sensitivity to oxygen. Pseudocyclic photophosphorylation is also not regarded as the main force because of its higher oxygen affinity. Occurrence of photorespiration has not been clearly established so far in related algae (Chlorella), and its use for phosphorylation is unknown. A better, although not complete explanation is given by comparing the oxygen effect with the well-known inhibition of photosynthesis by oxygen (Warburg effect), which leads to an increase in glycolate formation and a simultaneous decrease in the pool sizes of carbon reduction cycle intermediates, even in the absence of CO2. Since the photophosphorylation process, as

  17. Soil Organic Carbon Storage in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xian-Li; SUN Bo; ZHOU Hui-Zhen; LI An-Bo

    2004-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage under different types of vegetations in China were estimated using measured data of 2 440 soil profiles to compare SOC density distribution between different estimates, to map the soil organic carbon stocks under different types of vegetation in China, and to analyze the relationships between soil organic carbon stocks and environmental variables using stepwise regression analyses. Soil organic carbon storage in China was estimated at 69.38 Gt (10 15 g). There was a big difference in SOC densities for various vegetation types, with SOC distribution closely related to climatic patterns in general. Stepwise regression analyses of SOC against environmental variables showed that SOC generally increased with increasing precipitation and elevation, while it decreased with increasing temperature.Furthermore, the important factor controlling SOC accumulation for forests was elevation, while for temperate steppes mean annual temperature dominated. The more specific the vegetation type used in the regression analysis, the greater was the effect of environmental variables on SOC. However, compared to native vegetation, cultivation activities in the croplands reduced the influence of environmental variables on SOC.

  18. Hemolysis effect and calcium-phosphate precipitation of heat-organic-film treated magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jia-cheng; QIAO Li-ying; LI Long-chuan; WANG Yong

    2006-01-01

    A heat-organic-films process was employed to induce calcium-phosphate apatites formation on magnesium, consequently the corrosion resistance and hemolysis properties of magnesium were improved for biomedical applications. Firstly, magnesium samples were heat-treated at 773 K for 10 h; secondly, stearic acid films were coated on the surface of the heat-treated magnesium.Then the surface modified magnesium was soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) to test its corrosion resistance. The results show that the heat treatment process allows magnesium to form a dense oxide layer with a thickness of around 20 μm, thereby the surface modified magnesium has higher corrosion resistance. After 24 h in SBF island apatite was deposited on magnesium. The unevenly precipitates were characterized by XRD and FTIR as the mixture of hydroxyapatite(HA) and octacalcium phosphate(OCP). The preliminary hemolysis experiment indicates that untreated magnesium has hemolytic effect (about 60%); whereas the heat-organic film treated samples has no hemolytic effect. The mechanism of fast nucleation and growth of calcium-phosphate apatites on surface modified magnesium in SBF was also discussed.

  19. Organic amendment addition enhances phosphate fertiliser uptake and wheat growth in an acid soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Centre, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia). Dept. of Primary Industries

    2008-07-01

    The effect of 2 organic amendments (lignite and compost) on wheat growth and phosphate fertiliser efficiency (triple superphosphate, TSP; di-ammonium phosphate, DAP) in an acid soil was investigated in a glasshouse experiment. Organic amendments were incorporated into the top 40 mm of soil at rates resulting in a 1% and 2.5% increase in soil C, and fertilisers were banded within the seed row at rates equivalent to 5, 10, and 25 kg P/ ha. When no P was applied, addition of both organic amendments increased shoot height, with greatest growth recorded in the compost-amended treatments. Addition of organic amendments and P fertiliser resulted in additive effects, with increased shoot height, tiller number, and shoot dry matter (DM) in both the lignite-and compost-amended soils with fertiliser addition. The addition of 1% C resulted in plant growth equal to that measured at a higher rate of addition (2.5% C), resulting in a higher relative efficiency of application. Tissue P uptake was significantly increased when soil amendment was combined with 25 kg P/ ha DAP addition. Significant differences in nutrient uptake were also measured for other important plant nutrients. As the addition of organic amendments resulted in increased DM compared with untreated soil per unit of P fertiliser applied, it is feasible that this growth response may translate into increased yield. However, further study is required to de. ne the agronomic and economic feasibility of broad-scale application of such amendments for production gains.

  20. The Quest for Organic Carbon on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrode, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We are entering an era of Mars exploration in which organic carbon detection, characterization, and structural identification will be key to addressing some of the outstanding science objectives of the Mars Exploration Program. Success of these missions will depend on technical, scientific, and strategic elements--all of which are strongly determined based on terrestrial experience and knowledge of organic matter formation, concentration, and preservation. Analog studies including Precambrian sediments, modern endolithic communities, and experiments help us fine-tune these approaches, but we also need to expect the unexpected. This presentation will provide perspective on the challenges of detecting organic carbon on Mars, how we may achieve such detections with the in situ instruments, such as the SAM (Science Analysis at Mars) instrument suite onboard Curiosity, the rover for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  1. Enhanced cathode performance of nano-sized lithium iron phosphate composite using polytetrafluoroethylene as carbon precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report a facile and efficient solid state synthesis of carbon coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4/C) cathode material achieved through the pyrolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The current investigation is comparatively analyzed with the results of the composites of LiFePO4/C (LFP/C) synthesized using polystyrene-block-polybutadiene (PS-b-PBD), polyethyhylene (PE) and sucrose as carbon precursors. The optimized LFP/CPTFE composite is synthesized at 700 °C using 10 wt.% PTFE. The composite exhibits remarkable improvement in capacity, cyclability and rate capability compared to those of LFP/C synthesized using (PS-b-PBD), PE and sucrose. The specific discharge capacities as high as 166 mA h g-1 (theoretical capacity: 170 mA h g-1) at 0.2 C and 114 mA h g-1 at 10 C rates were achieved with LFP/CPTFE. In addition, the composite exhibits a long-term cycling stability with the capacity loss of only 11.4% after 1000 cycles. PTFE shifts the size distribution of the composite to nanometer scale (approximately 120 nm), however the addition of sucrose and other polymers do not have such an effect. According to TEM and XPS analysis, LFP/CPTFE particles are mostly coated with a few nanometers thick carbon layer forming a core-shell structure. Residual carbon does not contain fluorine.

  2. Hydrocortisone and Vitamin D3 stimulation of 32Psub(i)-phosphate accumulation by organ-cultured chick embryo duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Either vitamin D3 (or 1 α,25-(OH)2-D3) or hydrocortisone (HC) stimulated phosphate accumulation by organ-cultured embryonic chick duodenum. In combination, these two steroids stimulated phosphate uptake synergistically. Phosphate accumulation appeared to be independent of other vitamin D3-stimulated processes: CaBP concentration, cAMP concentration, or alkaline phosphataseactivity. L-phenylalanine, a reported alkaline phosphate inhibitor, when added to the culture medium progressively inhibited either D3- or HC-stimulated phosphate uptake subsequent to culture, but did not inhibit the synergistic action under these conditions L-phenylalanine had no consistent effect on alkaline phosphotase activity but unexpectedly, greatly inhibited vitamin D3 - stimulated CaBP concentration, but only in the absence of HC. Some limited suggestion of an intestinal phosphoprotein sensitve to either vitamin D3 or HC was observed. (orig.)

  3. Coastal climate reflected in carbon-13/carbon-12 ratio of organic carbon in varved sediment from Santa Barbara basin

    OpenAIRE

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Tegner, Mia J.

    1991-01-01

    A 1844-1987 time-series of carbon stable isotope ratios from dated sedimentary total organic carbon from the center of the Santa Barbara basin is compared with historical climate and oceanographic records. Carbon derived from carbon-13-depleted phytoplankton and carbon-13-enriched kelp appear responsible for a large part of the isotopic variance in sedimentary total organic carbon. El Niño/Southern Oscillation events are recorded by the isotopic response of marine organic carbon in sediments.

  4. Calcium carbonate phosphate binding ion exchange filtration and accelerated denitrification improve public health standards and combat eutrophication in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Cultural eutrophication, the process by which a lake becomes rich in dissolved nutrients as a result of point and nonpoint pollutant sources, is a major cause of the loss of natural lake ecosystems throughout the world. The process occurs naturally in all lakes, but phosphate-rich nutrient runoff from sources such as storm drains and agricultural runoff is a major cause of excess phosphate-induced eutrophication. Especially in Madrona Marsh, one of the last remaining vernal marshes in the greater Los Angeles area, California, cultural eutrophication has become a major problem. In this study, calcium carbonate was found to be an excellent phosphate binder, reducing up to 70% of the phosphates in a given sample of water, and it posed relatively negligent ecological repercussions. This study involved the testing of this principle in both the laboratory and the real ecosystem. A calcium carbonate lacing procedure was first carried out to determine its efficacy in Madrona Marsh. Through this, ammonia was found to interfere with the solubility of calcium carbonate and therefore to be a hindrance to the reduction of phosphate. Therefore, various approaches for reduction of ammonia were tested, including aeration, use of fiber growth media, and plants, mainly Caulerpa verticellata, chosen for it hardiness, primarily in an attempt to increase population of Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas. All were successful in moderately reducing ammonia levels. In addition, soil sampling, sediment analysis, microscopic plant analysis, microorganism and macroinvertebrate identification, and rate law formulations were conducted. The effect of phosphate and ammonia reduction on the populations of enterobacteria was also an important focus of this experiment. Varying concentrations of phosphate, ammonia, and calcium carbonate in conjunction with phosphate were tested in Madrona Marsh to determine their effects on the populations of enteropathogens on nonspecific blood agar, MacConkey agar, and

  5. Mini Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (miniTOCA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyzers function by converting (oxidizing) all organic compounds (contaminants) in the water sample to carbon dioxide gas (CO2), then...

  6. Method for obtaining more precise measures of excreted organic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for concentrating and measuring excreted organic carbon by lyophilization and scintillation counting is efficient, improves measurable radioactivity, and increases precision for estimates of organic carbon excreted by phytoplankton and macrophytes

  7. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  8. Mechanochemical-hydrothermal synthesis of calcium phosphate powders with coupled magnesium and carbonate substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanek, Wojciech L.; Byrappa, Kullaiah; Shuk, Pavel; Riman, Richard E.; Janas, Victor F.; TenHuisen, Kevor S.

    2004-03-01

    Magnesium- and carbonate-substituted calcium phosphate powders (Mg-, CO 3-CaP) with various crystallinity levels were prepared at room temperature via a heterogeneous reaction between MgCO 3/Ca(OH) 2 powders and an (NH 4) 2HPO 4 solution using the mechanochemical-hydrothermal route. X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis were performed. It was determined that the powders containing both Mg 2+ and CO 32- ions were incorporated uniformly into an amorphous calcium phosphate phase while in contrast, the as-prepared powder free of these dopants was crystalline phase-pure, stoichiometric hydroxyapatite. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the average particle size of the room temperature Mg-, CO 3-CaP powders was in the range of 482 nm-700 nm with a specific surface area between 53 and 91 m 2/g. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the Mg-, CO 3-CaP powders consisted of agglomerates of equiaxed, ≈20-35 nm crystals.

  9. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  10. Stable Isotope Analyses of Phosphate Oxygen From Micro-samples of Biological Apatite: A new Routine Procedure for Silverphosphate Micro-precipitation and the Removal of Organic Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann-Bidlack, F. B.; Colman, A. S.; Fogel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses in bone and teeth of living and fossil animals are widely used for testing hypotheses about variability of diet and habitat. For the analysis of environmental or dietary changes in the past, tooth enamel has become the preferred study material, because its mineral content is higher than bone and dentine, and the relatively large size of the carbonato-apatite crystals of enamel make it more stable against post mortem diagenetic alteration than dentine or bone. Intra-tooth sampling of dental enamel is increasingly used for the investigation of seasonal climate variability, taking advantage of both the high correlation between an animal's drinking water and the δ 18O in its mineralized tissues and the incremental growth pattern of tooth enamel. The different oxygen-containing ions of bioapatite (phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl group) incorporate into the mineral lattice at different rates during enamel mineralization, and differ in their susceptibility against post mortem diagenetic alteration. In addition, it is difficult to account for the different reaction chemistries of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl group using isotope analysis techniques that include all oxygen contained in the enamel (e.g., laser ablation). These problems can be addressed analyzing phosphate oxygen only. However, two major factors limit the potential of δ 18O analyses in dental enamel: A) the starting sample size for isotope analyzes often precludes the use of small teeth or the intra-tooth sampling of a given tooth; B) Small amounts of biogenic organic material in tooth enamel (less than 1% by wt) can reduce the precision and lead to anomalous analytical results in δ 18O measurements on Ag3PO4 produced from tooth enamel. A new procedure was developed for the pre-treatment and δ 18O analysis of phosphate from small samples (500 μ g) of tooth enamel containing organic matter. Ag3PO{4} was precipitated quantitatively for analysis of δ 18Ophosphate using a

  11. Gas chromatographic determination of Di-n-butyl phosphate in radioactive lean organic solvent of FBTR carbide fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work Di-n- butyl phosphate (DBP) a degraded product of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) formed by acid hydrolysis and radiolysis in the PUREX process was analyzed. Lean organic streams of different fuel burn-up FBTR carbide fuel reprocessing solution was determined by standard Gas Chromatographic technique. The method involves the conversion of non-volatile Di-n-butyl phosphate into volatile and stable derivatives by the action of diazomethane and then determined by Gas Chromatograph (GC). A calibration graph was made for DBP concentration range of 200-2000 ppm with correlation coefficient of 0.99587 and RSD 1.2 %. (author)

  12. Unusual carbon partitioning during phosphate deficiency in celery, a mannitol-synthesizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannitol and sucrose are the main photosynthetic products and translocated carbon compounds in celery (Apium graveolens L.). Carbon partitioning was studied in greenhouse-grown celery plants supplied with a nutrient solution containing or lacking phosphate (P). P-deficient plants developed new leaves at about the same rate as control plants, but showed greatly reduced growth of leaves and petioles; root growth was apparently unaffected. P-deficient leaves contained less mannitol and more sucrose than control leaves. Starch content increased with P-deficiency only in mature (the most photosynthetically-active) leaves, and then amounted to less than 10 mg/g fresh weight. Similarly, when 14CO2 was supplied to intact plants, P-deficient leaves contained less label in mannitol and more in sucrose than did control leaves; labeling of starch changed little. The P-status of celery leaves apparently affects the partitioning of carbon between mannitol and sucrose more than it affects starch accumulation. This is in marked contrast to the large increase in starch content commonly observed during P-deficiency in species that produce and translocate predominantly sucrose

  13. Black Carbon Contribution to Organic Carbon Stocks in Urban Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Potter, Jonathan; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Manning, David A C; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2015-07-21

    Soil holds 75% of the total organic carbon (TOC) stock in terrestrial ecosystems. This comprises ecosystem-derived organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC), a recalcitrant product of the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. Urban topsoils are often enriched in BC from historical emissions of soot and have high TOC concentrations, but the contribution of BC to TOC throughout the urban soil profile, at a regional scale is unknown. We sampled 55 urban soil profiles across the North East of England, a region with a history of coal burning and heavy industry. Through combined elemental and thermogravimetic analyses, we found very large total soil OC stocks (31-65 kg m(-2) to 1 m), exceeding typical values reported for UK woodland soils. BC contributed 28-39% of the TOC stocks, up to 23 kg C m(-2) to 1 m, and was affected by soil texture. The proportional contribution of the BC-rich fraction to TOC increased with soil depth, and was enriched in topsoil under trees when compared to grassland. Our findings establish the importance of urban ecosystems in storing large amounts of OC in soils and that these soils also capture a large proportion of BC particulates emitted within urban areas. PMID:26114917

  14. Precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate under diffusion controlled mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsigabu Gebrehiwet; James R. Henriksen; Luanjing Guo; Don T. Fox; Hai Huang; Lee Tu; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith; George Redden

    2014-07-01

    Multi-component mineral precipitation in porous, subsurface environments is challenging to simulate or engineer when in situ reactant mixing is controlled by diffusion. In contrast to well-mixed systems, the conditions that favor mineral precipitation in porous media are distributed along chemical gradients, which evolve spatially due to concurrent mineral precipitation and modification of solute transport in the media. The resulting physical and chemical characteristics of a mixing/precipitation zone are a consequence of coupling between transport and chemical processes, and the distinctive properties of individual chemical systems. We examined the spatial distribution of precipitates formed in “double diffusion” columns for two chemical systems, calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. Polyacrylamide hydrogel was used as a low permeability, high porosity medium to maximize diffusive mixing and minimize pressure- and density-driven flow between reactant solutions. In the calcium phosphate system, multiple, visually dense and narrow bands of precipitates were observed that were reminiscent of previously reported Liesegang patterns. In the calcium carbonate system, wider precipitation zones characterized by more sparse distributions of precipitates and a more open channel structure were observed. In both cases, formation of precipitates inhibited, but did not necessarily eliminate, continued transport and mixing of the reactants. A reactive transport model with fully implicit coupling between diffusion, chemical speciation and precipitation kinetics, but where explicit details of nucleation processes were neglected, was able to qualitatively simulate properties of the precipitation zones. The results help to illustrate how changes in the physical properties of a precipitation zone depend on coupling between diffusion-controlled reactant mixing and chemistry-specific details of precipitation kinetics.

  15. Urban tree effects on soil organic carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill L Edmondson

    Full Text Available Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered.

  16. Urban tree effects on soil organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Jill L; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Inger, Richard; Potter, Jonathan; McHugh, Nicola; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Urban trees sequester carbon into biomass and provide many ecosystem service benefits aboveground leading to worldwide tree planting schemes. Since soils hold ∼75% of ecosystem organic carbon, understanding the effect of urban trees on soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil properties that underpin belowground ecosystem services is vital. We use an observational study to investigate effects of three important tree genera and mixed-species woodlands on soil properties (to 1 m depth) compared to adjacent urban grasslands. Aboveground biomass and belowground ecosystem service provision by urban trees are found not to be directly coupled. Indeed, SOC enhancement relative to urban grasslands is genus-specific being highest under Fraxinus excelsior and Acer spp., but similar to grasslands under Quercus robur and mixed woodland. Tree cover type does not influence soil bulk density or C∶N ratio, properties which indicate the ability of soils to provide regulating ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and flood mitigation. The trends observed in this study suggest that genus selection is important to maximise long-term SOC storage under urban trees, but emerging threats from genus-specific pathogens must also be considered. PMID:25003872

  17. Calculating Organic Carbon Stock from Forest Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Constantin DINCĂ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The organic carbon stock (SOC (t/ha was calculated in different approaches in order to enhance the differences among methods and their utility regarding specific studies. Using data obtained in Romania (2000-2012 from 4,500 profiles and 9,523 soil horizons, the organic carbon stock was calculated for the main forest soils (18 types using three different methods: 1 on pedogenetical horizons, by soil bulk density and depth class/horizon thickness; 2 by soil type and standard depths; 3 using regression equations between the quantity of organic C and harvesting depths. Even though the same data were used, the differences between the values of C stock obtained from the three methods were relatively high. The first method led to an overvaluation of the C stock. The differences between methods 1 and 2 were high (and reached 33% for andosol, while the differences between methods 2 and 3 were smaller (a maximum of 23% for rendzic leptosol. The differences between methods 2 and 3 were significantly lower especially for andosol, arenosol and vertisol. A thorough analysis of all three methods concluded that the best method to evaluate the organic C stock was to distribute the obtained values on the following standard depths: 0 - 10 cm; 10 - 20 cm; 20 - 40 cm; > 40 cm. For each soil type, a correlation between the quantity of organic C and the sample harvesting depth was also established. These correlations were significant for all types of soil; however, lower correlation coefficients were registered for rendzic leptosol, haplic podzol and fluvisol.

  18. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XIX. The Identification of Sucrose Phosphate in Sugar Beet Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, J. G.

    1952-09-01

    The recognition and characterization of a sucrose phosphate as an intermediate in sucrose by synthesis by green plants is described. A tentative structure for this phosphate is proposed and its mode of formation suggested.

  19. Modelling of organic carbon forms in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model (MOMOS) describing the evolution of different carbon pools in soils (plant debris, microbial biomass, labile and stable humidified fractions) is presented. MOMOS was built from experimental long term incubation data (C and -1-4C of labelled mature wheat straw). The formulation of the model is simple and was tested with 2, 3 and 5 compartments. The predictions are in agreement with the data. It simulates the organic matter concentration in two contrasting soils. (authors). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Effect of pH and phosphate on calcium carbonate polymorphs precipitated at near-freezing temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Nehrke, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pH and phosphate on the precipitation of calcium carbonate polymorphs from aqueous solution were investigated. Experiments were carried out at near-freezing temperature and two different pH conditions (pH 13.4 and 9.0). At each pH condition, solutions having different concentrations of CaCl2 and NaHCO3 were mixed to achieve Ca/CO3 ratios of 1:1 and 10:1 at different pumping rates with and without phosphate. Results showed that, at pH 13.4, only ikaite wa...

  1. myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase is required for polar auxin transport and organ development

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2010-06-01

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase is a conserved enzyme that catalyzes the first committed and rate-limiting step in inositol biosynthesis. Despite its wide occurrence in all eukaryotes, the role of myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase and de novo inositol biosynthesis in cell signaling and organism development has been unclear. In this study, we isolated loss-of-function mutants in the Arabidopsis MIPS1 gene from different ecotypes. It was found that all mips1 mutants are defective in embryogenesis, cotyledon venation patterning, root growth, and root cap development. The mutant roots are also agravitropic and have reduced basipetal auxin transport. mips1 mutants have significantly reduced levels of major phosphatidylinositols and exhibit much slower rates of endocytosis. Treatment with brefeldin A induces slower PIN2 protein aggregation in mips1, indicating altered PIN2 trafficking. Our results demonstrate that MIPS1 is critical for maintaining phosphatidylinositol levels and affects pattern formation in plants likely through regulation of auxin distribution. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Stocks of organic carbon in Estonian soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kõlli, Raimo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The soil organic carbon (SOC stocks (Mg ha–1 ofautomorphic mineral (9 soil groups, hydromorphic mineral (7, and lowland organic soils (4 are given for the soil cover or solum layer as a whole and also for its epipedon (topsoil layer. The SOC stocks for forest, arable lands, and grasslands and for the entire Estonian soil cover were calculated on the basis of the mean SOC stock and distribution area of the respective soil type. In the Estonian soil cover (42 400 km2, a total of 593.8 ± 36.9 Tg of SOC is retained, with 64.9% (385.3 ± 27.5 Tg in the epipedon layer (O, H, and A horizons and 35.1% in the subsoil (B and E horizons. The pedo-ecological regularities of SOC retention in soils are analysed against the background of the Estonian soil ordination net.

  3. Characterisation of Phosphate Accumulating Organisms and Techniques for Polyphosphate Detection: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Cédric Tarayre; Huu-Thanh Nguyen; Alison Brognaux; Anissa Delepierre; Lies De Clercq; Raphaëlle Charlier; Evi Michels; Erik Meers; Frank Delvigne

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate minerals have long been used for the production of phosphorus-based chemicals used in many economic sectors. However, these resources are not renewable and the natural phosphate stocks are decreasing. In this context, the research of new phosphate sources has become necessary. Many types of wastes contain non-negligible phosphate concentrations, such as wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, phosphorus is eliminated by physicochemical and/or biological techniques. In this latte...

  4. Characterisation of Phosphate Accumulating Organisms and Techniques for Polyphosphate Detection: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tarayre, Cédric; Nguyen, Huu-Thanh; Brognaux, Alison; Delepierre, Anissa; De Clercq, Lies; Charlier, Raphaëlle; Michels, Evi; Meers, Erik; Delvigne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate minerals have long been used for the production of phosphorus-based chemicals used in many economic sectors. However, these resources are not renewable and the natural phosphate stocks are decreasing. In this context, the research of new phosphate sources has become necessary. Many types of wastes contain non-negligible phosphate concentrations, such as wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, phosphorus is eliminated by physicochemical and/or biological techniques...

  5. OCoc- from Ocean Colour to Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, B.; Overduin, P. P.; Schirrmeister, L.; Lantuit, H.; Doerffer, R.

    2009-12-01

    Enhanced permafrost warming and increased arctic river discharges have heightened concern about the input of terrigenous matter into Arctic coastal waters. The ‘OCoc-from Ocean Colour to Organic Carbon’ project (IPY-project 1176), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), is an Ocean Colour study joined with the Arctic Coastal Dynamics ACD network and Arctic Circum-polar Coastal Observatory Network ACCO-Net (IPY-project 90). OCoc uses Ocean Colour satellite data for synoptical monitoring of organic matter fluxes from fluvial and coastal sources. Initial results from German-Russian expeditions at the southeastern Laptev Sea Coast (Arctic Siberia, Russia) in August 2008 and August 2009 are presented. Large parts of this coastal zone are characterized by highly erosive organic-rich material. Ocean Colour MERIS Reduced Resolution (RR)-LIB data of the have been processed towards optical aquatic parameters using Beam-Visat4.2 and the MERIS case2 regional processor for coastal application (C2R). Calculated aquatic parameters are absorption and backscattering coefficients, apparent optical properties such as the first attenuation depth (‘Z90’) and calculated concentrations of chlorophyll, total suspended matter and coloured dissolved organic matter absorption from the water leaving reflectances. Initial comparisons with expedition data (Secchi depths, cDOM) show that the MERIS-C2R optical parameters ’total absorption’ and the first attenuation depth, ’Z90’, seem adequately to represent true conditions. High attenuation values in the spectral blue wavelength range may serve as tracer for the organic-rich terrigenous input. The synoptic information of Ocean Colour products will provide valuable spatial and dynamical information on the Organic Carbon and sediment fluxes from the Siberian permafrost coast.

  6. Fate of Organic Micropollutants during Hydrothermal Carbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, B.; Baskyr, I.; Pörschmann, J.; Kopinke, F.-D.

    2012-04-01

    The hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is an exothermic process, in which biomass in an aqueous suspension is transformed into a bituminous coal-like material (hydrochar) at temperatures between 180-250°C and under moderate pressure. With these process conditions, little gas is generated (1-5%), and a fraction of the organic carbon is dissolved in the aqueous phase (10-30%) but the largest part is obtained as solid char. The respective yields and the molecular composition depend on the choice of educts and the process conditions, such as temperature, pH-value, and reaction time. Various biomass-educts have recently been studied, such as waste materials from agriculture, brewer's spent grains, sewage sludge, as well as wood and paper materials. Besides their use for energy generation, the hydrochars have also been investigated as soil amendments. Prior to addition of the chars to soil, these should be free of toxic components that could be released into the environment as harmful organic pollutants. Herein, the potential for the degradation of trace organic pollutants, such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals, under typical HTC conditions will be presented. The degradation of selected organic pollutants with different polarity and hydrophobicity was investigated. Scope and limitations of the degradation potential of the HTC are discussed on examples of micro pollutants such as hormones, residues of pharmaceuticals and personal care products including their metabolites, and pesticides. We will show that the target analytes are partially and in some cases completely degraded. The degree of degradation depends on the HTC process conditions such as reaction temperature and time, the solution pH value, the presence of catalysts or additional reagents. The biotic and abiotic degradation of chlorinated organic compounds, in particular chlorinated aromatics, has been a well-known environmental problem and remains a challenging issue for the development of a HTC process for

  7. Isolation and characterization of biogenic calcium carbonate/phosphate from oral bacteria and their adhesion studies on YSZ-coated titanium substrate for dental implant application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GOBI SARAVANAN KALIARAJ; KAMALAN KIRUBAHARAN; G PRADHABAN; P KUPPUSAMI; VINITA VISHWAKARMA

    2016-04-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate/phosphate were isolated and characterized from oral bacteria (CPOB). The crystalline nature and morphology of calcium carbonate/phosphate were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD)and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), respectively. XRD analysis revealed the cubic phase of YSZ coating as well as biogenic calcium carbonate (rhombohedral) and calcium phosphate oxide (hexagonal) wasobserved from CPOB. FESEM confirmed the extracellular synthesis of calcium compounds. Bacterial adhesion result reveals that YSZ coating drastically reduce bacterial invasion than titanium substrate.

  8. Soil Chemical Properties and Nutrient Uptake of Cocoa as Affected by Application of Different Organic Matters and Phosphate Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyanto Sugiyanto

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Effort repair of land quality better be done by simultan namely with application of organic matters and inorganic fertilization. The objective of this research is to study the effect of varied organic matters source and phosphate fertilizers on the chemicals soil characteristic and cocoa nutrient uptake. The experiment was laid experimentally in split-plot design and environmentally in randomized complete block design. The main plot was source of P consisted of, control, SP 36 and rock phosphate in dosage of 200 mg P2O5 per kg of air dry soil. Source of organic matter as sub-plot consisted of control (no organic matter, cow dung, cocoa pod husk compost and sugar cane filter cake, each in dosage of 2.5 and 5.0%. Result of this experiment showed application of cow dung, cocoa pod husk compost and sugar cane filter cake increased content of C, N, Ca exchangeable, Fe available, and pH in soil, and SP 36 increased availability of P in soil. Application of sugar cane filter cake increased N, K, Ca, Mg, and SO4 uptake but did not increase Cl uptake, application of cow dung in dosage 5% increased N, K, and Cl uptake and cocoa pod husk compost dosage 5% increased N and K uptake of cocoa. SP 36 increased Mg uptake of cocoa but rock phosphate did not increase it. They were not interaction between organic matters and phosphate fertilizers to nutrient uptake of cocoa. Nutrient soil content as affected by organic matters correlated with nutrient uptake of cocoa.Key words : soil chemical properties, nutrient uptake, cocoa, organic matter, phosphate fertlizers.

  9. Selective stabilization of aliphatic organic carbon by iron oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Dinesh; Yang, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Stabilization of organic matter in soil is important for natural ecosystem to sequestrate carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emission. It is largely unknown what factors govern the preservation of organic carbon in soil, casting shadow on predicting the response of soil to climate change. Iron oxide was suggested as an important mineral preserving soil organic carbon. However, ferric minerals are subject to reduction, potentially releasing iron and decreasing the stability of iron-bound organic carbon. Information about the stability of iron-bound organic carbon in the redox reaction is limited. Herein, we investigated the sorptive interactions of organic matter with hematite and reductive release of hematite-bound organic matter. Impacts of organic matter composition and conformation on its sorption by hematite and release during the reduction reaction were analyzed. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic carbon was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic carbon. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil organic matter was stabilized by association with iron oxide. Selective stabilization of aliphatic over aromatic carbon can greatly contribute to the widely observed accumulation of aliphatic carbon in soil, which cannot be explained by sorptive interactions between minerals and organic matter.

  10. Extraction of lanthanides from acidic solution using tributyl phosphate modified supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using supercritical carbon dioxide as a substitute extraction solvent in nuclear reprocessing was tested by the extraction of lanthanide ions from acidic solution. Lanthanides were extracted from 6 M HNO3-3 M LiNO3 solutions using tributyl phosphate- (TBP-) modified CO2. Synergistic effects were also investigated using a combination of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) and TBP-modified CO2 as the extractant. It was found that near-quantitative extraction of Sm3+, Eu3+, Gd3+, and Dy3+ was achieved while the extraction efficiencies for La3+, Ce3+, Yb3+, and Lu3+ were much lower. The light lanthanides extracted as Ln(NO3)3·3TBP and the heavy lanthanides extracted as Ln(NO3)3·2TBP when TBP-modified CO2 was used as the extractant, while Ln(TTA)3· 3TBP and Ln(TTA)3·2TBP adducts were extracted when TTA was added to TBP-modified CO2. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. Chemical stability of hydroxysulphate green rust synthetised in the presence of foreign anions: carbonate, phosphate and silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby, C., E-mail: ruby@lcpme.cnrs-nancy.fr; Gehin, A.; Aissa, R.; Ghanbaja, J.; Abdelmoula, M.; Genin, J.-M. R. [UMR 7564 CNRS-Universite Henri Poincare-Nancy 1, Equipe Microbiologie et Physique and Departement Materiaux et Structures, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement (France)

    2006-01-15

    Hydroxysulphate green rust {l_brace}GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}){r_brace} species were precipitated in the presence of various anions. GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) is stable at {approx}pH 7 and is transformed into a mixture of magnetite and ferrous hydroxide when the pH raised at {approx}12. In the presence of carbonate species, GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) is partially transformed into a mixture of magnetite and siderite at {approx}pH 8.5. This transformation is stopped when silicate anions are present in the solution. As already observed for phosphate anions, the adsorption of silicate anions on the lateral faces of the GR(SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) crystals may explain this stabilization effect. Sulphate anions are easily exchanged by carbonate species at {approx}pH 10.5. In contrast, anionic exchange between sulphate and phosphate anions was not observed.

  12. Organic acids inhibit the formation of pyromorphite and Zn-phosphate in phosphorous amended Pb- and Zn-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debela, F; Arocena, J M; Thring, R W; Whitcombe, T

    2013-02-15

    Pyromorphite (PY) and some zinc phosphates (Zn-P) are very sparingly soluble minerals and hence can immobilize Pb and Zn in contaminated soils. However, mechanisms leading to the poor efficiency of PY and Zn-P formation in contaminated soils amended with P still remain unclear. We studied the influence of two low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) - oxalic acid and citric acid and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) - in PY and Zn-P formation in a P-amended contaminated soil. Despite the high levels of metals (∼4% Pb and 21% Zn) in the study soil, the addition of up to 1% inorganic P transformed only up to 37% and 17% of the total Pb and Zn to PY and Zn-P, respectively. Semi-quantitative estimates from a linear combination fitting of X-ray absorption near edge spectra (LC-XANES fitting) showed that the formation of PY decreased from 37% to 3% of the total Pb in the presence of oxalic acid and the addition of 1% P. The reduced PY formation may be associated with the increase in organic-bound Pb from 9% to 54% and decrease in carbonate associated Pb from 42% to 12% with oxalic acid addition as indicated by a chemical sequential extraction (SE) technique. Citric acid seemed to have a less adverse effect in PY formation than oxalic acid. Our data also suggests both oxalic and citric acids have less adverse effects on the efficiency of Zn-P formation. From this study we conclude that the abundance of LMWOA in soil environments can be one factor contributing to the poor efficiency of P amendments practices to effectively immobilize Pb and Zn in metal contaminated soils. PMID:23313859

  13. Could organic phosphorus compounds contaminate the analysis of phosphate oxygen isotopes in freshwater matrices?

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Ceri; Surridge, Ben; Gooddy, Daren C.

    2014-01-01

    Variation in the stable isotope composition of oxygen within dissolved phosphate (δ18Op) represents a novel and potentially powerful environmental tracer, providing insights into the sources of phosphorus and the extent to which phosphorus from different sources is metabolised. The analysis of δ18Op within freshwater matrices requires isolation of the phosphate ion from possible sources of contaminant oxygen within the bulk matrix, prior to pyrolysis (usually of a silver phosphate precipitate...

  14. Organic farmers grow grassclover in nature areas to remove soil phosphate for development of specious rich grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Timmermans, B.G.H.; Eekeren, N. van

    2014-01-01

    While worldwide the current reserves of phosphate rock are being exhausted, many agricultural and former agricultural soils in The Netherlands have been enriched by large quantities of phosphorus as a result of fertilization. In current nature development projects on former agricultural lands, it is thought that this phosphorus prevents development of target-nature types. Therefore nature organizations currently seek ways to remove it. We tested grassclover, organically managed by local farme...

  15. Effect of Azolla Based - Organic Fertilizer, Rock Phosphate and Rice Hull Ash on Rice Yield and Chemical Properties of Alfisols

    OpenAIRE

    Sudadi; Sumarno; Wiki Handi

    2014-01-01

    The application of chemical fertilizer for long time may adverse soil environment. Organic agriculture, for example combination use of azolla based-organic fertilizer, phosphate rock and rice hull ash, was one of ways that able to recover it. Research was conducted in Sukosari, Jumantono, Karanganyar while soi chemical properties analysis was analysed in Soil Chemistry and Fertility Laboratory, Fac. of Agriculture, Sebelas Maret University April to November 2013. Research design used was R...

  16. Soil Chemical Properties and Nutrient Uptake of Cocoa as Affected by Application of Different Organic Matters and Phosphate Fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyanto Sugiyanto; John Bako Baon; Ketut Anom Wijaya

    2008-01-01

    Effort repair of land quality better be done by simultan namely with application of organic matters and inorganic fertilization. The objective of this research is to study the effect of varied organic matters source and phosphate fertilizers on the chemicals soil characteristic and cocoa nutrient uptake. The experiment was laid experimentally in split-plot design and environmentally in randomized complete block design. The main plot was source of P consisted of, control, SP 36 and rock phosph...

  17. Volatile organic compound emissions in relation to plant carbon fixation and the terrestrial carbon budget

    OpenAIRE

    Kesselmeier, J.; P. Ciccioli; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Biesenthal, T.; Rottenberger, S.; Wolf, A.; Vitullo, M.; R. Valentini; Nobre, A.; Kabat, P.; Andreae, M.O.

    2002-01-01

    A substantial amount of carbon is emitted by terrestrial vegetation as biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC), which contributes to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, to particle production and to the carbon cycle. With regard to the carbon budget of the terrestrial biosphere, a release of these carbon compounds is regarded as a loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The significance of this loss for the regional and global carbon cycles is controversial. We estimate the amount of...

  18. Effect of Azolla Based - Organic Fertilizer, Rock Phosphate and Rice Hull Ash on Rice Yield and Chemical Properties of Alfisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The application of chemical fertilizer for long time may adverse soil environment. Organic agriculture, for example combination use of azolla based-organic fertilizer, phosphate rock and rice hull ash, was one of ways that able to recover it. Research was conducted in Sukosari, Jumantono, Karanganyar while soi chemical properties analysis was analysed in Soil Chemistry and Fertility Laboratory, Fac. of Agriculture, Sebelas Maret University April to November 2013. Research design used was RAKL with 5 treatments, each repeated 5 times. The treatments applied were P0 (control, P1 ( azola inoculum dosage 250 g/m2 + phosphate rock + rice hull ash equal to 150 kg/ha KCl, P2 (azola inoculum dosage 500 g/m2 + phosphate rock equal to 150kg/ha, SP-36 + rice hull ash equal to 100 kg/ha KCl, P3 (manure dosage of 5 ton/ha,P4 (Urea 250 kg/ha + SP-36 150 kg/ha + KCl 100 kg/ha. Data analysed statistically by F test (Fisher test with level of confident 95% followed by DMRT (Duncan Multiple Range Test if any significant differences. The result showed that the treatment combination of azolla, phosphate rock and rice hull ash increase soil organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, available-P and exchangeable-K as well as rice yield ( (at harvest-dry grain weight and milled-dry grain weight.

  19. Impact of salinity on the anaerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Hooijmans, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2014-09-01

    The use of saline water as secondary quality water in urban environments for sanitation is a promising alternative towards mitigating fresh water scarcity. However, this alternative will increase the salinity in the wastewater generated that may affect the biological wastewater treatment processes, such as biological phosphorus removal. In addition to the production of saline wastewater by the direct use of saline water in urban environments, saline wastewater is also generated by some industries. Intrusion of saline water into the sewers is another source of salinity entering the wastewater treatment plant. In this study, the short-term effects of salinity on the anaerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) and glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO) were investigated to assess the impact of salinity on enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Hereto, PAO and GAO cultures enriched at a relatively low salinity level (0.02 % W/V) were exposed to salinity concentrations of up to 6 % (as NaCl) in anaerobic batch tests. It was demonstrated that both PAO and GAO are affected by higher salinity levels, with PAO being the more sensitive organisms to the increasing salinity. The maximum acetate uptake rate of PAO decreased by 71 % when the salinity increased from 0 to 1 %, while that of GAO decreased by 41 % for the same salinity increase. Regarding the stoichiometry of PAO, a decrease in the P-release/HAc uptake ratio accompanied with an increase in the glycogen consumption/HAc uptake ratio was observed for PAO when the salinity increased from 0 to 2 % salinity, indicating a metabolic shift from a poly-P-dependent to a glycogen-dependent metabolism. The anaerobic maintenance requirements of PAO and GAO increased as the salinity concentrations risen up to 4 % salinity. PMID:24831025

  20. Carbon accumulation in arid croplands of northwest China: pedogenic carbonate exceeding organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujun; Wang, Jiaping; Xu, Minggang; Zhang, Wenju; Fan, Tinglu; Zhang, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Soil carbonate (SIC) exceeds organic carbon (SOC) greatly in arid lands, thus may be important for carbon sequestration. However, field data for quantifying carbonate accumulation have been lacking. This study aims to improve our understanding of SIC dynamics and its role in carbon sequestration. We analyzed two datasets of SOC and SIC and their 13C compositions , one with over 100 soil samples collected recently from various land uses in the Yanqi Basin, Xinjiang, and the other with 18 archived soil samples from a long-term experiment (LTE) in Pingliang, Gansu. The data from the Yanqi Basin showed that SOC had a significant relationship with SIC and pedogenic carbonate (PIC); converting shrub land to cropland increased PIC stock by 5.2 kg C m-2, which was 3.6 times of that in SOC stock. The data from the LTE showed greater accumulation of PIC (21-49 g C m-2 year-1) than SOC (10-39 g C m-2 year-1) over 0-20 cm. Our study points out that intensive cropping in the arid and semi-arid regions leads to an increase in both SOC and PIC. Increasing SOC through straw organic amendments enhances PIC accumulation in the arid cropland of northwestern China.

  1. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  2. Isotopic fractionation between organic carbon and carbonate carbon in Precambrian banded ironstone series from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    37 delta13Csub(org) and 9 delta13Csub(carb) values furnished by argillaceous and carbonate sediments from the Rio das Velhas and Minas Series (Minas Gerais, Brazil) have yielded means of -24.3 +- 3.9 promille [PDB] and -0.9 +- 1.4 promille [PDB], respectively. These results, obtained from a major sedimentary banded ironstone province with an age between 2 and 3 x 109 yr, support previous assumptions that isotopic fractionation between inorganic and organic carbon in Precambrian sediments is about the same as in Phanerozoic rocks. This is consistent with a theoretically expected constancy of the kinetic fractionation factor governing biological carbon fixation and, likewise, with a photosynthetic pedigree of the reduced carbon fraction of Precambrian rocks. (orig.)

  3. Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon Angela L. Straathof June 17, 2015, Wageningen UR ISBN 978-94-6257-327-7 Abstract Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of C compounds which, as

  4. Latitudinal gradients in degradation of marine dissolved organic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew; Ziervogel, Kai;

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrophic microbial communities cycle nearly half of net primary productivity in the ocean, and play a particularly important role in transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The specific means by which these communities mediate the transformations of organic carbon are largely unkn...

  5. Organic carbon dynamics in mangrove ecosystems: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristensen, E.; Bouillon, S.; Dittmar, T.; Marchand, C.

    2008-01-01

    Our current knowledge on production, composition, transport, pathways and transformations of organic carbon in tropical mangrove environments is reviewed and discussed. Organic carbon entering mangrove foodwebs is either produced autochthonously or imported by tides and/or rivers. Mangrove litter an

  6. Sulfurised carbohydrates: An important sedimentary sink for organic carbon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kok, M.D.; Koster, J.; Schouten, S.

    1998-01-01

    In contrast to the general belief that carbohydrate carbon (CCHO) is preferentially degraded and is not extensively preserved in the sedimentary record, it is shown here that CCHO forms a large fraction of the organic matter (OM) of the total organic carbon (TOC)-rich upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay

  7. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J; Olgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms. Supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate was not required during calcium ketoglutarate treatment, while two patients needed this supplement when treated with calcium carbonate. Five of 17 (29%) patients were withdrawn from calcium ketoglutarate therapy within 1 to 2 weeks due to intolerance (anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the study. Calculations based on median doses after 12 weeks showed that the cost of the therapy in Denmark was 10 times higher for calcium ketoglutarate compared with calcium

  8. Ratiometric Fluorescent Detection of Phosphate in Aqueous Solution Based on Near Infrared Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters/Metal-Organic Shell Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cong; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2015-11-17

    Synthesis of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent AgNCs with high quantum yield and stability is challenging but important for sensing and bioimaging application. Here, we report the fabrication of AgNCs/metal-organic shell composite via the deposition of metal-organic (zinc-nitrogen) coordination shell around AgNCs for ratiometric detection of phosphate. The composite exhibits NIR emission at 720 nm with 30 nm red-shift in comparison to bare AgNCs and a weak emission at 510 nm from the shell. The absolute quantum yield of NIR fluorescence of the composite is 15%, owing to FRET from the shell to the AgNCs core under the excitation at 430 nm. Besides, the composite is stable due to the protection of the shell. On the basis of the composite, a novel ratiometric fluorescence probe for the detection of phosphate in aqueous solution with good sensitivity and selectivity was developed. The limit of detection (3s) is 0.06 μM, and the relative standard deviation for 10 replicate detections of 10 μM phosphate was 0.6%. The recoveries of spiked phosphate in water, human urine, and serum samples ranged from 94.1% to 103.4%. PMID:26489902

  9. Organic carbon dynamics in mangrove ecosystems: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, E.; BOUILLON, S; Dittmar, T.; Marchand, C

    2008-01-01

    Our current knowledge on production, composition, transport, pathways and transformations of organic carbon in tropical mangrove environments is reviewed and discussed. Organic carbon entering mangrove foodwebs is either produced autochthonously or imported by tides and/or rivers. Mangrove litter and benthic microalgae are usually the most important autochthonous carbon sources. Depending on local conditions, phytoplankton and seagrass detritus imported with tides may represent a significant ...

  10. An experimental study on the effects of nutrient enrichment on organic carbon persistence in the western Pacific oligotrophic gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Jiao, N.; Tang, K.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon sequestration in the ocean is of great concern with respect to the mitigation of global warming. How to hold the fixed organic carbon in the presence of tremendous numbers of heterotrophic microorganisms in marine environments is the central issue. We previously hypothesized that excessive nutrients would ultimately decrease the storage of organic carbon in marine environments. To test this, a series of in situ nutrient enrichment incubation experiments were conducted at a site (17.59° N, 127.00° E) within the western Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Five treatments were employed: glucose (Glu), algal exudation organic material (EOM), nitrate (N) and phosphate (P), N and P in combination with glucose and a control with no added nutrients. The results showed that the dissolved organic carbon consumption rates and bacterial community specific growth rates were enhanced by inorganic nutrient enrichment treatments during the initial 48 h incubation. At the end of 14 days of incubation, about one-third (average 3.3 μmol C kg-1) more organic carbon was respired in the glucose-enriched incubation with the addition of inorganic nutrients compared to that without. In contrast, when nutrients were limiting, glucose could not be efficiently used by the bacteria and thus it remained in the environment. These results suggest that repletion of inorganic nutrients could facilitate microbial consumption of organic carbon and thus has a significant impact on carbon cycling in the environment.

  11. Net carbon flux in organic and conventional olive production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeid Mohamad, Ramez; Verrastro, Vincenzo; Bitar, Lina Al; Roma, Rocco; Moretti, Michele; Chami, Ziad Al

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural systems are considered as one of the most relevant sources of atmospheric carbon. However, agriculture has the potentiality to mitigate carbon dioxide mainly through soil carbon sequestration. Some agricultural practices, particularly fertilization and soil management, can play a dual role in the agricultural systems regarding the carbon cycle contributing to the emissions and to the sequestration process in the soil. Good soil and input managements affect positively Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) changes and consequently the carbon cycle. The present study aimed at comparing the carbon footprint of organic and conventional olive systems and to link it to the efficiency of both systems on carbon sequestration by calculating the net carbon flux. Data were collected at farm level through a specific and detailed questionnaire based on one hectare as a functional unit and a system boundary limited to olive production. Using LCA databases particularly ecoinvent one, IPCC GWP 100a impact assessment method was used to calculate carbon emissions from agricultural practices of both systems. Soil organic carbon has been measured, at 0-30 cm depth, based on soil analyses done at the IAMB laboratory and based on reference value of SOC, the annual change of SOC has been calculated. Substracting sequestrated carbon in the soil from the emitted on resulted in net carbon flux calculation. Results showed higher environmental impact of the organic system on Global Warming Potential (1.07 t CO2 eq. yr-1) comparing to 0.76 t CO2 eq. yr-1 in the conventional system due to the higher GHG emissions caused by manure fertilizers compared to the use of synthetic foliar fertilizers in the conventional system. However, manure was the main reason behind the higher SOC content and sequestration in the organic system. As a resultant, the organic system showed higher net carbon flux (-1.7 t C ha-1 yr-1 than -0.52 t C ha-1 yr-1 in the conventional system reflecting higher efficiency as a

  12. Pollution prevention and treatability of phosphate laden wastewater in the seafood industry

    OpenAIRE

    Krobath, Laurie J.

