WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbonate particles coated

  1. Fluidized bed reactor for working up carbon coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschollek, M.; Simon, W.; Walter, C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor is described for working up carbon coated particles, particularly nuclear fuel particles or fertile material particles consisting essentially of a cylindrical portion connected to a conical portion. Gas supply pipes, gas distribution space and gas distribution heads are provided within the conical reactor lower portion, the gas distribution members being arranged in at least two superimposed planes and distributed symmetrically over the cross-section of the reactor

  2. Pt coating on flame-generated carbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Dae; Lee, Dong Geun

    2008-01-01

    Carbon black, activated carbon and carbon nanotube have been used as supporting materials for precious metal catalysts used in fuel cell electrodes. One-step flame synthesis method is used to coat 2-5nm Pt dots on flame-generated carbon particles. By adjusting flame temperature, gas flow rates and resident time of particles in flame, we can obtain Pt/C nano catalyst-support composite particles. Additional injection of hydrogen gas facilitates pyrolysis of Pt precursor in flame. The size of as-incepted Pt dots increases along the flame due to longer resident time and sintering in high temperature flame. Surface coverage and dispersion of the Pt dots is varied at different sampling heights and confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive Spectra (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Crystallinity and surface bonding groups of carbon are investigated through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscoy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy

  3. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  4. Fluidized bed reactor for processing particles coated with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschollek, M.; Simon, W.; Walter, C.

    1978-01-01

    The carbon coating of production returns of these particles first has to be removed before the heavy metal core released can be reprocessed. For reasons of criticality, removal of burnt-up particles downwards must be possible in the fluidized bed reactor even if the reactor diameter is greater than 800 mm, and the material temperatures must not exceed 650 0 C. It consists of an upper cylindrical and a lower conical part, where, according to the invention, the gas distributor heads in the conical part are situated in several planes above one another for the fluidisation and combustion gas and where they are evently distributed over the reactor crossection, so that an even flow profile is achieved over the reactor cross section. (HP) [de

  5. Mechanical Properties and Structures of Pyrolytic Carbon Coating Layer in HTR Coated Particle Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Woong Ki; Cho, Moon Sung

    2009-01-01

    The TRISO(tri-isotropic)-coated fuel particle for a HTR(High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor) has a diameter of about 1 mm, composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and four different outer coating layers, consisting of a buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon) layer, inner PyC layer, SiC layer, and outer PyC layer with different coating thicknesses following a specific fuel design. While the fuel kernel is a source for a heat generation by a nuclear fission of fissile uranium, each of the four coating layers acts as a different role in view of retaining the generated fission products and the other interactions during an in-reactor service. Among these coating layers, PyC properties are scarcely in agreement among various investigators and the dependency of their changes upon the deposition condition is comparatively large due to their additional anisotropic properties. Although a recent review work has contributed to an establishment of relationship between the material properties and QC measurements, the data on the mechanical properties and structural parameters of PyC coating layers remain still unclearly evaluated. A review work on dimensional changes of PyC by neutron irradiation was one of re-evaluative works recently attempted by the authors. In this work, an attempt was made to analyze and re-evaluate the existing data of the experimental results of the mechanical properties, i.e., Young's modulus and fracture stress, in relation with the coating conditions, density and the BAF (Bacon Anisotropy Factor), an important structural parameter, of PyC coating layers obtained from various experiments performed in the early periods of the HTR coated particle development

  6. Fuel particle coating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Wagner, P.; Wahman, L.A.; White, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Development of coating on nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Fuels Technology program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory included process studies for low-density porous and high-density isotropic carbon coats, and for ZrC and ''alloy'' C/ZrC coats. This report documents the data generated by these studies

  7. Superparamagnetism in carbon-coated Co particles produced by the Kratschmer carbon arc process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, M. E.; Majetich, S. A.; Artman, J. O.; Degraef, M.; Staley, S. W.

    1994-04-01

    A process based on the Kratschmer-Huffman carbon arc method of preparing fullerenes has been used to generate carbon-coated cobalt and cobalt carbide nanocrystallites. Magnetic nanocrystallites are extracted from the soot with a gradient field technique. For Co/C composites, structural characterization by x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of a fcc Co phase, graphite, and a minority Co2C phase. The majority of Co nanocrystals exists as nominally spherical particles, 0.5-5 nm in radius. Hysteretic and temperature-dependent magnetic response, in randomly and magnetically aligned powder samples frozen in epoxy reveals fine-particle magnetism associated with monodomain Co particles. The magnetization exhibits a unique functional dependence on H/T, and hysteresis below a blocking temperature, TB~=160 K. Below TB, the temperature dependence of the coercivity is given by Hc=Hci[1-(T/TB)1/2], with Hci~=450 Oe.

  8. Metallic conductivity transition of carbon nanotube yarns coated with silver particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Daohong; Zhang, Yunhe; Miao, Menghe

    2014-01-01

    Dry spun carbon nanotube yarns made from vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube forests possess high mechanical strength and behave like semiconductors with electrical conductivity of the order of 4 × 10 4 S m −1 . Coating a submicron-thick film of silver particle-filled polymer on the surface increased the electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotube yarn by 60-fold without significantly sacrificing its mechanical strength. The transitional characteristics of the silver-coated carbon nanotube yarn were investigated by varying the take-up ratio of the silver coating. A step change in conductivity was observed when the silver content in the coated yarn was between 7 and 10 wt% as a result of the formation of connected silver particle networks on the carbon nanotube yarn surface. (papers)

  9. Formation of secondary organic aerosol coating on black carbon particles near vehicular emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Chen, Chia-Li; Liu, Jun; Price, Derek J.; Betha, Raghu; Russell, Lynn M.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) emitted from incomplete combustion can result in significant impacts on air quality and climate. Understanding the mixing state of ambient BC and the chemical characteristics of its associated coatings is particularly important to evaluate BC fate and environmental impacts. In this study, we investigate the formation of organic coatings on BC particles in an urban environment (Fontana, California) under hot and dry conditions using a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated in a configuration that can exclusively detect refractory BC (rBC) particles and their coatings. Using the -log(NOx / NOy) ratio as a proxy for photochemical age of air masses, substantial formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) coatings on rBC particles was observed due to active photochemistry in the afternoon, whereas primary organic aerosol (POA) components were strongly associated with rBC from fresh vehicular emissions in the morning rush hours. There is also evidence that cooking-related organic aerosols were externally mixed from rBC. Positive matrix factorization and elemental analysis illustrate that most of the observed SOA coatings were freshly formed, providing an opportunity to examine SOA coating formation on rBCs near vehicular emissions. Approximately 7-20 wt % of secondary organic and inorganic species were estimated to be internally mixed with rBC on average, implying that rBC is unlikely the major condensation sink of SOA in this study. Comparison of our results to a co-located standard high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measurement suggests that at least a portion of SOA materials condensed on rBC surfaces were chemically different from oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) particles that were externally mixed with rBC, although they could both be generated from local photochemistry.

  10. Coated particle waste form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oma, K.H.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Chick, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Coated particle waste forms have been developed as part of the multibarrier concept at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the Alternative Waste Forms Program for the Department of Energy. Primary efforts were to coat simulated nuclear waste glass marbles and ceramic pellets with low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings via the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Fluidized bed (FB) coaters, screw agitated coaters (SAC), and rotating tube coaters were used. Coating temperatures were reduced by using catalysts and plasma activation. In general, the LT-PyC coatings did not provide the expected high leach resistance as previously measured for carbon alone. The coatings were friable and often spalled off the substrate. A totally different concept, thermal spray coating, was investigated at PNL as an alternative to CVD coating. Flame spray, wire gun, and plasma gun systems were evaluated using glass, ceramic, and metallic coating materials. Metal plasma spray coatings (Al, Sn, Zn, Pb) provided a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in chemical durability. Because the aluminum coatings were porous, the superior leach resistance must be due to either a chemical interaction or to a pH buffer effect. Because they are complex, coated waste form processes rank low in process feasibility. Of all the possible coated particle processes, plasma sprayed marbles have the best rating. Carbon coating of pellets by CVD ranked ninth when compared with ten other processes. The plasma-spray-coated marble process ranked sixth out of eleven processes

  11. Index of refraction enhancement of calcite particles coated with zinc carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattaud, Kathleen; Vilminot, Serge; Hirlimann, Charles; Parant, Hubert; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    ZnCO 3 coating on calcite particles has been developed in order to enhance the index of refraction of this mineral that is used as a charge in paper, paint and polymer industries. Chemical reaction between calcite particles in an aqueous suspension with zinc chloride promotes the formation of a ZnCO 3 coating consisting of two layers with different interactions with the calcite particle. The refraction index of the resulting composite particles increases with the Zn/Ca ratio. A model allows to evaluate the coating thickness. The value of the scattering S and diffusion K coefficients of sheets coated with the ZnCO 3 coated particles reveal a dependence on the preparation conditions with a 15% increase for the best samples.

  12. Low Secondary Electron Yield Carbon Coatings for Electron-cloud Mitigation in Modern Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Calatroni, Sergio; Chiggiato, Paolo; Costa Pinto, Pedro; Marques, Hugo; Neupert, Holger; Taborelli, Mauro; Vollenberg, Wilhelmus; Wevers, Ivo; Yaqub, Kashif

    2010-01-01

    Electron-cloud is one of the main limitations for particle accelerators with positively charged beams of high intensity and short bunch spacing, as the SPS at CERN. The Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of the inner surface of the vacuum chamber is the main parameter governing the phenomenon. The effect could be eliminated by coating the vacuum chambers with a material of low SEY, which does not require bake-out and is robust against air exposure. For such a purpose amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings were produced by magnetron sputtering of graphite targets. They exhibit maximum SEY between 0.95 and 1.05 after air transfer to the measuring instrument. After 1 month of air exposure the SEY rises by 10 - 20 % of the initial values. Storage in desiccator or by packaging in Al foil makes this increase negligible. The coatings have a similar X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) C1s spectrum for a large set of deposition parameters and exhibit an enlarged linewidth compared to HOPG graphite. The static outgassing witho...

  13. Synthesis and electrochemical performances of amorphous carbon-coated Sn Sb particles as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Tian, Wenhuai; Liu, Xiaohe; Yang, Rong; Li, Xingguo

    2007-12-01

    The amorphous carbon coating on the Sn-Sb particles was prepared from aqueous glucose solutions using a hydrothermal method. Because the outer layer carbon of composite materials is loose cotton-like and porous-like, it can accommodate the expansion and contraction of active materials to maintain the stability of the structure, and hinder effectively the aggregation of nano-sized alloy particles. The as-prepared composite materials show much improved electrochemical performances as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries compared with Sn-Sb alloy and carbon alone. This amorphous carbon-coated Sn-Sb particle is extremely promising anode materials for lithium secondary batteries and has a high potentiality in the future use.

  14. Anti-corrosive Effects of Multi-Walled Carbon Nano Tube and Zinc Particle Shapes on Zinc Ethyl Silicate Coated Carbon Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, JiMan; Shon, MinYoung; Kwak, SamTak [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Zinc ethyl silicate coatings containing multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared, to which we added spherical and flake shaped zinc particles. The anti-corrosive effects of MWCNTs and zinc shapes on the zinc ethyl silicate coated carbon steel was examined, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and corrosion potential measurement. The results of EIS and corrosion potential measurement showed that the zinc ethyl silicate coated with flake shaped zinc particles and MWCNT showed lesser protection to corrosion. These outcomes were in agreement with previous results of corrosion potential and corrosion occurrence.

  15. Quantitative chemical method for the determination of the disordered carbon component in pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfrum, E.A.; Nickel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical behavior of the surface of pyrocarbon (PyC) coatings of nuclear fuel particles was investigated in aqueous suspension by reaction with oxygen at room temperature. The concentration of the disordered material component, which has a large internal surface, can be identified by means of a pH change. Using this fact, a chemical method was developed that can be used for the quantitative determination of the concentration of this carbon component in the PyC coating

  16. Utilization of calcium carbonate particles from eggshell waste as coating pigments for ink-jet printing paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sukjoon; Hsieh, Jeffery S; Zou, Peter; Kokoszka, John

    2009-12-01

    The effective treatment and utilization of biowaste have been emphasized in our society for environmental and economic concerns. Recently, the eggshell waste in the poultry industry has been highlighted because of its reclamation potential. This study presents an economical treatment process to recover useful bioproducts from eggshell waste and their utilization in commercial products. We developed the dissolved air floatation (DAF) separation unit, which successfully recovered 96% of eggshell membrane and 99% of eggshell calcium carbonate (ECC) particles from eggshell waste within 2 h of operation. The recovered ECC particles were utilized as coating pigments for ink-jet printing paper and their impact on the ink density and paper gloss were investigated. The addition of the ECC particles as coating pigments enhances the optical density of cyan, magenta and yellow inks while decreasing the black ink density and the gloss of the coated paper.

  17. Factors affecting defective fraction of biso-coated HTGR fuel particles during in-block carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputo, A.J.; Johnson, D.R.; Bayne, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of Biso-coated thoria fuel particles during the in-block processing step of HTGR fuel element refabrication was evaluated. The effect of various process variables (heating rate, particle crushing strength, horizontal and/or vertical position in the fuel element blocks, and fuel hole permeability) on pitch coke yield, defective fraction of fuel particles, matrix structure, and matrix porosity was evaluated. Of the variables tested, only heating rate had a significant effect on pitch coke yield while both heating rate and particle crushing strength had a significant effect on defective fraction of fuel particles

  18. Coated particles for lithium battery cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Pratt, Russell Clayton; Mullin, Scott Allen; Wang, Xiao-Liang

    2017-07-18

    Particles of cathodic materials are coated with polymer to prevent direct contact between the particles and the surrounding electrolyte. The polymers are held in place either by a) growing the polymers from initiators covalently bound to the particle, b) attachment of the already-formed polymers by covalently linking to functional groups attached to the particle, or c) electrostatic interactions resulting from incorporation of cationic or anionic groups in the polymer chain. Carbon or ceramic coatings may first be formed on the surfaces of the particles before the particles are coated with polymer. The polymer coating is both electronically and ionically conductive.

  19. Charged-particle coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Crane, J.K.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Advanced target designs require thicker (approx. 300 μm) coatings and better surface finishes that can be produced with current coating techniques. An advanced coating technique is proposed to provide maximum control of the coating flux and optimum manipulation of the shell during processing. In this scheme a small beam of ions or particles of known incident energy are collided with a levitated spherical mandrel. Precise control of the incident energy and angle of the deposition flux optimizes the control of the coating morphology while controlled rotation and noncontact support of the shell minimizes the possibility of particulate or damage generated defects. Almost infinite variability of the incident energy and material in this process provides increased flexibility of the target designs which can be physically realized

  20. Surfactant effect on functionalized carbon nanotube coated snowman-like particles and their electro-responsive characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ke; Liu, Ying Dan [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Jin, E-mail: hjchoi@inha.ac.kr [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The core–shell structured snowman-like (SL) microparticles coated by functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) were prepared in the presence of different surfactants including cationic surfactant-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic surfactant-sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS). The effect of surfactants on adsorption onto SL particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity. The cationic surfactant is found to be more effective than anionic surfactant for helping nanotube adsorbed onto microparticle due to the presence of electrostatic interaction between the functionalized MWNT and the surfactant. Furthermore, the MWNT/SL particles dispersed in silicone oil exhibited a typical fibril structure of the electrorheological characteristics under an applied electric field observed by an optical microscope (OM), in which the state of nanotubes wrapped on the particles strongly affects their electro-responsive characteristics.

  1. Surfactant effect on functionalized carbon nanotube coated snowman-like particles and their electro-responsive characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ke; Liu, Ying Dan; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2012-01-01

    The core–shell structured snowman-like (SL) microparticles coated by functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) were prepared in the presence of different surfactants including cationic surfactant-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and anionic surfactant-sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS). The effect of surfactants on adsorption onto SL particles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity. The cationic surfactant is found to be more effective than anionic surfactant for helping nanotube adsorbed onto microparticle due to the presence of electrostatic interaction between the functionalized MWNT and the surfactant. Furthermore, the MWNT/SL particles dispersed in silicone oil exhibited a typical fibril structure of the electrorheological characteristics under an applied electric field observed by an optical microscope (OM), in which the state of nanotubes wrapped on the particles strongly affects their electro-responsive characteristics.

  2. Coated powder for electrolyte matrix for carbonate fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacovangelo, C.D.; Browall, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    A plurality of electrolyte carbonate-coated ceramic particle which does not differ significantly in size from that of the ceramic particle and wherein no significant portion of the ceramic particle is exposed is fabricated into a porous tape comprised of said coated-ceramic particles bonded together by the coating for use in a molten carbonate fuel cell

  3. Intra-particle migration of mercury in granular polysulfide-rubber-coated activated carbon (PSR-AC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Masue-Slowey, Yoko; Fendorf, Scott; Luthy, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    The depth profile of mercuric ion after the reaction with polysulfide-rubber-coated activated carbon (PSR-AC) was investigated using micro-x-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) imaging techniques and mathematical modeling. The μ-XRF results revealed that mercury was concentrated at 0~100 μm from the exterior of the particle after three months of treatment with PSR-AC in 10 ppm HgCl2 aqueous solution. The μ-X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (μ-XANES) analyses indicated HgS as a major mercury species, and suggested that the intra-particle mercury transport involved a chemical reaction with PSR polymer. An intra-particle mass transfer model was developed based on either a Langmuir sorption isotherm with liquid phase diffusion (Langmuir model) or a kinetic sorption with surface diffusion (kinetic sorption model). The Langmuir model predicted the general trend of mercury diffusion, although at a slower rate than observed from the μ-XRF map. A kinetic sorption model suggested faster mercury transport, which overestimated the movement of mercuric ions through an exchange reaction between the fast and slow reaction sites. Both μ-XRF and mathematical modeling results suggest mercury removal occurs not only at the outer surface of the PSR-AC particle but also at some interior regions due to a large PSR surface area within an AC particle. PMID:22133913

  4. Low Secondary Electron Yield Carbon Coatings for Electron Cloud Mitigation in Modern Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Taborelli, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In order to upgrade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance to be oriented towards higher energies and higher intensities in the future, a series of improvements of the existing LHC injectors is planned to take place over the next few years. Electron cloud effects are expected to be enhanced and play a central role in limiting the performance of the machines of the CERN complex. Electron cloud phenomena in beam pipes are based on electron multiplication and can be sufficiently suppressed if the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of the surface of the beam pipes is lower than unity. The goal of this work is to find and study a thin film coating with reliably low initial Secondary Electron Yield (SEY), which does not require bake-out or conditioning in situ with photons, is robust again air exposure and can easily be applied in the beam pipes of accelerators. In this work, amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering for electron cloud mitigation and antimultipactor applicatio...

  5. Synthesis and electrochemical performances of amorphous carbon-coated Sn-Sb particles as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhong; Tian Wenhuai; Liu Xiaohe; Yang Rong; Li Xingguo

    2007-01-01

    The amorphous carbon coating on the Sn-Sb particles was prepared from aqueous glucose solutions using a hydrothermal method. Because the outer layer carbon of composite materials is loose cotton-like and porous-like, it can accommodate the expansion and contraction of active materials to maintain the stability of the structure, and hinder effectively the aggregation of nano-sized alloy particles. The as-prepared composite materials show much improved electrochemical performances as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries compared with Sn-Sb alloy and carbon alone. This amorphous carbon-coated Sn-Sb particle is extremely promising anode materials for lithium secondary batteries and has a high potentiality in the future use. - Graphical abstract: The amorphous carbon coating on the Sn-Sb particles was prepared from aqueous glucose solutions using a hydrothermal method. Because the outer layer carbon of composite materials is loose cotton-like and porous-like, it can accommodate the expansion and contraction of active materials to maintain the stability of the structure, and hinder effectively the aggregation of nano-sized alloy particles

  6. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  7. Fuel particle coating data. [Detailed information on coating runs at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Wagner, P.; Wahman, L.A.; White, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Development of coating on nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Fuels Technology program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory included process studies for low-density porous and high-density isotropic carbon coats, and for ZrC and ''alloy'' C/ZrC coats. This report documents the data generated by these studies.

  8. Procedure for coating articles with pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, C.C.; Allen, C.L.; Besenbruch, G.E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A method to coat articles with pyrolytic carbon is described which is particularly suitable for small nuclear fuel particles as one obtains a very homogeneous layer. The pyrolytic carbon is produced according to the invention by decomposing a hydrocarbon gas mixture composed of an inert gas share (20-65 Vol%) and a mixture of acetylene and propylene. It is favourable to have the hydrocarbon mixture contain between 50 and 55 Vol% acetylene. Variations on the known procedure are given. The coating of spherical thorium dioxide particles is mentioned as an example. (UWI) [de

  9. Facile synthesis of nano cauliflower and nano broccoli like hierarchical superhydrophobic composite coating using PVDF/carbon soot particles via gelation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bichitra Nanda; Balasubramanian, Kandasubramanian

    2014-12-15

    We have elucidated a cost effective fabrication technique to produce superhydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF/DMF/candle soot particle and PVDF/DMF/camphor soot particle composite) porous materials. The water repellent dry composite was formed by the interaction of non-solvent (methanol) into PVDF/carbon soot particles suspension in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). It is seen that longer quenching time effectively changes the surface morphology of dry composites. The nano broccoli like hierarchical microstructure with micro or nano scaled roughen surface was obtained for PVDF/DMF/camphor soot particle, which reveals water contact angle of 172° with roll off angle of 2°. However, composite coating of PVDF/DMF/candle soot particle shows nano cauliflower like hierarchical, which illustrates water contact angle of 169° with roll off angle of 3°. To elucidate the enhancement of water repellent property of PVDF composites, we further divulge the evolution mechanism of nano cauliflower and nano broccoli structure. In order to evaluate the water contact angle of PVDF composites, surface diffusion of water inside the pores is investigated. Furthermore, the addition of small amount of carbon soot particles in composite not only provides the crystallization of PVDF, but also leads to dramatical amendment of surface morphology which increases the surface texture and roughness for superhydrophobicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Silver release from coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.E.; Nabielek, H.

    1977-03-01

    The fission product Ag-110 m released from coated particles can be the dominant source of radioactivity from the core of a high temperature reactor in the early stages of the reactor life and possibly limits the accessability of primary circuit components. It can be shown that silver is retained in oxide fuel by a diffusion process (but not in carbide or carbon-diluted fuel) and that silver is released through all types of pyrocarbon layers. The retention in TRISO particles is variable and seems to be mainly connected with operating temperature and silicon carbide quality. (orig.) [de

  11. Hardened over-coating fuel particle and manufacture of nuclear fuel using its fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimuda, Hideharu.

    1990-01-01

    Coated-fuel particles comprise a coating layer formed by coating ceramics such as silicon carbide or zirconium carbide and carbons, etc. to a fuel core made of nuclear fuel materials. The fuel core generally includes oxide particles such as uranium, thorium and plutonium, having 400 to 600 μm of average grain size. The average grain size of the coated-fuel particle is usually from 800 to 900 μm. The thickness of the coating layer is usually from 150 to 250 μm. Matrix material comprising a powdery graphite and a thermosetting resin such as phenol resin, etc. is overcoated to the surface of the coated-fuel particle and hardened under heating to form a hardened overcoating layer to the coated-fuel particle. If such coated-fuel particles are used, cracks, etc. are less caused to the coating layer of the coated-fuel particles upon production, thereby enabling to prevent the damages to the coating layer. (T.M.)

  12. Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Kostecki, Robert; Wilcox, James; Lau, Grace

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO 4 and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO 4 suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10 -9 S cm -1 ). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures ( 4 , however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density

  13. Method for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles, device for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yung Y

    2015-01-20

    The invention provides a method for dispersing particles within a reaction field, the method comprising confining the particles to the reaction field using a standing wave. The invention also provides a system for coating particles, the system comprising a reaction zone; a means for producing fluidized particles within the reaction zone; a fluid to produce a standing wave within the reaction zone; and a means for introducing coating moieties to the reaction zone. The invention also provides a method for coating particles, the method comprising fluidizing the particles, subjecting the particles to a standing wave; and contacting the subjected particles with a coating moiety.

  14. Influence of nanosized carbon particles on the formation of the structure and properties of microarc ceramic coatings based on aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vityaz', P.A.; Komarov, A.I.; Komarova, V.I.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon-composite material based on a ceramic coating formed on aluminum alloys due to microarc oxidation and nanostructured carbon synthesized by the electric breakdown of liquid hydrocarbon (cyclohexane) is developed. The highest concentration of carbon nanoparticles is recorded in the coating surface coating 30-50 (μm in depth and also near the interface coating - base. It is shown that the nanocarbon introduced in electrolytes enhances the content of high-temperature modifications of aluminum oxide α-Al 2 O 3 by a factor of 3, as compared to the coating resulting in a solution without additives. The latter achieves higher tribomechanical properties - the 1.6-fold increase of microhardness, the multiple growth of wear resistance in the high pressure range (45,60 MPa) with a simultaneous reduction of the coefficient 2-9 times. (authors)

  15. Irradiation behaviors of coated fuel particles, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kashimura, Satoru; Ogawa, Toru; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi

    1981-09-01

    Loose coated fuel particles prepared in confirmity to a preliminary design for the multi-purpose VHTR in fiscal 1972 - 1974 were irradiated by 73F - 12A capsule in JMTR. Main purpose for this irradiation experiment was to examine irradiation stability of the candidate TRISO coated fuel particles for the VHTR. Also the coated particles possessing low-density kernel (90%TD), highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC and ZrC coating layer were loaded with the candidate particles in this capsule. The coated particles were irradiated up to 1.5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 of fast neutron fluence (E > 0.18 MeV) and 3.2% FIMA of burnup. In the post irradiation examination it was observed that among three kinds of TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the normal operating condition of the VHTR ones possessing poor characteristics of the coating layers did not show a good stability. The particles irradiated under abnormally high temperature condition (> 1800 0 C) revealed 6.7% of max. EOL failure fraction (95% confidence limit). Most of these particles were failed by the ameoba effect. Furthermore, among four kinds of the TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the transient condition of the VHTR (--1500 0 C) the two showed a good stability, while the particles possessing highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC or poorly characteristic coating layers were not so good. (author)

  16. Ion Deposited Carbon Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    PAGE ("’hen Dita t,,I,, efl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section No. Title Page No. 1.0 OBJECTIVE 1 2.0 SCOPE 2 3.0 BACKGROUND 3 4.0 COATINGS DEPOSITION 4 4.1...scientific, ards of measure. The Committee, and Confer- technical, practical, and teaching purposes.ence voting members, are leading professional On the

  17. Development of Coated Particle Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, B. G.; Kim, Y. K.

    2009-04-01

    UO 2 kernel fabrication technology was developed at the lab sacle(20∼30g-UO 2 /batch). The GSP technique, modified method of sol-gel process, was used in the preparation of spherical ADU gel particle and these particles were converted to UO 3 and UO 2 phases in calcination furnace and sintering furnace respectively. Based on the process variables optimized using simulant kernels in 1-2 inch beds, SiC TRISO-coated particles were fabricated using UO 2 kernel. Power densities of TRISO coated particle fuels and gamma heat of the tubes are calculated as functions of vertical location of the fuel specimen in the irradiation holes by using core physics codes, MCNP and Helios. A finite model was developed for the calculations of temperatures and stresses of the specimen and the irradiation tubes. Dimensions of the test tubes are determined based on the temperatures and stresses as well as the gamma heat generated at the given condition. 9 modules of the COPA code (MECH, FAIL, TEMTR, TEMBL, TEMPEB, FPREL, MPRO, BURN, ABAQ), the MECH, FAIL, TEMTR, TEMBL, TEMPEB, and FPREL were developed. The COPA-FPREL was verified through IAEA CRP-6 accident benchmarking problems. KAERI participated in the round robin test of IAEA CRP-6 program to characterize the diameter, sphericity, coating thickness, density and anisotropy of coated particles provided by Korea, USA and South Africa. The inspection and test plan describing specifications and inspection method of coated particles was developed to confirm the quality standard of coated particles. The quality inspection instructions were developed for the inspection of coated particles by particle size analyzer, density inspection of coating layers by density gradient column, coating thickness inspection by X-ray, and inspection of optical anistropy factor of PyC layer. The quality control system for the TRISO-coated particle fuel was derived based on the status of quality control systems of other countries

  18. Effect of Coating Parameters of the Buffer Layer on the Shape Ratio of TRISO-Coated Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIm, Weon Ju; Park, Jong Hoon; Park, Ji Yeon; Lee, Young Woo; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    Fuel for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) consists of TRISO-coated particles. Fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) has been applied to fabricate the TRISO-coated fuel particles. The TRISO particles consist of UO 2 microspheres coated with layers of porous pyrolytic carbon (PyC), inner dense PyC (IPyC), SiC, and outer dense PyC (OPyC). The porous PyC coating layer, called the buffer layer, attenuates fission recoils and provides void volume for gaseous fission products and carbon monoxide. The buffer layer, which has the highest coating rate among the coating layers, shows the largest variation of the coating thickness within a particle and a batch. This could be the most plausible source of an asphericity in the TRISO particles. The aspherical particles are expected to have an inferior fuel performance. Miller et al. have predicted that a larger stress is developed within the coating layers and thus the failure probability increases in the particles with high aspect ratios. Therefore, the shape of the TRISO-coated particles should be controlled properly and has been one of the important inspection items for the quality control of the fabrication process. In this paper, we investigated the effect of coating parameters of the buffer layer on the shape of the TRISO particles. The flow rate of coating gas and the coating temperature were varied to control the buffer layer. The asphericity of the TRISO-coated particles was evaluated for the various coating conditions of the buffer layer, but at constant coating parameters for the IPyC/SiC/OPyC layers

  19. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  20. Pyrolytic carbon coatings for nuclear fuels from commercial butane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, I.D.; Abdelhalim, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide and graphite semi-spherical particles (average diameter = 300 um) were coated with pyrolytic carbon at relatively low temperatures (800 to 1200 0 C). The spouting gas was a mixture of commercial butane and nitrogen. The hydrocarbon served as a source for carbon whereas nitrogenated as a diluent and a support for the bed. The total gas flow rate was 3.5 lit/min and the hydrocarbon content varied from 3 to 10%. Coating efficiencies ranging from 4 to 25 percent were obtained. The densities of the coatings varied from 1.25 g/cm 3 (which corresponds to coatings of laminar microstructures) and 1.82 g/cm 3 (which suggests the formation of isotropic coatings. Metallographic examination (using polarized light) of the pyrolytic carbon formed at the experimental conditions indicated the possibility of using the coatings for nuclear fuel applications

  1. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  2. Automatic size analysis of coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallisch, K.; Koss, P.

    1977-01-01

    The determination of the diameter, coating thickness, and sphericity of coated fuel particles by conventional methods is very time consuming. Therefore, statistical data can only be obtained with limited accuracy. An alternative method is described that avoids these disadvantages by utilizing a fast optical data-collecting system of high accuracy. This system allows the determination of the diameter of particles in the range between 100 and 1500 μm, with an accuracy of better than +-2 μm and with a rate of 100 particles per second. The density and thickness of coating layers can be determined by comparing the data obtained before and after coating, taking into account the relative increase of weight. A special device allows the automatic determination of the sphericity of single particles as well as the distribution in a batch. This device measures 50 to 100 different diameters of each particle per second. An on-line computer stores the measured data and calculates all parameters required, e.g., number of particles measured, particle diameter, standard deviation, diameter limiting values, average particle volume, average particle surface area, and the distribution of sphericity in absolute and percent form

  3. TRISO coated fuel particles with enhanced SiC properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Tan, J.; Meadows, P.J.; Marsh, G.; Xiao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The silicon carbide (SiC) layer used for the formation of TRISO coated fuel particles is normally produced at 1500-1650 deg. C via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane in a hydrogen environment. In this work, we show the deposition of SiC coatings with uniform grain size throughout the coating thickness, as opposed to standard coatings which have larger grain sizes in the outer sections of the coating. Furthermore, the use of argon as the fluidizing gas and propylene as a carbon precursor, in addition to hydrogen and methyltrichlorosilane, allowed the deposition of stoichiometric SiC coatings with refined microstructure at 1400 and 1300 deg. C. The deposition of SiC at lower deposition temperatures was also advantageous since the reduced heat treatment was not detrimental to the properties of the inner pyrolytic carbon which generally occurs when SiC is deposited at 1500 deg. C. The use of a chemical vapor deposition coater with four spouts allowed the deposition of uniform and spherical coatings.

  4. Alternative waste form development - low-temperature pyrolytic carbon coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oma, K.H.; Rusin, J.M.; Kidd, R.W.; Browning, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Although several chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - coated waste forms have been successfully produced, some major disadvantages associated with the high-temperature fluidized-bed CVD coating process exist. To overcome these disadvantages, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory has initiated the development of a pyrolytic carbon CVD coating system to coat large waste-form particles at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500/degree/C. This relatively simple system has been used to coat kilogram quantities of simulated waste-glass marbles. Further development of this system could result in a viable process to coat bulk quantities of both glass and ceramic waste forms. This paper discusses various aspects of the development work, including coating techniques, parametric study, and coater equipment. 10 refs

  5. Carbon coating of simulated nuclear-waste material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocher, J.M. Jr.; Browning, M.F.; Kidd, R.W.

    1982-03-01

    The development of low-temperature pyrolytic carbon (LT-PyC) coatings as described in this report was initiated to reduce the release of volatile waste form components and to permit the coating of larger glass marbles that have low temperature softening points (550 to 600 0 C). Fluidized bed coaters for smaller particles ( 2mm) were used. Coating temperatures were reduced from >1000 0 C for conventional CVD high temperature PyC to approx. 500 0 C by using a catalyst. The coating gas combination that produced the highest quality coatings was found to be Ni(CO) 4 as the catalyst, C 2 H 2 as the carbon source gas, and H 2 as a diluent. Carbon deposition was found to be temperature dependent with a maximum rate observed at 530 0 C. Coating rates were typically 6 to 7 μm/hour. The screw-agitated coater approach to coating large-diameter particles was demonstrated to be feasible. Clearances are important between the auger walls and coater to eliminate binding and attrition. Coatings prepared in fluidized bed coaters using similar parameters are better in quality and are deposited at two to three times the rate as in screw-agitated coaters

  6. Irradiation behaviors of coated fuel particles, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kashimura, Satoru; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1980-07-01

    This report is concerning to the irradiation experiments of the coated fuel particles, which were performed by 72F-6A and 72F-7A capsules in JMTR. The coated particles referred to the preliminary design of VHTR were prepared for the experiments in 1972 and 1973. 72F-6A capsule was irradiated at G-10 hole of JMTR fuel zone for 2 reactor cycles, and 72F-7A capsule had been planned to be irradiated at the same irradiation hole before 72F-6A. However, due to slight leak of the gaseous fission products into the vacuum system controlling irradiation temperature, irradiation of 72F-7A capsule was ceased after 85 hrs since the beginning. In the post irradiation examination, inspection to surface appearance, ceramography, X-ray microradiography and acid leaching for the irradiated particle samples were made, and crushing strength of the two particle samples was measured. (author)

  7. Thin Film Coatings for Suppressing Electron Multipacting in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Costa Pinto, P; Chiggiato, P; Neupert, H; Shaposhnikova, E N; Taborelli, M; Vollenberg, W; Yin Vallgren, C

    2011-01-01

    Thin film coatings are an effective way for suppressing electron multipacting in particle accelerators. For bakeable beam pipes, the TiZrV Non Evaporable Getter (NEG) developed at CERN can provide a Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) of 1.1 after activation at 180oC (24h). The coating process was implemented in large scale to coat the long straight sections and the experimental beam pipes for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For non bakeable beam pipes, as those of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), CERN started a campaign to develop a coating having a low SEY without need of in situ heating. Magnetron sputtered carbon thin films have shown SEY of 1 with marginal deterioration when exposed in air for months. This material is now being tested in both laboratory and accelerator environment. At CERN’s SPS, tests with electron cloud monitors attached to carbon coated chambers show no degradation of the coating after two years of operation interleaved with a total of 3 months of air exposure during shutdown periods...

  8. Carbon-coated anatase for water purification - cyclic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, M.; Kojin, F.; Nonaka, M.; Toyoda, M.

    2005-01-01

    It was reported that carbon-coated anatase photo-catalysts were able to be prepared through a simple process and gave various advantages for water purification [1-6]. Carbon coating suppressed the phase transformation from anatase to rutile, resulting in a high crystallinity of anatase phase which was desirable for the decomposition of pollutants in water. A high adsorptivity was given to carbon-coated anatase, because of porous nature of carton layers [7]. In addition, these carbon-coated anatase powders could be fixed on the substrate by using organic binder because carbon layer interrupt the direct contact between photo-catalytic anatase particles and organic binder [1]. In the present work, cyclic performance of carbon-coated anatase was studied for the decomposition of a model pollutant, methylene blue (MB), in water by fixing the photo-catalyst particles on a tape. Carbon-coated anatase photo-catalysts were prepared by heating the powder mixtures of commercially available anatase (ST-01, Ishihara Sngyo Co., Ltd) with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in different mass ratios at 900 C in N 2 , gas flow. Carbon-coated anatase powders thus prepared were fixed on a scotch tape. Photo-catalytic activity was measured on these tapes by irradiating UV rays on one side of the tape in MB solution with 0.3x10 -5 mol/L concentration. Since carbon-coated anatase had a high adsorptivity for MB, all tapes were saturated their adsorption in a concentrated MB solution in advance. The rate constant k for MB photo-decomposition was determined from the linear relations of logarithm of relative concentration of MB in the solution, ln(c/c 0 ), with irradiation time t. In Fig. 1, changes in ln(c/c 0 ) of MB with irradiation time t were shown on two samples with different carbon contents, 8 and 2 mass%, with cycle number. Good linearity was obtained between ln(c/c 0 ) and t. The values of rate constant k calculated from these linear relations were plotted against carbon content of the

  9. Development of coated particle fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moonsung; Kim, B. G.; Kim, D. J.

    2011-06-01

    Ammonia contacting method for prehardenning the surfaces of ADU liquid droplets and the ageing/washing/drying method and equipment for spherical dried-ADU particles were improved and tested with laboratory sacle. After the improvement of fabrication process, the sphericity of UO 2 kernel obtained to 1.1, and the sintered density and O/U ratio of final UO 2 kernel were above 10.60g/cm 3 . 2.01 respectively. Defects of SiC coating layer could be minimized by optimization of gas flow rate. The fracture strength of SiC layer increased from 450 MPa to 530 MPa by controlling the coating defects. An effort was made to develop the fundamental technology for the fuel element compact for use in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor(HTGR) through an establishment of fabrication process, required materials and process equipment as well as performing experiments to identify the basic process conditions and optimize them. Thermal load simulation and verification experiments were carried out for an assesment of the design feasibility of the irradiation rod. Out-of-pile testing of irradiation device such as measurement of pressure drop and vibration, endurance test was performed and the validity of its design was confirmed. A fuel performance analysis code, COPA has been developed to calculate the fuel temperature, the failure fractions of coated fuel particles, the release of fission products. The COPA code can be used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature reactor fuel under the reactor operation, irradiation, heating conditions. KAERI participated in the round robin test of IAEA CRP-6 program to characterize the diameter, sphericity, coating thickness, density and anisotropy of coated particles provided by Korea, USA and South Africa. QC technology was established for TRISO-coated fuel particle. A method for accurate measurement of the optical anisotropy factor for PyC layers of coated particles was developed. Technology and inspection procedures for density

  10. Electromagnetics of active coated nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews the fundamental properties of several spherical and cylindrical active coated nano-particles excited by their respective single and/or multiple sources of radiation at optical frequencies. Particular attention is devoted to the influence of the source location and orientation, t......, the optical gain constant and the nano-particle material composition on the electric and magnetic near fields, the power flow density, the radiated power as well as the directivities. Resonant as well as quasi-transparent states will be emphasized in the discussion.......This work reviews the fundamental properties of several spherical and cylindrical active coated nano-particles excited by their respective single and/or multiple sources of radiation at optical frequencies. Particular attention is devoted to the influence of the source location and orientation...

  11. Coating Thickness Measurement of the Simulated TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles using an Image Plate and a High Resolution Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Yeon Ku; Jeong, Kyung Chai; Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Eom, Sung Ho; Kim, Young Min; Yeo, Sung Hwan; Cho, Moon Sung

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the thickness of the coating layers of 196 coated particles was measured using an Image Plate detector, high resolution scanner and digital image processing techniques. The experimental results are as follows. - An X-ray image was acquired for 196 simulated TRISO-coated fuel particles with ZrO 2 kernel using an Image Plate with high resolution in a reduced amount of time. - We could observe clear boundaries between coating layers for 196 particles. - The geometric distortion error was compensated for the calculation. - The coating thickness of the TRISO-coated fuel particles can be nondestructively measured using X-ray radiography and digital image processing technology. - We can increase the number of TRISO-coated particles to be inspected by increasing the number of Image Plate detectors. A TRISO-coated fuel particle for an HTGR (high temperature gas-cooled reactor) is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The coating layers consist of buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon), inner PyC (I-PyC), SiC, and outer PyC (O-PyC) layer. The coating thickness is measured to evaluate the soundness of the coating layers. X-ray radiography is one of the nondestructive alternatives for measuring the coating thickness without generating a radioactive waste. Several billion particles are subject to be loaded in a reactor. A lot of sample particles should be tested as much as possible. The acquired X-ray images for the measurement of coating thickness have included a small number of particles because of the restricted resolution and size of the X-ray detector. We tried to test many particles for an X-ray exposure to reduce the measurement time. In this experiment, an X-ray image was acquired for 196 simulated TRISO-coated fuel particles using an image plate and high resolution scanner with a pixel size of 25Χ25 μm 2 . The coating thickness for the particles could be measured on the image

  12. Performance of CVD and CVR coated carbon-carbon in high temperature hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. W.; Barletta, R. E.; Svandrlik, J.; Vanier, P. E.

    As a part of the component development process for the particle bed reactor (PBR), it is necessary to develop coatings which will be time and temperature stable at extremely high temperatures in flowing hydrogen. These coatings must protect the underlying carbon structure from attack by the hydrogen coolant. Degradation which causes small changes in the reactor component, e.g. hole diameter in the hot frit, can have a profound effect on operation. The ability of a component to withstand repeated temperature cycles is also a coating development issue. Coatings which crack or spall under these conditions would be unacceptable. While refractory carbides appear to be the coating material of choice for carbon substrates being used in PBR components, the method of applying these coatings can have a large effect on their performance. Two deposition processes for these refractory carbides, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical vapor reaction (CVR), have been evaluated. Screening tests for these coatings consisted of testing of coated 2-D and 3-D weave carbon-carbon in flowing hot hydrogen at one atmosphere. Carbon loss from these samples was measured as a function of time. Exposure temperatures up to 3,000 K were used, and samples were exposed in a cyclical fashion cooling to room temperature between exposures. The results of these measurements are presented along with an evaluation of the relative merits of CVR and CVD coatings for this application.