    1996-01-01

    Seafood processing wastewater containing high concentrations of phosphate was evaluated for its composition, applicability for reuse and recycle, and treatability for phosphate removal. Wastewater from two seafood processing industries was characterized for orthophosphate (OP), condensed phosphate (CP), total phosphate (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), pH, and total suspended solids (TSS). Shrimp wastewater from industry one had an average pH of 6....

  13. Determination of total organic carbon content and delta(13)C in carbonate-rich detrital sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Galy, V; Julien Bouchez; C. France-Lanord;  ,

    2007-01-01

    The determination of total organic carbon content and composition in detrital sediments requires careful removal of their carbonate minerals. In detrital sediments containing large amounts of carbonates, including dolomite, this can only be achieved by liquid acid leaching that may solubilise a significant proportion of the organic carbon. For a set of detrital sediments from the Himalayan system and the Amazon River as well as five geological reference materials, we determined the proportion...

  14. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  15. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelVecchia, Amanda G; Bruno, John F; Benninger, Larry; Alperin, Marc; Banerjee, Ovik; de Dios Morales, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested) surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g). Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE) up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (8.0 ± 0.3%) in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks. PMID:24883249

  16. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda G. DelVecchia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g. Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm−3 (8.0 ± 0.3% in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks.

  17. Bone Regeneration of Rat Tibial Defect by Zinc-Tricalcium Phosphate (Zn-TCP Synthesized from Porous Foraminifera Carbonate Macrospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera carbonate exoskeleton was hydrothermally converted to biocompatible and biodegradable zinc-tricalcium phosphate (Zn-TCP as an alternative biomimetic material for bone fracture repair. Zn-TCP samples implanted in a rat tibial defect model for eight weeks were compared with unfilled defect and beta-tricalcium phosphate showing accelerated bone regeneration compared with the control groups, with statistically significant bone mineral density and bone mineral content growth. CT images of the defect showed restoration of cancellous bone in Zn-TCP and only minimal growth in control group. Histological slices reveal bone in-growth within the pores and porous chamber of the material detailing good bone-material integration with the presence of blood vessels. These results exhibit the future potential of biomimetic Zn-TCP as bone grafts for bone fracture repair.

  18. The EIS investigation of powder polyester coatings on phosphated low carbon steel: The effect of NaNO2 in the phosphating bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The effect of NaNO2 on surface morphology of iron-phosphate coatings were determined. → Better corrosion stability of polyester coating on phosphated steel without NaNO2. → EIS results and microscopic examinations correlate well with adhesion measurements. - Abstract: The effect of different type of iron-phosphate coatings on corrosion stability and adhesion characteristic of top powder polyester coating on steel was investigated. Iron-phosphate coatings were deposited on steel in the novel phosphating bath with or without NaNO2 as an accelerator. The corrosion stability of the powder polyester coating was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), adhesion by pull-off and NMP test, while surface morphology of phosphate coatings were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The adhesion and corrosion stability of powder polyester coatings were improved with pretreatment based on iron-phosphate coating deposited from NaNO2-free bath.

  19. Tillage Effect on Organic Carbon in a Purple Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xue-Xia; GAO Ming; WEI Chao-Fu; XIE De-Ti; PAN Gen-Xing

    2006-01-01

    The distribution and storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) based on a long-term experiment with various tillage systems were studied in a paddy soil derived from purple soil in Chongqing, China. Organic carbon storage in the 0-20and 0-40 cm soil layers under different tillage systems were in an order: ridge tillage with rice-rape rotation (RT-rr)> conventional tillage with rice only (CT-r) > ridge tillage with rice only (RT-r) > conventional tillage with rice-rape rotation (CT-rr). The RT-rr system had significantly higher levels of soil organic carbon in the 0-40 cm topsoil, while the proportion of the total remaining organic carbon in the total soil organic carbon in the 0-10 cm layer was greatest in the RT-rr system. This was the reason why the RT-rr system enhanced soil organic carbon storage. These showed that tillage system type was crucial for carbon storage. Carbon levels in soil humus and crop-yield results showed that the RT-rr system enhanced soil fertility and crop productivity. Adoption of this tillage system would be beneficial both for environmental protection and economic development.

  20. Growth and phosphorus uptake of sorghum plants in salt affected soil as affected by organic materials composted with rock phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the influence of different organic materials, Farm yard manure (FYM), Humic acid (HA) and Press mud (PM) and their composts prepared with rock phosphate on the growth and phosphorus (P) uptake of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.). The experiment was conducted in Randomized Complete Block design with three replication in salt affected soil at research farm of botanical garden Azakhel Nowshera during kharif 2012. Fertilizers were applied at the rate of 120- 90-60 kg ha/sup -1/ N, P and K, respectively. The source of N was urea and organic materials in composted and non composted form. Single super phosphate, rock phosphate, organic materials and their composts were used as P source, while sulphate of potash was used as source of K. The organic materials were applied before crop sowing at recommended level on the basis of their P content. The maximum and significantly (p=0.05) increased sorghum total dry matter yield of 23733 kg ha/sup -1/, emergence m/sup -2/ of 142 and plant height of 147 cm were observed in the treatment where composts of FYM, HA and PM were applied in combination. Increase in soil organic matter content was recorded by the application of composts of different organic materials, while decreasing trend was found in the values of soil electrical conductivity (ECe) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Maximum plant N uptake of 159 kg ha/sup -1/, P uptake of 62.5 kg ha/sup -1/ and K uptake of 557 kg ha/sup -1/ were noted in the treatment where a combination of composts of FYM, HA and PM were added. Results suggest that the use of composts of different organic materials and RP are environment friendly and have the potential to improve sorghum growth, plants nutrient uptake and ameliorate salt affected soils. (author)

  1. Novel organic polymer-inorganic hybrid material zinc poly(styrene-phenylvinylphosphonate)-phosphate prepared with a simple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel type of organic polymer-inorganic hybrid material layered crystalline zinc poly(styrene-phenylvinylphosphonate)-phosphate (ZnPS-PVPP) was synthesized under mild conditions in the absence of any template. And the ZnPS-PVPP were characterized by FT-IR, diffusion reflection UV-vis, AAS, N2 volumetric adsorption, SEM, TEM and TG. Notably, this method was entirely different from the traditional means used for preparing other zinc phosphonate. Moreover, it could be deduced that ZnPS-PVPP possessed the potential applications for catalyst supports. In the initial catalytic tests, the catalysts immobilized onto ZnPS-PVPP showed comparable or higher activity and enantioselectivity with that of catalysts reported by our group in the asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctional olefins. - Graphical Abstract: Zinc poly(styrene-phenylvinylphosphonate)-phosphate was a novel type of layered crystalline organic polymer-inorganic hybrid material prepared under mild conditions without addition of any template and could be used as heterogeneous catalyst supports. Highlights: → New types of layered crystalline inorganic-organic polymer hybrid materials zinc poly(styrene-phenylvinylphosphonate-phosphate(ZnPS-PVPP)). → ZnPS-PVPP prepared under mild condition without adding of any template. → Immobilized chiral salen Mn (III) catalysts on ZnPS-PVPP supports show comparative activity and enantioselectivity with that of on ZSPP or ZPS-PVPA.

  2. Soil organic matter as factor of carbon cycle in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil organic matter represents mos important pool of carbon in nature. Have been estimated content about 2000 Pg of carbon in soil cover of Earth and about 500 Pg C in plant biomass. In the global C cycle we can identify about 60 Pg C yearly removed from soil into the air and same quantities of C removed from air back to the soil. Carbon (as CO2 mainly) is directly emitted into the air from soil organic matter (after mineralization and back carbon removing from air into the soil is realized through soil and plant living biomass. (Author)

  3. Important role for organic carbon in subduction-zone fluids in the deep carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Stagno, Vincenzo; Huang, Fang

    2014-12-01

    Supercritical aqueous fluids link subducting plates and the return of carbon to Earth's surface in the deep carbon cycle. The amount of carbon in the fluids and the identities of the dissolved carbon species are not known, which leaves the deep carbon budget poorly constrained. Traditional models, which assume that carbon exists in deep fluids as dissolved gas molecules, cannot predict the solubility and ionic speciation of carbon in its silicate rock environment. Recent advances enable these limitations to be overcome when evaluating the deep carbon cycle. Here we use the Deep Earth Water theoretical model to calculate carbon speciation and solubility in fluids under upper mantle conditions. We find that fluids in equilibrium with mantle peridotite minerals generally contain carbon in a dissolved gas molecule form. However, fluids in equilibrium with diamonds and eclogitic minerals in the subducting slab contain abundant dissolved organic and inorganic ionic carbon species. The high concentrations of dissolved carbon species provide a mechanism to transport large amounts of carbon out of the subduction zone, where the ionic carbon species may influence the oxidation state of the mantle wedge. Our results also identify novel mechanisms that can lead to diamond formation and the variability of carbon isotopic composition via precipitation of the dissolved organic carbon species in the subduction-zone fluids.

  4. Impact of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Hooijmans, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2015-04-01

    The use of saline water in urban areas for non-potable purposes to cope with fresh water scarcity, intrusion of saline water, and disposal of industrial saline wastewater into the sewerage lead to elevated salinity levels in wastewaters. Consequently, saline wastewater is generated, which needs to be treated before its discharge into surface water bodies. The objective of this research was to study the effects of salinity on the aerobic metabolism of phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), which belong to the microbial populations responsible for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in activated sludge systems. In this study, the short-term impact (hours) of salinity (as NaCl) was assessed on the aerobic metabolism of a PAO culture, enriched in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). All aerobic PAO metabolic processes were drastically affected by elevated salinity concentrations. The aerobic maintenance energy requirement increased, when the salinity concentration rose up to a threshold concentration of 2 % salinity (on a W/V basis as NaCl), while above this concentration, the maintenance energy requirements seemed to decrease. All initial rates were affected by salinity, with the NH4- and PO4-uptake rates being the most sensitive. A salinity increase from 0 to 0.18 % caused a 25, 46, and 63 % inhibition of the O2, PO4, and NH4-uptake rates. The stoichiometric ratios of the aerobic conversions confirmed that growth was the process with the highest inhibition, followed by poly-P and glycogen formation. The study indicates that shock loads of 0.18 % salt, which corresponds to the use or intrusion of about 5 % seawater may severely affect the EBPR process already in wastewater treatment plants not exposed regularly to high salinity concentrations. PMID:25524698

  5. Membrane Organization and Ionization Behavior of the Minor but Crucial Lipid Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooijman, Edgar E.; Sot, Jesus; Montes, L.-Ruth; Alonso, Alicia; Gericke, Arne; de Kruijff, Ben; Kumar, Satyendra; Goni, Felix M. (Utrecht); (Kent); (Basque)

    2008-08-06

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (Cer-1-P), one of the simplest of all sphingophospholipids, occurs in minor amounts in biological membranes. Yet recent evidence suggests important roles of this lipid as a novel second messenger with crucial tasks in cell survival and inflammatory responses. We present a detailed description of the physical chemistry of this hitherto little explored membrane lipid. At full hydration Cer-1-P forms a highly organized subgel (crystalline) bilayer phase (L{sub c}) at low temperature, which transforms into a regular gel phase (L{sub {beta}}) at {approx}45 C, with the gel to fluid phase transition (L{sub {beta}}-L{sub {alpha}}) occurring at {approx}65 C. When incorporated at 5mol % in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer, the pK{sub a2} of Cer-1-P, 7.39{+-}0.03, lies within the physiological pH range. Inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the phosphatidylcholine bilayer, at equimolar ratio, dramatically reduces the pK{sub a2} to 6.64{+-}0.03. We explain these results in light of the novel electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch model described recently for phosphatidic acid. In mixtures with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, small concentrations of Cer-1-P cause a large reduction of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature, suggesting that Cer-1-P induces, like phosphatidic acid, negative membrane curvature in these types of lipid mixtures. These properties place Cer-1-P in a class more akin to certain glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid) than to any other sphingolipid. In particular, the similarities and differences between ceramide and Cer-1-P may be relevant in explaining some of their physiological roles.

  6. Membrane organization and ionization behavior of the minor but crucial lipid ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Sot, Jesús; Montes, L-Ruth; Alonso, Alicia; Gericke, Arne; de Kruijff, Ben; Kumar, Satyendra; Goñi, Felix M

    2008-06-01

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (Cer-1-P), one of the simplest of all sphingophospholipids, occurs in minor amounts in biological membranes. Yet recent evidence suggests important roles of this lipid as a novel second messenger with crucial tasks in cell survival and inflammatory responses. We present a detailed description of the physical chemistry of this hitherto little explored membrane lipid. At full hydration Cer-1-P forms a highly organized subgel (crystalline) bilayer phase (L(c)) at low temperature, which transforms into a regular gel phase (L(beta)) at approximately 45 degrees C, with the gel to fluid phase transition (L(beta)-L(alpha)) occurring at approximately 65 degrees C. When incorporated at 5 mol % in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer, the pK(a2) of Cer-1-P, 7.39 +/- 0.03, lies within the physiological pH range. Inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the phosphatidylcholine bilayer, at equimolar ratio, dramatically reduces the pK(a2) to 6.64 +/- 0.03. We explain these results in light of the novel electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch model described recently for phosphatidic acid. In mixtures with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, small concentrations of Cer-1-P cause a large reduction of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature, suggesting that Cer-1-P induces, like phosphatidic acid, negative membrane curvature in these types of lipid mixtures. These properties place Cer-1-P in a class more akin to certain glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid) than to any other sphingolipid. In particular, the similarities and differences between ceramide and Cer-1-P may be relevant in explaining some of their physiological roles. PMID:18296489

  7. Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R. [Rutgers Centre, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  8. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  9. Limits to soil carbon stability; Deep, ancient soil carbon decomposition stimulated by new labile organic inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil carbon (C) pools store about one-third of the total terrestrial organic carbon. Deep soil C pools (below 1 m) are thought to be stable due to their low biodegradability, but little is known about soil microbial processes and carbon dynamics below the soil surface, or how global change might aff...

  10. Evaluation of organic carbon analyzers for space application. [for water reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The state-of-the-art technology for organic carbon analysis in space applications is evaluated. An investigation into total organic carbon (TOC) analysis has identified a variety of schemes which include different methods for: (1) separation of inorganic carbon from organic carbon and/or differentiation of inorganic carbon from organic carbon; (2) reaction of organic carbon to form a quantifiable species; and (3) detection and measurement of that species. Each method option is discussed.

  11. Erosion-induced massive organic carbon burial and carbon emission in the Yellow River basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Ran, L.; X. X. Lu; Z. Xin

    2013-01-01

    Soil erosion and terrestrial deposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) can potentially play a significant role in global carbon cycling. Assessing the fate of SOC during erosion and subsequent transport and sedimentation is of critical importance. Using hydrological records of soil erosion and sediment load, and compiled organic carbon (OC) data, budgets of the eroded soils and OC induced by water in the Yellow River basin during 1950–2010 were analyzed. The Yellow River basin has experi...

  12. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Simple, Micro-Miniature Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a simple method for on-orbit or advanced mission Total Organic Carbon (TOC) monitoring has been a goal for many years. This proposal seeks to develop...

  14. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests

    OpenAIRE

    DelVecchia, Amanda G.; John F Bruno; Larry Benninger; Marc Alperin; Ovik Banerjee; Juan de Dios Morales

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hamp...

  15. Hidden cycle of dissolved organic carbon in the deep ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Follett, Christopher L.; Repeta, Daniel J.; Rothman, Daniel H.; Xu, Li; Santinelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contains as much carbon as Earth’s atmosphere, yet its cycling timescales and composition remain poorly constrained. We use serial oxidation experiments to measure the quantitative distribution of carbon isotopes inside the DOC reservoir, allowing us to estimate both its cycling timescales and source distribution. We find that a large portion of deep water DOC has a modern radiocarbon age and a fast turnover time supported by particle dissolution. In add...

  16. Improving interfacial adhesion with epoxy matrix using hybridized carbon nanofibers containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles for bone repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xukang; Lan, Jinle; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Hybridized carbon nanofibers containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CNF/CaP) were investigated as osteocompatible nanofillers for epoxy resin. The CNF/CaP was produced by electrospinning mixture solution of polyacrylonitrile and CaP precursor sol-gel, followed by preoxidation and carbonization. The continuous and long CNF/CaP was ultrasonically chopped, mixed into epoxy resin and thermo-cured. Compared to pure CNFs with similar ultrasonication treatment, the shortened CNF/CaP reinforced composites demonstrated significant enhancement in flexural properties of epoxy composites, benefiting from the improved interfacial adhesion between CNF/CaP and resin matrix. The resulting composites also displayed good biocompatibility and sustained calcium ion release, which categorized them as promising materials for bone repairing. PMID:26838838

  17. Improving Bond Strenght between Carbon Steel and Plasma Sprayed Ceramics by Phosphating Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, P.; Brožek, Vlastimil; Mastný, L.

    Ostrava : TANGER Ltd. Ostrava, 2012, s. 69-70. ISBN 978-80-87294-31-4. [International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials METAL 2012/21./. Brno (CZ), 23.05.2012-25.05.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : surface treatments * phosphating coatings * bond strenght * plasma spraying * ceramic coatings Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  18. SIMULATION EXPERIMENT OF ORGANIC FARMING SYSTEM: CHANGES OF SOIL ORGANIC CARBON AND MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES BY ORGANIC FERTILIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Run-Chi; Zong, Liang-Gang; Yan, Jia; Luo, Min; Yun-feng HU

    2014-01-01

    Soil beneficial microbe products are allowed to apply in organic farming system as soil amendment. Effects of different organic fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) and microbes were analyzed in this study in order to improve fertilization technology. Simulation culture experiment was designed and operated in the laboratory to exclude uncertainties, such as environment and human operations of the organic farm. Results showed that more soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) was discovered i...

  19. Soil Organic Carbon in the Soil Scapes of Southeastern Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Joni

    2009-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is well known to maintain several functions. On the one hand, being the major component of soil organic matter (SOM),it is a determinant of soil physical and chemical properties, an important proxy for soil biological activity and a measure of soil productivity. Land use management that will enhance soil carbon (C) levels is therefore important for farmers and land use planners, particularly in semiarid and sub-humid Africa where severe soil degradation and desertifi...

  20. Estimation of soil organic carbon reservoir in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper respectively adopted physio-chemical properties of every soil stratum from 2473 soil profiles of the second national soil survey. The corresponding carbon content of soils is estimated by utilizing conversion coefficient 0.58. In the second soil survey, the total amount of soil organic carbon is about 924.18×108t and carbon density is about 10.53 kgC/m2 in China according to the area of 877.63×106 hm2 surveyed throughout the country. The spatial distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon in China is that the carbon storage increases when latitude increases in eastern China and the carbon storage decreases when longitude reduces in northern China. A transitional zone with great variation in carbon storage exists. Moreover, there is an increasing tendency of carbon density with decrease of latitude in western China. Soil circle is of great significance to global change, but with substantial difference in soil spatial distribution throughout the country. Because the structure of soil is inhomogeneous, it could bring some mistakes in estimating soil carbon reservoirs. It is necessary to farther resolve soil respiration and organic matter conversion and other questions by developing uniform and normal methods of measurement and sampling.

  1. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  2. Pathways of organic carbon oxidation in three continental margin sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Fossing, Henrik;

    1993-01-01

    important and of a similar magnitude. Overall, most of the measured O2 flux into the sediment was used to oxidized reduced inorganic species and not organic carbon. We suspect that the importance of O2 respiration in many coastal sediments has been overestimated, whereas metal oxide reduction (both Fe and......We have combined several different methodologies to quantify rates of organic carbon mineralization by the various electron acceptors in sediments from the coast of Denmark and Norway. Rates of NH4+ and Sigma CO2 liberation sediment incubations were used with O2 penetration depths to conclude that...... O2 respiration accounted for only between 3.6-17.4% of the total organic carbon oxidation. Dentrification was limited to a narrow zone just below the depth of O2 penetration, and was not a major carbon oxidation pathway. The processes of Fe reduction, Mn reduction and sulfate reduction dominated...

  3. Terrestrial-marine carbon cycle coupling in ~500-m.y.-old phosphatic brachiopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Clinton A.; Fox, David L.; Runkel, Anthony C.; Saltzman, Matthew R.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon isotope Compositions (??13C) of inarticulate brachiopod shells from Upper Cambrian sandstone in the cratonic interior of Laurentia record a 5??? positive excursion that correlates biostratigraphically with the global Steptoean positive isotopic carbon excursion. A consistent 6??? negative displacement in brachiopod ??13C relative to carbonate values is interpreted to represent an onshore-offshore gradient in the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon in Cambrian seawater. Thus, these ???500-m.y.-old chitinophosphatic brachiopod shells preserve evidence for carbon cycle coupling between the ancient atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial reservoirs in the time before embryophytic land plants. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  4. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects on Mineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitman, Thea L.; Zhu, Zihua; Lehmann, Johannes C.

    2014-10-31

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical and active pool in the global C cycle, and the addition of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has been shown to change SOC cycling, increasing or decreasing mineralization rates (often referred to as priming). We adjusted the amount of easily mineralizable C in the soil, through 1-day and 6-month pre-incubations, and in PyOM made from maple wood at 350°C, through extraction. We investigated the impact of these adjustments on C mineralization interactions, excluding pH and nutrient effects and minimizing physical effects. We found short-term increases (+20-30%) in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions in the soil pre-incubated for 6 months. Over the longer term, both the 6-month and 1-day pre-incubated soils experienced net ~10% decreases in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions. This was possibly due to stabilization of SOC on PyOM surfaces, suggested by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally, the duration of pre-incubation affected priming interactions, indicating that there may be no optimal pre-incubation time for SOC mineralization studies. We show conclusively that relative mineralizability of SOC in relation to PyOM-24 C is an important determinant of the effect of PyOM additions on SOC mineralization.

  5. Microbial Contribution to Organic Carbon Sequestration in Mineral Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil productivity and sustainability are dependent on soil organic matter (SOM). Our understanding on how organic inputs to soil from microbial processes become converted to SOM is still limited. This study aims to understand how microbes affect carbon (C) sequestration and the formation of recalcit...

  6. Mechanisms of carbon aging and their effects on the retention of organic iodides by carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activated carbon used to treat the off-gas from the Savannah River Plant production reactor building was studied to determine the chemical changes occuring in this carbon during its service life. The carbon is a coconut-shell charcoal impregnated with 1% triethylenediamine (TEDA) and 2% KI. It was known that during its 30-month service life the carbon becomes more acidic and less effective for retaining iodine in organic form. The study showed that the most important change occurring in the carbon is the reaction of KI to give other chemical forms of iodine. The results suggest that the carbon reacts with KI to form organic compounds, but small amounts of oxidized iodine may also be present. The TEDA impregnant is lost from the carbon very quickly, and has no importance after a few months. Mathematical analysis of the carbon performance data show that they are consistent with the reaction of iodide impregnant with impurities in the air flowing through the carbon bed. Additional mathematical analysis, based on electron microscopic observation of the carbon particles, indicates that the external surfaces of the carbon are mainly responsible for their effectiveness in retaining iodine. Consequently, the condition of the impregnants on a relatively small fraction of the carbon surface can have a large effect on its performance. (author)

  7. Subduction of Organic Carbon into the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, T. A.; Malinverno, A.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor sediments approach active subduction zones with small amounts (generally Indus and Begal Fans, Gulf of Alaska, Cascadia, etc). Together, terrigenous turbidites make up about 60% of the global subducted sediment (GLOSS), and thus have a strong control on the concentration of OC in GLOSS. Sites dominated by terrigenous turbidites have 0.4 wt% OC on average (1sd = 0.1 wt%), and GLOSS is very similar, yielding about 6 MtC/yr OC subducted globally. This flux is enough to subduct the entire surface pool of OC every 2.6 Ga, which if not returned, or returned in a more oxidized form, could contribute to a significant rise in oxygen at the surface of the Earth. Seemingly fortuitously, the OC/total carbon fraction in GLOSS is 20%, very near the long term average required to maintain the isotopic composition of marine carbonates at ~ 0 per mil d13C over much of Earth history.

  8. The Feasibility of Modified Magnesia-Phosphate Cement as a Heat Resistant Adhesive for Strengthening Concrete with Carbon Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailian Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available External bonding of carbon fiber sheets has become a popular technique for strengthening concrete structures all over the world. Epoxy adhesive, which is used to bond the carbon fiber sheets and concrete, deteriorates rapidly when being exposed to high temperatures. This paper presents a high-temperature-resistant modified magnesia-phosphate cement (MPC with the compressive strength that does not decrease at the temperature of 600 °C. The bond properties of both the modified MPC and the epoxy adhesive between externally bonded carbon fiber sheets and concrete were evaluated by using a double-shear test method after exposure to elevating temperatures from 105 °C to 500 °C. The results showed that the bond strength of the modified MPC at room temperature (RT is much higher than that of the epoxy resin. Full carbonation with almost 0 MPa was detected for the epoxy sample after the exposure to 300 °C, while only 40% reduction of bond strength was tested for the modified MPC sample. Although the modified MPC specimens failed through interlaminar slip of fiber strips instead of complete debonding, the MPC specimens performed higher bond strength than epoxy resin at ambient temperature, and retained much higher bond strength at elevated temperatures. It could be concluded that it is feasible to strengthen concrete structural members with externally bonded carbon fiber sheets using the modified MPC instead of epoxy adhesive. Furthermore, the use of the modified MPC as the binder between carbon fiber sheets and concrete can be less expensive and an ecologically friendly alternative.

  9. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schartau

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC. A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO. The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM. The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is

  10. Modelling carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Völker

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During phytoplankton growth a fraction of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC assimilated by phytoplankton is exuded in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, which can be transformed into extracellular particulate organic carbon (POC. A major fraction of extracellular POC is associated with carbon of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP; carbon content = TEPC that form from dissolved polysaccharides (PCHO. The exudation of PCHO is linked to an excessive uptake of DIC that is not directly quantifiable from utilisation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, called carbon overconsumption. Given these conditions, the concept of assuming a constant stoichiometric carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N ratio for estimating new production of POC from DIN uptake becomes inappropriate. Here, a model of carbon overconsumption is analysed, combining phytoplankton growth with TEPC formation. The model describes two modes of carbon overconsumption. The first mode is associated with DOC exudation during phytoplankton biomass accumulation. The second mode is decoupled from algal growth, but leads to a continuous rise in POC while particulate organic nitrogen (PON remains constant. While including PCHO coagulation, the model goes beyond a purely physiological explanation of building up carbon rich particulate organic matter (POM. The model is validated against observations from a mesocosm study. Maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters, such as nitrogen- and carbon loss rates of phytoplankton, are determined. The optimisation yields results with higher rates for carbon exudation than for the loss of organic nitrogen. It also suggests that the PCHO fraction of exuded DOC was 63±20% during the mesocosm experiment. Optimal estimates are obtained for coagulation kernels for PCHO transformation into TEPC. Model state estimates are consistent with observations, where 30% of the POC increase was attributed to TEPC formation. The proposed model is of low complexity and is

  11. Beneficiation of Iraqi Akash at Phosphate Ore Using Organic Acids for the Production of Wet Process Phosphoric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Y. Eisa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, leaching process studiedusing organic acids (acetic acid and lactic acid to extract phosphate from the Iraqi Akashat phosphate ore by separation of calcareous materials (mainly calcite. This approach characterized by energy conservation, environmental enhancement by recovery of calcite as calcium sulfate (gypsum, keeping the physical and chemical properties of apatite. Samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectrophotometer. From the obtained experimental data it was found that using the two organic acids yields closed purity values of the produced apatite at the optimum conditions, while at different acid concentrations, it was found that the efficiency of acetic acid is higher at the low acid concentration (2 wt%, and that lactic acid gives the higher efficiency at high acid concentration (10 wt%.Concerning the ratio of acid volume to ore weight ratio, it was found that reducing this ratio to 5 ml/gm cause an increase in the purity of apatite at the optimum concentrations of the two acids. In addition, it was found that the reaction ofthe two organic acids with the calcareous material are fast and that the optimum reaction time, in which high purity apatite produced is 10 minutes.

  12. Review and suggestions for estimating particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon inventories in the ocean using remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Delu; LIU Qiong; BAI Yan

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) are basic variables for the ocean carbon cycle. Knowledge of the distribution and inventory of these variables is important for a better es-timation and understanding of the global carbon cycle. Owing to its considerable advantages in spatial and temporal coverage, remote sensing data provide estimates of DOC and POC inventories, which are able to give a synthetic view for the distribution and transportation of carbon pools. To estimate organic car-bon inventories using remote sensing involves integration of the surface concentration and vertical profile models, and the development of these models is critical to the accuracy of estimates. Hence, the distribu-tion and control factors of DOC and POC in the ocean first are briefly summarized, and then studies of DOC and POC inventories and flux estimations are reviewed, most of which are based on field data and few of which consider the vertical distributions of POC or DOC. There is some research on the estimation of POC inventory by remote sensing, mainly in the open ocean, in which three kinds of vertical profile models have been proposed:the uniform, exponential decay, and Gauss models. However, research on remote-sensing estimation of the DOC inventory remains lacking. A synthetic review of approaches used to estimate the or-ganic carbon inventories is offered and the future development of methods is discussed for such estimates using remote sensing data in coastal waters.

  13. Investigation of the benzotriazole as addictive for carbon steel phosphating; Estudo da utilizacao do benzotriazol como aditivo para a fosfatizacao de aco carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annies, V.; Cunha, M.T.; Rodrigues, P.R.P.; Banczek, E.P. [Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Costa, I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Terada, M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This work studied the viability of substitution of sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) for benzotriazole (BTAH) in the zinc phosphate bath (PZn+NaNO{sub 2}) for phosphating of carbon steel (SAE 1010). The characterization of the samples was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optical Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition was evaluated by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated by Open Circuit Potential, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Anodic Potentiodynamic Polarization Curves in a 0.5 mol L{sup -1} NaCl electrolyte. The experimental results showed that the phosphate layer obtained in the solution with benzotriazole (PZn+BTAH) presented better corrosion resistance properties than that obtained in sodium nitrite. The results demonstrated that the sodium nitrite NaNO{sub 2} can be replaced by benzotriazole (BTAH) in zinc phosphate baths. (author)

  14. Organic carbon efflux from a deciduous forest catchment in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Kim

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil infiltration and surface discharge of precipitation are critical processes that affect the efflux of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC and Particulate Organic Carbon (POC in forested catchments. Concentrations of DOC and POC can be very high in the soil surface in most forest ecosystems and their efflux may not be negligible particularly under the monsoon climate. In East Asia, however, there are little data available to evaluate the role of such processes in forest carbon budget. In this paper, we address two basic questions: (1 how does stream discharge respond to storm events in a forest catchment? and (2 how much DOC and POC are exported from the catchment particularly during the summer monsoon period? To answer these questions, we collected hydrological data (e.g., precipitation, soil moisture, runoff discharge, groundwater level and conducted hydrochemical analyses (including DOC, POC, and six tracers in a deciduous forest catchment in Gwangneung National Arboretum in west-central Korea. Based on the end-member mixing analysis of the six storm events during the summer monsoon in 2005, the surface discharge was estimated as 30 to 80% of the total runoff discharge. The stream discharge responded to precipitation within 12 h during these storm events. The annual efflux of DOC and POC from the catchment was estimated as 0.04 and 0.05 t C ha−1 yr−1, respectively. Approximately 70% of the annual organic carbon efflux occurred during the summer monsoon period. Overall, the annual efflux of organic carbon was estimated to be about 10% of the Net Ecosystem carbon Exchange (NEE obtained by eddy covariance measurement at the same site. Considering the current trends of increasing intensity and amount of summer rainfall and the large interannual variability in NEE, ignoring the organic carbon efflux from forest catchments would result in an inaccurate estimation of the carbon sink strength of forest ecosystems in the monsoon

  15. In vitro characterization of a phosphate starvation-independent carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens 23F.

    OpenAIRE

    McMullan, G.; Quinn, J P

    1994-01-01

    A novel, metal-dependent, carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage activity, provisionally named phosphonoacetate hydrolase, was detected in crude extracts of Pseudomonas fluorescens 23F, an environmental isolate able to utilize phosphonoacetate as the sole carbon and phosphorus source. The activity showed unique specificity toward this substrate; its organic product, acetate, was apparently metabolized by the glyoxylate cycle enzymes of the host cell. Unlike phosphonatase, which was also detected in ...

  16. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. PMID:27127035

  17. Incorporation of 14C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of 14C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication was studied. In brains of rats tested on the 20, 30 and 60th minute of exposure to CO and immediately after removal from the chamber the enzyme activity showed no essential deviation from the control level. In the group of rats tested 1 hour after taking them out from the chamber increase of the enzyme activity was noticed, amounting to about 33% of the control value. The brains tested 24 hours after exposure showed the largest increase of the enzyme activity by about 94%. In the next time periods, 48 and 72 hours after intoxication, the enzyme activity was decreasing. The glycogen content in brains of control animals increased 3 hours after CO intoxication by about 69%. The increase of glycogen synthesis was expressed by increase of the total radioactivity, which amounted to 160% of the control value. (Z.M.)

  18. Chemistry of organic carbon in soil with relationship to the global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various ecosystem disturbances alter the balances between production of organic matter and its decomposition and therefore change the amount of carbon in soil. The most severe perturbation is conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops. Conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops results in a lowered input of slowly decomposing material which causes a reduction in overall carbon levels. Disruption of soil matrix structure by cultivation leads to lowered physical protection of organic matter resulting in an increased net mineralization rate of soil carbon. Climate change is another perturbation that affects the amount and composition of plant production, litter inputs, and decomposition regimes but does not affect soil structure directly. Nevertheless, large changes in soil carbon storage are probable with anticipated CO2 induced climate change, particularly in northern latitudes where anticipated climate change will be greatest (MacCracken and Luther 1985) and large amounts of soil organic matter are found. It is impossible, given the current state of knowledge of soil organic matter processes and transformations to develop detailed process models of soil carbon dynamics. Largely phenomenological models appear to be developing into predictive tools for understanding the role of soil organic matter in the global carbon cycle. In particular, these models will be useful in quantifying soil carbon changes due to human land-use and to anticipated global climate and vegetation changes. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Aminolysis Reaction of Glycerol Carbonate in Organic and Hydroorganic Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Nohra, Bassam; Candy, Laure; Blanco, Jean-François; Raoul, Yann; Mouloungui, Zephirin

    2012-01-01

    Aminolysis reaction of glycerol carbonate with primary amine in organic and hydroorganic media leads to the formation of two hydroxyurethane isomers and a partial decomposition of glycerol carbonate into glycerol. Aminolysis with a secondary amine promotes the condensation reaction and limits the formation of glycerol. The ratio of α versus β was determined by zgig 13C NMR. This technique permits computing the yield of α and β products in the medium. The quantity of glycerol was determined by...

  20. Methodology guideline. Organization of conference neutral in carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the Climate Plan elaborated by the french government, the neutral carbon principle must be applied to conference organization and the international travels. This guide has two main functions: heighten to allow everybody to understand the climate change impacts and problems, and bring some recommendations and tools to implement a neutral carbon conference (transport, welcome, accommodation and meal). (A.L.B.)

  1. Carbon dioxide capture by means of cyclic organic nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    García Abuín, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The research work included in present PhD Thesis involves the research studies to capture carbon dioxide using different cyclic nitrogen organic compounds (glucosamine (GA), chitosan (C), alkyl-pyrrolidones, pyrrolidine (PYR) and piperidine (PIP). This investigation is based on the study of three experimental systems. Each of them has characteristics potentially suitable to achieve the aim of this work, that is to say, to improve the carbon dioxide capture process, which is pre...

  2. Remote Sensing to Support Monitoring of Soil Organic Carbon (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairn, H.; Pacheco, A.

    2009-12-01

    Soil organic carbon is fundamental to the sustainability of agricultural soils and soils play an important role in the global carbon balance. Estimating soil carbon levels and monitoring changes in these levels over time requires extensive data on climate, soil properties, land cover and land management. Remote sensing technologies are capable of providing some of the data needed in modeling soil organic carbon concentrations and in tracking changes in soil carbon. The characteristics of the vegetation cover influence the amount of organic matter in the soil and cultivation impacts the rate of organic matter decomposition. Consequently land management decisions, which include cropping and tillage practices, play a vital role in determining soil carbon levels. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has developed several methods to map land management practices from multispectral and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite sensors. These include identification of crops grown, estimation of crop residue cover left post-harvest and identification of tillage activities. Optical and SAR data are capable of identifying crop types to accuracies consistently above 85%. Knowledge of crop type also provides information needed to establish biomass levels and residue type, both of which influence the amounts and decomposition rates of organic matter. Scientists with AAFC have also extensively validated a method to estimate percent residue cover using spectral unmixing analysis applied to multispectral satellite data. Percentages for corn, soybean and small grain residues can be estimated to accuracies of 83%, 80% and 82%, respectively. Tillage activity influences residue decomposition and AAFC is investigating methods to identify tillage occurrence using advanced polarimetric SAR information. This presentation will provide an overview of methods and results from research ongoing at AAFC. The potential contribution of these remote sensing approaches to support wide area carbon

  3. Charcoal bed operation for optimal organic carbon removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, evaporation, reverse osmosis or charcoal-demineralizer systems have been used to remove impurities in liquid radwaste processing systems. At Nine Mile point, we recently replaced our evaporators with charcoal-demineralizer systems to purify floor drain water. A comparison of the evaporator to the charcoal-demineralizer system has shown that the charcoal-demineralizer system is more effective in organic carbon removal. We also show the performance data of the Granulated Activated Charcoal (GAC) vessel as a mechanical filter. Actual data showing that frequent backflushing and controlled flow rates through the GAC vessel dramatically increases Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal efficiency. GAC vessel dramatically increases Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal efficiency. Recommendations are provided for operating the GAC vessel to ensure optimal performance

  4. Superior Electrocatalytic Activity of a Robust Carbon-Felt Electrode with Oxygen-Rich Phosphate Groups for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Heon Seong; Kim, Jeonghun; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Young-Jun; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2016-06-01

    A newly prepared type of carbon felt with oxygen-rich phosphate groups is proposed as a promising electrode with good stability for all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). Through direct surface modification with ammonium hexafluorophosphate (NH4 PF6 ), phosphorus can be successfully incorporated onto the surface of the carbon felt by forming phosphate functional groups with -OH chemical moieties that exhibit good hydrophilicity. The electrochemical reactivity of the carbon felt toward the redox reactions of VO(2+) /VO2 (+) (in the catholyte) and V(3+) /V(2+) (in the anolyte) can be effectively improved owing to the superior catalytic effects of the oxygen-rich phosphate groups. Furthermore, undesirable hydrogen evolution can be suppressed by minimizing the overpotential for the V(3+) /V(2+) redox reaction in the anolyte of the VRFB. Cell-cycling tests with the catalyzed electrodes show improved energy efficiencies of 88.2 and 87.2 % in the 1(st) and 20(th)  cycles compared with 83.0 and 81.1 %, respectively, for the pristine electrodes at a constant current density of 32 mA cm(-2) . These improvements are mainly attributed to the faster charge transfer allowed by the integration of the oxygen-rich phosphate groups on the carbon-felt electrode. PMID:27106165

  5. Toward a better understanding of coagulation for dissolved organic nitrogen using polymeric zinc-iron-phosphate coagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guocheng; Wang, Qian; Yin, Jun; Li, Zhongwu; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Bozhi; Fan, Gongduan; Wan, Peng

    2016-09-01

    The increase of agricultural related activities and the lack of effective waste control has led to an increase of organic nitrogen in water. The development of coagulants to effectively remove dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a high priority in the water treatment industry. We developed a polymeric zinc-iron-phosphate (ZnFeP) coagulant and investigated its coagulation effect on DON removal. Optimum coagulant for coagulation for DON and TDN removals was characterized by the dense convex-concave packing structure differing from other zinc-based coagulant, polycrystalline structure and high content colloidal species, which could account up to 87% of the total colloidal species. Coagulation experiments showed the DON removal rate to vary greatly depending on principal components and their interaction with metals, phosphate and hydroxyl. DON removal efficiency increased with the increase of colloidal species. The coagulation was also dependent on coagulant dosage and water quality parameters: Coagulation efficiency increased with coagulant dosage in the investigated range of 1-16 mg/l, and a pH of 6 was found to be superior for the coagulation. DON removal efficiency was also higher than and linearly correlated with total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) removal, which implies that an effective coagulation for TDN is also effective for DON. The findings in this study indicate that coagulation of DON is largely influenced by coagulant composition and species. We also found the removal of DON by our newly developed polymeric ZnFeP coagulant to be effective. PMID:27192355

  6. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Gani Haji

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties to decompose organic waste can be handled naturally by pyrolisis so it can  decomposes quickly that produces charcoal as the product. This study aims to investigate the characteristics of activated carbon from urban organic waste. Charcoal results of pyrolysis of organic waste activated with KOH 1.0 M at a temperature of 700 and 800oC for 60 to 120 minutes. Characteristics of activated carbon were identified by Furrier Transform Infra Red (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. However, their quality is determined yield, moisture content, ash, fly substances, fixed carbon, and the power of adsorption of iodine and benzene. The identified functional groups on activated carbon, such as OH (3448,5-3436,9 cm-1, and C=O (1639,4 cm-1. In general, the degree and distance between the layers of active carbon crystallites produced activation in all treatments showed no significant difference. The pattern of activated carbon surface topography structure shows that the greater the pore formation in accordance with the temperature increase the more activation time needed. The yield of activated carbon obtained ranged from 72.04 to 82.75%. The results of characterization properties of activated carbon was obtained from 1.11 to 5.41% water, 13.68 to 17.27% substance fly, 20.36 to 26.59% ash, and 56.14 to 62.31% of fixed carbon . Absorption of activated carbon was good enough at 800oC and 120 minutes of activation time, that was equal to 409.52 mg/g of iodine and 14.03% of benzene. Activated carbon produced has less good quality, because only the water content and flying substances that meet the standards.Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94 [How to cite this article: Haji, A.G., Pari, G., Nazar, M., and Habibati.  (2013. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste . International Journal of Science and Engineering, 5(2,89-94. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94

  7. Pathways of organic carbon oxidation in three continental margin sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, D. E.; Jorgensen, B. B.; Fossing, H.; Glud, R.; Gundersen, J.; Ramsing, N. B.; Thamdrup, B.; Hansen, J. W.; Nielsen, L. P.; Hall, P. O.

    1993-01-01

    We have combined several different methodologies to quantify rates of organic carbon mineralization by the various electron acceptors in sediments from the coast of Denmark and Norway. Rates of NH4+ and Sigma CO2 liberation sediment incubations were used with O2 penetration depths to conclude that O2 respiration accounted for only between 3.6-17.4% of the total organic carbon oxidation. Dentrification was limited to a narrow zone just below the depth of O2 penetration, and was not a major carbon oxidation pathway. The processes of Fe reduction, Mn reduction and sulfate reduction dominated organic carbon mineralization, but their relative significance varied depending on the sediment. Where high concentrations of Mn-oxide were found (3-4 wt% Mn), only Mn reduction occurred. With lower Mn oxide concentrations more typical of coastal sediments, Fe reduction and sulfate reduction were most important and of a similar magnitude. Overall, most of the measured O2 flux into the sediment was used to oxidized reduced inorganic species and not organic carbon. We suspect that the importance of O2 respiration in many coastal sediments has been overestimated, whereas metal oxide reduction (both Fe and Mn reduction) has probably been well underestimated.

  8. Erosion of organic carbon in the Arctic as a geological carbon dioxide sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert G; Galy, Valier; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Dellinger, Mathieu; Bryant, Charlotte; O'Regan, Matt; Gröcke, Darren R; Coxall, Helen; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien

    2015-08-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales (thousands of years) and contain approximately double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. Warming and associated permafrost thaw can expose soil organic carbon and result in mineralization and carbon dioxide (CO2) release. However, some of this soil organic carbon may be eroded and transferred to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in marine sediments, then it can contribute to a longer-term (more than ten thousand years), geological CO2 sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers at high latitudes remains poorly constrained. Here, we quantify the source of POC in the Mackenzie River, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, and assess its flux and fate. We combine measurements of radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. Our samples reveal that the eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5,800 ± 800 years, much older than the POC in large tropical rivers. From the measured biospheric POC content and variability in annual sediment yield, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2(+1.3)(-0.9) teragrams of carbon per year from the Mackenzie River, which is three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering in this basin. Offshore, we find evidence for efficient terrestrial organic carbon burial over the Holocene period, suggesting that erosion of organic carbon-rich, high-latitude soils may result in an important geological CO2 sink. PMID:26245581

  9. Distinguishing between carbonate and non-carbonate precipitates from the carbonation of calcium-containing organic acid leachates

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; Chiang, Yi Wai; Elsen, Jan; Van Gerven, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Two organic acids were trialled for the extraction of calcium from steelmaking blast furnace slag for the purpose of precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production: succinic and acetic acids. While the leaching performance of succinic acid was superior, carbonation of its leachate did not result in the production of PCC, but rather the precipitation of calcium succinate, and only after the use of pH buffering agents (sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate). In contrast, carbonation of the acetic ac...

  10. Evaluation of Powdered Activated Carbon Efficiency in Removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon inWater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    G.R Bonyadi nejad; R Hadian; M Saadani; B Jaberian; M.M Amin; A Khodabakhshi

    2010-01-01

    "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Powdered Activated$ carbon is known as a suitable absorbent for organic materials. The aim of this research is evaluation of Powdered Activated-Carbon (PAC) efficiency in removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in water treatment in Isfahan."nMaterials and Methods : The increase of PAC for DOC reduction has done in three paths in the Isfahan water treatment plant (WTP). These paths including: 1) Intake up to entrance of WTP 2) Intake to exit ofWTP 3) Between...

  11. Light absorption by organic carbon from wood combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols affect the radiative balance of the Earth by absorbing and scattering light. While BC is highly absorbing, some organic compounds also have significant absorption, which is greater at near-ultraviolet and blue wavelengths. To the extent that OC absorbs visible light, it may be a non-negligible contributor to direct aerosol radiative forcing.

    In this work, we examine absorption by primary OC emitted from solid fuel pyrolysis. We provide absorption spectra of this material, which can be related to the imaginary refractive index. This material has polar character but is not fully water-soluble: more than 92% was extractable by methanol or acetone, compared with 73% for water and 52% for hexane. Water-soluble organic carbon contributed to light absorption at both ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. However, a larger portion came from organic carbon that is extractable only by methanol. The spectra of water-soluble organic carbon are similar to others in the literature. We compared spectra for material generated with different wood type, wood size and pyrolysis temperature. Higher wood temperature is the main factor creating organic aerosol with higher absorption, causing about a factor of four increase in mass-normalized absorption at visible wavelengths. A simple model suggests that, despite the absorption, both high-temperature and low-temperature carbon have negative climate forcing over a surface with average albedo.