  13. High temperature oxidation behavior of SiC coating in TRISO coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rongzheng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Kaihong; Liu, Malin; Shao, Youlin; Tang, Chunhe

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High temperature oxidation tests of SiC coating in TRISO particles were carried out. • The dynamic oxidation process was established. • Oxidation mechanisms were proposed. • The existence of silicon oxycarbides at the SiO 2 /SiC interface was demonstrated. • Carbon was detected at the interface at high temperatures and long oxidation time. - Abstract: High temperature oxidation behavior of SiC coatings in tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particles is crucial to the in-pile safety of fuel particles for a high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR). The postulated accident condition of air ingress was taken into account in evaluating the reliability of the SiC layer. Oxidation tests of SiC coatings were carried out in the ranges of temperature between 800 and 1600 °C and time between 1 and 48 h in air atmosphere. Based on the microstructure evolution of the oxide layer, the mechanisms and kinetics of the oxidation process were proposed. The existence of silicon oxycarbides (SiO x C y ) at the SiO 2 /SiC interface was demonstrated by X-ray photospectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Carbon was detected by Raman spectroscopy at the interface under conditions of very high temperatures and long oxidation time. From oxidation kinetics calculation, activation energies were 145 kJ/mol and 352 kJ/mol for the temperature ranges of 1200–1500 °C and 1550–1600 °C, respectively

  14. Improved gas distributor for coating HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackey, W.J.; Stinton, D.P.; Sease, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The important criteria to be considered in design of the gas distributor are: (1) The distributor should ideally spread or disperse the gas over the full area of the coating chamber to maximize the particle gas contact area and thereby increase both particle circulation and the percentage of the input gas that ends up as coating. (2) The gas should not heat up during its passage through the distributor. Otherwise the gas would partially decompose prematurely, causing excessive coating deposition within or on the distributor. (3) The distributor should be designed to minimize accidental drainage of particles from the furnace and blowover of particles into the effluent system. (4) The distributor should be capable of depositing both carbon and SiC coatings of high quality as regards to density, preferred orientation, permeability, defective fraction, and other product attributes. (5) The distributor should be amenable to use with large particle charges and short turnaround times and be simple, inexpensive, and reliable. We have devised a simple distributor that incorporates the five criteria listed above. The new design is termed a blind-hole frit. All the gas passes through the thinned blind-hole regions, and thus the gas velocity is considerably higher than for a flat frit of uniform thickness. Because of its high velocity, the gas does not have time to reach a high enough temperature to cause deposition within the frit. Also most of the resistance to gas flow is provided by the porous distributor and not by the particle bed; therefore, localized variations of the quantity of particles above any particular gas inlet do not significantly alter the flow rate through that inlet

  15. Development of Coated Particle Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, B. G.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    Uranium kernel fabrication technology using a wet chemical so-gel method, a key technology in the coated particle fuel area, is established up to the calcination step and the first sintering of UO2 kernel was attempted. Experiments on the parametric study of the coating process using the surrogate ZrO2 kernel give the optimum conditions for the PyC and SiC coating layer and ZrC coating conditions were obtained for the vaporization of the ZrCl4 precursor and coating condition from ZrC coating experiments using plate-type graphite substrate. In addition, by development of fuel performance analysis code a part of the code system is completed which enables the participation to the benchmark calculation and comparison in the IAEA collaborated research program. The technologies for irradiation and post irradiation examination, which are important in developing the HTGR fuel technology of its first kind in Korea was started to develop and, through a feasibility study and preliminary analysis, the technologies required to be developed are identified for further development as well as the QC-related basic technologies are reviewed, analyzed and identified for the own technology development. Development of kernel fabrication technology can be enhanced for the remaining sintering technology and completed based on the technologies developed in this phase. In the coating technology, the optimum conditions obtained using a surrogate ZrO2 kernel material can be applied for the uranium kernel coating process development. Also, after completion of the code development in the next phase, more extended participation to the international collaboration for benchmark calculation can be anticipated which will enable an improvement of the whole code system. Technology development started in this phase will be more extended and further focused on the detailed technology development to be required for the related technology establishment

  16. Sol-gel coatings on carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, S.M.; Krabill, R.M.; Dalzell, W.J. Jr.; Chu, P.Y.; Clark, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    The need for structural materials that can withstand severe environments up to 4000 0 F has promulgated the investigation of sol-gel derived ceramic and composite coatings on carbon/carbon composite materials. Alumina and zirconia sols have been deposited via thermophoresis on carbon/carbon substrates

  17. Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Sease, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

  18. Carbon nanotube-based coatings on titanium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    mon method is the deposition of bioactive ceramic mate- rials on the metal ... tion of nanoparticle layer, including carbon nanoparti- ... Coatings made of CNTs provide implants with .... reaches composite of CNT built into titanium oxide formed.

  19. SPOUTED BED DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR COATED NUCLEAR FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2017-07-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated nuclear fuel particles embedded in a carbon-graphite fuel body. TRISO coatings consist of four layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide that are deposited on uranium ceramic fuel kernels (350µm – 500µm diameters) in a concatenated series of batch depositions. Each layer has dedicated functions such that the finished fuel particle has its own integral containment to minimize and control the release of fission products into the fuel body and reactor core. The TRISO coatings are the primary containment structure in the HTGR reactor and must have very high uniformity and integrity. To ensure high quality TRISO coatings, the four layers are deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using high purity precursors and are applied in a concatenated succession of batch operations before the finished product is unloaded from the coating furnace. These depositions take place at temperatures ranging from 1230°C to 1550°C and use three different gas compositions, while the fuel particle diameters double, their density drops from 11.1 g/cm3 to 3.0 g/cm3, and the bed volume increases more than 8-fold. All this is accomplished without the aid of sight ports or internal instrumentation that could cause chemical contamination within the layers or mechanical damage to thin layers in the early stages of each layer deposition. The converging section of the furnace retort was specifically designed to prevent bed stagnation that would lead to unacceptably high defect fractions and facilitate bed circulation to avoid large variability in coating layer dimensions and properties. The gas injection nozzle was designed to protect precursor gases from becoming overheated prior to injection, to induce bed spouting and preclude bed stagnation in the bottom of the retort. Furthermore, the retort and injection nozzle designs minimize buildup of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide on the

  20. Modeling of coated fuel particles irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Tongxiang; Phelip, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report, PANAMA code was used to estimate the CP performance under normal and accident condition. Under the normal irradiation test (1000 degree C 625 efpd, 10% FIMA), for intact CP fuel, failure fraction is in the level of 10 -7 . As-fabricated SiC failed particles results in the through coatings failed particles much earlier than the intact particles does, OPyC layer does not fail immediately after irradiation starts. The significant failures start at beyond the burnup of about 7% FIMA. Under the accident condition, the calculated results showed that when the heating temperature is much higher than 1850 degree C, the failure fraction of coated particle can reach the level of 1 percent. The CP fuel fails significantly if it has a buffer layer thinner than 65 urn, SiC layer thinner than 30 μm. High burnup CP need to develop small size kernel, thick buffer layer and thick SiC layer. (authors)

  1. Preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Quanchao [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yunnan Copper Smelting and Processing Complex, Yunnan Copper (Group) CO., LTD., Kunming 650102 (China); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Peng, Jinghui [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Lei, E-mail: xulei_kmust@aliyun.com [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Srinivasakannan, C. [Chemical Engineering Department, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); and others

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • The Ti-Coated diamond particles have been prepared using by microwave heating. • The uniform and dense coating can be produced, and the TiC species was formed. • With increases the temperature results in the thickness of coating increased. • The coating/diamond interfacial bonding strength increased with temperature increasing until 760 °C, then decreased. - Abstract: Depositing strong carbide-forming elements on diamond surface can dramatically improve the interfacial bonding strength between diamond grits and metal matrix. In the present work, investigation on the preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating has been conducted. The morphology, microstructure, and the chemical composition of Ti-coated diamond particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDX). The thickness of Ti coating was measured and the interfacial binding strength between Ti coating and diamond was analyzed. The results show that the surface of the diamond particles could be successfully coated with Ti, forming a uniform and continuous Ti-coated layer. The TiC was found to form between the surface of diamond particles and Ti-coated layer. The amount of TiC as well as the thickness of coating increased with increasing coating temperature, furthermore, the grain size of the coating also grew gradually. The interfacial bonding strength between coating and diamond was found to be best at the temperature of 760 °C.

  2. Preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Quanchao; Peng, Jinghui; Xu, Lei; Srinivasakannan, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Ti-Coated diamond particles have been prepared using by microwave heating. • The uniform and dense coating can be produced, and the TiC species was formed. • With increases the temperature results in the thickness of coating increased. • The coating/diamond interfacial bonding strength increased with temperature increasing until 760 °C, then decreased. - Abstract: Depositing strong carbide-forming elements on diamond surface can dramatically improve the interfacial bonding strength between diamond grits and metal matrix. In the present work, investigation on the preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating has been conducted. The morphology, microstructure, and the chemical composition of Ti-coated diamond particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDX). The thickness of Ti coating was measured and the interfacial binding strength between Ti coating and diamond was analyzed. The results show that the surface of the diamond particles could be successfully coated with Ti, forming a uniform and continuous Ti-coated layer. The TiC was found to form between the surface of diamond particles and Ti-coated layer. The amount of TiC as well as the thickness of coating increased with increasing coating temperature, furthermore, the grain size of the coating also grew gradually. The interfacial bonding strength between coating and diamond was found to be best at the temperature of 760 °C.

  3. The Effect of Particle Size of Wollastonite Filler on Thermal Performance of Intumescent Fire Retardant Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intumescent Fire retardant coatings (IFRC’s are one of the simplest ways to protect substrates exposed to fire. In this study, Wollastonite (W filler of two different particle sizes were used to determine the fire performance of intumescent fire retardant coating. The basic ingredients of the coating were ammonium poly-phosphate (APP as acid source, expandable graphite (EG as carbon source, melamine (MEL as blowing agent in epoxy binder, boric acid as additive and hardener as curing agent. A series of coating formulations were developed by using different weight percentages of both sized Wollastonite fillers. The coated steel substrate samples were tested for fire performance using Bunsen burner and char expansion was measured using furnace fire test. A Comparison of the coatings thermal performance was determined. Wollastonite containing filler particle size 10 μm showed better thermal performance than formulations containing filler’s particle size 44 μm.

  4. Recovery and recycling of uranium from rejected coated particles for compact high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Rajesh V., E-mail: pairajesh007@gmail.com [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mollick, P.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Ashok [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Banerjee, J. [Radiometullurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Radhakrishna, J. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-15

    UO{sub 2} microspheres prepared by internal gelation technique were coated with pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide using CVD technique. The particles which were not meeting the specifications were rejected. The rejected/failed UO{sub 2} based coated particles prepared by CVD technique was used for oxidation and recovery and recycling. The oxidation behaviour of sintered UO{sub 2} microspheres coated with different layers of carbon and SiC was studied by thermal techniques to develop a method for recycling and recovery of uranium from the failed/rejected coated particles. It was observed that the complete removal of outer carbon from the spheres is difficult. The crushing of microspheres enabled easier accessibility of oxygen and oxidation of carbon and uranium at 800–1000 °C. With the optimized process of multiple crushing using die & plunger and sieving the broken coated layers, we could recycle around fifty percent of the UO{sub 2} microspheres which could be directly recoated. The rest of the particles were recycled using a wet recycling method. - Highlights: • The oxidation behaviour of coated particles was studied in air, O{sub 2} and moist O{sub 2}. • It was observed that coated layers cannot be completely removed by mere oxidation. • Complete recovery of uranium from the rejected coated particles has been carried out using a combination of dry and wet recovery scheme. • A crushing step prior to oxidation is needed for full recovery of uranium from the coated particles.

  5. Mass-spectrometric determination in individual coated HTR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigl, A.

    1976-11-01

    A method is described which allows the simultaneous determination of fission and reaction gases in individual coated particles at temperatures up to 2000 0 C. The particles are heated under high-vacuum in a micro resistance-furnace up to the desired temperature. After preselected times the particles are crushed by action of a pneumatic cylinder. The gases liberated are fed into a quadrupoleanalyzer where they are analyzed in a dynamic mode. A peak selector allows the simultaneous measurement of up to four gases. The method is used routinely for the determination of fission gases (Kr and Xe) and of carbon monoxide which is formed as a reaction gas from oxide fuel. Precision and accuracy are in the order of a few percent. Detection limits for routine measurements are about 10 -7 cm 3 (STP) for KR and Xe and 2 x 10 -5 cm 3 (STP) for CO but can be lowered by special techniques. (author)

  6. Stress analysis of aspherical coated particle with inner pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Bing, E-mail: bingliu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Yang Lin; Liang Tongxiang; Tang Chunhe [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Coated particles used in HTR fuel element sustain the inner pressure during irradiation as a pressure vessel. In actually the coated particle is not real spherical but with some asphericity, the stress distribution in the vessel is not uniform, coated layer in aspherical particle sustain more additional stress due to the asphericity. In this paper, the geometric shape distribution is summarized based on actual coated particle statistic. A mechanical analysis model is proposed for SiC layer by geometric combinations, and stress distribution of coated particle with a flat is calculated. The results show that the local maximum stress of aspherical particle increased two times than that of ideal spherical coated particle, which increase the failure probability under irradiation and high temperature.

  7. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  8. Thermal conductive epoxy enhanced by nanodiamond-coated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles were coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical reactions. Reliable bonding was formed by the combination of acyl chloride on NDs and amine group on CNTs. ND coated CNTs (CNT-ND) were dispersed into epoxy to fabricate thermal conductive resins. The results show that the surface energy of CNTs is decreased by the coated NDs, which is contributed to the excellent dispersion of CNT-NDs in the epoxy matrix. The heat-transfer channels were built by the venous CNTs cooperating with the coated NDs, which not only plays an effective role of heat conduction for CNTs and NDs, but also avoids the electrical leakage by the protection of NDs surrounding outside of CNTs. Electrical and thermal conductance measurements demonstrate that the influence of the CNT-ND incorporation on the electrical conductance is minor, however, the thermal conductivity is improved significantly for the epoxy filled with CNT-ND.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. A general method to coat colloidal particles with titiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a general one-pot method for coating colloidal particles with amorphous titania. Various colloidal particles such as silica particles, large silver colloids, gibbsite platelets, and polystyrene spheres were successfully coated with a titania shell. Although there are several ways of

  10. Transfer of fissile material through shielding coatings in emergency heating of HTGR coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, A.N.; Zhuravkov, S.G.; Koptev, M.A.; Kurepin, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement results of leakage dynamics of fissile material from the coated particles within a temperature range of 1200 + 2000 deg. C are given. The methods of carrying out the experiments are briefly described. The relation of the leakage rate of uranium-235 from CP (coated particles) with the pyrocarbonic coatings has been obtained. (author)

  11. Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore Distribution in Coated Small Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laksmana, F L; Van Vliet, L J; Hartman Kok, P J A; Vromans, H; Frijlink, H W; Van der Voort Maarschalk, K

    This study aims to develop a characterization method for coating structure based on image analysis, which is particularly promising for the rational design of coated particles in the pharmaceutical industry. The method applies the MATLAB image processing toolbox to images of coated particles taken

  12. Oxidative Attack of Carbon/Carbon Substrates through Coating Pinholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Leonhardt, Todd; Curry, Donald; Rapp, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    A critical issue with oxidation protected carbon/carbon composites used for spacecraft thermal protection is the formation of coating pinholes. In laboratory experiments, artificial pinholes were drilled through SiC-coatings on a carbon/carbon material and the material was oxidized at 600, 1000, and 1400 C at reduced pressures of air. The attack of the carbon/carbon was quantified by both weight loss and a novel cross-sectioning technique. A two-zone, one dimensional diffusion control model was adapted to analyze this problem. Agreement of the model with experiment was reasonable at 1000 and 1400 C; however results at lower temperatures show clear deviations from the theory suggesting that surface reaction control plays a role.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of carbon coated nanoparticles produced by a continuous low-pressure plasma process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, Vineet; Neergat, Manoj [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Energy Science and Engineering (India); Bhandarkar, Upendra, E-mail: bhandarkar@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Mechanical Engineering (India)

    2011-09-15

    Core-shell nanoparticles coated with carbon have been synthesized in a single chamber using a continuous and entirely low-pressure plasma-based process. Nanoparticles are formed in an argon plasma using iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO){sub 5} as a precursor. These particles are trapped in a pure argon plasma by shutting off the precursor and then coated with carbon by passing acetylene along with argon as the main background gas. Characterization of the particles was carried out using TEM for morphology, XPS for elemental composition and PPMS for magnetic properties. Iron nanoparticles obtained were a mixture of FeO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. TEM analysis shows an average size of 7-14 nm for uncoated particles and 15-24 nm for coated particles. The effect of the carbon coating on magnetic properties of the nanoparticles is studied in detail.

  14. Dielectric relaxation of glass particles with conductive nano-coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Shahid [Applied Technologies Department, QinetiQ Limited, Cody Technology Park, Farnborough, Hampshire, GU14 0LX (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-21

    This research focuses on the dielectric properties of particles consisting of glass cores with nanometre conductive coatings. The effects of the core glass particle shape (sphere, flake and fibre) and size are investigated for different coating characteristics over the frequency range 0.5-18 GHz. Experimental results for the coated glass particle combinations show the existence of a dielectric loss peak. This feature is associated with interfacial relaxation between the insulating core glass particle and the nanoscale conductive coating. The relaxation mechanism provides enhanced loss that is not observed in conventional solid metal particle composites. The results are fitted to a model, which shows that the relaxation frequency increases with increasing coating conductivity and thickness, with additional parameters identified for further particle optimizations.

  15. Multilayer oxidation resistant coating for SiC coated carbon/carbon composites at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hejun; Jiao Gengsheng; Li Kezhi; Wang Chuang

    2008-01-01

    To prevent carbon/carbon (C/C) composites from oxidation, a multilayer coating based on molybdenum disilicide and titanium disilicide was formed using a two-step pack cementation technique in argon atmosphere. XRD and SEM analysis showed that the internal coating was a bond SiC layer that acts as a buffer layer, and that the external multilayer coating formed in the two-step pack cementation was composed of two MoSi 2 -TiSi 2 -SiC layers. This coating, which is characterized by excellent thermal shock resistance, could effectively protect the composites from exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere at 1773 K for 79 h. The oxidation of the coated C/C composites was primarily due to the reaction of C/C matrix and oxygen diffusing through the penetrable cracks in the coating

  16. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Leilei, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  17. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Li, Hejun; Li, Kezhi; Zhang, Shouyang; Lu, Jinhua; Li, Wei; Cao, Sheng; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon-Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    4, -4 3 2.0 17-21 15 18 21 :9." -: 4:tes: 1, Cll •easureren’. ;rown ire in Ill e::ceoI ".-ic.-ie: "-.- : .. - are hown in •iai:’l4m raw court form...scatter in the samples rather than the additional formation of cristo - balite. This was supported by later diffraction scans of material after extended...could not be avoided due to the brittle nature of the coating. , b. Coupons were then mounted in epoxy using a vacuum-oimpregnation technique. This

  19. Carbon nanotube-based black coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, J.; Yung, C.; Tomlin, N.; Conklin, D.; Stephens, M.

    2018-03-01

    Coatings comprising carbon nanotubes are very black, that is, characterized by uniformly low reflectance over a broad range of wavelengths from the visible to far infrared. Arguably, there is no other material that is comparable. This is attributable to the intrinsic properties of graphitic material as well as the morphology (density, thickness, disorder, and tube size). We briefly describe a history of other coatings such as nickel phosphorous, gold black, and carbon-based paints and the comparable structural morphology that we associate with very black coatings. The need for black coatings is persistent for a variety of applications ranging from baffles and traps to blackbodies and thermal detectors. Applications for space-based instruments are of interest and we present a review of space qualification and the results of outgassing measurements. Questions of nanoparticle safety depend on the nanotube size and aspect ratio as well as the nature and route of exposure. We describe the growth of carbon nanotube forests along with the catalyst requirements and temperature limitations. We also describe coatings derived from carbon nanotubes and applied like paint. Building the measurement apparatus and determining the optical properties of something having negligible reflectance are challenging and we summarize the methods and means for such measurements. There exists information in the literature for effective media approximations to model the dielectric function of vertically aligned arrays. We summarize this along with the refractive index of graphite from the literature that is necessary for modeling the optical properties. In our experience, the scientific questions can be overshadowed by practical matters, so we provide an appendix of recipes for making as-grown and sprayed coatings along with an example of reflectance measurements.

  20. Morphology and Optical Properties of Black-Carbon Particles Relevant to Engine Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Dansson, M. A.; Schrader, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Black-carbon particles are believed to have a large influence on climate through direct radiative forcing, reduction of surface albedo of snow and ice in the cryosphere, and interaction with clouds. The optical properties and morphology of atmospheric particles containing black carbon are uncertain, and characterization of black carbon resulting from engines emissions is needed. Refractory black-carbon particles found in the atmosphere are often coated with unburned fuel, sulfuric acid, water, ash, and other combustion by-products and atmospheric constituents. Coatings can alter the optical and physical properties of the particles and therefore change their optical properties and cloud interactions. Details of particle morphology and coating state can also have important effects on the interpretation of optical diagnostics. A more complete understanding of how coatings affect extinction, absorption, and incandescence measurements is needed before these techniques can be applied reliably to a wide range of particles. We have investigated the effects of coatings on the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated black-carbon particles using a range of standard particle diagnostics, extinction, and time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements. Particles were generated in a co-flow diffusion flame, extracted, cooled, and coated with oleic acid. The diffusion flame produces highly dendritic soot aggregates with similar properties to those produced in diesel engines, diffusion flames, and most natural combustion processes. A thermodenuder was used to remove the coating. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to monitor aggregate sizes; a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) was used to measure coating mass fractions, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize particle morphologies. The results demonstrate important differences in optical measurements between coated and uncoated particles.

  1. Functional Carbon Nanocomposite, Optoelectronic, and Catalytic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu Teng

    Over the past couple decades, fundamental research into carbon nanomaterials has produced a steady stream of groundbreaking physical science. Their record setting mechanical strength, chemical stability, and optoelectronic performance have fueled many optimistic claims regarding the breadth and pace of carbon nanotube and graphene integration. However, present synthetic, processing, and economic constraints have precluded these materials from many practical device applications. To overcome these limitations, novel synthetic techniques, processing methodologies, device geometries, and mechanistic insight were developed in this dissertation. The resulting advancements in material production and composite device performance have brought carbon nanomaterials ever closer to commercial implementation. For improved materials processing, vacuum co-deposition was first demonstrated as viable technique for forming carbon nanocomposite films without property distorting covalent modifications. Co-deposited nanoparticle, carbon nanotube, and graphene composite films enabled rapid device prototyping and compositional optimization. Cellulosic polymer stabilizers were then shown to be highly effective carbon nanomaterial dispersants, improving graphene production yields by two orders of magnitude in common organic solvents. By exploiting polarity interactions, iterative solvent exchange was used to further increase carbon nanomaterial dispersion concentrations by an additional order of magnitude, yielding concentrated inks. On top of their low causticity, these cellulosic nanomaterial inks have highly tunable viscosities, excellent film forming capacity, and outstanding thermal stability. These processing characteristics enable the efficient scaling of carbon nanomaterial coatings and device production using existing roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Utilizing these process improvements, high-performance gas sensing, energy storage, transparent conductor, and photocatalytic

  2. Preparation and Application of Conductive Textile Coatings Filled with Honeycomb Structured Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Govaert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical conductive textile coatings with variable amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. Formulations of textile coatings were prepared with up to 15 wt % of CNT, based on the solid weight of the binder. The binders are water based polyacrylate dispersions. The CNTs were mixed into the binder dispersion starting from a commercially available aqueous CNT dispersion that is compatible with the binder dispersion. Coating formulations with variable CNT concentrations were applied on polyester and cotton woven and knitted fabrics by different textile coating techniques: direct coating, transfer coating, and screen printing. The coatings showed increasing electrical conductivity with increasing CNT concentration. The coatings can be regarded to be electrically conductive (sheet resistivity<103 Ohm/sq starting at 3 wt% CNT. The degree of dispersion of the carbon nanotubes particles inside the coating was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The CNT particles form honeycomb structured networks in the coatings, proving a high degree of dispersion. This honeycomb structure of CNT particles is forming a conductive network in the coating leading to low resistivity values.

  3. Quality of Coated Particles : Physical - Mechanical Characterization of Polymeric Film Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perfetti, G.

    2012-01-01

    All coated particle producers, when applying the coating layer(s) would like to know precisely what is the best coating system to use in order to answer customer’s requests. It is, therefore, of very high relevance for many industries, to have a clear understanding of what are the parameters I need

  4. Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore Distribution in Coated Small Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laksmana, F.L.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Hartman Kok, P.J.A.; Vromans, H.; Frijlink, H.W.; Van der Voort Maarschalk, K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to develop a characterization method for coating structure based on image analysis, which is particularly promising for the rational design of coated particles in the pharmaceutical industry. Methods The method applies the MATLAB image processing toolbox to images of coated

  5. Tuning roughness and gloss of powder coating paint by encapsulating the coating particles with thin Al

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valdesueiro, David; Hettinga, Hans; Drijfhout, Jan Pieter; Lips, Priscilla; Meesters, G.M.H.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report a method to change the surface finish of a standard polyester-based powder coating paint, from gloss to matt, by depositing ultrathin films of Al2O3 on the powder coating particles. The coating experiments were performed in a fluidized bed reactor at

  6. Carbon nanotube based functional superhydrophobic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sunny

    The main objective of this dissertation is synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT) based superhydrophobic materials. The materials were designed such that electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs could be combined with superhydrophobicity to create materials with unique properties, such as self-cleaning adhesives, miniature flotation devices, ice-repellant coatings, and coatings for heat transfer furnaces. The coatings were divided into two broad categories based on CNT structure: Vertically aligned CNT arrays (VA coatings) and mesh-like (non-aligned) carbon nanotube arrays (NA coatings). VA coatings were used to create self-cleaning adhesives and flexible field emission devices. Coatings with self cleaning property along with high adhesiveness were inspired from structure found on gecko foot. Gecko foot is covered with thousands of microscopic hairs called setae; these setae are further divided into hundreds of nanometer sized hairs called spatulas. When gecko presses its foot against any surface, these hairs bend and conform to the topology of the surface resulting into very large area of contact. Such large area of intimate contact allows geckos to adhere to surfaces using van der Waals (vdW) interactions alone. VA-CNTs adhere to a variety of surfaces using a similar mechanism. CNTs of suitable diameter could withstand four times higher adhesion force than gecko foot. We found that upon soiling these CNT based adhesives (gecko tape) could be cleaned using a water droplet (lotus effect) or by applying vibrations. These materials could be used for applications requiring reversible adhesion. VA coatings were also used for developing field emission devices. A single CNT can emit electrons at very low threshold voltages. Achieving efficient electron emission on large scale has a lot of challenges such as screening effect, pull-off and lower current efficiency. We have explored the use of polymer-CNT composite structures to overcome these challenges in this work. NA

  7. Durable superhydrophobic carbon soot coatings for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmeryan, K. D.; Radeva, E. I.; Avramov, I. D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of durable superhydrophobic (SH) carbon soot coatings used in quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based gas or liquid sensors is reported. The method uses modification of the carbon soot through polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) by means of glow discharge RF plasma. The surface characterization shows a fractal-like network of carbon nanoparticles with diameter of ~50 nm. These particles form islands and cavities in the nanometer range, between which the plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) embeds and binds to the carbon chains and QCM surface. Such modified surface structure retains the hydrophobic nature of the soot and enhances its robustness upon water droplet interactions. Moreover, it significantly reduces the insertion loss and dynamic resistance of the QCM compared to the commonly used carbon soot/epoxy resin approach. Furthermore, the PPHMDSO/carbon soot coating demonstrates durability and no aging after more than 40 probing cycles in water based liquid environments. In addition, the surface layer keeps its superhydrophobicity even upon thermal annealing up to 540 °C. These experiments reveal an opportunity for the development of soot based SH QCMs with improved electrical characteristics, as required for high-resolution gas or liquid measurements.

  8. High-Rate, Durable Sodium-Ion Battery Cathode Enabled by Carbon-Coated Micro-Sized Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 Particles with Interconnected Vertical Nanowalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environment Science and Engineering, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Bi, Xuanxuan [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South, Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Bai, Ying [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environment Science and Engineering, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Yuan, Yifei [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South, Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton MI 49931 USA; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton MI 49931 USA; Wu, Chuan [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environment Science and Engineering, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 China; Wu, Feng [Beijing Key Laboratory of Environment Science and Engineering, School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electric Vehicles in Beijing, Beijing 100081 China; Lu, Jun [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South, Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South, Cass Avenue Lemont IL 60439 USA

    2016-02-08

    Na-ion batteries have been regarded as promising alternatives for Li-ion batteries due to the extensive sodium reserves in the world. Na3V2(PO4)3 has been proved to be a good candidate of the cathode materials in Na-ion batteries but the intrinsic low electrical conductivity and sluggish kinetics handicapped its application. Here, 3D hierarchical Na3V2(PO4)3 particles are synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, constructed by carbon-coated 2D Na3V2(PO4)3 nanowalls. Superior cell performance of high rate capability and cycle stability are observed in the well-defined structure. As the cathode in Na-ion batteries, it delivers a high capacity almost reaching the theoretical one and exhibits high capacity retention. The enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the improved electrical conductivity from the interconnected carbon layer and the shortened ion diffusion length and high specific surface area from the nanowalls.

  9. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Yan; Li, Zhuguo; Feng, Kai; Guo, Xingwu; Zhou, Zhifeng; Dong, Jie; Wu, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The carbon film with nickel interlayer (Ni + C coating) is deposited on GW83. • In Ni + C composite coating the carbon coating has good adhesion with the nickel interlayer. • The wear track of Ni + C coating is narrower compared to the bare one. • The wear resistance of GW83 is greatly improved by the Ni + C coating. - Abstract: Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating

  10. Infrared light extinction by charged dielectric core-coat particles

    OpenAIRE

    Thiessen, Elena; Heinisch, Rafael L.; Bronold, Franz X.; Fehske, Holger

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of surplus electrons on the infrared extinction of dielectric particles with a core-coat structure and propose to use it for an optical measurement of the particle charge in a dusty plasma. The particles consist of an inner core with negative and an outer coat with positive electron affinity. Both the core and the coat give rise to strong transverse optical phonon resonances, leading to anomalous light scattering in the infrared. Due to the radial profile of the electron a...

  11. The influence of annealing temperature on the strength of TRISO coated particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: Isabel.vanrooyen@pbmr.co.z [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd., 1279 Mike Crawford Avenue, Centurion (South Africa); Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Neethling, J.H. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Rooyen, P.M. van [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd., 1279 Mike Crawford Avenue, Centurion (South Africa)

    2010-07-31

    The integrity of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) fuel, and specifically the SiC layer system of the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP), namely inner pyrolytic carbon, silicon carbide and outer pyrolytic carbon (I-PyC-SiC-O-PyC), determines the containment of fission products. The PBMR fuel consists of TRISO coated particles (CPs) embedded in a graphite matrix. One of the characterization techniques investigated by PBMR is the determination of strength of CPs. It is a well known metallurgical fact that temperature, amongst many other parameters, may influence the strength of a material. A recently developed method for measuring the strength of the TRISO coated particles was used and is briefly described in this article. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by the comparison of strength measurements of five experimental PBMR CP batches as a function of annealing temperature. Significant modification of strength after annealing was measured with increased temperature within the range 1000-2100 {sup o}C. The interesting feature of decreasing standard deviation of the strength with increasing temperature will also be discussed with a possible explanation. A significant difference in coated particle strength is also demonstrated for two CP batches with layer thickness on the extremities of the SiC layer thickness specification. The effect of long duration annealing on these strength values will also be demonstrated by comparing results from 1 h to 100 h annealing periods of coated particles at a temperature of 1600 {sup o}C.

  12. The influence of annealing temperature on the strength of TRISO coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Neethling, J.H.; Rooyen, P.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) fuel, and specifically the SiC layer system of the Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle (CP), namely inner pyrolytic carbon, silicon carbide and outer pyrolytic carbon (I-PyC-SiC-O-PyC), determines the containment of fission products. The PBMR fuel consists of TRISO coated particles (CPs) embedded in a graphite matrix. One of the characterization techniques investigated by PBMR is the determination of strength of CPs. It is a well known metallurgical fact that temperature, amongst many other parameters, may influence the strength of a material. A recently developed method for measuring the strength of the TRISO coated particles was used and is briefly described in this article. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by the comparison of strength measurements of five experimental PBMR CP batches as a function of annealing temperature. Significant modification of strength after annealing was measured with increased temperature within the range 1000-2100 o C. The interesting feature of decreasing standard deviation of the strength with increasing temperature will also be discussed with a possible explanation. A significant difference in coated particle strength is also demonstrated for two CP batches with layer thickness on the extremities of the SiC layer thickness specification. The effect of long duration annealing on these strength values will also be demonstrated by comparing results from 1 h to 100 h annealing periods of coated particles at a temperature of 1600 o C.

  13. Irradiation Testing of TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Yeo, Sunghwan; Jeong, Kyung-Chai; Eom, Sung-Ho; Kim, Yeon-Ku; Kim, Woong Ki; Lee, Young Woo; Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, Yong Wan

    2014-01-01

    In Korea, coated particle fuel is being developed to support development of a VHTR. At the end of March 2014, the first irradiation test in HANARO at KAERI to demonstrate and qualify TRISO-coated particle fuel for use in a VHTR was terminated. This experiment was conducted in an inert gas atmosphere without on-line temperature monitoring and control, or on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contained two test rods, one has nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact contains about 260 TRISO-coated particles. The duration of irradiation testing at HANARO was about 135 full power days from last August 2013. The maximum average power per particle was about 165 mW/particle. The calculated peak burnup of the TRISO-coated fuel was a little less than 4 atom percent. Post-irradiation examination is being carried out at KAERI’s Irradiated Material Examination Facility beginning in September of 2014. This paper describes characteristics of coated particle fuel, the design of the test rod and irradiation device for this coated particle fuel, and discusses the technical results of irradiation testing at HANARO. (author)

  14. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  15. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  16. One-Pot Synthesis of Carbon-Coated SnO 2 Nanocolloids with Improved Reversible Lithium Storage Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen; Chen, Jun Song; Chen, Peng; Archer, Lynden A.

    2009-01-01

    of 300 mA/g in hybrid SnO 2-carbon electrodes containing as much as 1/3 of their mass in the low-activity carbon shell. By reducing the SnO 2-carbon particles with H 2, we demonstrate a simple route to carbon-coated Sn nanospheres. Lithium storage

  17. Error Analysis of Ceramographic Sample Preparation for Coating Thickness Measurement of Coated Fuel Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoxue; Li Ziqiang; Zhao Hongsheng; Zhang Kaihong; Tang Chunhe

    2014-01-01

    The thicknesses of four coatings of HTR coated fuel particle are very important parameters. It is indispensable to control the thickness of four coatings of coated fuel particles for the safety of HTR. A measurement method, ceramographic sample-microanalysis method, to analyze the thickness of coatings was developed. During the process of ceramographic sample-microanalysis, there are two main errors, including ceramographic sample preparation error and thickness measurement error. With the development of microscopic techniques, thickness measurement error can be easily controlled to meet the design requirements. While, due to the coated particles are spherical particles of different diameters ranged from 850 to 1000μm, the sample preparation process will introduce an error. And this error is different from one sample to another. It’s also different from one particle to another in the same sample. In this article, the error of the ceramographic sample preparation was calculated and analyzed. Results show that the error introduced by sample preparation is minor. The minor error of sample preparation guarantees the high accuracy of the mentioned method, which indicates this method is a proper method to measure the thickness of four coatings of coated particles. (author)

  18. Carbon-coated tungsten and molybdenum carbides for electrode of electrochemical capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Takahiro; Soneda, Yasushi; Hatori, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Michio

    2007-01-01

    New electrode materials for electrochemical capacitor, tungsten carbide WC and molybdenum carbide Mo 2 C coated by porous carbon, were prepared through a simple heat treatment of the mixture of K 2 WO 4 and K 2 MoO 4 , respectively, with hydroxy propyl cellulose. Carbide changed to hydroxide during the 1st charge-discharge cycle in H 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte, which showed redox reaction in further charge-discharge cycles, in addition to electric double layers of the carbon formed on its surface. The carbon-coated carbide gave a high capacitance in 1 mol L -1 H 2 SO 4 electrolyte, as about 350 F cm -3 for carbon-coated WC and 550-750 F cm -3 for carbon-coated Mo 2 C. Coating of carbon inhibits the growth of carbide particles during their formation, of which the small particle size make possible to complete transformation to hydroxides during the 1st charge-discharge cycle, and also disturbs the agglomeration of tungsten and molybdenum hydroxides during charge-discharge cycles, as well as porous carbon coated act as electrode material for electric double layers of electrolyte ions

  19. Method to produce carbon-cladded nuclear fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturge, D.W.; Meaden, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    In the method charges of micro-spherules of fuel element are designed to have two carbon layers, whereby a one aims to achieve a uniform granulation (standard measurement). Two drums are used for this purpose connected behind one another. The micro-spherules coated with the first layer (phenolformaldehyde resin coated graphite particles) leave the first drum and enter the second one. Following the coating with a second layer, the micro-spherules are introduced into a grain size separator. The spherules that are too small are directly recycled into the second drum and those ones that are too large are recycled into the first drum after removing the graphite layers. The method may also be applied to metal cladded particles to manufacture cermet fuels. (RW) [de

  20. Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Kristy [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Fashion, Product, Design and Merchandising Dept., A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Inst. and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Perez, Carlos R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Inst. and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; McDonough, John K. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Inst. and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Presser, Volker [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Inst. and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Heon, Min [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Inst. and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Dion, Genevieve [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Fashion, Product, Design and Merchandising Dept.; Gogotsi, Yury [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). A. J. Drexel Nanotechnology Inst. and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2011-10-20

    This paper describes a flexible and lightweight fabric supercapacitor electrode as a possible energy source in smart garments. We examined the electrochemical behavior of porous carbon materials impregnated into woven cotton and polyester fabrics using a traditional printmaking technique (screen printing). The porous structure of such fabrics makes them attractive for supercapacitor applications that need porous films for ion transfer between electrodes. We used cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study the capacitive behaviour of carbon materials using nontoxic aqueous electrolytes including sodium sulfate and lithium sulfate. Electrodes coated with activated carbon (YP17) and tested at ~0.25 A·g⁻¹ achieved a high gravimetric and areal capacitance, an average of 85 F·g⁻¹ on cotton lawn and polyester microfiber, both corresponding to ~0.43 F·cm⁻².

  1. Low-Cost Repairable Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Carbon-Carbon Composites via CCVD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendrick, Michelle

    2000-01-01

    ...) thin film process to yield oxidation resistant coatings on carbon-carbon (C-C) composites. Work was on simple coatings at this preliminary stage of investigation, including silicon dioxide, platinum and aluminum oxide...

  2. Electroless silver coating of rod-like glass particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jee Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Hyung Wook; Lee, Sang Wha; Park, Sang Joon

    2008-09-01

    An electroless silver coating of rod-like glass particles was performed and silver glass composite powders were prepared to impart electrical conductivity to these non-conducting glass particles. The low density Ag-coated glass particles may be utilized for manufacturing conducting inorganic materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications and the techniques for controlling the uniform thickness of silver coating can be employed in preparation of biosensor materials. For the surface pretreatment, Sn sensitization was performed and the coating powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam microscopy (FIB), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) along with the surface resistant measurements. In particular, the use of FIB technique for determining directly the Ag-coating thickness was very effective on obtaining the optimum conditions for coating. The surface sensitization and initial silver loading for electroless silver coating could be found and the uniform and smooth silver-coated layer with thickness of 46 nm was prepared at 2 mol/l of Sn and 20% silver loading.

  3. Polypyrrole-palladium nanocomposite coating of micrometer-sized polymer particles toward a recyclable catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Syuji; Matsuzawa, Soichiro; Hamasaki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Bouleghlimat, Azzedine; Buurma, Niklaas J

    2012-02-07

    coated with PPy-Pd nanocomposite, and stable aqueous dispersions were obtained. The nanocomposite particles functioned as an efficient catalyst for the aerobic oxidative homocoupling reaction of 4-carboxyphenylboronic acid in aqueous media for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. The composite particles sediment in a short time (

  4. Composite Coatings of Chromium and Nanodiamond Particles on Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidikova N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrome plating is used to improve the properties of metal surfaces like hardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance in machine building. To further improve these properties, an electrodeposited chromium coating on steel, modified with nanodiamond particles is proposed. The nanodiamond particles (average size 4 nm measured by TEM are produced by detonation synthesis (NDDS. The composite coating (Cr+NDDS has an increased thickness, about two times greater microhardness and finer micro-structure compared to that of unmodified chromium coating obtained under the same galvanization conditions. In the microstructure of specimen obtained from chrome electrolyte with concentration of NDDS 25 g/l or more, “minisections” with chromium shell were found. They were identified by metallographic microscope and X-ray analyser on etched section of chromium plated sample. The object of further research is the dependence of the presence of NDDS in the composite coating from the nanodiamond particles concentration in the chroming electrolyte.

  5. Magnetic properties of carbon-coated, ferromagnetic nanoparticles produced by a carbon-arc method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsman, E. M.; Sutton, R.; Bortz, E.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Midelfort, K.; Williams, J.; Smith, P.; McHenry, M. E.; Majetich, S. A.; Artman, J. O.; De Graef, M.; Staley, S. W.

    1994-05-01

    The Krätschmer-Huffman carbon-arc method of preparing fullerenes has been used to generate carbon-coated transition metal (TM) and TM-carbide nanocrystallites. The magnetic nanocrystallites were extracted from the soot with a magnetic gradient field technique. For TM=Co the majority of nanocrystals exist as nominally spherical particles, 0.5-5 nm in radius. Hysteretic and temperature-dependent magnetic response, in randomly and magnetically aligned powder samples frozen in epoxy, correspond to fine particle magnetism associated with monodomain TM particles. The magnetization exhibits a unique functional dependence on H/T, and hysteresis below a blocking temperature TB. Below TB, the temperature dependence of the coercivity can be expressed as Hc=Hc0[1-(T/TB)1/2], where Hc0 is the 0 K coercivity.

  6. Pyrolytic carbon coating for cytocompatibility of titanium oxide nanoparticles: a promising candidate for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Simchi, Abdolreza; Imani, Mohammad; Yousefi, Mohammad; Galinetto, Pietro; Amiri, Houshang; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles for biomedical use must be cytocompatible with the biological environment that they are exposed to. Current research has focused on the surface functionalization of nanoparticles by using proteins, polymers, thiols and other organic compounds. Here we show that inorganic nanoparticles such as titanium oxide can be coated by pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and that the coating has cytocompatible properties. Pyrolization and condensation of methane formed a thin layer of pyrolytic carbon on the titanium oxide core. The formation of the PyC shell retards coalescence and sintering of the ceramic phase. Our MTT assay shows that the PyC-coated particles are cytocompatible at employed doses. (paper)

  7. Tough ceramic coatings: Carbon nanotube reinforced silica sol-gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A. J.; Rico, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Rams, J.

    2010-08-01

    Silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes were produced via sol-gel route using two mixing techniques of the sol-gel precursors, mechanical and ultrasonic mixing, and dip-coating as deposition process on magnesium alloy substrates. Effective incorporation and distribution of 0.1 wt.% of carbon nanotubes in the amorphous silica matrix of the coatings were achieved using both techniques. Fabrication procedure determines the morphological aspects of the coating. Only mechanical mixing process produced coatings dense and free of defects. Nanoindentation technique was used to examine the influence of the fabrication process in the mechanical features of the final coatings, i.e. indentation fracture toughness, Young's modulus and hardness. A maximum toughening effect of about 24% was achieved in silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes produced by the mechanical mixing route. Scanning electron microscopy investigation revealed that the toughening of these reinforced coatings was mainly due to bridging effect of the reinforcement.

  8. Surface protection of austenitic steels by carbon nanotube coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLucas, T.; Schütz, S.; Suarez, S.; Mücklich, F.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, surface protection properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited on polished austenitic stainless steel are evaluated. Electrophoretic deposition is used as a coating technique. Contact angle measurements reveal hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic wetting characteristics of the carbon nanotube coating depending on the additive used for the deposition. Tribological properties of carbon nanotube coatings on steel substrate are determined with a ball-on-disc tribometer. Effective lubrication can be achieved by adding magnesium nitrate as an additive due to the formation of a holding layer detaining CNTs in the contact area. Furthermore, wear track analysis reveals minimal wear on the coated substrate as well as carbon residues providing lubrication. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is used to qualitatively analyse the elemental composition of the coating and the underlying substrate. The results explain the observed wetting characteristics of each coating. Finally, merely minimal oxidation is detected on the CNT-coated substrate as opposed to the uncoated sample.

  9. Design and operation of equipment used to develop remote coating capability for HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Preston, M.K.; Heck, J.L.; Bolfing, B.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1978-12-01

    Refabrication of HTGR fuels is a manufacturing process that consists of preparation of fuel kernels, application of multiple layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, preparation of fuel rods, and assembly of fuel rods into fuel elements. All the equipment for refabrication of 233 U-containing fuel must be designed for completely remote operation and maintenance in hot-cell facilities. Equipment to remotely coated HTGR fuel particles has been designed and operated. Although not all of the equipment development needed for a fully remote coating system has been completed, significant progress has been made. The most important component of the coating furnace is the gas distributor, which must be simple, reliable, and easily maintainable. Techniques for loading and unloading the coater and handling microspheres have been developed. An engineering-scale system, currently in operation, is being used to verify the workability of these concepts. Coating crucible handling components are used to remove the crucible from the furnace, remove coated particles, and exchange the crucible, if necessary. After the batch of particles has been unloaded, it is transferred, weighed, and sampled. The components used in these processes have been tested to ensure that no particle breakage or holdup occurs. Tests of the particle handling system have been very encouraging because no major problems have been encountered. Instrumentation that controls the equipment performed very smoothly and reliably and can be operated remotely

  10. Carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon-coated conductive Kevlar fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Changsheng; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Hwang, Chi-Chau; Tour, James M

    2012-01-01

    Conductive carbon material-coated Kevlar fibers were fabricated through layer-by-layer spray coating. Polyurethane was used as the interlayer between the Kevlar fiber and carbon materials to bind the carbon materials to the Kevlar fiber. Strongly adhering single-walled carbon nanotube coatings yielded a durable conductivity of 65 S/cm without significant mechanical degradation. In addition, the properties remained stable after bending or water washing cycles. The coated fibers were analyzed using scanning electron microcopy and a knot test. The as-produced fiber had a knot efficiency of 23%, which is more than four times higher than that of carbon fibers. The spray-coating of graphene nanoribbons onto Kevlar fibers was also investigated. These flexible coated-Kevlar fibers have the potential to be used for conductive wires in wearable electronics and battery-heated armors. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Temperature of loose coated particles in irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1975-04-01

    An analysis is presented of the temperature of a monolayer bed of loose High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) type fissioning fuel particles in an annular cavity. Both conduction and radiant heat transfer are taken into account, and the effect of particle contact with the annular cavity surfaces is evaluated. Charts are included for the determination of the maximum surface temperature of the particle coating for any size particle or power generation rate in a fuel bed of this type. The charts are intended for the design and evaluation of irradiation experiments on loose beds of coated fuel particles of the type used in HTGRs. Included in an Appendix is a method for estimating the temperature of a particle in circular hole. (U.S.)