  12. Semicontinuous automated measurement of organic carbon in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Rashinkar, Shilpa M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-02-15

    A fully automated measurement system for ambient aerosol organic carbon, capable of unattended operation over extended periods, is described. Particles are collected in a cyclone with water as the collection medium. The collected sample is periodically aspirated by a syringe pump into a holding loop and then delivered to a wet oxidation reactor (WOR). Acid is added, and the WOR is purged to measure dissolved CO(2) or inorganic carbonates (IC) as evolved CO(2). The IC background can often be small and sufficiently constant to be corrected for, without separate measurement, by a blank subtraction. The organic material is now oxidized stepwise or in one step to CO(2). The one-step oxidation involves UV-persulfate treatment in the presence of ozone. This treatment converts organic carbon (OC) to CO(2), but elemental carbon is not oxidized. The CO(2) is continuously purged from solution and collected by two sequential miniature diffusion scrubbers (DSs), a short DS preceding a longer one. Each DS consists of a LiOH-filled porous hydrophobic membrane tube with terminal stainless steel tubes that function as conductance-sensing electrodes. As CO(2) is collected by the LiOH-filled DSs, hydroxide is converted into carbonate and the resulting decrease in conductivity is monitored. The simultaneous use of the dual short and long DS units bearing different concentrations of LiOH permits both good sensitivity and a large dynamic range. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is approximately 140 ng of C. With a typical sampling period of 30 min at a sampling rate of 30 L/min, this corresponds to an LOD of 160 ng/m(3). The approach also provides information on the ease of oxidation of the carbonaceous aerosol and hence the nature of the carbon contained therein. Ambient aerosol organic carbon data are presented. PMID:20092351

  13. Catalytic Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Terpene Scaffolds: Access to Challenging Bio-Based Organic Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Giulia; Stuck, Moritz; Martín, Carmen; Belmonte, Marta Martínez; Martin, Eddy; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Kleij, Arjan W

    2016-06-01

    The challenging coupling of highly substituted terpene oxides and carbon dioxide into bio-based cyclic organic carbonates catalyzed by Al(aminotriphenolate) complexes is reported. Both acyclic as well as cyclic terpene oxides were used as coupling partners, showing distinct reactivity/selectivity behavior. Whereas cyclic terpene oxides showed excellent chemoselectivity towards the organic carbonate product, acyclic substrates exhibited poorer selectivities owing to concomitant epoxide rearrangement reactions and the formation of undesired oligo/polyether side products. Considering the challenging nature of these coupling reactions, the isolated yields of the targeted bio-carbonates are reasonable and in most cases in the range 50-60 %. The first crystal structures of tri-substituted terpene based cyclic carbonates are reported and their stereoconnectivity suggests that their formation proceeds through a double inversion pathway. PMID:27159151

  14. Soil organic matter dynamics and the global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large size and potentially long residence time of the soil organic matter pool make it an important component of the global carbon cycle. Net terrestrial primary production of about 60 Pg C·yr-1 is, over a several-year period of time, balanced by an equivalent flux of litter production and subsequent decomposition of detritus and soil organic matter. We will review many of the major factors that influence soil organic matter dynamics that need to be explicitly considered in development of global estimates of carbon turnover in the world's soils. We will also discuss current decomposition models that are general enough to be used to develop a representation of global soil organic matter dynamics

  15. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, whereby it can influence the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic soil stocks (SOCS are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOCS is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing circa 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory.

    We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOCS as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOCS for the whole of metropolitan France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on soil organic carbon for such soils.

    The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOCS and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions over the French territory. These relationship strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOCS in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOCS distributions of France, and consequently that the previously

  16. Dissolution of actinide oxides in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide, containing various organic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution of actinide oxides in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide containing a complex of tri-n-butyl phosphate with nitric acid was investigated. It was shown for the first time that milligram amounts of uranium dioxide can be quantitatively dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide containing this reagent and efficiently separated from plutonium, neptunium, and thorium on its supercritical fluid extraction from a mixture of their oxides. The quantitative dissolution of milligram amounts of uranium trioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide containing thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tri-n-butyl phosphate was first performed using ultrasonication. (author)

  17. Organic carbon production, mineralization and preservation on the Peruvian margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Dale

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon cycling in Peruvian margin sediments (11° S and 12° S was examined at 16 stations from 74 m on the inner shelf down to 1024 m water depth by means of in situ flux measurements, sedimentary geochemistry and modeling. Bottom water oxygen was below detection limit down to ca. 400 m and increased to 53 μM at the deepest station. Sediment accumulation rates and benthic dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes decreased rapidly with water depth. Particulate organic carbon (POC content was lowest on the inner shelf and at the deep oxygenated stations (< 5% and highest between 200 and 400 m in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, 15–20%. The organic carbon burial efficiency (CBE was unexpectedly low on the inner shelf (< 20% when compared to a global database, for reasons which may be linked to the frequent ventilation of the shelf by oceanographic anomalies. CBE at the deeper oxygenated sites was much higher than expected (max. 81%. Elsewhere, CBEs were mostly above the range expected for sediments underlying normal oxic bottom waters, with an average of 51 and 58% for the 11° S and 12° S transects, respectively. Organic carbon rain rates calculated from the benthic fluxes alluded to a very efficient mineralization of organic matter in the water column, with a Martin curve exponent typical of normal oxic waters (0.88 ± 0.09. Yet, mean POC burial rates were 2–5 times higher than the global average for continental margins. The observations at the Peruvian margin suggest that a lack of oxygen does not affect the degradation of organic matter in the water column but promotes the preservation of organic matter in marine sediments.

  18. Model Establishment for Simulating Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; LIU Shi-liang; SHEN Qi-rong; ZONG Liang-gang

    2002-01-01

    Assuming that decomposition of organic matter in soils follows the first-order kinetics reaction,a computer model was developed to simulate soil organic matter dynamics. Organic matter in soils is divided up into two parts that include incorporated organic carbon from crop residues or other organic fertilizer and soil intrinsic carbon. The incorporated organic carbon was assumed to consist of two components, labile-C and resistant-C. The model was represented by a differential equation of dCi/dt = Ki× fT × fw × fs × Ci ( i = l,r, S ) and an integral equation of Cit = Cio × EXP ( Ki X fT X fw X fs X t ). Effect of soil parameters of temperature, moisture and texture on the decomposition was functioned by the fT, fw and fs, respectively.Data from laboratory incubation experiments were used to determine the first-order decay rate Ki and the fraction of labile-C of crop residues by employing a nonlinear method. The values of K for the components of labile-C and resistant-C and the soil intrinsic carbon were evaluated to be 0. 025,0. 080 × 10-2 and 0. 065 ×10-3d-1, respectively. The labile-C fraction of wheat straw, wheat roots, rice straw and rice roots were0.50, 0.25, 0.40 and 0.20, respectively. These values are related to the initial residue carbon-to-nitrogen ratio ( C/N) and lignin content.

  19. Adsorptive fractionation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and carbon nanotubes are introduced into aquatic environments. Thus, it is important to elucidate whether their interaction affects DOM amount and composition. In this study, the composition of DOM, before and after interactions with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), was measured and the adsorption affinity of the individual structural fractions of DOM to SWCNTs was investigated. Adsorption of DOM to SWCNTs was dominated by the hydrophobic acid fraction, resulting in relative enhancement of the hydrophilic character of non-adsorbed DOM. The preferential adsorption of the HoA fraction was concentration-dependent, increasing with increasing concentration. Adsorption affinities of bulk DOM calculated as the normalized sum of affinities of the individual structural fractions were similar to the measured affinities, suggesting that the structural fractions of DOM act as independent adsorbates. The altered DOM composition may affect the nature and reactivity of DOM in aquatic environments polluted with carbon nanotubes. - Highlights: • Interaction with carbon nanotubes alters DOM amount and composition. • Hydrophobic acid fraction governs DOM adsorption to carbon nanotubes. • Adsorbed DOM composition is concentration-dependent. • Adsorption affinity and capacity are dependent on hydrophobicity of DOM. - Dissolved organic matter (DOM)–single walled carbon nanotubes interactions result in the relative enrichment of the hydrophilic character of the DOM

  20. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated

  1. Modelling soil organic carbon in Danish agricultural soils suggests low potential for future carbon sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is in active exchange with the atmosphere. The amount of organic carbon (OC) input into the soil and SOC turnover rate are important for predicting the carbon (C) sequestration potential of soils subject to changes in land-use and climate. The C-TOOL model was developed to......, various agricultural management scenarios were considered including characteristic crop rotations with and without the presence of cover crops, and the application of organic amendments. We compared these simulated management effects with management effects estimated from Danish SOC monitoring network...... over the same period of time. The results of the C-TOOL simulations demonstrated that application of organic manure, use of cover crop, and converting the croplands to grassland had the potential to increase SOC in Danish mineral soils. The simulated data also suggested that C-TOOL gave a reasonably...

  2. A Ternary Polyaniline/Active Carbon/Lithium Iron Phosphate Composite as Cathode Material for Lithium Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wuxing; Huang, Yunhui; Xia, Tian; Lian, Yongfu

    2016-06-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) has been evaluated as the most promising cathode material for the next generation lithium-ion batteries because of its high operating voltage, good cycle performance, low cost, and environmentally friendly safety. However, pure LiFePO4 shows poor reversible capacity and charge/discharge performance at high current density. Many methods including optimization of particle size, introduction of coating carbon and conductive polymer, and the doping of metal and halogen ions have been developed to improve its electrochemical performance. In this study, conductive polymer polyaniline (PANI), active carbon and LiFePO4 (C-LFP/PANI) composite cathodes were successfully prepared by chemical oxidation method. Electrochemical performance shows that a remarkable improvement in capacity and rate performance can be achieved in the C-LFP/PANI composite cathodes with an addition of HCI. In comparison with C-LFP cathode, the C-LFP/PANI doped with HCl composite exhibits ca. 15% and 26% capacity enhancement at 0.2 C and 10 C, respectively. PMID:27427742

  3. Photoproduction of Carbon Monoxide from Natural Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioneering studies by Valentine provided early kinetic results that used carbon monoxide (CO) production to evaluate the photodecomposition of aquatic natural organic matter (NOM) . (ES&T 1993 27 409-412). Comparatively few kinetic studies have been conducted of the photodegradat...

  4. Organic carbon in the sediments of Mandovi estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    Total organic carbon (TOC) in surficial sediments in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India varies widely from 0.1 to 3% (av. 1.05%). Highest values of TOC (2.4-3%) lie close to the mouth region and indicate no definite trend in its variation in the estuarine...

  5. Ethanol production from crop residues and soil organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Reijnders

    2008-01-01

    In decision making about the use of residues from annual crops for ethanol production, alternative applications of these residues should be considered. Especially important is the use of such residues for stabilizing and increasing levels of soil organic carbon. Such alternative use leads to a limit

  6. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition,...

  7. Organic carbon transformation in agricultural soils : radiocarbon analysis of organic matter fractions and biomarker compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Rethemeyer, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Radiocarbon analyses of physical and chemical soil organic matter fractions as well as of individual compounds provided information on the origin, transformation and stabilisation of organic carbon in agricultural soils. A contamination of the soil at the study site at Halle/Saale (Germany) with fossil, lignite-derived carbon was identified by high apparent 14C ages of the organic matter in the plough horizon of about 5000 years BP and a decrease in 14C age with increasing soil depth. The fos...

  8. A facile method to synthesize polypyrrole nanoparticles in the presence of natural organic phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conductive polymers with unique nanostructures have attracted intense interest due to their potential application. Here the well-defined polypyrrole nanoparticles were facile fabricated via the facile chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole with high feeding ratio of phytic acid. Phytic acid is a renewable resource and a natural carbohydrate compound with a vast number of phosphate groups from plant which was used as the template and dopant for the nanostructured conductive polymer for the first time. The samples exhibit the well-defined nanoparticles observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The PPy nanoparticles were achieved and outstanding electrical conductivity as high as 5263 S m−1 was obtained with the feeding mass ratio of phytic acid: pyrrole=3:7. Furthermore, the polypyrrole nanoparticles were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and electrical conductivity techniques

  9. A facile method to synthesize polypyrrole nanoparticles in the presence of natural organic phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Mo, Haodao; Zang, Limin; Qiu, Jianhui; Sakai, Eiichi; Wu, Xueli

    2014-09-01

    The conductive polymers with unique nanostructures have attracted intense interest due to their potential application. Here the well-defined polypyrrole nanoparticles were facile fabricated via the facile chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole with high feeding ratio of phytic acid. Phytic acid is a renewable resource and a natural carbohydrate compound with a vast number of phosphate groups from plant which was used as the template and dopant for the nanostructured conductive polymer for the first time. The samples exhibit the well-defined nanoparticles observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The PPy nanoparticles were achieved and outstanding electrical conductivity as high as 5263 S m-1 was obtained with the feeding mass ratio of phytic acid: pyrrole=3:7. Furthermore, the polypyrrole nanoparticles were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and electrical conductivity techniques.

  10. A facile method to synthesize polypyrrole nanoparticles in the presence of natural organic phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao; Mo, Haodao [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nonferrous Metals and Specific Materials Processing, College of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Zang, Limin, E-mail: D14S004@akita-pu.ac.jp [Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo City, Akita 015-0055 (Japan); Qiu, Jianhui; Sakai, Eiichi; Wu, Xueli [Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Faculty of Systems Engineering, Akita Prefectural University, Yurihonjo City, Akita 015-0055 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The conductive polymers with unique nanostructures have attracted intense interest due to their potential application. Here the well-defined polypyrrole nanoparticles were facile fabricated via the facile chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole with high feeding ratio of phytic acid. Phytic acid is a renewable resource and a natural carbohydrate compound with a vast number of phosphate groups from plant which was used as the template and dopant for the nanostructured conductive polymer for the first time. The samples exhibit the well-defined nanoparticles observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The PPy nanoparticles were achieved and outstanding electrical conductivity as high as 5263 S m{sup −1} was obtained with the feeding mass ratio of phytic acid: pyrrole=3:7. Furthermore, the polypyrrole nanoparticles were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and electrical conductivity techniques.

  11. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, thereby possibly influencing the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic carbon (SOC stocks are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOC stocks is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing around 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory.

    We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOC stocks as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOC stocks for mainland France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on SOC for such soils.

    The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOC stocks and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions over the French territory. These relationships strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically, differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOC stocks in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOC stock distributions of France, and consequently that the

  12. Spatial distribution of soil organic carbon stocks in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. P.; Wattenbach, M.; Smith, P.; Meersmans, J.; Jolivet, C.; Boulonne, L.; Arrouays, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil organic carbon plays a major role in the global carbon budget, and can act as a source or a sink of atmospheric carbon, thereby possibly influencing the course of climate change. Changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks are now taken into account in international negotiations regarding climate change. Consequently, developing sampling schemes and models for estimating the spatial distribution of SOC stocks is a priority. The French soil monitoring network has been established on a 16 km × 16 km grid and the first sampling campaign has recently been completed, providing around 2200 measurements of stocks of soil organic carbon, obtained through an in situ composite sampling, uniformly distributed over the French territory. We calibrated a boosted regression tree model on the observed stocks, modelling SOC stocks as a function of other variables such as climatic parameters, vegetation net primary productivity, soil properties and land use. The calibrated model was evaluated through cross-validation and eventually used for estimating SOC stocks for mainland France. Two other models were calibrated on forest and agricultural soils separately, in order to assess more precisely the influence of pedo-climatic variables on SOC for such soils. The boosted regression tree model showed good predictive ability, and enabled quantification of relationships between SOC stocks and pedo-climatic variables (plus their interactions) over the French territory. These relationships strongly depended on the land use, and more specifically, differed between forest soils and cultivated soil. The total estimate of SOC stocks in France was 3.260 ± 0.872 PgC for the first 30 cm. It was compared to another estimate, based on the previously published European soil organic carbon and bulk density maps, of 5.303 PgC. We demonstrate that the present estimate might better represent the actual SOC stock distributions of France, and consequently that the previously published approach at the

  13. Conversion of organic carbon in the decomposable organic wastes in anaerobic lysimeters under different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, You-Cai; Wang, Luo-Chun

    2003-05-01

    The quantitative fractions of conversion of organic carbon in the decomposable organic wastes with initial moisture of 70% sorted from municipal solid wastes (MSW) in lysimeters into biogas, leachate and solid residue were characterized, under temperatures of 25, 30 and 41 degrees C, respectively, and circulation of leachate generated within the lysimeter. It is found that 27% of organic carbon in the wastes are conversed into gases, 0.8% into leachate, and the other 72% remained in the decomposable solid residues, after 180 days' degradation at 41 degrees C. Higher temperature will lead to more rapid degradation and result to higher conversion of the organic carbon to biogas and lower to both solid residues and leachate, while the pollutant concentrations in leachate will be lower at a higher temperature and the values of COD are quite consistent with TOC. PMID:12938979

  14. Conversion of organic carbon in the decomposable organic wastes in anaerobic lysimeters under different temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative fractions of conversion of organic carbon in the decomposable organic wastes with initial moisture of 70% sorted from municipal solid wastes(MSW) in lysimeters into biogas, leachate and solid residue were characterized, under temperatures of 25, 30 and 41℃, respectively, and circulation of leachate generated within the lysimeters. It is found that 27% of organic carbon in the wastes are conversed into gases, 0.8% into leachate, and the other 72% remained in the decomposable solid residues, after 180 days' degradation at 41℃. Higher temperature will lead to more rapid degradation and result to higher conversion of the organic carbon to biogas and lower to both solid residues and leachate, while the pollutant concentrations in leachate will be lower at a higher temperature and the values of COD are quite consistent with TOC.

  15. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yanyi; Liu Dawei; Zhang Qifeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Yu Danmei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liu Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Cao Guozhong, E-mail: gzcao@u.washington.ed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO{sub 4}/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO{sub 4} electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  16. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanyi; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qifeng; Yu, Danmei; Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO4/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO4 electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  17. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO4/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO4 electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  18. Efficient organic carbon burial in the Bengal fan sustained by the Himalayan erosional system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Valier; France-Lanord, Christian; Beyssac, Olivier; Faure, Pierre; Kudrass, Hermann; Palhol, Fabien

    2007-11-15

    Continental erosion controls atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on geological timescales through silicate weathering, riverine transport and subsequent burial of organic carbon in oceanic sediments. The efficiency of organic carbon deposition in sedimentary basins is however limited by the organic carbon load capacity of the sediments and organic carbon oxidation in continental margins. At the global scale, previous studies have suggested that about 70 per cent of riverine organic carbon is returned to the atmosphere, such as in the Amazon basin. Here we present a comprehensive organic carbon budget for the Himalayan erosional system, including source rocks, river sediments and marine sediments buried in the Bengal fan. We show that organic carbon export is controlled by sediment properties, and that oxidative loss is negligible during transport and deposition to the ocean. Our results indicate that 70 to 85 per cent of the organic carbon is recent organic matter captured during transport, which serves as a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. The amount of organic carbon deposited in the Bengal basin represents about 10 to 20 per cent of the total terrestrial organic carbon buried in oceanic sediments. High erosion rates in the Himalayas generate high sedimentation rates and low oxygen availability in the Bay of Bengal that sustain the observed extreme organic carbon burial efficiency. Active orogenic systems generate enhanced physical erosion and the resulting organic carbon burial buffers atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, thereby exerting a negative feedback on climate over geological timescales. PMID:18004382

  19. Assimilable organic carbon generation from algogenic organic matter in drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Young-Ju; QURESHI, Tahir Irman

    2011-01-01

    A study of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) derived from algogenic organic matter in different drinking water resources was conducted. Seasonal changes in the concentration of AOC at Kamafusa Dam were dependent on the algal cell numbers. Variations in AOC concentrations were found to be more reliant on the AOC-P17 component than the AOC-NOX component. The algal culture experiment showed that extracellular organic matter (EOM) released during the growth of Phormidium tenue in M-11 cu...

  20. Soil Organic Carbon Loss: An Overlooked Factor in the Carbon Sequestration Potential of Enhanced Mineral Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzen, Christiana; Harrison, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Weathering of silicate minerals regulates the global carbon cycle on geologic timescales. Several authors have proposed that applying finely ground silicate minerals to soils, where organic acids would enhance the rate of weathering, could increase carbon uptake and mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Silicate minerals such as olivine could replace lime, which is commonly used to remediate soil acidification, thereby sequestering CO2 while achieving the same increase in soil pH. However, the effect of adding this material on soil organic matter, the largest terrestrial pool of carbon, has yet to be considered. Microbial biomass and respiration have been observed to increase with decreasing acidity, but it is unclear how long the effect lasts. If the addition of silicate minerals promotes the loss of soil organic carbon through decomposition, it could significantly reduce the efficiency of this process or even create a net carbon source. However, it is possible that this initial flush of microbial activity may be compensated for by additional organic matter inputs to soil pools due to increases in plant productivity under less acidic conditions. This study aimed to examine the effects of olivine amendments on soil CO2 flux. A liming treatment representative of typical agricultural practices was also included for comparison. Samples from two highly acidic soils were split into groups amended with olivine or lime and a control group. These samples were incubated at 22°C and constant soil moisture in jars with airtight septa lids. Gas samples were extracted periodically over the course of 2 months and change in headspace CO2 concentration was determined. The effects of enhanced mineral weathering on soil organic matter have yet to be addressed by those promoting this method of carbon sequestration. This project provides the first data on the potential effects of enhanced mineral weathering in the soil environment on soil organic carbon pools.

  1. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  2. Fossil organic carbon in Siberian Yedoma and thermokarst deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, J.; Schirrmeister, L.; Wetterich, S.

    2011-12-01

    During the late Quaternary, a large pool of organic carbon accumulated in the ice-rich syngenetic frozen deposits and soils preserved in the arctic and subarctic permafrost zone. Because of the potential release of organic carbon from degrading permafrost, the organic-matter (OM) inventory in Yedoma deposits and its degradation features are relevant to current concerns about the effects of global warming. In this context, it is essential to improve the understanding permafrost-stored OM composition and availability. The objective of this study is to develop an approach of OM quantification in frozen deposits including OM quality estimation. We analyzed OM characteristics like total organic carbon content, stable carbon isotopes and carbon-nitrogen ratios. Moreover, lipid biomarkers (alkanes, fatty acids and glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether) and sediment parameters like grain size and bulk density of Yedoma and thermokarst deposits exposed at Duvanny Yar (lower Kolyma River, Siberia) and the west coast of Buor Khaya Peninsula (Laptev Sea, Siberia) were studied. With the biomarker approach it is possible to distinguish deposits which were accumulated and frozen during the Pleistocene and Holocene. Biomarker indices, like the compound specific index, average chain length and tetraether characteristics supply feasible results for past permafrost environments. Late Pleistocene biomarker records indicate cold conditions during the growth/summer period for the late Pleistocene and generally low degradation of the stored OM. In contrast, Holocene thermokarst deposits indicate warmer conditions. The averaged volumetric OM content of the studied Yedoma and thermokarst deposits are greater than 10 kg/m^3 and do not exceed 30 kg/m^3. Given that Yedoma deposits accumulated at relatively fast rates and at low temperatures, the OM underwent a short time of decomposition before it was incorporated into a permanently-frozen state. Consequently, such deposits contain a labile

  3. Fluorescence characteristics of water soluble organic carbon in eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence excitation and average molecular weight of 46 water soluble organic matter (WSOC) samples extracted from 20 soil types in eastern China were determined. It was found all samples shared similar spectroscopy. A good linear relationship existed between total organic carbon and excitation in the range of 350 to 450 nm though the content of organic carbon and pH of the samples vary in a wide range. No significant correlation between relative excitation intensity and average molecular weight of WSOC and FA was found, but the partial correlation became significant with pH as the controlling factor for WSOC samples. The relative excitation intensity showed a general trend of increasing from south to north in the study area. The pH value might play an important role in regulating the fluorescent spatial variation of WSOC.

  4. Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coating for carbon/carbon composites prepared by pulsed electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shou-jie; Li, He-jun; Zhang, Lei-lei; Feng, Lei; Yao, Pei

    2015-12-01

    Trace elements substituted apatite coatings have received a lot of interest recently as they have many benefits. In this work, strontium and magnesium substituted DCPD (SM-DCPD) coatings were deposited on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by pulsed electrodeposition method. The morphology, microstructure, corrosion resistance and in vitro bioactivity of the SM-DCPD coatings are analyzed. The results show that the SM-DCPD coatings exhibit a flake-like morphology with dense and uniform structure. The SM-DCPD coatings could induce the formation of apatite layers on their surface in simulated body fluid. The electrochemical test indicates that the SM-DCPD coatings can evidently decrease the corrosion rate of the C/C composites in simulated body fluid. The SM-DCPD has potential application as the bioactive coatings.

  5. Mineralogy and geochemistry of phosphate minerals and brannerite from the Proterozoic Carbon Leader Reef gold and uranium placer deposit, Witwatersrand, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttrium-phosphate, the most common phosphate phase, is closely associated with detrital uraninite. It is assumed having formed by the reaction of mobile phosphate with Y and HREE liberated from the lattice of detrital uraninite, during diagenesis and/or metamorphism of the sediments. Authigenic brannerite (UTi2-3O6-8) is well-defined microscopically and geochemically. Textural relationships indicate that both titanium migrated to uraninite, forming brannerite, and mobile uranium caused the 'branneritization' of rutile/leucoxene. Microprobe analyses demonstrate that brannerite from the Carbon Leader Reef displays a distinct and small variation of UO2/TiO2 ratios, which lie close to the theoretical value of 1.117 for UTi3O8, in contrast to uraniferous leucoxene/brannerite from other Witwatersrand-type deposits, the latter showing a wide scatter of UO2/TiO2 ratios. (orig./HP)

  6. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2005-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment. Two activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were also used, with no modification, to examine the effect of carbon porosity on DOM adsorption. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)) were employed to characterize the DOMs before and after adsorption. Iron-impregnated (HDFe) and ammonia-treated (HDN) activated carbons showed significantly higher DOM uptakes than the virgin GAC. The enhanced DOM uptake by HDFe was due to the presence of iron species on the carbon surface. The higher uptake of HDN was attributed to the enlarged carbon pores and basic surface created during ammonia treatment. The SEC and SUVA(254) results showed no specific selectivity in the removal of different DOM components as a result of carbon modification. The removal of DOM from both raw and treated waters was negligible by ACF10, having 96% of its surface area in pores smaller than 1 nm. Small molecular weight (MW) DOM components were preferentially removed by ACF20H, having 33% of its surface area in 1--3 nm pores. DOM components with MWs larger than 1600, 2000, and 2700 Da of Charleston raw, Charleston-treated, and Spartanburg-treated waters, respectively, were excluded from the pores of ACF20H. In contrast to carbon fibers, DOM components from entire MW range were removed from waters by virgin and modified GACs. PMID:15927230

  7. Study on the Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Carbon Steel by Sodium Phosphate and Sodium Nitrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium nitrite is widely used as one of the popular corrosion inhibitors for the protection of ferrous metal in closed cooling water system, such as a diesel engine and a chiller. The optimum treatment conditions are studied through laboratory tests using linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique. Corrosion rate of the carbon steel electrode could be maintained less than 2.5x10-3 mmpy in the test condition of 500 ppm as NO2-, 200 ppm as CT, 70 .deg. C and pH 6.8. The pH control is confirmed not to be an important factor in the protection of carbon steel by sodium nitrite inhibitor. The addition of tolyltriazole was needed for the protection of the copper alloy in the sodium nitrite treatment system

  8. Cyanobacterial reuse of extracellular organic carbon in microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Rhona K; Mayali, Xavier; Lee, Jackson Z; Craig Everroad, R; Hwang, Mona; Bebout, Brad M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacterial organic matter excretion is crucial to carbon cycling in many microbial communities, but the nature and bioavailability of this C depend on unknown physiological functions. Cyanobacteria-dominated hypersaline laminated mats are a useful model ecosystem for the study of C flow in complex communities, as they use photosynthesis to sustain a more or less closed system. Although such mats have a large C reservoir in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), the production and degradation of organic carbon is not well defined. To identify extracellular processes in cyanobacterial mats, we examined mats collected from Elkhorn Slough (ES) at Monterey Bay, California, for glycosyl and protein composition of the EPS. We found a prevalence of simple glucose polysaccharides containing either α or β (1,4) linkages, indicating distinct sources of glucose with differing enzymatic accessibility. Using proteomics, we identified cyanobacterial extracellular enzymes, and also detected activities that indicate a capacity for EPS degradation. In a less complex system, we characterized the EPS of a cyanobacterial isolate from ES, ESFC-1, and found the extracellular composition of biofilms produced by this unicyanobacterial culture were similar to that of natural mats. By tracing isotopically labeled EPS into single cells of ESFC-1, we demonstrated rapid incorporation of extracellular-derived carbon. Taken together, these results indicate cyanobacteria reuse excess organic carbon, constituting a dynamic pool of extracellular resources in these mats. PMID:26495994

  9. Methodology guideline. Organization of conference neutral in carbon; Guide methodologique. Organisation de conference neutre en carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    In the framework of the Climate Plan elaborated by the french government, the neutral carbon principle must be applied to conference organization and the international travels. This guide has two main functions: heighten to allow everybody to understand the climate change impacts and problems, and bring some recommendations and tools to implement a neutral carbon conference (transport, welcome, accommodation and meal). (A.L.B.)

  10. Soil Organic Carbon and Labile Carbon Along a Precipitation Gradient and Their Responses to Some Environmental Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-Ping; ZHOU Guang-Sheng; GAO Su-Hua; GUO Jian-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from a field survey in 2001 along the Northeast China transect (NECT), a precipitation gradient,and a short-term simulation experiment under ambient CO2 of 350 μmol mol-1 and doubled CO2 of 700 μmol mol-1 with different soil moisture contents of 30%-45%, 45%-60%, and 60%-80% soil water holding capacity, the distribution of soil organic carbon and labile carbon along the NECT, their relationships with precipitation and their responses to CO2 enrichment and soil moisture changes were analyzed. The results indicated that the soil labile carbon along the gradient was significantly related to soil organic carbon (r = 0.993, P < 0.001). The soil labile carbon decreased more rapidly with depth than organic carbon. The soil organic and labile carbon along the gradient decreased with decrease in longitude in both the topsoils and subsoils, and the coefficient of variation for the labile carbon was greater than that for the organic carbon. Both the soil organic carbon and labile carbon had significant linear relationships with precipitation,with the correlation coefficient of soil organic carbon being lower (0.677 at P <0.001) than that of soil labile carbon (0.712 at P < 0.001). In the simulation experiment with doubled and ambient CO2 and different moisture contents, the coefficient of variation for soil organic carbon was only 1.3%, while for soil labile carbon it was 29.7%. With doubled CO2 concentration (700μmol mol-1), soil labile carbon decreased significantly at 45% to 60% of soil moisture content. These indicated that soil labile carbon was relatively more sensitive to environmental changes than soil organic carbon.

  11. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  12. Effect of biostimulation on biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon in biological granular activated carbon filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tihomirova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The addition of labile organic carbon (LOC to enhance the biodegradation rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in biological columns was studied. Acetate standard solution (NaAc and LB (Luria Bertrani medium were used as LOC as biostimulants in glass column system used for measurements of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC. The addition of LOC related with the increase of total DOC in sample. The concentration of BDOC increased up to 7 and 5 times and was utilized after 24 min. contact time. The biodegradation rate constant was increased at least 8 times during adaptation-biostimulation period. There was a strong positive correlation between the biodegradation rate constant and the concentration of BDOC. Biostimulation period ranged from 24 to 53 h for NaAc biostimulant and from 20 to 168 h for LB. The study has shown that LOC could be used as stimulator to enhance the biodegradation rate of DOC during biofiltration.

  13. Axially aligned organic fibers and amorphous calcium phosphate form the claws of a terrestrial isopod (Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittori, Miloš; Srot, Vesna; Žagar, Kristina; Bussmann, Birgit; van Aken, Peter A; Čeh, Miran; Štrus, Jasna

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal elements that are exposed to heavy mechanical loads may provide important insights into the evolutionary solutions to mechanical challenges. We analyzed the microscopic architecture of dactylus claws in the woodlice Porcellio scaber and correlated these observations with analyses of the claws' mineral composition with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Extraordinarily, amorphous calcium phosphate is the predominant mineral in the claw endocuticle. Unlike the strongly calcified exocuticle of the dactylus base, the claw exocuticle is devoid of mineral and is highly brominated. The architecture of the dactylus claw cuticle is drastically different from that of other parts of the exoskeleton. In contrast to the quasi-isotropic structure with chitin-protein fibers oriented in multiple directions, characteristic of the arthropod exoskeleton, the chitin-protein fibers and mineral components in the endocuticle of P. scaber claws are exclusively axially oriented. Taken together, these characteristics suggest that the claw cuticle is highly structurally anisotropic and fracture resistant and can be explained as adaptations to predominant axial loading of the thin, elongated claws. The nanoscale architecture of the isopod claw may inspire technological solutions in the design of durable machine elements subjected to heavy loading and wear. PMID:27320700

  14. The Decomposition of Carbonates and Organics on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Richard C.; Zent, Aaron; McKay, Chris; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The return and analysis of pristine material that is relict of a putative period of chemical evolution is a fumdamental goal of the exobiological exploration of Mars. In order to accomplish this objective, it is desirable to find oxidant-free regions where pristine material can be accessed at the shallowest possible depth (ideally directly from the surface). The objective of our ongoing research is to understand the spatial and temporal distribution of oxidants in the martian regolith and the redox chemistry of the soil; in effect to understand the chemical mechanisms and kinetics relating to the in-situ destruction of organics and the formation of the reactive species responsible for the Viking biology results. In this work, we report on experimental studies of oxidizing processes that may contribute to carbonate and organic degradation on Mars. Organic molecules directly exposed to solar UV may decomposed either directly into CO2, or into more volatile organic fragments. Organic macromolecules not directly exposed to high UV flux are most likely to be affected by atmospheric oxidants which can diffuse to their surfaces. The oxidizing processes examined include: gas-phase oxidants, UV photolysis, and UV-assisted heterogeneous catalysis. For example, assuming a meteroritic infall rate of 4 x 10(exp -4) g/m^2yr (Flynn and McKay 1990) and a flux of organic carbon of 2 x 10(exp -5) g/m^2yr, laboratory measurements of the UV-assisted decomposition of benzenehexacarboxylic acid (mellitic acid, a likely intermediate of kerogen oxidation), indicate its decomposition rate on Mars would exceed the total flux of organic carbon to the planet by over four orders of magnitude. Our measurements indicate that although the decomposition temperature of kerogens in some cases exceeds the temperature limit of the Viking GCMS, it is unlikely kerogens or their decomposition intermediates were present at the Viking landings sites at levels above the GCMS detection limits.

  15. An experimental study on the effects of nutrient enrichment on organic carbon storage in western Pacific oligotrophic gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Jiao, N.; Tang, K.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon sequestration in the ocean is of great concern with respect to the mitigation of global warming. How to hold the fixed organic carbon in the presence of tremendous heterotrophic microorganisms in marine environments is the central issue. We have previously hypothesized that excessive nutrients would ultimately decrease the storage of organic carbon in marine environments. To test it out, a series of in situ nutrient enrichment incubation experiments were conducted at a site (17.59° N, 127.00° E) within the Western Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Five treatments were employed: glucose or algal exudation organic material (EOM) and nitrate and phosphate were added alone or in combination to approximate final concentrations of 10 μmol C kg-1, 1 μmol N kg-1 and 0.11 μmol P kg-1 respectively. The results showed that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) consumption rates and bacterial community specific growth rates were enhanced by inorganic nutrients enrichment treatments during the initial 48 h incubation. At the end of 14 days incubation, about 1/3 (average 3.29 μmol C kg-1) more organic carbon was respired from the glucose enriched incubation with addition of inorganic nutrients compared to that without addition of inorganic nutrients. In the case no essential nutrients were available, even glucose could not be efficiently used by bacteria and thus remained in the environment. These results suggest that repletion of inorganic nutrients has negative impacts on carbon preservation, presumably due to elevated nutrient-stimulated bacterial metabolism and respiration, which is meaningful for potential coastal water management and worth for further studies.

  16. An experimental study on the effects of nutrient enrichment on organic carbon storage in western Pacific oligotrophic gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in the ocean is of great concern with respect to the mitigation of global warming. How to hold the fixed organic carbon in the presence of tremendous heterotrophic microorganisms in marine environments is the central issue. We have previously hypothesized that excessive nutrients would ultimately decrease the storage of organic carbon in marine environments. To test it out, a series of in situ nutrient enrichment incubation experiments were conducted at a site (17.59° N, 127.00° E within the Western Pacific oligotrophic gyre. Five treatments were employed: glucose or algal exudation organic material (EOM and nitrate and phosphate were added alone or in combination to approximate final concentrations of 10 μmol C kg−1, 1 μmol N kg−1 and 0.11 μmol P kg−1 respectively. The results showed that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC consumption rates and bacterial community specific growth rates were enhanced by inorganic nutrients enrichment treatments during the initial 48 h incubation. At the end of 14 days incubation, about 1/3 (average 3.29 μmol C kg−1 more organic carbon was respired from the glucose enriched incubation with addition of inorganic nutrients compared to that without addition of inorganic nutrients. In the case no essential nutrients were available, even glucose could not be efficiently used by bacteria and thus remained in the environment. These results suggest that repletion of inorganic nutrients has negative impacts on carbon preservation, presumably due to elevated nutrient-stimulated bacterial metabolism and respiration, which is meaningful for potential coastal water management and worth for further studies.

  17. Aged riverine particulate organic carbon in four UK catchments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The riverine transport of particulate organic matter (POM) is a significant flux in the carbon cycle, and affects macronutrients and contaminants. We used radiocarbon to characterise POM at 9 riverine sites of four UK catchments (Avon, Conwy, Dee, Ribble) over a one-year period. High-discharge samples were collected on three or four occasions at each site. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) was obtained by centrifugation, and the samples were analysed for carbon isotopes. Concentrations of SPM and SPM organic carbon (OC) contents were also determined, and were found to have a significant negative correlation. For the 7 rivers draining predominantly rural catchments, PO14C values, expressed as percent modern carbon absolute (pMC), varied little among samplings at each site, and there was no significant difference in the average values among the sites. The overall average PO14C value for the 7 sites of 91.2 pMC corresponded to an average age of 680 14C years, but this value arises from the mixing of differently-aged components, and therefore significant amounts of organic matter older than the average value are present in the samples. Although topsoil erosion is probably the major source of the riverine POM, the average PO14C value is appreciably lower than topsoil values (which are typically 100 pMC). This is most likely explained by inputs of older subsoil OC from bank erosion, or the preferential loss of high-14C topsoil organic matter by mineralisation during riverine transport. The significantly lower average PO14C of samples from the River Calder (76.6 pMC), can be ascribed to components containing little or no radiocarbon, derived either from industrial sources or historical coal mining, and this effect is also seen in the River Ribble, downstream of its confluence with the Calder. At the global scale, the results significantly expand available information for PO14C in rivers draining catchments with low erosion rates. - Highlights: • Particulate organic

  18. Aged riverine particulate organic carbon in four UK catchments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Jessica L., E-mail: jesams@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Bryant, Charlotte L., E-mail: charlotte.bryant@glasgow.ac.uk [NERC Radiocarbon Facility, East Kilbride G75 0QF, Scotland (United Kingdom); Helliwell, Rachel C., E-mail: rachel.helliwell@hutton.ac.uk [The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH Scotland (United Kingdom); Toberman, Hannah, E-mail: hannahtoberman@hotmail.com [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Quinton, John, E-mail: j.quinton@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    The riverine transport of particulate organic matter (POM) is a significant flux in the carbon cycle, and affects macronutrients and contaminants. We used radiocarbon to characterise POM at 9 riverine sites of four UK catchments (Avon, Conwy, Dee, Ribble) over a one-year period. High-discharge samples were collected on three or four occasions at each site. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) was obtained by centrifugation, and the samples were analysed for carbon isotopes. Concentrations of SPM and SPM organic carbon (OC) contents were also determined, and were found to have a significant negative correlation. For the 7 rivers draining predominantly rural catchments, PO{sup 14}C values, expressed as percent modern carbon absolute (pMC), varied little among samplings at each site, and there was no significant difference in the average values among the sites. The overall average PO{sup 14}C value for the 7 sites of 91.2 pMC corresponded to an average age of 680 {sup 14}C years, but this value arises from the mixing of differently-aged components, and therefore significant amounts of organic matter older than the average value are present in the samples. Although topsoil erosion is probably the major source of the riverine POM, the average PO{sup 14}C value is appreciably lower than topsoil values (which are typically 100 pMC). This is most likely explained by inputs of older subsoil OC from bank erosion, or the preferential loss of high-{sup 14}C topsoil organic matter by mineralisation during riverine transport. The significantly lower average PO{sup 14}C of samples from the River Calder (76.6 pMC), can be ascribed to components containing little or no radiocarbon, derived either from industrial sources or historical coal mining, and this effect is also seen in the River Ribble, downstream of its confluence with the Calder. At the global scale, the results significantly expand available information for PO{sup 14}C in rivers draining catchments with low erosion rates

  19. A study of organic acid production in contrasts between two phosphate solubilizing fungi: Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Bai, Tongshuo; Dai, Letian; Wang, Fuwei; Tao, Jinjin; Meng, Shiting; Hu, Yunxiao; Wang, Shimei; Hu, Shuijin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate solubilizing fungi (PSF) have huge potentials in enhancing release of phosphorus from fertilizer. Two PSF (NJDL-03 and NJDL-12) were isolated and identified as Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger respectively in this study. The quantification and identification of organic acids were performed by HPLC. Total concentrations of organic acids secreted by NJDL-03 and NJDL-12 are ~4000 and ~10,000 mg/L with pH values of 3.6 and 2.4 respectively after five-days culture. Oxalic acid dominates acidity in the medium due to its high concentration and high acidity constant. The two fungi were also cultured for five days with the initial pH values of the medium varied from 6.5 to 1.5. The biomass reached the maximum when the initial pH values are 4.5 for NJDL-03 and 2.5 for NJDL-12. The organic acids for NJDL-12 reach the maximum at the initial pH = 5.5. However, the acids by NJDL-03 continue to decrease and proliferation of the fungus terminates at pH = 2.5. The citric acid production increases significantly for NJDL-12 at acidic environment, whereas formic and oxalic acids decrease sharply for both two fungi. This study shows that NJDL-12 has higher ability in acid production and has stronger adaptability to acidic environment than NJDL-03. PMID:27126606

  20. Organic nutrient enrichment in the oligotrophic ocean: Impacts on remineralization, carbon sequestration, and community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, K. R.; Paytan, A.; Post, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    In oligotrophic seas where inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are below the limits of detection, organic forms of these nutrients may constitute greater than 90% of the total N and P in the euphotic zone. The combined enzymatic activity of phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria determines the rate of nutrient remineralization, thereby influencing phytoplankton growth rates and carbon sequestration in these regions. In this study we investigated the effects of fertilization with ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), and phosphate (PO4) as well as various forms of organic N (urea, glycine) and P (deoxyribonucleic acid, 2- aminoethyl phosphonic acid, phytic acid) on the growth and taxonomic composition of the phytoplankton community in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. The impacts of these changes on nutrient cycling and biological assimilation were also assessed. Organic N additions led to phytoplankton growth when given together with PO4, yielding 2-3 fold increases in chlorophyll a (Chl a) and cell density relative to initial levels. Moreover, our results show that addition of NH4 or NO3 led to accumulation of extra-cellular NO2, suggesting that incomplete assimilatory reduction of NO3 by phytoplankton as well as chemoautotrophic oxidation of NH4 by ammonium oxidizing microbes contributed to NO2 formation. These findings conflict with earlier studies in the Gulf that attributed NO2 formation solely to the phytoplankton community. Organic P additions also led to 2-3 fold increases in Chl a and cell density relative to initial levels when given together with NH4 and NO3. Compared to other P additions, DNA led to the rapid accumulation of extra-cellular PO4, indicating substantial nucleotidase activity in excess of the amount needed to meet phytoplankton growth requirements. These results show the importance and interconnectivity of phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria communities in contributing to nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration in

  1. Dissolved organic carbon in headwater streams and riparian soil organic carbon along an altitudinal gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    Full Text Available Stream water dissolved organic carbon (DOC correlates positively with soil organic carbon (SOC in many biomes. Does this relationship hold in a small geographic region when variations of temperature, precipitation and vegetation are driven by a significant altitudinal gradient? We examined the spatial connectivity between concentrations of DOC in headwater stream and contents of riparian SOC and water-soluble soil organic carbon (WSOC, riparian soil C:N ratio, and temperature in four vegetation types along an altitudinal gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China. Our analyses showed that annual mean concentrations of headwater stream DOC were lower in alpine meadow (AM than in subtropical evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF, coniferous forest (CF, and subalpine dwarf forest (SDF. Headwater stream DOC concentrations were negatively correlated with riparian SOC as well as WSOC contents, and were unrelated to riparian soil C:N ratio. Our findings suggest that DOC concentrations in headwater streams are affected by different factors at regional and local scales. The dilution effect of higher precipitation and adsorption of soil DOC to higher soil clay plus silt content at higher elevation may play an important role in causing lower DOC concentrations in AM stream of the Wuyi Mountains. Our results suggest that upscaling and downscaling of the drivers of DOC export from forested watersheds when exploring the response of carbon flux to climatic change or other drivers must done with caution.

  2. Erosion of Organic Carbon from Permafrost Zones in the Arctic as a Geological Carbon Dioxide Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, R. G.; Galy, V.; Gaillardet, J.; Dellinger, M.; Bryant, C.; O'Regan, M.; Gröcke, D. R.; Coxall, H.; Bouchez, J.; Calmels, D.

    2015-12-01

    Soils of the northern high latitudes store carbon over millennial timescales and contain almost double the carbon stock of the atmosphere. The exposure and decomposition of aged organic matter in these soils is a carbon dioxide (CO2) source to the atmosphere. Permafrost thaw over the coming century may result in a significant CO2 release. However, some of this soil organic carbon in permafrost zones can be eroded and input to rivers. If it escapes degradation during river transport and is buried in ocean sediments, it instead contributes to a longer-term (>104 yr), geological CO2sink. Despite this recognition, the erosional flux and fate of particulate organic carbon (POC) in large rivers draining permafrost zones remains poorly constrained. We quantify POC source, flux and fate in the Mackenzie River Basin, the main sediment supplier to the Arctic Ocean, using radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes and element ratios to correct for rock-derived POC. The eroded biospheric POC has resided in the basin for millennia, with a mean radiocarbon age of 5800±800 yr. Rivers eroding continuous permafrost zones contribute the oldest biospheric POC. Based on the measured biospheric POC content and annual sediment flux, we calculate a biospheric POC flux of 2.2 (+1.3/-0.9) TgC yr-1 from the Mackenzie River to the Arctic Ocean, three times the CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering. Offshore we find evidence for efficient terrestrial carbon burial over the Holocene period. Our findings demonstrate how erosion of organic carbon-rich, high latitude soils can result in a significant geological CO2sink. We postulate that this geological CO2 sink is sensitive to climate conditions in the Arctic. The transfer can operate when high latitudes host carbon stocks in soil, and while rivers can erode and transfer sediments to the Arctic Ocean. Over the last 1Ma, the erosional transfer was likely to have been enhanced during interglacials. We propose that erosion of biospheric carbon by large

  3. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Depositional Landscapes of Bavaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegs, Stefanie; Schwindt, Daniel; Völkel, Jörg; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    Erosion leads to redistribution and accumulation of soil organic matter (SOM) within agricultural landscapes. These fluvic and colluvic deposits are characterized by a highly diverse vertical structure and can contain high amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) over the whole soil profile. Depositional landscapes are therefore not only productive sites for agricultural use but also influence carbon dynamics which is of great interest with regard on the recent climate change debate. The aim of our study is to elucidate the spatial distribution of organic carbon stocks, as well as its depth function and the role of these landscapes as a reservoir for SOM. Therefore we compare two representative depositional landscapes in Bavaria composed of different parent materials (carbonate vs. granitic). We hypothesize that the soils associated with different depositional processes (fluvial vs. colluvial) differ in SOC contents and stocks, also because of different hydromorphic regimes in fluvic versus colluvic soil profiles. Sampling sites are located in the Alpine Foreland (quaternary moraines with carbonatic parent material) and the foothills of the Bavarian Forest (Granite with Loess) with the main soil types Fluvisols, Gleysols and Luvisols. At both sites we sampled twelve soil profiles up to 150 cm depth, six in the floodplain and six along a vertical slope transect. We took undisturbed soil samples from each horizon and analyzed them for bulk density, total Carbon (OC and IC) and total Nitrogen (N) concentrations. This approach allows to calculate total OC contents and OC stocks and to investigate vertical and horizontal distribution of OC stocks. It will also reveal differences in OC stocks due to the location of the soil profile in fluvic or colluvic deposition scenarios.