  12. Implanted deuterium retention and release in carbon-coated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Oates, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 angstrom. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 angstrom revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400 degrees C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400 degrees C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 X 10 19 D/m 2 sec), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  13. Implanted Deuterium Retention and Release in Carbon-Coated Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Longhurst, G. R.; Pawelko, R. J.; Oates, M. A.

    1997-06-01

    Deuterium implantation experiments have been conducted on samples of clean and carbon-coated beryllium. These studies entailed preparation and characterization of beryllium samples coated with carbon thicknesses of 100, 500, and 1000 Å. Heat treatment of a beryllium sample coated with carbon to a thickness of approximately 100 Å revealed that exposure to a temperature of 400°C under high vacuum conditions was sufficient to cause substantial diffusion of beryllium through the carbon layer, resulting in more beryllium than carbon at the surface. Comparable concentrations of carbon and beryllium were observed in the bulk of the coating layer. Higher than expected oxygen levels were observed throughout the coating layer as well. Samples were exposed to deuterium implantation followed by thermal desorption without exposure to air. Differences were observed in deuterium retention and postimplantation release behavior in the carbon-coated samples as compared with bare samples. For comparable implantation conditions (sample temperature of 400°C and an incident deuterium flux of approximately 6 × 1019 D/m2-s), the quantity of deuterium retained in the bare sample was less than that retained in the carbon-coated samples. Further, the release of the deuterium took place at lower temperatures for the bare beryllium surfaces than for carbon-coated beryllium samples.

  14. Irradiation testing of coated particle fuel at Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo Kim, Bong; Sung Cho, Moo; Kim, Yong Wan

    2014-01-01

    TRISO-coated particle fuel is developing to support development of VHTR in Korea. From August 2013, the first irradiation testing of coated particle fuel was begun to demonstrate and qualify TRISO fuel for use in VHTR in the HANARO at KAERI. This experiment is currently undergoing under the atmosphere of a mixed inert gas without on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contains two test rods, one contains nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact has 263 coated particles. After a peak burn-up of about 4 at% and a peak fast neutron fluence of about 1.7 x 10 21 n/cm 2 , PIE will be carried out at KAERI's Irradiated Material Examination Facility. This paper is described characteristics of coated particle fuel, the design of test rod and irradiation device for coated particle fuel, discusses the technical results for irradiation testing at HANARO. (authors)

  15. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L

    2005-01-01

    glassy carbon presents a good adhesion appear smooth and non porous, therefore suggesting that glassy carbon deposition is an interesting route to shut off the open porosity on the surface of graphite pieces. Nevertheless, numbers of parameters have to be better understood: i.e. the optimal protocol to impregnate graphite by the resin, the role of the interface and the possibilities to control the resin shrinkage by adding additives (i.e. carbon black, graphite particles, carbon char,...) to the glassy carbon precursor. (authors)

  16. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    of the graphite substrate. The deposit regions where glassy carbon presents a good adhesion appear smooth and non porous, therefore suggesting that glassy carbon deposition is an interesting route to shut off the open porosity on the surface of graphite pieces (Fig 3). Nevertheless, numbers of parameters have to be better understood: i.e. the optimal protocol to impregnate graphite by the resin, the role of the interface and the possibilities to control the resin shrinkage by adding additives (i.e. carbon black, graphite particles, carbon char..) to the glassy carbon precursor. (authors)

  17. Anisotropic biodegradable lipid coated particles for spatially dynamic protein presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Randall A; Mathew, Mohit P; Ben-Akiva, Elana; Sunshine, Joel C; Shmueli, Ron B; Ren, Qiuyin; Yarema, Kevin J; Green, Jordan J

    2018-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of particles coated with lipids for applications ranging from drug delivery, gene delivery, and diagnostic imaging to immunoengineering. To date, almost all particles with lipid coatings have been spherical despite emerging evidence that non-spherical shapes can provide important advantages including reduced non-specific elimination and increased target-specific binding. We combine control of core particle geometry with control of particle surface functionality by developing anisotropic, biodegradable ellipsoidal particles with lipid coatings. We demonstrate that these lipid coated ellipsoidal particles maintain advantageous properties of lipid polymer hybrid particles, such as the ability for modular protein conjugation to the particle surface using versatile bioorthogonal ligation reactions. In addition, they exhibit biomimetic membrane fluidity and demonstrate lateral diffusive properties characteristic of natural membrane proteins. These ellipsoidal particles simultaneously provide benefits of non-spherical particles in terms of stability and resistance to non-specific phagocytosis by macrophages as well as enhanced targeted binding. These biomaterials provide a novel and flexible platform for numerous biomedical applications. The research reported here documents the ability of non-spherical polymeric particles to be coated with lipids to form anisotropic biomimetic particles. In addition, we demonstrate that these lipid-coated biodegradable polymeric particles can be conjugated to a wide variety of biological molecules in a "click-like" fashion. This is of interest due to the multiple types of cellular mimicry enabled by this biomaterial based technology. These features include mimicry of the highly anisotropic shape exhibited by cells, surface presentation of membrane bound protein mimetics, and lateral diffusivity of membrane bound substrates comparable to that of a plasma membrane. This platform is demonstrated to

  18. Microstructure and property of WC particles ceramic-metal composite coatings by laser surface cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xiaoyan; Zhu Beidi; Tao Zengyi; Yang Shuguo; Cui Kun

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic-metal is widely used as a kind of good hardfacing material. The coarse WC particles ceramic-metal composite coatings with WC density of 67% it weight and the thickness of 1.6-2.0 mm have been cladded on 20Ni 4 Mo steel surface by a 2kw CO 2 laser. The sintered WC particles with the size of 600-1,000 μm are chosen as the main strengthening phase, Ni-base self-flux alloy as the binder in the composite coatings. The microstructure and micro-hardness of both WC particles and binder are analyzed. The rigid ball indention with acoustic emission technique is used to evaluate the brittleness of the coating. Finally, the abrasive wear resistance of the coatings are tested, Besides, the coatings with the same ratio and size of WC particles within low carbon steel tube were cladded on 20Ni 4 Mo steel by atomic hydrogen welding technique and analyzed by the same ways their result are compared

  19. Fission product released experiment of coated fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shijiang, Xu; Bing, Yang; Chunhe, Tang; Junguo, Zhu; Jintao, Huang; Binzhong, Zhang [Inst. of Nucl. Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Jinghan, Luo [Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    1992-01-15

    Four samples of coated fuel particles were irradiated in the Heavy-Water Research Reactor of the Institute of Atomic Energy. Each of them was divided into two groups and irradiated to the burn up of 0.394% fima and 0.788% fima in two static capsules, respectively. After irradiation and cooling, post irradiation annealing experiment was carried out, the release ratios of the fission product {sup 133}Xe and {sup 131}I were measured, they are in the order of 10{sup -6}{approx}10{sup -7}. The fission product release ratio of naked kernel was also measured under the same conditions as for the coated fuel particles, the ratio of the fission product release of the coated fuel particles and of the naked kernel was in the order of 10{sup -5}{approx}10{sup -4}.

  20. Coated fuel particles: requirements and status of fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Vygen, P.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel cycle, design, and irradiation performance requirements impose restraints on the fabrication processes. Both kernel and coating fabrication processes are flexible enough to adapt to the needs of the various existing and proposed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Extensive experience has demonstrated that fuel kernels with excellent sphericity and uniformity can be produced by wet chemical processes. Similarly experience has shown that the various multilayer coatings can be produced to fully meet design and specification requirements. Quality reliability of coated fuel particles is ensured by quality control and quality assurance programs operated by an aduiting system that includes licensing officials and the customer

  1. Physical and chemical analysis of interaction between oxide fuel and pyrocarbon coating of coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, R.A.; Kromov, Yu.F.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    In terms of the model proposed the equilibrium pressure of gases (CO, Kr, Xe) in pyrocarbon-coated uranium dioxide fuel particles has been calculated, as function of the initial composition of the fuel (O/U), the design features of the coated particles, the fuel temperature, and the burnup. The possibility of reducing gas pressure in the particles by alloying the kernels with uranium carbide, and increasing the kernel capacity for retention of solid fission products by alloying the uranium oxide with aluminum-silicates, has been investigated. (author)

  2. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, K. A.; Silva, C. M.; Kiggans, J. O.; Cai, Z.; Shin, D.; Snead, L. L.

    2013-06-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels were examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was the least substantial, while the PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  3. Numerical Investigation on Absorption Enhancement of Black Carbon Aerosols Partially Coated With Nonabsorbing Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Mao, Mao; Yin, Yan; Wang, Bin

    2018-01-01

    This study numerically evaluates the effects of aerosol microphysics, including coated volume fraction of black carbon (BC), shell/core ratio, and size distribution, on the absorption enhancement (Eab) of polydisperse BC aggregates partially coated by organics, which is calculated by the exact multiple-sphere T-matrix method. The coated volume fraction of BC plays a substantial role in determining the absorption enhancement of partially coated BC aggregates, which typically have an Eab in the range of 1.0-2.0 with a larger value for larger coated volume fraction of BC as the shell/core ratio, BC geometry, and size distribution are fixed. The shell/core ratio, BC geometry, and size distribution have little impact on the Eab of coated BC with small coated volume fraction of BC, while they become significant for large coated volume fraction of BC. The Eab of partially coated BC particles can be slightly less than 1.0 for the large BC in the accumulation mode exhibiting large shell/core ratio and small coated volume fraction of BC, indicating that the absorption shows even slight decrease relative to uncoated BC particles. For partially coated BC aggregates in the accumulation and coarse modes, the refractive index uncertainties of BC result in the Eab differences of less than 9% and 2%, respectively, while those of organics can induce larger variations with the maximum differences up to 22% and 18%, respectively. Our study indicates that accounting for particle coating microphysics, particularly the coated volume fraction of BC, can potentially help to understand the differences in observations of largely variable absorption enhancements over various regions.

  4. Optical Coating Degradation Due to Particle Impacts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Charged particles are an important source of contamination for laser transmitter optics. However, these effects are not currently included in the GSFC contamination...

  5. Improvement on the electrochemical characteristics of graphite anodes by coating of the pyrolytic carbon using tumbling chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Young-Soo; Lee, Jai-Young

    2003-01-01

    The electrochemical characteristics of graphite coated with pyrolytic carbon materials using tumbling chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process have been studied for the active material of anodes in lithium ion secondary batteries. Coating of pyrolytic carbons on the surface of graphite particles, which tumble in a rotating reactor tube, was performed through the pyrolysis of liquid propane gas (LPG). The surface morphology of these graphite particles coated with pyrolytic carbon has been observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface of graphite particles can well be covered with pyrolytic carbon by tumbling CVD. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image of these carbon particles shows that the core part is highly ordered carbon, while the shell part is disordered carbon. We have found that the new-type carbon obtained from tumbling CVD has a uniform core (graphite)-shell (pyrolytic carbon) structure. The electrochemical property of the new-type carbons has been examined using a charge-discharge cycler. The coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite can effectively reduce the initial irreversible capacity by 47.5%. Cyclability and rate-capability of theses carbons with the core-shell structure are much better than those of bare graphite. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) spectra, it is found that the coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite causes the decrease of the contact resistance in the carbon electrodes, which means the formation of solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer is suppressed. We suggest that coating of pyrolytic carbon by the tumbling CVD is an effective method in improving the electrochemical properties of graphite electrodes for lithium ion secondary batteries

  6. The Effects of Particle Size on the Surface Properties of an HVOF Coating of WC-Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Tong Yul; Yoon, Jae Hong; Yoon, Sang Hwan; Joo, Yun Kon [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Ho; Son, Young Bok [Xinix Metallizing Co., Ltd, Gyungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The effects of particle size on the surface properties of HVOF spray coating were studied to improve of the durability of metal components. Micro and nano sized WC-12Co powders were coated on the surface of Inconel718, and the effects of particle size on surface properties were studied. Surface hardness was reduced when the particle sizes of the powder were decreased, because the larger specific surface area of the smaller particles caused greater heat absorption and decomposition of the hard WC to less hard W{sub 2}C and graphite. Porosity was increased by decreasing the particle size, because the larger specific surface area of the smaller particles caused a greater decomposition of WC to W{sub 2}C and free carbon. The free carbon formed carbon oxide gases which created the porous surface. The friction coefficient was reduced by decreasing the particle size because the larger specific surface area of the smaller particles produced more free carbon free Co and Co oxide which acted as solid lubricants. The friction coefficient increased when the surface temperature was increased from 25 to 500 ℃, due to local cold welding. To improve the durability of metal mechanical components, WC-Co coating with the proper particle size is recommended.

  7. The effects of carbon coating on the electrochemical performances of ZnO in Ni–Zn secondary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Wei; Yang, Zhanhong; Fan, Xinming; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Jing, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The ZnO samples coated with carbon are successfully synthesized by using a high energy ball milling method. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) spectra of the carbon-coated ZnO and pure ZnO show that the carbon-coated ZnO (carbon source: glucose, citric acid) samples and the untreated ZnO sample have similar particle size and crystal form. The particles have prismatic microstructure whose sizes are about 100–200 nm. However, the carbon-coated ZnO (carbon source: sucrose) sample has become agglomeration after calcination whose size has been increased to 2–6 μm. The uncoated ZnO powders have more complete crystal shape and they are glazed quadrangular materials, while the carbon coated ZnO particles has a rough surface, which resulted from the growth of carbon coating on ZnO particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the carbon-coated ZnO and the pure ZnO show carbon formed on the surface of ZnO is amorphous. Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry (CV), AC impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charge–discharge measurement are utilized to examine the electrochemical performances of the carbon-coated ZnO. The carbon-coated ZnO (carbon source: glucose) have the most positive steady-state potential and lowest corrosion current density in the zinc electrodes which indicates that it has a good anticorrosion ability. A lower charge platform and a higher discharge platform of carbon-coated ZnO indicate that it have a better charge/discharge performance as anodic material for Ni/Zn cells. A smaller ohmic resistance and charge-transfer resistance imply that the carbon film upon ZnO could greatly decrease the impedance of the reaction process. Meanwhile, the carbon-coated ZnO also showed more excellent cycling performance than pure ZnO. The reason of improvement about electrochemical performance can be ascribed as the unique structure of amorphous carbon layer

  8. Degradation of modified carbon black/epoxy nanocomposite coatings under ultraviolet exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Degradation behavior of modified Carbon Black (CB) epoxy coating was studied under UV irradiation using based on EIS technique. • By using SDS as a surfactant, nano particles of CB were uniformly dispersed in an epoxy matrix. • ATR-FTIR analysis showed that the CB coatings were degraded less than epoxy coating. • EIS results showed the coating with 2.5 wt% CB nanoparticles had higher corrosion resistance than neat epoxy. - Abstract: Degradation of epoxy coatings with and without Carbon Black (CB) nanoparticles under ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to obtain a good dispersion of CB nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. TEM analysis proved a uniform dispersion of modified CB nanoparticles in epoxy coating. The coatings were subjected to UV radiation to study the degradation behavior and then immersed in 3.5 wt% NaCl. The results showed that the electrochemical behavior of neat epoxy coating was related to the formation and development of microcracks on the surface. The occurrence of microcracks on the surface of the coatings and consequently the penetration of ionic species reduced by adding CB nanoparticles into the formulation of the coatings. CB nanoparticles decreased degradation of CB coatings by absorbing UV irradiation. The ATR-FTIR results showed that decrease in the intensity of methyl group as main peak in presence of 2.5 wt% CB was lower than neat epoxy. In addition, the reduction in impedance of neat epoxy coating under corrosive environment was larger than CB coatings. The CB coating with 2.5 wt% nanoparticles had the highest impedance to corrosive media after 2000 h UV irradiation and 24 h immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl.

  9. Degradation of modified carbon black/epoxy nanocomposite coatings under ultraviolet exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad, E-mail: ahmad_usk@yahoo.com [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariatpanahi, Homeira, E-mail: shariatpanahih@ripi.ir [Coating Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neshati, Jaber [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil [Coating Research Center, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Degradation behavior of modified Carbon Black (CB) epoxy coating was studied under UV irradiation using based on EIS technique. • By using SDS as a surfactant, nano particles of CB were uniformly dispersed in an epoxy matrix. • ATR-FTIR analysis showed that the CB coatings were degraded less than epoxy coating. • EIS results showed the coating with 2.5 wt% CB nanoparticles had higher corrosion resistance than neat epoxy. - Abstract: Degradation of epoxy coatings with and without Carbon Black (CB) nanoparticles under ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to obtain a good dispersion of CB nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. TEM analysis proved a uniform dispersion of modified CB nanoparticles in epoxy coating. The coatings were subjected to UV radiation to study the degradation behavior and then immersed in 3.5 wt% NaCl. The results showed that the electrochemical behavior of neat epoxy coating was related to the formation and development of microcracks on the surface. The occurrence of microcracks on the surface of the coatings and consequently the penetration of ionic species reduced by adding CB nanoparticles into the formulation of the coatings. CB nanoparticles decreased degradation of CB coatings by absorbing UV irradiation. The ATR-FTIR results showed that decrease in the intensity of methyl group as main peak in presence of 2.5 wt% CB was lower than neat epoxy. In addition, the reduction in impedance of neat epoxy coating under corrosive environment was larger than CB coatings. The CB coating with 2.5 wt% nanoparticles had the highest impedance to corrosive media after 2000 h UV irradiation and 24 h immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl.

  10. Multiple-diffusion flame synthesis of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Memon, Nasir

    2013-09-01

    A multi-element diffusion flame burner (MEDB) is useful in the study of flame synthesis of nanomaterials. Here, the growth of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) using an MEDB is demonstrated. Hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar) are utilized to establish the flame, whereas titanium tetraisopropoxide is used as the precursor for TiO2. The nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, with elemental mapping (of C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The growth of pure anatase TiO2 nanoparticles occurs when Ar and H2 are used as the precursor carrier gas, while the growth of carbon-coated nanoparticles ensues when Ar and ethylene (C2H4) are used as the precursor carrier gas. A uniform coating of 3-5nm of carbon is observed around TiO2 particles. The growth of highly crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles is dependent on the gas flow rate of the precursor carrier and amorphous particles are observed at high flow rates. Carbon coating occurs only on crystalline nanoparticles, suggesting a possible growth mechanism of carbon-coated TiO2 nanoparticles. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  11. Carbon coated Fe, Co and Ni Nanoparticles produced by high pressure CVD and their potential for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gendy, A.A.; Ibrahim, E.M.M.; Khavrus, V.; Krupskaya, Y.; Leonhardt, A.; Klingeler, R.; Buechner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW), Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Fe rate at C, Co rate at C and Ni rate at C nanocapsules have been produced by high pressure chemical vapour deposition (HPCVD). Scanning electron microscopy images prove that most of the particles are coated with carbon. High resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging confirms that these particles have a broad size distribution and a core/shell structure. In addition, individual nanoparticles are found inside a carbon capsule as well as several particles together in one shell. X-ray diffraction confirms the phases and allows calculating the average particle size from the width of the peaks. Our magnetisation studies confirm that the coated particles are ferromagnetic up to 400 K. AC magnetic heating studies have been performed which imply the potential of carbon coated nanomagnets for applications in hyperthermia therapies.

  12. Controlling the scattering properties of thin, particle-doped coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William; Corbett, Madeleine; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2013-03-01

    Coatings and thin films of small particles suspended in a matrix possess optical properties that are important in several industries from cosmetics and paints to polymer composites. Many of the most interesting applications require coatings that produce several bulk effects simultaneously, but it is often difficult to rationally formulate materials with these desired optical properties. Here, we focus on the specific challenge of designing a thin colloidal film that maximizes both diffuse and total hemispherical transmission. We demonstrate that these bulk optical properties follow a simple scaling with two microscopic length scales: the scattering and transport mean free paths. Using these length scales and Mie scattering calculations, we generate basic design rules that relate scattering at the single particle level to the film's bulk optical properties. These ideas will be useful in the rational design of future optically active coatings.

  13. Reliability of magnetic particle inspection performed through coatings: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The magnetic particle examination (MT) technique can reliably examine containment welds without removing their protective coatings. This study has investigated a variety of MT methods used in the oil and gas industry for their suitability for nuclear plant applications. 102 figs

  14. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploger, Scott A., E-mail: scott.ploger@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Hunn, John D.; Kehn, Jay S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 × 10{sup 5} total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  15. Composite of ceramic-coated magnetic alloy particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A composite structure and method for manufacturing same, the composite structure being comprised of metal particles and an inorganic bonding media. The method comprises the steps of coating particles of a metal powder with a thin layer of an inorganic bonding media selected from the group of powders consisting of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. The particles are assembled in a cavity and heat, with or without the addition of pressure, is thereafter applied to the particles until the layer of inorganic bonding media forms a strong bond with the particles and with the layer of inorganic bonding media on adjacent particles. The resulting composite structure is strong and remains cohesive at high temperatures.

  16. Effects of Two Purification Pretreatments on Electroless Copper Coating over Single-Walled Carbon Nano tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Z.; Li, L.; Dong, Sh.; Li, Sh.; Xiao, A.; Sun, Sh.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the reinforcement of copper matrix composite by single-walled carbon nano tubes, a three-step-refluxing purification of carbon nano tubes sample with HNO 3 -NaOH-HCl was proposed and demonstrated. A previously reported purification process using an electromagnetic stirring with H 2 O 2 /HCl mixture was also repeated. Then, the purified carbon nano tubes were coated with copper by the same electroless plating process. At the end, the effects of the method on carbon nano tubes themselves and on copper coating were determined by transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry. It was clearly confirmed that both of the two processes could remove most of iron catalyst particles and carbonaceous impurities without significant damage to carbon nano tubes. The thermal stability of the sample purified by H 2 O 2 /HCl treatment was slightly higher than that purified by HNO 3 -NaOH-HCl treatment. Nevertheless, the purification by HNO 3 -NaOH-HCl treatment was more effective for carboxyl functionalization on nano tubes than that by H 2 O 2 /HCl treatment. The Cu-coating on carbon nano tubes purified by both purification processes was complete, homogenous, and continuous. However, the Cu-coating on carbon nano tubes purified by H 2 O 2 /HCl was oxidized more seriously than those on carbon nano tubes purified by HNO 3 -NaOH-HCl treatment.

  17. Diamond-like carbon coated ultracold neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heule, S.; Atchison, F.; Daum, M.; Foelske, A.; Henneck, R.; Kasprzak, M.; Kirch, K.; Knecht, A.; Kuzniak, M.; Lippert, T.; Meier, M.; Pichlmaier, A.; Straumann, U.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown recently that diamond-like carbon (DLC) with a sp 3 fraction above 60% is a better wall coating material for ultracold neutron applications than beryllium. We report on results of Raman spectroscopic and XPS measurements obtained for diamond-like carbon coated neutron guides produced in a new facility, which is based on pulsed laser deposition at 193 nm. For diamond-like carbon coatings on small stainless steel substrates we find sp 3 fractions in the range from 60 to 70% and showing slightly increasing values with laser pulse energy and pulse repetition rate

  18. Table sugar as preparation and carbon coating reagent for facile synthesis and coating of rod-shaped MnO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Ahmed M., E-mail: ahmedh242@yahoo.co [National Research Centre, Inorganic Chemistry Department, Behoes St., Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Abuzeid, Hanaa M. [National Research Centre, Inorganic Chemistry Department, Behoes St., Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Nikolowski, Kristian; Ehrenberg, Helmut [Institute for Complex Materials, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-05-14

    Rod-shaped {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} has been synthesized by a novel and facile wet chemical method using simple sugar and potassium permanganate. Redox reaction between KMnO{sub 4} and sucrose is carried out in an acidic medium. Acidic medium provides a reducing character to sucrose through its decomposition to elemental carbon. Carbon coating process was done using simple sugar also as a source for carbon in an absolute ethanol with heating the mixture of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} and sugar at 350 {sup o}C for an hour in an ambient atmosphere. A single phase of cryptomelane-like phase MnO{sub 2} was observed from XRD patterns for bare and carbon coated samples. TGA analysis shows the presence of carbon layer through more weight loss percent of carbon coated sample in comparison with that of carbon free MnO{sub 2}. Both virgin and carbon coated MnO{sub 2} have high thermal stability due to high percent of K inside the tunnel determined from ICP analysis. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) showed a rod-shaped crystal for both the parent and carbon coated {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} and confirmed the presence of a thin film of carbon around MnO{sub 2} particles. Both XRD and TEM investigations show that the prepared powders are in nano-scale. Initial capacity of about 140 mAh/g was obtained for the parent and carbon coated samples. The results show also that carbon coating process improves the capacity retention and the efficiency of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} in comparison with that carbon free sample.

  19. Improved graphite matrix for coated-particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, D.H.; Davidson, K.V.

    1978-10-01

    An experimental process was developed to incorporate coated fuel particles in an extruded graphite matrix. This structure, containing 41 vol% particles, had a high matrix density, >1.6 g/cm 3 , and a matrix conductivity three to four times that of a pitch-injected fuel rod at 1775 K. Experiments were conducted to determine the uniformity of particle loadings in extrusions. Irradiation specimens were supplied for five tests in the High-Fluence Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  20. Geometrical-optics approximation of forward scattering by coated particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Cai, Xiaoshu; Ren, Kuanfang

    2004-03-20

    By means of geometrical optics we present an approximation algorithm with which to accelerate the computation of scattering intensity distribution within a forward angular range (0 degrees-60 degrees) for coated particles illuminated by a collimated incident beam. Phases of emerging rays are exactly calculated to improve the approximation precision. This method proves effective for transparent and tiny absorbent particles with size parameters larger than 75 but fails to give good approximation results at scattering angles at which refractive rays are absent. When the absorption coefficient of a particle is greater than 0.01, the geometrical optics approximation is effective only for forward small angles, typically less than 10 degrees or so.

  1. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  2. Microstructure changes and properties of TiC-coated carbon fiber-reinforced carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kunjie; Guo Quangui; Zhang Guobing; Shi Jingli; Zhang Hua; Liu Lang

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study distortion of TiC crystals after thermal cycles in plasma environment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe morphology changes and penetrating cracks in TiC/C coatings. To avoid the cracks and enhance properties of coated carbon fiber-reinforced carbon (C/C) composites, TiC/C composites were prepared as buffer layer to relieve thermal stresses. Thermal cycles indicated that the buffer layer could effectively improve thermal shock resistance of pure TiC coated C/C composites. To study the reason, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results suggested that TiC particles were uniformly imbedded in pyrocarbon in the buffer layer, which was advantageous to relieve mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between pure TiC and C/C. Moreover, thermal conductivity tests showed that the buffer layer was in favor of transferring heat loading

  3. Electron probe micro-analysis of irradiated Triso-coated UO2 particles, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kosaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1983-11-01

    The Triso-coated low-enriched UO 2 particles were subjected to the post-irradiation electron probe micro-analysis. Observations and analyses on the amoeba effect, inclusions and solutes in the UO 2 matrix were made. In the cooler side of the particle which suffered extensive kernel migration, two significant features were observed: (1) the wake of minute particles, presumably UO 2 , left by the moving kernel in the carbon phase and (2) carbon precipitation in the pores and along the grain boundaries of the UO 2 kernel. Both features could be hardly explained by the gas-phase mechanism of carbon transport and rather suggest the solid state mechanism. Two-types of 4d-transition metal inclusions were observed: the one which was predominantly Mo with a fraction of Tc and another which was enriched with Ru and containing significant amount of Si. The Mo and Si were also found in the UO 2 matrix; the observation led to the discussion of the oxygen potential in the irradiated Triso-coated UO 2 particle. (author)

  4. Coating of graphite flakes with MgO/carbon nanocomposite via gas state reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: Sharif_m@metaleng.iust.ac.i [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faghihi-Sani, M.A. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golestani-Fard, F. [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saberi, A. [Tabriz University (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, Ali Khalife [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-06-18

    Coating of graphite flakes with MgO/carbon nanocomposite was carried out via gaseous state reaction between mixture of Mg metal, CO gas and graphite flakes at 1000 {sup o}C. XRD and FE-SEM analysis of coating showed that the coating was comprised of MgO nano particles and amorphous carbon distributed smoothly and covered the graphite surface evenly. Thermodynamic calculations were employed to predict the reaction sequences as well as phase stability. The effect of coating on water wettability and oxidation resistance of graphite was studied using contact angle measurement and TG analysis, respectively. It was demonstrated that the reaction between Mg and CO could result in MgO/C nanocomposite deposition. The coating improved water wettability of graphite and also enhanced the oxidation resistance of graphite flakes significantly. Also the graphite coating showed significant phenolic resin-wettabilty owing to high surface area of such hydrophilic nano composite coating. The importance of graphite coating is explained with emphasis on its potential application in graphite containing refractories.

  5. Coating of graphite flakes with MgO/carbon nanocomposite via gas state reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, M.; Faghihi-Sani, M.A.; Golestani-Fard, F.; Saberi, A.; Soltani, Ali Khalife

    2010-01-01

    Coating of graphite flakes with MgO/carbon nanocomposite was carried out via gaseous state reaction between mixture of Mg metal, CO gas and graphite flakes at 1000 o C. XRD and FE-SEM analysis of coating showed that the coating was comprised of MgO nano particles and amorphous carbon distributed smoothly and covered the graphite surface evenly. Thermodynamic calculations were employed to predict the reaction sequences as well as phase stability. The effect of coating on water wettability and oxidation resistance of graphite was studied using contact angle measurement and TG analysis, respectively. It was demonstrated that the reaction between Mg and CO could result in MgO/C nanocomposite deposition. The coating improved water wettability of graphite and also enhanced the oxidation resistance of graphite flakes significantly. Also the graphite coating showed significant phenolic resin-wettabilty owing to high surface area of such hydrophilic nano composite coating. The importance of graphite coating is explained with emphasis on its potential application in graphite containing refractories.

  6. Flexible diamond-like carbon film coated on rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are major sources of friction of lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 70% of the total friction. The solution we present is to coat rubbers with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films by which the coefficient of friction is reduced to less than one tenth. Coating

  7. Science and technology of kernels and TRISO coated particle sorting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nothnagel, G.

    2006-09-01

    The ~1mm diameter TRISO coated particles, which form the elemental units of PBMR nuclear fuel, has to be close to spherical in order to best survive damage during sphere pressing. Spherical silicon carbide layers further provide the strongest miniature pressure vessels for fission product retention. To make sure that the final product contains particles of acceptable shape, 100% of kernels and coated particles have to be sorted on a surface-ground sorting table. Broken particles, twins, irregular (odd) shapes and extreme ellipsoids have to be separated from the final kernel and coated particle batches. Proper sorting of particles is an extremely important step in quality fuel production as the final failure fraction depends sensitively on the quality of sorting. After sorting a statistically significant sample of the sorted product is analysed for sphericity, which is defined as the ratio of maximum to minimum diameter, as part of a standard QC test to ensure conformance to German specifications. In addition a burn-leach test is done on coated particles (before pressing) and fuel spheres (after pressing) to ensure adherence to failure specifications. Because of the extreme importance of particle sorting for assurance of fuel quality it is essential to have an in-depth understanding of the capabilities and limitations of particle sorting. In this report a systematic scientific rationale is developed, from fundamental principles, to provide a basis for understanding the relationship between product quality and sorting parameters. The principles and concepts, developed in this report, will be of importance when future sorting tables (or equivalents) are to be designed. A number of new concepts and methodologies are developed to assist with equivalence validation of any two sorting tables. This is aimed in particular towards quantitative assessment of equivalence between current QC tables (closely based on the original NUKEM parameters, except for the driving mechanism

  8. One-pot synthesis and electrochemical reactivity of carbon coated LiFePO4 spindles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Juanjuan; Hu Juncheng; Li Jinlin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated LiFePO 4 spindles have been successfully synthesized via a novel supercritical method. ► The concentrations of lithium have an effect on the morphology of carbon coated LiFePO 4 . ► Amorphous carbon layer formed on the surface of LiFePO 4 by adding glucose. ► The carbon coating is responsible for the enhanced electrochemical performance. - Abstract: Spindle-like carbon coated LiFePO 4 (LiFePO 4 /C) composites have been successfully synthesized via a novel one-pot supercritical methanol method. The products were characterized by X-ray power diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The particle size, morphology and electrochemical reactivity changed with the concentration of lithium and carbon source. A possible morphology evolution process was also proposed. The glucose not only facilitates the formation of single crystalline LiFePO 4 , but also gives an amorphous carbon layer on the surface LiFePO 4 spindles.

  9. The effect of diamond-like carbon coating on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 particles for all solid-state lithium-ion batteries based on Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Heidy; Aihara, Yuichi; Ito, Seitaro; Watanabe, Taku; Park, Youngsin; Doo, Seokgwang

    2016-05-01

    There have been several reports on improvements of the performance of all solid-state battery using lithium metal oxide coatings on the cathode active material. However, the mechanism of the performance improvement remains unclear. To better understand the effect of the surface coating, we studied the impact of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The DLC coated NCA showed good cycle ability and rate performance. This result is further supported by reduction of the interfacial resistance of the cathode and electrolyte observed in impedance spectroscopy. The DLC layer was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy (TEM-EELS). After 100 cycles the sample was analyzed by X-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). These analyses showed that the thickness of the coating layer was around 4 nm on average, acting to hinder the side reactions between the cathode particle and the solid electrolyte. The results of this study will provide useful insights for understanding the nature of the buffer layer for the cathode materials.

  10. Structure and properties of carbon black particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei

    Structure and properties of carbon black particles were investigated using atomic force microscopy, gas adsorption, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Supplementary information was obtained using TEM and neutron scattering. The AFM imaging of carbon black aggregates provided qualitative visual information on their morphology, complementary to that obtained by 3-D modeling based on TEM images. Our studies showed that carbon black aggregates were relatively flat. The surface of all untreated carbon black particles was found to be rough and its fractal dimension was 2.2. Heating reduced the roughness and fractal dimension for all samples heat treated at above 1300 K to 2.0. Once the samples were heat treated rapid cooling did not affect the surface roughness. However, rapid cooling reduced crystallite sizes, and different Raman spectra were obtained for carbon blacks of various history of heat treatment. By analyzing the Raman spectra we determined the crystallite sizes and identified amorphous carbon. The concentration of amorphous carbon depends on hydrogen content. Once hydrogen was liberated at increased temperature, the concentration of amorphous carbon was reduced and crystallites started to grow. Properties of carbon blacks at high pressure were also studied. Hydrostatic pressure did not affect the size of the crystallites in carbon black particles. The pressure induced shift in Raman frequency of the graphitic component was a result of increased intermolecular forces and not smaller crystallites. Two methods of determining the fractal dimension, the FHH model and the yardstick technique based on the BET theory were used in the literature. Our study proved that the FHH model is sensitive to numerous assumptions and leads to wrong conclusions. On the other hand the yardstick method gave correct results, which agreed with the AFM results.

  11. Acceptance Test Data for BWXT Coated Particle Batch 93164A Defective IPyC Fraction and Pyrocarbon Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Coated particle fuel batch J52O-16-93164 was produced by Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT) for possible selection as fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), or may be used as demonstration production-scale coated particle fuel for other experiments. The tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coatings were deposited in a 150-mm-diameter production-scale fluidizedbed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace onto 425-μm-nominal-diameter spherical kernels from BWXT lot J52L-16-69316. Each kernel contained a mixture of 15.5%-enriched uranium carbide and uranium oxide (UCO) and was coated with four consecutive CVD layers: a ~50% dense carbon buffer layer with 100-μm-nominal thickness, a dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness, a silicon carbide (SiC) layer with 35-μm-nominal thickness, and a dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness. The TRISO-coated particle batch was sieved to upgrade the particles by removing over-sized and under-sized material, and the upgraded batch was designated by appending the letter A to the end of the batch number (i.e., 93164A).

  12. Zn-10.2% Fe coating over carbon steel atmospheric corrosion resistance. Comparison with zinc coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnau, G.; Gimenez, E.; Rubio, M.V.; Saura, J.J.; Suay, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Zn-10.2% Fe galvanized coating versus hot galvanized coating over carbon steel corrosion performance has been studied. Different periods of atmospheric exposures in various Valencia Community sites, and salt spray accelerated test have been done. Carbon steel test samples have been used simultaneously in order to classify exposure atmosphere corrosivity, and environmental exposure atmosphere characteristics have been analyzed. Corrosion Velocity versus environmental parameters has been obtained. (Author) 17 refs

  13. Frictional forces between hydrophilic and hydrophobic particle coated nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Petra M; Claesson, Per M.; Swerin, Agne

    2013-01-01

    Friction forces have long been associated with the famous Amontons' rule that states that the friction force is linearly dependent on the applied normal load, with the proportionality constant being known as the friction coefficient. Amontons' rule is however purely phenomenological and does...... not in itself provide any information on why the friction coefficient is different for different material combinations. In this study, friction forces between a colloidal probe and nanostructured particle coated surfaces in an aqueous environment exhibiting different roughness length scales were measured...... by utilizing the atomic force microscope (AFM). The chemistry of the surfaces and the probe was varied between hydrophilic silica and hydrophobized silica. For hydrophilic silica surfaces, the friction coefficient was significantly higher for the particle coated surfaces than on the flat reference surface. All...

  14. Architectural design of diamond-like carbon coatings for long-lasting joint replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujing; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lai-Chang; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2013-07-01

    Surface engineering through the application of super-hard, low-friction coatings as a potential approach for increasing the durability of metal-on-metal replacements is attracting significant attention. In this study innovative design strategies are proposed for the development of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) coatings against the damage caused by wear particles on the joint replacements. Finite element modeling is used to analyze stress distributions induced by wear particles of different sizes in the newly-designed coating in comparison to its conventional monolithic counterpart. The critical roles of architectural design in regulating stress concentrations and suppressing crack initiation within the coatings is elucidated. Notably, the introduction of multilayer structure with graded modulus is effective in modifying the stress field and reducing the magnitude and size of stress concentrations in the DLC diamond-like-carbon coatings. The new design is expected to greatly improve the load-carrying ability of surface coatings on prosthetic implants, in addition to the provision of damage tolerance through crack arrest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate nanoparticle agglomerates for the preparation of controlled release fine particles: The relationship between coating performance and the characteristics of various polymethacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keita; Kato, Shinsuke; Niwa, Toshiyuki

    2017-10-30

    We aimed to understand the factors controlling mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate. The relationship between coating performance and the characteristics of polymethacrylate powders was investigated. First, theophylline crystals were treated using a mechanical powder processor to obtain theophylline spheres (grindability of the agglomerates were attributed to differences in particle structure, resulting from consolidation between colloidal particles. High-grindability agglomerates exhibited higher pulverization as their glass transition temperature (T g ) increased and the further pulverization promoted coating. We therefore conclude that the minimization of polymethacrylate powder by pulverization is an important factor in mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate with low deformability. Meanwhile, when product temperature during coating approaches T g of polymer, polymethacrylate was soften to show high coating performance by plastic deformation. The effective coating by this mechanism may be accomplished by adjusting the temperature in the processor to the T g . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sintering of Fine Particles in Suspension Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Latka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Suspension plasma spraying is a process that enables the production of finely grained nanometric or submicrometric coatings. The suspensions are formulated with the use of fine powder particles in water or alcohol with some additives. Subsequently, the suspension is injected into plasma jet and the liquid additives evaporate. The remaining fine solids are molten and subsequently agglomerate or remain solid, depending on their trajectory in the plasma jet. The coating’s microstructure results from these two groups of particles arriving on a substrate or previously deposited coating. Previous experimental studies carried out for plasma sprayed titanium oxide and hydroxyapatite coatings enabled us to observe either a finely grained microstructure or, when a different suspension injection mode was used, to distinguish two zones in the microstructure. These two zones correspond to the dense zone formed from well molten particles, and the agglomerated zone formed from fine solid particles that arrive on the substrate in a solid state. The present paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical analysis of the formation process of the agglomerated zone. The experimental section establishes the heat flux supplied to the coating during deposition. In order to achieve this, calorimetric measurements were made by applying experimental conditions simulating the real coatings’ growth. The heat flux was measured to be in the range from 0.08 to 0.5 MW/m2,depending on the experimental conditions. The theoretical section analyzes the sintering during the coating’s growth, which concerns the fine particles arriving on the substrate in the solid state. The models of volume, grain boundary and surface diffusion were analyzed and adapted to the size and chemistry of the grains, temperature and time scales corresponding to the suspension plasma spraying conditions. The model of surface diffusion was found to best describe the sintering during suspension

  17. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku-Herrera, J.J., E-mail: jesuskuh@live.com.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Nistal, A. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cauich-Rodríguez, J.V. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Rubio, F.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bartolo-Pérez, P. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Cinvestav, Unidad Mérida, C.P., 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto E-glass fibers. • The role of the fiber coating on the deposition of MWCNTs on the fibers is studied. • A rather homogeneous deposition of MWCNTs is achieved if the coating is maintained. • Multiple oxygen-containing groups were found in the analysis of the fiber coating. • Evidence of chemical interaction between MWCNTs and the fiber coating was found. - Abstract: Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as “sizing”), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  18. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku-Herrera, J.J.; Avilés, F.; Nistal, A.; Cauich-Rodríguez, J.V.; Rubio, F.; Rubio, J.; Bartolo-Pérez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto E-glass fibers. • The role of the fiber coating on the deposition of MWCNTs on the fibers is studied. • A rather homogeneous deposition of MWCNTs is achieved if the coating is maintained. • Multiple oxygen-containing groups were found in the analysis of the fiber coating. • Evidence of chemical interaction between MWCNTs and the fiber coating was found. - Abstract: Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as “sizing”), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible

  19. Formation mechanism of a silicon carbide coating for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. C.; Shuford, D. M.; Mueller, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for a study to determine the mechanisms involved in a high-temperature pack cementation process which provides a silicon carbide coating on a carbon-carbon composite. The process and materials used are physically and chemically analyzed. Possible reactions are evaluated using the results of these analytical data. The coating is believed to develop in two stages. The first is a liquid controlled phase process in which silicon carbide is formed due to reactions between molten silicon metal and the carbon. The second stage is a vapor transport controlled reaction in which silicon vapors react with the carbon. There is very little volume change associated with the coating process. The original thickness changes by less than 0.7%. This indicates that the coating process is one of reactive penetration. The coating thickness can be increased or decreased by varying the furnace cycle process time and/or temperature to provide a wide range of coating thicknesses.

  20. Applications of thin carbon coatings and films in injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Eusebio Duarte

    In this research, the technical feasibility of two novel applications of thin carbon coatings is demonstrated. The first application consists of using thin carbon coatings on molds for molding ultra-thin plastic parts (graphene coating with carbide bonding to the mold surface. The coating resulted in a significant decrease of surface friction and consequently easiness of flow when compared to their uncoated counterparts. Thermoplastic polymers and their composites are a very attractive alternative but are hindered by the non-conductive nature of polymers. There are two general approaches used to date to achieve EMI shielding for plastic products. One is to spray a conductive metal coating onto the plastic surface forming a layer that must maintain its shielding effectiveness (SE), and its adhesion to the plastic throughout the expected life of the product. However, metal coatings add undesirable weight and tend to corrode over time. Furthermore, scratching the coating may create shielding failure; therefore, a protective topcoat may be required. The other approach is to use polymer composites filled with conductive fillers such as carbon black (CB), carbon nanofiber (CNF), and carbon nanotube (CNT). While conductive fillers may increase the electrical conductivity of polymer composites, the loading of such fillers often cannot reach a high level (painting using carbon black (CB). Such process can also be applied to injection molding for creating a top conductive layer. Increasing the amount of CB will increase the surface conductivity of the coated part, thus improving the paint transfer efficiency. However the CB levels needed to achieve the conductivity levels required for achieving EMI shielding would make the coating viscosity too large for proper coating. Nanopaper based composites are excellent candidates for EMI shielding because of the nanopaper's high concentration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) (~2 wt% to 10 wt% depending on nanopaper/thermoplastic thickness

  1. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz [Research Center Julich (FZJ), Julich (Germany); Kendall, James M. [Global Virtual L1c, Prescott (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be{exclamation_point} It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine

  2. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz; Kendall, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be! It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine applications at 850-900 .deg. C

  3. Tribological study of novel metal-doped carbon-based coatings with enhanced thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Paranjayee

    and M0S2. This mechanism is believed to be the key-factor for low friction properties of Mo-W-C coating and presence of graphitic carbon particles further benefits the friction behaviour. It is observed that low friction is achieved mostly due to formation of WS2 at ambient temperature, whereas formation of both WS2 and M0S2 significantly decreases the friction of Mo-W-C coating at high temperature. This further indicates importance of combined Mo and W doping over single-metal doping into carbon-based coatings.Isothermal oxidation tests indicate that Mo-W-C coating preserves it's as-deposited graphitic nature up to 500°C, whereas local delamination of DLC coating leads to substrate exposure and loss of its diamond-like structure at the same temperature. Further, thermo-gravimetric tests confirm excellent thermal stability of Mo-W-C coating compared to DLC. Mo-W-C coating resists oxidation up to 800°C and no coating delamination is observed due to retained coating integrity and its strong adhesion with substrate. On the other hand, state-of-the-art DLC coating starts to delaminate beyond 380°C.The test results confirm that Mo-W-C coating sustains high working temperature and simultaneously maintains improved tribological properties during boundary lubricated condition at ambient and high temperature. Thus Mo-W-C coating is a suitable candidate for low friction and high temperature wear resistant applications compared to commercially available state-of-the-art DLC coatings.

  4. Preparation and properties of in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shoujie, E-mail: jlliushoujie@126.com; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Su, Yangyang, E-mail: suyangyang@mail.nwpu.edu.cn; Guo, Qian, E-mail: 1729299905@163.com; Zhang, Leilei, E-mail: zhangleilei@nwpu.edu.cn

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess excellent mechanical properties for their role playing in reinforcement as imparting strength to brittle hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic coating. However, there are few reports relating to the in-situ grown carbon nanotubes reinforced hydroxyapatite (CNTs-HA) coating. Here we demonstrate the potential application in reinforcing biomaterials by an attempt to use in-situ grown of CNTs strengthen HA coating, using a combined method composited of injection chemical vapor deposition (ICVD) and pulsed electrodeposition. The microstructure, phases and chemical compositions of CNTs-HA coatings were characterized by various advanced methods. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that CNTs-HA coatings avoided the inhomogeneous dispersion of CNTs inside HA coating. The result show that the interfacial shear strength between CNTs-HA coating and the C/C composite matrix reaches to 12.86 ± 1.43 MPa. Potenitodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies show that the content of CNTs affects the corrosion resistance of CNTs-HA coating. Cell culturing and simulated body fluid test elicit the biocompatibility with living cells and bioactivity of CNTs-HA coatings, respectively. - Highlights: • A novel bioceramic composite coating of hydroxyapatite reinforced with in-situ grown carbon nanotubes was fabricated. • The doping of carbon nanotubes had almost no impact on the biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite coatings. • The doping of carbon nanotubes improved corrosion resistance of hydroxyapatite coatings in simulated human body solution.

  5. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) oxidation resistant material samples - Baseline coated, and baseline coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced carbon-carbon material specimens were machined from 19 and 33 ply flat panels which were fabricated and processed in accordance with the specifications and procedures accepted for the fabrication and processing of the leading edge structural subsystem (LESS) elements for the space shuttle orbiter. The specimens were then baseline coated and tetraethyl orthosilicate impregnated, as applicable, in accordance with the procedures and requirements of the appropriate LESS production specifications. Three heater bars were ATJ graphite silicon carbide coated with the Vought 'pack cementation' coating process, and three were stackpole grade 2020 graphite silicon carbide coated with the chemical vapor deposition process utilized by Vought in coating the LESS shell development program entry heater elements. Nondestructive test results are reported.

  6. Irradiation test HT-31: high-temperature irradiation behavior of LASL-made extruded fuel rods and LASL-made coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.; Reiswig, R.D.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1977-04-01

    Three LASL-made extruded graphite and coated particle fuel rods have been irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Fluence Isotope Reactor test HT-31. Test conditions were about 9 x 10 21 nvt(E > .18 MeV) at 1250 0 C. The graphite matrix showed little or no effect of the irradiation. LASL-made ZrC containing coated particles with ZrC coats and ZrC-doped pyrolytic carbon coats showed no observable effects of the irradiation

  7. Pair interaction of bilayer-coated nanoscopic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi-Yi, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The pair interaction between bilayer membrane-coated nanosized particles has been explored by using the self-consistent field (SCF) theory. The bilayer membranes are composed of amphiphilic polymers. For different system parameters, the pair-interaction free energies are obtained. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of a sequence of structural transformations of bilayers on spherical particles, which occur during their approaching processes. For different head fractions of amphiphiles, the asymmetrical morphologies between bilayers on two particles and the inverted micellar intermediates have been found in the membrane fusion pathway. These results can benefit the fabrication of vesicles as encapsulation vectors for drug and gene delivery. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  8. Some calculations of the failure statistics of coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.G.; Hobbs, J.E.

    1977-03-01

    Statistical variations of coated fuel particle parameters were considered in stress model calculations and the resulting particle failure fraction versus burn-up evaluated. Variations in the following parameters were considered simultaneously: kernel diameter and porosity, thickness of the buffer, seal, silicon carbide and inner and outer pyrocarbon layers, which were all assumed to be normally distributed, and the silicon carbide fracture stress which was assumed to follow a Weibull distribution. Two methods, based respectively on random sampling and convolution of the variations were employed and applied to particles manufactured by Dragon Project and RFL Springfields. Convolution calculations proved the more satisfactory. In the present calculations variations in the silicon carbide fracture stress caused the greatest spread in burn-up for a given change in failure fraction; kernel porosity is the next most important parameter. (author)

  9. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of carbon steel with bulk coating holidays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With epoxy coal tar as the coating material, the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Q235 with different kinds of bulk coating holidays has been investigated with EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) in a 3.5vol% NaCl aqueous solution.The area ratio of bulk coating holiday to total coating area of steel is 4.91%. The experimental results showed that at free corrosionpotential, the corrosion of carbon steel with disbonded coating holiday is heavier than that with broken holiday and disbonded & broken holiday with time; Moreover, the effectiveness of Cathodic Protection (CP) of carbon steel with broken holiday is better than that with disbonded holiday and disbonded & broken holiday on CP potential -850 mV (vs CSE). Further analysis indicated that the two main reasons for corrosion are electrolyte solution slowly penetrating the coating, and crevice corrosion at steel/coating interface near holidays. The ratio of impedance amplitude (Z) of different frequency to minimum frequency is defined as K value. The change rate of K with frequency is related to the type of coating holiday.

  10. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Baseline Coated Particle Composite LEU01-46T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 baseline coated particle composite LEU01-46T, a composite of four batches of TRISO-coated 350 (micro)m 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with a ∼ 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 (micro)m nominal thickness) followed by a dense inner pyrocarbonlayer (40 (micro)m nominal thickness) followed by a SiC layer (35 (micro)m nominal thickness) followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 (micro)m nominal thickness). The coated particles, were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program to be put into compacts for insertion in the first irradiation test capsule, AGR-1. The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite (G73D-20-69302). The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). Additional particle batches were coated with only buffer or buffer plus inner pyrocarbon (IPyC) layers using similar process conditions as used for the full TRISO batches comprising the LEU01-46T composite. These batches were fabricated in order to qualify that the process conditions used for buffer and IPyC would produce acceptable densities, as described in sections 8 and 9. These qualifying batches used 350 (micro)m natural uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (NUCO). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73B-NU-69300. The use of NUCO surrogate kernels is not expected to significantly effect the densities of the buffer and IPyC coatings. Confirmatory batches using LEUCO kernels from G73D-20-69302 were coated and characterized to verify this assumption. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380, Rev. 6) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance

  11. Preparation and characterization of SnO2 and Carbon Co-coated LiFePO4 cathode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibin; Liu, Shuxin; Huang, Yongmao

    2014-04-01

    The SnO2 and carbon co-coated LiFePO4 cathode materials were successfully synthesized by solid state method. The microstructure and morphology of LiFePO4 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope. The results showed that the SnO2 and carbon co-coated LiFePO4 cathode materials exhibited more uniform particle size distribution. Compared with the uncoated LiFePO4/C, the structure of LiFePO4 with SnO2 and carbon coating had no change. The existence of SnO2 and carbon coating layer effectively enhanced the initial discharge capacity. Among the investigated samples, the one with DBTDL:LiFePO4 molar ratios of 7:100 exhibited the best electrochemical performance.

  12. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  13. Method for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lloyd J.; Willey, Melvin G.; Tiegs, Sue M.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in "hot cells" designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel material, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  14. Study of SEY degradation of amorphous carbon coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bundaleski, N.; Santos, A.; Teodoro, O.M.N.D.; Silva, A.G.

    2013-04-22

    Deposition of low secondary electron yield (SEY) carbon coatings by magnetron sputtering onto the inner walls of the accelerator seems to be the most promising solution for suppressing the electron cloud problem. However, these coatings change their electron emission properties during long term exposure to air. The ageing process of carbon coated samples with initial SEY of about 0.9 received from CERN is studied as a function of exposure to different environments. It is shown that samples having the same initial SEY may age with different rates. The SEY increase can be correlated with the surface concentration of oxygen. Annealing of samples in air at 100-200 {\\deg}C reduces the ageing rate and even recovers previously degraded samples. The result of annealing is reduction of the hydrogen content in the coatings by triggering its surface segregation followed by desorption.

  15. Carbon-Supported Iron Oxide Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meaz, T.; Mørup, Steen; Koch, C. Bender

    1996-01-01

    A carbon black ws impregnated with 6 wt% iron using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate. The impregnated carbon was initially dried at 125 C. The effect of heating of the iron oxide phase was investigated at temperatures between 200 and 600 C using Mossbauer spectroscopy. All heat treatments were...... done in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. Ferrihydrite is formed and is stable at and below a temperature of 300 C. At 600 C small particles of maghemite is the dominant iron oxide. A transformation reaction is suggested....

  16. Carbon nanostructure formation driven by energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhiyuan; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been envisaged to be the building blocks of a variety of nanoscale devices and materials. The inherent nanometer-size and ability of being either metallic or semiconductive of CNTs lead to their application in nanoelectronics. Excellent mechanical characteristics of CNTs suggest their use as structural reinforcements. However, to fully exploit the potential applications, effective means of tailoring CNT properties must be developed. Irradiation of materials with energetic particles beams (ions and electrons) is a standard and important tool for modifying material properties. Irradiation makes it possible to dope the samples, to create local amorphous region or vice versa, recrystallize the lattice and even drive a phase transition. In this paper, we report our results of (1) phase transfromation from carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond driven by hydrogen plasma, (2) onion-like nanostructure from carbon nanotubes driven by ion beams of several tens keV, and (3) amorphous carbon nanowire network formation by ion beam irradiation. Structural phase transformation from multiwalled carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond by hydrogen plasma post-treatment was carried out. Ultrahigh equivalent diamond nucleation density of more than 1011 nuclei/cm 2 was obtained. The diamond formation and growth mechanisms were proposed to be the consequence of the formation of sp3 bonded amorphous carbon clusters. The hydrogen chemisorption on curved graphite network and the energy deposited on CNTs by continuous impingement of activated molecular or atomic hydrogen are responsible for the formation of amorphous carbon matrix. Diamond nucleates and grows in the way similar to that of diamond chemical vapor deposition processes on amorphous carbon films. Furthermore, single crystalline diamond nanorods of 4-8 nm in diameter and up to 200 nm in length have been successfully synthesized by hydrogen plasma post

  17. Mass spectrometric determination of gases in individual coated HTR fuel particles. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigl, A.; Bildstein, H.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described which allows the simultaneous determination of fission and reaction gases in individual coated particles at temperatures up to 2 000 0 C. The particles are heated under high-vacuum in a micro resistance-furnace up to the desired temperature. After preselected times the particles are crushed by action of a pneumatic cylinder. The gases liberated are fed into a quadrupole analyzer where they are analyzed in a dynamic mode. A peak selector allows the simultaneous measurement of up to four gases. The method is used routinely for the determination of fission gases (Kr and Xe) and of carbon monoxide which is formed as a reaction gas from oxide fuel. Precision and accuracy are in the order of a few percent. Detection limits for routine measurements are about 10 -7 cm 3 (STP) for Kr and Xe and 2x10 -5 cm 3 (STP) for CO but can be lowered by special techniques. (Auth.)

  18. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of SiC and ZrC composite coating on TRISO coated particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. G.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    SiC coating is widely suggested as structural materials for nuclear application due to its excellent high irradiation resistance properties and high temperature mechanical properties. SiC coating on TRistructural-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles plays an important role as a protective layer from radioactive fission gas and a mechanical structural layer. TRISO coating layer was deposited on a spherical particle by a FBCVD method. The ZrO{sub 2} spherical particles were used as a simulant kernel. TRISO coating layers consisting of a porous buffer layer, an inner PyC layer were sequentially deposited before depositing SiC or ZrC coating layer. In order investigate the phase of each composite coating layer, Raman analysis was conducted. SiC, ZrC coating and SiC/ZrC composite coating on spherical particle were successfully deposited via FBCVD method by adjusting source gas flow rate. In the SiC and ZrC composite coating, SiC phase and ZrC phase were observed by XRD and SEM analysis. In the condition of 100 sccm of ZrCl{sub 4}, 25 sccm of CH{sub 4}, and 30 sccm of MTS, only two phases of SiC and ZrC were observed and two phases are located with clean grain boundary.

  20. Effect of carbon coating on cycle performance of LiFePO4/C composite cathodes using Tween80 as carbon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, You-Guo; Zheng, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Qing-Yu; Wang, Hong-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Tween80 addition could enhance cycle stability of LiFePO 4 material. • The FTIR spectrum confirms Tween80 surfactant can bond with LiFePO 4 particles. • Some chemical bonds between material and carbon layer still exist after sintering. - Abstract: The influence of carbon coating on the cycle performance of LiFePO 4 /C composite cathodes using polyoxyethylenesorbitan monooleate (Tween80) as carbon source against lithium metal foil anode for Li-ion batteries was investigated in this paper. According to Infrared spectrum analysis (FTIR), the Tween80 surfactant molecules bond to the surface of LiFePO 4 and form an adsorption layer, which contribute to the formation of a homogeneous carbon layer tightly coating on the surface of LiFePO 4 particles in the process of sintering, due to a strong binding force provided by surface chemical bonds. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the carbon layer around LiFePO 4 using Tween80 as carbon source still coating on the surface of LiFePO 4 after 200 cycles at 5 C rate while the carbon layer shed from the surface of LiFePO 4 using glucose as carbon source. As a result, the carbon-coated LiFePO 4 using Tween80 as carbon source exhibits much higher capacity retention than the sample using glucose as carbon source. Electrochemical impedance measurement (EIS) reveals that the carbon-coated LiFePO 4 electrode using Tween80 surfactant has a lower charge transfer resistance than the electrode using glucose as carbon source electrode after 100 and 200 cycles at 5 C rate

  1. Coating applications for the molten carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigeaud, A.; Skok, A.J.; Patel, P.S.; Maru, H.C.

    1981-09-25

    The molten carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient low polluting fuel-to-electricity conversion device which is at present being developed for power plant and industrial use. Because the alkali carbonates at the operating temperature of 650/sup 0/C are corrosive and the methods employed for sealing the cell lead to certain electrochemical corrosion couples, different types of protective coatings are needed to minimize attack in a cost-effective manner. Besides protective purposes, other opportunities are also described where coating technology can be gainfully employed in this system.

  2. Transient Liquid Phase Behavior of Sn-Coated Cu Particles and Chip Bonding using Paste Containing the Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jun Ho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sn-coated Cu particles were prepared as a filler material for transient liquid phase (TLP bonding. The thickness of Sn coating was controlled by controlling the number of plating cycles. The Sn-coated Cu particles best suited for TLP bonding were fabricated by Sn plating thrice, and the particles showed a pronounced endothermic peak at 232°C. The heating of the particles for just 10 s at 250°C destroyed the initial core-shell structure and encouraged the formation of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds. Further, die bonding was also successfully performed at 250°C under a slight bonding pressure of around 0.1 MPa using a paste containing the particles. The bonding time of 30 s facilitated the bonding of Sn-coated Cu particles to the Au surface and also increased the probability of network formation between particles.

  3. Coated air-stable cobalt--rare earth alloy particles and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeggil, J.C.; Charles, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for producing novel air-stable coated particles of a magnetic transition metal-rare earth alloys. An organometallic compound which decomposes at a temperature below 500 0 C is heated to produce a metal vapor which is contacted with particles of a transition metal-rare earth alloy to deposit a metal coating on the particles. (U.S.)

  4. Persistent cyclestability of carbon coated Zn–Sn metal oxide/carbon microspheres as highly reversible anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guoqing; Kaneko, Shingo; Liu, Weiwei; Xia, Bingbo; Sun, Hongdan; Zhang, Ruixue; Zheng, Junwei; Li, Decheng

    2013-01-01

    Development of high-capacity anode materials equipped with strong cyclestability is a great challenge for use as practical electrode for high-performance lithium-ion rechargeable battery. In this study, we synthesized a carbon coated Zn–Sn metal nanocomposite oxide and carbon spheres (ZTO@C/CSs) via a simple glucose hydrothermal reaction and subsequent carbonization approach. The carbon coated ZTO/carbon microspheres composite maintained a reversible capacity of 680 mAh g −1 after 345 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g −1 , and furthermore the cell based on the composite exhibited an excellent rate capability of 470 mAh g −1 even when the cell was cycled at 2000 mA g –1 . The thick carbon layer formed on the ZTO nanoparticles and carbon spheres effectively buffered the volumetric change of the particles, which thus prolonged the cycling performance of the electrodes

  5. Influences of sodium carbonate on physicochemical properties of lansoprazole in designed multiple coating pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yang, Min; Fan, Jun Hong; Feng, Cai Xia; Zhang, Su Juan; Wang, Jin Xu; Guan, Pei Pei; Wu, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Lansoprazole (LSP), a proton-pump inhibitor, belongs to class II drug. It is especially instable to heat, light, and acidic media, indicating that fabrication of a formulation stabilizing the drug is difficult. The addition of alkaline stabilizer is the most powerful method to protect the drug in solid formulations under detrimental environment. The purpose of the study was to characterize the designed multiple coating pellets of LSP containing an alkaline stabilizer (sodium carbonate) and assess the effect of the stabilizer on the physicochemical properties of the drug. The coated pellets were prepared by layer-layer film coating with a fluid-bed coater. In vitro release and acid-resistance studies were carried out in simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid, respectively. Furthermore, the moisture-uptake test was performed to evaluate the influence of sodium carbonate on the drug stability. The results indicate that the drug exists in the amorphous state or small (nanometer size) particles without crystallization even after storage at 40°C/75% for 5 months. The addition of sodium carbonate to the pellet protects the drug from degradation in simulated gastric fluid in a dose-dependent manner. The moisture absorbed into the pellets has a detrimental effect on the drug stability. The extent of drug degradation is directly correlated with the content of moisture absorption. In conclusion, these results suggest that the presence of sodium carbonate influence the physicochemical properties of LSP, and the designed multiple coating pellets enhance the drug stability.

  6. Statistical optimization of microencapsulation process for coating of magnesium particles with Viton polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaee, Saeed; Ashtiani, Fatemeh Shamsi [Faculty of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface of magnesium particles was modified with Viton via solvent/non-solvent method. • FT-IR, SEM, EDX, Map analysis, and TG/DSC techniques were employed to characterize the coated particles. • Coating process factors were optimized by Taguchi robust design. • The importance of coating conditions on resistance of coated magnesium against oxidation was studied. - Abstract: The surface of magnesium particles was modified by coating with Viton as an energetic polymer using solvent/non-solvent technique. Taguchi robust method was utilized as a statistical experiment design to evaluate the role of coating process parameters. The coated magnesium particles were characterized by various techniques, i.e., Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and thermogravimetry (TG), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results showed that the coating of magnesium powder with the Viton leads to a higher resistance of metal against oxidation in the presence of air atmosphere. Meanwhile, tuning of the coating process parameters (i.e., percent of Viton, flow rate of non-solvent addition, and type of solvent) influences on the resistance of the metal particles against thermal oxidation. Coating of magnesium particles yields Viton coated particles with higher thermal stability (632 °C); in comparison with the pure magnesium powder, which commences oxidation in the presence of air atmosphere at a lower temperature of 260 °C.

  7. Failure of the capsule for coated particles irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Jikei; Nomura, Yasushi; Nagamatsuya, Takaaki; Yamahara, Takeshi; Sakai, Haruyuki

    1975-10-01

    During operation cycle No. 27 of the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) on May 20, 1974, leakage of the fission product gas occurred from the capsule 72F-7A, which contained coated particles for the irradiation; the coated particles are for the development of a multi-purpose high temperature gas cooled reactor. The capsule was designed for heat 1600 0 C. Three nickel plates as the heat reflector were sandwiched in between the plates of titanium and zirconium, which were adsorbents for the impurity gases in the cladding tube (Nb-1%Zr). Temperatures of the plates were about 1000 0 C under the irradiation, so one metal diffused into the other metal through interfaces, resulting in the formation of an alloy. Its melting point was lower than those of metals in the capsule. The cladding material Nb-1%Zr was melted by the alloy and finally a pin hole developed through the cladding. The process of failure, design of the capsule, post-irradiation test of the capsule and the failure-reproducing experiment with a mock-up capsule are described. (auth.)

  8. Light absorption by coated nano-sized carbonaceous particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Martin; Kocifaj, Miroslav; Videen, Gorden; Horvath, Helmuth

    The optical properties of strongly absorbing soot particles coated by transparent material are investigated experimentally and described by several modeling approaches. Soot is produced by spark discharge and passed through a Sinclair-La Mer generator where non-absorbing carnauba wax is condensed onto it to obtain internal soot-wax mixtures in a controlled way. Measurements of the extinction and volume scattering coefficient show an amplification of absorption by a factor of approximately 1.8. This behavior was described by different approaches of internally mixed materials for the modal diameters of the measured size distributions: concentric-sphere model, effective medium approximations and heterogeneous ellipsoids. The concentric-sphere model describes the absorption increase quantitatively; and hence, it is chosen to be applied to the entire particle population in the size distribution. The growth of the soot particles by condensing wax is described by a simplified growth model to estimate the different contributions of several soot particle diameters to the overall absorption cross-section.

  9. Effect of nano-TiO{sub 2} particles size on the corrosion resistance of alkyd coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyab, M.A., E-mail: hamadadeiab@yahoo.com; Keera, S.T.

    2014-08-01

    The coating system containing various sizes (∼10, 50, 100, 150 nm) of nano-TiO{sub 2} were prepared and investigated for corrosion protection of carbon steel in 1.0 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} using polarization, EIS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. It was found that nano-TiO{sub 2} particles improved the corrosion resistance of alkyd coatings. The corrosion resistance occurs via physical adhesion on the metal surface. O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O permeability of coating decreased with decrease in the nano-TiO{sub 2} size. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with decreasing the size of nano-TiO{sub 2} and with decreasing the temperature. - Highlights: • Nano-TiO{sub 2} coating were prepared and used for corrosion protection of C-steel. • Nano-TiO{sub 2} particles in coating are effective to improve the corrosion resistance. • Nano-TiO{sub 2} coating inhibit both anodic and cathodic reactions. • Corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with decrease in the size of nano-TiO{sub 2}. • O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O permeability of coating decreased with decrease in the nano-TiO{sub 2} size.

  10. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of aluminum reinforced with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, R.; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Caudillo, R.; Garcia-Gutierrez, D.I.; Marquez-Lucero, A.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Mendoza-Ruiz, D.C.; Jose Yacaman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of pure aluminum with carbon-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag-C NP) of 10 nm in size were prepared by the mechanical milling process. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the Ag-C NP are homogeneously dispersed into the Al matrix, silver nanoparticles do not coalesce, grow or dissolve in the aluminum matrix due the carbon shell. The values of yield strength (σ y ), maximum strength (σ max ) and micro-hardness Vickers (HVN) of the composites were evaluated and reported as a function of Ag-C NP content. It has been found that the introduction of this type of particles in aluminum strengthen it, increasing all the previous parameters

  11. An Application of X-ray Fluorescence as Process Analytical Technology (PAT) to Monitor Particle Coating Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshio; Katakuse, Yoshimitsu; Azechi, Yasutaka

    2018-03-30

    An attempt to apply X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis to evaluate small particle coating process as a Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) was made. The XRF analysis was used to monitor coating level in small particle coating process with at-line manner. The small particle coating process usually consists of multiple coating processes. This study was conducted by a simple coating particles prepared by first coating of a model compound (DL-methionine) and second coating by talc on spherical microcrystalline cellulose cores. The particles with two layered coating are enough to demonstrate the small particle coating process. From the result by the small particle coating process, it was found that the XRF signal played different roles, resulting that XRF signals by first coating (layering) and second coating (mask coating) could demonstrate the extent with different mechanisms for the coating process. Furthermore, the particle coating of the different particle size has also been investigated to evaluate size effect of these coating processes. From these results, it was concluded that the XRF could be used as a PAT in monitoring particle coating processes and become powerful tool in pharmaceutical manufacturing.

  12. Design of sustained release fine particles using two-step mechanical powder processing: particle shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with polymer nanoparticle agglomerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keita; Ito, Natsuki; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-09-10

    We attempted to prepare sustained release fine particles using a two-step mechanical powder processing method; particle-shape modification and dry particle coating. First, particle shape of bulk drug was modified by mechanical treatment to yield drug crystals suitable for the coating process. Drug crystals became more rounded with increasing rotation speed, which demonstrates that powerful mechanical stress yields spherical drug crystals with narrow size distribution. This process is the result of destruction, granulation and refinement of drug crystals. Second, the modified drug particles and polymer coating powder were mechanically treated to prepare composite particles. Polymer nanoparticle agglomerate obtained by drying poly(meth)acrylate aqueous dispersion was used as a coating powder. The porous nanoparticle agglomerate has superior coating performance, because it is completely deagglomerated under mechanical stress to form fine fragments that act as guest particles. As a result, spherical drug crystals treated with porous agglomerate were effectively coated by poly(meth)acrylate powder, showing sustained release after curing. From these findings, particle-shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with nanoparticle agglomerate using a mechanical powder processor is expected as an innovative technique for preparing controlled-release coated particles having high drug content and size smaller than 100 μm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, ...

  14. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  15. Carbon nanostructures and graphite-coated metal nanostructures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Under certain conditions, pyrolysis of ruthenocene gives rise to graphite coated ruthenium nanoparticles as well as worm-like carbon structures. Pyrolysis of mixtures of ruthenocene and ferrocene gives rise to nanoparticles or nanorods of FeRu alloys, the composition depending upon the composition of the original mixture.

  16. Could humicity affect the mechanical properties of carbon based coatings?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobota, Jaroslav; Grossman, Jan; Vyskočil, J.; Novák, R.; Fořt, Tomáš; Vítů, T.; Dupák, Libor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 15 (2010), s. 375-377 ISSN 0009-2770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : carbon * mechanical properties * humidity * fracture toughness of hard thin coatings Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.620, year: 2010

  17. Pressure analysis in the fabrication process of TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Shao Youlin; Liu Bing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The pressure signals during the real TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle fabrication process. ► A new relationship about the pressure drop change and the coated fuel particles properties. ► The proposed relationship is validated by experimental results during successive coating. ► A convenient method for monitoring the fluidized state during coating process. - Abstract: The pressure signals in the coating furnace are obtained experimentally from the TRISO UO 2 -coated fuel particle fabrication process. The pressure signals during the coating process are analyzed and a simplified relationship about the pressure drop change due to the coated layer is proposed based on the spouted bed hydrodynamics. The change of pressure drop is found to be consistent with the change of the combination factor about particle density, bed density, particle diameter and static bed height, during the successive coating process of the buffer PyC, IPyC, SiC and OPyC layer. The newly proposed relationship is validated by the experimental values. Based on this relationship, a convenient method is proposed for real-time monitoring the fluidized state of the particles in a high-temperature coating process in the spouted bed. It can be found that the pressure signals analysis is an effective method to monitor the fluidized state on-line in the coating process at high temperature up to 1600 °C.

  18. Large area diamond-like carbon coatings by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, A.R.; Proctor, G.; Jones, A.M.; Bull, S.J.; Chivers, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto large geometry components in the Harwell Blue Tank ion implantation facility. To modify the substrate surface and to crack the low vapour pressure oil which is evaporated and condensed onto the surface, a 40 Kev nitrogen ion bucket ion source is used. The coating of areas up to 1 metre in diameter is common and with component manipulation larger areas may be coated. Since the component temperature never exceeds 80 o C during the process, a wide range of materials may be coated including specialist tool steels and even certain high density polymers. In order to produce hard wear resistant coatings with extremely low coefficients of friction (0.02-0.15) and a range of mechanical and electrical properties, various oil precursors have been investigated. The production and assessment of such coatings, including measurements of their tribiological performance, is presented. Applications for wear resistance, corrosion protection and electrically conducting coatings are discussed with examples drawn from engineering, electronics and biomedicine. (7 figures, 13 references). (UK)

  19. Biomedical applications of diamond-like carbon coatings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ritwik Kumar; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2007-10-01

    Owing to its superior tribological and mechanical properties with corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and hemocompatibility, diamond-like carbon (DLC) has emerged as a promising material for biomedical applications. DLC films with various atomic bond structures and compositions are finding places in orthopedic, cardiovascular, and dental applications. Cells grew on to DLC coating without any cytotoxity and inflammation. DLC coatings in orthopedic applications reduced wear, corrosion, and debris formation. DLC coating also reduced thrombogenicity by minimizing the platelet adhesion and activation. However, some contradictory results (Airoldi et al., Am J Cardiol 2004;93:474-477, Taeger et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2003;34:1094-1100) were also reported that no significant improvement was observed in the performance of DLC-coated stainless stent or DLC-coated femoral head. This controversy should be discussed based on the detailed information of the coating such as atomic bond structure, composition, and/or electronic structure. In addition, instability of the DLC coating caused by its high level of residual stress and poor adhesion in aqueous environment should be carefully considered. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are thus required to confirm its use for medical devices.

  20. One-Pot Synthesis of Carbon-Coated SnO 2 Nanocolloids with Improved Reversible Lithium Storage Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen

    2009-07-14

    We report a simple glucose-mediated hydrothermal method for gram-scale synthesis of nearly monodisperse hybrid SnO 2 nanoparticles. Glucose is found to play the dual role of facilitating rapid precipitation of polycrystalline SnO 2 nanocolloids and in creating a uniform, glucose-derived, carbon-rich polysaccharide (GCP) coating on the SnO 2 nanocores. The thickness of the GCP coating can be facilely manipulated by varying glucose concentration in the synthesis medium. Carbon-coated SnO 2 nanocolloids obtained after carbonization of the GCP coating exhibit significantly enhanced cycling performance for lithium storage. Specifically, we find that a capacity of ca. 440 mA h/g can be obtained after more than 100 charge/discharge cycles at a current density of 300 mA/g in hybrid SnO 2-carbon electrodes containing as much as 1/3 of their mass in the low-activity carbon shell. By reducing the SnO 2-carbon particles with H 2, we demonstrate a simple route to carbon-coated Sn nanospheres. Lithium storage properties of the latter materials are also reported. Our results suggest that large initial irreversible losses in these materials are caused not only by the initial, presumably irreversible, reduction of SnO 2 as generally perceived in the field, but also by the formation of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI). © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  1. Beam Tests of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating for Mitigation of Electron Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey [Fermilab; Backfish, Michael [Fermilab; Kato, Shigeki [KEK, Tsukuba; Tan, Cheng-Yang [Fermilab; Zwaska, Robert [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Electron cloud beam instabilities are an important consideration in virtually all high-energy particle accelerators and could pose a formidable challenge to forthcoming high-intensity accelerator upgrades. Our results evaluate the efficacy of a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating for the mitigation of electron in the Fermilab Main Injector. The interior surface of the beampipe conditions in response to electron bombardment from the electron cloud and we track the change in electron cloud flux over time in the DLC coated beampipe and uncoated stainless steel beampipe. The electron flux is measured by retarding field analyzers placed in a field-free region of the Main Injector. We find the DLC coating reduces the electron cloud signal to roughly 2\\% of that measured in the uncoated stainless steel beampipe.

  2. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  3. Electrochemical performances of diamond-like carbon coatings on carbon steel, stainless steel, and brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadinata, Samuel-Sudibyo; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Pan, Szu-Jung; Tsai, Wen-Ta; Tai, Chen-Yi; Shih, Chuan-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto stainless steel, carbon steel and brass by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, respectively. Atomic arrangement, chemical structure, surface morphology and cross-section microstructure of the DLC coatings were examined by X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of the DLC coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated by performing an open circuit potential (OCP) measurement and a potentiodynamic polarization test. The experimental results showed that properly deposited DLC coatings could cause an increase of OCP by hundreds of millivolts and a reduction of anodic current density by several orders of magnitude as compared to that of the substrate. The results also demonstrated that electrochemical techniques could be used as tools to detect the soundness of the DLC coating by examining OCP and polarization curve, which varied with the form of defect and depended on the type of substrate. - Highlights: ► The substrate could affect the quality of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. ► Defect-free DLC coating exhibited extremely low anodic current density. ► The quality of DLC coating on metal could be evaluated by electrochemical test

  4. Electrochemical performances of diamond-like carbon coatings on carbon steel, stainless steel, and brass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadinata, Samuel-Sudibyo; Lee, Ming-Tsung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Pan, Szu-Jung [Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Wen-Ta, E-mail: wttsai@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tai, Chen-Yi [Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Shih, Chuan-Feng [Ocean Energy Research Center, Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited onto stainless steel, carbon steel and brass by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, respectively. Atomic arrangement, chemical structure, surface morphology and cross-section microstructure of the DLC coatings were examined by X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of the DLC coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated by performing an open circuit potential (OCP) measurement and a potentiodynamic polarization test. The experimental results showed that properly deposited DLC coatings could cause an increase of OCP by hundreds of millivolts and a reduction of anodic current density by several orders of magnitude as compared to that of the substrate. The results also demonstrated that electrochemical techniques could be used as tools to detect the soundness of the DLC coating by examining OCP and polarization curve, which varied with the form of defect and depended on the type of substrate. - Highlights: ► The substrate could affect the quality of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. ► Defect-free DLC coating exhibited extremely low anodic current density. ► The quality of DLC coating on metal could be evaluated by electrochemical test.

  5. Electrochemically assisted co-deposition of calcium phosphate/collagen coatings on carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xueni [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Hu Tao [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Li Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Chen Mengdi; Cao Sheng; Zhang Leilei [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Hou Xianghui [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)/collagen coatings were prepared on the surface of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by electrochemically assisted co-deposition technique. The effects of collagen concentration in the electrolyte on morphology, structure and composition of the coatings were systematically investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesive strength of the coatings was also evaluated by scratch tests and tensile bond tests. It was demonstrated that the coatings of three-dimensional collagen network structure was formed on the C/C composites from the electrolyte containing collagen. The surface of the collagen network was covered by uniform CaP aggregates. The coatings were actually composites of CaP and collagen. Hydroxyapatite (HA) was a favorable composition in the coatings with the increase of the collagen concentration in the electrolyte. The formed collagen network increased the cohesive and adhesive strength of the coatings. The adhesive strength between the coatings and substrates increased as the collagen concentration in the electrolyte increased. The coatings prepared at the collagen concentration of 500 mg/L in the electrolyte were not scraped off until the applied load reached 32.0 {+-} 2.2 N and the average tensile adhesive strength of the coatings was 4.83 {+-} 0.71 MPa. After C/C coated with composite coatings (500 mg/L) being immersed in a 10{sup -3} M Ca (OH){sub 2} solution at 30-33 deg. C for 96 h, nano-structured HA/collagen coatings similar to the natural human bone were obtained on the C/C.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Pyrotechnics Binder-Coated Nano-Aluminum Composite Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mingquan; Zhang, Shuting; Liu, Songsong; Han, Aijun; Chen, Xin

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to protect the activity of nano-aluminum (Al) particles in solid rocket propellants and pyrotechnics. The morphology, structure, active aluminum content, and thermal and catalytic properties of the coated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and oxidation-reduction titration methods. The results indicated that nano-Al particles could be effectively coated with phenolic resin (PF), fluororubber (Viton B), and shellac through a solvent/nonsolvent method. The energetic composite particles have core-shell structures and the thickness of the coating film is about 5-15 nm. Analysis of the active Al content revealed that Viton B coating had a much better protective effect. The TG-DSC results showed that the energy amount and energy release rate of PF-, Viton B-, and shellac-coated Al particles were larger than those of the raw nano-Al particles. The catalytic effects of coated Al particles on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) were better than those of raw nano-Al particles, and the effect of shellac-coated Al particles was significantly better than that of Viton B-coated Al particles.

  7. Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coating for carbon/carbon composites prepared by pulsed electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shou-jie, E-mail: jlliushoujie@126.com; Li, He-jun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Lei-lei, E-mail: zhangleilei@nwpu.edu.cn; Feng, Lei, E-mail: fengleijinan@163.com; Yao, Pei, E-mail: 1113923884@qq.com

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The potentiodynamic polarization curve shows that the SM-DCPD coating can dramatically enhance the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) value and meanwhile decrease the corrosion current density (I{sub corr}) of C/C composites. - Highlights: • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coatings for carbon/carbon composites were synthesized by pulsed eletrodeposition. • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coated carbon/carbon composites exhibited excellent bioactivity in vivo. • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coated carbon/carbon composites showed lower corrosion rate with the comparison to pure carbon/carbon composites. - Abstract: Trace elements substituted apatite coatings have received a lot of interest recently as they have many benefits. In this work, strontium and magnesium substituted DCPD (SM-DCPD) coatings were deposited on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by pulsed electrodeposition method. The morphology, microstructure, corrosion resistance and in vitro bioactivity of the SM-DCPD coatings are analyzed. The results show that the SM-DCPD coatings exhibit a flake-like morphology with dense and uniform structure. The SM-DCPD coatings could induce the formation of apatite layers on their surface in simulated body fluid. The electrochemical test indicates that the SM-DCPD coatings can evidently decrease the corrosion rate of the C/C composites in simulated body fluid. The SM-DCPD has potential application as the bioactive coatings.

  8. Solid Particle Erosion Behaviors of Carbon-Fiber Epoxy Composite and Pure Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Gao, Feng; Pant, Shashank; Huang, Xiao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rotor blades of Bell CH-146 Griffon helicopter experience excessive solid particle erosion at low altitudes in desert environment. The rotor blade is made of an advanced light-weight composite which, however, has a low resistance to solid particle erosion. Coatings have been developed and applied to protect the composite blade. However, due to the influence of coating process on composite material, the compatibility between coating and composite base, and the challenges of repairing damaged coatings as well as the inconsistency between the old and new coatings, replaceable thin metal shielding is an alternative approach; and titanium, due to its high-specific strength and better formability, is an ideal candidate. This work investigates solid particle erosion behaviors of carbon-fiber epoxy composite and titanium in order to assess the feasibility of titanium as a viable candidate for erosion shielding. Experiment results showed that carbon-fiber epoxy composite showed a brittle erosion behavior, whereas titanium showed a ductile erosion mode. The erosion rate on composite was 1.5 times of that on titanium at impingement angle 15° and increased to 5 times at impact angle 90°.

  9. Design colloidal particle morphology and self-assembly for coating applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Van Dyk, Antony; Maurice, Alvin; Bohling, James; Fasano, David; Brownell, Stan

    2017-06-19

    The progressive replacement of organic solvent-based coatings by waterborne latex polymer coatings has substantially renovated the coating industry, and generated huge environmental and health benefits. Today, on top of the continuing demand for higher performance and lower costs, the coating industry faces tighter regulation and higher sustainability standards. In addition, the new waterborne coatings have created unique opportunities and challenges in terms of fundamental understanding and research development. To address these challenges, polymer latex binders with diverse particle morphologies have been developed to improve coating performance. Furthermore, colloidal self-assembly has been utilized to help manufacturers make better paint with less cost. In this report, we review the recent progress in both fundamental study and industrial application in the context of developing new generation architectural coating materials. We introduce the basic concepts in coating materials and showcase several key technologies that have been implemented to improve coating performance. These technologies also represent the most important considerations in architectural coating design.

  10. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Antti J; Jensen, Alexander C Ø; Kling, Kirsten I; Kling, Jens; Budtz, Hans Christian; Koponen, Ismo K; Tuinman, Ilse; Hussein, Tareq; Jensen, Keld A; Nørgaard, Asger; Levin, Marcus

    2018-01-05

    Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO 2 )-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m 3 test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×10 10 s -1 and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs -1 . The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h -1 for deposited particles consisted of mainly TiO 2 , TiO 2 mixed with Cl and/or Ag, TiO 2 particles coated with carbon, and Ag particles with size ranging from 60nm to ca. 5μm. As expected, no significant VOC emissions were observed as a result of spraying. Finally, we provide recommendations for exposure model parameterization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ni-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the magnetorheological performance of magnetorheological gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pingan; Yu, Miao, E-mail: yumiao@cqu.edu.cn; Fu, Jie [Chongqing University, Key Lab for Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering (China)

    2016-03-15

    As a kind of new Magnetorheological (MR) material, MR Gel (MRG) can be regarded as the analog of MR fluid (MRF), which can overcome the iron particles sedimentation and unstable application of MRF. Normally, the storage modulus of conventional MRG is relatively small, although it has a very high relative MR effect. Therefore, practical engineering application of conventional MRG has been restricted more or less. In this work, an MRG with high magneto-induced shear storage modulus and excellent relative MR effect has been fabricated by incorporating Ni-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-coated MWCNTs). And several polyurethane-based MRG composites with the addition of Ni-coated MWCNTs were prepared. The dynamic mechanical property of those MRG composites with applying magnetic field is researched through an advanced commercial rheometer. The experimental results indicated that the initial storage modulus and magneto-induced modulus in sample 4 (containing 6 wt% of the Ni-coated MWCNTs) were approximately 4.45 and 2.27 times than that in the sample 1 (without Ni-coated MWCNTs). Moreover, the relative MR effect of sample 4 can reach 3427 %. The high modulus of sample 4 can be mainly attributed to the following points. One is the Ni-coated MWCNTs can be aligned along the direction of the magnetic field within the matrix which provided a better reinforcing efficiency. The other is Ni-coated MWCNTs can be made to form a better bonding between the iron particles and the matrix. It is concluded that this study provides a meaningful way to improve the mechanical properties of MRG and expected to promote the application of MRG in practice.

  12. Textile fibers coated with carbon nanotubes for smart clothing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepak, Sandra; Lalek, Bartłomiej; Janczak, Daniel; Dybowska-Sarapuk, Łucja; Krzemiński, Jakub; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Łekawa-Raus, Agnieszka

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanomaterials: graphene, fullerenes and in particular carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are extremely interesting and extraordinary materials. It is mostly thanks to theirs unusual electrical and mechanical properties. Carbon nanotubes are increasingly examined to enable its usage in many fields of science and technology. It has been reported that there is a high possibility to use CNTs in electronics, optics, material engineering, biology or medicine. However, this material still interests and inspire scientists around the world and the list of different CNTs applications is constantly expanding. In this paper we are presenting a study on the possibility of application carbon nanotubes as a textile fiber coating for smart clothing applications. Various suspensions and pastes containing CNTs have been prepared as a possible coating onto textile fibers. Different application techniques have also been tested. Those techniques included painting with nanotube suspension, spray coating of suspensions and immersion. Following textile fibers were subject to tests: cotton, silk, polyester, polyamide and wool. Obtained composites materials were then characterized electrically by measuring the electrical resistance.

  13. Cohesive zone model of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, Prabhat Kamal; Kar, Kamal K; Basu, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously reported that the average properties of carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber/polyester multiscale composites critically depend on the length and density of nanotubes on the fiber surface. In this paper the effect of nanotube length and density on the interfacial properties of the carbon nanotube-coated carbon fiber–polymer interface has been studied using shear lag and a cohesive zone model. The latter model incorporates frictional sliding after complete debonding between the fiber and matrix and has been developed to quantify the effect of nanotube coating on various interfacial characterizing parameters. Our numerical results indicate that fibers with an optimal coverage and length of nanotubes significantly increase the interfacial strength and friction between the fiber and polymer. However, they also embrittle the interface compared with bare fibers. (paper)

  14. A study on the basic CVD process technology for TRISO coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, D. J.; Cheon, J. H.; Keum, I. S.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2006-03-01

    Hydrogen energy has many advantages and is suitable as alternative energy of fossil fuel. The study of nuclear hydrogen production has performed at present. For nuclear hydrogen production, it is needed the study of VHTR(Very High Temperature Reactor) and TRISO(TRI-iSOtropic) coated fuel. TRISO coated fuel particle deposited by FBCVD(Fludized Bed CVD) method is composed of three isotropic layers: Inner Pyrolytic Carbon (IPyC), Silicon Carbide (SiC), Outer Pyrolytic Carbon (OPyC) layers. Silicon carbide was chemically vapor deposed on graphite substrate using methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 ) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere. The effect of deposition temperature and input gas ratios ( α=Q H2 /Q MTS =P H2 /P MTS ) was investigated in order to find out characteristics of silicon carbide layer. From results of those, SiC-TRISO coating deposition was conducted and achieved. Zirconium carbide layer as an advanced material of silicon carbide layer has studied. In order to find out basic properties and characteristics, studies have conducted using various methods. Zirconium carbide is chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl 4 ) and using methan(CH 4 ) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere. Many experiments were conducted on graphite substrate about many deposition conditions such as ZrCl 4 heating temperatures and variables of H2 and CH 4 flow rate. but carbon graphite was deposited. For deposition of zirconium carbide, several different methods were approached. so zirconium carbide deposed on ZrO 2 substrate. In this experiments. source subliming type and equipment are no problems. But deposition of zirconium carbide will be continuously studied on graphite substrate approaching views of experimental way and equipment structure

  15. Numerical simulation of white double-layer coating with different submicron particles on the spectral reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jiale; Cheng, Qiang; Si, Mengting; Su, Yang; Zhou, Yifan; Song, Jinlin

    2017-01-01

    The spectral selective coating is becoming more and more popular against solar irradiation not only in keeping the coated objects stay cool but also retain the appearance of the objects by reducing the glare of reflected sunlight. In this work a numerical study is investigated to design the double-layer coating with different submicron particles to achieve better performance both in thermal and aesthetic aspects. By comparison, the performance of double-layer coating with TiO_2 and ZnO particles is better than that with single particles. What's more, the particle diameter, volume fraction of particle as well as substrate condition is also investigated. The results show that an optimized double-layer coating with particles should be the one with an appropriate particle diameter, volume fraction and the black substrate. - Highlights: • The double-layer coating has a great influence on both thermal and aesthetic aspects. • The double-layer coating performs better than the uniform one with single particles. • The volume fraction, particle diameter and substrate conditions are optimized.