  4. Poly(trimethylene carbonate) and biphasic calcium phosphate composites for orbital floor reconstruction: a feasibility study in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, A C; Yuan, H; Passanisi, G; van der Meer, J W; de Bruijn, J D; van Kooten, T G; Grijpma, D W; Bos, R R M

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of orbital floor fractures, bone is ideally regenerated. The materials currently used for orbital floor reconstruction do not lead to the regeneration of bone. Our objective was to render polymeric materials based on poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) osteoinductive, and to evaluate their suitability for use in orbital floor reconstruction. For this purpose, osteoinductive biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) particles were introduced into a polymeric PTMC matrix. Composite sheets containing 50 wt% BCP particles were prepared. Also laminates with poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) were prepared by compression moulding PDLLA films onto the composite sheets. After sterilisation by gamma irradiation, the sheets were used to reconstruct surgically-created orbital floor defects in sheep. The bone inducing potential of the different implants was assessed upon intramuscular implantation. The performance of the implants in orbital floor reconstruction was assessed by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Histological evaluation revealed that in the orbital and intramuscular implantations of BCP containing specimens, bone formation could be seen after 3 and 9 months. Analysis of the CBCT scans showed that the composite PTMC sheets and the laminated composite sheets performed well in orbital floor reconstruction. It is concluded that PTMC/BCP composites and PTMC/BCP composites laminated with PDLLA have osteoinductive properties and seem suitable for use in orbital floor reconstruction. PMID:24488822

  5. Photoelectrochemical investigation of methylene blue immobilised on zirconium phosphate modified carbon paste electrode in flow injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto zirconium phosphate (ZrP) was studied and the adsorption capacity value and isotherms were determined. The adsorption capacity of ZrP was increased after being exposed to gas phase n-butyl amine. The adsorbed MB on ZrP was used as a modifier material in carbon paste electrode (MCPE), which in turn was used in voltammetric investigations and flow injection (FI) amperometric determination of ascorbic acid (AA). A quasi-reversible electrode reaction of adsorbed MB was exhibited. A home made flow-through electrochemical cell with a suitable transparent window for irradiation of the electrode surface was constructed and used for amperometric FI studies. The photoamperometric-FI conditions were optimised as 1.5 mL min-1 flow rate, a 25 cm transmission tubing length, a 100 μL injection volume, and a constant applied potential of +100 mV versus SCE. The calibration curve for AA was linear over the concentration range from 1.0 x 10-6 to 4.0 x 10-5 M. The relative standard deviation of four replicate injections of 3.0 x 10-5 M AA was 1.2%. The results obtained for AA determination in pharmaceutical products are in good agreement with those obtained using the procedure involving the reaction between triiodide and AA

  6. Carbon isotope fractionation of sapropelic organic matter during early diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Study of an algal, sapropelic sediment from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda shows that the mass balance of carbon and stable carbon isotopes in the major organic constituents is accounted for by a relatively straightforward model of selective preservation during diagenesis. The loss of 13C-enriched carbohydrates is the principal factor controlling the intermolecular mass balance of 13C in the sapropel. Results indicate that labile components are decomposed leaving as a residual concentrate in the sediment an insoluble humic substance that may be an original biochemical component of algae and associated bacteria. An overall decrease of up to about 4??? in the ?? 13C values of the organic matter is observed as a result of early diagenesis. ?? 1984.

  7. Soil Organic Carbon Responses to Forest Expansion on Mountain Grasslands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guidi, Claudia

    Grassland abandonment followed by progressive forest expansion is the dominant land-use change in the European Alps. Contrasting trends in soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks have been reported for mountainous regions following forest expansion on grasslands. Moreover, its effects on SOC properties...... involved into long-term stability are largely unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to explore changes in: (i) SOC stocks; (ii) physical SOC fractions; and (iii) labile soil carbon components following forest expansion on mountain grasslands. A land-use gradient located in the Southern Alps (Italy) was....... Changes in labile soil C were assessed by carbohydrate and thermal analyses of soil samples and fractions. Forest expansion on mountain grasslands caused a decrease in SOC stocks within the mineral soil. The SOC accumulation within the organic layers following forest establishment could not fully...

  8. Dilution limits dissolved organic carbon utilization in the deep ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Arrieta, Jesus

    2015-03-19

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the second largest reservoir of organic carbon in the biosphere. About 72% of the global DOC inventory is stored in deep oceanic layers for years to centuries, supporting the current view that it consists of materials resistant to microbial degradation. An alternative hypothesis is that deep-water DOC consists of many different, intrinsically labile compounds at concentrations too low to compensate for the metabolic costs associated to their utilization. Here, we present experimental evidence showing that low concentrations rather than recalcitrance preclude consumption of a substantial fraction of DOC, leading to slow microbial growth in the deep ocean. These findings demonstrate an alternative mechanism for the long-term storage of labile DOC in the deep ocean, which has been hitherto largely ignored. © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparation of Rabbit Skin Tanned by Different Organic Phosphate%有机磷盐鞣制兔皮性能比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑶; 周裕婷; 刘强; 张宗才

    2011-01-01

    The organic phosphate is a kind of nontoxic phosphor compound without environmental pollution. It has been regarded as an ideal chrome-free tanning agent due to its good protein crosslinking characteristics. On the basis of studying on organic phosphate tanning of goatskin leather, application of organic phosphate tanning technology on rabbit skin and the tanning performance of different organic phosphate were studied in this paper.%有机磷盐是一种低毒、无污染的具有羟甲基结构的含磷化合物.由于其优良的蛋白质交联性能,被认为是一种较理想的无铬鞣剂,而成为当前皮革鞣制研究的重点.本文在原有有机磷盐鞣制山羊皮革研究的基础上,进一步研究有机磷盐鞣制兔皮的工艺技术,并比较了多种有机磷盐的鞣制性能.

  10. Aqueous adsorption and removal of organic contaminants by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jin-Gang, E-mail: yujg@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhao, Xiu-Hui; Yang, Hua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Chen, Xiao-Hong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving and Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Yang, Qiaoqin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Yu, Lin-Yan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Jiang, Jian-Hui [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Chen, Xiao-Qing, E-mail: xqchen@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Organic contaminants have become one of the most serious environmental problems, and the removal of organic contaminants (e.g., dyes, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals/drugs) and common industrial organic wastes (e.g., phenols and aromatic amines) from aqueous solutions is of special concern because they are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gradually applied to the removal of organic contaminants from wastewater through adsorption processes. This paper reviews recent progress (145 studies published from 2010 to 2013) in the application of CNTs and their composites for the removal of toxic organic pollutants from contaminated water. The paper discusses removal efficiencies and adsorption mechanisms as well as thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. CNTs are predicted to have considerable prospects for wider application to wastewater treatment in the future. - Highlights: • We summarize the most recent research progress of CNTs for removal of organics. • Adsorption mechanisms between CNTs and organics were elucidated in detail. • The developing trends and prospects of CNTs for removal of organics were discussed.

  11. Aqueous adsorption and removal of organic contaminants by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic contaminants have become one of the most serious environmental problems, and the removal of organic contaminants (e.g., dyes, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals/drugs) and common industrial organic wastes (e.g., phenols and aromatic amines) from aqueous solutions is of special concern because they are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gradually applied to the removal of organic contaminants from wastewater through adsorption processes. This paper reviews recent progress (145 studies published from 2010 to 2013) in the application of CNTs and their composites for the removal of toxic organic pollutants from contaminated water. The paper discusses removal efficiencies and adsorption mechanisms as well as thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. CNTs are predicted to have considerable prospects for wider application to wastewater treatment in the future. - Highlights: • We summarize the most recent research progress of CNTs for removal of organics. • Adsorption mechanisms between CNTs and organics were elucidated in detail. • The developing trends and prospects of CNTs for removal of organics were discussed

  12. Riparian zone hydrology and soil water total organic carbon (TOC)

    OpenAIRE

    T. Grabs; K. Bishop; Laudon, H.; Lyon, S. W.; Seibert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater flowing from hillslopes through riparian (near-stream) soils often undergoes chemical transformations that can substantially influence stream water chemistry. We used landscape analysis to predict total organic carbon (TOC) concentration profiles and groundwater levels measured in the riparian zone (RZ) of a 67 km2 catchment in Sweden. TOC exported laterally from 13 riparian soil profiles was then estimated based on the riparian flow–concentration integratio...

  13. Temperature sensitivity of organic carbon mineralization in contrasting lake sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Gudasz, Cristian; Sobek, Sebastian; Bastviken, David; Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature alone explains a great amount of variation in sediment organic carbon (OC) mineralization. Studies on decomposition of soil OC suggest that (1) temperature sensitivity differs between the fast and slowly decomposition OC and (2) over time, decreasing soil respiration is coupled with increase in temperature sensitivity. In lakes, autochthonous and allochthonous OC sources are generally regarded as fast and slowly decomposing OC, respectively. Lake sediments with different contribut...

  14. Dissolved organic carbon fluxes by seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds

    OpenAIRE

    Barrón, Cristina; Apostolaki, Eugenia T.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds) based on in situ benthic chambers from published and unpublished are compiled in this study. The effect of temperature and light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined. Almost 85% of the seagrass communities and all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. Net DOC fluxes in seagrass communities increase positively with w...

  15. Microtrapping of volatile organic compounds with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhery Mustansar Hussain; Chutarat Saridara; Somenath Mitra

    2010-01-01

    Micro-sorbent traps referred to as microtraps serve as integrated concentration-injection devices for continuousmonitoring in gas phase streams. The application of carbon nanotubes as unique sorbents for the fabrication of microtrapsfor the nano-scale adsorption/desorption of volatile organic molecules is presented in this paper. The microtrap applicationrequires high adsorption capacity as well as easy desorbability; the latter being critical for injection mode of these integrateddevices. Th...

  16. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian C. Dincă; Gheorghe Spârchez; Maria Dincă; Viorel N. B. Blujdea

    2012-01-01

    Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS) and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determinatio...

  17. Organic carbon stabilization in the fractal pore structure of Andosols

    OpenAIRE

    Chevallier, Tiphaine; Woignier, Thierry; Toucet, Joële; Blanchart, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Despite the outstanding potential of Andosols for soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration, the importance of the different mechanisms involved in protecting SOC against mineralization is still unclear. Previous studies have described allophane particles as having a fractal structure. One hypothesis is that SOC is adsorbed or trapped in this fractal structure and could be less available to microbes and enzymes. This paper aims to determine the fractal structure of allophanic soils, especially ...

  18. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, <50 μm). Delta carbon-13 was determined by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. In addition, a site with natural vegetation (reference site, REF) was also sampled for delta carbon-13 determination. ANOVA and Tukey statistical analysis were carried out for all data. The SOC was higher in ICLS than in CCS at both depths (20.8 vs 17.7 g kg-1 for 0-5 cm and 16.1 vs 12.7 g kg-1 at 0-20 cm, respectively, P<0.05). MOC was

  19. Direct measurement of riverine particulate organic carbon age structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, Brad E.; Galy, Valier

    2012-10-01

    Carbon cycling studies focusing on transport and transformation of terrigenous carbon sources toward marine sedimentary sinks necessitate separation of particulate organic carbon (OC) derived from many different sources and integrated by river systems. Much progress has been made on isolating and characterizing young biologically-formed OC that is still chemically intact, however quantification and characterization of old, refractory rock-bound OC has remained troublesome. Quantification of both endmembers of riverine OC is important to constrain exchanges linking biologic and geologic carbon cycles and regulating atmospheric CO2 and O2. Here, we constrain petrogenic OC proportions in suspended sediment from the headwaters of the Ganges River in Nepal through direct measurement using ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon analysis. The unique results apportion the biospheric and petrogenic fractions of bulk particulate OC and characterize biospheric OC residence time. Compared to the same treatment of POC from the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system, contrast in age spectra of the Ganges tributary samples illustrates the difference between small mountainous river systems and large integrative ones in terms of the global carbon cycle.

  20. Understanding drivers of the export of dissolved organic carbon from a German headwater catchment using Generalised Additive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, Benny; Musolff, Andreas; Tittel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the literature, several causes of recently increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in headwaters across eastern North America and northern and central Europe have been debated. One likely driver of the widespread increase of DOC concentrations since the early 1990s are decreasing depositions of acid rain resulting in an increased solubility of organic carbon compounds including humic acids. Here, we tested the hypothesis if the reduced availability of nitrate stimulated the microbial reduction of ferric iron soil minerals and the mobilisation of DOC. Forested catchments are relatively unaffected by agricultural and urban nitrate inputs. In these catchments, decreasing depositions often resulted in a reduced availability of nitrate, which are preferred electron acceptors in microbial decomposition processes. As ferric iron minerals act as efficient sorbents of organic compounds in soils its reduction may cause a release of humic substances and hence an export of DOC. To test this hypothesis, time series of DOC, dissolved iron and nitrate from a forested headwater catchment in Germany were examined using Generalised Additive Models. We found that rising DOC concentrations most likely resulted from a reductive dissolution of iron(III) minerals in soils and the associated mobilisation of adsorbed organic carbon. Phosphate, which can trigger undesired algal growth and is also known to be adsorbed by particulate iron(III), was released as well.

  1. Direct Imaging of Nanoscale Dissolution of Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate by an Organic Ligand: Concentration Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Lihong [Huazhong Agricultural University, China; Zhang, Wenjun [Huazhong Agricultural University, China; Lu, Jianwei [Huazhong Agricultural University, China; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Wang, Lijun [Huazhong Agricultural University, China

    2013-01-01

    Unraveling the kinetics and mechanisms of sparingly soluble calcium orthophosphate (Ca!P) dissolution in the presence of organic acids at microscopic levels is important for an improved understanding in determining the effectiveness of organic acids present in most rhizosphere environments. Herein, we use in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) coupled with a fluid reaction cell to image dissolution on the (010) face of brushite, CaHPO4 2H2O, in citrate- bearing solutions over a broad concentration range. We directly measure the dependence of molecular step retreat rate on citrate concentration at various pH values and ionic strengths, relevant to soil solution conditions. We find that low concentrations of citrate(10!100 M)inducedareductioninstepretreatratesalongboththe[10 0]Ccand[101] Ccdirections.However,at higher concentrations (exceeding 0.1 mM), this inhibitory effect was reversed with step retreat speeds increasing rapidly. These results demonstrate that the concentration-dependent modulation of nanoscale Ca!P phase dissolution by citrate may be applied to analyze the controversial role of organic acids in enhancing Ca!P mineral dissolution in a more complex rhizosphere environment. These in situ observations may contribute to resolving the previously unrecognized interactions of root exudates (low molecular weight organic acids) and sparingly soluble Ca!P minerals.

  2. Hyperspectral Analysis of Soil Nitrogen, Carbon, Carbonate, and Organic Matter Using Regression Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monika Moskal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of soil attributes using hyperspectral sensors has revealed patterns in soil spectra that are known to respond to mineral composition, organic matter, soil moisture and particle size distribution. Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm. Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series. Using classification and regression tree statistical methods, regression trees were fitted to each spectral response using concentrations of nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter as the response variables. Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R2 0.91 (p < 0.01 at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R2 0.95 (p < 0.01 at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R2 0.93 (p < 0.01 at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R2 0.98 (p < 0.01 at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths. Use of the 400 to 1,000 nm electromagnetic range utilizing regression trees provided a powerful, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter for upper soil horizons in a nondestructive method.

  3. Carbon uptake in low dissolved inorganic carbon environments: the effect of limited carbon availability on photosynthetic organisms in thermal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, K. D.; Omelon, C. R.; Bennett, P.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the primary carbon fixation process in thermal waters below 70°C, but some hydrothermal waters have extremely low dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), potentially limiting the growth of inorganic carbon fixing organisms such as algae and cyanobacteria. To address the issue of how carbon is assimilated by phototrophs in these environments, we conducted experiments to compare inorganic carbon uptake mechanisms by two phylogenetically distinct organisms collected from geographically distinct carbon limited systems: the neutral pH geothermal waters of El Tatio, Chile, and the acidic geothermal waters of Tantalus Creek in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. Discharge waters at El Tatio have low total DIC concentrations (2 to 6 ppm) found mainly as HCO3-; this is in contrast to even lower measured DIC values in Tantalus Creek (as low as 0.13 ppm) that, due to a measured pH of 2.5, exists primarily as CO2. Cyanobacteria and algae are innately physiologically plastic, and we are looking to explore the possibility that carbon limitation in these environments is extreme enough to challenge that plasticity and lead to a suite of carbon uptake adaptations. We hypothesize that these microorganisms utilize adaptive modes of Ci uptake that allow them to survive under these limiting conditions. Cyanobacteria (primarily Synechococcus spp.) isolated from El Tatio can utilize either passive CO2 uptake or active HCO3- uptake mechanisms, in contrast to the eukaryotic alga Cyanidium spp. from Tantalus Creek, which is restricted to an energy-dependent CO2 uptake mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we conducted pH drift experiments (Omelon et al., 2008) to examine changes in pH and [DIC] under a range of pH and [DIC] culture conditions. This work provides baseline information upon which we will begin to investigate the effects of low [DIC] on the growth of phototrophs collected from these and other less carbon limited systems.

  4. Evaluation of Powdered Activated Carbon Efficiency in Removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon inWater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R Bonyadi nejad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Powdered Activated$ carbon is known as a suitable absorbent for organic materials. The aim of this research is evaluation of Powdered Activated-Carbon (PAC efficiency in removal of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC in water treatment in Isfahan."nMaterials and Methods : The increase of PAC for DOC reduction has done in three paths in the Isfahan water treatment plant (WTP. These paths including: 1 Intake up to entrance of WTP 2 Intake to exit ofWTP 3 Between entrance and exit of waterworks. The paths were simulated by the Jar test system. Then DOC and UV254 absorption were analyzed and SUVA parameter for samples and activated-carbon adsorption isotherm was calculated."nResults: The injected PAC doses of 20,40,60,80 and 100 mg/l caused decreasing in DOC and UV254 absorption in every sample in all paths. The average of this decrease, from intake to WTP.s exit (second path was the greatest 69.8± 3.9%and the commonWTP process had capability of removing 35% of DOC. The first path also showed that PAC can reduce 33± 2% DOC of raw water by itself. Activated-carbon absorption results were adhered from Freundlich adsorption isotherm."nConclusion: In the third path therewas lessDOCremoval efficiency than exceptedwhen Activated- Carbon injected in rapid mixed basin with coagulant. Powdered activated carbon porosity reduction due to effect of coagulant can be the reason for this issue.Also according to different paths, the point of intake is more suitable for powdered activated carbon addition.

  5. Organic carbon redistribution due to erosion at various spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Judit; Szalai, Zoltán; Mészáros, Erzsébet; Szabó, Boglárka; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) has a crucial role both in terms of crop production and climate change mitigation. Soil could be an effective sink of atmospheric carbon since in agricultural areas the carbon content of the soil is much lower than its capacity. The main obstacle against carbon charge of the soils is cultivation and erosion. Soil detachment, delivery and deposition are rather scale dependent processes that is why it is difficult to compare or extrapolate results among scales. Present case study aims to compare the SOC content and soil organic matter (SOM) compound of the detached soil particles on the ridge to those that are deposited at the bottom of the catena in order to clarify the role of delivery in soil erosion. Initial soil erosion was modelled using a laboratory rainfall simulator at the point scale. Deposition was surveyed and analysed by 3D sampling from drillings on the sedimentary parts at the field scale. At the detachment phase carbon enrichment (50-100%) and C/N ratio increase were found in each aggregate size class of the detached soil particles. Variations in SOM compounds suggested that a very intensive SOM exchange took place during initial erosion processes and delivery. In addition to the selective erosion selective SOC deposition were also found at the field scale. Two topographical hotspots were identified as the place of SOC surplus deposition. In these patches SOM compounds were deposited separately due to different geomorphologic positions. The lower patch next to the end of an ephemeral gully was dominated by less polymerized more aromatic SOM, while the upper one was ruled by high molecular weighted aliphatic SOM. Difference in SOM compound was manifested also in different sediment morphology. The topographically higher deposition patch were covered by aggregates while the lower one was found to be sealed by individual soil particles. Present study was supported by the National Hungarian Research Found K100180, G. Jakab was

  6. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC in Arctic ground ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal permafrost degradation and coastal erosion in the Arctic remobilize substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC and nutrients which have been accumulated in late Pleistocene and Holocene unconsolidated deposits. Their vulnerability to thaw subsidence, collapsing coastlines and irreversible landscape change is largely due to the presence of large amounts of massive ground ice such as ice wedges. However, ground ice has not, until now, been considered to be a source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and other elements, which are important for ecosystems and carbon cycling. Here we show, using geochemical data from a large number of different ice bodies throughout the Arctic, that ice wedges have the greatest potential for DOC storage with a maximum of 28.6 mg L−1 (mean: 9.6 mg L−1. Variation in DOC concentration is positively correlated with and explained by the concentrations and relative amounts of typically terrestrial cations such as Mg2+ and K+. DOC sequestration into ground ice was more effective during the late Pleistocene than during the Holocene, which can be explained by rapid sediment and OC accumulation, the prevalence of more easily degradable vegetation and immediate incorporation into permafrost. We assume that pristine snowmelt is able to leach considerable amounts of well-preserved and highly bioavailable DOC as well as other elements from surface sediments, which are rapidly stored in ground ice, especially in ice wedges, even before further degradation. In the Yedoma region ice wedges represent a significant DOC (45.2 Tg and DIC (33.6 Tg pool in permafrost areas and a fresh-water reservoir of 4172 km3. This study underlines the need to discriminate between particulate OC and DOC to assess the availability and vulnerability of the permafrost carbon pool for ecosystems and climate feedback upon mobilization.

  7. Validation and Scenario Analysis of a Soil Organic Carbon Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yao; LIU Shi-liang; SHEN Qi-rong; ZONG Liang-gang; JIANG Ding-an; HUANG Hong-guang

    2002-01-01

    A model developed by the authors was validated against independent data sets. The data sets were obtained from field experiments of crop residue decomposition and a 7-year soil improvement in Yixing City, Jiangsu Province. Model validation indicated that soil organic carbon dynamics can be simulated from the weather variables of temperature, sunlight and precipitation, soil clay content and bulk density, grain yield of previous crops, qualities and quantities of the added organic matter. Model simulation in general agreed with the measurements. The comparison between computed and measured resulted in correlation coefficient γ2 values of 0.9291 * * * (n = 48) and 0. 6431 * * (n = 65) for the two experiments, respectively. Model prediction under three scenarios of no additional organic matter input, with an annual incorporation of rice and wheat straw at rates of 6.75t/ha and 9.0t/ha suggested that the soil organic carbon in Wanshi Township of Yixing City would be from an initial value of 7.85g/kg in 1983 to 6.30g/kg, 11.42g/kg and 13g/kg in 2014, respectively. Consequently, total nitrogen content of the soil was predicted to be respectively 0.49g/kg,0.89g/kg and 1.01g/kg under the three scenarios.

  8. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  9. Synthesis and characterization of carbonated hydroxyapatite and bioinspired polymer-calcium phosphate nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusufoglu, Yusuf [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Nature offers many exciting ideas and inspiration for the development of new materials and processes. The toughness of spider silk, the strength and lightweight of bone, and the adhesion abilities of the gecko's feet are some of the many examples of highperformance natural materials, which have attracted the interest of scientist to duplicate their properties in man-made materials. Materials found in nature combine many inspiring properties such as miniaturization, sophistication, hierarchical organization, hybridization, and adaptability. In all biological systems, whether very basic or highly complex, nature provides a multiplicity of materials, architectures, systems and functions. Generally, the architectural configurations and material characteristics are the important features that have been duplicated from nature for building synthetic structural composites.

  10. Assessment of methods for organic and inorganic carbon quantification in carbonate-containing Mediterranean soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apesteguia, Marcos; Virto, Iñigo; Plante, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of soil organic matter (SOM) stocks and fluxes continues to be an important endeavor in assessments of soil quality, and more broadly in assessments of ecosystem functioning. The quantification of SOM in alkaline, carbonate-containing soils, such as those found in Mediterranean areas, is complicated by the need to differentiate between organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC), which continues to present methodological challenges. Acidification is frequently used to eliminate carbonates prior to soil OC quantification, but when performed in the liquid phase, can promote the dissolution and loss of a portion of the OC. Acid fumigation (AF) is increasingly preferred for carbonate removal, but its effectiveness is difficult to assess using conventional elemental and isotopic analyses. In addition, the potential effects of AF on SOM are not well characterized. The objective of the current study was to apply a multi-method approach to determine the efficacy of carbonate removal by AF and its effects on the residual SOM. We selected a set of 24 surface agricultural soils representing a large range of textures, SOM contents and presumed carbonate contents. For each soil, OC was determined using wet combustion (Walkley-Black) and IC was determined using the calcimeter method. Samples were then subjected to elemental (total C) and isotopic (δ13C) analyses by dry combustion using a Costech autoanalyzer coupled to a Thermo Finnigan Delta Plus isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) before and after AF. IC was equated to total C determined after fumigation, and OC was estimated as the different in total C before and after AF. Samples were also subjected to ramped oxidation using a Netzsch STA109 PC Luxx thermal analyzer coupled to a LICOR 820A infrared gas analyzer (IRGA). Quantification of OC was performed using evolved gas analysis of CO2 (CO2-EGA) in the exothermic region 200-500° C associated with organic matter combustion. IC was quantified by CO2-EGA

  11. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll-a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C showed higher values (from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios tended to increase with increasing local wind speeds, indicating that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray contribute significantly to the marine organic

  12. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C increased from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios showed positive correlations with local wind speeds, suggesting that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray significantly contributes to marine organic aerosols over the

  13. Organic carbon in glacial fjords of Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Silvio; Gutiérrez, Marcelo; Tapia, Fabián; Abarzúa, Leslie; Daneri, Giovanni; Reid, Brian; Díez, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Ice Field in Chilean Patagonia is the largest (13,000 km2) temperate ice mass in the Southern hemisphere, yearly transporting ca. 40 km3 of freshwater to fjords. This volume of fresh and cold water likely affects adjacent marine ecosystems by changing circulation, productivity, food web dynamics, and the abundance and distribution of planktonic and benthic organisms. We hypothesize that freshwater-driven availability of inorganic nutrient and transport of organic and inorganic suspended matter, as well as microbes, become a controlling factor for productivity in the fjord associated with the Baker river and Jorge Montt glacier. Both appear to be sources of silicic acid, but not of nitrate and particulate organic carbon, especially during summer, when surface PAR and glacier thawing are maximal. In contrast to Baker River, the Jorge Montt glacier is also a source of dissolved organic carbon towards a proglacial fjord and the Baker Channel, indicating that a thorough chemical description of sources (tidewater glacier and glacial river) is needed. Nitrate in fiord waters reaches ca. 15 μM at 25 m depth with no evidence of mixing up during summer. Stable isotope composition of particulate organic nitrogen reaches values as low as 3 per mil in low-salinity waters near both glacier and river. Nitrogen fixation could be depleting δ15N in organic matter, as suggested by the detection at surface waters of nif H genes belonging to diazotrophs near the Montt glacier. As diazotrophs have also been detected in other cold marine waters (e.g. Baltic Sea, Arctic Ocean) as well as glaciers and polar terrestrial waters, there is certainly a potential for both marine and freshwater microbes to contribute and have a significant impact on the Patagonian N and C budgets. Assessing the impact of freshwater on C and N fluxes and the microbial community structure in Patagonian waters will allow understanding future scenarios of rapid glacier melting. This research was funded

  14. Enhanced anaerobic transformations of carbon tetrachloride by soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, R.; Picardal, F.

    1999-12-01

    Anaerobic, reductive dehalogenation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by Shewanella putrefaciens 200 is enhanced by the presence of a high-organic-carbon soil. In microbial incubations without soil, 29% of the initial 3 ppm CT was transformed after 33 h, whereas 64% was transformed after only 18 h when soil was present. In sterile, biomimetic systems using a chemical reductant, 20 mM dithiothreitol, similar results were observed, suggesting that abiotic electron-transfer mediators in the soil were catalyzing the reaction. Destruction of 62% of the soil organic carbon by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in a soil that was less effective in enhancing CT dechlorination. Following separation of the soil organic matter into three humic fractions, the humic acid (HA) fraction catalyzed the dechlorination reaction to a greater extent than did the fulvic acid (FA) fraction, and both were more effective than the fraction containing humin and inorganic minerals. The results are consistent with a mechanism involving humic functional groups that serve as electron-transfer mediators able to enhance the reductive transformation of CT in the presence of a microbial or chemical reductant. Humic functional group analyses showed that the FA contained more total acidity and carboxylic acidity than did the HA; however, both fractions contained similar amounts of total carbonyl groups and quinone carbonyls. Abiotic, HA-mediated CT transformation was observed regardless of whether dithiothreitol was present or not. At circumneutral pH, HA-mediated CT transformation required the presence of dithiothreitol. At pH 8.7, HA-mediated reductive CT transformation occurred both in the absence or presence of dithiothreitol although the transformation was greater in the presence of a reductant. Trichloromethane (chloroform [CF]) production at pH 8.7 was much lower than at circumneutral pH, and volatile organic compounds other than CF were not detected as products in any case.

  15. Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Levitsky, Igor A; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2012-01-01

    Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials describes physical, optical and spectroscopic properties of the emerging class of nanocomposites formed from carbon nanotubes (CNTs)  interfacing with organic and inorganic materials. The three main chapters detail novel trends in  photophysics related to the interaction of  light with various carbon nanotube composites from relatively simple CNT/small molecule assemblies to complex hybrids such as CNT/Si and CNT/DNA nanostructures.   The latest experimental results are followed up with detailed discussions and scientific and technological perspectives to provide a through coverage of major topics including: ·   Light harvesting, energy conversion, photoinduced charge separation  and transport  in CNT based nanohybrids · CNT/polymer composites exhibiting photoactuation; and ·         Optical  spectroscopy  and structure of CNT/DNA complexes. Including original data and a short review of recent research, Phot...

  16. Effect of land use change on soil organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barančíková Gabriela

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The direction of changes and conversion of soil organic carbon (SOC is in most current ecosystems influenced by human activity. Soil Science and Conservation Research Institute is responsible for monitoring the agricultural soils in a five-year cycle. One part of the soil monitoring involves the determination of the soil organic carbon (SOC storage. Further, we followed the conversion of arable land on grassland during more than 20 years of monitoring period at some locations where changes in land use occurred. Ten places on basic network and 2 places on key monitoring localities in which arable land have been converted into grassland were identified. About 50 percent of studied soils converted into permanent grassland were Cambisols. The other converted soil types were Luvic Stagnosol, Stagnic Regosol, Mollic Fluvisol, and Stagnic Luvisol. The results showed that after the third monitoring cycle (2002, increase of SOC was observed in all the localities, with the change in land use. Statistical parameter (t-test confirmed significant differences between the set of average SOC values before and after the land use conversion. The chemical structure of humic acids (HA isolated from arable soil and permanent grassland indicated increasing of aliphatic carbon content in grassland HA. More aromatic and stabile were HA isolated from arable soils.

  17. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Lizhen Xing; Li Ren; Bo Tang,; Guangxue Wu; Yuntao Guan

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the app...

  18. Distribution of soil organic carbon in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Norman B.; Waltman, Sharon W.; West, Larry T.; Neale, Anne; Mehaffey, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) database provides detailed soil mapping for most of the conterminous United States (CONUS). These data have been used to formulate estimates of soil carbon stocks, and have been useful for environmental models, including plant productivity models, hydrologic models, and ecological models for studies of greenhouse gas exchange. The data were compiled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) from 1:24,000-scale or 1:12,000-scale maps. It was found that the total soil organic carbon stock in CONUS to 1 m depth is 57 Pg C and for the total profile is 73 Pg C, as estimated from SSURGO with data gaps filled from the 1:250,000-scale Digital General Soil Map. We explore the non-linear distribution of soil carbon on the landscape and with depth in the soil, and the implications for sampling strategies that result from the observed soil carbon variability.

  19. Highly fluorescent xerogels with entrapped carbon dots for organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaranta, A., E-mail: quaranta@ing.unitn.it [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Carturan, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Campagnaro, A.; Dalla Palma, M. [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Giarola, M.; Daldosso, N. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Maggioni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Mariotto, G. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    Organically modified silicate thin film and bulk samples were prepared using [3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyl]trimethoxysilane (AEAP-TMOS) as precursor with the addition of different amounts of AEAP-TMOS functionalized C-dots, prepared by reaction of AEAP-TMOS and citric acid at high temperature. The synthesis of surface functionalized C-dots was followed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and the C-dots optical properties were characterized by optical absorption and UV–vis fluorescence. Thin xerogel films and bulk samples were studied by FTIR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Intense blue-green emission was observed by UV excitation of functionalized C-dots. Carbon quantum dot (CQD) luminescence was preserved also in the xerogel matrices, and the energy transfer from the matrix to CQDs, which is a key characteristic for scintillation detectors, was investigated in the two systems. - Highlights: • Functionalized carbon dots were synthesized. • Carbon dots were dispersed in hybrid xerogel bulk and thin film. • Carbon dots exhibit a strong tunable blue luminescence. • Xerogels were characterized by FT-IR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies. • Energy transfer processes were evidenced between C-dots and xerogel matrix.

  20. Phosphate sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Jüppner, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Human phosphate homeostasis is regulated at the level of intestinal absorption of phosphate from the diet, release of phosphate through bone resorption, and renal phosphate excretion and involves the actions of parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D (1,25-(OH)2-D), and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) to maintain circulating phosphate levels within a narrow normal range, which is essential for numerous cellular functions, for the growth of tissues and for bone mineralization. ...

  1. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  2. Strontium hydroxyapatite and strontium carbonate as templates for the precipitation of calcium-phosphates in the absence and presence of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternitzke, Vanessa; Janousch, Markus; Heeb, Michèle B.; Hering, Janet G.; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation of calcium-phosphates on calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAP) in the presence and absence of fluoride is important in the formation of bone and teeth, protection against tooth decay, dental and skeletal fluorosis and defluoridation of drinking water. Strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr10(PO4)6(OH)2 or SrHAP) and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) were used as calcium-free seed templates in precipitation experiments conducted with varying initial calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) or calcium-to-phosphate-to-fluoride (Ca/P/F) ratios. Suspensions of SrHAP or SrCO3 seed templates (which were calcium-limited for both templates and phosphate-limited in the case of SrCO3) were reacted at pH 7.3 (25 °C) over 3 days. The resulting solids were examined with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Calcium apatite was the predominant phase identified by all techniques independent of the added Ca/P ratios and of the presence of fluoride. It was not possible to make an unambiguous distinction between HAP and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2, FAP). The apatite was calcium-deficient and probably contained some strontium.

  3. Investigation the Effects of Different Doses Organic Fertilizers and Phosphate Solubilizing Bacterias on Yield and Nutrient Contents in Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferit SÖNMEZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to determine the effect of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (N2; Bacillus megaterium M-3, TV-6I; Cellulosimicrobium cellulans, TV-34A; Hafnia Alve, TV-69E; Acetobacter pasteurianus and TV-83F; Bacillus cereus and organic fertilizer (0, 10 and 20 ton / ha on the seed yield and nutrient content of chickpea under field conditions in 2010 and 2011 growing seasons. Phosphate solubilizing bacteria used in this study were determined by the separate investigation conducted in chamber room by using ten phosphate solubilizing bacteria and organic fertilizer (control, %5,%10. The tiral were laid out with a factorial design in randomized complete block with three replications. In this study, plant height, primary branches, secondary branches and number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, grain yield and biological yield and nutrient content of stem and seed were determined. According to the results of the study bacteria applications increased significantly biological and seed yield. Bacteria applications without organic fertilizer increased nutrient contents of seed and steed except cupper content. In case of inoculation with organic fertilizer provided more increases in biological and seed yields. The highest seed yield were obtained from application of 20 ton/ha + N2 (Bacillus megaterium M-3 with 1020 kg/ha and 1793 kg/ha in 2010 and 2011 years, respectively. Bacteria without organic fertilizer application were more active in terms of phosphorus uptake in both years. 

  4. Self-organized global control of carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenyuan; Fenn, Daniel J.; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2010-09-01

    There is much disagreement concerning how best to control global carbon emissions. We explore quantitatively how different control schemes affect the collective emission dynamics of a population of emitting entities. We uncover a complex trade-off which arises between average emissions (affecting the global climate), peak pollution levels (affecting citizens’ everyday health), industrial efficiency (affecting the nation’s economy), frequency of institutional intervention (affecting governmental costs), common information (affecting trading behavior) and market volatility (affecting financial stability). Our findings predict that a self-organized free-market approach at the level of a sector, state, country or continent can provide better control than a top-down regulated scheme in terms of market volatility and monthly pollution peaks. The control of volatility also has important implications for any future derivative carbon emissions market.

  5. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, M; Schouten, S; Damsté, J S; de Leeuw, J W; Summons, R E

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ((13)C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in (18)O (delta(18)O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes (delta(13)C = 25.4 +/- 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C(35) hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing (13)C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples (delta(13)C = -29.5 to -31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone. PMID:17831625

  6. Spatial Characteristics of Soil Organic Carbon Storage in China's Croplands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-Qiang; YU Gui-Rui; ZHAO Qian-Jun; NIU Dong; CHEN Qing-Mei; WU Zhi-Feng

    2005-01-01

    The soil organic carbon (SOC) pool is the largest component of terrestrial carbon pools. With the construction of a geographically referenced database taken from the second national general soil survey materials and based on 1 546typical cropland soil profiles, the paddy field and dryland SOC storage among six regions of China were systematically quantified to characterize the spatial pattern of cropland SOC storage in China and to examine the relationship between mean annual temperature, precipitation, soil texture features and SOC content. In all regions, paddy soils had higher SOC storage than dryland soils, and cropland SOC content was the highest in Southwest China. Climate controlled the spatial distribution of SOC in both paddy and dryland soils, with SOC storage increasing with increasing precipitation and decreasing with increasing temperature.

  7. Environmental analyse of soil organic carbon stock changes in Slovakia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koco, Š.; Barančíková, G.; Skalský, R.; Tarasovičová, Z.; Gutteková, M.; Halas, J.; Makovníková, J.; Novákova, M.

    2012-04-01

    The content and quality of soil organic matter is one of the basic soil parameters on which soil production functioning depends as well as it is active in non production soil functions like an ecological one especially. Morphologic segmentation of Slovakia has significant influence of structure in using agricultural soil in specific areas of our territory. Also social changes of early 90´s of 20´th century made their impact on change of using of agricultural soil (transformation from large farms to smaller ones, decreasing the number of livestock). This research is studying changes of development of soil organic carbon stock (SOC) in agricultural soil of Slovakia as results of climatic as well as social and political changes which influenced agricultury since last 40 years. The main goal of this research is an analysis of soil organic carbon stock since 1970 until now at specific agroclimatic regions of Slovakia and statistic analysis of relation between modelled data of SOC stock and soil quality index value. Changes of SOC stock were evaluated on the basis SOC content modeling using RothC-26.3 model. From modeling of SOC stock results the outcome is that in that time the soil organic carbon stock was growing until middle 90´s years of 20´th century with the highest value in 1994. Since that year until new millennium SOC stock is slightly decreasing. After 2000 has slightly increased SOC stock so far. According to soil management SOC stock development on arable land is similar to overall evolution. In case of grasslands after slight growth of SOC stock since 1990 the stock is in decline. This development is result of transformational changes after 1989 which were specific at decreasing amount of organic carbon input from organic manure at grassland areas especially. At warmer agroclimatic regions where mollic fluvisols and chernozems are present and where are soils with good quality and steady soil organic matter (SOM) the amount of SOC in monitored time is

  8. Organic carbon decomposition rates controlled by water retention time across inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Núria; Marcé, Rafael; Kothawala, Dolly N.; Tranvik, Lars. J.

    2016-07-01

    The loss of organic carbon during passage through the continuum of inland waters from soils to the sea is a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Yet, the amount of organic carbon mineralized and released to the atmosphere during its transport remains an open question, hampered by the absence of a common predictor of organic carbon decay rates. Here we analyse a compilation of existing field and laboratory measurements of organic carbon decay rates and water residence times across a wide range of aquatic ecosystems and climates. We find a negative relationship between the rate of organic carbon decay and water retention time across systems, entailing a decrease in organic carbon reactivity along the continuum of inland waters. We find that the half-life of organic carbon is short in inland waters (2.5 +/- 4.7 yr) compared to terrestrial soils and marine ecosystems, highlighting that freshwaters are hotspots of organic carbon degradation. Finally, we evaluate the response of organic carbon decay rates to projected changes in runoff. We calculate that regions projected to become drier or wetter as the global climate warms will experience changes in organic carbon decay rates of up to about 10%, which illustrates the influence of hydrological variability on the inland waters carbon cycle.

  9. Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus uptake by poly-phosphate accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Yang, Yingying; Wang, Xiangdong; Li, Lei; Peng, Yongzhen

    2014-02-01

    Impact of nitrite on aerobic phosphorus (P) uptake of poly-phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in three different enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems was investigated, i.e., the enriched PAOs culture fed with synthetic wastewater, the two lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) treating domestic wastewater for nutrient removal through nitrite-pathway nitritation and nitrate-pathway nitrification, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization results showed that PAOs in the three sludges accounted for 72, 7.6 and 6.5% of bacteria, respectively. In the enriched PAOs culture, at free nitrous acid (FNA) concentration of 0.47 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, aerobic P-uptake and oxidation of intercellular poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates were both inhibited. Denitrifying phosphorus removal under the aerobic conditions was observed, indicating the existence of PAOs using nitrite as electron acceptor in this culture. When the FNA concentration reached 2.25 × 10(-3) mg HNO2-N/L, denitrifying phosphorus removal was also inhibited. And the inhibition ceased once nitrite was exhausted. Corresponding to both SBRs treating domestic wastewater with nitritation and nitrification pathway, nitrite inhibition on aerobic P-uptake by PAOs did not occur even though FNA concentration reached 3 × 10(-3) and 2.13 × 10(-3) mg HNO₂-N/L, respectively. Therefore, PAOs taken from different EBPR activated sludges had different tolerance to nitrite. PMID:23771179

  10. Organic Carbon--water Concentration Quotients (IIsocS and [pi]pocS): Measuring Apparent Chemical Disequilibria and Exploring the Impact of Black Carbon in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    When black carbon (bc) and biologically derived organic carbon (bioc) phases are present in sediments or suspended particulates, both forms of carbon act additively to sorb organic chemicals but the bc phase has more sorption capacity per unit mass. . . .

  11. The Burial of Biogenic Silica, Organic Carbon and Organic Nitrogen in the Sediments of the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lisha; ZHANG Chuansong; SHI Xiaoyong

    2015-01-01

    We sampled the sediments of the East China Sea during 2005 and 2006, and analysed the contents of the biogenic mat-ters: biogenic silica, organic carbon, and organic nitrogen. From the surface distribution we found the contents of these substances to be in the ranges of 0.72%-1.64%, 0.043%-0.82%, and 0.006%-0.11%, respectively. Their distributions were similar to each other, being high inside the Hangzhou Bay and low outside the bay. The vertical variations of the contents were also similar. In order to discuss the relation between them we analysed the variations of content with depth. They increased in the first 7cm and then de-creased with depth. The peaks were found at depths between 20 to 25cm. The distribution of carbonate showed an opposite trend to that of biogenic matters. The content of total carbon was relatively stable with respect to depth, and the ratio of high organic carbon to carbonate showed a low burial efficiency of carbonate, which means that the main burial of carbon is organic carbon. In order to discuss the source of organic matters, the ratio of organic carbon to organic nitrogen was calculated, which was 8.01 to 9.65, indicat-ing that the organic matter in the sediments was derived mainly from phytoplankton in the seawater.

  12. Improved automation of dissolved organic carbon sampling for organic-rich surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Richard P; Holden, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    In-situ UV-Vis spectrophotometers offer the potential for improved estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes for organic-rich systems such as peatlands because they are able to sample and log DOC proxies automatically through time at low cost. In turn, this could enable improved total carbon budget estimates for peatlands. The ability of such instruments to accurately measure DOC depends on a number of factors, not least of which is how absorbance measurements relate to DOC and the environmental conditions. Here we test the ability of a S::can Spectro::lyser™ for measuring DOC in peatland streams with routinely high DOC concentrations. Through analysis of the spectral response data collected by the instrument we have been able to accurately measure DOC up to 66 mg L(-1), which is more than double the original upper calibration limit for this particular instrument. A linear regression modelling approach resulted in an accuracy >95%. The greatest accuracy was achieved when absorbance values for several different wavelengths were used at the same time in the model. However, an accuracy >90% was achieved using absorbance values for a single wavelength to predict DOC concentration. Our calculations indicated that, for organic-rich systems, in-situ measurement with a scanning spectrophotometer can improve fluvial DOC flux estimates by 6 to 8% compared with traditional sampling methods. Thus, our techniques pave the way for improved long-term carbon budget calculations from organic-rich systems such as peatlands. PMID:26580726

  13. Burial of organic carbon and carbonate on inner shelf of the northern South China Sea during the postglacial period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shouye YANG; Wyss W.-S. YIM; Min TANG; Guangqing HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Two vibrocores from the inner shelf off Hong Kong are investigated to compare the contents of organic and inorganic carbon in postglacial sediments. The com-positions of organic elements and carbonate are highly variable in the core sediments, but overall drop within the compositional ranges of modern seabed sediments in the Zhujiang estuarine and its shelf area. The Holocene sediments in the inner shelf have never been subject to subaerial exposure and the organic matter and carbonate can be preserved well. The burial of carbon in river-domi-nated shelf environments is highly dependent on the river flux with time. Nevertheless, it is difficult to establish a simple relationship between carbon burial in sediments in relation to climatic changes of basin-wide scale due to complex controls of production, transport and deposition of organic matter and carbonate. Our study suggests that the organic carbon to nitrogen ratio can not reliably identify the sources of depositional organic matters because of selective decomposition of organic matter com-ponents during humification and sedimentation. Caution is therefore needed in using organic elemental composi-tions as indicators of organic matter sources and paleoen-vironmental changes in the East Asian continental shelves where intense river-sea interaction and variable carbon flux in geologic record occur.

  14. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time isan actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. Thepresent article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimationsfor other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layersin any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  15. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimations for other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layers in any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  16. Natural versus wastewater derived dissolved organic carbon: implications for the environmental fate of organic micropollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Antony, Alice; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Leslie, Greg; Escher, Beate I

    2011-08-01

    The interaction of organic micropollutants with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) can influence their transport, degradation and bioavailability. While this has been well established for natural organic carbon, very little is known regarding the influence of DOC on the fate of micropollutants during wastewater treatment and water recycling. Dissolved organic carbon-water partition coefficients (K(DOC)) for wastewater derived and reference DOC were measured for a range of micropollutants using a depletion method with polydimethylsiloxane disks. For micropollutants with an octanol-water partition coefficient (log K(OW)) greater than 4 there was a significant difference in K(DOC) between reference and wastewater derived DOC, with partitioning to wastewater derived DOC over 1000 times lower for the most hydrophobic micropollutants. The interaction of nonylphenol with wastewater derived DOC from different stages of a wastewater and advanced water treatment train was studied, but little difference in K(DOC) was observed. Organic carbon characterisation revealed that reference and wastewater derived DOC had very different properties due to their different origins. Consequently, the reduced sorption capacity of wastewater derived DOC may be related to their microbial origin which led to reduced aromaticity and lower molecular weight. This study suggests that for hydrophobic micropollutants (log K(OW) > 4) a higher concentration of freely dissolved and thus bioavailable micropollutants is expected in the presence of wastewater derived DOC than predicted using K(DOC) values quantified using reference DOC. The implication is that naturally derived DOC may not be an appropriate surrogate for wastewater derived DOC as a matrix for assessing the fate of micropollutants in engineered systems. PMID:21703657

  17. Adsorption of organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbons under natural organic matter preloading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersan, Gamze; Kaya, Yasemin; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-09-15

    The effect of NOM preloading on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and graphene oxide nanosheet (GO) was investigated and compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and two coal based granular activated carbons (GACs). PNT uptake was higher than TCE by all adsorbents on both mass and surface area bases. This was attributed to the hydrophobicity of PNT. The adsorption capacities of PNT and TCE depend on the accessibility of the organic molecules to the inner regions of the adsorbent which was influenced from the molecular size of OCs. The adsorption capacities of all adsorbents decreased as a result of NOM preloading due to site competition and/or pore/interstice blockage. However, among all adsorbents, GO was generally effected least from the NOM preloading for PNT, whereas there was not observed any trend of NOM competition with a specific adsorbent for TCE. In addition, SWCNT was generally affected most from the NOM preloading for TCE and there was not any trend for PNT. The overall results indicated that the fate and transport of organic contaminants by GNSs and CNTs type of nanoadsorbents and GACs in different natural systems will be affected by water quality parameters, characteristics of adsorbent, and properties of adsorbate. PMID:27107611

  18. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon in the northwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Rajendran, A.; Somasundar, K.; Haake, B.; Jenisch, A.; Shuo, Z.; Ittekkot, V.; Desai, B.N.

    stream_size 42710 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Mar_Chem_31_299.pdf.txt stream_source_info Mar_Chem_31_299.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Marine Chemistry, 31 (1990... in the conversion of detrital 0304-4203/90/$03.50 © 1990 -- Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. 300 M. DILEEP KUMAR ET AL. matter into inorganic carbon dioxide and plays a pivotal role in food chain processes by becoming a substrate for micro-organisms. The nature...