  16. Evaluation of High Temperature Particle Erosion Resistance of Vanadium-Boride Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, S. I.; Lee, S. H.; Eum, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    The components in ultra super critical (USC) steam turbine, which is under development for high efficient power generation, are encountering harsher solid particle erosion by iron oxide scales than ones in the existing steam turbines. Therefore, the currently used boride coating will not be able to hold effective protection from particle erosion in USC system and should be replaced by new particle erosion resistant coatings. One of the best protective coatings developed for USC steam turbine parts was found to be vanadium-boride (V-boride) coating which has a hardness of about 3000 HV, much higher than that of boride, 1600∼2000 HV. In order to evaluate particle erosion resistance of the various coatings such as V-boride, boride and Cr-carbide coatings at high temperature, particle erosion test equipment were designed and manufactured. In addition, erosion particle velocity was simulated using FLUENT software based on semi-implicity method for pressure linked equations revised (SIMPLER). Based on experimental results of this work, the vanadium-boride coating was found to be superior to others and to be a candidate coating to replace the boride coating

  17. Evaluation of High Temperature Particle Erosion Resistance of Vanadium-Boride Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, S. I. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. H.; Eum, G. W. [Corporate R and D Institute Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The components in ultra super critical (USC) steam turbine, which is under development for high efficient power generation, are encountering harsher solid particle erosion by iron oxide scales than ones in the existing steam turbines. Therefore, the currently used boride coating will not be able to hold effective protection from particle erosion in USC system and should be replaced by new particle erosion resistant coatings. One of the best protective coatings developed for USC steam turbine parts was found to be vanadium-boride (V-boride) coating which has a hardness of about 3000 HV, much higher than that of boride, 1600∼2000 HV. In order to evaluate particle erosion resistance of the various coatings such as V-boride, boride and Cr-carbide coatings at high temperature, particle erosion test equipment were designed and manufactured. In addition, erosion particle velocity was simulated using FLUENT software based on semi-implicity method for pressure linked equations revised (SIMPLER). Based on experimental results of this work, the vanadium-boride coating was found to be superior to others and to be a candidate coating to replace the boride coating.

  18. Protective amorphous carbon coatings on glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silins, Kaspars; Baránková, Hana; Bardos, Ladislav

    2017-11-01

    Thick amorphous carbon films were deposited by the Magnets-in-Motion (M-M) rf linear hollow cathode at varying acetylene contents in Ar in a hybrid PVD/PE-CVD process directly on glass substrates. The hollow cathode plates manufactured from graphite were used as the PVD target. The measurements show that the films can reach thickness of up to 50 μm at deposition rates of up to 2.5 μm/min. Scratch test measurements confirm that well adhering films several μm thick can be achieved at C2H2 contents of up to 0.5%.

  19. Impact on burnup performance of coated particle fuel design in pebble bed reactor with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR), a kind of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is expected to be among the next generation of nuclear reactors as it has excellent passive safety features, as well as online refueling and high thermal efficiency. Rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel has been studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a new once-through type fuel concept. Rock-like oxide used as fuel in a PBR can be expected to achieve high burnup and improve chemical stabilities. In the once-through fuel concept, the main challenge is to achieve as high a burnup as possible without failure of the spent fuel. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on burnup performance of different coated fuel particle (CFP) designs in a PBR with ROX fuel. In the study, the AGR-1 Coated Particle design and Deep-Burn Coated Particle design were used to make the burnup performance comparison. Criticality and core burnup calculations were performed by MCPBR code using the JENDL-4.0 library. Results at equilibrium showed that the two reactors utilizing AGR-1 Coated Particle and Deep-Burn Coated Particle designs could be critical with almost the same multiplication factor k eff . However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the AGR-1 coated particle design was lower than that of Deep-Burn coated particle design. The AGR-1 design also showed an advantage in fissions per initial fissile atoms (FIFA); the AGR-1 coated particle design produced a higher FIFA than the Deep-Burn coated particle design. These results suggest that the difference in coated particle fuel design can have an effect on the burnup performance in ROX fuel. (author)

  20. Evaluation of coat uniformity and taste-masking efficiency of irregular-shaped drug particles coated in a modified tangential spray fluidized bed processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2015-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of coating irregular-shaped drug particles in a modified tangential spray fluidized bed processor (FS processor) and evaluate the coated particles for their coat uniformity and taste-masking efficiency. Paracetamol particles were coated to 20%, w/w weight gain using a taste-masking polymer insoluble in neutral and basic pH but soluble in acidic pH. In-process samples (5, 10 and 15%, w/w coat) and the resultant coated particles (20%, w/w coat) were collected to monitor the changes in their physicochemical attributes. After coating to 20%, w/w coat weight gain, the usable yield was 81% with minimal agglomeration (coat compared with the uncoated particles. A 15%, w/w coat was optimal for inhibiting drug release in salivary pH with subsequent fast dissolution in simulated gastric pH. The FS processor shows promise for direct coating of irregular-shaped drug particles with wide size distribution. The coated particles with 15% coat were sufficiently taste masked and could be useful for further application in orally disintegrating tablet platforms.

  1. Coatings of black carbon in Tijuana, Mexico, during the CalMex Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, S.; Russell, L. M.; Duran, R.; Subramanian, R.; Kok, G.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon number and mass concentrations were measured by a single-particle soot photometer (SP2; by Droplet Measurement Technologies) in Tijuana, Mexico between May 15, 2010, and June 30, 2010, for the CalMex campaign. The measurement site, Parque Morelos, is a recreational area located in the Southeast region of Tijuana. The SP2 was equipped with 8-channels of signal detection that spans a wider range of sensitivity for incandescing and scattering measurements than traditional configurations. The campaign-average number concentration of incandescing particles was 280 #/cc, peaking during traffic activity in the mornings. Incandescing particles made up 50% of all particles (incandescing and purely scattering) detected by the SP2. The mode of the number size distribution estimated for black carbon, according to estimated mass-equivalent diameters, was approximately 100 nm or smaller. Temporal variations in estimated coating thicknesses for these black carbon particles are discussed together with co-located measurements of organic aerosol and inorganic salts.

  2. THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE LASER CLAD COATINGS WITH Ni BASED MATRIX WITH WC PARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Iždinská

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the influence of the processing conditions on the microstructure and abrasive wear behavior of composite laser clad coatings with Ni based matrix reinforced with 50% WC particles is analyzed. Composite powder was applied in the form of coatings onto a mild steel substrate (Fe–0.17% C by different laser powers and cladding speeds. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Tribological properties of coatings were evaluated by pin-on-disc wear test. It appeared that the hardness of the matrix of composite coatings decreases with increasing cladding speed. However, wear resistance of composite coatings with decreasing hardness of Ni based matrix increases. Significantly enhanced wear resistance of WC composite coatings in comparison with Ni based coatings is attributed to the hard phase structures in composite coatings.

  3. The influence of conductive additives and inter-particle voids in carbon EDLC electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandolfo, A.G.; Wilson, G.J.; Huynh, T.D.; Hollenkamp, A.F. [CSIRO - Energy Technology, Bayview Avenue, Clayton, Vic 3168 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    Through the interpretation of porosity and intrusion data, and correlation to the electrochemical response, this study has confirmed that are not only carbon blacks (CBs) very effective in improving the electrical connectivity of a carbon electrode coating, but they also significantly modify the porosity of the electrode coating and thereby also influence ionic diffusion. CBs are more effective conductive fillers than graphites in EDLC electrodes. The highly branched structure of CBs allows multiple electrical contact points and results in a lower electrode electronic resistance. CBs can decrease inter-particle porosity (both volume and size) and introduce additional porosity that is characteristic of the type of carbon employed. It is observed that electrode coatings prepared from a carbon slurry have a highly macroporous structure and that electrolyte accessibility to individual activated carbon particles is unlikely to be the limiting factor to accessing capacitance. Electrochemical testing has confirmed the strong relationship between bulk electrode resistance and the accessibility of capacitance at different rates. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

  5. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L J; Sood, D K; Manory, R R [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 μm thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10 17 - 8x10 17 ions cm -2 . Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs

  8. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  9. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leilei, Zhang; Hejun, Li; Kezhi, Li; Shouyang, Zhang; Qiangang, Fu; Yulei, Zhang; Jinhua, Lu; Wei, Li

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na + and CO 3 2− were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement

  10. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leilei, Zhang, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Hejun, Li; Kezhi, Li; Shouyang, Zhang; Qiangang, Fu; Yulei, Zhang; Jinhua, Lu; Wei, Li

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement.

  11. An improved pyrolysis route to synthesize carbon-coated CdS quantum dots with fluorescence enhancement effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kejie; Liu Xiaoheng

    2011-01-01

    Well-dispersed carbon-coated CdS (CdS-C) quantum dots were successfully prepared via the improved pyrolysis of bis(1-dodecanethiol)-cadmium(II) under nitrogen atmosphere. This simple method effectively solved the sintered problem resulted from conventional pyrolysis process. The experimental results indicated that most of the as-prepared nanoparticles displayed well-defined core-shell structures. The CdS cores with diameter of ∼5 nm exhibited hexagonal crystal phase, the carbon shells with thickness of ∼2 nm acted as a good dispersion medium to prevent CdS particles from aggregation, and together with CdS effectively formed a monodisperse CdS-Carbon nanocomposite. This composite presented a remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect, which indicated that the prepared nanoparticles might be a promising photoresponsive material or biosensor. This improved pyrolysis method might also offer a facile way to prepare other carbon-coated semiconductor nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: We demonstrated a facile approach to synthesize well-dispersed carbon-coated CdS quantum dots. The as-prepared nanoparticles presented remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect. Highlights: → Carbon-coated CdS quantum dots were synthesized by an one-step pyrolysis method. → Well-dispersed CdS-carbon nanoparticles were obtained by an acid treatment process. → As-prepared nanoparticles presented remarkable fluorescence enhancement effect.

  12. Fluorescence Quenching of Humic Acid by Coated Metallic Silver Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guocheng; Yin, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Natural organic matter is an important component of the aquatic environments, which has attracted wide attention to its influence of interaction with other pollutants. The present work aimed to investigate its fluorescence quenching (FQ) by coated metallic silver particles (AgNPs). In this work, using fluorescence spectroscopy in conjunction with UV-Vis spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering, the effect of coated AgNPs on fluorescence quenching intensity (FQI) of humic acid (HA) was assessed. In addition, the influence of electrolytes (NaCl, NaNO 3 and CaNO 3 ) in the FQI was observed. Results showed that with AgNPs dosage increased (>1.17X10 -3  mM), fluorescence quantum yield of HA gradually decreased, which implies that the FQ occurred. Furher observation showed that the FQ process followed both first-order and second-order Stern-Volmer functions. The FQ process was affected by the electrolytes: NaCl had an effect on reduction of FQI, possibly resulting from dissolution of AgNPs; Both of NaNO 3 and Ca(NO 3 ) 2 had an effect on the FQ of HA but Ca(NO 3 ) 2 presented greater degree. As a result, the FQ degree of HA by alone electrolyte was listed in descent order as Ca(NO 3 ) 2  > NaNO 3  > NaCl, which also implies the subsequent experimental results, indicating the FQ degree of HA by mutual electrolytes as Ca(NO 3 ) 2  + NaNO 3  > Ca(NO 3 ) 2  + NaCl > NaNO 3  + NaCl.

  13. Study of the preparation of Cu-TiC composites by reaction of soluble Ti and ball-milled carbon coating TiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuexia; Li, Wenbin; Wang, Yong; Dong, Guozhen; Jing, Shangqian; Wang, Qing; Feng, Yanting; Fan, Xiaoliang; Ding, Haimin

    2018-06-01

    In this work, Cu-TiC composites have been successfully prepared by reaction of soluble Ti and carbon coating TiC. Firstly, the ball milling of graphite and TiC mixtures is used to obtain the carbon coating TiC which has fine size and improved reaction activity. After adding the ball milled carbon coating TiC into Cu-Ti melts, the soluble Ti will easily react with the carbon coating to form TiC. This process will also improve the wettability between Cu melts and TiC core. As a result, besides the TiC prepared by reaction of soluble Ti and carbon coating, the ball milled TiC will also be brought into the melts. Some of these ball-milled TiC particles will go on being coated by the formed TiC from the reaction of Ti and the coating carbon and left behind in the composites. However, most of TiC core will be further reacted with the excessive Ti and be transformed into the newly formed TiC with different stoichiometry. The results indicate that it is a feasible method to synthesize TiC in Cu melts by reaction of soluble Ti and ball-milled carbon coating TiC.

  14. Self-healing properties of TiO{sub 2} particle-polymer composite coatings for protection of aluminum alloys against corrosion in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuki, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-hiroshima (Japan); Urushihara, W.; Kinugasa, J. [Materials Research Laboratory, KOBE STEEL, LTD., Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Sugano, K. [Machinery and Engineering Company, KOBE STEEL, LTD., Shinhama, Arai, Takasago, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    TiO{sub 2} particle-polymer composite coatings were applied to the surface of a 5083 aluminum alloy. After using a knife to create an artificial defect, polarization resistance was monitored in artificial seawater at a temperature of 30 C. The polarization resistance of the specimen coated with the composite polymer containing 3 vol% TiO{sub 2} particles increased significantly over time, suggesting that the composite coating had self-healing properties. A carbon-containing 2-{mu}m thick film was found on the coated aluminum substrate at the site of the artificial defect. The formation of the film was related to the dissolution of bisphenol A (BPA), which is a chemical precursor of the polymer coating that behaved as an inhibiting agent. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Characterization, optical properties and laser ablation behavior of epoxy resin coatings reinforced with high reflectivity ceramic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhi; Kong, Jing; Wu, Taotao; Gao, Lihong; Ma, Zhuang; Liu, Yanbo; Wang, Fuchi; Wei, Chenghua; Wang, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    Thermal damage induced by high power energy, especially high power laser, significantly affects the lifetime and performance of equipment. High-reflectance coating/film has attracted considerable attention due to its good performance in the damage protection. Preparing a high-reflectance coating with high reaction endothermal enthalpy will effectively consume a large amount of incident energy and in turn protect the substrate from thermal damage. In this study, a low temperature process was used to prepare coatings onto substrate with complex shape and avoid thermal effect during molding. An advanced high reflection ceramic powder, La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ , was added in the epoxy adhesive matrix to improve the reflectivity of coating. The optical properties and laser ablation behaviors of coatings with different ceramic additive ratio of La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ and modified epoxy-La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ with ammonium polyphosphate coatings were investigated, respectively. We found that the reflectivity of coatings is extremely high due to mixed high-reflection La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ particles, up to 96% at 1070 nm, which can significantly improve the laser resistance. In addition, the ammonium polyphosphate modifies the residual carbon structure of epoxy resin from discontinuous fine particles structure to continuous and porous structure, which greatly enhances the thermal-insulation property of coating. Furthermore, the laser ablation threshold is improved obviously, which is from 800 W cm‑2 to 1000 W cm‑2.

  16. On the formation of protective sulphide coatings on carbon steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, C.; Venkateswaran, G.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical method for protecting carbon steel surfaces by forming pyrrhotite/pyrite coatings has been developed. The protective nature of the coatings has been studied by weight loss kinetics, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements. A comparison is drawn between the protective nature of pyrite coating with that of magnetite coating. (author)

  17. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hings

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. Adipic acid is a frequently employed surrogate for such slightly soluble organic materials. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they, in most cases, agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing "wet" (deliquesced solution droplets and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Wet adipic acid particles follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. In addition, the effect of adipic acid coatings on the CCN activity of both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. When a water-soluble core is coated by adipic acid, the CCN-hindering effect of particle phase is eliminated. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. If the soot particle is relatively small (dcore≤102 nm, the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  18. Design and development on automated control system of coated fuel particle fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Shao Youlin; Liu Bing

    2013-01-01

    With the development trend of the large-scale production of the HTR coated fuel particles, the original manual control system can not meet the requirement and the automation control system of coated fuel particle fabrication in modern industrial grade is needed to develop. The comprehensive analysis aiming at successive 4-layer coating process of TRISO type coated fuel particles was carried out. It was found that the coating process could be divided into five subsystems and nine operating states. The establishment of DCS-type (distributed control system) of automation control system was proposed. According to the rigorous requirements of preparation process for coated particles, the design considerations of DCS were proposed, including the principle of coordinated control, safety and reliability, integration specification, practical and easy to use, and open and easy to update. A complete set of automation control system for coated fuel particle preparation process was manufactured based on fulfilling the requirements of these principles in manufacture practice. The automated control system was put into operation in the production of irradiated samples for HTRPM demonstration project. The experimental results prove that the system can achieve better control of coated fuel particle preparation process and meet the requirements of factory-scale production. (authors)

  19. Diffusion barrier coatings for high temperature corrosion resistance of advanced carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Raman, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon possesses an excellent combination of mechanical and thermal properties, viz., excellent creep resistance at temperatures up to 2400 deg C in non-oxidizing environment and a low thermal expansion coefficient. These properties make carbon a potential material for very high temperature applications. However, the use of carbon materials at high temperatures is considerably restricted due to their extremely poor oxidation resistance at temperatures above 400 deg C. The obvious choice for improving high temperature oxidation resistance of such materials is a suitable diffusion barrier coating. This paper presents an overview of recent developments in advanced diffusion- and thermal-barrier coatings for ceramic composites, with particular reference to C/C composites. The paper discusses the development of multiphase and multi-component ceramic coatings, and recent investigations on the oxidation resistance of the coated C/C composites. The paper also discusses the cases of innovative engineering solutions for traditional problems with the ceramic coatings, and the scope of intelligent processing in developing coatings for the C/C composites. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  20. Radiation cured coating containing glitter particles and process therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, P.R.; Sears, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation curable coatings for use on a variety of substrates and curable by exposure to ionizing irradiation of ultraviolet light are well known. The use of urethane type coatings cured with ultraviolet light to provide protective wear layers for wall or floor tile is for instance described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,180,615. U.S. Pat. No. 3,918,393 describes a method for obtaining a non-glossy coating on various substrates by curing radiation sensitive material with ionizing irradiation or ultraviolet light in two stages. In this process the coating is partially cured in an oxygen-containing atmosphere and the curing is completed in an inert atmosphere. U.S. Pat. No. 4,122,225 discloses a method and apparatus for coating tile which involves the application of one coat of radiation curable material to an entire substrate followed by partial curing and the subsequent application and curing of a second coat or radiation curable material only on high areas of the substrate which are subject to greater than average wear. Use of pigment in radiation cured coatings on products such as floor covering which are subject to wear during use has presented substantial difficulties. Incorporation of pigment, especially enough pigment to make the coating opaque, makes the coating hard to cure and substantially reduces the thicknesses of coating which can be cured relative to a clear coating cured under the same conditions

  1. Clearance of iron oxide particles in rat liver: effect of hydrated particle size and coating material on liver metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C; Johansson, Lars O; Hustvedt, Svein Olaf; Haldorsen, Anita G; Bjørnerud, Atle; Fayad, Zahi A; Ahlstrom, Haakan K

    2006-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of the particle size and coating material of various iron oxide preparations on the rate of rat liver clearance. The following iron oxide formulations were used in this study: dextran-coated ferumoxide (size = 97 nm) and ferumoxtran-10 (size = 21 nm), carboxydextran-coated SHU555A (size = 69 nm) and fractionated SHU555A (size = 12 nm), and oxidized-starch coated materials either unformulated NC100150 (size = 15 nm) or formulated NC100150 injection (size = 12 nm). All formulations were administered to 165 rats at 2 dose levels. Quantitative liver R2* values were obtained during a 63-day time period. The concentration of iron oxide particles in the liver was determined by relaxometry, and these values were used to calculate the particle half-lives in the liver. After the administration of a high dose of iron oxide, the half-life of iron oxide particles in rat liver was 8 days for dextran-coated materials, 10 days for carboxydextran materials, 14 days for unformulated oxidized-starch, and 29 days for formulated oxidized-starch. The results of the study indicate that materials with similar coating but different sizes exhibited similar rates of liver clearance. It was, therefore, concluded that the coating material significantly influences the rate of iron oxide clearance in rat liver.

  2. A methodology to study impactor particle reentrainment and a proposed stage coating for the NGI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rissler, Jenny; Asking, Lars; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye

    2009-01-01

    , particle reentrainment is critical because it may lead to an overestimation of the respirable fraction. To avoid reentrainment, the collection surfaces need to be coated with a suitable material. METHODS: In this study a method was developed to test flow dependence of particle reentrainment in the Next...... Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) at flow rates ranging from 20 to 80 L/min, and was used to test three coating materials: glycerol coating, aqueous coating with, and without soaked filter paper. Uncoated cups were also tested. In the experimental setup a Vilnius Aerosol Generator generated a flow...

  3. Carbon-coated mesoporous SnO2 nanospheres as anode material for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fei; Song, Xiaoping; Yao, Gang; Zhao, Mingshu; Liu, Rui; Xu, Minwei; Sun, Zhanbo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper mesoporous SnO 2 nanospheres with an average diameter of about 83 nm, composed of many tiny primary particles (∼10 nm) and holes, are synthesized on a large scale by a simple hydrothermal route. The as-prepared mesoporous SnO 2 nanospheres were uniformly coated with carbon by a further hydrothermal treatment in glucose aqueous solution. As anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the core–shell SnO 2 /C nanocomposites exhibit a markedly improved cycling performance.

  4. Numerical Control Device for Preparation Nano-Carbon Granule Coating Superhydrophobic Template and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, G. R.; Li, Y.

    2017-12-01

    It is one of the ways for changing surface property by fabricating superhydrophibic coating with the help of template that is made of depositing nano-carbon particles of fuel flame on substrate such as pure copper or aluminium alloy. In the process of making template, it is difficult to keep the deposition layer uniformed. In this work, the problem was solved by manufacturing a set of numerical control equipment. It has been proved by application test that the deposition layer was uniformed by means of this facility. The contact angle is more than 150°. A new way has been developed for making superhydrohibic template.

  5. Analysis of the physical properties of black carbon coatings from near-road to remote aging scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowsky, T. S.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sioutas, C.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    As black carbon (BC) particles are transported in the atmosphere, they acquire soluble coatings with important environmental implications. However, there is still vast uncertainty associated with "how" and "when" coatings accumulate on BC particles, including at rapid time-scales (e.g., adjacent to major roadways) and at more remote locations. A Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was used to measure refractory BC during the summer months in Los Angeles, California. BC physical properties were compared near a major freeway and at a remote receptor site in Redlands, California, approximately 100 km east of the downtown Los Angeles area. We have attempted to reduce uncertainty associated with the mechanisms that govern the procurement of soluble coatings on BC by investigating various meteorological regimes and comparing weekday to weekend BC properties. BC coatings were quantified using the "Lag-Time" and "Leading-Edge-Only" methods. Results reported here show an increased fraction of thickly-coated BC particles up to 115 meters from the roadway where competing partial pressure and vapor pressure causes various species to condense on BC as distance from the roadway increases. However, the median coating thickness for all BC particles measured near the roadway on August 4, 2016 was approximately 0 nm indicating BC particles near major roads are mostly uncoated. Despite ever-changing meteorological regimes at the receptor site, BC at the receptor site exhibited remarkably similar properties to BC measured 115 meters from the roadway. Although the overall mixing states were not vastly different at the roadway source and receptor sites, there were systematic mixing state dependencies based on changes in meteorological regimes and the day of week measured. On weekends, a higher relative portion of gasoline vehicles than diesel trucks may be leading to relatively more secondary organic aerosols to coat proportionately less BC mass.

  6. Incorporation of different antibiotics into carbonated hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium implants, release and antibiotic efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, M.; Bezemer, J.M.; de Groot, K.; Layrolle, P.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) coatings were applied onto titanium implants by using a biomimetic precipitation method. Different antibiotics were incorporated into the CHA coatings and their release and efficacy against bacteria growth were studied in vitro. The following antibiotics were used

  7. Electrodeposition, characterization, and antibacterial activity of zinc/silver particle composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Vidal, Y.; Suarez-Rojas, R.; Ruiz, C.; Torres, J. [Center of Research and Technological Development in Electrochemistry (CIDETEQ), Parque Tecnológico Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, Querétaro, A.P.064, C.P.76703, Querétaro (Mexico); Ţălu, Ştefan [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of AET, Discipline of Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Graphics, 103-105 B-dul Muncii St., Cluj-Napoca 400641 Cluj (Romania); Méndez, Alia [Centro de Química-ICUAP Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria Puebla, 72530 Puebla (Mexico); Trejo, G., E-mail: gtrejo@cideteq.mx [Center of Research and Technological Development in Electrochemistry (CIDETEQ), Parque Tecnológico Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, Querétaro, A.P.064, C.P.76703, Querétaro (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • Zn/AgPs composites coatings were formed for electrodeposition. • CTAB promotes occlusion of silver particles in the coating. • Zn/AgPs coatings present very good antibacterial activity. - Abstract: Composite coatings consisting of zinc and silver particles (Zn/AgPs) with antibacterial activity were prepared using an electrodeposition technique. The morphology, composition, and structure of the Zn/AgPs composite coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The antibacterial properties of the coatings against the microorganisms Escherichia coli as a model Gram-negative bacterium and Staphylococcus aureus as a model Gram-positive bacterium were studied quantitatively and qualitatively. The results revealed that the dispersant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) assisted in the formation of a stable suspension of Ag particles in the electrolytic bath for 24 h. Likewise, a high concentration of CTAB in the electrolytic bath promoted an increase in the number of Ag particles occluded in the Zn/AgPs coatings. The Zn/AgPs coatings that were obtained were compact, smooth, and shiny materials. Antimicrobial tests performed on the Zn/AgPs coatings revealed that the inhibition of bacterial growth after 30 min of contact time was between 91% and 98% when the AgPs content ranged from 4.3 to 14.0 mg cm{sup −3}.

  8. The failure mechanisms of HTR coated particle fuel and computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin; Liu Bing; Shao Youlin; Liang Tongxiang; Tang Chunhe

    2010-01-01

    The basic constituent unit of fuel element in HTR is ceramic coated particle fuel. And the performance of coated particle fuel determines the safety of HTR. In addition to the traditional detection of radiation experiments, establishing computer code is of great significance to the research. This paper mainly introduces the structure and the failure mechanism of TRISO-coated particle fuel, as well as a few basic assumptions,principles and characteristics of some existed main overseas codes. Meanwhile, this paper has proposed direction of future research by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of several computer codes. (authors)

  9. Annealed coated air-stable cobalt--rare earth alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeggil, J.C.; Charles, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for producing novel air-stable coated particles of a magnetic transition metal-rare earth alloy. An organometallic compound which decomposes at a temperature below 500 0 C is heated to produce a metal vapor which is contacted with particles of a transition metal-rare earth alloy to deposit a metal coating thereon. The coated particles are heated at a temperature ranging from 50 to 200 0 C for a period of time sufficient to increase their intrinsic coercive force by at least 10 percent. (U.S.)

  10. Effect of secondary organic aerosol coating thickness on the real-time detection and characterization of biomass-burning soot by two particle mass spectrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Ahern

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is a large source of light-absorbing refractory black carbon (rBC particles with a wide range of morphologies and sizes. The net radiative forcing from these particles is strongly dependent on the amount and composition of non-light-absorbing material internally mixed with the rBC and on the morphology of the mixed particles. Understanding how the mixing state and morphology of biomass-burning aerosol evolves in the atmosphere is critical for constraining the influence of these particles on radiative forcing and climate. We investigated the response of two commercial laser-based particle mass spectrometers, the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV ablation LAAPTOF and the IR vaporization SP-AMS, to monodisperse biomass-burning particles as we sequentially coated the particles with secondary organic aerosol (SOA from α-pinene ozonolysis. We studied three mobility-selected soot core sizes, each with a number of successively thicker coatings of SOA applied. Using IR laser vaporization, the SP-AMS had different changes in sensitivity to rBC compared to potassium as a function of applied SOA coatings. We show that this is due to different effective beam widths for the IR laser vaporization region of potassium versus black carbon. The SP-AMS's sensitivity to black carbon (BC mass was not observed to plateau following successive SOA coatings, despite achieving high OA : BC mass ratios greater than 9. We also measured the ion fragmentation pattern of biomass-burning rBC and found it changed only slightly with increasing SOA mass. The average organic matter ion signal measured by the LAAPTOF demonstrated a positive correlation with the condensed SOA mass on individual particles, despite the inhomogeneity of the particle core compositions. This demonstrates that the LAAPTOF can obtain quantitative mass measurements of aged soot-particle composition from realistic biomass-burning particles with complex morphologies and composition.

  11. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  12. Behavior of Ag nanoparticles in soil: Effects of particle surface coating, aging and sewage sludge amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, Annie R.; Levard, Clément; Oostveen, Emily; Bertsch, Paul M.; Matocha, Chris J.; Kammer, Frank von der; Unrine, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the relative importance of particle coating, sewage sludge amendment, and aging on aggregation and dissolution of manufactured Ag nanoparticles (Ag MNPs) in soil pore water. Ag MNPs with citrate (CIT) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coatings were incubated with soil or municipal sewage sludge which was then amended to soil (1% or 3% sludge (w/w)). Pore waters were extracted after 1 week and 2 and 6 months and analyzed for chemical speciation, aggregation state and dissolution. Ag MNP coating had profound effects on aggregation state and partitioning to pore water in the absence of sewage sludge, but pre-incubation with sewage sludge negated these effects. This suggests that Ag MNP coating does not need to be taken into account to understand fate of AgMNPs applied to soil through biosolids amendment. Aging of soil also had profound effects that depended on Ag MNP coating and sludge amendment. -- Highlights: •Silver nanoparticle coating affects fate in unamended soils. •Citrated coated silver nanoparticles could be found in pore water for up to six months. •Pre-incubation of silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge negated effects of surface coating. •Weathered or reprecipitated particles found in pore water for up to two months in sludge amended soils. •Particle surface coating, sewage sludge amendment and aging all have important impacts. -- Behavior of manufactured silver nanoparticles in soil depends on surface coating, contact with sewage sludge, and aging

  13. Study of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode materials coated with high surface area carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Cheng-Zhang; Fey, George Ting-Kuo [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054 (China); Kao, Hsien-Ming [Department of Chemistry, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054 (China)

    2009-04-01

    LiFePO{sub 4} is a potential cathode material for 4 V lithium-ion batteries. Carbon-coated lithium iron phosphates were prepared using a high surface area carbon to react precursors through a solid-state process, during which LiFePO{sub 4} particles were embedded in amorphous carbon. The carbonaceous materials were synthesized by the pyrolysis of peanut shells under argon, where they were carbonized in a two-step process that occurred between 573 and 873 K. The shells were also treated with a proprietary porogenic agent with the goal of altering the pore structure and surface area of the pyrolysis products. The electrochemical properties of the as-prepared LiFePO{sub 4}/C composite cathode materials were systematically characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, element mapping, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. In LiFePO{sub 4}/C composites, the carbon not only increases rate capability, but also stabilizes capacity. In fact, the capacity of the composites increased with the specific surface area of carbon. The best result was observed with a composite made of 8.0 wt.% with a specific surface area of 2099 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. When high surface area carbon was used as a carbon source to produce LiFePO{sub 4}, overall conductivity increased from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1}, because the inhibition of particle growth during the final sintering process led to greater specific capacity, improved cycling properties and better rate capability compared to a pure olivine LiFePO{sub 4} material. (author)

  14. Polymer Coating of Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Electric Microcables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noe T. Alvarez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered the most promising candidates to replace Cu and Al in a large number of electrical, mechanical and thermal applications. Although most CNT industrial applications require macro and micro size CNT fiber assemblies, several techniques to make conducting CNT fibers, threads, yarns and ropes have been reported to this day, and improvement of their electrical and mechanical conductivity continues. Some electrical applications of these CNT conducting fibers require an insulating layer for electrical insulation and protection against mechanical tearing. Ideally, a flexible insulator such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR on the CNT fiber can allow fabrication of CNT coils that can be assembled into lightweight, corrosion resistant electrical motors and transformers. HNBR is a largely used commercial polymer that unlike other cable-coating polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC, it provides unique continuous and uniform coating on the CNT fibers. The polymer coated/insulated CNT fibers have a 26.54 μm average diameter—which is approximately four times the diameter of a red blood cell—is produced by a simple dip-coating process. Our results confirm that HNBR in solution creates a few microns uniform insulation and mechanical protection over a CNT fiber that is used as the electrically conducting core.

  15. Polymer Coating of Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Electric Microcables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Noe T.; Ochmann, Timothy; Kienzle, Nicholas; Ruff, Brad; Haase, Mark R.; Hopkins, Tracy; Pixley, Sarah; Mast, David; Schulz, Mark J.; Shanov, Vesselin

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered the most promising candidates to replace Cu and Al in a large number of electrical, mechanical and thermal applications. Although most CNT industrial applications require macro and micro size CNT fiber assemblies, several techniques to make conducting CNT fibers, threads, yarns and ropes have been reported to this day, and improvement of their electrical and mechanical conductivity continues. Some electrical applications of these CNT conducting fibers require an insulating layer for electrical insulation and protection against mechanical tearing. Ideally, a flexible insulator such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) on the CNT fiber can allow fabrication of CNT coils that can be assembled into lightweight, corrosion resistant electrical motors and transformers. HNBR is a largely used commercial polymer that unlike other cable-coating polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), it provides unique continuous and uniform coating on the CNT fibers. The polymer coated/insulated CNT fibers have a 26.54 μm average diameter—which is approximately four times the diameter of a red blood cell—is produced by a simple dip-coating process. Our results confirm that HNBR in solution creates a few microns uniform insulation and mechanical protection over a CNT fiber that is used as the electrically conducting core. PMID:28344254

  16. Mesoporous silica particles modified with graphitic carbon: interaction with human red blood cells and plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Diego Stefani Teodoro; Franqui, Lidiane Silva; Bettini, Jefferson; Strauss, Mathias, E-mail: diego.martinez@lnnano.cnpem.br [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Damasceno, Joao Paulo Vita; Mazali, Italo Odone [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: In this work the interaction of the mesoporous silica particles (SBA-15, ∼700 nm) modified with graphitic carbon (SBA-15/C) on human red blood cells (hemolysis) and plasma proteins (protein corona formation) is studied. XPS and CHN analysis showed that the carbon content on the SBA-15/C samples varied from 2 to 10% and was tuned by the functionalization step. The formed carbon structures where associated to graphitic nanodomains coating the pores surface as verified by Raman spectroscopy and {sup 13}C NMR. Advanced TEM/EELS analysis showed that the carbon structures are distributed along the SBA-15 mesopores. SAXS and textural analyses were used to confirm that the porous structure of the silica support is kept after the modification procedure and to calculate the number of graphitic carbon stacked layers coating the mesopores. After incubation of SBA-15 with human red blood cells (RBCs), it was observed a dose-dependent hemolytic effect, probably, due to binding of the material silanol-rich surface to the phosphatidylcholine molecules from the RBC membrane. The graphitic carbon modifications have mitigated this effect, indicating that the graphitic carbon coating protected the silanol groups of the particle surface hindering the hemolysis. Considering the protein corona formation, selective biomolecular interaction of proteins was observed for the different materials using gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Besides, graphitic carbon modification decreased the amount of proteins on the corona. Together, the in vitro hemolysis and protein corona assays are promising biological models to understand the influence of silica surface functionalization on their bionano-interactions. Finally, our work contributes to the development of fundamental research on such nanomaterials chemistry in the emerging field of nanobioscience and nanotoxicology. (author)

  17. Blackbody Radiation and the Carbon Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the days of Kirchhoff, blackbody radiation has been considered to be a uni- versal process, independent of the nature and shape of the emitter. Nonetheless, in promoting this concept, Kirchhoff did require, at the minimum, thermal equilibrium with an enclosure. Recently, the author stated (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. , 2003, v. 31(6, 1263–1267; P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys. , 2006, v. 2, 22–23, that blackbody radiation is not universal and has called for a return to Stewart’s law (P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys. , 2008, v. 3, 30–35. In this work, a historical analysis of thermal radiation is presented. It is demonstrated that soot, or lampblack, was the standard for blackbody experiments throughout the 1800s. Furthermore, graphite and carbon black continue to play a central role in the construction of blackbody cavities. The advent of universality is reviewed through the writings of Pierre Prevost, Pierre Louis Dulong, Alexis Therese Petit, Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Simeon Denis Pois- son, Frederick Herve de la Provostaye, Paul Quentin Desain, Balfour Stewart, Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, and Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck. These writings illustrate that blackbody radiation, as experimentally produced in cavities and as discussed theoreti- cally, has remained dependent on thermal equilibrium with at least the smallest carbon particle. Finally, Planck’s treatment of Kirchhoff’s law is examined in detail and the shortcomings of his derivation are outlined. It is shown once again, that universality does not exist. Only Stewart’s law of thermal emission, not Kirchhoff’s, is fully valid.

  18. Blackbody Radiation and the Carbon Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Robitaille

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the days of Kirchhoff, blackbody radiation has been considered to be a universal process, independent of the nature and shape of the emitter. Nonetheless, in promoting this concept, Kirchhoff did require, at the minimum, thermal equilibrium with an enclosure. Recently, the author stated (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 2003, v.31(6, 1263-1267; P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys., 2006, v.2, 22-23, that blackbody radiation is not universal and has called for a return to Stewart's law (P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys., 2008, v.3, 30-35. In this work, a historical analysis of thermal radiation is presented. It is demonstrated that soot, or lampblack, was the standard for blackbody experiments throughout the 1800s. Furthermore, graphite and carbon black continue to play a central role in the construction of blackbody cavities. The advent of universality is reviewed through the writings of Pierre Prevost, Pierre Louis Dulong, Alexis Therese Petit, Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Simeon Denis Poisson, Frederick Herve de la Provostaye, Paul Quentin Desain, Balfour Stewart, Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, and Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck. These writings illustrate that blackbody radiation, as experimentally produced in cavities and as discussed theoretically, has remained dependent on thermal equilibrium with at least the smallest carbon particle. Finally, Planck's treatment of Kirchhoff's law is examined in detail and the shortcomings of his derivation are outlined. It is shown once again, that universality does not exist. Only Stewart's law of thermal emission, not Kirchhoff's, is fully valid.

  19. TiO2-coated mesoporous carbon: conventional vs. microwave-annealing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coromelci-Pastravanu, Cristina; Ignat, Maria; Popovici, Evelini; Harabagiu, Valeria

    2014-08-15

    The study of coating mesoporous carbon materials with titanium oxide nanoparticles is now becoming a promising and challenging area of research. To optimize the use of carbon materials in various applications, it is necessary to attach functional groups or other nanostructures to their surface. The combination of the distinctive properties of mesoporous carbon materials and titanium oxide is expected to be applied in field emission displays, nanoelectronic devices, novel catalysts, and polymer or ceramic reinforcement. But, their synthesis is still largely based on conventional techniques, such as wet impregnation followed by chemical reduction of the metal nanoparticle precursors, which takes time and money. The thermal heating based techniques are time consuming and often lack control of particle size and morphology. Hence, since there is a growing interest in microwave technology, an alternative way of power input into chemical reactions through dielectric heating is the use of microwaves. This work is focused on the advantages of microwave-assisted synthesis of TiO2-coated mesoporous carbon over conventional thermal heating method. The reviewed studies showed that the microwave-assisted synthesis of such composites allows processes to be completed within a shorter reaction time allowing the nanoparticles formation with superior properties than that obtained by conventional method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes with nitrogen-containing carbon coating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomšík, Elena; Morávková, Zuzana; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Šálek, Petr; Kovářová, Jana; Zemek, Josef; Cieslar, M.; Prokeš, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 8 (2013), s. 1054-1065 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP108/11/P763; GA ČR GAP205/12/0911; GA ČR GA202/09/0428 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : polyaniline coating * carbon ization * multi-wall carbon nanotubes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.193, year: 2013

  1. SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY COATING CONTAINING MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE/ POLY ORTHO AMINOPHENOL NANOCOMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bahrami Panah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The epoxy coatings containing multi-walled carbon nanotube/ poly ortho aminophenol nanocomposite were prepared and used as anticorrosive coatings. The nanocomposites with different contents of carbon nanotube were synthesized in a solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate and ammonium peroxy disulfate as a surfactant and an oxidant, respectively. The morphology and structural properties were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy methods. The mean size of nanocomposite particles was 20-35 nm determined by scanning electron microscopy. The epoxy coatings containing the nanocomposites were applied over mild steel panels and their corrosion performance was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in a 3.5 % sodium chloride solution. The results showed that epoxy coatings consisting of nanocomposite with 1 wt.% multi-walled carbon nanotube exhibited higher anticorrosive properties than other prepared coatings of different carbon nanotube contents, which could be due to the strong interaction between the mild steel surface and the conjugated nanocomposite.

  2. Study on coated layer material performance of coated particle fuel FBR (2). High temperature property and capability of coating to thick layer of TiN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganuma, Masayuki; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2002-08-01

    'Helium Gas Cooled Coated Particle Fuel FBR' is one of attractive core concepts in the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System in Japan, and the design study is presently proceeded. As one of key technologies of this concept, the coated layer material is important, and ceramics is considered to be a candidate material because of the superior refractory. Based on existing knowledge, TiN is regarded to be a possible candidate material, to which some property tests and evaluations have been conducted. In this study, preliminary tests about the high temperature property and the capability of thick layer coating of TiN have been conducted. Results of these tests come to the following conclusions. Heating tests of two kinds of TiN layer specimens coated by PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) and CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) were conducted. As a result, as for CVD coating specimens, remarkable charge was not observed on the layer up to 2,000degC, therefore we concluded that the layer by CVD had applicability up to high temperature of actual operation level. On the other hand, as for PVD coating specimens, an unstable behavior that the layer changed to a mesh like texture was observed on a 2,000degC heated specimen, therefore the applied PVD method is not considered to be promising as the coating technique. The surface conditions of some parts inside CVD device were investigated in order to evaluate possibility of TiN thick coating (∼100 μm). As a result, around 500 μm of TiN coating layer was observed on the condition of multilayer. Therefore, we conclude that CVD has capability of coating up to thick layer in actual coated particle fuel fabrication. (author)

  3. Investigation of non-isocyanate urethane functional latexes and carbon nanofiller/epoxy coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lei

    This dissertation consists of two parts. In the first part, a new class of non-isocyanate urethane methacrylates was synthesized and the effect of the new monomers on the urethane functional latex was investigated. The second part focused on a comparison of carbon nanofillers in inorganic/organic epoxy coating system for anticorrosive applications. A new class of non-isocyanate urethane methacrylates (UMAs) monomers was synthesized through an environmentally friendly non-isocyanate pathway. The kinetics of seeded semibatch emulsion polymerization of UMAs with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and butyl acrylate (BA) was monitored. The particle size and morphology were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), ultrasound acoustic attenuation spectroscopy (UAAS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The minimum film formation temperature (MFFT), mechanical and viscoelastic properties were studied. It was found that the emulsion polymerization processes all proceeded via Smith-Ewart control, leading to the uniform morphology and particle size. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and the mechanical properties of poly(MMA/BA/UMA) decreased with the increasing chain length of urethane methacrylate monomers due to the increasing flexibility of side chains. Without the effect of Tg, lower MFFT and improved mechanical properties were observed from urethane functional latexes. The improved mechanical properties were due to the increasing particle interaction by forming hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, the effect of urethane functionality in terms of the polymer composition, the location and the concentration was investigated by the batch, single-stage and two-stage semibatch polymerization of 2-[(butylcarbamoyl)oxy]ethyl methacrylate (BEM) with MMA and BA. The core-shell and homogeneous structures were evaluated by TEM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR). The compositional drift was observed from the batch

  4. Asymmetric electrochemical supercapacitor, based on polypyrrole coated carbon nanotube electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Polypyrrole (PPy) coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were prepared. • New method is based on the use of new electrochemically active dopants for PPy. • The dopans provided dispersion of MWCNT and promoted PPy coating formation. • Symmetric PPy–MWCNT supercapacitors showed high capacitance and low resistance. • Asymmetric PPy–MWCNT/VN–MWCNT devices and modules allowed larger voltage window. - Abstract: Conductive polypyrrole (PPy) polymer – multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) composites were synthesized using sulfanilic acid azochromotrop (SPADNS) and sulfonazo III sodium salt (CHR-BS) as anionic dopants for chemical polymerization of PPy. The composites were tested for application in electrodes of electrochemical supercapacitors (ES). Sedimentation tests, electrophoretic deposition experiments and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) investigations showed that strong adsorption of anionic CHR-BS on MWCNT provided MWCNT dispersion. The analysis of scanning and transmission electron microscopy data demonstrated that the use of CHR-BS allowed the formation of PPy coatings on MWCNT. As a result, the composites, prepared using CHR-BS, showed higher capacitance, compared to the composites, prepared using SPADNS. The electrodes, containing MWCNT, coated with PPy showed a capacitance of 179 F g −1 for active mass loading of 10 mg cm −2 , good capacitance retention at scan rates in the range of 2–100 mV s −1 and excellent cyclic stability. Asymmetric ES devices, containing positive PPy–MWCNT electrodes and negative vanadium nitride (VN)–MWCNT electrodes showed significant improvement in energy storage performance, compared to the symmetric ES due to the larger voltage window. The low impedance and high capacitance of the individual cells paved the way to the development of modules with higher voltage, which showed good electrochemical performance

  5. Microwave absorption properties of helical carbon nanofibers-coated carbon fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs coated-carbon fibers (CFs were fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. TEM and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the graphitic layers of the HCNFs changed from disorder to order after high temperature annealing. The electromagnetic parameters and microwave absorption properties were measured at 2–18 GHz. The maximum reflection loss is 32 dB at 9 GHz and the widest bandwidth under −10 dB is 9.8 GHz from 8.2 to 18 GHz for the unannealed HCNFs coated-CFs composite with 2.5 mm in thickness, suggesting that HCNFs coated-CFs should have potential applications in high performance microwave absorption materials.