  19. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of Miocene climate changes

    OpenAIRE

    Schoell, M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; J. W. de Leeuw; Summons, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in carbon-13 (13C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in 18O (δ18O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes (δ13C = 25.4 ± 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfu...

  20. Carbon dioxide as a carbon source in organic transformation: carbon-carbon bond forming reactions by transition-metal catalysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yasushi; Fujihara, Tetsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Recent carbon-carbon bond forming reactions of carbon dioxide with alkenes, alkynes, dienes, aryl zinc compounds, aryl boronic esters, aryl halides, and arenes having acidic C-H bonds are reviewed in which transition-metal catalysts play an important role.

  1. Young organic matter as a source of carbon dioxide outgassing from Amazonian rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayorga, E; Aufdenkampe, A K; Masiello, C A; Krusche, A V; Hedges, J I; Quay, P D; Richey, J E; Brown, T A

    2005-06-23

    Rivers are generally supersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide, resulting in large gas evasion fluxes that can be a significant component of regional net carbon budgets. Amazonian rivers were recently shown to outgas more than ten times the amount of carbon exported to the ocean in the form of total organic carbon or dissolved inorganic carbon. High carbon dioxide concentrations in rivers originate largely from in situ respiration of organic carbon, but little agreement exists about the sources or turnover times of this carbon. Here we present results of an extensive survey of the carbon isotope composition ({sup 13}C and {sup 14}C) of dissolved inorganic carbon and three size-fractions of organic carbon across the Amazonian river system. We find that respiration of contemporary organic matter (less than 5 years old) originating on land and near rivers is the dominant source of excess carbon dioxide that drives outgassing in mid-size to large rivers, although we find that bulk organic carbon fractions transported by these rivers range from tens to thousands of years in age. We therefore suggest that a small, rapidly cycling pool of organic carbon is responsible for the large carbon fluxes from land to water to atmosphere in the humid tropics.

  2. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7–8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π–π electron donor–acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion

  3. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  4. Dispersion of organic pigments using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, W T; Hsu, C W; Chih, Y W

    2004-02-01

    This research describes dispersion of organic pigments using supercritical fluids. With low surface tension and high diffusivity of fluids in supercritical states, aggregated particles may be effectively wetted and swelled to form the primary constituent of the dispersing solution by volume. In this paper, the conditions of temperature and pressure are used to control the density of supercritical carbon dioxide subject to PGMEA as cosolvent for dispersing organic powder in a solution. As shown from measurement with a laser scattering particle analyzer, the average diameter of phthalocyanine green 36 with the haloid structure can be significantly reduced to 93.5 nm; for aminoanthraquinone red containing and amino group (-NH(2)) and phthalocyanine blue 15:6 with symmetry benzene and inner hydrogen bond, the mean particle sizes are 178.5 and 188.7 nm, respectively, using supercritical CO(2). Additionally, the transmittance of UV light is used to confirm the dispersing performance in this study. PMID:14693141

  5. Studies on the 4-carbon precursor in the biosynthesis of riboflavin. Purification and properties of L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, R; Bacher, A

    1990-11-15

    The formation of the riboflavin precursor, 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, from 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione requires a phosphorylated 4-carbon intermediate which has been designated as Compound X (Neuberger, G., and Bacher, A. (1985) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 127, 175-181). The enzyme catalyzing the formation of Compound X has been purified about 600-fold from the cell extract of the flavinogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii by chromatographic procedures. The purified protein appeared homogeneous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and consisted of a single polypeptide of 24 kDa. The committed substrate of the enzyme was identified as D-ribulose 5-phosphate. The enzyme yields two products which were identified as L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate and formate by NMR and CD spectroscopy. Mg2+ is required for activity. PMID:2246238

  6. Organic carbon in Hanford single-shell tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents an analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) involving the organic carbon laboratory measurement data for Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTS) obtained from a review of the laboratory analytical data. This activity was undertaken at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The objective of this study is to provide a best estimate, including confidence levels, of total organic carbon (TOC) in each of the 149 SSTs at Hanford. The TOC analyte information presented in this report is useful as part of the criteria to identify SSTs for additional measurements or monitoring for the organic safety program. This report is a precursor to an investigation of TOC and moisture in Hanford SSTS, in order to provide best estimates for each together in one report. Measured laboratory data were obtained for 75 of the 149 SSTS. The data represent a thorough investigation of data from 224 tank characterization datasets, including core-sampling and process laboratory data. Liquid and solid phase TOC values were investigated by examining selected tanks with both reported TOC values in solid and liquid phases. Some relationships were noted, but there was no clustering of data or significance between the solid and liquid phases. A methodology was developed for estimating the distribution and levels of TOC in SSTs using a logarithmic scale and an analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique. The methodology grouped tanks according to waste type using the Sort On Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) grouping method. The SORWT model categorizes Hanford SSTs into groups of tanks expected to exhibit similar characteristics based on major waste types and processing histories. The methodology makes use of laboratory data for the particular tank and information about the SORWT group of which the tank is a member. Recommendations for a simpler tank grouping strategy based on organic transfer records were made

  7. Calcium Carbonate Phosphate Binding Ion Exchange Filtration and Accelerated Denitrification Improve Public Health Standards and Combat Eutrophication in Aquatic Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Cultural eutrophication, the process by which a lake becomes rich in dissolved nutrients as a result of point and nonpoint pollutant sources, is a major cause of the loss of natural lake ecosystems throughout the world. The process occurs naturally in all lakes, but phosphate-rich nutrient runoff from sources such as storm drains and agricultural runoff is a major cause of excess phosphate-induced eutrophication. Especially in Madrona Marsh, one of the last remaining vernal marshes in the gre...

  8. Carbon nanotubes: a suitable material for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of organic pollutants?

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Rui; Silva, Adrián; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2012-01-01

    Carbon materials, such as activated carbons (AC), graphite and activated carbon xerogels, have been explored as metal-free catalysts for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of bio-refractory organic compounds, such as azo dyes and phenolic compounds [1-3]. At the same time, the application of carbon nanomaterials in catalysis, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT), has grown exponentially [4]. In the present work, commercial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were used in the CWPO of 2-nitr...

  9. Estimation of the soil-water partition coefficient normalized to organic carbon for ionizable organic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    calculated by the software ACD/Labs®. The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation was applied to calculate dissociation. Regressions were developed to predict separately for the neutral and the ionic molecule species the distribution coefficient (Kd) normalized to organic carbon (KOC) from log KOW and pKa. The log......The sorption of organic electrolytes to soil was investigated. A dataset consisting of 164 electrolytes, composed of 93 acids, 65 bases, and six amphoters, was collected from literature and databases. The partition coefficient log KOW of the neutral molecule and the dissociation constant pKa were...

  10. Total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) - Monitoring of organic pollutants in wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Hodzic, Elvisa

    2011-01-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) are two methods used for measuring organic pollutants in wastewater. Both methods are widely used but the COD method results in production of hazardous wastes, including mercury.The purpose of this study was to validate the method TOC that will replace COD and find a factor to convert TOC to COD. In this study 26 samples were analyzed from four sewage treatment plant in the municipality of Enköping.The results show that the COD metho...

  11. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in ultrafiltered high-molecular-weight DOM (UDOM) was measured in surface waters of Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean (USA) to ascertain the importance of riverine and estuarine DOM as a source of BC to the ocean. BC comprised 5-72% of UDOM-C (27+/-l7%) and on average 8.9+/-6.5% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with higher values in the turbid region of the Delaware Estuary and lower yields in the river and coastal ocean. The spatial and seasonal distributions of BC along the salinity gradient of Delaware Bay suggest that the higher levels of BC in surface water UDOM originated from localized sources, possibly from atmospheric deposition or released from resuspended sediments. Black carbon comprised 4 to 7% of the DOC in the coastal Atlantic Ocean, revealing that river-estuary systems are important exporters of colloidal BC to the ocean. The annual flux of BC from Delaware Bay UDOM to the Atlantic Ocean was estimated at 2.4x10(exp 10) g BC yr(exp -1). The global river flux of BC through DOM to the ocean could be on the order of 5.5x1O(exp 12)g BC yr (exp -1). These results support the hypothesis that the DOC pool is the intermediate reservoir in which BC ages prior to sedimentary deposition.

  12. Soil Organic Carbon Mapping by Geostatistics in Europe Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, E.; Panagos, P.; Montanarella, L.

    2013-12-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because SOC is an important soil component that plays key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. The SOC content varies from place to place and it is strongly related with climate variables (temperature and rainfall), terrain features, soil texture, parent material, vegetation, land-use types, and human management (management and degradation) at different spatial scales. Geostatistical techniques allow for the prediction of soil properties using soil information and environmental covariates. In this study, assessment of SOC distribution has been predicted with Regression-Kriging method in Europe scale. In this prediction, combination of the soil samples which were collected from the LUCAS (European Land Use/Cover Area frame statistical Survey) & BioSoil Projects, with local soil data which were collected from six different CZOs in Europe and ten spatial predictors (slope, aspect, elevation, CTI, CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, WRB soil classification, annual average temperature and precipitation) were used. Significant correlation between the covariates and the organic carbon dependent variable was found. Moreover, investigating the contribution of local dataset in watershed scale into regional dataset in European scale was an important challenge.

  13. Dissolved organic carbon and its potential predictors in eutrophic lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toming, Kaire; Kutser, Tiit; Tuvikene, Lea; Viik, Malle; Nõges, Tiina

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of the true role of lakes in the global carbon cycle requires reliable estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and there is a strong need to develop remote sensing methods for mapping lake carbon content at larger regional and global scales. Part of DOC is optically inactive. Therefore, lake DOC content cannot be mapped directly. The objectives of the current study were to estimate the relationships of DOC and other water and environmental variables in order to find the best proxy for remote sensing mapping of lake DOC. The Boosted Regression Trees approach was used to clarify in which relative proportions different water and environmental variables determine DOC. In a studied large and shallow eutrophic lake the concentrations of DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were rather high while the seasonal and interannual variability of DOC concentrations was small. The relationships between DOC and other water and environmental variables varied seasonally and interannually and it was challenging to find proxies for describing seasonal cycle of DOC. Chlorophyll a (Chl a), total suspended matter and Secchi depth were correlated with DOC and therefore are possible proxies for remote sensing of seasonal changes of DOC in ice free period, while for long term interannual changes transparency-related variables are relevant as DOC proxies. CDOM did not appear to be a good predictor of the seasonality of DOC concentration in Lake Võrtsjärv since the CDOM-DOC coupling varied seasonally. However, combining the data from Võrtsjärv with the published data from six other eutrophic lakes in the world showed that CDOM was the most powerful predictor of DOC and can be used in remote sensing of DOC concentrations in eutrophic lakes. PMID:27318445

  14. Microtrapping of volatile organic compounds with carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhery Mustansar Hussain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-sorbent traps referred to as microtraps serve as integrated concentration-injection devices for continuousmonitoring in gas phase streams. The application of carbon nanotubes as unique sorbents for the fabrication of microtrapsfor the nano-scale adsorption/desorption of volatile organic molecules is presented in this paper. The microtrap applicationrequires high adsorption capacity as well as easy desorbability; the latter being critical for injection mode of these integrateddevices. The micro-sorbent characteristics of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gas phase adsorption/desorptionof several volatile organic compounds like DCM, ethanol and benzene etc. has been studied. The nonporous nature of carbonnanotubes (CNTs eliminates the mass transfer resistance related to diffusion into pore structures, thus allowing easydesorbability. At the same time, their high aspect ratios lead to large breakthrough volumes. As compared to a commercialsorbent carbopackTM, the breakthrough volume was as much as an order of magnitude higher in the CNTs, while the higherrate of desorption measured as the peak width at half height of the desorption band was found nearly eight times lower (i.e.,0.26 seconds with SWNT and 1.89 seconds with carbopackTM. The trapping and desorption characteristics of single andmulti walled nanotubes were found to be comparable. We also found that the presence of disordered carbon impurities,which could be removed by controlled oxidative annealing, could greatly degrade the performance of CNTs. This researchhas suggested that CNTs can be used in micro-sorbent traps and surprisingly enhance the efficiency of the integrated concentration-injection devices. Consequently, this will open the doors to the application of high-capacity, CNTs-based sorbentsas a better alternative to conventional sorbent in continuous monitoring devices.

  15. Dynamics of formation of particles of the condensed carbon phase at shock compression of organic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, M G; Luckjanchikov, L A; Lyakhov, N Z; Sharafutdinov, M R; Sheromov, M A; Ten, K A; Titov, V M; Tolochko, B P; Zubkov, P I

    2001-01-01

    Results of the SR study of the density behavior and dynamics of formation of condensed carbon particles at expansion of shock waves in organic materials and some low-sensitive explosives as well as at shock loading of ultra-dispersed diamonds are presented. Appearance of particles of the condensed carbon phase was observed in carbon-rich organic materials.

  16. Isotope-based Fluvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) Model: Model formulation, sensitivity, and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, William I.; Fox, James F.

    2015-06-01

    Watershed-scale carbon budgets remain poorly understood, in part due to inadequate simulation tools to assess in-stream carbon fate and transport. A new numerical model termed ISOtope-based FLuvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) is formulated to simulate the fluvial organic carbon budget in watersheds where hydrologic, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes are coupled to control benthic and transported carbon composition and flux. One ISOFLOC innovation is the formulation of new stable carbon isotope model subroutines that include isotope fractionation processes in order to estimate carbon isotope source, fate, and transport. A second innovation is the coupling of transfers between carbon pools, including algal particulate organic carbon, fine particulate and dissolved organic carbon, and particulate and dissolved inorganic carbon, to simulate the carbon cycle in a comprehensive manner beyond that of existing watershed water quality models. ISOFLOC was tested and verified in a low-gradient, agriculturally impacted stream. Results of a global sensitivity analysis suggested the isotope response variable had unique sensitivity to the coupled interaction between fluvial shear resistance of algal biomass and the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon. Model calibration and validation suggested good agreement at event, seasonal, and annual timescales. Multiobjective uncertainty analysis suggested inclusion of the carbon stable isotope routine reduced uncertainty by 80% for algal particulate organic carbon flux estimates.

  17. Effect of humic substances on the precipitation of calcium phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yong-hui; Hermann H. HAHN; Erhard HOFFMANN; Peter G. WEIDLER

    2006-01-01

    For phosphorus (P) recovery from wastewater, the effect of humic substances (HS) on the precipitation of calcium phosphate was studied. Batch experiments of calcium phosphate precipitation were undertaken with synthetic water that contained 20 mg/L phosphate (as P) and 20 mg/L HS (as dissolved organic carbon, DOC) at a constant pH value in the range of 8.0-10.0. The concentration variations of phosphate, calcium (Ca) and HS were measured in the precipitation process; the crystalline state and compositions of the precipitates were analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, respectively. It showed that at solution pH 8.0, the precipitation rate and removal efficiency of phosphate were greatly reduced by HS, but at solution pH ≥9.0,the effect of HS was very small. The Ca consumption for the precipitation of phosphate increased when HS was added; HS was also removed from solution with the precipitation of calcium phosphate. At solution pH 8.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 3.5 mg/L, and at pH ≥ 9.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 10 mg/L, the final precipitates were proved to be hydroxyapatite (HAP) by XRD. The increases of solution pH value and initial Ca/P ratio helped reduce the influence of HS on the precipitation of phosphate.

  18. Effect of surface treatment of pigment particles with polypyrrole and polyaniline phosphate on their corrosion inhibiting properties in organic coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalendová, A.; Veselý, D.; Kohl, M.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 9 (2014), s. 1465-1483. ISSN 0300-9440 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : conductive polymer * polypyrrole * polyaniline phosphate Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.358, year: 2014

  19. Implications of Different Worldviews to Assess Soil Organic Carbon Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, S.

    2012-04-01

    Profound shifts have occurred over the last three centuries in which human actions have become the main driver to global environmental change. In this new epoch, the Anthropocene, human-driven changes such as climate and land use change, are pushing the Earth system well outside of its normal operating range causing severe and abrupt environmental change. Changes in land use management and land cover are intricately linked to the carbon cycle, but our knowledge on its spatially and temporally explicit impact on carbon dynamics across different scales is still poorly understood. To elucidate on the magnitude of change in soil organic carbon (SOC) due to human-induced stressors different philosophical worldviews may be considered including (i) empiricism - direct measurements of properties and processes at micro, site-specific or field scales; (ii) metaphysics and ontology - conceptual models to assess soil change (e.g., STEP-AWBH); (iii) epistemology - indirect approaches (e.g., meta-analysis or spectral informed prediction models); (iv) reductionism - e.g., carbon flux measurements; (iv) determinism - mechanistic simulation models and biogeochemical investigations (e.g., Century or DNDC); (v) holism - national or global soil databases and aggregate maps; or (vi) integral - fusing individual, social, economic, cultural and empirical perspectives. The strengths and limitations of each of these philosophical approaches are demonstrated using case examples from Florida and U.S.A. The sensitivity to assess SOC change and uncertainty, backcasting and forecasting ability, scaling potential across space and time domains, and limitations and constraints of different worldviews are discussed.

  20. Sodium Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium phosphate is used in adults 18 years of age or older to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) ... view of the walls of the colon. Sodium phosphate is in a class of medications called saline ...

  1. Phosphate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels that are too high, and for preventing kidney stones. They are also taken for treating osteomalacia (often ... But intravenous phosphate salts should not be used. Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis). Taking potassium phosphate by mouth might help ...

  2. An Assessment of The Contribution of Organic Carbon of Terrigenous Origin To The Total Organic Carbon In Sediments In Scottish Coastal Waters (sea Lochs and Shelf Depressions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, P. S.; Reeves, A. D.; Overnell, J.; Harvey, M.; Miller, A.

    Sedimentary organic carbon is of global importance because it represents a significant sink of fixed carbon, which is being lost from the biosphere through eventual burial. In the process some carbon is remineralized which fuels marine biogeochemical cycles and returns most of the bound nutrients to the water column. In addition it may bind anthropogenic contaminants, such as heavy metals and PCBs which are removed from the water column. Sea lochs are representative of low energy hydrographic regimes and act as traps for sediment, which generally accumulates at high rat es. The sediments are associated with enhanced levels of terrigenous input, and are rich in organic matter. Further out to sea towards the shelf break, sedimentation rates decrease and the contribution of carbon of marine origin to the total decreases. It is generally considered that organic carbon of marine origin is readily degradable and that organic carbon of terrestrial origin is refractory and eventually becomes integrated into permanent sediment deposits. Thus terrigenous particulate organic carbon would be transported across the shelf and deposited on the shelf slope. Recent experiments have shown however, that on a transect from the head of Loch Etive (West Coast of Scotland) to the sea, it is the input of particulate terrigenous organic carbon that seems to determine the oxygen uptake rates. Work presented in this paper is being undertaken in association with the Centre for Coastal and Marine Sciences core programme, Restricted Exchange Environments. The wider study involves measuring processes such as oxygen uptake rates, sulphate reduction rates and total sediment carbon contents. The aims of the research presented here is to assess the contribution of terrigenous organic carbon to total carbon inputs; to assess degradation of organic carbon; to measure lignin content of sediment; to compare sedimentation rates with those outside the loch and to measure sedimentary carbon of marine

  3. Soil carbon dynamics inferred from carbon isotope compositions of soil organic matter and soil respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To better understand 14C cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, 14C abundances were evaluated for fractionated soil organic matter (SOM) and soil respiration in an urban forest. In 2001 soil profile, Δ 14C values of litter and bulk SOM increased rapidly from litter surface (62.7 per mille) to uppermost mineral soil layer (244.9 per mille), and then decreased sharply to 6 cm depth of mineral soil (125.0 per mille). Carbon enriched in 14C by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing had penetrated to at least 16 cm depth of mineral soil. The average Δ 14C in atmospheric CO2 was 58.8 per mille in August 2001, suggesting recent carbon input to the topmost litter layer. Although a similar depth distribution was observed for Δ 14C values of residual SOM after acid hydrolysis, the Δ 14C values were slightly lower than those in bulk SOM. This indicates input of 'bomb' C into this organic fraction and higher 14C abundance in acid-soluble SOM. The most of CO2 may be derived from the microbial decomposition of the acid-soluble, or labile, SOM. Therefore, the labile SOM may become most influential pool for soil carbon cycling. In contrast, carbon in base-insoluble SOM remained considerably low in 14C abundance at all depths, suggesting no or little incorporation of 'bomb' C to this fraction. Values of Δ 14C in soil respiration ranged from 91.9 to 146.4 per mille in August 2001, showing a significant contribution from decomposition of SOM fixed over past 2-40 years. These results indicate that the use of bulk SOM as a representative of soil carbon pool would lead to severe misunderstand of the soil C dynamics on decadal and shorter time scales. (author)

  4. Using scratch testing to measure the adhesion strength of calcium phosphate coatings applied to poly(carbonate urethane) substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Dunstan; Johnson, Scott; Snell, Robert; Best, Serena

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive coatings are applied to components of modern orthopædic implants to improve the host tissue response to the implants. Such coatings cannot be applied to polymeric implants by high-temperature techniques, because the use of high temperatures may critically degrade the polymer substrate. Regardless of the coating technique that is used, the coating must be sufficiently well adhered to the underlying substrate to provide any practical benefit. This paper investigates the use of scratch testing to measure the adhesion strength of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings that were applied to a poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU) substrate by an aqueous process at temperatures of 19, 28, 37, and 50 °C. This work represents the first time that scratch testing analysis has been used to study CaP coatings deposited by an aqueous, low-temperature process on to a polymer substrate. Scratch testing was shown to be a useful technique for obtaining comparative, rather than absolute, values of adhesion strength for hard coatings formed on a compliant substrate. Generally, the coating temperature was not found to influence the CaP-PCU adhesion strength. Although CaP coatings formed at 19 °C exhibited considerably lower adhesion strengths than CaP coatings formed at 28, 37, and 50 °C, this finding was attributable to the inconsistency of CaP coatings formed on the PCU substrates at 19 °C. The coating-substrate adhesion strength was measured for CaP coatings of four different coating ages (0, 1, 2, and 3 years). CaP coatings that were aged for 0, 1, or 2 years exhibited similar coating-substrate adhesion strengths to each other. In contrast, CaP coatings that were aged for 3 years demonstrated considerably lower coating-substrate adhesion strengths. The observed reduction in adhesion strength with age was thought to be attributable to suspected "drying out" of the CaP coatings. PMID:22301182

  5. Total organic carbon in aggregates as a soil recovery indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciene Maltoni, Katia; Rodrigues Cassiolato, Ana Maria; Amorim Faria, Glaucia; Dubbin, William

    2015-04-01

    The soil aggregation promotes physical protection of organic matter, preservation of which is crucial to improve soil structure, fertility and ensure the agro-ecosystems sustainability. The no-tillage cultivation system has been considered as one of the strategies to increase total soil organic carbono (TOC) contents and soil aggregation, both are closely related and influenced by soil management systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of soil aggregates and the total organic carbon inside aggregates, with regard to soil recovery, under 3 different soil management systems, i.e. 10 and 20 years of no-tillage cultivation as compared with soil under natural vegetation (Cerrado). Undisturbed soils (0-5; 5-10; and 10-20 cm depth) were collected from Brazil, Central Region. The soils, Oxisols from Cerrado, were collected from a field under Natural Vegetation-Cerrado (NV), and from fields that were under conventional tillage since 1970s, and 10 and 20 years ago were changed to no-tillage cultivation system (NT-10; NT-20 respectively). The undisturbed samples were sieved (4mm) and the aggregates retained were further fractionated by wet sieving through five sieves (2000, 1000, 500, 250, and 50 μm) with the aggregates distribution expressed as percentage retained by each sieve. The TOC was determined, for each aggregate size, by combustion (Thermo-Finnigan). A predominance of aggregates >2000 μm was observed under NV treatment (92, 91, 82 %), NT-10 (64, 73, 61 %), and NT-20 (71, 79, 63 %) for all three depths (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm). In addition greater quantities of aggregates in sizes 1000, 500, 250 and 50 μm under NT-10 and NT-20 treatments, explain the lower aggregate stability under these treatments compared to the soil under NV. The organic C concentration for NV in aggregates >2000 μm was 24,4; 14,2; 8,7 mg/g for each depth (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm, respectively), higher than in aggregates sized 250-50 μm (7,2; 5,5; 4,4 mg/g) for all depths

  6. Environmental Controls of Soil Organic Carbon in Soils Across Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Paz, Claudia; Phillips, Oliver; Nonato Araujo Filho, Raimundo; Lloyd, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Amazonian forests store and cycle a significant amount of carbon on its soils and vegetation. Yet, Amazonian forests are now subject to strong environmental pressure from both land use and climate change. Some of the more dramatic model projections for the future of the Amazon predict a major change in precipitation followed by savanization of most currently forested areas, resulting in major carbon losses to the atmosphere. However, how soil carbon stocks will respond to climatic and land use changes depend largely on how soil carbon is stabilized. Amazonian soils are highly diverse, being very variable in their weathering levels and chemical and physical properties, and thus it is important to consider how the different soils of the Basin stabilize and store soil organic carbon (SOC). The wide variation in soil weathering levels present in Amazonia, suggests that soil groups with contrasting pedogenetic development should differ in their predominant mechanism of SOC stabilization. In this study we investigated the edaphic, mineralogical and climatic controls of SOC concentration in 147 pristine forest soils across nine different countries in Amazonia, encompassing 14 different WRB soil groups. Soil samples were collected in 1 ha permanent plots used for forest dynamics studies as part of the RAINFOR project. Only 0-30 cm deep averages are reported here. Soil samples were analyzed for carbon and nitrogen and for their chemical (exchangeable bases, phosphorus, pH) and physical properties, (particle size, bulk density) and mineralogy through standard selective dissolution techniques (Fe and Al oxides) and by semi-quantitative X-Ray diffraction. In Addition, selected soils from each soil group had SOC fractionated by physical and chemical techniques. Our results indicate that different stabilization mechanisms are responsible for SOC stabilization in Amazonian soils with contrasting pedogenetic level. Ferralsols and Acrisols were found to have uniform mineralogy

  7. Aggregate and soil organic carbon dynamics in South Chilean Andisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygens, D.; Boeckx, P.; Van Cleemput, O.; Oyarzún, C.; Godoy, R.

    2005-06-01

    Extreme sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC) to climate and land use change warrants further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between aggregate and SOC dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses of a south Chilean Andisol: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR), a grassland (GRASS) and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS). Total carbon content of the 0-10cm soil layer was higher for GRASS (6.7 kg C m-2) than for PINUS (4.3 kg C m-2, while TC content of SGFOR (5.8 kg C m-2) was not significantly different from either one. High extractable oxalate and pyrophosphate Al concentrations (varying from 20.3-24.4 g kg-1, and 3.9-11.1 g kg-1, respectively) were found in all sites. In this study, SOC and aggregate dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOC, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOC fractions, and C mineralization experiments. The results showed that electrostatic sorption between and among amorphous Al components and clay minerals is mainly responsible for the formation of metal-humus-clay complexes and the stabilization of soil aggregates. The process of ligand exchange between SOC and Al would be of minor importance resulting in the absence of aggregate hierarchy in this soil type. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS (respectively 0.495, 0.266 and 0.196 g CO2-Cm-2d-1 for the top soil layer). In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions gave opposite results, showing that the recalcitrance of the SOC decreased in another order: PINUS>SGFOR>GRASS. We deduced that electrostatic sorption processes and physical protection of SOC in soil aggregates were the main processes determining SOC stabilization. As a result, high aggregate carbon concentrations, varying from 148 till 48 g kg-1, were encountered for all land use sites. Al

  8. Aggregate and soil organic carbon dynamics in South Chilean Andisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Huygens

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC to climate and land use change warrants further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between aggregate and SOC dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses of a south Chilean Andisol: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR, a grassland (GRASS and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS. Total carbon content of the 0-10cm soil layer was higher for GRASS (6.7 kg C m-2 than for PINUS (4.3 kg C m-2, while TC content of SGFOR (5.8 kg C m-2 was not significantly different from either one. High extractable oxalate and pyrophosphate Al concentrations (varying from 20.3-24.4 g kg-1, and 3.9-11.1 g kg-1, respectively were found in all sites. In this study, SOC and aggregate dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOC, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOC fractions, and C mineralization experiments. The results showed that electrostatic sorption between and among amorphous Al components and clay minerals is mainly responsible for the formation of metal-humus-clay complexes and the stabilization of soil aggregates. The process of ligand exchange between SOC and Al would be of minor importance resulting in the absence of aggregate hierarchy in this soil type. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS (respectively 0.495, 0.266 and 0.196 g CO2-Cm-2d-1 for the top soil layer. In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions gave opposite results, showing that the recalcitrance of the SOC decreased in another order: PINUS>SGFOR>GRASS. We deduced that electrostatic sorption processes and physical protection of SOC in soil aggregates were the main processes determining SOC stabilization. As a result, high aggregate carbon concentrations, varying from 148 till 48 g kg-1, were encountered for all land use

  9. Studies on organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous in the sediments of Mandovi Estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nasnolkar, C.M.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    Sediment organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and hydrography of the overlying waters of the estuarine region in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India have been studied. The relationship of carbon and nutrients with sediment characteristics...

  10. Variation in assimilable organic carbon formation during chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingbin; Yuan, Ting; Ni, Huishan; Li, Yanpeng; Hu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter (EOM) solutions under different conditions, to determine how the metabolites produced by these organisms affect water safety and the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC). The effects of chlorine dosages, coagulant dosage, reaction time and temperature on the formation of AOC were investigated during the disinfection of M.aeruginosa metabolite solutions. The concentration of AOC followed a decreasing and then increasing pattern with increasing temperature and reaction time. The concentration of AOC decreased and then increased with increasing chlorination dosage, followed by a slight decrease at the highest level of chlorination. However, the concentration of AOC decreased continuously with increasing coagulant dosage. The formation of AOC can be suppressed under appropriate conditions. In this study, chlorination at 4mg/L, combined with a coagulant dose of 40mg/L at 20°C over a reaction time of 12hr, produced the minimum AOC. PMID:27372113

  11. Susceptibility of Permafrost Soil Organic Carbon under Warming Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Liang, L.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of soil organic carbon (SOC) that has been stored in permafrost is a key concern under warming climate because it could provide a positive feedback. Studies and conceptual models suggest that SOC degradation is largely controlled by the decomposability of SOC, but it is unclear exactly what portions of SOC are susceptible to rapid breakdown and what mechanisms may be involved in SOC degradation. Using a suite of analytical techniques, we examined the dynamic consumption and production of labile SOC compounds, including sugars, alcohols, and small molecular weight organic acids in incubation experiments (up to 240 days at either -2 or 8 °C) with a tundra soil under anoxic conditions, where SOC respiration and iron(III) reduction were monitored. We observe that sugars and alcohols are main components in SOC accounting for initial rapid release of CO2 and CH4 through anaerobic fermentation, whereas the fermentation products such as acetate and formate are subsequently utilized as primary substrates for methanogenesis. Iron(III) reduction is correlated to acetate production and methanogenesis, suggesting its important roles as an electron acceptor in tundra SOC respiration. These observations corroborate strongly with the glucose addition during incubation, in which rapid CO2 and CH4 production is observed concurrently with rapid production and consumption of organics such as acetate. Thus, the biogeochemical processes we document here are pertinent to understanding the accelerated SOC decomposition with temperature and could provide basis for model predicting feedbacks to climate warming in the Arctic.

  12. Interactions between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic matter: Further implications for the ballast hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    De La Rocha, Christina,; Nowald, N.; Passow, Uta

    2008-01-01

    Correlations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes into sediment traps in the deep sea have previously suggested that interactions between organic matter and minerals play a key role in organic matter flux to the deep. Here experiments were carried out in rolling tanks to observe the incorporation of suspended biogenic minerals ( calcium carbonate coccoliths or silica diatom frustules) into diatom aggregates and examine their influence on aggregate character. Addition of high...

  13. Connecting Soil Organic Carbon and Root Biomass with Land-Use and Vegetation in Temperate Grassland

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Soils contain much of Earth's terrestrial organic carbon but are sensitive to land-use. Rangelands are important to carbon dynamics and are among ecosystems most widely impacted by land-use. While common practices like grazing, fire, and tillage affect soil properties directly related to soil carbon dynamics, their magnitude and direction of change vary among ecosystems and with intensity of disturbance. We describe variability in soil organic carbon (SOC) and root biomass—sampled from 0–170 ...

  14. How will conversion to organic cereal production affect carbon stocks in Swedish agricultural soils?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrén, Olof; Kätterer, Thomas; Kirchmann, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Soil carbon changes were modelled over 30 years with the focus on cereal crops, since leys are often managed similarly in organic and conventional agriculture. Other crops were not considered due to difficulties in large-scale cropping of oilseed rape and potatoes organically because of pest problems. Four scenarios were used: 0%, 8% (current), 20% and 100% organic cereal production. Conversion to organic cereal crop production was found to reduce the amount of carbon stored as organic matter...

  15. Treatment of hydroponic wastewater by denitrification filters using plant prunings as the organic carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Sukias, J P S

    2008-05-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using pre-treated plant liquors as organic carbon sources for the treatment of hydroponic wastewater containing high nitrate-N (>300 mg N/L). The waste plant material was pre-treated to extract organic carbon-rich liquors. When this plant liquor was used as an organic carbon source in denitrification filters at the organic carbon:nitrogen dose rate of 3C:N, nitrate removal efficiencies were >95% and final effluent nitrate concentrations were consistently 140 mg/L) of organic carbon (fBOD5) remained in the final effluents. Therefore, a 'compromise' organic carbon:nitrogen dose rate (2C:N) was trialled, at which nitrate removal efficiencies were maintained at >85%, final effluent nitrate concentrations were consistently below 45 mg N/L, and effluent fBOD5 concentrations were hydroponic wastewater in a denitrification filter. PMID:17714940

  16. The importance of a surface organic layer in simulating permafrost thermal and carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarov, Elchin; Schaefer, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Permafrost-affected soils contain twice as much carbon as currently exists in the atmosphere. Studies show that warming of the perennially frozen ground could initiate significant release of the frozen soil carbon into the atmosphere. Initializing the frozen permafrost carbon with the observed soil carbon distribution from the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database reduces the uncertainty associated with the modeling of the permafrost carbon feedback. To improve permafrost thermal and carbon dynamics we implemented a dynamic surface organic layer with vertical carbon redistribution, and introduced dynamic root growth controlled by active layer thickness, which improved soil carbon exchange between frozen and thawed pools. These changes increased the initial amount of simulated frozen carbon from 313 to 560 Gt C, consistent with observed frozen carbon stocks, and increased the spatial correlation of the simulated and observed distribution of frozen carbon from 0.12 to 0.63.

  17. Methane hydrate in the global organic carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The global occurrence of methane hydrate in outer continental margins and in polar regions, and the magnitude of the amount of methane sequestered in methane hydrate suggest that methane hydrate is an important component in the global organic carbon cycle. Various versions of this cycle have emphasized the importance of methane hydrate, and in the latest version the role of methane hydrate is considered to be analogous to the workings of an electrical circuit. In this circuit the methane hydrate is a condenser and the consequences of methane hydrate dissociation are depicted as a resistor and inductor, reflecting temperature change and changes in earth surface history. These consequences may have implications for global change including global climate change.

  18. Soil Organic Carbon dynamics in agricultural soils of Veneto Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampa, F. B.; Morari, F. M.; Hiederer, R. H.; Toth, G. T.; Giandon, P. G.; Vinci, I. V.; Montanarella, L. M.; Nocita, M.

    2012-04-01

    One of the eight soil threats expressed in the European Commission's Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection (COM (2006)231 final) it's the decline in Soil Organic Matter (SOM). His preservation is recognized as with the objective to ensure that the soils of Europe remain healthy and capable of supporting human activities and ecosystems. One of the key goals of the strategy is to maintain and improve Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) levels. As climate change is identified as a common element in many of the soil threats, the European Commission (EC) intends to assess the actual contribution of the soil protection to climate change mitigation and the effects of climate change on the possible depletion of SOM. A substantial proportion of European land is occupied by agriculture, and consequently plays a crucial role in maintaining natural resources. Organic carbon preservation and sequestration in the EU's agricultural soils could have some potential to mitigate the effects of climate change, particularly linked to preventing certain land use changes and maintaining SOC stocks. The objective of this study is to assess the SOC dynamics in agricultural soils (cropland and grassland) at regional scale, focusing on changes due to land use. A sub-objective would be the evaluation of the most used land management practices and their effect on SOC content. This assessment aims to determine the geographical distribution of the potential GHG mitigation options, focusing on hot spots in the EU, where mitigation actions would be particularly efficient and is linked with the on-going work in the JRC SOIL Action. The pilot area is Veneto Region. The data available are coming from different sources, timing and involve different variables as: soil texture, climate, soil disturbance, managements and nutrients. The first source of data is the LUCAS project (Land Use/Land Cover Area Frame statistical Survey). Started in 2001, the LUCAS project aims to monitor changes in land cover/use and

  19. Adsorption mechanism of different organic chemicals on fluorinated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Zheng, Nan; Liang, Ni; Zhang, Di; Wu, Min; Pan, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MC) were fluorinated by a solid-phase reaction method using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The surface alteration of carbon nanotubes after fluorination (MC-F) was confirmed based on surface elemental analysis, TEM and SEM. The incorporation of F on MC surface was discussed as F incorporation on carbon defects, replacement of carboxyl groups, as well as surface coating of PTFE. The adsorption performance and mechanisms of MC-F for five kinds of representative organic compounds: sulfamethoxazole (SMX), ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR), bisphenol a (BPA) and phenanthrene (PHE) were investigated. Although BET-N2 surface area of the investigated CNTs decreased after fluorination, the adsorption of all five chemicals increased. Because of the glassification of MC-F surface coating during BET-N2 surface area measurement, the accessible surface area of MC-F was underestimated. Desorption hysteresis was generally observed in all the sorption systems in this study, and the desorption hysteresis of MC-F were stronger than the pristine CNTs. The enhanced adsorption of MC-F may be attributed the pores generated on the coated PTFE and the dispersed CNT aggregates due to the increased electrostatic repulsion after fluorination. The rearrangement of the bundles or diffusion of the adsorbates in MC-F inner pores were the likely reason for the strong desorption hysteresis of MC-F. The butterfly structure of BPA resulted in its high sorption and strong desorption hysteresis. The exothermic sorption character of OFL on CNTs resulted in its strong desorption hysteresis. PMID:27058918

  20. Erosion-induced massive organic carbon burial and carbon emission in the Yellow River basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, L.; Lu, X. X.; Xin, Z.

    2014-02-01

    Soil erosion and terrestrial deposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) can potentially play a significant role in global carbon cycling. Assessing the redistribution of SOC during erosion and subsequent transport and burial is of critical importance. Using hydrological records of soil erosion and sediment load, and compiled organic carbon (OC) data, estimates of the eroded soils and OC induced by water in the Yellow River basin during the period 1950-2010 were assembled. The Yellow River basin has experienced intense soil erosion due to combined impact of natural process and human activity. Over the period, 134.2 ± 24.7 Gt of soils and 1.07 ± 0.15 Gt of OC have been eroded from hillslopes based on a soil erosion rate of 1.7-2.5 Gt yr-1. Approximately 63% of the eroded soils were deposited in the river system, while only 37% were discharged into the ocean. For the OC budget, approximately 0.53 ± 0.21 Gt (49.5%) was buried in the river system, 0.25 ± 0.14 Gt (23.5%) was delivered into the ocean, and the remaining 0.289 ± 0.294 Gt (27%) was decomposed during the erosion and transport processes. This validates the commonly held assumption that 20-40% of the eroded OC would be oxidized after erosion. Erosion-induced OC redistribution on the landscape likely represented a carbon source, although a large proportion of OC was buried. In addition, about half of the terrestrially redeposited OC (49.4%) was buried behind dams, revealing the importance of dam trapping in sequestering the eroded OC. Although several uncertainties need to be better constrained, the obtained budgetary results provide a means of assessing the redistribution of the eroded OC within the Yellow River basin. Human activities have significantly altered its redistribution pattern over the past decades.

  1. Erosion-induced massive organic carbon burial and carbon emission in the Yellow River basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion and terrestrial deposition of soil organic carbon (SOC can potentially play a significant role in global carbon cycling. Assessing the fate of SOC during erosion and subsequent transport and sedimentation is of critical importance. Using hydrological records of soil erosion and sediment load, and compiled organic carbon (OC data, budgets of the eroded soils and OC induced by water in the Yellow River basin during 1950–2010 were analyzed. The Yellow River basin has experienced intense soil erosion due to integrated impact of natural process and human activity. Over the period, 134.2 ± 24.7 Gt of soils and 1.07 ± 0.26 Gt of OC have been eroded from slope lands based on a soil erosion rate of 1.7–2.5 Gt yr–1. Among the produced sediment, approximately 63% of it was deposited on land, while only 37% was discharged into the ocean. For the OC budget, approximately 0.53 ± 0.18 Gt (49.5% was buried on land, 0.25 ± 0.14 Gt (23.5% was delivered into the ocean, and the remaining 0.289 ± 0.202 Gt (27% was decomposed during the erosion and transport processes. This validates the commonly used assumption that 20–40% of the eroded OC would be oxidized after erosion. Erosion-induced OC transport in the basin likely represents an atmospheric carbon source. In addition, about half of the terrestrially redeposited OC (around 49.4% was buried in reservoirs and behind silt check dams, revealing the importance of dam sedimentation in trapping the eroded OC. Although with several uncertainties to be better constrained, the obtained budgetary results provide a means of assessing the potential fates of the eroded OC within the Yellow River basin.

  2. Mineland reclamation and soil organic carbon sequestration in Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mining industry has been continuously involved in initiatives to reduce the emission of green house gases in to atmosphere. Control measures have been introduced in all steps starting from the mining of coal to energy production. Reclamation of mined land was and is one of the eco-friendly measures adopted by the industry. Apart from the inherent benefits of reclamation to improve on and offsite environmental quality, its potential to produce biomass and enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) has not been addressed. Reclamative effects of establishing forest and pasture with (graded) and without topsoil (ungraded) application on soil quality and soil carbon sequestration was studied on mine land in Ohio. The SOC pool for 0--30 cm depth for the undisturbed control sites was 56.6 MgC/ha for forest and 66.3 MgC/ha for pasture. In comparison, the SOC pool in the forest and pasture of graded mineland for 0--30 cm depth after 25 years of reclamation was 58.9 MgC/ha and 62.7 MgC/ha respectively. In ungraded mineland, the SOC pool in the 0--30 cm depth after 30 years of reclamation was 51.5 MgC/ha in forest and 58.9 MgC/ha in the pasture

  3. Organic carbon isotopes of the Sinian and Early Cambrian black shales on Yangtze Platform, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李任伟; 卢家烂; 张淑坤; 雷加锦

    1999-01-01

    Organic matter of the Sinian and early Cambrian black shales on the Yangtze Platform belongs to the light carbon group of isotopes with the δ13C values from - 27 % to -35 % , which are lower than those of the contemporaneously deposited carbonates and phosphorites. A carbon isotope-stratified paleooceanographic model caused by upwelling is proposed, which can be used not only to interpret the characteristics of organic carbon isotopic compositions of the black shales, but also to interpret the paleogeographic difference in the organic carbon isotope compositions of various types of sedimentary rocks.

  4. Physical and chemical protection of soil organic carbon in three agricultural soils with different contents of calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of organic carbon physically protected by entrapment within aggregates and through polyvalent cation organic matter bridging was determined on non-calcareous and calcareous soils. The composition of organic carbon in whole soils and 13C NMR analysis. High energy photo-oxidation was carried out on <53 μm fractions and results from the NMR spectra showed 17-40% of organic carbon was in a condensed aromatic form, most likely charcoal (char). The concept that organic material remaining after photo-oxidation may be physically protected within aggregates was investigated by treating soils with a mild acid prior to photo-oxidation. More organic material was protected in the calcareous than the non-calcareous soils, regardless of whether the calcium occurred naturally or was an amendment. Acid treatment indicated that the presence of exchangeable calcium reduced losses of organic material upon photo-oxidation by about 7% due to calcium bridging. These results have implications for N fertiliser recommendations based upon organic carbon content. Firstly, calcium does not impact upon degradability of organic material to an extent likely to affect N fertiliser recommendations. Secondly, standard assessment techniques overestimate active organic carbon content in soils with high char content. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Publishing

  5. Particulate organic carbon and nitrogen export from major Arctic rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. W.; Holmes, R. M.; Peterson, B. J.; Raymond, P. A.; Striegl, R. G.; Zhulidov, A. V.; Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.; Tank, S. E.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Staples, R.; Gurtovaya, T. Y.; Griffin, C. G.

    2016-05-01

    Northern rivers connect a land area of approximately 20.5 million km2 to the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas. These rivers account for ~10% of global river discharge and transport massive quantities of dissolved and particulate materials that reflect watershed sources and impact biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. In this paper, multiyear data sets from a coordinated sampling program are used to characterize particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) export from the six largest rivers within the pan-Arctic watershed (Yenisey, Lena, Ob', Mackenzie, Yukon, Kolyma). Together, these rivers export an average of 3055 × 109 g of POC and 368 × 109 g of PN each year. Scaled up to the pan-Arctic watershed as a whole, fluvial export estimates increase to 5767 × 109 g and 695 × 109 g of POC and PN per year, respectively. POC export is substantially lower than dissolved organic carbon export by these rivers, whereas PN export is roughly equal to dissolved nitrogen export. Seasonal patterns in concentrations and source/composition indicators (C:N, δ13C, Δ14C, δ15N) are broadly similar among rivers, but distinct regional differences are also evident. For example, average radiocarbon ages of POC range from ~2000 (Ob') to ~5500 (Mackenzie) years before present. Rapid changes within the Arctic system as a consequence of global warming make it challenging to establish a contemporary baseline of fluvial export, but the results presented in this paper capture variability and quantify average conditions for nearly a decade at the beginning of the 21st century.

  6. Dynamics of organic and inorganic carbon across contiguous mangrove and seagrass systems (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    OpenAIRE

    BOUILLON, S; F. Dehairs; Velimirov, B.; Abril, G.; Borges, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    [1] We report on the water column biogeochemistry in adjacent mangrove and seagrass systems in Gazi Bay (Kenya), with a focus on assessing the sources and cycling of organic and inorganic carbon. Mangrove and seagrass-derived material was found to be the dominant organic carbon sources in the water column, and could be distinguished on the basis of their delta C-13 signatures and particulate organic carbon: total suspended matter (POC/TSM) ratios. Spatially, a distinct boundary existed whereb...

  7. Soil organic carbon of an intensively reclaimed region in China: Current status and carbon sequestration potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xunfei; Zhan, Yu; Wang, Fei; Ma, Wanzhu; Ren, Zhouqiao; Chen, Xiaojia; Qin, Fangjin; Long, Wenli; Zhu, Zhenling; Lv, Xiaonan

    2016-09-15

    Land reclamation has been highly intensive in China, resulting in a large amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) loss to the atmosphere. Evaluating the factors which drive SOC dynamics and carbon sequestration potential in reclaimed land is critical for improving soil fertility and mitigating global warming. This study aims to determine the current status and factors important to the SOC density in a typical reclaimed land located in Eastern China, where land reclamation has been undergoing for centuries. A total of 4746 topsoil samples were collected from 2007 to 2010. The SOC density of the reclaimed land (3.18±0.05kgCm(-2); mean±standard error) is significantly lower than that of the adjacent non-reclaimed land (5.71±0.04kgCm(-2)) (pdensity and the environmental/anthropogenic factors (R(2)=0.59). The soil pH, land use, and elevation are the most important factors for determining SOC dynamics. In contrast, the effect of the reclamation age on the SOC density is negligible, where SOC content in the land reclaimed during years 1047-1724 is as low as that reclaimed during years 1945-2004. The scenario analysis results indicate that the carbon sequestration potential of the reclaimed lands may achieve a maximum of 5.80±1.81kgCO2m(-2) (mean±SD) when dryland is converted to flooded land with vegetable-rice cropping system and soil pH of ~5.9. Note that in some scenarios the methane emission substantially offsets the carbon sequestration potential, especially for continuous rice cropping system. With the optimal setting for carbon sequestration, it is estimated that the dryland reclaimed in the last 50years in China is able to sequester 0.12milliontons CO2 equivalent per year. PMID:27196991

  8. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Xing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  9. 14C in fractions of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report carbon isotope ratios of fractions of natural organic compounds in ground waters isolated from the Stripa mine (Sweden) and the Milk River aquifer (Alberta, Canada). High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fractions of the organic carbon were characterized and these, along with dissolved inorganic carbon, were analysed for δ13C and 14C. The 14C results suggest that the dissolved organic carbon originates from a combination of soil organic matter and kerogen in the aquifer matrix. The high-molecular-weight fractions show a predominant soil origin, whereas the low-molecular-weight fractions are often strongly influenced by kerogen. (author)

  10. Zooplankton response to organic carbon level in lakes of differing trophic states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowszys M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Water eutrophication is associated with an increase in the organic carbon content (both particulate and dissolved forms, which may affect the functioning of the zooplankton community. Mesotrophic and eutrophic lakes in the Masurian Lake District (Poland were selected to evaluate the relationship between the organic carbon level and the zooplankton community. The lakes differed significantly in most environmental variables. RDA analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of environmental variables on zooplankton. The variables that significantly explained the variance in the zooplankton community abundance (Monte Carlo permutation test included dissolved and particulate organic carbon, Secchi disc visibility, soluble reactive phosphorus and total nitrogen. The response of zooplankton to an increasing level of organic carbon is functional rather than quantitative. In the mesotrophic system, the results of the redundancy analysis indicated relatively strong positive relationships between dissolved organic carbon and zooplankton biomass, and negative correlations between chlorophyll a and zooplankton biomass. The above suggests that indirect organic carbon utilization by zooplankton could partly compensate for the poor feeding conditions of planktonic animals (decreased phytoplankton availability. In the eutrophic lake, elevated organic carbon levels are partly limited by zooplankton, which is suggested by the positive relationship between particulate organic matter and the total zooplankton biomass (RDA results. The positive relationship between the biomass of copepods and organic carbon in particulate and dissolved forms implies that copepods benefit from the increased heterotrophic carbon flow that is activated in the eutrophic lake.

  11. Assessment of the potential impact of the phosphate industry along the Syrian Coast by evaluating 210Po and 210Pb levels in sediment, seawater and selected marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate industry is considered to be one of the potential sources of natural radionuclides in Syrian environment. Most of the phosphate ore is exported in large quantities via one of the main Syrian ports (Tartous) situated on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea (34 54 North , 35 52 East). The impact of the loading cargoes on the marine environment has been evaluated. 210Po and 210Pb in seawater, sediment and marine organisms have been determined. Results have shown a significant enhancement of these two radionuclides in sediment and surface water inside the port area. The highest 210Po and 210Pb concentrations observed in sediment were found to be 170 Bq.kg-1and 64 Bq.kg-1 respectively. While, 210Pb and 210Po concentrations in surface water ranged from 5 to 20 m Bq.l-1 and 0.93 to 3.23 m Bq.l-1. In addition, other naturally occurring radionuclides were also determined in the collected sediment samples and relatively higher values (226Ra = 33.2 Bq.kg-1 and 234Th = 88 Bq.kg-1) were observed for those samples collected from inside the port. However, the effect of loading cargoes on the near marine environment was found to be mainly related to wind direction where air particulate carrying radioactivity either being blown to lands or sea. Moreover, comparable values of 210Po and 210Pb for all marine organisms (algae, crab and fish) have been observed and it is not recommended to use these organisms for evaluating the effect of phosphate industry on marine environment. This is due to the fact that marine organisms accumulate 210Po and 210Pb in their body. Two core samples were also collected in order to investigate the history of pollution in the port. Results have shown a complex relation for unsupported 210Pb with depth, where the constant supply dating method can not be applied. This is due to the fact that two sources for unsupported 210Pb being observed in the port area; viz. radon gas and phosphate dust carrying radioactivity including 210Pb. However, depth

  12. In vitro and in vivo degradation of biomimetic octacalcium phosphate and carbonate apatite coatings on titanium implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrere, F.; Valk, van der C.M.; Dalmeijer, R.A.J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Groot, de K.; Layrolle, P.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings have been applied onto titanium alloys prosthesis to combine the srength of metals with the bioactivity of Ca-P. It has been clearly shown in many publications that Ca-P coating accelerates bone formation around the implant. However, longevity of the Ca-P coating fo

  13. Application of Two Exponential Equations in the Study of Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization in Natural Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Huan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study respective using the exponential equation and double exponential equation which are widely used were fitted Pinus massoniana, evergreen broad leaved forest, deciduous oak forest, pine-oak forest, Pinus koraiensis and Pinus tabulaeformis and other six kinds of typical natural forest soil organic carbon mineralization process, it also by fitting curves and cumulative release of CO2 mineralization process analysis and correlation of inert carbon content of soil measured and fitted values of t-test analysis, the two exponential equations in natural forest soil organic carbon mineralization process the application results were evaluated. The results show that the double exponential equation on soil organic carbon mineralization has a better fitting description effect can be more realistically reflect the changes in soil organic carbon mineralization characteristics of the fitting results of insert soil carbon content and measured values a significant difference is not level, the soil can be more accurately reflect the changes of the inert carbon.

  14. Multicore-shell carbon-coated lithium manganese phosphate and lithium vanadium phosphate composite material with high capacity and cycling performance for lithium-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy crisis and energy security leads a great attention to Li-ion batteries (LIB) as the excellent power candidates. We successfully synthesized LiMnPO4·Li3V2(PO4)3/C composite cathode material with high capacity and excellent cycling performance from prickly MnV2O6·2H2O precursor, following chemical reduction and lithiation with double carbon sources. The LiMnPO4·Li3V2(PO4)3/C sample has a special multicore-shell structure, whose inner stuffing are LiMnPO4 and Li3V2(PO4)3 in the range of 5-25nm. The initial discharge capacity of LiMnPO4·Li3V2(PO4)3/C composite delivers 221.4 mAh g−1, 202.3 mAh g−1 and 152.9 mAh g−1 at the rate of 0.1C, 1C and 5C in the range of 1.5-4.5 V, and retains 99.5%, 99.1% and 94.3% of its initial discharge capacity after 50 cycles, respectively

  15. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in

  16. Fractionation and characterization of soil organic carbon during transition to organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, H.; Olk, D.; Cocozza, C.; Miano, T.

    2012-04-01

    The transition from conventional to organic farming is the most difficult period faced by organic growers as it could be characterized by unstable conditions, such as nutrient availability, production reductions, mineralization extents. As soil organic matter (SOM), specifically soil organic carbon (SOC), is known to play important roles in maintenance and improvement of many soil properties, it is important to define its changes during the transition period. Total SOC might not be the suitable tool to track the changes in organically based soil fertility within a 3- to 5-yr transition period. Labile fractions that are important for nutrient cycling and supply are likely to be controlled by management to a much greater extent than is total SOM. Two field experiments, in south of Italy, were established in 2009 to study the changes in SOC during transition to organic farming. Experiments included a cereal/leguminous rotation with triplicates treatments of permitted amendments (compost and fertilizers). Soils were sampled at the beginning of the project, and after each crop harvest in 2010 and 2011. A sequential fractionation procedure was used to separate different SOC-fractions: light fraction (LF), two size classes of particulate organic matter (POM), mobile humic acid (MHA) and Ca++ bound humic acid (CaHA). Isolated fractions were quantified and analyzed for their content of C, N, carbohydrates and amino compounds fingerprints. The obtained results showed that compost application contributed to significantly higher quantities of LF, POM and MHA than did fertilizers application. Carbohydrates content decreased in LF while increased noticeably in POM and slightly in MHA fractions, which indicates that decomposing materials are converted, within the time span of humification, from young fractions into more mature fractions. Amino compounds were found to provide up to 40% of total soil N with a major contribution of the humified fractions, MHA and CaHA. The utilized

  17. [Screening, identification and phosphate-solubilizing characteristics of Rahnella sp. phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in calcareous soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhi-wei; Hong, Jian-ping; Xie, Ying-he; Li, Lin-xuan

    2013-08-01

    Several strains of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria were isolated and screened from the crop rhizosphere of calcareous soil in Shanxi Province of China. After repeated isolation and purification, the strain W25 with strong phosphate-solubilizing activity was obtained, and identified as Rahnella sp., based on the morphological, physiological and biochemical properties and the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. Further studies on the W25 showed that the maximum phosphate-solubilizing capability of the W25 on tricalium phosphate, aluminum phosphate and ferric phosphate reached 385.5, 110.4 and 216.6 mg x L(-1), respectively. In the liquid culture with aluminum phosphate and ferric phosphate, the solubilized phosphorous by the W25 was significantly negatively correlated with the liquid pH, with the correlation coefficient being 0.56 and 0.81, respectively. Among the carbon and nitrogen sources, glucose and ammonium nitrate were the optimum for the solubilization of tricalium phosphate by W25. The utilization of carbon source was in the order of glucose > lactose > sucrose > mannitose > starch, and that of nitrogen source was in the order of ammonium nitrate > ammonium chloride > ammonium sulfate > potassium nitrate > sodium nitrate. Different nitrogen sources had greater effects on the production of organic acids by W25. Formic acid and acetic acid would be produced when the nitrogen source was NH4+, oxalic acid and succinic acid would be produced when the nitrogen source was NO3(-), and citric acid would be extra produced when the ammonium nitrate was used as the nitrogen source. PMID:24380351

  18. RT-MATRIX: Measuring Total Organic Carbon by Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inevitably accumulate in enclosed habitats such as the International Space Station and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a result of human metabolism, material off-gassing, and leaking equipment. Some VOCs can negatively affect the quality of the crew's life, health, and performance; and consequently, the success of the mission. Air quality must be closely monitored to ensure a safe living and working environment. Currently, there is no reliable air quality monitoring system that meets NASA's stringent requirements for power, mass, volume, or performance. The ultimate objective of the project -- the development of a Real-Time, Miniaturized, Autonomous Total Risk Indicator System (RT.MATRIX).is to provide a portable, dual-function sensing system that simultaneously determines total organic carbon (TOC) and individual contaminants in air streams.

  19. Tritium distribution ratios between the 30 % tributyl phosphate(TBP)-normal dodecane(nDD) organic phase and uranyl nitrate-nitric acid aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium distribution ratios between the organic and aqueous phases were measured for the system of 30 % tributyl phosphate(TBP)-normal dodecane(nDD)/uranyl nitrate-nitric acid water. It was confirmed that tritium is extracted by TBP into the organic phase in both chemical forms of tritiated water (HTO) and tritiated nitric acid (TNO3). The value of tritium distribution ratio ranged from 0.002 to 0.005 for the conditions of 0-6 mol/L nitric acid, 0.5-800 mCi/L tritium in aqueous phase, and 0-125 g-U/L uranium in organic phase. Isotopic distribution coefficient of tritium between the organic and aqueous phases was observed to be about 0.95. (author)

  20. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  1. Examining organic carbon transport by the Orinoco River using SeaWiFS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ramón; Del Castillo, Carlos E.; Miller, Richard L.; Salisbury, Joseph; Wisser, Dominik

    2012-09-01

    The Orinoco River is the fourth largest in the world in terms of water discharge and organic carbon export to the ocean. River export of organic carbon is a key component of the carbon cycle and the global carbon budget. Here, we examined the seasonal transport of organic carbon by the Orinoco River into the eastern Caribbean using the conservative relationship of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in low salinity coastal waters influenced by river plumes. In situ measurements of CDOM absorption, DOC, and salinity were used to develop an empirical model for DOC concentration at the Orinoco River Plume. Satellite remote sensing reflectances were used with empirical models to determine DOC and Particulate organic carbon (POC) river transport. Our estimates of CDOM and DOC significantly correlated with in situ measurements and were within the expected ranges for the river. Total organic carbon transport by the Orinoco River during the period of 1998 to 2010 was 7.10 ×1012 g C y-1, from 5.29 × 1012 g C y-1 of DOC and 1.81 × 1012 g C y-1 of POC, representing ˜6% increase to previous published estimates. The variability in organic carbon transport responded to the seasonality in river flow more than to changes in organic carbon concentration in the river. Our results corroborate that is possible to estimate organic carbon transport using ocean color data at global scales. This is needed to reduce the uncertainties of land-ocean carbon fluxes.

  2. Depositional environments inferred from variations of calcium carbonate, organic carbon, and sulfide sulfur: a core from southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.; Iyer, S.D.; Chauhan, O.S.; PrakashBabu, C.

    Pleistocene has been inferred. The higher contents of organic carbon and sulfide sulfur and their negative relationship clearly establish the existence of a reducing environment below 65 cm subbottom depth. The occurrence of pyrite framboids and crystals...

  3. Synthesis and structural characterization of zirconium phosphate adipate dimethyl sulphoxide: A new lambda-type organic-inorganic layered material

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hussein Alhendawi

    2014-07-01

    −Zirconium phosphate adipate dimethyl sulphoxide, -ZrPO4(OOC-(CH2)4-COOH)(CH3)2SO, is prepared by means of topotactic anion exchange of the chloride ligand of -Zirconium phosphate, -ZrPO4Cl(CH3)2SO, with adipate. The samples are characterized by thermal analyses, X-ray diffractometry and FT-IR spectrophotometry. The used analysis approaches provide strong evidence that the chloride monovalent anions of -Zirconium phosphate are completely exchanged with the carboxylate groups of the adipate monoanionic ligands. Moreover, the adipate ligands replace the chloride anions in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In this case the formula of the derivative should contain the monoanionic adipate fragment: (OOC-(CH2)4-COOH). This formula is in agreement with TGA and elemental analysis. With respect to intercalation properties, the synthesized adipate-solid phase has a higher acidic character and a larger gallery height in comparison to the pristine -Zirconium phosphate (1.47, 1.02 nm, respectively). Therefore, this material is expected to be a suitable host for intercalation of huge basic guests.

  4. Organic carbon stock in topsoil of Jiangsu Province, China, and the recent trend of carbon sequestration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Gen-xing; LI Lian-qing; ZHANG Qi; WANG Xu-kui; SUN Xing-bin; XU Xiao-bo; JIANG Ding-an

    2005-01-01

    Data collection of soil organic carbon(SOC) of 154 soil series of Jiangsu, China from the second provincial soil survey and of recent changes in SOC from a number of field pilot experiments across the province were collected. Statistical analysis of SOC contents and soil properties related to organic carbon storage were performed. The provincial total topsoil SOC stock was estimated to be 0.1 Pg with an extended pool of 0.4 Pg taking soil depth of 1 m, being relatively small compared to its total land area of 101700 km2 . One quarter of this topsoil stock was found in the soils of the Taihu Lake region that occupied 1/6 of the provincial arable area. Paddy soils accounted for over 50% of this stock in terms of SOC distribution among the soil types in the province. Experimental data from experimental farms widely distributed in the province showed that SOC storage increased consistently over the last 20 years despite a previously reported decreasing tendency during the period between 1950-1970. The evidence indicated that agricultural management practices such as irrigation, straw return and rotation of upland crops with rice or wheat crops contributed significantly to the increase in SOC storage. The annual carbon sequestration rate in the soils was in the range of 0.3-3.5 tC/( hm2 · a), depending on cropping systems and other agricultural practices. Thus, the agricultural production in the province, despite the high input, could serve as one of the practical methods to mitigate the increasing air CO2.

  5. Organic Geochemistry of the Hamersley Province: Relationships Among Organic Carbon Isotopes, Molecular Fossils, and Lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular fossils are particularly valuable ancient biosignatures that can provide key insight about microbial sources and ecology in early Earth studies. In particular, hopanes carrying 2-methyl or 3-methyl substituents are proposed to be derived from cyanobacteria and oxygen-respiring methanotrophs, respectively, based on both their modem occurrences and their Proterozoic and Phanerozoic sedimentary distributions. Steranes are likely from ancestral eukaryotes. The distribution of methylhopanes, steranes, and other biomarkers in 2.72-2.56 billion-year-old rocks from the Hamersley Province, Western Australia show relationships to lithology, facies, and isotopes of macromolecular carbon, and other biomarkers. These observations support biomarker syngenicity and thermal maturity. Moreover, ecological signatures are revealed, including a surprising relationship between isotopic values for bulk macromolecular carbon and the biomarker for methanotrophs. The record suggests that cyanobacteria were likely key organisms of shallow-water microbial ecosystems providing molecular oxygen, fixed carbon, and possibly fixed nitrogen, and methanotrophs were not alone in recycling methane and other C-13-depleted substrates.

  6. Influence of sample composition on aerosol organic and black carbon determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results on characterization of filter-collected redwood (Sequoia sempevirens)-needle and eucalyptus smoke particles by thermal, optical, and solvent extraction methods. Our results demonstrate that organic and black carbon concentrations determined by thermal and optical methods are not only method dependent, but also critically influenced by the overall chemical composition of the samples. These conclusions are supported by the following: (1) the organic fraction of biomass smoke particles analyzed includes a component, ranging in concentration from about 6-20% of total carbon or from 16-30% of organic carbon, that is relatively non-volatile and has a combustion temperature close to that of black carbon; (2) presence of K or Na in biomass smoke samples lowers the combustion temperatures of this organic component and of black carbon, making their combustion properties indistinguishable; (3) about 20% of total organic material is nonvolatile when heated to 550 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. Consequently, thermal methods that rely on a specific temperature to separate organic from black carbon may either underestimate or overestimate the black and organic carbon concentrations, depending on the amounts of Na and K and on the composition and concentration of organic material present in a sample. These analytical uncertainties and, under some conditions, absorption by organic material may contribute to the variability of empirically derived proportionality between light transmission through filter deposits and black carbon concentrations

  7. Influence of sample composition on aerosol organic and black carbon determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakov, T.; Corrigan, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we present results on characterization of filter-collected redwood (Sequoia sempevirens)-needle and eucalyptus smoke particles by thermal, optical, and solvent extraction methods. Our results demonstrate that organic and black carbon concentrations determined by thermal and optical methods are not only method dependent, but also critically influenced by the overall chemical composition of the samples. These conclusions are supported by the following: (1) the organic fraction of biomass smoke particles analyzed includes a component, ranging in concentration from about 6-20% of total carbon or from 16-30% of organic carbon, that is relatively non-volatile and has a combustion temperature close to that of black carbon; (2) presence of K or Na in biomass smoke samples lowers the combustion temperatures of this organic component and of black carbon, making their combustion properties indistinguishable; (3) about 20% of total organic material is nonvolatile when heated to 550{degrees}C in an inert atmosphere. Consequently, thermal methods that rely on a specific temperature to separate organic from black carbon may either underestimate or overestimate the black and organic carbon concentrations, depending on the amounts of Na and K and on the composition and concentration of organic material present in a sample. These analytical uncertainties and, under some conditions, absorption by organic material may contribute to the variability of empirically derived proportionality between light transmission through filter deposits and black carbon concentrations.

  8. Tracing the sources of organic carbon in freshwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendell, Miriam; Meersmans, Jeroen; Barclay, Rachel; Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Barker, Sam; Jones, Richard; Hartley, Iain; Dungait, Jennifer; Quine, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the lateral fluxes of carbon from land to inland waters is critical for the understanding of the global carbon cycle and climate change mitigation. However, the crucial role of rivers in receiving, transporting and processing the equivalent of terrestrial net primary production in their watersheds has only recently been recognised. In addition, the fluxes of carbon from land to ocean, and the impact of anthropogenic perturbation, are poorly quantified. Therefore, a mechanistic understanding of the processes involved in the loss and preservation of C along the terrestrial-aquatic continuum is required to predict the present and future contribution of aquatic C fluxes to the global C budget. This pilot study examines the effect of land use on the fate of organic matter within two headwater catchments in Cornwall (UK) in order to develop a methodological framework for investigating C-cycling across the entire terrestrial-aquatic continuum. To this end, we aim to characterise the spatial heterogeneity of soil erosion driven lateral fluxes of SOC to identify areas of erosion and deposition using 137Cs radio-isotope and trace the terrestrial versus aquatic origin of C along the river reaches and in lake sediments at the catchment outlet. The 3D spatial distribution of SOC has been investigated by sampling three depth increments (i.e. 0-15cm, 15-30cm and 30-50cm) along 14 hillslope transects within two sub-catchments of ˜km2 each. In total, 80 terrestrial sites were monitored and analysed for total C and N, and bulk stable 13C/15N isotope values, while 137Cs was used to obtain a detailed understanding of the spatial - temporal variability in erosion driven lateral fluxes of SOC within the catchments. The relative contribution of terrestrial and aquatic C was examined along the river reaches as well as in lake sediments at the catchment outlet by considering n-alkane signatures. By linking the C accumulation rates in lake sediments over decadal timescales from

  9. Bioavailability of dissolved organic carbon linked with the regional carbon cycle in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Shuchai; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The regional carbon cycle on continental shelves has created great interest recently due to the enigma of whether these areas are a carbon sink or a source. It is vital for a precise carbon cycle model to take the bioavailability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into account, as it impacts the sink and source capacity, especially on dynamic shelves such as the East China Sea. Nine bio-decomposition experiments were carried out to assess differences in the bioavailability of DOC. Samples were collected from different water masses in the East China Sea, such as the Coastal Current, the Taiwan Current, and the Kuroshio Current, as well as from the Changjiang (Yangtze River), the main contributor of terrestrial DOC in the East China Sea. This study aimed to quantify and qualify bioavailable DOC (BDOC) in the East China Sea. Both the degradation constant of BDOC and the carbon output from microorganisms have been quantitatively evaluated. Qualitatively, excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra (EEMs) were used to evaluate the intrinsic reasons for BDOC variation. By using EEMs in conjunction with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), five individual fluorescent components were identified in this study: three humic-like and two protein-like components (P1, P2). The highest P1 and P2 fluorescence intensities were recorded in the coastal water during a phytoplankton algal bloom, while the lowest intensities were recorded in the Changjiang estuary. Quantitatively, BDOC observed during the incubation ranged from 0 to 26.1 μM. The DOC degradation rate constant varied from 0 to 0.027 (d-1), and was lowest in the Changjiang and highest in algal bloom water and warm shelf water (the Taiwan current). The Taiwan Current and mixed shelf water were the major contributors of BDOC flux to the open ocean, and the East China Sea was a net source of BDOC to the ocean. The results verified the importance of BDOC in regional carbon cycle modeling. Combining the data of BDOC and EEMs

  10. Light absorption by organic carbon from wood combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols affect the radiative balance of the Earth by absorbing and scattering light. While black carbon (BC is highly absorbing, some organic carbon (OC also has significant absorption, especially at near-ultraviolet and blue wavelengths. To the extent that OC absorbs visible light, it may be a non-negligible contributor to positive direct aerosol radiative forcing. Quantification of that absorption is necessary so that radiative-transfer models can evaluate the net radiative effect of OC.

    In this work, we examine absorption by primary OC emitted from solid fuel pyrolysis. We provide absorption spectra of this material, which can be related to the imaginary refractive index. This material has polar character but is not fully water-soluble: more than 92% was extractable by methanol or acetone, compared with 73% for water and 52% for hexane. Water-soluble OC contributes to light absorption at both ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. However, a larger portion of the absorption comes from OC that is extractable only by methanol. Absorption spectra of water-soluble OC are similar to literature reports. We compare spectra for material generated with different wood type, wood size and pyrolysis temperature. Higher wood temperature is the main factor creating OC with higher absorption; changing wood temperature from a devolatilizing state of 210 °C to a near-flaming state of 360 °C causes about a factor of four increase in mass-normalized absorption at visible wavelengths. A clear-sky radiative transfer model suggests that, despite the absorption, both high-temperature and low-temperature OC result in negative top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing over a surface with an albedo of 0.19 and positive radiative forcing over bright surfaces. Unless absorption by real ambient aerosol is higher than that measured here, it probably affects global average clear-sky forcing very little, but could be important in energy balances over bright

  11. Maximum total organic carbon limit for DWPF melter feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DWPF recently decided to control the potential flammability of melter off-gas by limiting the total carbon content in the melter feed and maintaining adequate conditions for combustion in the melter plenum. With this new strategy, all the LFL analyzers and associated interlocks and alarms were removed from both the primary and backup melter off-gas systems. Subsequently, D. Iverson of DWPF- T ampersand E requested that SRTC determine the maximum allowable total organic carbon (TOC) content in the melter feed which can be implemented as part of the Process Requirements for melter feed preparation (PR-S04). The maximum TOC limit thus determined in this study was about 24,000 ppm on an aqueous slurry basis. At the TOC levels below this, the peak concentration of combustible components in the quenched off-gas will not exceed 60 percent of the LFL during off-gas surges of magnitudes up to three times nominal, provided that the melter plenum temperature and the air purge rate to the BUFC are monitored and controlled above 650 degrees C and 220 lb/hr, respectively. Appropriate interlocks should discontinue the feeding when one or both of these conditions are not met. Both the magnitude and duration of an off-gas surge have a major impact on the maximum TOC limit, since they directly affect the melter plenum temperature and combustion. Although the data obtained during recent DWPF melter startup tests showed that the peak magnitude of a surge can be greater than three times nominal, the observed duration was considerably shorter, on the order of several seconds. The long surge duration assumed in this study has a greater impact on the plenum temperature than the peak magnitude, thus making the maximum TOC estimate conservative. Two models were used to make the necessary calculations to determine the TOC limit

  12. Clay:organic-carbon and organic carbon as determinants of the soil physical properties: reassessment of the Complexed Organic Carbon concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Adrien; Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is well known to largely determine the soil physical properties and fertility. Total porosity, structural porosity, aeration, structural stability among others are reported to increase linearly with increasing SOC in most studies. Is there an optimal SOC content as target in soil management, or is there no limit in physical fertility improvement with SOC? Dexter et al. (2008) investigated the relation between clay:SOC ratio and the physical properties of soils from different databases. They observed that the R2 of the relation between SOC and the physical properties were maximized when considering the SOC fraction limited to a clay:SOC ratio of 10. They concluded that this fraction of the SOC was complexed, and that the additional SOC was not influencing the physical properties as strongly as the complexed one. In this study, we reassessed this approach, on a database of 180 undisturbed soil samples collected from cambiluvisols of the Swiss Plateau, on an area of 2400 km2, and from different soil uses. The physical properties were obtained with Shrinkage Analysis, which involved the parameters used in Dexter et al., 2008. We used the same method, but detected biases in the statistical approach, which was, therefore, adapted. We showed that the relation between the bulk density and SOC was changing with the score of visual evaluation of the structure (VESS) (Ball et al., 2007). Therefore, we also worked only on the "good" structures according to VESS. All shrinkage parameters were linearly correlated to SOC regardless of the clay:SOC ratio, with R2 ranging from 0.45 to 0.8. Contrarily to Dexter et al. (2008), we did not observed an optimum in the R2 of the relation when considering a SOC fraction based on the clay:SOC ratio. R2 was increasing until a Clay:SOC of about 7, where it reached, and kept, its maximum value. The land use factor was not significant. The major difference with the former study is that we worked on the same soil group

  13. Uranium leaching from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium in phosphate rock was removed by means of alkaline leach solutions. Ammonium carbonate/bicarbonate solution produced a very stable uranyl carbonate compound which was separated by centrifugation. Radiometric analysis showed that about 40% of uranium was solubilized and it can be recuperated. This process could be used before the manufacture of phosphatic fertilizers and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  14. Role of Organic Matter and Carbonates in Soil Aggregation Estimated Using Laser Diffractometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. VIRTO; N. GARTZIA-BENGOETXEA; O. FERN(A)NDEZ-UGALDE

    2011-01-01

    Aggregation in many soils in semi-arid land is affected by their high carbonate contents.The presence of lithogenic and/or primary carbonates can also influence the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in aggregation.The role of carbonates and SOM in aggregation was evaluated by comparing the grain-size distribution in two carbonate-rich soils (15% and 30% carbonates) under conventional tillage after different disaggregating treatments.We also compared the effect of no-tillage and conventional tillage on the role of these two aggregating agents in the soil with 30% of carbonates.Soil samples were treated as four different ways:shaking with water (control),adding hydrochloric acid (HCl) to remove carbonates,adding hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to remove organic matter,and consecutive removal of carbonates and organic matter (HCl +H2O2),and then analyzed by laser diffraction grain-sizing.The results showed that different contributions of carbonates and SOM to aggregate formation and stability depended not only on their natural proportion,but also on the soil type,as expressed by the major role of carbonates in aggregation in the 15% carbonate-rich soil,with a greater SOC-to-SIC (soil organic C to soil inorganic C) ratio than the 30% carbonate-rich soil.The increased organic matter stocks under no-tillage could moderate the role of carbonates in aggregation in a given soil,which meant that no-tillage could affect the organic and the inorganic C cycles in the soil.In conclusion,the relative role of carbonates and SOM in aggregation could alter the aggregates hierarchy in carbonate-rich soils.

  15. Effectiveness of submersed angiosperm-epiphyte complexes on exchange of nutrients and organic carbon in littoral systems. III. Refractory organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickle, A.M.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Refractory dissolved organic compounds, consisting mainly of fulvic acids labelled with /sup 14/C of aquatic plant origin, were added to the inlet stream water of a hardwater lake and passed through two continuously, very slowly flowing (3 1/24 h) littoral systems. System I contained a natural stand of Scripus subterminalis Torr. and System II contained Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx. Macrophytic epiphytes were left intact. Control systems, containing similar sediments without macrophytes, received identical treatments. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), both labelled and unlabelled, of inflow and outflow water was fractionated into several molecular weight fractions; uv absorption and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter, particulate organic carbon (POC), and major cationic concentrations were also analyzed in inflowing and outflowing water. The pathways of the labelled refractory organic carbon amendments were followed in the water, the plant foliage and roots, epiphytes, and the sediments.

  16. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Ece; Yigini, Yusuf; Montanarella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they're collected from the "Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey" (LUCAS) Project (samples from agricultural soil), BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil), and "Soil Transformations in European Catchments" (SoilTrEC) Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs) in Europe). Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI), CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB) soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960-1990 and 2000-2010)) were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK), was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas; agricultural

  17. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Aksoy

    Full Text Available Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they're collected from the "Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey" (LUCAS Project (samples from agricultural soil, BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil, and "Soil Transformations in European Catchments" (SoilTrEC Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs in Europe. Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI, CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960-1990 and 2000-2010 were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK, was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas

  18. Combining Soil Databases for Topsoil Organic Carbon Mapping in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in assessing the distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important issue because of playing key roles in the functions of both natural ecosystems and agricultural systems. There are several studies in the literature with the aim of finding the best method to assess and map the distribution of SOC content for Europe. Therefore this study aims searching for another aspect of this issue by looking to the performances of using aggregated soil samples coming from different studies and land-uses. The total number of the soil samples in this study was 23,835 and they’re collected from the “Land Use/Cover Area frame Statistical Survey” (LUCAS) Project (samples from agricultural soil), BioSoil Project (samples from forest soil), and “Soil Transformations in European Catchments” (SoilTrEC) Project (samples from local soil data coming from six different critical zone observatories (CZOs) in Europe). Moreover, 15 spatial indicators (slope, aspect, elevation, compound topographic index (CTI), CORINE land-cover classification, parent material, texture, world reference base (WRB) soil classification, geological formations, annual average temperature, min-max temperature, total precipitation and average precipitation (for years 1960–1990 and 2000–2010)) were used as auxiliary variables in this prediction. One of the most popular geostatistical techniques, Regression-Kriging (RK), was applied to build the model and assess the distribution of SOC. This study showed that, even though RK method was appropriate for successful SOC mapping, using combined databases was not helpful to increase the statistical significance of the method results for assessing the SOC distribution. According to our results; SOC variation was mainly affected by elevation, slope, CTI, average temperature, average and total precipitation, texture, WRB and CORINE variables for Europe scale in our model. Moreover, the highest average SOC contents were found in the wetland areas

  19. Pesticide sorption by low organic carbon sediments: A sceening for seven herbicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene; Lindhardt, Bo; Rosenberg, Per;

    2000-01-01

    The sorption of seven pesticides in 10 Danish aquifer sediments has been studied. These sediments all have a total organic carbon (TOC) content below 1 g kg(-1), and include carbonate-bearing and carbonate-free Quatenary sand deposits and a Cretaceous chalk aquifer. Batch experiments were carried...

  20. Microporous metal-organic framework with potential for carbon dioxide capture at ambient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Xiang; Y. He; Z. Zhang; H. Wu; W. Zhou; R. Krishna; B. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and separation are important industrial processes that allow the use of carbon dioxide for the production of a range of chemical products and materials, and to minimize the effects of carbon dioxide emission. Porous metal-organic frameworks are promising materials to achieve s

  1. Rapid Assessment of U.S. Forest and Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Forest Biomass Carbon-Sequestration Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Eric T.; Ackerman, Katherine V.; Bliss, Norman B.; Kellndorfer, Josef M.; Reeves, Matt C.; Rollins, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides results of a rapid assessment of biological carbon stocks and forest biomass carbon sequestration capacity in the conterminous United States. Maps available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture are used to calculate estimates of current organic carbon storage in soils (73 petagrams of carbon, or PgC) and forest biomass (17 PgC). Of these totals, 3.5 PgC of soil organic carbon and 0.8 PgC of forest biomass carbon occur on lands managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). Maps of potential vegetation are used to estimate hypothetical forest biomass carbon sequestration capacities that are 3-7 PgC higher than current forest biomass carbon storage in the conterminous United States. Most of the estimated hypothetical additional forest biomass carbon sequestration capacity is accrued in areas currently occupied by agriculture and development. Hypothetical forest biomass carbon sequestration capacities calculated for existing forests and woodlands are within +or- 1 PgC of estimated current forest biomass carbon storage. Hypothetical forest biomass sequestration capacities on lands managed by the DOI in the conterminous United States are 0-0.4 PgC higher than existing forest biomass carbon storage. Implications for forest and other land management practices are not considered in this report. Uncertainties in the values reported here are large and difficult to quantify, particularly for hypothetical carbon sequestration capacities. Nevertheless, this rapid assessment helps to frame policy and management discussion by providing estimates that can be compared to amounts necessary to reduce predicted future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  2. Distribution Characteristic of Soil Organic Carbon Fraction in Different Types of Wetland in Hongze Lake of China

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon fractions included microbial biomass carbon (MBC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and labile organic carbon (LOC), which was investigated over a 0–20 cm depth profile in three types of wetland in Hongze Lake of China. Their ecoenvironmental effect and the relationships with soil organic carbon (SOC) were analyzed in present experiment. The results showed that both active and SOC contents were in order reduced by estuarine wetland, flood plain, and out-of-lake wetland. Pea...

  3. Impacts of Soil Organic Stability on Carbon Storage in Coastal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. K.; Rosenheim, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal wetlands store vast amounts of organic carbon, globally, and are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the effects of anthropogenic sea level rise. Recently, we used ramped pyrolysis/oxidation decomposition characteristics as proxies for soil organic carbon (SOC) stability to understand the fate of carbon storage in coastal wetlands (fresh, brackish, and salt marshes) comprising the Mississippi River deltaic plain, undergoing rapid rates of local sea level rise. At equivalent soil depths, we observed that fresh marsh SOC was more thermochemically stable than brackish and salt marsh SOC. The differences in stability imply stronger carbon sequestration potential of fresh marsh soil carbon, compared to that of salt and brackish marshes. Here, we expand upon these results of differential organic carbon stability/reactivity and model how projected changes in salinity due to sea-level rise and other environmental changes will impact carbon storage in this region with implications globally.

  4. Sources of organic carbon in mangrove sediments: variability and possible ecological implications

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillon, Steven; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Rao, AVVS; N. Koedam; F. Dehairs

    2005-01-01

    Mangrove sediments from three different mangrove ecosystems (Coringa Wildlife Sanctuary in the Godavari Delta, Andhra Pradesh, India, and Galle and Pambala, south-west Sri Lanka) were analysed for their organic carbon content, elemental ratios (C:N) and carbon stable isotope composition. Organic carbon content (0.6 - 31.7% dry weight), C/N ratios (7.0 - 27.3) and delta(13)C (between -29.4 and -20.6parts per thousand) showed a wide range of values. Lower stocks of organic carbon coincided with...

  5. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  6. Emission of CO2 from biochar-amended soils and implications for soil organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagrilo, E.; Jeffery, S.L.; Hoffland, E.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Soil amendment with pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM), also named biochar, is claimed to sequester carbon (C). However, possible interactions between PyOM and native soil organic carbon (SOC) may accelerate the loss of SOC, thus reducing PyOM's C sequestration potential. We combined the results of 46

  7. Using Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Carbon in Native Prairie Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to characterize soil organic carbon (SOC) with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) and then to determine correlations between the mass spectra and associated soil characterization data. Both soil carbon chemistry and the organic forms in which SOC is...

  8. Vertical distribution characteristics of soil organic carbon content in Caohai wetland ecosystem of Guizhou plateau, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunjie Wu; Fengyou Wang; Sixi Zhu

    2016-01-01

    We selected four kinds of land use types from Caohai wetlands of Guizhou plateau (a total number of 32 soil profiles) to study the distribution characteristics of organic carbon content in soil. With different ways of land use, the organic carbon content of soil profiles and organic carbon density show the tendency of decreasing firstly and then increasing from top to bottom. With the increase of depth, the vertical difference becomes smaller first and then starts increasing. Land reclamation reduces the soil organic carbon content and density, changing its distribu-tion structure in topsoil. The average content of organic carbon in Caohai wetlands are as follows: lake bed silt [ marsh wetland [ farmland [ woodland, the average organic carbon content of lake bed silt, marsh wetland, farmland and woodland are 16.40, 2.94, 1.81 and 1.08%, respectively. Land reclamation reduces the organic carbon content of soil, therefore the conversion of cultivated lands to wetlands and the increase of forest coverage will help to fix the organic carbon in soil and increase its reserves.

  9. Dynamics of organic and inorganic carbon across contiguous mangrove and seagrass systems (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouillon, S.; Dehairs, F.; Velimirov, B.; Abril, G.; Borges, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the water column biogeochemistry in adjacent mangrove and seagrass systems in Gazi Bay (Kenya), with a focus on assessing the sources and cycling of organic and inorganic carbon. Mangrove and seagrass-derived material was found to be the dominant organic carbon sources in the water colu

  10. Seasonal Distribution of Organic Carbon in the Surface Sediments of the Terengganu Nearshore Coastal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hasrizal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The distribution of organic carbon in the surface sediment is a crucial indicator for current productivity in the ocean especially in the nearshore area. The difference of organic carbon in the surface sediment reflects the influence of current movement on the bottom sediment. Approach: This study was carried out to oversee the difference of organic carbon distribution during pre and post-monsoon seasons. For the purpose of the study, 42 surface sediments in the Terengganu near shore area were collected and determined for organic carbon by using the wet dichromate acid method. Results: The concentration of organic carbon was significantly different between the seasons showing a relatively higher content during pre-monsoon seasons. In this study, the average concentration of organic carbon in pre-monsoon was 1.14±0.29% and varied from 0.60-1.80%. Meanwhile during post-monsoon seasons, the average concentration of organic carbon was slightly lower to 0.82±0.23% and ranged from 0.24-1.32%. Conclusion: Generally, the average concentration of organic carbon in South China Sea was low compared to the occurrence in riverine environment as well as the mangrove environment.

  11. Soil erosion and organic carbon export by wet snow avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Korup

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many mountain belts sustain prolonged snow cover for parts of the year, although enquiries into rates of erosion in these landscapes have focused almost exclusively on the snow-free periods. This raises the question of whether annual snow cover contributes significantly to modulating rates of erosion in high-relief terrain. In this context, the sudden release of snow avalanches is a frequent and potentially relevant process, judging from the physical damage to subalpine forest ecosystems, and the amount of debris contained in avalanche deposits. To quantitatively constrain this visual impression and to expand the sparse existing literature, we sampled sediment concentrations of n = 28 river-spanning snow-avalanche deposits (snow bridges in the eastern Swiss Alps, and infer an orders-of-magnitude variability in specific fine sediment and organic carbon yields (1.8 to 830 t km−2 yr−1, and 0.04 to 131 t C km−2 yr−1, respectively. A Monte Carlo simulation demonstrates that, with a minimum of free parameters, such variability is inherent to the geometric scaling used for computing specific yields. Moreover, the widely applied method of linearly extrapolating plot-scale sample data may be prone to substantial under- or over-estimates. A comparison of our inferred yields with previously published work demonstrates the relevance of wet snow avalanches as prominent agents of soil erosion and transporters of biogeochemical constituents to mountain rivers. Given that a number of snow bridges persisted below the insulating debris cover well into the summer months, snow-avalanche deposits also contribute to regulating in-channel sediment and organic debris storage on seasonal timescales. Finally, our results underline the potential shortcomings of neglecting erosional processes in the winter and spring months in mountainous terrain subjected to prominent snow cover.

  12. Mapping organic carbon stocks of Swiss forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, M.; Papritz, A.; Baltensweiler, A.; Walthert, L.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration into forest sinks offsets greenhouse gas emissions under the Kyoto protocol. Therefore, quantifying C stocks and fluxes in forest ecosystems is of interest for reporting greenhouse gas emissions. In Switzerland, the National Forest Inventory offers comprehensive data to quantify the above ground forest biomass and its change in time. Estimating stocks of soil organic C (SOC) in forests is more difficult because of its high spatial variability. To date the greenhouse gas inventory relies only on sparse data and regionally differentiated predictions of SOC stocks in forest soils are currently not possible. Recently, more soil data and new explanatory variables for statistical modeling like high resolution elevation data and satellite images became available. Based on data from 1'033 sites, we modeled SOC stocks to a depth of 1 m including the organic layer for the Swiss forested area. We used a novel robust restricted maximum likelihood method to fit a linear regression model with spatially correlated errors to the C stock data. For the regression analysis we used a broad range of covariates derived from climate data (precipitation, temperature, radiation), two elevation models (resolutions 25 and 2 m) and spectral variables representing vegetation. Furthermore, the main cartographic categories of an overview soil map were used to broadly represent the parent material. The numerous covariates, that partly correlated strongly, were reduced to a first subset using LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator). This subset of covariates was then further reduced based on cross validation of the robustly fitted spatial model. The levels of categorical covariates were partly aggregated during this process and interactions between covariates were explored to account for nonlinear dependence of C stocks on the covariates. Using the final model, robust kriging prediction and error maps were computed with a resolution of one hectare.

  13. Dutch (organic) agriculture, carbon sequestration and energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, van der G.J.H.M.; Staps, S.; Timmermans, B.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in soils is often mentioned in the discussions about climate changes. In this paper the opportunities for carbon sequestration in Dutch agriculture are discussed at farm and national level. Farm internal carbon sources are already completely used in livestock farming. The effect

  14. Organic carbon burial efficiency in a subtropical hydroelectric reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Raquel; Kosten, Sarian; Sobek, Sebastian; Jaqueline Cardoso, Simone; Figueiredo-Barros, Marcos Paulo; Henrique Duque Estrada, Carlos; Roland, Fábio

    2016-06-01

    Hydroelectric reservoirs bury significant amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. Many reservoirs are characterized by high sedimentation rates, low oxygen concentrations in bottom water and a high share of terrestrially derived OC, and all of these factors have been linked to a high efficiency of OC burial. However, investigations of OC burial efficiency (OCBE, i.e., the ratio between buried and deposited OC) in reservoirs are limited to a few studies, none of which include spatially resolved analyses. In this study we determined the spatial variation in OCBE in a large subtropical reservoir and related it to sediment characteristics. Our results show that the sediment accumulation rate explains up to 92 % of the spatial variability in OCBE, outweighing the effect of other variables, such as OC source and oxygen exposure time. OCBE at the pelagic sites varied from 48 to 86 % (mean 67 %) and decreased towards the dam. At the margins, OCBE was lower (9-17 %) due to the low sediment accumulation in shallow areas. Our data show that the variability in OCBE both along the rivers-dam and the margin-pelagic axes must be considered in whole-reservoir assessments. Combining these results with a spatially resolved assessment of sediment accumulation and OC burial in the studied reservoir, we estimated a spatially resolved mean OC burial efficiency of 57 %. Being the first assessment of OCBE with such a high spatial resolution in a reservoir, these results suggest that reservoirs may bury OC more efficiently than natural lakes.

  15. Energy costs of carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms in aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Giordano, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Minimum energy (as photon) costs are predicted for core reactions of photosynthesis, for photorespiratory metabolism in algae lacking CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) and for various types of CCMs; in algae, with CCMs; allowance was made for leakage of CO2 from the internal pool. These predicted values are just compatible with the minimum measured photon costs of photosynthesis in microalgae and macroalgae lacking or expressing CCMs. More energy-expensive photorespiration, for example for organisms using Rubiscos with lower CO2-O2 selectivity coefficients, would be less readily accommodated within the lowest measured photon costs of photosynthesis by algae lacking CCMs. The same applies to the cases of CCMs with higher energy costs of active transport of protons or inorganic carbon species, or greater allowance for significant leakage from the accumulated intracellular pool of CO2. High energetic efficiency can involve a higher concentration of catalyst to achieve a given rate of reaction, adding to the resource costs of growth. There are no obvious mechanistic interpretations of the occurrence of CCMs algae adapted to low light and low temperatures using the rationales adopted for the occurrence of C4 photosynthesis in terrestrial flowering plants. There is an exception for cyanobacteria with low-selectivity Form IA or IB Rubiscos, and those dinoflagellates with low-selectivity Form II Rubiscos, for which very few natural environments have high enough CO2:O2 ratios to allow photosynthesis in the absence of CCMs. PMID:24390639

  16. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial recharge by carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges in artificial recharge for drinking water purposes is to decrease the relatively high content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. Two processes have been suggested to have an effect on diminishing the concentrations of DOC in infiltrated water during artificial recharge: 1) Either organic matter is adsorbed on the surfaces of soil particles, or 2) DOC is oxidized and decomposed by bacterially mediated processes. Geochemical concentration and microbiological activity data have, however, proved to be insufficient for getting quantitative evidence for comparison of these models. We applied the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the recharged water as a tracer for redox processes and decomposition of DOC. The study site is an artificial groundwater plant at Janiksenlinna in southern Finland. Surface water is artificially recharged into an unconfined shallow aquifer by pond infiltration. Infiltrated surface water is derived from Lake Paijanne, a large lake in middle Finland. Water samples were collected from infiltrated surface water and groundwater at varying distances from the infiltration plant. The samples were analysed for the contents of the major dissolved components, DOC and the isotopic composition of carbon in DIC. In addition, the 18O/16O and D/H ratios of water were determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between local groundwater and infiltrated surface water. The δ18O and δD end member compositions for mixing calculations were based on a monitoring period of two years. The δ13CDIC value in recharge waters was -10.4 per mille, which differed significantly from the composition of local groundwaters, with δ13CDIC at -20.8 per mille. The recharged water recorded a considerable decrease in δ13CDIC from -10.4 per mille in the pond to -16.3 per mille in the first observation well, at a distance of 30 metres. No admixture of local groundwater was observed in this well based on oxygen and

  17. Tracing the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon in artificial recharge by carbon isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges in artificial recharge for drinking water purposes is to decrease the relatively high content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters. Two processes have been suggested to have an effect on diminishing the concentrations of DOC in infiltrated water during artificial recharge: 1) Either organic matter is adsorbed on the surfaces of soil particles, or 2) DOC is oxidized and decomposed by bacterially mediated processes. Geochemical concentration and microbiological activity data have, however, proved to be insufficient for getting quantitative evidence for comparison of these models. We applied the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the recharged water as a tracer for redox processes and decomposition of DOC. The study site is an artificial groundwater plant at Janiksenlinna in southern Finland. Surface water is artificially recharged into an unconfined shallow aquifer by pond infiltration. Infiltrated surface water is derived from Lake Paijanne, a large lake in middle Finland. Water samples were collected from infiltrated surface water and groundwater at varying distances from the infiltration plant. The samples were analysed for the contents of the major dissolved components, DOC and the isotopic composition of carbon in DIC. In addition, the δ18O/16O and D/H ratios of water were determined in order to calculate mixing ratios between local groundwater and infiltrated surface water. The 18O and δD end member compositions for mixing calculations were based on a monitoring period of two years. The δ13CDIC value in recharge waters was -10.4 per mille, which differed significantly from the composition of local groundwaters, with δ13CDIC at -20.8 per mille. The recharged water recorded a considerable decrease in δ13CDIC from -10.4 per mille in the pond to -16.3 per mille in the first observation well, at a distance of 30 metres. No admixture of local groundwater was observed in this well based on oxygen and

  18. Terrain influence on soil organic carbon and total nitrogen sorage in soils of Herschel Island

    OpenAIRE

    Obu, Jaroslav; Lantuit, Hugues; Fritz, Michael; Myers-Smith, Isla; Heim, Birgit; Wolter, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic-wide increase of permafrost temperatures and subsequent thaw is mobilising large amounts of organic matter that is stored in permafrost environments. Organic matter decomposition results in the release of carbon dioxide and methane, which will amplify the warming and will cause so called permafrost carbon feedback. Increasing air temperatures due to greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost is not yet incorporated into Earth System Models. The lack of high-resolution carbon storage ...