  6. Photothermal cancer therapy using graphitic carbon–coated magnetic particles prepared by one-pot synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyo-Jeong Lee,1 Jakkid Sanetuntikul,2 Eun-Sook Choi,1 Bo Ram Lee,1 Jung-Hee Kim,1 Eunjoo Kim,1 Sangaraju Shanmugam2 1Nano and Bio Research Division, 2Department of Energy Systems Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu, Republic of Korea Abstract: We describe here a simple synthetic strategy for the fabrication of carbon-coated Fe3O4 (Fe3O4@C particles using a single-component precursor, iron (III diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex. Physicochemical analyses revealed that the core of the synthesized particles consists of ferromagnetic Fe3O4 material ranging several hundred nanometers, embedded in nitrogen-doped graphitic carbon with a thickness of ~120 nm. Because of their photothermal activity (absorption of near-infrared [NIR] light, the Fe3O4@C particles have been investigated for photothermal therapeutic applications. An example of one such application would be the use of Fe3O4@C particles in human adenocarcinoma A549 cells by means of NIR-triggered cell death. In this system, the Fe3O4@C can rapidly generate heat, causing >98% cell death within 10 minutes under 808 nm NIR laser irradiation (2.3 W cm-2. These Fe3O4@C particles provided a superior photothermal therapeutic effect by intratumoral delivery and NIR irradiation of tumor xenografts. These results demonstrate that one-pot synthesis of carbon-coated magnetic particles could provide promising materials for future clinical applications and encourage further investigation of this simple method. Keywords: graphitic carbon–encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles, iron oxide, one-pot synthesis, photothermal cancer therapy

  7. Improvement of deposition efficiency and control of hardness for cold-sprayed coatings using high carbon steel/mild steel mixture powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Amao, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Nobuyuki; Ootaki, Kousuke

    2011-01-01

    In this study, in order to make high carbon steel coating by cold spray technique, spray conditions such as carrier gas temperature and pressure etc. were investigated. And also, in order to improve deposition efficiency and control coating hardness of cold-sprayed high carbon steel, high carbon and mild steel mixed powder and its mechanical milled powder were developed and were optimized. By using the cold-spray technique, particle deposition of a high carbon steel was successful. Moreover, by applying mixed and mechanical milled powders, the porosity ratio was decreased and deposition efficiency was improved. Furthermore, using these powders, it is possible to control the hardness value. Especially, when using mechanical milled powder, it is very difficult to identify the interface between the coating and the substrate. The bonding between the coating and the substrate is thus considered to be excellent. (author)

  8. Stress Calculation of a TRISO Coated Particle Fuel by Using a Poisson's Ratio in Creep Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon-Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Kim, W. K.

    2007-01-01

    KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) project since 2004, has been developing a performance analysis code for the TRISO coated particle fuel named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). COPA predicts temperatures, stresses, a fission gas release and failure probabilities of a coated particle fuel in normal operating conditions. KAERI, on the other hand, is developing an ABAQUS based finite element(FE) model to cover the non-linear behaviors of a coated particle fuel such as cracking or debonding of the TRISO coating layers. Using the ABAQUS based FE model, verification calculations were carried out for the IAEA CRP-6 benchmark problems involving creep, swelling, and pressure. However, in this model the Poisson's ratio for elastic solution was used for creep strain calculation. In this study, an improvement is made for the ABAQUS based finite element model by using the Poisson's ratio in creep condition for the calculation of the creep strain rate. As a direct input of the coefficient in a creep condition is impossible, a user subroutine for the ABAQUS solution is prepared in FORTRAN for use in the calculations of the creep strain of the coating layers in the radial and hoop directions of the spherical fuel. This paper shows the calculation results of a TRISO coated particle fuel subject to an irradiation condition assumed as in the Miller's publication in comparison with the results obtained from the old FE model used in the CRP-6 benchmark calculations

  9. Influence of carbon coating on the electrochemical performance of {lambda}-MnO{sub 2} electrode for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malak-Polaczyk, A. [Poznan Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry; CNRS LRC, Mulhouse (France). Inst. de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse; Vix-Guterl, C. [CNRS LRC, Mulhouse (France). Inst. de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse; Frackowiak, E. [Poznan Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry

    2010-07-01

    In the present study carbon-coated {lambda}-MnO{sub 2} electrodes were prepared by a simple route. In the first step sugar was pyrolyzed to form a carbon coating on the commercial spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. As-prepared materials were acid treated which resulted in the formation of {lambda}-MnO{sub 2} coated with carbon. Physical properties, morphology and specific surface area of electrode materials were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and X-ray diffraction and nitrogen sorption measurements. Voltammetry cycling, galvanostatic charge/discharge and impedance spectroscopy measurements performed in two and three electrode cells have been applied in order to measure electrochemical parameters. Neutral Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution has been selected for electrolytic medium. SEM images confirmed well dispersed carbon particles on the surface of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. As a result of charge/discharge measurements, electrode with carbon coating showed smaller decrease of capacity at higher current and kept the value of 100Fg{sup -1} at 1Ag{sup -1}. (orig.)

  10. C/SiC/MoSi2-Si multilayer coatings for carbon/carbon composites for protection against oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yulei; Li Hejun; Qiang Xinfa; Li Kezhi; Zhang Shouyang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A C/SiC/MoSi 2 -Si multilayer coating was prepared on C/C by slurry and pack cementation. → Multilayer coating can protect C/C for 300 h at 1873 K or 103 h at 1873 K in air. → The penetration cracks in the coating result in the weight loss of the coated C/C. → The fracture of the coated C/C in wind tunnel result from the excessive local stress. - Abstract: To improve the oxidation resistance of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, a C/SiC/MoSi 2 -Si multilayer oxidation protective coating was prepared by slurry and pack cementation. The microstructure of the as-prepared coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The isothermal oxidation and erosion resistance of the coating was investigated in electrical furnace and high temperature wind tunnel. The results showed that the multilayer coating could effectively protect C/C composites from oxidation in air for 300 h at 1773 K and 103 h at 1873 K, and the coated samples was fractured after erosion for 27 h at 1873 K h in wind tunnel. The weight loss of the coated specimens was considered to be caused by the formation of penetration cracks in the coating. The fracture of the coated C/C composites might result from the excessive local stress in the coating.

  11. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10{approx}40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  12. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10∼40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  13. Performance limits of coated particle fuel. Part II. Mechanical failure of coated particles due to internal gas pressure and kernel swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hick, H.; Nabielek, H.; Harrison, T. A.

    1973-10-15

    This report presents a summary of experimental results and their theoretical explanation with regard to the "Pressure Failure" of coated particle fuel. While the experimental results refer mainly to the Dragon Reference Particle as proposed for typical Low Enriched Homogeneous Prismatic Steam Cycle HTR Power Reactors, the theoretical understanding of the phenomena and the mathematical models for their description are not limited to a specific design line.

  14. Synthesis of Yttria-stabilized zirconia nanoparticles by decomposition of metal nitrates coated on carbon powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.; Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.; Schulze, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Weakly agglomerated nanoparticles of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were synthesized by a novel process which involved the decomposition of metal nitrates that had been coated on ultrafine carbon black powder, after which the carbon black was gasified. The use of ultrafine, high-surface-area carbon black powder apparently allowed the nanocrystalline oxide particles to form and remain separate from each other, after which the carbon black was gasified at a somewhat higher temperature. As a result, the degree of agglomeration was shown to be relatively low. The average crystallite size and the specific surface area of the as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles were 5∼6 nm and 130 m 2 /g, respectively, for powder synthesized at 650 degree C. The as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles had a light brown color and were translucent, which differs distinctly from conventional YSZ particles which are typically white and opaque. The mechanism of the synthesis process was investigated, and indicated that the gasification temperature had a direct effect on the crystallite size of the as-synthesized YSZ nanoparticles. High-density and ultrafine-grained YSZ ceramic articles were prepared by fast-firing, using a dwell temperature of 1250 degree C and a dwell time of two minutes or less. copyright 1996 Materials Research Society

  15. Preparation of SiC and Ag/SiC coatings on TRISO surrogate particles by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lustfeld, Martin; Reinecke, Anne-Maria; Lippman, Wolfgang; Hurtado, Antonio; Ruiz-Moreno, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Recently published research results suggest significant advantages of using nanocrystalline instead of coarse grained SiC for nuclear applications. In this work it was attempted to prepare nanocrystalline SiC coatings on TRISO surrogate kernels using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process. As a plasma-based physical vapor deposition process, PLD allows the synthesis of dense and stoichiometric coatings in the amorphous or nanocrystalline phase. Two different types of TRISO surrogate kernels were used with outer diameters of 500 pm and 800 μm, respectively: plain Al_2O_3 kernels and ZrO_2 kernels coated with TRISO-like buffer and pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layers. In a second step, the PLD process was used for the preparation of multilayer coatings consisting of a Ag layer buried with a SiC layer. The samples were analyzed regarding their morphology, microstructure, crystalline phase and chemical composition using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser scanning microscopy (LSM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy- dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The samples will be used in future work for out-of-pile investigations of both thermal stability and Ag retention capability of nanocrystalline SiC layers. X-ray diflraction measurements did not confirm nano crystallinity of the SiC coatings, but rather indicated that the coatings were mainly amorphous possibly with a little fraction of the nanocrystalline phase. Further analyses showed that some of the SiC coatings had an adequate stoichiometric composition and that Ag/SiC multilayer coatings were successfully produced by PLD. Coatings on TRISO- like buffer and PyC layers exhibited good adhesion to the substrate while coatings on Al_2O_3 kernels were susceptible to delamination. The results suggest that PLD is generally suitable for SiC coating of TRISO particles. However, further optimization of the process parameters such as the coating temperature is needed to obtain fine- grained non-columnar SiC layers that are

  16. Nano-sensing of the orientation of fluorescing molecules with active coated nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    The potential of using active coated nano-particles to determine the orientation of fluorescing molecules is reported. By treating each fluorescing molecule as an electric Hertzian dipole, single and multiple fluorescing molecules emitting coherently and incoherently in various orientations...... are considered in the presence of active coated nano-particles. It is demonstrated that in addition to offering a means to determine the orientation of a single molecule or the over-all orientation of the molecules surrounding it, the nature of the far-field response from the active coated nano...

  17. Impact of palmitic acid coating on the water uptake and loss of ammonium sulfate particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Garland

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available While water insoluble organics are prevalent in the atmosphere, it is not clear how the presence of such species alters the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Here we use a combination of FTIR spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS to characterize ammonium sulfate particles coated with palmitic acid. Coated aerosols were generated by atomizing pure ammonium sulfate, mixing the particles with a heated flow of nitrogen with palmitic acid vapor, and then flowing the mixture through an in-line oven to create internally mixed particles. The mixing state of the particles was probed using the AMS data and images from the TEM. Both of these probes suggest that the particles were internally mixed. Water uptake by the mixed particles was then probed at 273 K. It was found that for ammonium sulfate containing ~20 wt% palmitic acid the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH was the same as for pure ammonium sulfate (80±3% RH. For particles with ~50 wt% palmitic acid however, the mixed particles began to take up water at relative humidities as low at 69% and continued to slowly take up water to 85% RH without fully deliquescing. In addition to studies of water uptake, water loss was also investigated. Here coatings of up to 50 wt% had no impact on the efflorescence relative humidity. These studies suggest that even if insoluble substances coat salt particles in the atmosphere, there may be relatively little effect on the resulting water uptake and loss.

  18. Source contributions to atmospheric fine carbon particle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Gray, H.; Cass, Glen R.

    A Lagrangian particle-in-cell air quality model has been developed that facilitates the study of source contributions to atmospheric fine elemental carbon and fine primary total carbon particle concentrations. Model performance was tested using spatially and temporally resolved emissions and air quality data gathered for this purpose in the Los Angeles area for the year 1982. It was shown that black elemental carbon (EC) particle concentrations in that city were dominated by emissions from diesel engines including both on-highway and off-highway applications. Fine primary total carbon particle concentrations (TC=EC+organic carbon) resulted from the accumulation of small increments from a great variety of emission source types including both gasoline and diesel powered highway vehicles, stationary source fuel oil and gas combustion, industrial processes, paved road dust, fireplaces, cigarettes and food cooking (e.g. charbroilers). Strategies for black elemental carbon particle concentration control will of necessity need to focus on diesel engines, while controls directed at total carbon particle concentrations will have to be diversified over a great many source types.

  19. In situ carbon nanotube reinforcements in a plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balani, K.; Zhang, T.; Karakoti, A.; Li, W.Z.; Seal, S.; Agarwal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are potential reinforcements for toughening the ceramic matrix. The critical issue of avoiding CNT agglomeration and introducing CNT-matrix anchoring has challenged many researchers to improve the mechanical properties of the CNT reinforced nanocomposite. In the current work, dispersed CNTs are grown on Al 2 O 3 powder particles in situ by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique. Consequently, 0.5 wt.% CNT-reinforced Al 2 O 3 particles were successfully plasma sprayed to obtain a 400 μm thick coating on the steel substrate. In situ CNTs grown on Al 2 O 3 shows a promising enhancement in hardness and fracture toughness of the plasma-sprayed coating attributed to the existence of strong metallurgical bonding between Al 2 O 3 particles and CNTs. In addition, CNT tentacles have imparted multi-directional reinforcement in securing the Al 2 O 3 splats. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows interfacial fusion between Al 2 O 3 and CNT and the formation of Y-junction nanotubes

  20. Ignition of a Combustible Atmosphere by Incandescent Carbon Wear Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max A.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether carbon wear particles from carbon elements in sliding contact with a metal surface were sufficiently hot to cause ignition of a combustible atmosphere. In some machinery, electric potential differences and currents may appear at the carbon-metal interface. For this reason the effect of these voltages and currents on the ability of carbon wear particles to cause ignition was evaluated. The test specimens used in the investigation were carbon vanes taken from a fuel pump and flat 21-inch-diameter 2 metal disks (440-C stainless steel) representing the pump housing. During each experiment a vane was loaded against a disk with a 0.5-pound force, and the disk was rotated to give a surface speed of 3140 feet per minute. The chamber of the apparatus that housed the vane and the disk was filled with a combustible mixture of air and propane. Various voltages and amperages were applied across the vane-disk interface. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 75, 350, 400, and 450 F. Fires were produced by incandescent carbon wear particles obtained at conditions of electric potential as low as 106 volts and 0.3 ampere at 400 F. Ignitions were obtained only with carbon wear particles produced with an electric potential across the carbon-vane-disk interface. No ignitions were obtained with carbon wear particles produced in the absence of this potential; also, the potential difference produced no ignitions in the absence of carbon wear particles. A film supplement showing ignition by incandescent wear particles is available.

  1. Operation Procedure of Inspection Equipment for TRISO-coated Fuel Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Cho, M. S.; Kim, Y. M.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Jeong, K. C.; Oh, S. C.; Lee, Y. W.

    2007-03-01

    TRISO-coated fuel particle for HTGR(high temperature gas cooled reactor) is composed of fuel kernel and coating layers. The kernel and coated particle are characterized by inspection processes for inspection items such as diameter of kernel, thickness, density and an-isotropy of coating layer. The coating thickness can be nondestructively measured by X-ray inspection equipment. The coating thickness as well as the sphericity can be also measured by optical inspection system as a ceramography method. The an-isotropy can be characterized by photometer. The density of coating layer can be measured by density column. The size and sphericity of particles can be measured by PSA(particle size analyzer). The thermo-chemical characteristics of kernel can be analyzed by TG/DTA(Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyzer). The inspection objective, equipment composition, operation principle, operation manual for each equipment was described in this operation procedure, which will be used for the characterization of inspection items described above

  2. Influence of process variables on permeability and anisotropy of Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Thiele, B.A.

    1977-11-01

    The effect of several important process variables on the fraction of defective particles and anisotropy of the low-temperature isotropic (LTI) coating layer was determined for Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Process variables considered are deposition temperature, hydrocarbon type, diluent type, and percent diluent. The effect of several other variables such as coating rate and density that depend on the process variables were also considered in this analysis. The fraction of defective particles was controlled by the dependent variables coating rate and LTI density. Coating rate was also the variable controlling the anisotropy of the LTI layer. Diluent type and diluent concentration had only a small influence on the deposition rate of the LTI layer. High-quality particles in terms of anisotropy and permeability can be produced by use of a porous plate gas distributor if the coating rate is between 3 and 5 μm/min and the coating density is between about 1.75 and 1.95 g/cm 3

  3. HIGH TEMPERATURE EROSION WEAR OF CERMET PARTICLES REINFORCED SELF-FLUXING ALLOY MATRIX HVOF SPRAYED COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Surzhenkov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the resistance of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF sprayed TiC-NiMo and Cr3C2-Ni cermet particles reinforced NiCrSiB self-fluxing alloy matrix coatings to high temperature erosion wear is studied. Microstructure of the coatings was examined by SEM, phase composition was determined by XRD. A four-channel centrifugal particle accelerator was applied to study the high temperature erosion wear of the coatings. The impact angles were 30 and 90 degrees, initial particle velocity was 50 m/s, temperature of the test - 650 degrees. Volume wear of the coatings was calculated and compared to the respective values of the reference materials. Wear mechanisms were studied by SEM.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7617

  4. Mathematical model and computer code for coated particles performance at normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, I.; Kadarmetov, I.; Makarov, V.

    2002-01-01

    Computer modeling of thermo-mechanical behavior of coated particles during operating both at normal and off-normal conditions has a very significant role particularly on a stage of new reactors development. In Russia a big experience has been accumulated on fabrication and reactor tests of CP and fuel elements with UO 2 kernels. However, this experience cannot be using in full volume for development of a new reactor installation GT-MHR. This is due to very deep burn-up of the fuel based on plutonium oxide (up to 70% fima). Therefore the mathematical modeling of CP thermal-mechanical behavior and failure prediction becomes particularly important. The authors have a clean understanding that serviceability of fuel with high burn-ups are defined not only by thermo-mechanics, but also by structured changes in coating materials, thermodynamics of chemical processes, 'amoeba-effect', formation CO etc. In the report the first steps of development of integrate code for numerical modeling of coated particles behavior and some calculating results concerning the influence of various design parameters on fuel coated particles endurance for GT-MHR normal operating conditions are submitted. A failure model is developed to predict the fraction of TRISO-coated particles. In this model it is assumed that the failure of CP depends not only on probability of SiC-layer fracture but also on the PyC-layers damage. The coated particle is considered as a uniform design. (author)

  5. Electrochemical and anticorrosion behaviors of hybrid functionalized graphite nano-platelets/tripolyphosphate in epoxy-coated carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Somayeh; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Taromi, Faramarz Afshar; Neshati, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • FGNP was combined with TPP to obtain a hybrid nano-particle. • TEM image showed uniform distribution of the hybrid nanoparticles in epoxy coating. • FGNP is a substrate for linking of TPP anions by hydrogen bonding. • FGNP as an accelerator, provides rapid iron phosphate passive film formation. • The hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection. - Abstract: Functionalized graphite nano-platelets (FGNP) were combined with tripolyphosphate (TPP) to gain a hybrid nano-particle (FGNP-TPP) with homogenous dispersion in epoxy, resulting in an excellent anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel substrate. Characterization analyses of the hybrid nano-particle were performed by FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TEM. TPP was linked to FGNP nano-particles by hydrogen bondings. Different epoxy coatings formulated with 1 wt.% of FGNP, FGNP-TPP and TPP were evaluated. Electrochemical investigations, salt spray and pull-off tests showed that the hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection compared to FGNP and TPP due to synergistic effect between FGNP as an accelerator and TPP as a corrosion inhibitor to produce a uniform and stable iron-phosphate passive film with high surface coverage.

  6. Electrochemical and anticorrosion behaviors of hybrid functionalized graphite nano-platelets/tripolyphosphate in epoxy-coated carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Somayeh, E-mail: somaye.mohammadi32@aut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariatpanahi, Homeira [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taromi, Faramarz Afshar [Department of Polymer Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neshati, Jaber [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • FGNP was combined with TPP to obtain a hybrid nano-particle. • TEM image showed uniform distribution of the hybrid nanoparticles in epoxy coating. • FGNP is a substrate for linking of TPP anions by hydrogen bonding. • FGNP as an accelerator, provides rapid iron phosphate passive film formation. • The hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection. - Abstract: Functionalized graphite nano-platelets (FGNP) were combined with tripolyphosphate (TPP) to gain a hybrid nano-particle (FGNP-TPP) with homogenous dispersion in epoxy, resulting in an excellent anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel substrate. Characterization analyses of the hybrid nano-particle were performed by FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TEM. TPP was linked to FGNP nano-particles by hydrogen bondings. Different epoxy coatings formulated with 1 wt.% of FGNP, FGNP-TPP and TPP were evaluated. Electrochemical investigations, salt spray and pull-off tests showed that the hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection compared to FGNP and TPP due to synergistic effect between FGNP as an accelerator and TPP as a corrosion inhibitor to produce a uniform and stable iron-phosphate passive film with high surface coverage.

  7. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by controlling its particle size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nudelman, F.; Sonmezler, E.; Bomans, P.H.H.; With, de G.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles of different size are prepared using a flow system. Post-synthesis stabilization with a layer of poly[(a,ß)-DL-aspartic acid] leads to stabilization of the ACC, but only for particles

  8. Single particle composition measurements of artificial Calcium Carbonate aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, S. R.; Mentel, T. F.; Schwinger, T.; Croteau, P. L.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust, with an estimated total source from natural and anthropogenic emissions of up to 2800 Tg/yr, is one of the two largest contributors to total aerosol mass, with only Sea salt having a similar source strength (up to 2600 Tg/yr). The composition of dust particles varies strongly depending on the production process and, most importantly, the source location. Therefore, the composition of single dust particles can be used both to trace source regions of air masses as well as to identify chemical aging processes. Here we present results of laboratory studies on generating artificial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles, a model compound for carbonaceous mineral dust particles. Particles were generated by atomizing an aqueous hydrogen carbonate solution. Water was removed using a silica diffusion dryer., then the particles were processed in an oven at temperatures up to 900°C, converting the hydrogen carbonate to its anhydrous form. The resulting aerosol was analyzed using an on-line single particle laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF). The results confirm the conversion to calcium carbonate, and validate that the produced particles indeed can be used as a model compound for carbonaceous dust aerosols.

  9. Enhancement and degradation of the R2* relaxation rate resulting from the encapsulation of magnetic particles with hydrophilic coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Hendrick W; Paquet, Chantal

    2011-12-01

    The effects of including a hydrophilic coating around the particles are studied across a wide range of particle sizes by performing Monte Carlo simulations of protons diffusing through a system of magnetic particles. A physically realistic methodology of implementing the coating by cross boundary jump scaling and transition probabilities at the coating surface is developed. Using this formulation, the coating has three distinct impacts on the relaxation rate: an enhancement at small particle sizes, a degradation at intermediate particle sizes, and no effect at large particles sizes. These varied effects are reconciled with the underlying dephasing mechanisms by using the concept of a full dephasing zone to present a physical picture of the dephasing process with and without the coating for all sizes. The enhancement at small particle sizes is studied systemically to demonstrate the existence of an optimal ratio of diffusion coefficients inside/outside the coating to achieve maximal increase in the relaxation rate. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Carbon coated Li4Ti5O12 nanorods as superior anode material for high rate lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hongjun; Shen, Laifa; Rui, Kun; Li, Hongsen; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A novel approach has been developed to fabricate 1D Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 /C nanorods by a wet-chemical route. •Carbon coating layer effectively restrict the particle growth and enhance electronic conductivity. •The Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 /C nanorods exhibit remarkable rate capability and long cycle life. -- Abstract: We describe a novel approach for the synthesis of carbon coated Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 (Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 /C) nanorods for high rate lithium ion batteries. The carbon coated TiO 2 nanotubes using the glucose as carbon source are first synthesized by hydrothermal treatment. The commercial anatase TiO 2 powder is immersed in KOH sulotion and subsequently transforms into Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 /C in LiOH solution under hydrothermal condition. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption/desorption and Raman spectra are performed to characterize their morphologies and structures. Compared with the pristine Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 , one-dimensional (1D) Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 /C nanostructures show much better rate capability and cycling stability. The 1D Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 /C architectures effectively restrict the particle growth and enhance their electronic conductivity, enabling fast ion and electron transport

  11. Characterization of D2 tool steel friction surfaced coatings over low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekharbabu, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Rao, K. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Solid state coating by friction surfacing method. • D2 tool steel is coated over relatively softer low carbon steel. • Defect free interface between tool steel coating and low carbon steel substrate. • D2 coatings exhibited higher hardness and good wear resistance. • Highly refined martensitic microstructure in the coating. - Abstract: In this work D2 tool steel coating is produced over a low carbon steel substrate using friction surfacing process. The process parameters are optimized to get a defect free coating. Microstructural characterization is carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Infrared thermography is used to measure the thermal profile during friction surfacing of D2 steel. Wear performance of the coating is studied using Pin-on-Disk wear tests. A lower rotational speed of the consumable rod and higher translational speed of the substrate is found to result in thinner coatings. Friction surfaced D2 steel coating showed fine-grained martensitic microstructure compared to the as-received consumable rod which showed predominantly ferrite microstructure. Refinement of carbides in the coating is observed due to the stirring action of the process. The infrared thermography studies showed the peak temperature attained by the D2 coating to be about 1200 °C. The combined effect of martensitic microstructure and refined carbides resulted in higher hardness and wear resistance of the coating

  12. Impact of the Excitation Source and Plasmonic Material on Cylindrical Active Coated Nano-Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Liu, Yan; Malureanu, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties of cylindrical active coated nano-particles comprised of a silica nano-cylinder core layered with a plasmonic concentric nano-shell are investigated for potential nano-sensor applications. Particular attention is devoted to the near-field properties of these particles...

  13. Influence of layer eccentricity on the resonant properties of cylindrical active coated nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, R. O.; Arslanagic, Samel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the influence of the layer eccentricity on the resonant properties of active coated nano-particles made of a silver core and gain impregnated silica shell illuminated by a near-by magnetic line source. For a fixed over-all size of the particle, designs with small and large cores...

  14. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO 2 tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study

  15. Characterisation of a new carbon nanotube detector coating for solar absolute radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remesal Oliva, A.; Finsterle, W.; Walter, B.; Schmutz, W.

    2018-02-01

    A new sprayable carbon nanotube coating for bolometric detectors aims to increase the absorptance compared to regular space qualified black paints. In collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), we have characterized the optical properties and mechanical and thermal stability of the carbon nanotube coating inside conical shaped cavity detectors.

  16. Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Paul K. T.; Gallaher, George R.; Wu, Jeffrey C. S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane.

  17. Thermal Protection of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites by Ceramic Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kandola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal barrier efficiency of two types of ceramic particle, glass flakes and aluminum titanate, dispersed on the surface of carbon-fiber epoxy composites, has been evaluated using a cone calorimeter at 35 and 50 kW/m2, in addition to temperature gradients through the samples’ thicknesses, measured by inserting thermocouples on the exposed and back surfaces during the cone tests. Two techniques of dispersing ceramic particles on the surface have been employed, one where particles were dispersed on semi-cured laminate and the other where their dispersion in a phenolic resin was applied on the laminate surface, using the same method as used previously for glass fiber composites. The morphology and durability of the coatings to water absorption, peeling, impact and flexural tension were also studied and compared with those previously reported for glass-fiber epoxy composites. With both methods, uniform coatings could be achieved, which were durable to peeling or water absorption with a minimal adverse effect on the mechanical properties of composites. While all these properties were comparable to those previously observed for glass fiber composites, the ceramic particles have seen to be more effective on this less flammable, carbon fiber composite substrate.

  18. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Kristiansen, Helge [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Conpart AS, Skjetten 2013 (Norway); Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying, E-mail: jianying.he@ntnu.no [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway)

    2016-06-28

    Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.

  19. Electromechanical characterization of individual micron-sized metal coated polymer particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Kristiansen, Helge; Pettersen, Sigurd Rolland; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Micron-sized polymer particles with nanoscale metal coatings are essential in conductive adhesives for electronics assembly. The particles function in a compressed state in the adhesives. The link between mechanical properties and electrical conductivity is thus of the utmost importance in the formation of good electrical contact. A custom flat punch set-up based on nanoindentation has been developed to simultaneously deform and electrically probe individual particles. The set-up has a sufficiently low internal resistance to allow the measurement of sub-Ohm contact resistances. Additionally, the set-up can capture mechanical failure of the particles. Combining this data yields a fundamental understanding of contact behavior. We demonstrate that this method can clearly distinguish between particles of different sizes, with different thicknesses of metal coating, and different metallization schemes. The technique provides good repeatability and physical insight into the behavior of these particles that can guide adhesive design and the optimization of bonding processes.

  20. Engineering and characterization of mesoporous silica-coated magnetic particles for mercury removal from industrial effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jie; Xu Zhenghe; Wang Feng

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silica coatings were synthesized on dense liquid silica-coated magnetite particles using cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTAC) as molecular templates, followed by sol-gel process. A specific surface area of the synthesized particles as high as 150 m 2 /g was obtained. After functionalization with mercapto-propyl-trimethoxy-silane (MPTS) through silanation reaction, the particles exhibited high affinity of mercury in aqueous solutions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential measurement, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) were used to characterize the synthesis processes, surface functionalization, and mercury adsorption on the synthesized magnetite particles. The loading capacity of the particles for mercury was determined to be as high as 14 mg/g at pH 2. A unique feature of strong magnetism of the synthesized nanocomposite particles makes the subsequent separation of the magnetic sorbents from complex multiphase suspensions convenient and effective

  1. Engineering and characterization of mesoporous silica-coated magnetic particles for mercury removal from industrial effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Xu, Zhenghe; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-01

    Mesoporous silica coatings were synthesized on dense liquid silica-coated magnetite particles using cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTAC) as molecular templates, followed by sol-gel process. A specific surface area of the synthesized particles as high as 150 m 2/g was obtained. After functionalization with mercapto-propyl-trimethoxy-silane (MPTS) through silanation reaction, the particles exhibited high affinity of mercury in aqueous solutions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential measurement, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) were used to characterize the synthesis processes, surface functionalization, and mercury adsorption on the synthesized magnetite particles. The loading capacity of the particles for mercury was determined to be as high as 14 mg/g at pH 2. A unique feature of strong magnetism of the synthesized nanocomposite particles makes the subsequent separation of the magnetic sorbents from complex multiphase suspensions convenient and effective.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium obtained by electrochemical deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Xibo; Zeng, Yongxiang; He, Rui; Li, Zhongjie; Tian, Lingyang; Wang, Jian; Wan, Qianbing; Li, Xiaoyu; Bao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The incorporation of SWNTs into the HA coating leaded to the formation of homogeneous and crack-free composite coatings. • The highest bonding strength was detected for the SWNTs/HA-0.5 composite coating (25.70 MPa). • The SWNTs/HA composite coatings induced better cell proliferation, cell viability and ALP activity compared to pure HA coating and pure Ti. • The results suggested that SWNTs/HA-0.5 and SWNTs/HA-1.0 composite coating prepared in this work is acceptable in terms of mechanical property and in-vitro bioactivity. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite (SWNTs/HA) composite coatings were successfully fabricated by electrochemical deposition technique. Different concentrations of SWNTs were incorporated into the apatite coating by adding functionalized SWNTs into the electrolyte. Homogeneous and crack-free SWNTs/HA composite coatings were achieved and the coatings had higher crystallinity compared to pure HA coating. In addition, the highest bonding strength of the SWNTs/HA coating reached 25.7 MPa, which was nearly 70% higher than that of pure HA coating. The in-vitro cellular biocompatibility tests revealed that SWNTs/HA composite coatings exhibited higher in-vitro bioactivity than that of pure HA coating and pure titanium (Ti). It suggests that SWNTs/HA composite coating may have enormous potential applications in the field of biomaterials, especially for the metal implants

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium obtained by electrochemical deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Xibo; Zeng, Yongxiang [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Prosthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); He, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Stomatology, the Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310015 (China); Li, Zhongjie; Tian, Lingyang [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Prosthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Jian, E-mail: fero@scu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Prosthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wan, Qianbing, E-mail: pxb1024@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Prosthodontics, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Bao, Hong [Department of Stomatology, Hospital of Chengdu Office of People' s Government of Tibetan Autonomous Region, Chengdu 610000 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The incorporation of SWNTs into the HA coating leaded to the formation of homogeneous and crack-free composite coatings. • The highest bonding strength was detected for the SWNTs/HA-0.5 composite coating (25.70 MPa). • The SWNTs/HA composite coatings induced better cell proliferation, cell viability and ALP activity compared to pure HA coating and pure Ti. • The results suggested that SWNTs/HA-0.5 and SWNTs/HA-1.0 composite coating prepared in this work is acceptable in terms of mechanical property and in-vitro bioactivity. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes/hydroxyapatite (SWNTs/HA) composite coatings were successfully fabricated by electrochemical deposition technique. Different concentrations of SWNTs were incorporated into the apatite coating by adding functionalized SWNTs into the electrolyte. Homogeneous and crack-free SWNTs/HA composite coatings were achieved and the coatings had higher crystallinity compared to pure HA coating. In addition, the highest bonding strength of the SWNTs/HA coating reached 25.7 MPa, which was nearly 70% higher than that of pure HA coating. The in-vitro cellular biocompatibility tests revealed that SWNTs/HA composite coatings exhibited higher in-vitro bioactivity than that of pure HA coating and pure titanium (Ti). It suggests that SWNTs/HA composite coating may have enormous potential applications in the field of biomaterials, especially for the metal implants.

  4. Simultaneous acid exposure and erosive particle wear of thermoset coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Frankær, Sarah Maria

    2018-01-01

    , similar to the erosion/corrosion-type phenomena found in metals. A vinyl ester-based coating was the most resistant to the simultaneous erosive/acidic exposure, with a maximum polishing rate of 3.24±0.61 μm/week, while novolac epoxy and polyurethane coatings showed high polishing rates of 11.7±1.50 and 13.4±0......Handling acidic chemicals is a challenge in the chemical industry, requiring a careful choice of contact material. Certain thermoset organic coatings are applicable in low pH environments, but when particulate erosion is also present the performance demand is increased. This is the case in, e...

  5. The role of nano-particles in the field of thermal spray coating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmann, Stephan; Leparoux, Marc; Rohr, Lukas

    2005-06-01

    Nano-particles play not only a key role in recent research fields, but also in the public discussions about health and safety in nanotechnology. Nevertheless, the worldwide activities in nano-particles research increased dramatically during the last 5 to 10 years. There are different potential routes for the future production of nano-particles at large scale. The main directions envisaged are mechanical milling, wet chemical reactions or gas phase processes. Each of the processes has its specific advantages and limitations. Mechanical milling and wet chemical reactions are typically time intensive and batch processes, whereas gas phase productions by flames or plasma can be carried out continuously. Materials of interest are mainly oxide ceramics, carbides, nitrides, and pure metals. Nano-ceramics are interesting candidates for coating technologies due to expected higher coating toughness, better thermal shock and wear resistance. Especially embedded nano-carbides and-nitrides offer homogenously distributed hard phases, which enhance coatings hardness. Thermal spraying, a nearly 100 years old and world wide established coating technology, gets new possibilities thanks to optimized, nano-sized and/or nano-structured powders. Latest coating system developments like high velocity flame spraying (HVOF), cold gas deposition or liquid suspension spraying in combination with new powder qualities may open new applications and markets. This article gives an overview on the latest activities in nano-particle research and production in special relation to thermal spray coating technology.

  6. Removing nickel from nickel-coated carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardianto, A.; Hertleer, C.; De Mey, G.; Van Langenhove, L.

    2017-10-01

    Conductive fibers/yarns are one of the most important materials for smart textiles because of their electrically conductive functionality combined with flexibility and light weight. They can be applied in many fields such as the medical sector, electronics, sensors and even as thermoelectric generators. Temperature sensors, for example, can be made using the thermocouple or thermopile principle which usually uses two different metal wires that can produce a temperature-dependent voltage. However, if metal wires are inserted into a textile structure, they will decrease the flexibility properties of the textile product. Nickel-coated Carbon Fiber (NiCF), a conductive textile yarn, has a potential use as a textile-based thermopile if we can create an alternating region of carbon and nickel along the fiber which in turn it can be used for substituting the metallic thermopile. The idea was to remove nickel from NiCF in order to obtain a yarn that contains alternating zones of carbon and nickel. Due to no literature reporting on how to remove nickel from NiCF, in this paper we investigated some chemicals to remove nickel from NiCF.

  7. Electrochemical Behavior of Biomedical Titanium Alloys Coated with Diamond Carbon in Hanks' Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanavel, S.; Ponnusamy, S.; Mohan, L.; Radhika, R.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.; Ramasubramanian, K.

    2018-03-01

    Biomedical implants in the knee and hip are frequent failures because of corrosion and stress on the joints. To solve this important problem, metal implants can be coated with diamond carbon, and this coating plays a critical role in providing an increased resistance to implants toward corrosion. In this study, we have employed diamond carbon coating over Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys using hot filament chemical vapor deposition method which is well-established coating process that significantly improves the resistance toward corrosion, wears and hardness. The diamond carbon-coated Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy showed an increased microhardness in the range of 850 HV. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization studies in SBF solution (simulated body fluid solution) were carried out to understand the in vitro behavior of uncoated as well as coated titanium alloys. The experimental results showed that the corrosion resistance of Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy is relatively higher when compared with diamond carbon-coated Ti-6Al-4V alloys due to the presence of β phase in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy. Electrochemical impedance results showed that the diamond carbon-coated alloys behave as an ideal capacitor in the body fluid solution. Moreover, the stability in mechanical properties during the corrosion process was maintained for diamond carbon-coated titanium alloys.

  8. Repair of oxidation protection coatings on carbon-carbon using preceramic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Stuart T.; Graef, Renee C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a field-applicable technique for the repair of damage to SiC protective coatings on carbon/carbon composites, using commercial preceramic polymers, such as perhydropolysilazane developed by the Southwest Research Institute and several commercial polymers (NICALON, PS110, PS116, PS117, NCP-200, and PHPS were tested). After being applied on the damaged panel and oxidized at 1400 C, these polymers form either SiC or Si3N4 (or a mixture of both). It was found that impact damaged carbon/carbon specimens repaired with perhydropolysilazane exhibit substantial oxidation resistance. Many of the other tested preceramic polymer were found to be unsuitable for the purpose of repair due to either low ceramic yield, foaming, or intumescence.

  9. Pre- and post-irradiation characterization and properties measurements of ZrC coated surrogate TRISO particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Zirconium carbide is a candidate to either replace or supplement silicon carbide as a coating material in TRISO fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels. Six sets of ZrC coated surrogate microsphere samples, fabricated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition method, were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developmental samples available for the irradiation experiment were in conditions of either as-fabricated coated particles or particles that had been heat-treated to simulate the fuel compacting process. Five sets of samples were composed of nominally stoichiometric compositions, with the sixth being richer in carbon (C/Zr = 1.4). The samples were irradiated at 800 and 1250 C with fast neutron fluences of 2 and 6 dpa. Post-irradiation, the samples were retrieved from the irradiation capsules followed by microstructural examination performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis Laboratory. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor program as part of International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative collaboration with Japan. This report includes progress from that INERI collaboration, as well as results of some follow-up examination of the irradiated specimens. Post-irradiation examination items included microstructural characterization, and nanoindentation hardness/modulus measurements. The examinations revealed grain size enhancement and softening as the primary effects of both heat-treatment and irradiation in stoichiometric ZrC with a non-layered, homogeneous grain structure, raising serious concerns on the mechanical suitability of these particular developmental coatings as a replacement for SiC in TRISO fuel. Samples with either free carbon or carbon-rich layers dispersed in the ZrC coatings experienced negligible grain size

  10. Superhydrophobic and transparent coatings prepared by self-assembly of dual-sized silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian-Feng; Wang, Jian-Nong

    2010-06-01

    Superhydrophobic and transparent coatings have been prepared by self-assembly of dual-sized silica particles from a mixed dispersion. The desirable micro/nano hierarchical structure for superhydrophobicity is constructed simply by adjusting the size and ratio of the dual-sized particles without organic/inorganic templates. The transparency of the prepared coatings is also researched, and the light scattering can be reduced by lowering the ratio of big sub-micro particles while the superhydrophobicity maintains unchanged. When nano particles with a diameter of 50 nm and sub-micro particles with a diameter of 350 nm are assembled, a superhydrophobic property with a water contact angle of 161° is achieved. Additionally, the coated glass is also very transparent. The highest transmittance of the coated glass can reach 85%. Compared to traditional colloid self-assembly approach, which often involves dozens of steps of layer-by-layer processing and organic/inorganic templates, the present approach is much simpler and has advantages for large-scale coating.

  11. Chemical sensors using coated or doped carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of carbon-coated Li3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials with different carbon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui, X.H.; Li, C.; Chen, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The carbon-coated monoclinic Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 (LVP) cathode materials were synthesized by a solid-state reaction process under the same conditions using citric acid, glucose, PVDF and starch, respectively, as both reduction agents and carbon coating sources. The carbon coating can enhance the conductivity of the composite materials and hinder the growth of Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 particles. Their structures and physicochemical properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods. In the voltage region of 3.0-4.3 V, the electrochemical cycling of these LVP/C electrodes all presents good rate capability and excellent cycle stability. It is found that the citric acid-derived LVP owns the largest reversible capacity of 118 mAh g -1 with no capacity fading during 100 cycles at the rate of 0.2C, and the PVDF-derived LVP possesses a capacity of 95 mAh g -1 even at the rate of 5C. While in the voltage region of 3.0-4.8 V, all samples exhibit a slightly poorer cycle performance with the capacity retention of about 86% after 50 cycles at the rate of 0.2C. The reasons for electrochemical performance of the carbon coated Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 composites are also discussed. The solid-state reaction is feasible for the preparation of the carbon coated Li 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 composites which can offer favorable properties for commercial applications

  13. The in vitro biomineralization and cytocompatibility of polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Penghua; Wang Jinqing; Wang Lin; Liu Bin; Lei Ziqiang; Yang Shengrong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were firstly prepared by a simple and feasible route. Then, for comparison, the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the carbon nanotubes and the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were assessed by immersion study in simulated body fluids and 3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide test using osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1), respectively. As a result, it has been demonstrated that the introduction of polydopamine coating can greatly enhance the bioactivity and promote cell proliferation of the carbon nanotubes. The improvement of bioactive behavior is attributed to the good combination of catecholamines structure of the polydopamine and the structural advantages of carbon nanotubes as a framework material. It is anticipated that the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes would find potential applications in bone tissue engineering and other biomedical areas.