  19. ORGANIC CHELATING REAGENT ON REDOX ADSORPTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER TOWARDS Au3+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Organic chelating reagent influences upon the redox adsorption of activated carbon fibertowards Au3- were systematically investigated. The experimental results indicated that the presenceof organic chelating reagent on activated carbon fiber strongly affects adsorption capacity ofactivated carbon fiber towards Au3+. The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ increased three timesby the presence of 8-quinolinol. Furthermore, The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ depended onthe pH value of adsorption and temperature.

  20. Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization along an Elevation Gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China

    OpenAIRE

    Guobing Wang; Yan Zhou; Xia Xu; Honghua Ruan; Jiashe Wang

    2013-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) actively participates in the global carbon (C) cycle. Despite much research, however, our understanding of the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization is still very limited. To investigate the responses of SOC mineralization to temperature, we sampled surface soils (0-10 cm) from evergreen broad-leaf forest (EBF), coniferous forest (CF), sub-alpine dwarf forest (SDF), and alpine meadow (AM) along an elevational gradient in the Wuyi Mountai...

  1. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-02-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean-atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink.

  2. Size-exclusion chromatography with organic carbon detection using a mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warton, Ben; Heitz, Anna; Allpike, Bradley; Kagi, Robert

    2008-10-17

    A novel organic carbon detector for size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) is described. The instrument uses the conventional UV-persulfate oxidation method to convert organic carbon to CO(2), which is then detected using a mass spectrometer. This system, using the mass spectrometer, had lower limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) than a previously described system using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy 'lightpipe' detector (i.e. when quantification was based on calibration using phthalate standards). When used to analyse natural organic matter (NOM) in water, it also had a superior signal-to-noise ratio to the previously described system. The use of a mass spectrometer to detect organic carbon (as CO(2)) enables the possibility of further characterisation of NOM by measuring the stable carbon isotope ratios of the various molecular size fractions of organic carbon, as obtained by SEC. PMID:18790486

  3. Role of organic soils in the world carbon cycle: problem definition and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentano, T.V. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The following goals were addressed in the workshop: review and analysis of available data on carbon in organic soils from the past century to the present; assessment of the probable flux of carbon to and from organic soils in the near future; identification of major data inadequacies which preclude reliable analysis of the principal processes influencing carbon flux in organic soils; and proposal of research initiatives which could improve understanding of organic deposits in relation to the carbon cycle within a time frame of two to four years. The major finding of the workshop is that the organic soils are important in the overall carbon budget. Histosols and gleysols, the major organic soil deposits of the world, normally sequester organic carbon fixed by plants. They may now be releasing enough carbon to account for nearly 10% of the annual rise in atmospheric content of CO/sub 2/. Current annual release of carbon from organic soils is estimated to fall within the range of 0.03 to 0.37 x 10/sup 9/ t, a release equivalent to 1.3% to 16% of the annual increase of carbon in the atmosphere. Present annual releases of carbon from the Everglades Agricultural Area in Florida and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Valley in California are estimated at 0.017 x 10/sup 9/ tons. Annual sequestering of carbon by undrained organic soils has been estimated at about 0.045 x 10/sup 9/ tons. Several strategies for peatland management are available, including creation, preservation, functional designation, and use of wetlands for agriculture and energy supply.

  4. Phosphate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for children 9-18 years of age. Phosphate salts are POSSIBLY UNSAFE if the amount of phosphate consumed (expressed as phosphorous) exceeds the tolerable upper intake level (UL). The ULs are 3 grams per day for children 1-8 years; and 4 grams per day ...

  5. Patterns and drivers of riverine particulate organic carbon transport in an Andean valley

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Kathryn Elizabeth; Malhi, Yadvinder; New, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Physical erosion can mobilise particulate organic carbon (POC) from vegetation and soil, representing an export of primary productivity from ecosystems, and a lateral transfer of carbon recently-derived from the atmosphere. These carbon transfers are thought to be enhanced in mountain forests where erosion rates are high. However, the rates and controls on POC transfer remain poorly constrained, as does the impact of POC export on carbon cycling at regional and global scales. This thesis take...

  6. Digital Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon Contents and Stocks in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Kabindra Adhikari; Hartemink, Alfred E.; Budiman Minasny; Rania Bou Kheir; Mette B Greve; Greve, Mogens H.

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60 and 60-100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, ...

  7. Molecular and isotopic characterization of terrestrial organic carbon released to (sub-)Arctic coastal waters

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, Jorien Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Arctic soils store half of the global soil organic carbon (OC) pool and twice as much C as is currently present in the atmosphere. A considerable part of these carbon pools are stored in permafrost. Amplified climate warming in the Arctic will thaw permafrost and remobilize some of these substantial carbon stocks into the active carbon cycle, potentially causing positive feedback to global warming. Despite the global importance of this mechanism, our understanding of the fate of these thawing...

  8. Human induced impacts on soil organic carbon in southwest Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Erlendsson, Egill; Lal, Rattan

    2013-04-01

    The Icelandic environment has been strongly influenced by natural processes during the Holocene. Since settlement in AD 874, the introduction of grazing animals and other land use has drastically affected the natural environment. This includes the diminishing of vegetative cover, which has led to soil exposure and accelerated erosion over large areas, especially when in conjunction with harsh climate. This has specifically impacted processes and properties of volcanic soils (Andosols), which are subject to accelerated erosion by wind and water. While approximately 46% of the land surface in Iceland has sustained continuous vegetation cover, large areas have lost some or all of their soil cover formed during the postglacial era. Elsewhere, remaining soils have sparse or no vegetation cover, thus impairing soil carbon (C) sequestration. Among their multifunctional roles, soils support plant growth, increase soil biotic activity, enhance nutrient storage and strengthen the cycling of water and nutrients. In contrast, soil degradation by accelerated erosion and other processes impairs soil quality, reduces soil structure and depletes the soil organic matter (SOM) pool. Depletion of the SOM pool has also global implications because the terrestrial C pool is the third largest pool and strongly impacts the global C cycle. Erosional-depositional processes may deplete soil organic C (SOC) by erosion and increase by deposition. Some SOC-enriched sediments are redistributed over the landscape, while others are deposited in depression sites and transported into aquatic ecosystems. SOC decomposition processes are severely constrained in some environmental settings and any SOC buried under anaerobic conditions is protected against decomposition. Yet, the impact of the SOC transported by erosional processes and redistributed over the landscape is not fully understood because the variability in its turnover characteristics has not been widely studied. Thus, the fate of C

  9. Inositol phosphates in the environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Benjamin L.; Papházy, Michael J; Haygarth, Philip M.; McKelvie, Ian D

    2002-01-01

    The inositol phosphates are a group of organic phosphorus compounds found widely in the natural environment, but that represent the greatest gap in our understanding of the global phosphorus cycle. They exist as inositols in various states of phosphorylation (bound to between one and six phosphate groups) and isomeric forms (e.g. myo, D-chiro, scyllo, neo), although myo-inositol hexakisphosphate is by far the most prevalent form in nature. In terrestrial environments, inositol phosphates are ...

  10. Lunar carbon chemistry - Relations to and implications for terrestrial organic geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, G.; Maxwell, J. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    Survey of the various ways in which studies of lunar carbon chemistry have beneficially affected terrestrial organic geochemistry. A lunar organic gas-analysis operating system is cited as the most important instrumental development in relation to terrestrial organic geochemistry. Improved methods of analysis and handling of organic samples are cited as another benefit derived from studies of lunar carbon chemistry. The problem of controlling contamination and minimizing organic vapors is considered, as well as the possibility of analyzing terrestrial samples by the techniques developed for lunar samples. A need for new methods of analyzing carbonaceous material which is insoluble in organic solvents is indicated.

  11. Second Hydrocarbon—Generation from Organic Matter Trapped in Fluid Inclusions in Carbonate Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施继锡; 余孝颖

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism and significance of second hydrocarbon-generation from organic matter trapped in fluid inclusions in carbonate rocks are discussed.The types of organic matter and the relationship between them are also reviewed.The organic matter trapped in inclusions and crystals,which account for more than 20%of the total organic matter in carbonate rocks,may be of great significance in the generation of hydrocarbons.High-temperature oil resulting from second hydrocarbon-generation should be an important target,in addition to natural gas,in oilgas prospecting in regions of high-maturity carbonate rocks.

  12. Processes controlling production and transport of dissolved organic carbon in forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Fröberg, Mats

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from the O horizon of forest soils is a major source of soil organic carbon in the mineral soil, where a major proportion of the organic carbon in forest ecosystems is located. The relative contribution of recent litter and humified organic matter to the leaching of DOC from the O horizon is still being debated. In the present work, I studied the sources of DOC leached from the O horizon by manipulating the amounts of litter and humus and measuring DOC c...

  13. Optimization of water and nutrient use by maize and peanut in rotation based on organic and rock phosphate soil amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A four-year nationwide project was initiated in 1997 to boost food and cash-crop production. Phosphorus and calcium from local mines were applied as mineral amendments and/or organic matter applications were made as strategies to optimize nutrient and water use by staple crops. The objective was to determine optimal balances between soil nutrients and water dynamics in degraded semi arid soil. A long-term experiment was installed at Nioro du Rip Research Station in 1997 within a corn-peanut cropping system in the Senegal peanut basin. The four treatments under comparison were: control with no P or Ca added, phosphogypsum and phosphate rock (PG-PR) at 1,000 kg/ha, manure at 5,000 kg/ha every two years, and PG-PR mix combined with manure. Data collected during the subsequent rainy seasons consisted of soil-fertility change, maize and peanut water balance, nitrogen (N)-use efficiency, Δ13C values and yield components. Water-balance components (infiltration, evapotranspiration, storage and drainage) were obtained through weekly monitoring with a neutron probe to a depth of 4.3 m and tensiometers installed at depth ranges of 1.4 to 1.6 m. Nitrogen-15-labeled fertilizer was applied in 1999 and 2001 to determine fertilizer-N-use efficiency by maize. Moisture data indicated a rapid downward movement of the wetting front for all treatments. In dry soil conditions, volumetric water-content values increased from 0.1 m3m-3 in the top horizon layer (0-10 cm) to 0.25 m3m-3 at the depth of 1.0 m. In 2000, the water content below 1.0 m depth was high, with values at the bottom of the access tubes reaching 18% of the total rainfall. This trend was attributed to increasing clay content with profile depth coupled with less evaporative loss. Findings from this study indicate that water losses through evapotranspiration (approximately 50% of the effective annual rainfall) did not limit maize productivity in 1999 and 2001, or that of peanut in 2000. The current practice of applying PG

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon and organic carbon in mires in the Forsmark area. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Anders [EcoAnalytica, Haegersten (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the large dissolved carbon pools in mires. They are both related to a number of factors such as groundwater flow, minerogenic influence and peat properties, which all are more or less related to peatland development stage. In a scenario of a release of radionuclides from an underground repository containing radioactive material, behaviour of these pools during the mire ontogeny will be of importance for the understanding of how C-14 will constitute a potential risk to humans and non-human biota. In this pilot study, DIC and DOC concentrations were investigated for three mires representing a potential sequence of peatland development in a coastal area at Forsmark in central Sweden characterized by land upheaval, a flat topography and calcareous content in the soil. The mires where chosen based on difference in height above the sea level, covering approximate 1000 years, and characteristics based on their vegetation. Water samples were collected during August from all three mires at two different depths in the anoxic layer of the mires, by extracting water from peat obtained with a peat corer. DIC concentrations where related to the age of the mires, with the lowest concentrations in the highest located mire. There was a positive correlation between pH and DIC, where the higher DIC concentrations were found in the 'richer' fens. DIC concentrations were also positively related to the conductivity within and between the mires, where conductivity would be a proxy for the dominating cation Ca{sup 2+} associated to the calcareous-influenced groundwater. DOC concentrations were highest in the oldest mire, but were similar in the younger mires. No patterns were found between DIC and DOC, and the peat bulk density. The report ends with suggestions on how a continued study could be improved.

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon and organic carbon in mires in the Forsmark area. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the large dissolved carbon pools in mires. They are both related to a number of factors such as groundwater flow, minerogenic influence and peat properties, which all are more or less related to peatland development stage. In a scenario of a release of radionuclides from an underground repository containing radioactive material, behaviour of these pools during the mire ontogeny will be of importance for the understanding of how C-14 will constitute a potential risk to humans and non-human biota. In this pilot study, DIC and DOC concentrations were investigated for three mires representing a potential sequence of peatland development in a coastal area at Forsmark in central Sweden characterized by land upheaval, a flat topography and calcareous content in the soil. The mires where chosen based on difference in height above the sea level, covering approximate 1000 years, and characteristics based on their vegetation. Water samples were collected during August from all three mires at two different depths in the anoxic layer of the mires, by extracting water from peat obtained with a peat corer. DIC concentrations where related to the age of the mires, with the lowest concentrations in the highest located mire. There was a positive correlation between pH and DIC, where the higher DIC concentrations were found in the 'richer' fens. DIC concentrations were also positively related to the conductivity within and between the mires, where conductivity would be a proxy for the dominating cation Ca2+ associated to the calcareous-influenced groundwater. DOC concentrations were highest in the oldest mire, but were similar in the younger mires. No patterns were found between DIC and DOC, and the peat bulk density. The report ends with suggestions on how a continued study could be improved

  16. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis ofpublished data and implications for climate forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

    2005-07-11

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC)concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide, have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of two lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  17. Critical carbon input to maintain current soil organic carbon stocks in global wheat systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guocheng; Luo, Zhongkui; Han, Pengfei; Chen, Huansheng; Xu, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics in croplands is a crucial component of global carbon (C) cycle. Depending on local environmental conditions and management practices, typical C input is generally required to reduce or reverse C loss in agricultural soils. No studies have quantified the critical C input for maintaining SOC at global scale with high resolution. Such information will provide a baseline map for assessing soil C dynamics under potential changes in management practices and climate, and thus enable development of management strategies to reduce C footprint from farm to regional scales. We used the soil C model RothC to simulate the critical C input rates needed to maintain existing soil C level at 0.1° × 0.1° resolution in global wheat systems. On average, the critical C input was estimated to be 2.0 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, with large spatial variability depending on local soil and climatic conditions. Higher C inputs are required in wheat system of central United States and western Europe, mainly due to the higher current soil C stocks present in these regions. The critical C input could be effectively estimated using a summary model driven by current SOC level, mean annual temperature, precipitation, and soil clay content.

  18. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  19. Dissolved organic carbon pools and export from the coastal ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Barrón, Cristina

    2015-10-21

    The distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration across coastal waters was characterized based on the compilation of 3510 individual estimates of DOC in coastal waters worldwide. We estimated the DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters in two different ways, as the DOC concentration at the edge of the shelf break and as the DOC concentration in coastal waters with salinity close to the average salinity in the open ocean. Using these estimates of DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters, the mean DOC concentration in the open ocean and the estimated volume of water annually exchanged between coastal and open ocean, we estimated a median ± SE (and average ± SE) global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters ranging from 4.4 ± 1.0 Pg C yr−1 to 27.0 ± 1.8 Pg C yr−1 (7.0 ± 5.8 Pg C yr−1 to 29.0 ± 8.0 Pg C yr−1) depending on the global hydrological exchange. These values correspond to a median and mean median (and average) range between 14.7 ± 3.3 to 90.0 ± 6.0 (23.3 ± 19.3 to 96.7 ± 26.7) Gg C yr−1 per km of shelf break, which is consistent with the range between 1.4 to 66.1 Gg C yr−1 per km of shelf break of available regional estimates of DOC export. The estimated global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters is also consistent with independent estimates of the net metabolic balance of the coastal ocean. The DOC export from the coastal to the open ocean is likely to be a sizeable flux and is likely to be an important term in the carbon budget of the open ocean, potentially providing an important subsidy to support heterotrophic activity in the open ocean.

  20. Dissolved organic carbon pools and export from the coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrón, Cristina; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration across coastal waters was characterized based on the compilation of 3510 individual estimates of DOC in coastal waters worldwide. We estimated the DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters in two different ways, as the DOC concentration at the edge of the shelf break and as the DOC concentration in coastal waters with salinity close to the average salinity in the open ocean. Using these estimates of DOC concentration in the coastal waters that directly exchange with open ocean waters, the mean DOC concentration in the open ocean and the estimated volume of water annually exchanged between coastal and open ocean, we estimated a median ± SE (and average ± SE) global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters ranging from 4.4 ± 1.0 Pg C yr-1 to 27.0 ± 1.8 Pg C yr-1 (7.0 ± 5.8 Pg C yr-1 to 29.0 ± 8.0 Pg C yr-1) depending on the global hydrological exchange. These values correspond to a median and mean median (and average) range between 14.7 ± 3.3 to 90.0 ± 6.0 (23.3 ± 19.3 to 96.7 ± 26.7) Gg C yr-1 per km of shelf break, which is consistent with the range between 1.4 to 66.1 Gg C yr-1 per km of shelf break of available regional estimates of DOC export. The estimated global DOC export from coastal to open ocean waters is also consistent with independent estimates of the net metabolic balance of the coastal ocean. The DOC export from the coastal to the open ocean is likely to be a sizeable flux and is likely to be an important term in the carbon budget of the open ocean, potentially providing an important subsidy to support heterotrophic activity in the open ocean.

  1. Plastidial Glycolytic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Determinant in the Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism of Heterotrophic Cells in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoman, Armand D; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Rosa-Téllez, Sara; Flores-Tornero, María; Serrano, Ramón; Bueso, Eduardo; Fernie, Alisdair R; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2015-11-01

    This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (Rubisco small subunit RBCS2B [RBCS]) or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2 [PHT]) cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of the PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically, GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that the lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus, GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways, such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway, or the metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate, which in turn affect plant development. PMID:26134167

  2. Carbon trading as incentive for conversion to organic agriculture. Case study. Organic peanuts in Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnar, F.

    2005-12-15

    In this pilot project, the climate effects of the conversion from conventional to organic cultivation of peanuts are evaluated. We could aim at voluntary carbon credits that do not comply with the CDM (Clean Development Mechanisms) rules, but we try to meet the CDM rules by combining it with a agroforestry component. However, in the example of Tanzania meeting the CDM rules was a problem. The agricultural system in Tanzania consists of a rotation of several years cultivation and several years fallow. This fallow of grass, shrubs and trees could be considered as 'forest'. Taking fallow land into cultivation would then be deforestation, which would make the planting of trees no longer eligible under CDM. This is a shame because the traditional 'slash and burn' system emits a lot of greenhouse gases.

  3. Simulation of soil organic carbon in different soil size fractions using 13Carbon measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, P.; Bellarby, J.; Chenu, C.; Foereid, B.; Wattenbach, M.; Zingore, S.; Smith, J.

    2009-04-01

    We simulate the soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics at a chronoseqeunce site in France, using the Rothamsted Carbon model. The site exhibits a transition from C3 plants, dominated by pine forest, to a conventional C4 maize rotation. The different 13C signatures of the forest plants and maize are used to distinguish between the woodland derived carbon (C) and the maize derived C. The model is evaluated against total SOC and C derived from forest and maize, respectively. The SOC dynamics of the five SOC pools of the model, decomposable plant material (DPM), resistant plant material (RPM), biomass, humus and inert C, are also compared to the SOC dynamics measured in different soil size fractions. These fractions are > 50 μm (particulate organic matter), 2-50 μm (silt associated SOC) and 50 μm and the sum of the other pools corresponds well to the SOC measured in the soil size fraction stocks in the first 20 years after land-use change and overestimates the C accumulation of maize C. Several hypotheses were tested to evaluate the simulations. Input data and internal model parameter uncertainties had minor effects on the simulations results. Accounting for erosion and implementing a simple tillage routine did not improve the simulation fit to the data. We therefore hypothesize that a generic process that is not yet explicitly accounted for in the ROTHC model could explain the loss in soil C after land use change. Such a process could be the loss of the physical protection of soil organic matter as would be observed following cultivation of a previously uncultivated soil. Under native conditions a fraction of organic matter is protected in stable soil aggregates. These aggregates are physically disrupted by continuous and repeated cultivation of the soil. The underestimation of SOC loss by the model can be mainly attributed to the slow turnover of the humus pool. This pool was shown to represent mainly the SOC associated with the silt and clay soil fraction. Here, the

  4. 新型有机结合态磷肥田间试验效果%Field Experimental Results of New-Type Organic Combined State Phosphatic Fertilizers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩霜; 李菊梅; 戴建军

    2012-01-01

    Corn is planted in the dry red earth land, and normal superphosphate is used as a contrast, making a comparison of new-type organic combined state phosphatic fertilizers: starch phosphatic fertilizer and straw phosphatic fertilizer with respect to their fertilizer efficiency. The results show that these two new-type fertilizers are better than normal superphosphate in increase in soil readily available phosphate content, corn yield and fertilizer availability. With the application of 60 kg/hm" of each, the readily available phosphate content in the soil is higher than that of the superphosphate by 57.4% and 59. 1% , respectively. With the application of 90 kg/hm of each, the available phosphate content is higher by 63.0% and 93.3%, respectively. With the application of 60 kg/hm2 of each, the corn yield is higher by 2. 6% and 15. 2% respectively than that when 90 kg/hm2 of superphosphate is used. In the case of high yield, the application of organic combined state phosphatic fertilizers may be lowered by one-third than superphosphate, and the fertilizer availability rises by 29. 5% on the average.%红壤旱地种植玉米,以普通过磷酸钙作对比,比较了新型有机结合态磷肥——淀粉磷肥和秸秆磷肥的肥料效果.结果表明:2种新型磷肥在提高土壤速效磷含量及玉米产量和肥料利用率方面都优于普通过磷酸钙;分别施用淀粉磷肥和秸秆磷肥60kg/hm2,土壤速效磷含量比普通过磷酸钙提高了57.4%和59 1%;分别施用90 kg/hm2时,土壤速效磷含量分别比普通过磷酸钙提高了63.0%和93.3%;施用2种新型磷肥60 kg/hm2,玉米产量优于施用普通过磷酸钙90 kg/hm2的效果,产量分别提高了2.6%和15.2%;在达到高产的情况下,有机结合态磷肥可以比普通过磷酸钙使用量减少1/3,肥料利用率平均提高29 5%.

  5. Reference spectra of important adsorbed organic and inorganic phosphate binding forms for soil P speciation using synchrotron-based K-edge XANES spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietzel, Jörg; Harrington, Gertraud; Häusler, Werner; Heister, Katja; Werner, Florian; Klysubun, Wantana

    2016-03-01

    Direct speciation of soil phosphorus (P) by linear combination fitting (LCF) of P K-edge XANES spectra requires a standard set of spectra representing all major P species supposed to be present in the investigated soil. Here, available spectra of free- and cation-bound inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP), representing organic P, and of Fe, Al and Ca phosphate minerals are supplemented with spectra of adsorbed P binding forms. First, various soil constituents assumed to be potentially relevant for P sorption were compared with respect to their retention efficiency for orthophosphate and IHP at P levels typical for soils. Then, P K-edge XANES spectra for orthophosphate and IHP retained by the most relevant constituents were acquired. The spectra were compared with each other as well as with spectra of Ca, Al or Fe orthophosphate and IHP precipitates. Orthophosphate and IHP were retained particularly efficiently by ferrihydrite, boehmite, Al-saturated montmorillonite and Al-saturated soil organic matter (SOM), but far less efficiently by hematite, Ca-saturated montmorillonite and Ca-saturated SOM. P retention by dolomite was negligible. Calcite retained a large portion of the applied IHP, but no orthophosphate. The respective P K-edge XANES spectra of orthophosphate and IHP adsorbed to ferrihydrite, boehmite, Al-saturated montmorillonite and Al-saturated SOM differ from each other. They also are different from the spectra of amorphous FePO4, amorphous or crystalline AlPO4, Ca phosphates and free IHP. Inclusion of reference spectra of orthophosphate as well as IHP adsorbed to P-retaining soil minerals in addition to spectra of free or cation-bound IHP, AlPO4, FePO4 and Ca phosphate minerals in linear combination fitting exercises results in improved fit quality and a more realistic soil P speciation. A standard set of P K-edge XANES spectra of the most relevant adsorbed P binding forms in soils is presented. PMID:26917141

  6. Detailed Carbon Isotopic Characterization of Aerosol-Derived Organic Carbon Deposited to two Temperate Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Bauer, J. E.; Keesee, E. E.; McNichol, A. P.; Xu, L.; Dickhut, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of carbonaceous aerosols can be a quantitatively significant flux in the carbon budgets of temperate watersheds. Characterizing the sources and fates of this material is therefore critical for assessing its role in carbon and organic matter cycling in these systems. Aerosol samples were collected in the Hudson and York River watersheds throughout 2006-2007 and analyzed for quantities and isotopic signatures (δ13C, Δ14C) of total and water-soluble organic carbon (TOC, WSOC, respectively). On average ~2.4 and 2.1 mg m-2 d-1 of aerosol TOC were deposited to the Hudson and York River watersheds, respectively, and nearly half of this material was water-soluble. δ13C analyses indicated that both the TOC and the WSOC were primarily terrestrial in nature. TOC Δ14C signatures covered a broad range for both watersheds, with calculated contributions from fossil sources (e.g., anthropogenic combustion of petroleum, coal, etc.) ranging from 0% for samples collected during the summer of 2007 to approximately 50% for samples collected in the winter of 2007. Aerosol-derived WSOC Δ14C values were less variable and were nearly always enriched in 14C with respect to the corresponding TOC, indicating that contemporary aerosol material tends to partition into the aqueous phase, while fossil-derived aerosol OC is more likely to remain insoluble. However, WSOC still often showed considerable contributions from fossil OC (up to 20%). Thus, some portion of the anthropogenic fossil-derived aerosol OC is relatively soluble and may be transported hydrologically through watersheds and aquatic systems. A subset of aerosol samples from each watershed was selected for more thorough isotopic analysis of operationally-defined components of the carbonaceous material. Isotopic signatures were obtained for TOC, WSOC, total solvent-extract, and the aliphatic, aromatic, and polar components. Isotopic information on these fractions allows us to determine which components

  7. Soil organic carbon forms with different uses in the department of magdalena (colombia)

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez Polo, José Rafael; Macías Vázquez, Felipe; Menjivar Flores, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) labile and humified, can be affected by use and management practices, but the impact of these changes has not been evaluated in soils of tropical environments. The present study investigated the contents and some forms of soil organic carbon (SOC) in five warm tropical climate zones of the Department of Magdalena (Colombia), and the effect of the cropping practices on these forms of organic carbon in cultivated soils, associated with Coffee (Coffea arabi...

  8. Application of Metal Organic Frameworks in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liu; Heping Zeng; Xiangfang Peng

    2013-01-01

    The environmental problem caused by excess carbon dioxide emissions has received great attention. The metal organic framework compounds as a new porous materials which self-assembled with inorganic vertices (metal ions or clusters) and organic struts can be used in carbon dioxide capture and separation due to their have advantage of the degree of orderliness, the high surface, diversity structures, tunable structures and modification porous. In this paper, the research progress of metal organ...

  9. Chloride induced localized corrosion in simulated concrete pore solution: effect of a phosphate-based inhibitor on the behavior of 304L stainless steel compared to carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the acoustic emission technique coupled with electrochemical measurements was used to determine, in simulated concrete pore solution (Ca(OH)2), the critical value [Cl-] / [OH-], which prevents the pitting corrosion initiation of AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel, and to compare this critical value with that of the carbon steel in the same medium with and without inhibitor Na3PO4. The results show that for the austenitic stainless steel, the critical threshold of pitting corrosion initiation is around 5, while for carbon steel without inhibitor in Ca(OH)2 solution, it has a low value of about 0.6. However, the presence of the inhibitor Na3PO4 in this solution leads to the formation of a protective phosphate layer on the steel surface, increasing the critical ratio [Cl-] / [OH-] from 0.6 to 15. Under these conditions, the corrosion behavior of carbon steel is improved and, thanks to the blocking of pitting sites by the Na3PO4 inhibitor, it becomes much more resistant to localized corrosion than AISI 304L austenitic steel. (authors)

  10. Distribution of organic carbon and petroleum source rock potential of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary carbonates, South Florida Basin: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacas, James George

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of 134 core samples from the South Florida Basin show that the carbonates of Comanchean age are relatively richer in average organic carbon (0.41 percent) than those of Coahuilan age (0.28 percent), Gulfian age (0.18 percent) and Paleocene age (0.20 percent). They are also nearly twice as rich as the average world, wide carbonate (average 0.24 percent). The majority of carbonates have organic carbons less than 0.30 percent but the presence of many relatively organic rich beds composed of highly bituminous, argillaceous, highly stylolitic, and algal-bearing limestones and dolomites accounts for the higher percentage of organic carbon in some of the stratigraphic units. Carbonate rocks that contain greater than 0.4 percent organic carbon and that might be considered as possible petroleum sources were noted in almost each subdivision of the Coahuilan and Comanchean Series but particularly the units of Fredericksburg 'B', Trinity 'A', Trinity 'F', and Upper Sunniland. Possible source rocks have been ascribed by others to the Lower Sunniland, but lack of sufficient samples precluded any firm assessment in this initial report. In the shallower section of the basin, organic-rich carbonates containing as much as 3.2 percent organic carbon were observed in the lowermost part of the Gulfian Series and carbonate rocks with oil staining or 'dead' and 'live oil' were noted by others in the uppermost Gulfian and upper Cedar Keys Formation. It is questionable whether these shallower rocks are of sufficient thermal maturity to have generated commercial oil. The South Florida basin is still sparsely drilled and produces only from the Sunniland Limestone at an average depth of 11,500 feet (3500 m). Because the Sunniland contains good reservoir rocks and apparently adequate source rocks, and because the success rate of new oil field discoveries has increased in recent years, the chances of finding additional oil reserves in the Sunniland are promising. Furthermore, the

  11. Biomimetic synthesis of needle-like fluorescent calcium phosphate/carbon dot hybrid composites for cell labeling and copper ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shanshan; Lu, Shousi; Xu, Pingxiang; Ma, Yi; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Yuming; Gu, Wei; Xue, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we report a biomimetic method to synthesize needle-like calcium phosphate (CaP) with dimensions of ∼130 nm length and ∼30 nm width using carbon dots (CDs) and sodium carboxymethylcellulose as dual templates. In addition to acting as the template, the CDs enable the CaP/CDs hybrid composites to emit blue fluorescence under UV excitation. Moreover, the prepared CaP/CDs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells. The potential of these CaP/CDs as a fluorescent probe for cell labeling was tested. In addition, it was demonstrated that the CaP/CDs were capable of selective detection of copper ions in drinking water. PMID:27052495

  12. Dissolved and particulate organic carbon fluxes from an agricultural watershed during consecutive tropical storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverly, Emma; Kaste, James M.; Hancock, Gregory S.; Chambers, Randolph M.

    2013-10-01

    Low-frequency high-magnitude hydrologic events mobilize a disproportionate amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from watersheds, but few studies measure the role of extreme storms in exporting organic carbon from croplands. We use high-resolution measurements of storm runoff to quantify DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes from an agricultural field during consecutive tropical storms that delivered 41 cm of rainfall to the Virginia Coastal Plain. Over a 2 week period, we measured exports of 22 kg DOC ha-1 and 11.3 kg POC ha-1. Ultraviolet absorbance measurements indicate that the aromatic DOC fraction systematically increased as plant-derived aliphatic carbon was depleted during the initial event. Croplands can have event-scale carbon losses that equal or exceed published estimates of annual export for perennial streams draining forested and mixed land use watersheds. We quantify aromatic DOC fractions approaching 50%, indicating that agricultural stormflow can produce a significant load of relatively photoreactive carbon.

  13. Dutch (organic) agriculture, carbon sequestration and energy production

    OpenAIRE

    Burgt, van der, Maarten; Staps, S.; Timmermans, B.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in soils is often mentioned in the discussions about climate changes. In this paper the opportunities for carbon sequestration in Dutch agriculture are discussed at farm and national level. Farm internal carbon sources are already completely used in livestock farming. The effect under arable conditions is limited in time and very limited compared to national CO2 emission. External sources are scarce. Energy production out of crop residues and manure via biogas installatio...

  14. The energetic and chemical fingerprints of persistent soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Pierre; Plante, Alain F.; Cécillon, Lauric; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Baudin, François; Bernard, Sylvain; Christensen, Bent T.; Fernandez, Jose M.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Le Guillou, Corentin; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of soil organic carbon (SOC) persistence is needed to better predict SOC vulnerability to global change. The absence of convincing physical or chemical procedures to define, characterize or isolate relatively labile versus persistent SOC pools makes the study of persistent SOC difficult. Long-term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments, in which C inputs have been stopped for several decades, provide a unique opportunity to study persistent SOC without the inherent artefacts induced by extraction procedures, the hypothesis being that SOC is gradually enriched in persistent C with time as labile components decompose. We determined the evolution of thermal and chemical characteristics of bulk SOC in five LTBF experiments across Europe: Askov (DK), Grignon (FR), Rothamsted (UK), Ultuna (SW) and Versailles (FR), using a multi-technique approach involving Rock-Eval pyrolysis, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRIFT-MIRS), and Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). Results of Rock-Eval and TG analyses showed that the temperature needed to combust the SOC increased with bare fallow duration at all sites. Conversely, SOC energy density (in mJ mg-1 C) measured by DSC decreased with bare fallow duration. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results showed that hydrogen index (HI) tended to decrease with bare fallow duration whereas the oxygen index (OI) did not show consistent trends across sites. NEXAFS signals presented little differences and were dominated by carboxyl peak. Nonetheless, NEXAFS results showed a trend of increasing carboxyl groups and decreasing ketone and amide groups with bare fallow duration. Due to the mineral matrix, only a reduced part of the DRIFT-MIRS signals has been used. We observed that the bulk chemistry of aliphatic SOC (CH3 vs. CH2 functional groups) showed different trends for the different sites. Our results showed that in spite of the heterogeneity of

  15. Carbon isotopic studies of individual lipids in organisms from the Nansha sea area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; Yi; SONG; Jinming; ZHANG; Hui

    2004-01-01

    Carbon isotopes of individual lipids in typical organisms from the Nansha sea area were measured by the GC-IRMS analytical technique. δ13C values of saturated fatty acids in different organisms examined are from -25.6‰ to -29.7‰ with the average values ranging from -26.4‰ to -28.2‰ and the variance range of 1.8‰ between different organisms is also observed.Unsaturated fatty acids have heavy carbon isotopic compositions and the mean differences of 2.9‰-6.8‰ compared to the same carbon number saturated fatty acids. δ13C values of n-alkanes range from -27.5‰ to -29.7‰ and their mean values, ranging from -28.6‰ to -28.9‰, are very close in different organisms. The mean difference in δ13C between the saturated fatty acids and n-alkanes is only 1.5‰, indicating that they have similar biosynthetic pathways. The carbon isotopic variations between the different carbon-number lipids are mostly within ±2.0‰, reflecting that they experienced a biosynthetic process of the carbon chain elongation. At the same time, the carbon isotopic genetic relationships between the biological and sedimentary lipids are established by comparative studies of carbon isotopic compositions of individual lipids in organisms and sediments from the Nansha sea area, which provides scientific basis for carbon isotopic applied research of individual lipids.

  16. Hyperspectral remote sensing for soil organic carbon mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A.; van Wesemael, B.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite and airborne hyperspectral remote sensing is increasingly investigated as a fast and convenient tool to map soil properties. However, several research have pointed out the difficulty to obtain good calibration results over large areas due to spatial variation in soil types and surface soil conditions (moisture content, roughness, vegetation cover). These effects induce a spectral variability not directly related to the property studied and decrease the accuracy of predictions. A flight campaign was organized on 4-9th October 2007 using the AHS-160 airborne spectrometer to predict Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) in bare cropland soils in Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The study area consisted in a north-south transect of ~7 km width and ~60 km length and crossed 4 of the 5 agro-geological regions of Luxembourg, characterized by various soil types such as Cambisols, Luvisols, Arenosols and Calcisols. After collecting more than 300 soil samples of the soil surface, spectral data was related with SOC content using several standard multivariate calibration techniques (Partial Least Square Regression, Penalized-spline Regression, Support Vector Machine). It is shown that calibrations yield reasonably accurate predictions over large areas as long as secondary information (e.g. soil types, agro-pedological regions) are included in the models (Root Mean Square Error of Prediction: ~3 g C kg-1). Such calibration models could be applied to every soil pixel of the hyperspectral image to produce a SOC map of the area. However, predictions have been realized using statistical relationships based on a set of calibration randomly chosen from a set of samples collected during a field campaign, the rest being used for validation purposes. It means that the validation set is not completely independent from the calibration set. As a consequence, a true independent validation (over fields not covered by the calibration/validation sets) would probably give lower accuracies than the ones

  17. Comparative toxicity of sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate to freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Tyler D; Kinley, Ciera M; Iwinski, Kyla J; Calomeni, Alyssa J; Rodgers, John H

    2016-10-01

    Sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate (SCP) is a granular algaecide containing H2O2 as an active ingredient to control growth of noxious algae. Measurements of sensitivities of target and non-target species to hydrogen peroxide are necessary for water resource managers to make informed decisions and minimize risks for non-target species when treating noxious algae. The objective of this study was to measure and compare responses among a target noxious alga (cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa) and non-target organisms including a eukaryotic alga (chlorophyte Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), microcrustacean (Ceriodaphnia dubia), benthic amphipod (Hyalella azteca), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to exposures of hydrogen peroxide as SCP. Hydrogen peroxide exposures were confirmed using the I3(-) method. SCP margins of safety for these organisms were compared with published toxicity data to provide context for other commonly used algaecides and herbicides (e.g. copper formulations, endothall, and diquat dibromide). Algal responses (cell density and chlorophyll a concentrations) and animal mortality were measured after 96h aqueous exposures to SCP in laboratory-formulated water to estimate EC50 and LC50 values, as well as potency slopes. Despite a shorter test duration, M. aeruginosa was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide as SCP (96h EC50:0.9-1.0mgL(-)(1) H2O2) than the eukaryotic alga P. subcapitata (7-d EC50:5.2-9.2mgL(-1) H2O2), indicating potential for selective control of prokaryotic algae. For the three non-target animals evaluated, measured 96-h LC50 values ranged from 1.0 to 19.7mgL(-1) H2O2. C. dubia was the most sensitive species, and the least sensitive species was P. promelas, which is not likely to be affected by concentrations of hydrogen peroxide as SCP that would be used to control noxious algae (e.g. M. aeruginosa). Based on information from peer-reviewed literature, other algaecides could be similarly selective for cyanobacteria. Of the

  18. Temperature sensitivity of organic carbon mineralization in contrasting lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudasz, Cristian; Sobek, Sebastian; Bastviken, David; Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature alone explains a great amount of variation in sediment organic carbon (OC) mineralization. Studies on decomposition of soil OC suggest that (1) temperature sensitivity differs between the fast and slowly decomposition OC and (2) over time, decreasing soil respiration is coupled with increase in temperature sensitivity. In lakes, autochthonous and allochthonous OC sources are generally regarded as fast and slowly decomposing OC, respectively. Lake sediments with different contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous components, however, showed similar temperature sensitivity in short-term incubation experiments. Whether the mineralization of OC in lake sediments dominated by allochthonous or autochthonous OC has different temperature sensitivity in the longer term has not been addressed. We incubated sediments from two boreal lakes that had contrasting OC origin (allochthonous versus autochthonous), and OC characteristics (C/N ratios of 21 and 10) at 1, 3, 5, 8, 13, and 21°C for five months. Compared to soil and litter mineralization, sediment OC mineralization rates were low in spite of low apparent activation energy (Ea). The fraction of the total OC pool that was lost during five months varied between 0.4 and 14.8%. We estimate that the sediment OC pool not becoming long-term preserved was degraded with average apparent turnover times between 3 and 32 years. While OC mineralization was strongly dependent on temperature as well as on OC composition and origin, temperature sensitivity was similar across lakes and over time. We suggest that the temperature sensitivity of OC mineralization in lake sediments is similar across systems within the relevant seasonal scales of OC supply and degradation.

  19. Bismuth oxychloride modified titanium phosphate nanoplates: A new p-n type heterostructured photocatalyst with high activity for the degradation of different kinds of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Yanhui; Bao, Jiaqiu; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun

    2016-08-15

    In this work, BiOCl modified titanium phosphate nanoplates (BiOCl/TP) composite photocatalysts with p-n heterojunctions were prepared by a in-situ growth method. The morphology, crystal structure and optical properties of the prepared samples were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrometry (DRS). Rhodamine B (RhB), reactive brilliant Red X-3B (X-3B), methylene blue (MB), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and phenol were used to investigate the photocatalytic performance of the prepared samples under ultraviolet light irradiation. Results showed that the BiOCl/TP exhibited much higher activity for the degradation of all these model organic pollutants than pure TP. The mechanism for the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance was established with the help of the results of photocurrent measurements and Photoluminescence spectra. The results illustrated that the enhanced activity could be attributed to the formation of p-n heterojunctions between p-type BiOCl and n-type titanium phosphate, which effectively suppressed the recombination of photo-induced electron-hole pairs. Furthermore, the possible photocatalytic mechanisms on the degradation of the organic pollutants were also proposed. PMID:27209392

  20. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone-kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  1. Concentrations, loads, and yields of organic carbon in streams of agricultural watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholm, Scott; Capel, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Carbon is cycled to and from large reservoirs in the atmosphere, on land, and in the ocean. Movement of organic carbon from the terrestrial reservoir to the ocean plays an important role in the global cycling of carbon. The transition from natural to agricultural vegetation can change the storage and movement of organic carbon in and from a watershed. Samples were collected from 13 streams located in hydrologically and agriculturally diverse watersheds, to better understand the variability in the concentrations and loads of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) in the streams, and the variability in watershed yields. The overall annual median concentrations of DOC and POC were 4.9 (range: 2.1–6.8) and 1.1 (range: 0.4–3.8) mg C L−1, respectively. The mean DOC watershed yield (± SE) was 25 ± 6.8 kg C ha−1 yr−1. The yields of DOC from these agricultural watersheds were not substantially different than the DOC yield from naturally vegetated watersheds in equivalent biomes, but were at the low end of the range for most biomes. Total organic carbon (DOC + POC) annually exported from the agricultural watersheds was found to average 0.03% of the organic carbon that is contained in the labile plant matter and top 1 m of soil in the watershed. Since the total organic carbon exported from agricultural watersheds is a relatively small portion of the sequestered carbon within the watershed, there is the great potential to store additional carbon in plants and soils of the watershed, offsetting some anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  2. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate rock, the major raw material for phosphate fertilizers, contains uranium that can be recovered when the rock is processed. This makes it possible to produce uranium in a country that has no uranium ore deposits. The author briefly describes the way that phosphate fertilizers are made, how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry, and how to detect uranium recovery operations in a phosphate plant. Uranium recovery from the wet-process phosphoric acid involves three unit operations: (1) pretreatment to prepare the acid; (2) solvent extraction to concentrate the uranium; (3) post treatment to insure that the acid returning to the acid plant will not be harmful downstream. There are 3 extractants that are capable of extracting uranium from phosphoric acid. The pyro or OPPA process uses a pyrophosphoric acid that is prepared on site by reacting an organic alcohol (usually capryl alcohol) with phosphorous pentoxide. The DEPA-TOPO process uses a mixture of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO). The components can be bought separately or as a mixture. The OPAP process uses octylphenyl acid phosphate, a commercially available mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. All three extractants are dissolved in kerosene-type diluents for process use

  3. Flocculation of Allochthonous Dissolved Organic Matter – a Significant Pathway of Sedimentation and Carbon Burial in Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    von Wachenfeldt, Eddie

    2008-01-01

    Inland waters receive substantial amounts of organic carbon from adjacent watersheds. Only about half of the carbon exported from inland waters reaches the oceans, while the remainder is lost en route. This thesis identifies flocculation as an important and significant fate of carbon in the boreal landscape. Flocculation reallocates organic carbon from the dissolved state into particles which are prone to settle. Thus, flocculation relocates organic carbon from the water column to the sedimen...

  4. Role of organic soils in the world carbon cycle: problem definition and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentano, T.V. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    Findings and recommendations of the workshop on organic soils are summarized. The major finding of the workshop is that organic soils are important in the overall carbon budget. Histosols and gleysols, the major organic soil deposits of the world, normally sequester organic carbon fixed by plants. They may now be releasing enough carbon to account for nearly 10% of the annual rise in atmospheric content of CO/sub 2/. Current annual release of carbon from organic soils is estimated to fall within the range of 0.03 to 0.37 x 10/sup 9/ t, a release equivalent to 1.3% to 16% of the annual increase of carbon in the atmosphere. If half of the released carbon remains airborne, organic soils contribute 0.6% to 8.0% of the annual rise in CO/sub 2/. Uncertainties in data suggest the actual release could lie outside the range. Present annual releases of carbon from the Everglades Agricultural Area in Florida and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Valley in California are estimated at 0.017 x 10/sup 9/ tons. When combined with additional carbon release from other known drainage programs and the possibility of major drainage activity in the tropics, this figure suggests that the lower limit of the world estimate of carbon release from organic soils is too low. Annual sequestering of carbon by undrained organic soils has been estimated at about 0.045 x 10/sup 9/ tons. This estimate is based on only a few studies, however, and precision is probably no better than an order of magnitude. Several strategies for peatland management are available, including creation, preservation, functional designation, and use of wetlands for agriculture and energy supply.

  5. Fructose-6-phosphate aldolase in organic synthesis: preparation of D-fagomine, N-alkylated derivatives, and preliminary biological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, José A; Calveras, Jordi; Casas, Josefina; Mitjans, Montserrat; Vinardell, M Pilar; Parella, Teodor; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Sprenger, Georg A; Joglar, Jesús; Clapés, Pere

    2006-12-21

    [Structure: see text] D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase (FSA) mediates a novel straightforward two-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis of D-fagomine and some of its N-alkylated derivatives in 51% isolated yield and 99% de. The key step is the FSA-catalyzed aldol addition of simple dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to N-Cbz-3-aminopropanal. The use of FSA greatly simplifies the enzymatic procedures that used dihydroxyacetonephosphate or DHA/esters. Some N-alkyl derivatives synthesized elicited antifungal and antibacterial activity as well as enhanced inhibitory activity, and selectivity against beta-galactosidase and alpha-glucosidase. PMID:17165931

  6. Research on determining organic carbon in rock and mineral samples by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors introduce results of research on transformation mechanism, temperature and time of organic carbon during analysis of rock and mineral samples by gas chromatography, as well as conditions for eliminating carbonate constituent that may produce carbon dioxide gas. The research has solved the problem of connecting the chemical processing and instrument determination. The newly-established method is characterized by high sensitivity, good exactitude, simple and fast operation, and may be applied to the determination of organic carbon in rock, mineral, as well as sediment samples

  7. Dissolved organic carbon reduces the toxicity of aluminum to three tropical freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenfield, Melanie A; Markich, Scott J; Ng, Jack C; Noller, Barry; van Dam, Rick A

    2012-02-01

    The influence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the toxicity of aluminum (Al) at pH 5 (relevant to acid mine drainage conditions), to the tropical green hydra (Hydra viridissima), green alga (Chlorella sp.), and cladoceran (Moinodaphnia macleayi) was assessed. Two DOC sources, a natural in situ DOC in soft billabong water (SBW) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) standard, were compared. The order of sensitivity of the test organisms to dissolved Al (0.1 µm fraction) was Hydra viridissima > Moinodaphnia macleayi > Chlorella sp. with DOC reducing dissolved Al toxicity most for Hydra viridissima. However, colloidal or precipitated Al may contribute indirectly to the toxicity for M. macleayi and Chlorella sp. The toxicity of dissolved Al was up to six times lower in test waters containing 10 mg L(-1) DOC (in the form of SRFA), relative to toxicity observed at 1 mg L(-1) DOC. In contrast, the toxicity of Al was up to two times lower in SBW containing 10 mg L(-1) DOC, relative to water containing 1 mg L(-1) DOC. The increased ability of SRFA in reducing Al toxicity was linked to its greater affinity for complexing Al compared with the in situ DOC. This has important implications for studies that use commercial standards of humic substances to predict Al toxicity in local environments. Speciation modeling demonstrated that Al(3+) and AlOH(2+) provided a strong relationship with toxicity. An empirical relationship is provided for each organism that can be used to predict Al toxicity at a given Al and DOC concentration. PMID:22105345

  8. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G.M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  9. Aqueous leaching of organic acids and dissolved organic carbon from various biochars prepared at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Berti, William R; Landis, Richard C

    2015-03-01

    Biochar has been used as a soil amendment, as a water treatment material, and for carbon (C) sequestration. Thirty-six biochars, produced from wood, agricultural residue, and manure feedstocks at different temperatures, were evaluated for the aqueous leaching of different forms of soluble C. The release of inorganic C (alkalinity), organic acids (OAs), and total dissolved organic C (DOC) was highly variable and dependent on the feedstock and pyrolysis temperature. The pH and alkalinity increased for the majority of samples. Higher pH values were associated with high-temperature (high-T) (600 and 700°C) biochars. Statistically significant differences in alkalinity were not observed between low-temperature (low-T) (300°C) and high-T biochars, whereas alkalinity released from wood-based biochar was significantly lower than from others. Concentrations of OAs and DOC released from low-T biochars were greater than from high-T biochars. The C in the OAs represented 1 to 60% of the total DOC released, indicating the presence of other DOC forms. The C released as DOC represented up to 3% (majority biochar. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed the high-T biochars had a greater proportion of micropores. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that hydroxyl, aliphatic, and quinone were the predominant functional groups of all biochars and that the abundance of other functional groups was dependent on the feedstock. The release of DOC, especially bioavailable forms such as OAs, may promote growth of organisms and heavy metal complexation and diminish the potential effectiveness of various biochars for C sequestration. PMID:26023986

  10. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-09-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  11. Distribution of Organic Carbon in the Sediments of Xinxue River and the Xinxue River Constructed Wetland, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Cao

    Full Text Available Wetland ecosystems are represented as a significant reservoir of organic carbon and play an important role in mitigating the greenhouse effect. In order to compare the compositions and distribution of organic carbon in constructed and natural river wetlands, sediments from the Xinxue River Constructed Wetland and the Xinxue River, China, were sampled at two depths (0-15 cm and 15-25 cm in both upstream and downstream locations. Three types of organic carbon were determined: light fraction organic carbon, heavy fraction organic carbon, and dissolved organic carbon. The results show that variations in light fraction organic carbon are significantly larger between upstream and downstream locations than they are between the two wetland types; however, the opposite trend is observed for the dissolved organic carbon. There are no significant differences in the distribution of heavy fraction organic carbon between the discrete variables (e.g., between the two depths, the two locations, or the two wetland types. However, there are significant cross-variable differences; for example, the distribution patterns of heavy fraction organic carbon between wetland types and depths, and between wetland types and locations. Correlation analysis reveals that light fraction organic carbon is positively associated with light fraction nitrogen in both wetlands, while heavy fraction organic carbon is associated with both heavy fraction nitrogen and the moisture content in the constructed wetland. The results of this study demonstrate that the constructed wetland, which has a relatively low background value of heavy fraction organic carbon, is gradually accumulating organic carbon of different types, with the level of accumulation dependent on the balance between carbon accumulation and carbon decomposition. In contrast, the river wetland has relatively stable levels of organic carbon.

  12. Changes in Organic Carbon Index of Grey Desert Soil in Northwest China After Long-Term Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yong-mei; LIU Hua; WANG Xi-he; XU Ming-gang; ZHANG Wen-ju; JIANG Gui-ying

    2014-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC), soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) and SMBC quotient (SMBC/SOC, qSMBC) are key indexes of soil biological fertility because of the relationship to soil nutrition supply capacity. Yet it remains unknown how these three indexes change, which limits our understanding about how soil respond to different fertilization practices. Based on a 22-yr (1990-2011) long-term fertilization experiment in northwest China, we investigated the dynamics of SMBC and qSMBC during the growing period of winter wheat, the relationships between the SMBC, qSMBC, soil organic carbon (SOC) concentrations, the carbon input and grain yield of wheat as well. Fertilization treatments were 1) nonfertilization (control);2) chemical nitrogen plus phosphate plus potassium (NPK);3) NPK plus animal manure (NPKM);4) double NPKM (hNPKM) and 5) NPK plus straw (NPKS). Results showed that the SMBC and qSMBC were signiifcantly different among returning, jointing, lfowering and harvest stages of wheat under long-term fertilization. And the largest values were observed in the lfowering stage. Values for SMBC and qSMBC ranged from 37.5 to 106.0 mg kg-1 and 0.41 to 0.61%, respectively. The mean value rank of SMBC during the whole growing period of wheat was hNPKM>NPKM>NPKS>CK>NPK. But there were no statistically signiifcant differences between hNPKM and NPKM, or between CK and NPK. The order for qSMBC was NPKS>NPKM>CK>hNPKM>NPK. These results indicated that NPKS signiifcantly increased the ratio of SMBC to SOC, i.e., qSMBC, compared with NPK fertilizer or other two NPKM fertilizations. Signiifcant linear relationships were observed between the annual carbon input and SOC (P<0.01) or SMBC (P<0.05), and between the relative grain yield of wheat and the SOC content as well (P<0.05). But the qSMBC was not correlated with the annual carbon input. It is thus obvious that the combination of manure, straw with mineral fertilizer may be beneift to increase SOC and improve soil quality than

  13. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Relation to Water Erosion and Tillage Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the 137Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of 137Cs...

  14. Organic carbon sedimentation rates in Asian mangrove coastal ecosystems estimated by {sup 210}PB chronology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateda, Y.; Wattayakorn, G.; Nhan, D.D.; Kasuya, Y. [Abiko Research Laboratory CRIEPI, Biology Dept., Abiko, Chiba (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Organic carbon balance estimation of mangrove coastal ecosystem is important for understanding of Asian coastal carbon budget/flux calculation in global carbon cycle modelling which is powerful tool for the prediction of future greenhouse gas effect and evaluation of countermeasure preference. Especially, the organic carbon accumulation rate in mangrove ecosystem was reported to be important sink of carbon as well as that in boreal peat accumulation. For the estimation of 10{sup 3} years scale organic carbon accumulation rates in mangrove coastal ecosystems, {sup 14}C was used as long term chronological tracer, being useful in pristine mangrove forest reserve area. While in case of mangrove plantation of in coastal area, the {sup 210}Pb is suitable for the estimation of decades scale estimation by its half-life. Though it has possibility of bio-/physical- turbation effect in applying {sup 210}Pb chronology that is offset in case of 10{sup 3} years scale estimation, especially in Asian mangrove ecosystem where the anthropogenic physical turbation by coastal fishery is vigorous.In this paper, we studied the organic carbon and {sup 210}Pb accumulation rates in subtropical mangrove coastal ecosystems in Japan, Vietnam and Thailand with {sup 7}Be analyses to make sure the negligible effect of above turbation effects on organic carbon accumulation. We finally concluded that {sup 210}Pb was applicable to estimate organic carbon accumulation rates in these ecosystems even though the physical-/bio-turbation is expected. The measured organic carbon accumulation rates using {sup 210}Pb in mangrove coastal ecosystems of Japan, Vietnam and Thailand were 0.067 4.0 t-C ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. (author)

  15. Organic Carbon Isotope Geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qingjun; LIU Congqiang; Harald STRAUSS; Tatiana GOLDBERG; ZHU Maoyan; PI Daohui; WANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation on the Yangtze Platform, South China,documents a sedimentary succession with different sedimentary facies from carbonate platform to slope and to deep sea basin, and hosts one of the world-class phosphorite deposits. In these strata,exquisitely preserved fossils have been discovered: the Weng'an biota. This study presents carbon isotope geochemistry which is associated paired carbonate and organic matter from the Weng'an section of a carbonate platform (shelf of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) from the Songtao section and Nanming section of a transition belt (slope of the Yangtze Platform, Guizhou Province) and from the Yanwutan section (basin area of the Yangtze Platform, Hunan Province). Environmental variations and bio-events on the Yangtze Platform during the Late Neoproterozoic and their causal relationship are discussed. Negative carbon isotope values for carbonate and organic carbon (mean δ13Corg = -35.0%) from the uppermost Nantuo Formation are followed by an overall increase in δ13C up-section. Carbon isotope values vary between -9.9% and 3.6% for carbonate and between -35.6% and -21.5% for organic carbon, respectively. Heavier δ13Ccarb values suggest an increase in organic carbon burial, possibly related to increasing productivity (such as the Weng'an biota). The δ13C values of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation decreased from the platform via the slope to basin,reflecting a reduced environment with minor dissolved inorganic carbon possibly due to a lower primary productivity. It is deduced that the classical upwelling process, the stratification structure and the hydrothermal eruption are principally important mechanisms to interpret the carbon isotopic compositions of the sediments from the Doushantuo Formation.

  16. Hierarchically-organized, well-dispersed hydroxyapatite-coated magnetic carbon with combined organics and inorganics removal properties

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Huihui; Liu, Qiang; Masse, Sylvie; Zhang, Hao; Li, Laifeng; ,; Coradin, Thibaud

    2015-01-01

    Novel hierarchically-organized magnetic microspheres have been successfully developed that consist of an aqueous hollow core, a magnetic porous Fe3O4-carbon layer and a well-define hydroxyapatite (HAp) shell. The hollow magnetic carbon microspheres were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis and coated with HAp using a biomimetic approach. The resulting powders exhibit micro- and meso-porosity. The removal capacity of the composite spheres towards an antibiotic (ampicilin), a rare-earth ion (...

  17. Release of dissolved organic carbon from submersed aquatic macrophytes: diel, seasonal, and community relationships. [Najas flexilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, R.A.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    Release of dissolved organic carbon from aquatic macrophytes was measured simultaneously with release of carbon dioxide in a /sup 14/C-assay for photorespiration (glycolate metabolism) developed for use in the laboratory and in situ. Release of organic carbon from axenic Najas flexilis was somewhat more rapid in the dark than in the light, and temporarily so by a factor of over 2 following sudden darkness. Rates of organic release were largely independent of oxygen and carbon dioxide concentration both in the light and in the dark, although the post-illumination surge was somewhat enhanced by high oxygen concentration. The kinetics of release suggested that glycolate was not excreted extensively by N. flexilis, but rather was oxidized in photorespiration. Organic carbon release from N. flexilis cultures was greater in presence of epiphytic diatoms than in axenic controls, whereas release in presence of a mixed bacterial microflora was similar to that in axenic controls, although the post-illumination surge was somewhat diminished in presence of the bacteria. Release of organic carbon in situ was relatively low in N. flexilis in summer, but increased 4-fold in the fall during senescence. Rates of release in early afternoon were over 2 fold those in the morning and late afternoon. Release of organic carbon by Scirpus subterminalis was lowest in the fall and highest in the spring.

  18. Organic carbon accumulation capability of two typical tidal wetland soils in Chongming Dongtan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiping; Wang, Lei; Hu, Jiajun; Zhang, Wenquan; Fu, Xiaohua; Le, Yiquan; Jin, Fangming

    2011-01-01

    We measured organic carbon input and content of soil in two wetland areas of Chongming Dongtan (Yangtze River Estuary) to evaluate variability in organic carbon accumulation capability in different wetland soils. Observed differences were investigated based on the microbial activity and environmental factors of the soil at the two sites. Results showed that the organic carbon content of wetland soil vegetated with Phragmites australis (site A) was markedly lower than that with P. australis and Spartina alterniflora (site B). Sites differences were due to higher microbial activity at site A, which led to higher soil respiration intensity and greater carbon outputs. This indicated that the capability of organic carbon accumulation of the site B soils was greater than at site A. In addition, petroleum pollution and soil salinity were different in the two wetland soils. After bio-remediation, the soil petroleum pollution at site B was reduced to a similar level of site A. However, the culturable microbial biomass and enzyme activity in the remediated soils were also lower than at site A. These results indicated that greater petroleum pollution at site B did not markedly inhibit soil microbial activity. Therefore, differences in vegetation type and soil salinity were the primary factors responsible for the variation in microbial activity, organic carbon output and organic carbon accumulation capability between site A and site B. PMID:21476345

  19. Spark Plasma Sintering of Load-Bearing Iron-Carbon Nanotube-Tricalcium Phosphate CerMets for Orthopaedic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montufar, Edgar B.; Horynová, Miroslava; Casas-Luna, Mariano; Diaz-de-la-Torre, Sebastián; Celko, Ladislav; Klakurková, Lenka; Spotz, Zdenek; Diéguez-Trejo, Guillermo; Fohlerová, Zdenka; Dvorak, Karel; Zikmund, Tomáš; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    Recently, ceramic-metallic composite materials (CerMets) have been investigated for orthopaedic applications with promising results. This first generation of bio-CerMets combine the bioactivity of hydroxyapatite with the mechanical stability of titanium to fabricate bioactive, tough and biomechanically more biocompatible osteosynthetic devices. Nonetheless, these first CerMets are not biodegradable materials and a second surgery is required to remove the implant after bone healing. The present work aims to develop the next generation bio-CerMets, which are potential biodegradable materials. The process to produce the new biodegradable CerMet consisted of mixing powder of soluble and osteoconductive alpha tricalcium phosphate with biocompatible and biodegradable iron with consolidation through spark plasma sintering (SPS). The microstructure, composition and mechanical strength of the new CerMet were studied by metallography, x-ray diffraction and diametral tensile strength tests, respectively. The results show that SPS produces CerMet with higher mechanical performance (120 MPa) than the ceramic component alone (29 MPa) and similar mechanical strength to the pure metallic component (129 MPa). Nonetheless, although a short sintering time (10 min) was used, partial transformation of the alpha tricalcium phosphate into its allotropic and slightly less soluble beta phase was observed. Cell adhesion tests show that osteoblasts are able to attach to the CerMet surface, presenting spread morphology regardless of the component of the material with which they are in contact. However, the degradation process restricted to the small volume of the cell culture well quickly reduces the osteoblast viability.

  20. Effects of ozonation and temperature on the biodegradation of natural organic matter in biological granular activated carbon filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Aa, L.T.J.; Rietveld, L.C.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Four pilot (biological) granular activated carbon ((B)GAC) filters were operated to quantify the effects of ozonation and water temperature on the biodegradation of natural organic matter (NOM) in (B)GAC filters. The removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and oxy

  1. Effects of ozonation and temperature on biodegradation of natural organic matter in biological granular activated carbon filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Aa, L.T.J.; Rietveld, L.C.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Four pilot (biological) granular activated carbon ((B)GAC) filters were operated to quantify the effects of ozonation and water temperature on the biodegradation of natural organic matter (NOM) in (B)GAC filters. Removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and oxygen

  2. Identification of Effective Organic Carbon for Biofloc Shrimp Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sakkaravarthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify an effective carbon source which enhances not only the microbial load but also the shrimps growth. The carbon source cane sugar, molasses and jaggery were tested in 100 L culture tanks with stocking density of 30 m‾2 Peneus monodon seeds for a culture period of 40 days. Jaggery biofloc tank shows highest floc formation (22 mL, highest survival (86% and highest ABW (6 g, proximate composition of jagerry biofloc had higher protein level (35% followed by mollases and sugar culture tanks. It confirms jaggery is a new efficient carbon source for shrimp culture system.

  3. Monitoring soil organic carbon in croplands using imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, A.; Udelhoven, T.; Denis, A.; Tychon, B.; Lioy, R.; Hoffmann, L.; van Wesemael, B.

    2009-04-01

    Conventional soil sampling techniques are often too expensive and time consuming to meet the amount of quantitative data required in soil monitoring or modelling studies. The emergence of portable and flexible spectrometer operating in the visible and near infrared range of the electro-magnetic spectrum could provide the large amount of spatial data needed. To this regard, the ability of airborne imaging spectroscopy to cover large surfaces in a single flight campaign and study the spatial distribution of soil properties with a high spatial resolution represents an opportunity for improving the monitoring of soils. The potential of quantitative spectral analysis has been repeatedly demonstrated in soil science either in the laboratory or with remote sensors. However, imaging spectroscopy for soil applications has been generally applied over small areas or homogeneous soil types and surface conditions. Here, five hyperspectral images acquired with the AHS-160 sensor were analysed to predict Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) in an area (350 km2) in Luxembourg characterized by different soil types and a large variation in SOC contents. Reflectance data were related to surface SOC contents of bare cropland by means of 3 different multivariate calibration techniques: Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR), Penalized-spline Signal Regression (PSR) and Least Square Support Vector Machine (LS-SVM). The stability of the methods across different agropedological zones, soil types or soil surface conditions were tested by comparing their performance under different combinations of calibration/validation sets (global and local calibrations). A lack of fit at high SOC content was observed under global calibrations, yielding a relatively high Root Mean Square Error in the Predictions (RMSEP) of 4.7-6.2 g C kg-1. PSR showed a greater ability to handle noisy spectral features, resulting in more robust calibrations than PLSR. Local calibrations based on soil types and agro

  4. Interannual stability of organic to inorganic carbon production on a coral atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Albright, Rebecca; Hosfelt, Jessica; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Rivlin, Tanya; Sesboüé, Marine; Wolfe, Kennedy; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Ocean acidification has the potential to adversely affect marine calcifying organisms, with substantial ocean ecosystem impacts projected over the 21st century. Characterizing the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to natural variability in carbonate chemistry may improve our understanding of the long-term impacts of ocean acidification. We explore the potential for intensive temporal sampling to isolate the influence of carbonate chemistry on community calcification rates of a coral reef and compare the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production to previous studies at the same location. Even with intensive temporal sampling, community calcification displays only a weak dependence on carbonate chemistry variability. However, across three years of sampling, the ratio of organic to inorganic carbon production is highly consistent. Although further work is required to quantify the spatial variability associated with such ratios, this suggests that these measurements have the potential to indicate the response of coral reefs to ongoing disturbance, ocean acidification, and climate change.

  5. Energy costs of carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms in aquatic organisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, J.; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 121, 2-3 (2014), s. 111-124. ISSN 0166-8595 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : carbon dioxide * environmental change * radiation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.502, year: 2014

  6. Arterial Blood Carbonic Acid Inversely Determines Lactic and Organic Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Aiken, Christopher Geoffrey Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish that arterial blood carbonic acid varies inversely with lactic acid in accordance with bicarbonate exchanging for lactate across cell membranes through the anion exchange mechanism to maintain the Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium.

  7. Impact of wastewater treatment processes on organic carbon, organic nitrogen, and DBP precursors in effuent organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasner, Stuart W; Westerhoff, Paul; Chen, Baiyang; Rittmann, Bruce E; Nam, Seong-Nam; Amy, Gary

    2009-04-15

    Unintentional, indirect wastewater reuse often occurs as wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges contaminate receiving waters serving as drinking-water supplies. A survey was conducted at 23 WWTPs that utilized a range of treatment technologies. Samples were analyzed for typical wastewater and drinking-water constituents, chemical characteristics of the dissolved organic matter (DOM), and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors present in the effluent organic matter (EfOM). This was the first large-scale assessment of the critical water quality parameters that affect the formation of potential carcinogens during drinking water treatment relative to the discharge of upstream WWTPs. This study considered a large and wide range of variables, including emerging contaminants rarely studied at WWTPs and never before in one study. This paper emphasizesthe profound impact of nitrification on many measures of effluent water quality, from the obvious wastewater parameters (e.g., ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand) to the ones specific to downstream drinking water treatment plants (e.g., formation potentialsfor a diverse group of DBPs of health concern). Complete nitrification reduced the concentration of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and changed the ratio of BDOC/DOC. Although nitrification reduced ultraviolet absorbance (UVA) at 254 nm, it resulted in an increase in specific UVA (UVA/DOC). This is attributed to preferential removal of the less UV-absorbing (nonhumic) fraction of the DOC during biological treatment. EfOM is composed of hydrophilic and biodegradable DOM, as well as hydrophobic and recalcitrant DOM, whose proportions change with advanced biological treatment. The onset of nitrification yielded lower precursor levels for haloacetic acids and nitrogenous DBPs (haloacetonitriles, N-nitrosodimethylamine). However, trihalomethane precursors were relatively unaffected by the level of wastewater treatment Thus, one design/operations parameter in

  8. Mycorrhizal mediation of soil organic carbon decomposition under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant effort in global change research has recently been directed towards assessing the potential of soil as a carbon sink under future atmospheric carbon dioxide scenarios. Attention has focused on the impact of elevated carbon dioxide on plant interactions with mycorrhizae, a symbiotic soil...

  9. Estimating organic micro-pollutant removal potential of activated carbons using UV absorption and carbon characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietzschmann, Frederik; Altmann, Johannes; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian; Dünnbier, Uwe; Dommisch, Ingvild; Sperlich, Alexander; Meinel, Felix; Jekel, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Eight commercially available powdered activated carbons (PAC) were examined regarding organic micro-pollutant (OMP) removal efficiencies in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. PAC characteristic numbers such as B.E.T. surface, iodine number and nitrobenzene number were checked for their potential to predict the OMP removal of the PAC products. Furthermore, the PAC-induced removal of UV254 nm absorption (UVA254) in WWTP effluent was determined and also correlated with OMP removal. None of the PAC characteristic numbers can satisfactorily describe OMP removal and accordingly, these characteristics have little informative value on the reduction of OMP concentrations in WWTP effluent. In contrast, UVA254 removal and OMP removal correlate well for carbamazepine, diclofenac, and several iodinated x-ray contrast media. Also, UVA254 removal can roughly describe the average OMP removal of all measured OMP, and can accordingly predict PAC performance in OMP removal. We therefore suggest UVA254 as a handy indicator for the approximation of OMP removal in practical applications where direct OMP concentration quantification is not always available. In continuous operation of large-scale plants, this approach allows for the efficient adjustment of PAC dosing to UVA254, in order to ensure reliable OMP removal whilst minimizing PAC consumption. PMID:24651017

  10. Effectiveness of submersed angiosperm--epiphyte complexes on exchange of nutrients and organic carbon in littoral systems. II. Dissolved organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickle, A.M.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon concentrations, UV absorption, and fluorescence were measured daily for several weeks in water from an inlet stream of a hardwater lake before and after passing through three continuously, very slowly flowing (31/24 h) littoral systems. System I contained a natural stand of Scirpus subterminalis Torr. and Systems II and III contained Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx. Macrophytic epiphytes were left intact. Dissolved organic matter of inflow and outflow water from System III was fractionated into several molecular weight fractions. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations and UV absorption increased as inflow water passed through all three littoral systems. This increase consisted only of organic compounds of >1000 molecular weight. Fluorescence increased in outflow waters of Systems I and III, but consistently decreased in System II. During periods of rainfall, but not snowfall, all three parameters in inflow water increased significantly. All three littoral systems were effective in dampening these higher concentrations; only slight increases appeared in the outflows.

  11. Chlorophyll 'a' particulate organic carbon and suspended load from the mangrove areas of Cochin backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sheeba, P.; Devi, K.S.; Balasubramanian, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Chlorophyll 'a' Particulate Organic Carbon and suspended load were estimated for one year from two distinct mangrove areas of Cochin backwaters, viz. Puthuvypeen and Nettoor. Environmental parameters like tau degrees C, S ppt and pH were also...

  12. VIIRSN Level-3 Standard Mapped Image, Particulate Organic Carbon, Monthly, 4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes Particulate Organic Carbon data from ther NPP-Suomi spacecraft. Measurements are gathered by VIIRS instrument carried aboard the...

  13. Organic carbon in the sediments of the lower reaches of Periar River

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, K.S.; Venugopal, P.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Sediments are indicators of the quality of water overlying them and hence, useful in the assessment of environmental pollution. Temporal and spatial variations in sediment characteristics and organic carbon content from 9 stations in the lower...

  14. EVOLUTIONARY AND GEOLOGIC CONSEQUENCES OF ORGANIC CARBON FIXING IN THE PRIMITIVE ANOXIC OCEAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, W. B.N.; Wilde, P.

    1980-09-01

    A model is proposed for a group of Archean pre-prokaryotes primary producers (termed Anoxium), that derived their energy from geothermal hydrogen sulfide discharged at oceanic vents. With time, competition developed for available S{sup =} due to organic oxidation and loss of sulfur to sediments. As a consequence, evolutionary advantage shifted to Anoxium isolates that could use alternative energy sources such as light to supplement diminished supplies of S{sup =}. Subsequent carbon fixing and deposition of organic carbon improved both the quality and quantity of light reaching the ocean surface so that eventually photosynthesis replaced sulfur chemosynthesis as the primary carbon dioxide-fixing mechanism. Organisms occupying niches similar to those of modern purple and green sulfur bacteria, thiobacilli and cyanobacteria could have evolved from the Anoxium complex as the environment was organically modified by the consequences of carbon fixing.

  15. 14C in fractions of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report carbon isotope ratios of fractions of natural organic compounds in ground waters isolated from the Stripa mine (Sweden) and the Milk River aquifer (Alberta, Canada). High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fractions of the organic carbon were characterized and these, along with dissolved inorganic carbon, were analysed for δ13C and 14C. The 14C results suggest that the dissolved organic carbon originates from a combination of soil organic matter and kerogen in the aquifer matrix. The high-molecular-weight fractions show a predominant soil origin, whereas the low-molecular-weight fractions are often strongly influenced by kerogen. (author). 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Calcium phosphate-based organic-inorganic hybrid nanocarriers with pH-responsive on/off switch for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Takahiro; Fukushima, Shigeto; Kumagai, Michiaki; Miyazaki, Kozo; Inoue, Aki; Mi, Peng; Maeda, Yoshinori; Toh, Kazuko; Matsumoto, Yu; Morimoto, Yuji; Kishimura, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-05-26

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality for malignant tumors in a light-selective manner. To improve the PDT efficacy, numerous kinds of nanocarriers have been developed to deliver photosensitizers (PSs) selectively into the tumor through leaky tumor-associated vasculature. However, the corresponding prolonged retention of the nanocarrier in the bloodstream may lead to unfavorable photochemical damage to normal tissues such as skin. Here, we report an organic-inorganic hybrid nanocarrier with a pH-responsive on/off switch of PDT efficacy. This hybrid nanocarrier is constructed by hydrothermal synthesis after simple mixing of calcium/phosphate ions, chlorin e6 (amphiphilic low molecular weight PS), and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(aspartic acid) (PEG-PAsp) copolymers in an aqueous solution. The hybrid nanocarrier possesses a calcium phosphate (CaP) core encapsulating the PSs, which is surrounded by a PEG shielding layer. Under physiological conditions (pH 7.4), the nanocarrier suppressed the photochemical activity of PS by lowering the access of oxygen molecules to the incorporated PS, while PDT efficacy was restored in a pH-responsive manner because of the dissolution of CaP and eventual recovery of access between the oxygen and the PS. Owing to this switch, the nanocarrier reduced the photochemical damage in the bloodstream, while it induced effective PDT efficacy inside the tumor cell in response to the acidic conditions of the endo-/lysosomes. PMID:26971562

  17. Evaluating soil organic carbon and nutrient storage in a sustainable forest chestnut management context

    OpenAIRE

    Patrício, Maria do Sameiro; Nunes, Luís; Pereira, Ermelinda

    2013-01-01

    Forests fix carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sequester it in biomass, timber products and soils (stock effect). Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the major stock of the terrestrial biosphere with great importance for the balance of carbon at the global scale. Nowadays, a reliable estimate of the stored C, in the mineral soil pool of forest ecosystems, is of great importance in helping Governments to make decisions in carrying out the Kyoto Protocol. In this study the quantification of C and ...

  18. The potential impact of climate change on Australia's soil organic carbon resources

    OpenAIRE

    Hennessy Kevin; Post Wilfred M; Grace Peter R

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Soil organic carbon (SOC) represents a significant pool of carbon within the biosphere. Climatic shifts in temperature and precipitation have a major influence on the decomposition and amount of SOC stored within an ecosystem and that released into the atmosphere. We have linked net primary production (NPP) algorithms, which include the impact of enhanced atmospheric CO2 on plant growth, to the SOCRATES terrestrial carbon model to estimate changes in SOC for the Australia ...

  19. Molecular DYNAmics of Soil Organic carbon (DYNAMOS ): a project focusing on soils and carbon through data and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Millan, Mercedes

    2010-05-01

    Here we present the first results of the DynaMOS project whose main issue is the build-up of a new generation of soil carbon model. The modeling will describe together soil organic geochemistry and soil carbon dynamics in a generalized, quantitative representation. The carbon dynamics time scale envisaged here will cover the 1 to 1000 yr range and describe molecule behaviours (i.e.)carbohydrate, peptide, amino acid, lignin, lipids, their products of biodegradation and uncharacterized carbonaceous species of biological origin. Three main characteristics define DYNAMOS model originalities: it will consider organic matter at the molecular scale, integrate back to global scale and account for component vertical movements. In a first step, specific data acquisition will concern the production, fate and age of carbon of individual organic compounds. Dynamic parameters will be acquired by compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of both 13C and 14C, by GC/C/IR-MS and AMS. Sites for data acquisition, model calibration and model validation will be chosen on the base of their isotopic history and environmental constraints: 13C natural labeling (with and without C3/C4 vegetation changes), 13C/15N-labelled litter application in both forest and cropland. They include some long-term experiments owned by the partners themselves plus a worldwide panel of sites. In a second step the depth distribution of organic species, isotopes and ages in soils (1D representation) will be modeled by coupling carbon dynamics and vertical movement. Besides the main objective of providing a robust soil carbon dynamics model, DYNAMOS will assess and model the alteration of the isotopic signature of molecules throughout decay and create a shared database of both already published and new data of compound specific information. Issues of the project will concern different scientific fields: global geochemical cycles by refining the description of the terrestrial carbon cycle and entering the chemical

  20. Assessment of soil organic carbon stocks under future climate and land cover changes in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigini, Yusuf; Panagos, Panos

    2016-07-01

    Soil organic carbon plays an important role in the carbon cycling of terrestrial ecosystems, variations in soil organic carbon stocks are very important for the ecosystem. In this study, a geostatistical model was used for predicting current and future soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in Europe. The first phase of the study predicts current soil organic carbon content by using stepwise multiple linear regression and ordinary kriging and the second phase of the study projects the soil organic carbon to the near future (2050) by using a set of environmental predictors. We demonstrate here an approach to predict present and future soil organic carbon stocks by using climate, land cover, terrain and soil data and their projections. The covariates were selected for their role in the carbon cycle and their availability for the future model. The regression-kriging as a base model is predicting current SOC stocks in Europe by using a set of covariates and dense SOC measurements coming from LUCAS Soil Database. The base model delivers coefficients for each of the covariates to the future model. The overall model produced soil organic carbon maps which reflect the present and the future predictions (2050) based on climate and land cover projections. The data of the present climate conditions (long-term average (1950-2000)) and the future projections for 2050 were obtained from WorldClim data portal. The future climate projections are the recent climate projections mentioned in the Fifth Assessment IPCC report. These projections were extracted from the global climate models (GCMs) for four representative concentration pathways (RCPs). The results suggest an overall increase in SOC stocks by 2050 in Europe (EU26) under all climate and land cover scenarios, but the extent of the increase varies between the climate model and emissions scenarios. PMID:27082446

  1. Effects of Rice Straw and Its Biochar Addition on Soil Labile Carbon and Soil Organic Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yun-feng; HE Xin-hua; GAO Ren; MA Hong-liang; YANG Yu-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Whether the biochar amendment could affect soil organic matter (SOM) turnover and hence soil carbon (C) stock remains poorly understood. Effects of the addition of 13C-labelled rice straw or its pyrolysed biochar at 250 or 350°C to a sugarcane soil (Ferrosol) on soil labile C (dissolved organic C, DOC;microbial biomass C, MBC;and mineralizable C, MC) and soil organic C (SOC) were investigated after 112 d of laboratory incubation at 25°C. Four treatments were examined as (1) the control soil without amendment (Soil);(2) soil plus 13C-labelled rice straw (Soil+Straw);(3) soil plus 250°C biochar (Soil+B250) and (4) soil plus 350°C biochar (Soil+B350). Compared to un-pyrolysed straw, biochars generally had an increased aryl C, carboxyl C, C and nitrogen concentrations, a decreased O-alkyl C and C:N ratio, but similar alkyl C and d13C (1 742-1 877‰). Among treatments, signiifcant higher DOC, MBC and MC derived from the new C (straw or biochar) ranked as Soil+Straw>Soil+B250>Soil+B350, whilst signiifcant higher SOC from the new C as Soil+B250>Soil+Straw≈Soil+B350. Compared to Soil, DOC and MBC derived from the native soil were decreased under straw or biochar addition, whilst MC from the native soil was increased under straw addition but decreased under biochar addition. Meanwhile, native SOC was similar among the treatments, irrespective of the straw or biochar addition. Compared to Soil, signiifcant higher total DOC and total MBC were under Soil+Straw, but not under Soil+B250 and Soil+B350, whilst signiifcant higher total MC and total SOC were under straw or biochar addition, except for MC under Soil+B350. Our results demonstrated that the application of biochar to soil may be an appropriate management practice for increasing soil C storage.

  2. Decadal carbon discharge by a mountain stream is dominated by coarse organic matter

    OpenAIRE

    Turowski, Jens M; Hilton, Robert G; Sparkes, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Rapid erosion in mountain forests results in high rates of biospheric particulate organic carbon (POC) export by rivers, which can contribute to atmospheric carbon dioxide drawdown. However, coarse POC (CPOC) carried by particles >∼1 mm is rarely quantified. In a forested pre-Alpine catchment, we measured CPOC transport rates and found that they increase more rapidly with water discharge than fine POC (

  3. Tracing organic matter sources of estuarine tidal flat nematodes with stable carbon isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moens, T.; Luyten, C.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Vincx, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present study explores the use of stable carbon isotopes to trace organic matter sources of intertidal nematodes in the Schelde estuary (SW Netherlands). Stable carbon isotope signatures of nematodes from a saltmarsh and 4 tidal flat stations were determined in spring and winter situations, and

  4. EPIC modeling of soil organic carbon sequestration in croplands of Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural lands can mitigate detrimental effects of greenhouse gases because soils can be managed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and sequester carbon in soil organic matter. Simulation models are useful tools for studying the long-term impacts of crop and soil management practices on soil org...

  5. Impacts of management practices on soil organic carbon in degraded alpine meadows on the Tibetan Plateau

    OpenAIRE

    X. F. Chang; Wang, S.P.; X. X. ZHU; Cui, S. J.; Luo, C. Y.; Zhang, Z. H.; A. Wilkes

    2014-01-01

    Grassland soil organic carbon (SOC) is sensitive to anthropogenic activities. Increased anthropogenic disturbance related to overgrazing has led to widespread alpine grassland degradation on the Tibetan Plateau. The degraded grasslands are considered to have great potential for carbon sequestration after adoption of improved management practices. Here, we calibrated and employed the Century model to investigate the effects of overgrazing and improved managem...

  6. Self-assembly and Self-organization Processes of Carbon Nanotubes in the Colloidal Systems

    OpenAIRE

    A.P. Kuzmenko; Thet Phyo Naing; Myo Min Than; Chan Nyein Aung; M.B. Dobromyslov; S.G. Emelyanov; L.M. Chervyakov

    2015-01-01

    The features and patterns of self-organization processes in the diffusion-limited conditions (method of drops) of carbon-containing compounds and carbon nanotubes have been studied. The results of the research influence of the substrate temperature and solvent on the formation of nanoscale fractal structures in sediments of colloidal solutions are provided.

  7. Self-assembly and Self-organization Processes of Carbon Nanotubes in the Colloidal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Kuzmenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The features and patterns of self-organization processes in the diffusion-limited conditions (method of drops of carbon-containing compounds and carbon nanotubes have been studied. The results of the research influence of the substrate temperature and solvent on the formation of nanoscale fractal structures in sediments of colloidal solutions are provided.

  8. Organic carbon concentration profiles in recent cave sediments: records of agricultural pollution or diagenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrell, S H

    1996-01-01

    Recent (<7 years old) cave sediments in Speedwell Cavern, Derbyshire, show an approximately exponential decay of organic carbon with depth. This phenomenon was thought to be due to one of two causes: (i) changing agricultural practice within the catchment feeding the cave, especially the increased use of sewage sludge and animal slurry as fertilizer; (ii) a relatively constant organic carbon concentration over time in the input sediment, with subsequent carbon mineralization during diagenesis. Carbon isotope composition of the organic material and the evolution of H/C ratio with depth indicate that the latter hypothesis is correct and that the profiles result from microbial diagenesis, not increased organic carbon inputs. By comparison with sediment of known (7 years) age, temporal decay constants for organic matter can be derived; these lie between rates previously determined for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments and soils. The H/C ratio of organic matter can be modelled as a function of time and proceeds in a similar fashion to soil organic material. PMID:15091425

  9. Evaluation of a 2-step thermal method for separating organic and elemental carbon for radiocarbon analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dusek, U.; M. Monaco; Prokopiou, M.; F. Gongriep; R. Hitzenberger; Meijer, H.A.J.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-01-01

    We thoroughly characterized a system for thermal separation of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) for subsequent radiocarbon analysis. Different organic compounds as well as ambient aerosol filter samples were introduced into an oven system and combusted to CO2 in pure O2. The main objective was to test which combustion times and temperatures are best suited to separate OC and EC. The final separation step for OC was combustion ...

  10. Molecular, radioactive and stable carbon isotope characterization of estuarine particulate organic matter

    OpenAIRE

    Megens, L.; van der Plicht, J.; De Leeuw, JW; Leeuw, Jan W. de; Mook, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    Organic matter in sediments and suspended matter is a complex mixture of constituents with different histories, sources and stabilities. To study these components in a suspended matter sample from the Ems-Dollard Estuary, we used combined molecular analysis with pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stable and radioactive carbon isotope analyses of the bulk and separated chemical fractions. Carbohydrates and proteins, ca. 50% of the total organic carbon (TOC), are much younger th...

  11. Organic carbon source and burial during the past one hundred years in Jiaozhou Bay, North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; SONG Jinming

    2008-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and 210Pb in core sediment were measured to quantify the burial of organic carbon and the relative importance of allochthonous and autochthonous contributions during the past one hundred years in Jiaozhou Bay, North China. The core sediment was dated using 210Pb chronology, which is the most promising method for estimation of sedimentation rate on a time scale of 100-150 years. The variation of the burial flux of organic carbon in the past one hundred years can be divided into the following three stages: (1) relatively steady before 1980s; (2) increasing rapidly from the 1980s to a peak in the 1990s, and (3) decreasing from the 1990s to the present. The change is consistent with the amount of solid waste and sewage emptied into the bay. The OC:TN ratio was used to evaluate the source of organic carbon in the Jiaozhou Bay sediment. In the inner bay and bay mouth, the organic carbon was the main contributor from terrestrial sources, whereas only about half of organic carbon was contributed from terrestrial source in the outer bay. In the inner bay, the terrestrial source of organic carbon showed a steady change with an increase in the range of 69%-77% before 1990 to 93% in 2000, and then decreased from 2000 because of the decrease in the terrestrial input. In the bay mouth, the percentage of organic carbon from land reached the highest value with 94% in 1994. In the outer bay, the sediment source maintained steady for the past one hundred years.

  12. Land-cover effects on soil organic carbon stocks in a European city

    OpenAIRE

    Edmondson, Jill L.; Davies, Zoe G; McCormack, Sarah A.; Gaston, Kevin J.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Soil is the vital foundation of terrestrial ecosystems storing water, nutrients, and almost three-quarters of the organic carbon stocks of the Earth's biomes. Soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks vary with land-cover and land-use change, with significant losses occurring through disturbance and cultivation. Although urbanisation is a growing contributor to land-use change globally, the effects of urban land-cover types on SOC stocks have not been studied for densely built cities. Additionally, th...

  13. The percentage of living bacterial cells related to organic carbon release from senescent oceanic phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    S. Lasternas; S. Agustí

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria recycle vast amounts of organic carbon, playing key biogeochemical and ecological roles in the ocean. Bacterioplankton dynamics are expected to be dependent on phytoplankton primary production, but there is a high diversity of processes (e.g., sloppy feeding, cell exudation, viral lysis) involved in the transfer of primary production to dissolved organic carbon available to bacteria. Here, we show the percentage of living heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the subtro...

  14. Organic amendments' dissolved organic carbon influences bioavailability of agricultural soil DOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straathof, Angela L.; Chincarini, Riccardo; Hoffland, Ellis; Comans, Rob N. J.

    2013-04-01

    Agricultural soils benefit from additions of organic amendments because they improve soil structure, are a source of plant nutrients, and increase concentrations of soil organic carbon (SOC). The latter fuels microbial processes important for plant growth, including nutrient mineralization and the suppression of plant diseases. However, these amendment additions range in quality and quantity of C and little is known about how their properties interact with native soil C and affect turnover. The dissolved pool of SOC (DOC) may be the most important C source for these processes as it is more biologically available and thus relatively easily turned over by the soil microbial biomass. Using a rapid-batch DOC fractionation procedure, we studied the composition of different organic amendments' DOC pools and measured how their additions change the quantity and turnover of soil DOC. Fractions isolated and quantified with this procedure include humic and fulvic acids, hydrophobic neutral and hydrophilic compounds. We hypothesized that these range from biologically recalcitrant to readily available, respectively. Amendments analysed included composts of different source materials and maturation stages collected from two different compost facilities in the Netherlands. Both total DOC concentrations and proportions of the aforementioned fractions ranged highly between composts. Composts cured for >10 days had a lower proportion of hydrophilic C compounds, suggesting that these are the most bioavailable and released as CO2 via microbial activity during maturation. To measure the effects of compost DOC on soil DOC, we extracted the former and added it to a sandy soil in an incubation experiment. The amendment increased soil total DOC, CO2 production from the soil, and the pools of humic and fulvic acids as a proportion of total DOC. Turnover of C from the incubated soil was measured by substrate-induced CO2 production (an indicator of microbial activity) from a 96-well

  15. Absorption features of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and tracing implication for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in Changjiang Estuary, China

    OpenAIRE

    X. Y. Zhang; Chen, X.; Deng, H.; Du, Y; Jin, H. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) represents the light absorbing fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Studies have shown that the optical properties of CDOM can be used to infer the distribution and diffusion characteristics of DOC in the estuary and coastal zone. The inversion of DOC concentrations from remote sensing has been implemented in certain regions. In this study we investigate the potential of tracing DOC from CDOM by the measure...

  16. Chemical attributes, total organic carbon stock and humified fractions of organic matter soil submitted to different systems of sugarcane management

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Sérgio Rosset; Jolimar Antonio Schiavo; Ricardo Augusto Rezende Atanázio

    2014-01-01

    Mechanized harvesting maintenance of trash from cane sugar and soil application of waste as vinasse and filter cake can improve the system of crop yield. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the changes in the chemical, the stock of total organic carbon and humified organic matter fractions in an Oxisol cultivated with cane sugar with the following management systems: with sugarcane vinasse application (CCV), without application of burnt cane waste (CQS), with burnt cane vinasse application (CQ...

  17. The carbon copy of human activities : how long-term land use explains spatial variability of soil organic carbon stocks at multiple scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulp, C.J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Invloed van landgebruik, landgebruik-geschiedenis en management op de koolstofvoorraad in de bodem in Nederland.The carbon copy of human activities - how long-term land use explains spatial variability of soil organic carbon stocks at multiple scales.

  18. Nanosized Carbon Dots from Organic Matter and Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuanyuan; CHEN Tong; MA Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanoparticles (C-dots) were prepared by relfuxing the combustion soots of candles and corn stalk in nitric acid. The synthesized C-dots were characterized. The results showed a sharp increase in oxygen content and a sharp decrease in carbon content after oxidation. The C-dots had -OH and -CO2H groups introduced which made them hydrophilic. However, their difference was also obvious. The C-dots from candle soot had a 10-45 nm broad particle size distribution, and those from corn stalk soot had a 6-18 nm relatively small and narrow size distribution. The C-dots were mainly ofsp2 andsp3 carbon structure different from the C-dots of diamond-like structure from candle soot. Interestingly, two kinds of C-dots all exhibited unique photoluminescent properties. The obtained C-dots have potential applications in a broad range of areas.

  19. Symmetric organization of self-assembled carbon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for creating 'flower-like' nanostructures of carbon nitride is described that involves the self-assembly of nanocrystals following laser ablation of a solid graphite target immersed in aqueous ammonia solution. The primary nanocrystals possess rod-like symmetry, and then self-assemble upon drying to form nanoleaf or nanopetal shaped structures. Samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The analyses confirmed their composition to be consistent with that of crystalline β-phase carbon nitride. The morphologies of the carbon nitride nanostructures depended strongly on the synthesis conditions and upon the conditions under which the aqueous suspension of ablated particles were dried

  20. Evidence for the assimilation of ancient glacier organic carbon in a proglacial stream food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellman, Jason; Hood, Eran; Raymond, Peter A.; Hudson, J.H.; Bozeman, Maura; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.

    2015-01-01

    We used natural abundance δ13C, δ15N, and Δ14C to compare trophic linkages between potential carbon sources (leaf litter, epilithic biofilm, and particulate organic matter) and consumers (aquatic macroinvertebrates and fish) in a nonglacial stream and two reaches of the heavily glaciated Herbert River. We tested the hypothesis that proglacial stream food webs are sustained by organic carbon released from glacial ecosystems. Carbon sources and consumers in the nonglacial stream had carbon isotope values that ranged from -30‰ to -25‰ for δ13C and from -14‰ to 53‰ for Δ14C reflecting a food web sustained mainly on contemporary primary production. In contrast, biofilm in the two glacial stream sites was highly Δ14C-depleted (-215‰ to 175‰) relative to the nonglacial stream consistent with the assimilation of ancient glacier organic carbon. IsoSource modeling showed that in upper Herbert River, macroinvertebrates (Δ14C = -171‰ to 22‰) and juvenile salmonids (Δ14C = −102‰ to 17‰) reflected a feeding history of both biofilm (~ 56%) and leaf litter (~ 40%). We estimate that in upper Herbert River on average 36% of the carbon incorporated into consumer biomass is derived from the glacier ecosystem. Thus, 14C-depleted glacial organic carbon was likely transferred to higher trophic levels through a feeding history of bacterial uptake of dissolved organic carbon and subsequent consumption of 14C-depleted biofilm by invertebrates and ultimately fish. Our findings show that the metazoan food web is sustained in part by glacial organic carbon such that future changes in glacial runoff could influence the stability and trophic structure of proglacial aquatic ecosystems.