  14. The in vitro biomineralization and cytocompatibility of polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Penghua [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Jinqing, E-mail: jqwang@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Lin; Liu Bin [School of Stomatology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lei Ziqiang [Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Yang Shengrong, E-mail: sryang@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2011-03-15

    In this work, polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were firstly prepared by a simple and feasible route. Then, for comparison, the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the carbon nanotubes and the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were assessed by immersion study in simulated body fluids and 3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide test using osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1), respectively. As a result, it has been demonstrated that the introduction of polydopamine coating can greatly enhance the bioactivity and promote cell proliferation of the carbon nanotubes. The improvement of bioactive behavior is attributed to the good combination of catecholamines structure of the polydopamine and the structural advantages of carbon nanotubes as a framework material. It is anticipated that the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes would find potential applications in bone tissue engineering and other biomedical areas.

  15. Tribological behavior of dual-layer electroless-plated Ag–carbon nanotube coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun-Dai; Penkov, Oleksiy V.; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2013-01-01

    The tribological behavior of electroless Ag-plated carbon nanotube (CNT) dual-layer coatings was assessed and compared to that of the pure CNT coating. The motivation was to protect the surface of CNT coatings from wear by depositing a thin, soft Ag coating. The methods used for coating CNTs and Ag were spin coating and electroless plating, respectively. These coating methods were selected based on their simplicity and cost effectiveness. Wear tests were conducted by sliding the coatings against a stainless steel ball under a 10–30 mN applied load. Results showed that the wear rate of the dual-layer coating was strongly dependent on the thickness of the Ag layer as well as the applied load. At a 10 mN load and an Ag thickness of 65 nm, the wear rate of the dual-layer coating was about 10 times less than that of the pure CNT coating. However, when the thickness of the Ag was decreased to 11.5 nm, the wear rate was significantly higher. Also, the steady-state friction coefficients of the CNT and the dual-layer Ag–CNT coatings were in the range of 0.65–0.73 for all loads. A model of the wear reduction mechanism of the dual-layer Ag–CNT coating was proposed. - Highlights: ► Dual-layer Ag–carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings were deposited on silicon wafer. ► Friction coefficient of the Ag–CNT coatings was about 0.65. ► Wear of Ag–CNT coatings depended on the thickness of Ag layer and the applied load. ► Wear rate of the Ag–CNT coating was 10-fold less than that of the pure CNT coating

  16. Carbon-coated NiPt, CoPt nanoalloys: size control and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gendy, A.A. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden (Germany); Hampel, S.; Leonhardt, A.; Khavrus, V.; Buechner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden (Germany); Klingeler, R. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Controlled synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with well-defined size and composition is always a challenge in material-based nanoscience. Here, we apply the high pressure chemical vapour deposition technique (HPCVD) to obtain carbon-shielded magnetic alloy nanoparticles under control of the particle size. Carbon encapsulated NiPt, CoPt (NiPt rate at C, CoPt rate at C) nanoalloys were synthesized by means of HPCVD starting from sublimating appropriate metal-organic precursors. Structural characterization by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction indicated the formation of coated bimetallic Ni{sub x}Pt{sub 100-x} and CoxPt{sub 100-x} nanoparticles. Adjusting the sublimation temperature of the different precursors allowed tuning the core sizes with small size distribution. In addition, detailed studies of the magnetic properties are presented. AC magnetic heating studies imply the potential of the coated nanoalloys for hyperthermia therapy.

  17. Adsorptive removal of nickel from aqueous solutions by activated carbons from doum seed (Hyphaenethebaica coat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal El-Sadaawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the possibility of using low cost agriculture waste as doum-palm seed coat for the removal of nickel ions from aqueous solutions. Two activated carbons had been prepared from raw doum-palm seed coat (DACI and DACII; as well, the raw material was used as an adsorbent (RD. Batch adsorption experiments were performed as a function of pH of solution, initial nickel ions concentration, dose of adsorbent and contact time. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and D–R Models. Different error analysis conforms that the isotherm data followed Freundlich models for all adsorbents. Adsorption kinetic data were tested using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Elovich model. Adsorption mechanism was investigated using the intra-particle diffusion model. Diffusion coefficients were calculated using the film and intraparticle diffusion models. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Ni2+ ions onto RD, DACI and DACII followed pseudo-second order kinetic model, and indicates that the intra-particle diffusion controls the rate of adsorption but it is not the rate limiting step.

  18. Enhanced performance of LiFePO4 through hydrothermal synthesis coupled with carbon coating and cupric ion doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Bo; Wang Qiang; Zhang Weixin; Yang Zeheng; Chen Min

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hydrothermal reaction has been adopted to synthesize LiFePO 4 with a narrow size distribution. → LiFePO 4 was modified with carbon coating and cupric cation (Cu 2+ ) doping simultaneously. → Electrochemical properties of LiFePO 4 were improved by carbon coating and cupric cation doping. - Abstract: A hydrothermal reaction has been adopted to synthesize pure LiFePO 4 first, which was then modified with carbon coating and cupric ion (Cu 2+ ) doping simultaneously through a post-heat treatment. X-ray diffraction patterns, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy images along with energy dispersive spectroscopy mappings have verified the homogeneous existence of coated carbon and doped Cu 2+ in LiFePO 4 particles with phospho-olivine structure and an average size of 400 nm. The electrochemical performances of the material have been studied by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. The carbon-coated and Cu 2+ -doped LiFePO 4 sample (LFCu5/C) exhibited an enhanced electronic conductivity of 2.05 x 10 -3 S cm -1 , a specific discharge capacity of 158 mAh g -1 at 50 mA g -1 , a capacity retention of 96.4% after 50 cycles, a decreased charge transfer resistance of 79.4 Ω and superior electrode reaction reversibility. The present synthesis route is promising in making the hydrothermal method more practical for preparation of the LiFePO 4 material and enhancement of electrochemical properties.

  19. Dendrimer-coated magnetic particles for radionuclide separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüttner, Cordula; Böhmer, Volker; Casnati, Alessandro; Dozol, Jean-Francois; Reinhoudt, David; Reinoso garcia, M.M.; Rudershausen, Sandra; Teller, Joachim; Ungaro, Rocco; Verboom, Willem; Wang, Pingshan

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic particles were synthesised for radionuclide removal from nuclear wastes by magnetic separation. Dendrimers with terminal amino groups attached to the particle surface were used to bind chelating groups for lanthanides and actinides. This led to a 50–400-fold increase of the distribution

  20. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND CORROSION PROTECTION OF CARBON STEEL COATED WITH AN EPOXY BASED POWDER COATING CONTAINING MONTMORILONITE FUNCTIONALIZED WITH SILANE

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Tibola Bertuoli; Veronica Perozzo Frizzo; Diego Piazza; Lisete Cristine Scienza; Ademir José Zattera

    2014-01-01

    In the present work the MMT-Na+ clay was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) and incorporated in a commercial formulation epoxy-based powder coating in a proportion of 8 wt% and applied on 1008 carbon steel panels by electrostatic spray. Adhesion, flexibility, impact and corrosion performance in salt spray chamber tests were performed to evaluate the coatings. The presence of clay did not affect the mechanical properties of the film, however greater subcutaneo...

  1. Anticorrosion Coatings Based on Assemblies of Superhydrophobic Particles Impregnated with Conductive Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 13/5/2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) April 2015 – April 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT...coatings for electrical system components. The coatings inhibited the build-up of resistive corrosion on electrical connector backshells as well as on...and silica particles. To enhance the corrosion resistance and achieve low electrical resistance, exfoliated graphene sheets were dispersed in

  2. Preparation of porous carbon particle with shell/core structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous carbon particles with a shell/core structure have been prepared successfully by controlled precipitation of the polymer from droplets of oil-in-water emulsion, followed by curing and carbonization. The droplets of the oil phase are composed of phenolic resin (PFR, a good solvent (ethyl acetate and porogen (Poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA. The microstructure was characterized in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nitrogen adsorption, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The obtained carbon particles have a capsular structure with a microporous carbon shell and a mesoporous carbon core. The BET surface area and porous volume are calculated to be 499 m2g-1 and 0.56 cm3g-1, respectively. The effects of the amount of porogen (PMMA, co-solvent (acetone and surfactant on the resultant structure were studied in detail.

  3. LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

  4. Calculating failure probabilities for TRISO-coated fuel particles using an integral formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Gregory K.; Maki, John T.; Knudson, Darrell L.; Petti, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental design for a gas-cooled reactor relies on the safe behavior of the coated particle fuel. The coating layers surrounding the fuel kernels in these spherical particles, termed the TRISO coating, act as a pressure vessel that retains fission products. The quality of the fuel is reflected in the number of particle failures that occur during reactor operation, where failed particles become a source for fission products that can then diffuse through the fuel element. The failure probability for any batch of particles, which has traditionally been calculated using the Monte Carlo method, depends on statistical variations in design parameters and on variations in the strengths of coating layers among particles in the batch. An alternative approach to calculating failure probabilities is developed herein that uses direct numerical integration of a failure probability integral. Because this is a multiple integral where the statistically varying parameters become integration variables, a fast numerical integration approach is also developed. In sample cases analyzed involving multiple failure mechanisms, results from the integration methods agree closely with Monte Carlo results. Additionally, the fast integration approach, particularly, is shown to significantly improve efficiency of failure probability calculations. These integration methods have been implemented in the PARFUME fuel performance code along with the Monte Carlo method, where each serves to verify accuracy of the others.

  5. Black Carbon Aging from SOA Coatings and Coagulation with Diesel BC Emissions during SAAS at the PNNL Environmental Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Zaveri, R. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Gourihar, K.; Pekour, M. S.; Subramanian, R.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is considered to be potentially the 2nd most important global warming factor behind CO2 (Bond et al., 2013). Uncertainties exist due to BC morphology and mixing state on the extent of the warming that it causes, e.g. Cappa et al., 2012. Core-shell BC is expected to enhance absorption by up to a factor of 2, but has yet to be observed to this extent from ambient data. Experiments were conducted during the Soot Aerosol Aging Study (SAAS) Laboratory Campaign at Pactific Northwest National Laboratory's Environmental Chamber in the winter of 2013-2014 to investigate the relationship between coatings and enhancements from diesel emissions. Direct on-line measurements were made with the single particle soot photometer (SP2) from fresh and aged BC from coating and coagulation experiments with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed in the chamber. BC measurements are coupled with photoactoustic measurements spanning the visible region to probe BC enhancements when mixed with SOA. Here we focus on the enhancements at 781 nm, that are tracked throughout SOA growth on BC, as determined from SP2 coating thicknesses. Thermal denuder (TD) experiments are conducted and enhancements are calculated from two different methods that agree well with each other, confirming the observed results. BC measurements are also compared with co-located measurements from SPLAT-II and filter analysis using SEM and TEM. BC coagulated with SOA produces minimal absorption enhancement values, whereas coatings are observed to have significant enhancement values at 300 degrees C, e.g. 1.3 for thickly coated BC. BC particles were coagulated with SOA in the chamber since this morphology has been observed in wildfire emissions (Sedlacek et al., 2012). Since we did not observe appreciable enhancements for the coagulated BC, we expect that ambient emissions dominated by this particle type to have enhancements due to other sources, such as brown carbon (BrC) that is often co-emitted (Saleh et

  6. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of composite galvanic Ni with carbon nanomaterials and PVD Mo coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdovich, V.B.; Chayeuski, V.V.; Zhdanok, S.A.; Barkovskaya, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Double layer coatings Ni – Mo were obtained by electrolytic deposition of galvanic Ni and following arc PVD deposition of molybdenum. The ion plating coatings Mo on Ni foil and composition electrolytic Ni coatings with carbon nanomaterials (CNM) deposited on mild steel has been also investigated. Composite galvanic Ni coatings with CNM and ion plating coatings Mo contain separately obtained cubic α-Mo phase as well as fragmentary solid solution Mo in Ni. Such coatings exclude hydrogenation of Ni foundation in alkaline solution and possess enlarged electrocatalytic properties while emitting hydrogen and oxygen. Availability of carbon based nanomaterials in combined coatings is cause of an active absorption hydrogen after cathodic polarization. A formation on the surface layer of nanostructure solid solution (Ni, Mo) after compression plasma flows treatment with fixed parameters of patterns Mo/Ni/ mild steel take place. (authors)

  7. Fracture of a Brittle-Particle Ductile Matrix Composite with Applications to a Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianculli, Steven J.

    In material systems consisting of hard second phase particles in a ductile matrix, failure initiating from cracking of the second phase particles is an important failure mechanism. This dissertation applies the principles of fracture mechanics to consider this problem, first from the standpoint of fracture of the particles, and then the onset of crack propagation from fractured particles. This research was inspired by the observation of the failure mechanism of a commercial zinc-based anti-corrosion coating and the analysis was initially approached as coatings problem. As the work progressed it became evident that failure mechanism was relevant to a broad range of composite material systems and research approach was generalized to consider failure of a system consisting of ellipsoidal second phase particles in a ductile matrix. The starting point for the analysis is the classical Eshelby Problem, which considered stress transfer from the matrix to an ellipsoidal inclusion. The particle fracture problem is approached by considering cracks within particles and how they are affected by the particle/matrix interface, the difference in properties between the particle and matrix, and by particle shape. These effects are mapped out for a wide range of material combinations. The trends developed show that, although the particle fracture problem is very complex, the potential for fracture among a range of particle shapes can, for certain ranges in particle shape, be considered easily on the basis of the Eshelby Stress alone. Additionally, the evaluation of cracks near the curved particle/matrix interface adds to the existing body of work of cracks approaching bi-material interfaces in layered material systems. The onset of crack propagation from fractured particles is then considered as a function of particle shape and mismatch in material properties between the particle and matrix. This behavior is mapped out for a wide range of material combinations. The final section of

  8. Carbon nanotubes with silver nanoparticle decoration and conductive polymer coating for improving the electrical conductivity of polycarbonate composites

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Archana S.

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a strategy to enhance the conductivity of polycarbonate by using three-phase hybrid metallic/non-metallic fillers. Ethylene diamine (EDA) functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-EDA) are first decorated with silver nanoparticles. These Ag/ MWCNT-EDA fillers are then coated with a conductive layer of ethylene glycol treated PEDOT: PSS (poly [3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]: poly [styrenesulfonate]) (EP). In such an approach, the MWCNT backbone is covered by a highly conductive coating made of Ag nanoparticles surrounded by EP. To understand how Ag and EP form a highly conductive coating, the effect of different wt% of Ag nanoparticles on EP was studied. Ag nanoparticles around the size of 128 ± 28 nmeffectively lowered the volume resistivity of bulk EP, resulting in a highly conducting Ag/EP blend. We found that in the final Ag/MWCNT-EDA/EP assembly, the EP coating enhances the electrical conductivity in two ways: (1) it is an efficient dispersing agent that helps in achieving a uniform dispersion of the Ag/MWCNT-EDA and (2) it acts as a conductive bridge between particles (Ag and MWCNT-EDA), reducing the particle to particle resistivity. When inserted into polycarbonate, this three-phase blend successfully reduced the volume resistivity of the polymer by two orders of magnitude compared with previous approaches.

  9. Development of a FE Model for the Stress Analysis of HTGR TRISO-coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Finite element modelling of the stresses in TRISO-coated fuel particle under normal operating conditions was carried out with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. The FE model took into account the irradiation induced swelling and the creep of the PyC layers, the internal fission gas pressure that builds up during irradiation and the constant external ambient pressure. All of the inputs such as particle dimensions, swelling rates and creep rates of PyC layers and other mechanical properties used in these calculations were adopted from Miller's publication published in 1993. The FE model was verified against Miller's solution. Results of this model were found to be in good agreement with Miller's results. With use of the FE model, the static behavior of the TRISO-coated fuel particle, such as load shares, stress contours, stress variations as a function of fluence and shape changes of the TRISO -coated layers were investigated

  10. Gas phase deposition of oxide and metal-oxide coatings on fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patokin, A.P.; Khrebtov, V.L.; Shirokov, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Production processes and properties of oxide (Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 ) and metal-oxide (Mo-Al 2 O 3 , Mo-ZrO 2 , W-Al 2 O 3 , W-ZrO 2 ) coatings on molybdenum substrates and uranium dioxide fuel particles were investigated. It is shown that the main factors that have an effect on the deposition rate, density, microstructure and other properties of coatings are the deposition temperature, the ratio of H 2 and CO 2 flow rates, the total reactor pressure and the ratio of partial pressures of corresponding metal chlorides during formation of metal-oxide coatings

  11. Room-temperature aqueous plasma electrolyzing Al2O3 nano-coating on carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuping; Meng, Yang; Shen, Yonghua; Chen, Weiwei; Cheng, Huanwu; Wang, Lu

    2017-10-01

    A novel room-temperature aqueous plasma electrolysis technique has been developed in order to prepared Al2O3 nano-coating on each fiber within a carbon fiber bundle. The microstructure and formation mechanism of the Al2O3 nano-coating were systematically investigated. The oxidation resistance and tensile strength of the Al2O3-coated carbon fiber was measured at elevated temperatures. It showed that the dense Al2O3 nano-coating was relatively uniformly deposited with 80-120 nm in thickness. The Al2O3 nano-coating effectively protected the carbon fiber, evidenced by the slower oxidation rate and significant increase of the burn-out temperature from 800 °C to 950 °C. Although the bare carbon fiber remained ∼25 wt.% after oxidation at 700 °C for 20 min, a full destruction was observed, evidenced by the ∼0 GPa of the tensile strength, compared to ∼1.3 GPa of the Al2O3-coated carbon fiber due to the effective protection from the Al2O3 nano-coating. The formation mechanism of the Al2O3 nano-coating on carbon fiber was schematically established mainly based on the physic-chemical effect in the cathodic plasma arc zone.

  12. Osteoconduction of impacted porous titanium particles with a calcium-phosphate coating is comparable to osteoconduction of impacted allograft bone particles: in vivo study in a nonloaded goat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walschot, Lucas H B; Aquarius, René; Schreurs, Barend W; Verdonschot, Nico; Buma, Pieter

    2012-08-01

    Impaction grafting restores bone defects in hip arthroplasty. Defects are reconstructed with bone particles (BoP) as substitute materials with adequate mechanical and biological properties are not yet available. Ceramic particles (CeP) have mechanical drawbacks as opposed to porous titanium particles (TiP). In this in vivo study, bone ingrowth and bone volume in coated and noncoated TiP were compared to porous biphasic calcium-phospate CeP and allograft BoP. Coatings consisted of silicated calcium-phosphate and carbonated apatite. Materials were implanted in goats and impacted in cylindrical defects (diameter 8 mm) in the cancellous bone of the femur. On the basis of fluorochrome labeling and histology, bone ingrowth distance was measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Cross-sectional bone area was measured at 12 weeks. TiP created a coherent matrix of entangled particles. CeP pulverized and were noncoherent. Bone ingrowth in TiP improved significantly by the coatings to levels comparable to BoP and CeP. Cross-sectional bone area was smaller in CeP and TiP compared to BoP. The osteoconductive properties of impacted TiP with a calcium-phosphate coating are comparable to impacted allograft bone and impacted biphasic ceramics. A more realistic loaded in vivo study should prove that coated TiP is an attractive alternative to allograft bone. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Carbon coated (carbonous) catalyst in ebullated bed reactor for production of oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peizheng Zhou

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R and D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO 2 efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates

  14. A study of tribological behaviors of the phenolic composite coating reinforced with carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haojie; Zhang Zhaozhu; Luo Zhuangzhu

    2007-01-01

    The nitric acid treatment was used as a method to bind acidic oxygen functional groups on carbon fiber surfaces, thereafter these fibers (CFO) and unmodified carbon fibers (CF) were incorporated into the phenolic composite coating for wear investigations. Surface analyses of the carbon fibers before and after treatments were performed by FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS). Tribological behaviors of carbon fibers filled phenolic coatings were investigated using a ring on block wear tests under dry friction condition, and the worn surfaces and the transfer films formed on the surface of counterpart ring were, respectively, studied by SEM and optical microscope. The results show that the additions of carbon fibers were able to reduce the friction coefficient of the phenolic coating and enhance the wear life of it, especially, the wear life of the phenolic coating was the best when content of carbon fibers is at 10 wt.%. Moreover, we found that the friction and wear behaviors of the phenolic coating reinforced with 10 wt.% CFO were better than those of the coating reinforced with 10 wt.% CF. FTIR and XPS analyses indicated that the oxygen functional groups, such as -OH, O-C=O, C=O, and C-O, were attached on the carbon fiber surfaces after the oxidated treatment. In both cases, appropriate treatments could effectively improve the mechanical and tribological properties in the phenolic composite coating due to the enhanced fiber-matrix interfacial bonding

  15. Thermochemical equilibrium in a kernel of a UN TRISO coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Min; Jo, C. K.; Lim, H. S.; Cho, M. S.; Lee, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    A coated fuel particle (CFP) with a uranium mononitride (UN) kernel has been recently considered as an advanced fuel option, such as in fully ceramic micro encapsulated (FCM) replacement fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). In FCM fuel, a large number of tri isotropic coated fuel particles (TRISOs) are embedded in a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix. Thermochemical equilibrium calculations can predict the chemical behaviors of a kernel in a TRISO of FCM fuel during irradiation. They give information on the kind and quantity of gases generated in a kernel during irradiation. This study treats the quantitative analysis of thermochemical equilibrium in a UN TRISO of FCM LWR fuel using HSC software

  16. Development of functionally graded anti-oxidation coatings for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, J.H. [Dept. of Materials Technology, Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Changwon (Korea); Fang Hai-Tao; Lai Zhong-Hong; Yin Zhong-Da [Materials Science and Engineering School, Harbin Inst. of Tech., Harbin (China)

    2005-07-01

    The concept of functionally graded materials (FGMs) was originated in the research field of thermal barrier coatings. Continuous changes in the composition, grain size, porosity, etc., of these materials result in gradients in such properties as mechanical strength and thermal conductivity. In recent years, functionally graded structural composite materials have received increased attention as promising candidate materials to exhibit better mechanical and functional properties than homogeneous materials or simple composite materials. Therefore the research area of FGMs has been expending in the development of various structural and functional materials, such as cutting tools, photonic crystals, dielectric and piezoelectric ceramics, thermoelectric semiconductors, and biomaterials. We have developed functionally graded structural ceramic/metal composite materials for relaxation of thermal stress, functionally graded anti-oxidation coatings for carbon/carbon composites, and functionally graded dielectric ceramic composites to develop advanced dielectric ceramics with flat characteristics of dielectric constant in a wide temperature range. This paper introduces functionally graded coatings for C/C composites with superior oxidation resistance at high temperatures. (orig.)

  17. Improvement of a method for predicting failure rates of coated particles during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.

    1977-01-01

    A method for calculating the coating stress distribution resulting from the statistical spread of geometrical parameters in irradiated fuel particle batches has been developed by Gulden et al. The existing method utilizing coated particles is extended in two ways: 1. A more realistic treatment of the buffer layer is adopted, taking into account its physical properties. 2. A statistical distribution according to Weibull has been adopted for the silicon carbide layer strength. Calculations with both the new and the old assumptions were performed on one feed particle and one breed particle type. It is shown that the two modifications influence the results of the original method. It was found that the extension of the first assumption has no influence on the stress distribution and the fraction of breaking feed particles, but it changes the stress distribution of the breed particles significantly. The fraction of broken particles at end burnup is increased by a factor of approximately 10. The extension of the second assumption affects the fraction of broken feed as well as that of the breed particles. Depending on the Weibull parameter, m, the number of failed feed particles increases by a factor of 1.3 to 2; the corresponding factor for breed particles is between 3.5 and 60

  18. Electroless nickel – phosphorus coating on crab shell particles and its characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulvel, S., E-mail: gs.arulvel.research@gmail.com; Elayaperumal, A.; Jagatheeshwaran, M.S.

    2017-04-15

    Being hydrophilic material, crab shell particles have only a limited number of applications. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the surface of the crab shell particles. To make them useful ever for the applications, the main theme we proposed in this article is to utilize crab shell particles (CSP) with the core coated with nickel phosphorus (NiP) as a shell using the electroless coating process. For dealing with serious environmental problems, utilization of waste bio-shells is always an important factor to be considered. Chelating ability of crab shell particles eliminates the surface activation in this work proceeding to the coating process. The functional group, phase structure, microstructure, chemical composition and thermal analysis of CSP and NiP/CSP were characterized using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray diffraction analyzer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The combination of an amorphous and crystalline structure was exhibited by CSP and NiP/CSP. NiP/CSP has shown a better thermal stability when compared to uncoated CSP. Stability test, adsorption test, and conductivity test were conducted for the study of adsorption behavior and conductivity of the particles. CSP presented a hydrophilic property in contrast to hydrophobic NiP/CSP. NiP/CSP presented a conductivity of about 44% greater compared to the CSP without any fluctuations. - Highlights: • Utilization of crab shell waste is focused on. • NiP coating on crab shell particle is fabricated using electroless process. • Thermal analysis, stability test, adsorption test and conductivity test were done. • Organic matrix of crab shell particle favors the coating process. • Results demonstrate the characterization of CSP core – NiP shell structure.

  19. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives

  20. Evaluation of Fracture Stress for the SiC Layer of TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles by A Modified Crush Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jin Weon; Miller, James Henry; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hunn, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Fracture stress data for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC coatings of tri-isotropic (TRISO) carbon/silicon carbide coated fuel particles were obtained using a newly developed testing and evaluation method, and their relationship with microstructure investigated. A crush testing technique using a blanket foil at load-transferring contact has been developed for hemispherical shell SiC specimens based on finite element (FE) analysis results. Mean fracture stress varied with test material in the range of 330-650 MPa, and was connected to the combined characteristics of inner surface roughness and porosity.

  1. Urea route to coat inorganic nanowires, carbon fibers and nanotubes by boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomathi, A.; Ramya Harika, M.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2008-01-01

    A simple route involving urea as the nitrogen source has been employed to carry out boron nitride coating on carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and inorganic nanowires. The process involves heating the carbon fibers and nanotubes or inorganic nanowires in a mixture of H 3 BO 3 and urea, followed by a heat treatment at 1000 deg. C in a N 2 atmosphere. We have been able to characterize the BN coating by transmission electron microscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The urea decomposition route affords a simple method to coat boron nitride on one-dimensional nanostructures

  2. Thermal annealing dynamics of carbon-coated LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles studied by in-situ analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumeich, Frank, E-mail: krumeich@inorg.chem.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Waser, Oliver; Pratsinis, Sotiris E. [Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The thermal behavior of core-shell carbon-coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}-C) nanoparticles made by flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) during annealing was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in-situ X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) as well as ex-situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Crystallization of the initially glassy LiFePO{sub 4}-C nanoparticles starts at quite low temperatures (T=400 °C), forming single crystals inside the confinement of the carbon shell. Upon increasing the temperature to T≥700 °C, LiFePO{sub 4} starts to diffuse through the carbon shell resulting in cavities inside the mostly intact carbon shell. By increasing the temperature further to T≥800 °C, the initial core-shell morphology converts into open carbon shells (flakes and cenospheres) and bulky LiFePO{sub 4} particles (diameter in the range 300–400 nm), in agreement with ex-situ experiments. - Graphical abstract: TEM images of a typical sample area recorded at room temperature and after heating in-situ heating reveal the growth of particles and the formation of empty carbon cages. - Highlights: • LiFePO{sub 4} coated by a carbon shell is produced by flame spray pyrolysis. • The amorphous LiFePO{sub 4} starts to crystallize at 400 °C as revealed by in-situ XRD. • Crystal growth was visualized by TEM heating experiments. • The formation of empty carbon cages starts at 700 °C.

  3. Effect of substrates on tribological properties of diamond-like carbon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renhui ZHANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to well investigate the effect of different substrates on the friction and wear of diamond-like carbon (DLC coating, the DLC coatings are deposited on substrates like the high-speed steel (HSS, SiC and 304 stainless steel by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. The diamond-like carbon is prepared. The microstructure of the coatings is characterized using SEM, TEM and Raman. The SEM results exhibit that the total thickness of the coatings is about 6.5 μm, and there's apparent interfaces between layers. The TEM results imply that the coatings have an amorphous structure. Raman spectrum exhibits that G and D peaks are observed, which implies that the deposition coatings are diamond-like carbon coating. The results of tribological tests show that the substrates have a significant effect on the friction and wear of the coating. For different substrates, the transfer film is found on the steel counterpart surface, the wear track of the HSS has a lowest width, and the DLC coating that deposited on HSS exhibits the lowest wear and low friction coefficient (about 0.1.The microstructure of different substrates wear track surfaces is analyzed by using Raman spectrum, and the lowest wear of the HSS is attributed to the lower degree of the graphitization. The research provides reference for preparing the DLC coating with excellent tribological properties.

  4. Continuous flame aerosol synthesis of carbon-coated nano-LiFePO4 for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waser, Oliver; Büchel, Robert; Hintennach, Andreas; Novák, Petr; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell, nanosized LiFePO4-carbon particles were made in one step by scalable flame aerosol technology at 7 g/h. Core LiFePO4 particles were made in an enclosed flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) unit and were coated in-situ downstream by auto thermal carbonization (pyrolysis) of swirl-fed C2H2 in an O2-controlled atmosphere. The formation of acetylene carbon black (ACB) shell was investigated as a function of the process fuel-oxidant equivalence ratio (EQR). The core-shell morphology was obtained at slightly fuel-rich conditions (1.0 < EQR < 1.07) whereas segregated ACB and LiFePO4 particles were formed at fuel-lean conditions (0.8 < EQR < 1). Post-annealing of core-shell particles in reducing environment (5 vol% H2 in argon) at 700 °C for up to 4 hours established phase pure, monocrystalline LiFePO4 with a crystal size of 65 nm and 30 wt% ACB content. Uncoated LiFePO4 or segregated LiFePO4-ACB grew to 250 nm at these conditions. Annealing at 800 °C induced carbothermal reduction of LiFePO4 to Fe2P by ACB shell consumption that resulted in cavities between carbon shell and core LiFePO4 and even slight LiFePO4 crystal growth but better electrochemical performance. The present carbon-coated LiFePO4 showed superior cycle stability and higher rate capability than the benchmark, commercially available LiFePO4. PMID:23407817

  5. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    adhesion and durability in the environment. Though these coatings are efficient in protecting polymer composites, their application imposes severe constraints. Their thermal expansion coefficients may differ markedly from those of polymer composite substrates: as a result, cracks develop in the coatings on thermal cycling and AO can penetrate through them to the substrate. In addition to the technicalities of forming an effective barrier, such factors as cost, convenience of application and ease of repair are important considerations in the selection of a coating for a particular application. The latter issues drive the aerospace research toward the development of novel light composite materials, like the so called polymer nanocomposites, which are materials with a polymer matrix and a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nanometers. Current interest in nanocomposites has been generated and maintained because nanoparticle-filled polymers exhibit unique combinations of properties not achievable with traditional composites. These combinations of properties can be achieved because of the small size of the fillers, the large surface area the fillers provide, and in many cases the unique properties of the fillers themselves. In particular, the carbon fiber-based polymeric composite materials are the basic point of interest: the aim of the present study is to find new solution to produce carbon fiber-based composites with even more upgraded performances. One intriguing strategy to tackle such an issue has been picked out in the coupling between the carbon fibers and the carbon nanostructures. That for two main reasons: first, carbon nanostructures have shown fancy potentialities for any kind of technological applications since their discovery, second, the chemical affinity between fiber and nanostructure (made of the same element) should be a likely route to approach the typical problems due to thermo-mechanical compatibility. This work is joined in such framework

  6. Tribological performance of hard carbon coatings on 440C bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustas, F M; Misra, M S; Shepard, D F; Froechtenigt, J F [Martin Marietta Astronautics Group, Denver, CO (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Hard carbon coatings such as amorphous carbon, diamond and diamond-like carbon have received considerable attention for tribological applications owing to their high hardness, high modulus and desirable surface properties. Unfortunately, most of the deposition techniques induce high substrate temperatures that would temper traditional bearing steels and reduce the substrate load-carrying capability. Therefore, to effectively use these desirable coatings, a lower temperature deposition technique is required. Ion beam deposition can provide essentially ambient temperature conditions, accurate control of process parameters and good coating-substrate adhesion. To use these attributes, a test program was initiated to deposit mass-analyzed, high purity C{sup +} and CH{sub 4}{sup +} ions on molybdenum and 440C bearing steel for subsequent characterization by Raman spectroscopy and friction-wear tests. Results for a coating deposited from a carbon monoxide source showed an amorphous carbon-microcrystalline graphtie structure which exhibited very high microhardness and a three fold reduction in coefficient of friction for unlubricated tests compared to untreated 440C steel. In addition, incrementally increasing the applied load (by up to a factor of 5) resulted in progressively lower coefficients of friction, which conforms to solid lubrication theory. End-of-travel wear debris and some limited coating delamination were observed within thinner areas of the coating. Therefore an amorphous carbon-graphite coating applied to 440C steel at ambient temperature exhibits solid lubricating film characteristics with high load-carrying capability. (orig.).

  7. Microwave electromagnetic properties of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qing Yuchang; Zhou Wancheng; Luo Fa; Zhu Dongmei

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic characteristics of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coatings were studied. The reflection loss of the coatings exceeds -10 dB at 8-18 GHz and -9 dB at 2-18 GHz when the coating thickness is 1 and 3 mm, respectively. The dielectric and magnetic absorbers filled coatings possess excellent microwave absorption, which could be attributed to the proper incorporate of the multi-polarization mechanisms as well as strong natural resonance. It is feasible to develop the thin and wideband microwave absorbing coatings using carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder.

  8. Microwave electromagnetic properties of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2010-02-01

    The electromagnetic characteristics of carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder filled epoxy-silicone coatings were studied. The reflection loss of the coatings exceeds -10 dB at 8-18 GHz and -9 dB at 2-18 GHz when the coating thickness is 1 and 3 mm, respectively. The dielectric and magnetic absorbers filled coatings possess excellent microwave absorption, which could be attributed to the proper incorporate of the multi-polarization mechanisms as well as strong natural resonance. It is feasible to develop the thin and wideband microwave absorbing coatings using carbonyl iron particles and Si/C/N nano-powder.

  9. Enhanced antioxidation and microwave absorbing properties of SiO2-coated flaky carbonyl iron particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Xie, Hui; Zhou, Wancheng; Ren, Zhaowen

    2018-01-01

    SiO2 was successfully coated on the surface of flaky carbonyl iron particles using a chemical bath deposition method in the presence of 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). The morphologies, composition, valence states of elements, as well as antioxidation and electromagnetic properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric (TG) and microwave network analyzer. TG curve shows the obvious weight gain of carbonyl iron was deferred to 360 °C after SiO2-coated, which can be ascribed to the exits of SiO2 overlayer. Compared with the raw carbonyl iron, SiO2-coated sample shows good wave absorption performance due to its impedance matching. The electromagnetic properties of raw and SiO2-coated carbonyl iron particles were characterized in X band before and after heat treatment at 250 °C for 10 h. It was established that SiO2-coated carbonyl iron demonstrate good thermal stability, indicating SiO2-coating is useful in the usage of microwave absorbers operating at temperature up to 250 °C.

  10. Carbon particle induced foaming of molten sucrose for the preparation of carbon foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimman, R.; Vijayan, Sujith; Prabhakaran, K.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An easy method for the preparation of carbon foam from sucrose is presented. • Wood derived activated carbon particles are used to stabilize the molten sucrose foam. • The carbon foams show relatively good mechanical strength. • The carbon foams show excellent CO 2 adsorption and oil absorption properties. • The process could be scaled up for the preparation of large foam bodies. - Abstract: Activated carbon powder was used as a foaming and foam setting agent for the preparation of carbon foams with a hierarchical pore structure from molten sucrose. The rheological measurements revealed the interruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in molten sucrose by the carbon particles. The carbon particles stabilized the bubbles in molten sucrose by adsorbing on the molten sucrose–gas interface. The carbon foams obtained at the activated carbon powder to sucrose weight ratios in the range of 0–0.25 had a compressive strength in the range of 1.35–0.31 MPa. The produced carbon foams adsorb 2.59–3.04 mmol/g of CO 2 at 760 mmHg at 273 K and absorb oil from oil–water mixtures and surfactant stabilized oil-in-water emulsions with very good selectivity and recyclability

  11. Janus droplets: liquid marbles coated with dielectric/semiconductor particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Pogreb, Roman; Gendelman, Oleg

    2011-01-04

    The manufacturing of water droplets wrapped with two different powders, carbon black (semiconductor) and polytetrafluoroethylene (dielectric), is presented. Droplets composed of two hemispheres (Janus droplets) characterized by various physical and chemical properties are reported first. Watermelon-like striped liquid marbles are reported. Janus droplets remained stable on solid and liquid supports and could be activated with an electric field.

  12. Directive properties of active coated nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, W.

    2012-01-01

    and optical gain constant on the directivities. While significant variations in the directivities are realized in the cylindrical cases for different source locations within and slightly outside the nano-particles and values of the optical gain constant, the corresponding spherical cases exhibit negligible...

  13. Coatings with laser melt injection of ceramic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Ocelik, V.; de Oliveira, U.; Seal, S; Dahotre, NB; Moore, JJ; Suryanarayana, C; Agarwal, A

    2003-01-01

    The conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of Al8Si and Ti6Al4V alloys were studied experimentally and theoretically by FEM calculations. The laser employed is a high power Nd:YAG The formation of a relatively thick aluminium oxide layer on

  14. ELECTROPHORETIC DEPOSITION OF TIO2-MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE COMPOSITE COATINGS: MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. MAHMOUDI JOZEE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A homogenous TiO2 / multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs composite film were prepared by electrophoretic co-deposition from organic suspension on a stainless steel substrate.  In this study, MWCNTs was incorporated to the coating because of their long structure and their capability to be functionalized by different inorganic groups on the surface. FTIR spectroscopy showed the existence of carboxylic groups on the modified carbon nanotubes surface. The effect of applied electrical fields, deposition time and concentration of nanoparticulates on coatings morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that combination of MWCNTs within TiO2 matrix eliminating micro cracks presented on TiO2 coating. Also, by increasing the deposition voltages, micro cracks were increased. SEM observation of the coatings revealed that TiO2/multi-walled carbon nanotubes coatings produced from optimized electric field was uniform and had good adhesive to the substrate.

  15. Implementation of Carbon Thin Film Coatings in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) for Electron Cloud Mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    Costa Pinto, P; Basso, T; Edwards, P; Mensi, M; Sublet, A; Taborelli, M

    2014-01-01

    Low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) carbon thin films eradicate electron multipacting in accelerator beam pipes. Two magnetic cells of the SPS were coated with such material and installed. In total more than forty vacuum vessels and magnet interconnections were treated. The feasibility of the coating process was validated. The performance of the carbon thin film will be tested with LHC nominal beams after the end of the long shutdown 1. Particular attention will be drawn to the long term behaviour. This paper presents the sputtering techniques used to coat the different components; their characterization (SEY measurements on coupons, RF multipacting tests and pump down curves); and the technology to etch the carbon film in case of a faulty coating. The strategy to coat the entire SPS will also be described.

  16. Solvent-free formation of hydroxyapatite coated biodegradable particles via nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Masahiro; Fujii, Syuji; Nishimura, Taiki; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Takeda, Shoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles stabilized polymer melt-in-water emulsions without any molecular surfactants. ► Interaction between polymer and HAp played a crucial role. ► HAp-coated polymer particles were obtained from the emulsions without any organic solvents. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particles were fabricated from a nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion in the absence of any molecular surfactants or organic solvents. First, a polymer melt-in-water emulsion was prepared by mixing a water phase containing nanosized HAp particles as a particulate emulsifier and an oil phase consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) or poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) above its melting point. It was clarified that the interaction between ester/carboxyl groups of the polymers and the HAp nanoparticles at the polymer–water interface played a crucial role to prepare the nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion. The HAp nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particle (a polymer solid-in-water emulsion) was fabricated by cooling the emulsion. The particle morphology and particle size were evaluated using scanning electron microscope.

  17. Ordered mesoporous carbon coating on cordierite: Synthesis and application as an efficient adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Ying, E-mail: ywan@shnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Resource Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Cui, Xiangting; Wen, Zhentao [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surfactant self-assembly of ordered mesoporous carbon coating on honeycomb cordierite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon coating with opened, hexagonally ordered pore arrays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Honeycomb adsorbents for removal of p-chlorophenol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbents exhibit large processing volume, and great advantages in reusability. - Abstract: Ordered mesoporous carbon coating on the honeycomb cordierite substrate has been prepared using low-polymerized phenolic resins as carbon sources and triblock copolymer F127 as the structure directing agent via the evaporation induced self-assembly route. The high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen sorption techniques prove the hexagonally ordered pore arrays of carbon coating on the cordierite. The honeycomb monolith adsorbents coated by ordered mesoporous carbons are directly used without any activation, and exhibit adsorption capacities for chlorinated organic pollutants in water with 200 mg/g for p-chlorophenol and 178 mg/g for p-chloroaniline (with respect to the net carbon coating), high adsorption ratio for low-concentration pollutants, large processing volumes and reusability. More than 200 repeated times can be achieved without obvious loss in both adsorption capacity and weight.

  18. Influences of spray parameters on the structure and corrosion resistance of stainless steel layers coated on carbon steel by plasma spray treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Kyong An; Lee, Sang Dong; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Shur, Dong Soo; Kim, Joung Soo

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel powders were sprayed on the grit-blasted SM45C carbon steel substrates using a plasma spray method. The influences of the spray parameters on the structure and corrosion resistance of the layers coated on the carbon steel were investigated. Corrosion behavior of the layers were analyzed by the anodic polarization tests in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl + 0.01 M NaOH solution at 80 deg C. The surface roughness and porosity were observed to decrease with decreasing the particle size. The surface hardness of the coating was always higher than that of the matrix, SM45C, implying that the higher resistance of the coating to erosion-corrosion than that of matrix, and increased as the spray power and the spray distance increase. Stainless steel coats showed more corrosion resistance than the carbon steel did, due to their passivity. The corrosion resistance of the coats, however, were inferior to that of the bulk stainless steels due to the inherent defects formed in the coats. The defects such as rough surface and pores provided the occluded sites favorable for the initiation of localized corrosion, resulting in the conclusion that finer the powder is, higher the corrosion resistance is. And the Cr oxides formation resulting in Cr depletion around the oxides reduced the corrosion resistance of the coats. (author)

  19. Effect of Carbon Coating on Li4TiO12 of Anode Material for Hybrid Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Kyu; Lee, Byung-Gwan; Yoon, Jung-Rag

    2015-11-01

    The carbon-coated Li4Ti5O12 of anode material for hybrid capacitor was prepared by controlling carbonization time at 700 degrees C in nitrogen. With increasing of carbonization time, the discharge capacity and capacitance were decreased, while the equivalent series resistance was not changed remarkably. The rate capability and cycle performance of carbon-coated Li4Ti5O12 were larger than that of Li4Ti5O12. Carbon coating improved conductivity as well as Li-ion diffusion, and thus also resulted in good rate capabilities and cycle stability. The effects of carbon coating on the gas generation of hybrid capacitor were also discussed.

  20. Effects of carbon nanotube coating on flow boiling in a micro-channel

    OpenAIRE

    Khanikar, Vikash; Mudawar, Issam; Fisher, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the heat transfer enhancement benefits of coating the bottom wall of a shallow rectangular micro-channel with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Using water as working fluid, tests were performed with a bare copper surface and three separate, yet identical CNT-coated surfaces. Each of the CNT-coated surfaces was tested repeatedly at the same mass velocity to explore any time dependence of heat transfer performance parameters, especially critical heat flux (CHIF). Ap...

  1. Absorbing Property of Multi-layered Short Carbon Fiber Absorbing Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhaohui; Tao, Rui; Ban, Guodong; Luo, Ping

    2018-01-01

    The radar absorbing coating was prepared with short carbon fiber asabsorbent and waterborne polyurethane (WPU) as matrix resin. The coating’s absorbing property was tested with vectornetwork analyzer, using aramid honeycomb as air layer which was matched withcarbon fiber coating. The results demonstrate that the single-layered carbonfiber absorbing coating presented relatively poor absorbing property when thelayer was thin, and the performance was slightly improved after the matched airlayer ...

  2. Machinability and scratch wear resistance of carbon-coated WC inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazhanivel, B., E-mail: palcecri@yahoo.co.in; Kumar, T. Prem; Sozhan, G.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Cemented WC inserts were coated with carbon by CVD. • The deposits were either loosely held MWCNTs or adherent carbides. • Co-efficient of friction (ramp load; 1–13 N); 0.2 and 0.1 μ, respectively, for the uncoated and carbide-coated inserts. • The carbide-coated insert exhibited better machinability and surface finish than a commercial TiCN-coated insert. - Abstract: In this work, cemented tungsten carbide (WC) inserts were coated with nanocarbons/carbides by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and their machinability and scratch wear resistance were investigated. The hardness and surface conditions of the WC substrate were studied before and after coating. The CVD-generated nanocarbons on the insert surfaces were examined by SEM, FE-SEM and TEM. The electron microscopic images revealed that the carbons generated were multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbides depending on the experimental conditions. In both the cases, the cutting edges of the inserts had dense deposits. Scratch wear test with the coated inserts showed that the co-efficient of friction was 0.1 μ as against 0.2 μ for the uncoated inserts under a ramp load of 1–13 N. The machinability characteristics of commercially available TiCN-coated inserts and the carbon-coated WC inserts were compared by using a CNC machine and a Rapid I vision inspection system. It was found that the carbide-coated inserts exhibited machinability with better surface finish comparable to that of the TiCN-coated inserts while the MWCNT-coated inserts showed inferior adhesion properties.

  3. International R and D project on development of coated particle fuel for innovative reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents an outline for an international collaborative project of coated particle fuel development for innovative reactors. Specific issues include identification of R and D needs and the Member State facilities for meeting the needs followed by development and demonstration of technology. (author)

  4. Spherical active coated nano-particles – impact of the electric Hertzian dipole orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Mostafavi, M.; Malureanu, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Spherical active coated nano-particles comprised of a silica nano-cylinder core covered with a plasmonic nano-shell are investigated with regard to their near- and far-field properties. The source of excitation is taken to be that of a tangential or a radial electric Hertizan dipole while three...

  5. Interaction between UO2 kernel and pyrocarbon coating in irradiated and unirradiated HTR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drago, A.; Klersy, R.; Simoni, O.; Schrader, K.H.

    1975-08-01

    Experimental observations on unidirectional UO 2 kernel migration in TRISO type coated particle fuels are reported. An analysis of the experimental results on the basis of data and models from the literature is reported. The stoichiometric composition of the kernel is considered the main parameter that, associated with a temperature gradient, controls the unidirectional kernel migration

  6. Ablation behavior of rare earth La-modified ZrC coating for SiC-coated carbon/carbon composites under an oxyacetylene torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yujun; Li, Hejun; Feng, Lei; Sun, Jiajia; Li, Kezhi; Fu, Qiangang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • La-modified ZrC coating was prepared by supersonic atmosphere plasma spraying. • The oxyacetylene ablation behavior of La-modified ZrC/SiC coating was evaluated. • The coating shows a good ablation resistance under heat flux of 2.4 MW/m"2. • La promotes the liquid phase sintering of ZrO_2 and the formation of a compact scale. • The protection of the scale results in retaining elemental C in its inner layer. - Abstract: To improve the ablation resistance of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites at ultra-high temperature, La-modified ZrC coating was prepared on SiC-coated C/C composites by supersonic atmosphere plasma spraying. The coating shows a significant improvement on the ablation resistance compared with ZrC coating and could protect C/C composites for more than 120 s under heat flux of 2.4 MW/m"2. La acted as a role in promoting the liquid phase sintering of ZrO_2 and forming a compact scale with high thermal stability, improving the ablation resistance of C/C composites.

  7. Influence of carbon nanotubes coatings onto carbon fiber by oxidative treatments combined with electrophoretic deposition on interfacial properties of carbon fiber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Chao; Jiang, Jianjun; Liu, Fa; Fang, Liangchao; Wang, Junbiao; Li, Dejia; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanotube/carbon fiber hybrid fiber was proposed by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition process. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotube coated carbon fiber was prepared by two methods. • Uniform and dense CNTs network formed by oxidative treatments combined with EPD. • Pretreatment of the CF is beneficial to EPD of CNTs on carbon fiber surface. • CNTs enhanced the surface activity and wettability of carbon fibers. • CNTs have contributed to the interfacial properties of composite. - Abstract: To improve the interfacial performance of carbon fiber (CF) and epoxy resin, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coatings were utilized to achieve this purpose through coating onto CF by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The influence of electrophoretically deposited CNTs coatings on the surface properties of CFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic contact angle analysis. The results indicated that the deposition of carbon nanotubes introduced some polar groups to carbon fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of carbon fibers. Surface wettability of carbon fibers may be significantly improved by increasing surface free energy of the fibers due to the deposition of CNTs. The thickness and density of the coatings increases with the introduction of pretreatment of the CF during the EPD process. Short beam shear test was performed to examine the effect of carbon fiber functionalization on mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites. The interfacial adhesion of CNTs/CF reinforced epoxy composites showed obvious enhancement of interlaminar shear strength by 60.2% and scanning electron microscope photographs showed that the failure mode of composites was changed

  8. Carbon nanotube-coated macroporous sponge for microbial fuel cell electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Ye, Meng; Hu, Liangbing; Liu, Nian; McDonough, James R.; Chen, Wei; Alshareef, Husam N.; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The materials that are used to make electrodes and their internal structures significantly affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. In this study, we describe a carbon nanotube (CNT)-sponge composite prepared by coating a sponge with CNTs

  9. Optimization of Process Variables for Insulation Coating of Conductive Particles by Response Surface Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Chol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The powder core, conventionally fabricated from iron particles coated with insulator, showed large eddy current loss under high frequency, because of small specific resistance. To overcome the eddy current loss, the increase in the specific resistance of powder cores was needed. In this study, copper oxide coating onto electrically conductive iron particles was performed using a planetary ball mill to increase the specific resistance. Coating factors were optimized by the Response surface methodology. The independent variables were the CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, coating time, ball size, ball mass and sample mass. The response variable was the specific resistance. The optimization of six factors by the fractional factorial design indicated that CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, and coating time were the key factors. The levels of these three factors were selected by the three-factors full factorial design and steepest ascent method. The steepest ascent method was used to approach the optimum range for maximum specific resistance. The Box-Behnken design was finally used to analyze the response surfaces of the screened factors for further optimization. The results of the Box-Behnken design showed that the CuO mass fraction and mill revolution number were the main factors affecting the efficiency of coating process. As the CuO mass fraction increased, the specific resistance increased. In contrast, the specific resistance increased with decreasing mill revolution number. The process optimization results revealed a high agreement between the experimental and the predicted data (Adj-R2=0.944). The optimized CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, and coating time were 0.4, 200 rpm, and 15 min, respectively. The measured value of the specific resistance of the coated pellet under the optimized conditions of the maximum specific resistance was 530 kΩ·cm

  10. Optimization of Process Variables for Insulation Coating of Conductive Particles by Response Surface Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Chol-Ho [Sangji University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The powder core, conventionally fabricated from iron particles coated with insulator, showed large eddy current loss under high frequency, because of small specific resistance. To overcome the eddy current loss, the increase in the specific resistance of powder cores was needed. In this study, copper oxide coating onto electrically conductive iron particles was performed using a planetary ball mill to increase the specific resistance. Coating factors were optimized by the Response surface methodology. The independent variables were the CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, coating time, ball size, ball mass and sample mass. The response variable was the specific resistance. The optimization of six factors by the fractional factorial design indicated that CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, and coating time were the key factors. The levels of these three factors were selected by the three-factors full factorial design and steepest ascent method. The steepest ascent method was used to approach the optimum range for maximum specific resistance. The Box-Behnken design was finally used to analyze the response surfaces of the screened factors for further optimization. The results of the Box-Behnken design showed that the CuO mass fraction and mill revolution number were the main factors affecting the efficiency of coating process. As the CuO mass fraction increased, the specific resistance increased. In contrast, the specific resistance increased with decreasing mill revolution number. The process optimization results revealed a high agreement between the experimental and the predicted data (Adj-R2=0.944). The optimized CuO mass fraction, mill revolution number, and coating time were 0.4, 200 rpm, and 15 min, respectively. The measured value of the specific resistance of the coated pellet under the optimized conditions of the maximum specific resistance was 530 kΩ·cm.

  11. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previous studies. A novel spinal fusion cage was fabricated by applying a thin tantalum coating on the surface...

  12. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...

  13. Flexible diamond-like carbon thin film coated rubbers: fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic rubber seals are major sources of friction of lubrication systems and bearings, which may take up to 75% of the total friction. The solution we present is to coat rubbers with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film, by which the coefficient of friction is reduced to less than one tenth. Coating

  14. Morphological and microstructural studies on aluminizing coating of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsu, Zaifol; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Daud, Abd Razak; Hussein, Hishammuddin [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Hot dip aluminizing is one of the most effective methods of surface protection for steels and is gradually gaining popularity. The morphology and microstructure of an inter-metallic layer form on the surface of low carbon steel by hot dip aluminization treatment had been studied in detail. This effect has been investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the reaction between the steel and the molten aluminium leads to the formation of Fe–Al inter-metallic compounds on the steel surface. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic studies showed that a two layer coating was formed consisting of an external Al layer and a (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) inter metallic on top of the substrate after hot dip aluminizing process. The inter-metallic layer is ‘thick’ and exhibits a finger-like growth into the steel. Microhardness testing shown that the intermetallic layer has high hardness followed by steel substrate and the lowest hardness was Al layer.

  15. Characterization of Carbon Coatings with Low Secondary Electron Yield

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, C; Costa Pinto, P; Kuzucan, A; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings can reliably be produced with a maximum secondary electron yield (SEY) close to 1 at room temperature. Measurements at low temperature (LHe) are in progress. Analysis by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a correlation between the lineshape of C1s spectrum in XPS and the maximum SEY of the investigated samples. The initial level of oxygen on the surface of the various samples does not seem to be related to the initial maximum SEY value. However, the increase of the SEY with air exposure time on each individual sample is related to the amount of oxygen containing adsorbates. Storage in different environments has been investigated (static vacuum, aluminium foil, dry nitrogen and desiccators), and shows significant differences in the “aging” behaviour. Aging is very moderate when storing samples wrapped in aluminium foil in air. Samples which have undergone aging due to inappropriate storage can be recovered nearly to the initial value of their SEY by surface treatme...

  16. Electrodeposition of Copper/Carbonous Nanomaterial Composite Coatings for Heat-Dissipation Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuki Goto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbonous nanomaterials are promising additives for composite coatings for heat-dissipation materials because of their excellent thermal conductivity. Here, copper/carbonous nanomaterial composite coatings were prepared using nanodiamond (ND as the carbonous nanomaterial. The copper/ND composite coatings were electrically deposited onto copper substrates from a continuously stirred copper sulfate coating bath containing NDs. NDs were dispersed by ultrasonic treatment, and the initial bath pH was adjusted by adding sodium hydroxide solution or sulfuric acid solution before electrodeposition. The effects of various coating conditions—the initial ND concentration, initial bath pH, stirring speed, electrical current density, and the amount of electricity—on the ND content of the coatings were investigated. Furthermore, the surface of the NDs was modified by hydrothermal treatment to improve ND incorporation. A higher initial ND concentration and a higher stirring speed increased the ND content of the coatings, whereas a higher initial bath pH and a greater amount of electricity decreased it. The electrical current density showed a minimum ND content at approximately 5 A/dm2. Hydrothermal treatment, which introduced carboxyl groups onto the ND surface, improved the ND content of the coatings. A copper/ND composite coating with a maximum of 3.85 wt % ND was obtained.

  17. Nitrogen doped silicon-carbon multilayer protective coatings on carbon obtained by TVA method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, Victor; Vasile, Eugeniu; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Lungu, Cristian P.; Vladoiu, Rodica; Jepu, Ionut; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Caraiane, Aureliana; Nicolescu, Virginia; Cupsa, Ovidiu; Dinca, Paul; Zaharia, Agripina

    2017-08-01

    Protective nitrogen doped Si-C multilayer coatings on carbon, used to improve the oxidation resistance of carbon, were obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The initial carbon layer having a thickness of 100nm has been deposed on a silicon substrate in the absence of nitrogen, and then a 3nm Si thin film to cover carbon layer was deposed. Further, seven Si and C layers were alternatively deposed in the presence of nitrogen ions, each having a thickness of 40nm. In order to form silicon carbide at the interface between silicon and carbon layers, all carbon, silicon and nitrogen ions energy has increased up to 150eV . The characterization of microstructure and electrical properties of as-prepared N-Si-C multilayer structures were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM) techniques, Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) and electrical measurements. Oxidation protection of carbon is based on the reaction between oxygen and silicon carbide, resulting in SiO2, SiO and CO2, and also by reaction involving N, O and Si, resulting in silicon oxynitride (SiNxOy) with a continuously variable composition, and on the other hand, since nitrogen acts as a trapping barrier for oxygen. To perform electrical measurements, 80% silver filled two-component epoxy-based glue ohmic contacts were attached on the N-Si-C samples. Electrical conductivity was measured in constant current mode. The experimental data show the increase of conductivity with the increase of the nitrogen content. To explain the temperature behavior of electrical conductivity we assumed a thermally activated electric transport mechanism.

  18. Characteristics and defluoridation performance of granular activated carbons coated with manganese oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yue; Wang Shuguang; Fan Maohong; Gong Wenxin; Gao Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    Using a redox process, granular activated carbon (GAC) was coated with manganese oxides to enhance its ability to adsorb fluoride from an aqueous solution. Compared with plain GAC, the fluoride adsorption capacity of this new adsorbent was improved and at least three times greater than that of uncoated GAC. The surface characteristics of coated GAC were observed with scanning electron microscopy. The surface area of the new adsorbent was calculated using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. X-ray diffraction revealed that manganese oxides are amorphous. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that manganese existed primarily in the oxidation state +IV. Kinetic and equilibrium adsorption data showed that the adsorption process follows the pseudo-second order kinetic and Freundlich equation models. The sorption data also indicated that the removal of fluoride by adsorption is a highly complex process, involving both boundary layer diffusion and intra-particle diffusion. The pH value of solution influences fluoride removal, and the optimum equilibrium pH value of fluoride adsorption is 3.0.

  19. Carbon nanotube-coating accelerated cell adhesion and proliferation on poly (L-lactide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Eri; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Takita, Hiroko; Watari, Fumio; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The surface of a polylactic acid (PLLA) was coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). ► MWCNT-coated PLLA showed remarkable higher wettability than uncoated PLLA. ► More Human osteosarcoma cell line (Saos2) adhered on the CNT-coated than those on uncoated PLLA at 2 h after seeding. ► MWCNT-coating on PLLA improved the surface wettability and initial cell attachment at early stage. - Abstract: The surface of a polylactic acid (PLLA) was coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in order to improve the surface properties. In addition, its surface characteristics and cell culturing properties were examined. Whole surface of PLLA was homogeneously covered by MWCNTs maintained a unique tubular structure. MWCNT-coated PLLA showed remarkable higher wettability than uncoated PLLA. Human osteosarcoma cell line (Saos2) adhered well on the CNT-coated PLLA whereas there are few cells attached on the uncoated PLLA at 2 h after seeding. The number of the cells on uncoated PLLA was still smaller than on the MWCNT-coated PLLA at 1 and 3 days. Moreover, The DNA content in the cells attached to the MWCNT-coated PLLA was significantly higher than that on the uncoated PLLA (p 0.1). Therefore MWCNT-coating on PLLA improved the surface wettability and initial cell attachment at early stage.

  20. A process for the production of a scale-proof and corrosion-resistant coating on graphite and carbon bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzer, E.

    1981-01-01

    A process for the production of a corrosion resistant coating on graphite and carbon bodies is described. The carbon or graphite body is coated or impregnated with titanium silicide under the addition of a metal containing wetting agent in a nitrogen free atmosphere, so that a tight coating is formed.

  1. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Pair interaction of bilayer-coated nanoscopic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Yi

    2009-02-01

    The pair interaction between bilayer membrane-coated nanosized particles has been explored by using the self-consistent field (SCF) theory. The bilayer membranes are composed of amphiphilic polymers. For different system parameters, the pair-interaction free energies are obtained. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of a sequence of structural transformations of bilayers on spherical particles, which occur during their approaching processes. For different head fractions of amphiphiles, the asymmetrical morphologies between bilayers on two particles and the inverted micellar intermediates have been found in the membrane fusion pathway. These results can benefit the fabrication of vesicles as encapsulation vectors for drug and gene delivery.

  2. Impact of the Excitation Source and Plasmonic Material on Cylindrical Active Coated Nano-Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W. Ziolkowski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic properties of cylindrical active coated nano-particles comprised of a silica nano-cylinder core layered with a plasmonic concentric nano-shell are investigated for potential nano-sensor applications. Particular attention is devoted to the near-field properties of these particles, as well as to their far-field radiation characteristics, in the presence of an electric or a magnetic line source. A constant frequency canonical gain model is used to account for the gain introduced in the dielectric part of the nano-particle, whereas three different plasmonic materials (silver, gold, and copper are employed and compared for the nano-shell layers.

  3. Surface Modification of α-Fe Metal Particles by Chemical Surface Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The structure of α-Fe metal magnetic recording particles coated with silane coupling agents have been studied by TEM, FT-IR, EXAFS, Mossbauer. The results show that a close, uniform, firm and ultra thin layer, which is beneficial to the magnetic and chemical stability, has been formed by the cross-linked chemical bond Si-O-Si. And the organic molecule has chemically bonded to the particle surface, which has greatly affected the surface Fe atom electronic structure. Furthermore, the covalent bond between metal particle surface and organic molecule has obvious effect on the near edge structure of the surface Fe atoms.

  4. Visual Observation of Bubble Departure Characteristics in the Nano-particle Coated Heating Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Won Soek; Yoo, Shin; Lee, Jae Young

    2010-01-01

    Although the great enhancement of the thermal conductivity of the nanofluids, the fluid mixed with small amount of the nano meter sized particles, has been known, many experimental data of the boiling heat transfer reported degraded heat transfer rate than the fresh fluid. However, the great enhancement of the critical heat flux in nanofluids has been reported by many investigators. Due to the opaque scattering of the nano particles in nano fluids, direct observation of the bubble dynamics in the boiling process has not been made. However, it has been known that the boiling heat transfer characteristics of the heater coated by the nano particles in the fresh water are almost similar to that in the nano fluid. Recently, consensus has been made in the understanding of the CHF enhancement of nanofluids or nano-particle coated heater as the surface phenomena. Therefore, in the present paper, we do experimental study to observe the bubble departure in the pool boiling process with the nano-particle coated heater

  5. Controlling the radiative properties of cool black-color coatings pigmented with CuO submicron particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonome, Hiroki; Baneshi, Mehdi; Okajima, Junnosuke; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design a pigmented coating with dark appearance that maintains a low temperature while exposed to sunlight. The radiative properties of a black-color coating pigmented with copper oxide (CuO) submicron particles are described. In the present work, the spectral behavior of the CuO-pigmented coating was calculated. The radiative properties of CuO particles were evaluated, and the radiative transfer in the pigmented coating was modeled using the radiation element method by ray emission model (REM 2 ). The coating is made using optimized particles. The reflectivity is measured by spectroscopy and an integrating sphere in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) regions. By using CuO particles controlled in size, we were able to design a black-color coating with high reflectance in the NIR region. The coating substrate also plays an important role in controlling the reflectance. The NIR reflectance of the coating on a standard white substrate with appropriate coating thickness and volume fraction was much higher than that on a standard black substrate. From the comparison between the experimental and calculated results, we know that more accurate particle size control enables us to achieve better performance. The use of appropriate particles with optimum size, coating thickness and volume fraction on a suitable substrate enables cool and black-color coating against solar irradiation. -- Highlights: • A new approach in designing pigmented coatings was used. • The effects of particles size on both visible and near infrared reflectivities were studied. • The results of numerical calculation were compared with experimental ones for CuO powders

  6. Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP and DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

  7. Fission product Pd-SiC interaction in irradiated coated particle fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1980-04-01

    Silicon carbide is the main barrier to fission product release from coated particle fuels. Consequently, degradation of the SiC must be minimized. Electron microprobe analysis has identified that palladium causes corrosion of the SiC in irradiated coated particles. Further ceramographic and electron microprobe examinations on irradiated particles with kernels ranging in composition from UO 2 to UC 2 , including PuO/sub 2 -x/ and mixed (Th, Pu) oxides, and in enrichment from 0.7 to 93.0% 235 U revealed that temperature is the major factor affecting the penetration rate of SiC by Pd. The effects of kernel composition, Pd concentration, other fission products, and SiC properties are secondary

  8. Microstructural analysis and mechanical characterization of aluminum matrix nanocomposites reinforced with uncoated and Cu-coated alumina particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beygi, H., E-mail: hossein.beygi@stu-mail.um.ac.ir; Sajjadi, S.A.; Zebarjad, S.M.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum matrix composites used in the aerospace, military and automotive industries are typically fabricated by a stir casting method. However, when nanoparticles are used for reinforcement, fabrication of composite materials by this method leads to the formation of a large number of structural defects. In this study, copper coating of alumina reinforcement particles is investigated as a technique for improving the structure of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites. Microstructural investigations by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the alumina particles were coated uniformly with copper shells. Copper coating of the reinforcing particles significantly increased their wettability in the molten aluminum alloy, strengthened the matrix-particle interfaces and improved the distribution of reinforcing particles within the matrix. Due to these microstructural improvements, the hardness, compressive strength, yield stress, tensile strength and elongation of the composites were enhanced by copper coating of the alumina particles.

  9. Microstructural analysis and mechanical characterization of aluminum matrix nanocomposites reinforced with uncoated and Cu-coated alumina particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beygi, H.; Sajjadi, S.A.; Zebarjad, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum matrix composites used in the aerospace, military and automotive industries are typically fabricated by a stir casting method. However, when nanoparticles are used for reinforcement, fabrication of composite materials by this method leads to the formation of a large number of structural defects. In this study, copper coating of alumina reinforcement particles is investigated as a technique for improving the structure of Al-Al 2 O 3 composites. Microstructural investigations by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the alumina particles were coated uniformly with copper shells. Copper coating of the reinforcing particles significantly increased their wettability in the molten aluminum alloy, strengthened the matrix-particle interfaces and improved the distribution of reinforcing particles within the matrix. Due to these microstructural improvements, the hardness, compressive strength, yield stress, tensile strength and elongation of the composites were enhanced by copper coating of the alumina particles

  10. Oxidation protection and behavior of in-situ zirconium diboride–silicon carbide coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lu; Li, Hejun; Yin, Xuemin; Chu, Yanhui; Chen, Xi; Fu, Qiangang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ZrB 2 –SiC coating was prepared on C/C composite by in-situ reaction. • A two-layered structure was obtained when the coating was oxidized at 1500 °C. • The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. • The morphology evolution of oxide scale during oxidation was illuminated. - Abstract: To protect carbon/carbon (C/C) composites against oxidation, zirconium diboride–silicon carbide (ZrB 2 –SiC) coating was prepared by in-situ reaction using ZrC, B 4 C and Si as raw materials. The in-situ ZrB 2 –SiC coated C/C presented good oxidation resistance, whose weight loss was only 0.15% after isothermal oxidation at 1500 °C for 216 h. Microstructure evolution of coating at 1500 °C was studied, revealing a two-layered structure: (1) ZrO 2 (ZrSiO 4 ) embedded in SiO 2 -rich glass, and (2) unaffected ZrB 2 –SiC. The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. A model based on the evolution of oxide scale was proposed to explain the failure mechanism of coating

  11. Research on in-pile release of fission products from coated particle fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, K.; Iwamoto, K.

    1985-01-01

    Coated particle fuels fabricated in accordance with VHTR (Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor) fuel design have been irradiated by both capsules and an in-pile gas loop (OGL-1), and data on the fission products release under irradiation were obtained for loose coated particles, fuel compacts and fuel rods in the temperature range between 800 deg. C and 1600 deg. C. For the fission gases, temperature- and time dependences of the fractional release(R/B) were measured. Relation between release and failure fraction of the coated particles was elucidated on the VHTR reference fuels. Also measured was tritium concentration in the helium coolant of OGL-1. In-pile release behavior of the metallic fission products was studied by measuring the activities of the fission products adsorbed in the graphite sleeves of the OGL-1 fuel rods and the graphite fuel container of the sweep gas capsules in the PIE. Investigation on palladium interaction with SiC coating layer was included. (author)

  12. The system of quantum structures coated with the diamond-like carbon for silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, V.P.; Abyzov, A.S.; Luchaninov, A.A.; Omarov, A.O.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2010-01-01

    The peculiarity of the process of amorphous diamond-like carbon coating deposition on the surface of Si photoelectric cell with quantum filaments, which was irradiated by the electrons and heavy multi-charge ions, have been investigated. The experimental results on the investigations of the optical characteristics of the nitrogen doped hydrogenated diamond-like carbon a-C:(H,N) coatings were presented. The parameters of the process of a-C:(H,N) coating deposition on the surfaces of disordered Si semiconductors structures were optimized for the purpose of minimizing optical reflection coefficient from the front surface of the crystal and supplying its mechanical durability.

  13. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  14. High temperature tribological properties of plasma-sprayed metallic coatings containing ceramic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallaire, S.; Legoux, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    For sealing a moving metal component with a dense silica-based ceramic pre-heated at 800 C, coatings with a low coefficient of friction and moderate wear loss are required. As reported previously, plasma-sprayed coatings containing solid lubricants could reduce sliding wear in high-temperature applications. Plasma-sprayed metal-based coatings containing ceramic particles have been considered for high temperature sealing. Selected metal powders (NiCoCrAlY, CuNi, CuNiIn, Ag, Cu) and ceramic particles (boron nitride, Zeta-B ceramic) were agglomerated to form suitable spray powders. Plasma-sprayed composite coatings and reference materials were tested in a modified pin-on-disc apparatus in which the stationary disc consisted of a dense silica-based ceramic piece initially heated at 800 C and allowed to cool down during tests. The influence of single exposure and repeated contacts with a dense silica-based ceramic material pre-heated to 800 C on the coefficient of friction, wear loss and damage to the ceramic piece was evaluated. Being submitted to a single exposure at high temperature, coatings containing malleable metals such as indium, silver and copper performed well. The outstanding tribological characteristics of the copper-Zeta-B ceramic coating was attributed to the formation of a glazed layer on the surface of this coating which lasted over exposures to high temperature. This glazed layer, composed of fine oxidation products, provided a smooth and polished surface and helped maintaining the coefficient of friction low

  15. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai; Zhong, Zhihui

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating. (paper)

  16. Erosion protection of carbon-epoxy composites by plasma-sprayed coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, F.; Fagoaga, I.; Oregui, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with the production of plasma-sprayed erosion-resistant coatings on carbon-fibre - epoxy composites, and the study of their erosion behaviour. The heat sensitivity of the composite substrate requires a specific spraying procedure in order to avoid its degradation. In addition, several bonding layers were studied to allow spraying of the protective coatings. Two different functional coatings were sprayed onto an aluminium-glass bonding layer, a WC-12Co cermet and an Al 2 O 3 ceramic oxide. The microstructure and properties of these coatings were studied and their erosion behaviour determined experimentally in an erosion-testing device. (orig.)

  17. Deposition of coatings on Ti by sputtering of tableted carbonate-hydroxylapatite in HF discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamchukov, Y.D.; Klubovich, V.; Potapenko, I.

    2001-01-01

    The coatings of carbonate-hydroxyapatite (CHA) on materials suitable for implants must have, because of their shielding functions, sufficiently large thickness and good adhesion. For these reasons, the production of these coatings is a technological task whose solution may be obtained on the basis of the application of different ion-plasma technologies. Examination of the properties of the CHA coatings on the substrate of titanium and the effect on the materials of the coating and the substrate of ion-plasma technology with the application of high-frequency discharge was the aim of this investigation

  18. Study on the efficiency of ceramic coating for avoiding oxidation in carbon refractories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, I.M.G.; Cruz Junior, F.; Paskocimas, C.A.; Leite, E.R.; Longo, Elson; Varela, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A ceramic coating made of sodium phosphossilicate and clay was developed to the protection of refractories against carbon oxidation during the pre-heating of siderurgical equipment. This search has the objective of comparing the refractory behaviour with and without coating, according to temperature, time and atmosphere. The results show that the coating is more efficient at higher temperatures. An important point is that the efficiency is smaller after long thermal is that the efficiency is smaller after long thermal treatments and at very aggressive conditions. In spite of this the oxidation is still smaller than in refractory without coating. (author)

  19. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND CORROSION PROTECTION OF CARBON STEEL COATED WITH AN EPOXY BASED POWDER COATING CONTAINING MONTMORILONITE FUNCTIONALIZED WITH SILANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Tibola Bertuoli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the MMT-Na+ clay was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS and incorporated in a commercial formulation epoxy-based powder coating in a proportion of 8 wt% and applied on 1008 carbon steel panels by electrostatic spray. Adhesion, flexibility, impact and corrosion performance in salt spray chamber tests were performed to evaluate the coatings. The presence of clay did not affect the mechanical properties of the film, however greater subcutaneous migration was assessed after the completion of salt spray testing, which can compromise the use of paints obtained as primers.

  20. Experimental investigation of coating degradation during simultaneous acid and erosive particle exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Victor Buhl; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Frankær, Sarah Maria

    When used in industrial processes, such as stirred acid leaching in the mineral industry, thermoset coatings are exposed to a combination of aggressive chemicals and erosive particlewear. While each exposure condition has been studied separately, no research has been presented on the effects...... of a simultaneous exposure. To investigate this, a pilot-scale stirred acid leaching tank, containing erosive particles and acidic solutions, has been designed and constructed. Resin types considered are amine-cured novolac epoxy and vinyl ester. Transient coating degradation is mapped through visual inspection...

  1. Fabricating bio-inspired micro/nano-particles by polydopamine coating and surface interactions with blood platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Wei [Jiangsu Provincial Key Lab for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003 (China); State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Shi, Qiang, E-mail: shiqiang@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Hou, Jianwen; Gao, Jian; Li, Chunming; Jin, Jing; Shi, Hengchong [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Yin, Jinghua, E-mail: yinjh@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: The particles or particle aggregations activate the blood platelets and provide the physical adhesive sites for platelets adhesion. - Highlights: • Particles with varied sizes and surface properties were fabricated by facile polydopamine (PDA) coating on polystyrene microsphere. • The direct interaction between PDA particles and blood platelets was qualitatively investigated. • The knowledge on platelet–particle interactions provided the basic principle to select biocompatible micro/nano-particles in biomedical field. - Abstract: Although bio-inspired polydopamine (PDA) micro/nano-particles show great promise for biomedical applications, the knowledge on the interactions between micro/nano-particles and platelets is still lacking. Here, we fabricate PDA-coated micro/nano-particles and investigate the platelet–particle surface interactions. Our strategy takes the advantage of facile PDA coating on polystyrene (PS) microsphere to fabricate particles with varied sizes and surface properties, and the chemical reactivity of PDA layers to immobilize fibrinogen and bovine serum albumin to manipulate platelet activation and adhesion. We demonstrate that PS particles activate the platelets in the size-dependent manner, but PDA nanoparticles have slight effect on platelet activation; PS particles promote platelet adhesion while PDA particles reduce platelet adhesion on the patterned surface; Particles interact with platelets through activating the glycoprotein integrin receptor of platelets and providing physical sites for initial platelet adhesion. Our work sheds new light on the interaction between platelets and particles, which provides the basic principle to select biocompatible micro/nano-particles in biomedical field.

  2. Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the carbon fibers surface and interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of its composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.L.; Liu, Y.; Huang, Y.D.; Liu, L.

    2013-01-01

    Effect of particle size and distribution of the sizing agent on the performance of carbon fiber and carbon fiber composites has been investigated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize carbon fiber surface topographies. At the same time, the single fiber strength and Weibull distribution were also studied in order to investigate the effect of coatings on the fibers. The interfacial shear strength and hygrothermal aging of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were also measured. The results indicated that the particle size and distribution is important for improving the surface of carbon fibers and its composites performance. Different particle size and distribution of sizing agent has different contribution to the wetting performance of carbon fibers. The fibers sized with P-2 had higher value of IFSS and better hygrothermal aging resistant properties.

  3. Experimental investigation on carbon nano tubes coated brass rectangular extended surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, Rajendran; Prabhu, Sethuramalingam; Cheralathan, Marimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Finned surface has been extensively used for free convection cooling of internal combustion engines and several electronic kits etc. Here rectangular brass fin was preferred for analysis. Thermocouples were attached all over the surface of the fin in equal distances. The measurement of surface temperature and calculated convective heat transfer rate were reported for several heat input values. The overall system performance can be improved by enhancing heat transfer rate of extended surfaces. Based on the above requirement, brass surface was coated by carbon nano tubes. The temperature and heat transfer characteristics were investigated using Taguchi method for experimental design. Finally the performances of coated and non-coated rectangular brass fins were compared. The average percentage of increase in heat transfer rate was proved around 12% for carbon nanocoated rectangular brass fins. - Graphical abstract: The designed Natural and Forced convection Heat Transfer Test Rig measures the enhanced rate of heat transfer for nano coated rectangular fins than in non-coated fins. Highlights: ► Rectangular brass fins were preferred for convective heat transfer process. ► The rectangular brass fins are coated with multi wall carbon nano tubes in EBPVD process with nanometer thickness. ► Temperature and heat transfer rate were investigated for nanocoated and non-coated fins by using Taguchi method. ► Multi wall carbon nanotubes act as a pin fin to enhance surface area for effective convective heat transfer rate.

  4. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • a-C:Ti nanocomposite coatings were prepared on 316L stainless steel by using R.F. magnetron sputtering method. • Properties of the nanocomposite coatings were analyzed with respect to titanium content. • Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and hydrophobicity of nanocomposite coating were enhanced with increasing titanium content. • Coating with 2.33 at.% titanium showed superior tribological properties compared to other coatings. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp"2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  5. Coating of carbon short fibers with thin ceramic layers by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackl, Gerrit; Gerhard, Helmut; Popovska, Nadejda

    2006-01-01

    Carbon short fiber bundles with a length of 6 mm were uniformly coated using specially designed, continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) equipment. Thin layers of titanium nitride, silicon nitride (SiC) and pyrolytic carbon (pyC) were deposited onto several kilograms of short fibers in this large scale CVD reactor. Thermo-gravimetric analyses and scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed layer thicknesses between 20 and 100 nm on the fibers. Raman spectra of pyC coated fibers show a change of structural order depending on the CVD process parameters. For the fibers coated with SiC, Raman investigations showed a deposition of amorphous SiC. The coated carbon short fibers will be applied as reinforcing material in composites with ceramic and metallic matrices

  6. Suppressing propylene carbonate decomposition by coating graphite electrode foil with silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.; Zhang, H.P.; Fu, L.J.; Zhang, T.; Wu, Y.P.; Takamura, T.; Wu, H.Q.; Holze, R.

    2007-01-01

    A method has been developed to suppress the decomposition of propylene carbonate (PC) by coating graphite electrode foil with a layer of silver. Results from electrochemical impedance measurements show that the Ag-coated graphite electrode presents lower charge transfer resistance and faster diffusion of lithium ions in comparison with the virginal one. Cyclic voltammograms and discharge-charge measurements suggest that the decomposition of propylene carbonate and co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions are prevented, and lithium ions can reversibly intercalate into and deintercalate from the Ag-coated graphite electrode. These results indicate that Ag-coating is a good way to improve the electrochemical performance of graphitic carbon in PC-based electrolyte solutions

  7. Carbon coatings with olive oil, soybean oil and butter on nano-LiFePO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ketack; Jeong, Ji Hwa; Kim, Ick-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    Kitchen oils (olive, soybean and butter) are selected for carbon coatings on LiFePO 4. The surface properties of LiFePO 4 are unknown or vary depending on synthetic methods. The multi-functional groups of fatty acids in the oils can orient properly to cope with the variable surface properties of LiFePO 4, which can lead to dense carbon coatings. The low price and low toxicity of kitchen oils are other advantages of the coating process. LiFePO 4 (D 50 = 121 nm)combined with the carbon coating enhances the rate capability. Capacities at the 2 C rate reach 150 mAh g -1 or higher. The charge retention values of 2.0 C/0.2 C are between 94.4 and 98.9%.

  8. The Diversity of Carbon in Cometary Refractory Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    When comparing the dark icy surfaces of outer solar system small bodies and the composition of carbonaceous chondrites derived from dark asteroids we find a significant discrepancy in the assessed amounts of elemental carbon: up to 80% amorphous carbon is used to model the dark surfaces of Kuiper Belt Objects and Centaurs whereas at most 5% of elemental carbon is found in carbonaceous chondrites. If we presume that regimes of comet nuclei formation are analogous to disk regimes where other outer solar system ice-rich bodies formed then we can turn to comet dust to gain insights into the diversity in the concentration and forms of carbon available in the outer disk. Comet dust offers important insights into the diversity in the amounts and forms of carbon that were incorporated into aggregate dust particles in the colder parts of the protoplanetary disk out of which comet nuclei accreted. Comet nuclei are amongst the most primitive bodies because they have remained cold and unequilibrated. Comet dust particles reveal the presence of forms of elemental carbon and of soluble and insoluble organic matter, and in a great diversity of concentrations from very little, e.g., Stardust samples of comet 81P/Wild 2, to 80% by volume for Ultra Carbonaceous Antarctic Micro Meteorites (UCAMMs). Cometary outbursts and/or jet activity also demonstrate variations in the concentration of carbon in the grains at different grain sizes within a single comet. We review the diversity of carbon-bearing dust grains in cometary samples, flyby measurements and deduced from remote-sensing to enrich the discussion about the diversity of carbonaceous matter available in the outer ice-rich disk at the time of comet nuclei formation.

  9. Review of experimental studies of zirconium carbide coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of zirconium carbide(ZrC) coated fuel particles were reviewed from the viewpoints of fuel particle designs, fabrication, characterization, fuel performance, and fission product retentiveness. ZrC is known as a refractory and chemically stable compound, so ZrC is a candidate to replace the silicon carbide(SiC) coating layer of the Triso-coated fuel particles. The irradiation experiments, the postirradiation heating tests, and the out-of-reactor experiments showed that the ZrC layer was less susceptible than the SiC layer to chemical attack by fission products and fuel kernels, and that the ZrC-coated fuel particles performed better than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles at high temperatures, especially above 1600degC. The ZrC-coated fuel particles demonstrated better cesium retention than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles though the ZrC layer showed a less effective barrier to ruthenium than the SiC layer. (author) 51 refs

  10. Precursor polymers for the carbon coating of Au@ZnO multipods for application as active material in lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschmann, Bernd; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Mueller, Franziska; Bresser, Dominic; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Tremel, Wolfgang; Passerini, Stefano; Zentel, Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of statistical and block copolymers based on polyacrylonitrile, as a source for carbonaceous materials, and thiol-containing repeating units as inorganic nanoparticle anchoring groups is reported. These polymers are used to coat Au@ZnO multipod heteroparticles with polymer brushes. IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy prove the successful binding of the polymer onto the inorganic nanostructures. Thermogravimetric analysis is applied to compare the binding ability of the block and statistical copolymers. Subsequently, the polymer coating is transformed into a carbonaceous (partially graphitic) coating by pyrolysis. The obtained carbon coating is characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The benefit of the conformal carbon coating of the Au@ZnO multipods regarding its application as lithium-ion anode material is revealed by performing galvanostatic cycling, showing a highly enhanced and stabilized electrochemical performance of the carbon-coated particles (still 831 mAh g(-1) after 150 cycles) with respect to the uncoated ones (only 353 mAh g(-1) after 10 cycles). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. TiO2 (NanoParticles Extracted from Sugar-Coated Confectionery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lorenzetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the debate about TiO2 food additive safety is still open, the present study focuses on the extraction and characterisation of TiO2 (nanoparticles added as a whitening agent to confectionary products, that is, chewing gum pellets. The aim was to (1 determine the colloidal properties of suspensions mutually containing TiO2 and all other chewing gum ingredients in biologically relevant media (preingestion conditions; (2 characterise the TiO2 (nanoparticles extracted from the chewing gum coating (after ingestion; and (3 verify their potential photocatalysis. The particle size distribution, in agreement with the zeta potential results, indicated that a small but significant portion of the particle population retained mean dimensions close to the nanosize range, even in conditions of moderate stability, and in presence of all other ingredients. The dispersibility was enhanced by proteins (i.e., albumin, which acted as surfactants and reduced particle size. The particle extraction methods involved conventional techniques and no harmful chemicals. The presence of TiO2 particles embedded in the sugar-based coating was confirmed, including 17–30% fraction in the nanorange (<100 nm. The decomposition of organics under UV irradiation proved the photocatalytic activity of the extracted (nanoparticles. Surprisingly, photocatalysis occurred even in presence of an amorphous SiO2 layer surrounding the TiO2 particles.

  12. Cell attachment on diamond-like carbon coating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    was a better coating with desirable tissue and blood compatibility. Keywords. .... Optical microscopic picture showing the fibroblasts adhering to. DLC coating prepared at 800 eV. ... In other words, the 800 eV CHn+ beam bombarding energy ...

  13. Carbon nanotube-coating accelerated cell adhesion and proliferation on poly (L-lactide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Eri; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Takita, Hiroko; Watari, Fumio; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2012-12-01

    The surface of a polylactic acid (PLLA) was coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in order to improve the surface properties. In addition, its surface characteristics and cell culturing properties were examined. Whole surface of PLLA was homogeneously covered by MWCNTs maintained a unique tubular structure. MWCNT-coated PLLA showed remarkable higher wettability than uncoated PLLA. Human osteosarcoma cell line (Saos2) adhered well on the CNT-coated PLLA whereas there are few cells attached on the uncoated PLLA at 2 h after seeding. The number of the cells on uncoated PLLA was still smaller than on the MWCNT-coated PLLA at 1 and 3 days. Moreover, The DNA content in the cells attached to the MWCNT-coated PLLA was significantly higher than that on the uncoated PLLA (p 0.1). Therefore MWCNT-coating on PLLA improved the surface wettability and initial cell attachment at early stage.

  14. Characterization of calcium carbonate sorbent particle in furnace environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Soo; Jung, Jae Hee; Keel, Sang In; Yun, Jin Han; Min, Tai Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2012-01-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion system is a promising technology to control CO 2 and NO X emissions. Furthermore, sulfation reaction mechanism under CO 2 -rich atmospheric condition in a furnace may lead to in-furnace desulfurization. In the present study, we evaluated characteristics of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) sorbent particles under different atmospheric conditions. To examine the physical/chemical characteristics of CaCO 3 , which is used as a sorbent particle for in-furnace desulfurization in the oxy-fuel combustion system, they were injected into high temperature drop tube furnace (DTF). Experiments were conducted at varying temperatures, residence times, and atmospheric conditions in a reactor. To evaluate the aerosolizing characteristics of the CaCO 3 sorbent particle, changes in the size distribution and total particle concentration between the DTF inlet and outlet were measured. Structural changes (e.g., porosity, grain size, and morphology) of the calcined sorbent particles were estimated by BET/BJH, XRD, and SEM analyses. It was shown that sorbent particles rapidly calcined and sintered in the air atmosphere, whereas calcination was delayed in the CO 2 atmosphere due to the higher CO 2 partial pressure. Instead, the sintering effect was dominant in the CO 2 atmosphere early in the reaction. Based on the SEM images, it was shown that the reactions of sorbent particles could be explained as a grain–subgrain structure model in both the air and CO 2 atmospheres.

  15. Acceptance Test Data for BWXT Coated Particle Batches 93172B and 93173B—Defective IPyC and Pyrocarbon Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schumacher, Austin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Coated particle batches J52O-16-93172B and J52O-16-93173B were produced by Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT) as part of the production campaign for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), but were not used in the final fuel composite. However, these batches may be used as demonstration production-scale coated particle fuel for other experiments. Each batch was coated in a 150-mm-diameter production-scale fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace. Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coatings were deposited on 425-μm-nominal-diameter spherical kernels from BWXT lot J52R-16-69317 containing a mixture of 15.5%-enriched uranium carbide and uranium oxide (UCO). The TRISO coatings consisted of four consecutive CVD layers: a ~50% dense carbon buffer layer with 100-μm-nominal thickness, a dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness, a silicon carbide (SiC) layer with 35-μm-nominal thickness, and a dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness. The TRISO-coated particle batches were sieved to upgrade the particles by removing over-sized and under-sized material, and the upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter A to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93172A). Secondary upgrading by sieving was performed on the A-designated batches to remove particles with missing or very-thin buffer layers that were identified during previous analysis of the individual batches for defective IPyC, as reported in the acceptance test data report for the AGR-5/6/7 production batches [Hunn et al. 2017b]. The additionally-upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter B to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93172B).

  16. Application of carbon-coated TiO2 for decomposition of methylene blue in a photocatalytic membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozia, Sylwia; Toyoda, Masahiro; Inagaki, Michio; Tryba, Beata; Morawski, Antoni W.

    2007-01-01

    An application of carbon-coated TiO 2 for decomposition of methylene blue (MB) in a photocatalytic membrane reactor (PMR), coupling photocatalysis and direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) was investigated. Moreover, photodegradation of a model pollutant in a batch reactor without membrane distillation (MD) was also examined. Carbon-modified TiO 2 catalysts containing different amount of carbon and commercially available TiO 2 (ST-01) were used in this study. The carbon-coated catalyst prepared from a mixture of ST-01 and polyvinyl alcohol in the mass ratio of 70/30 was the most effective in degradation of MB from all of the photocatalysts applied. Photodecomposition of MB on the recovered photocatalysts was lower than on the fresh ones. The photodegradation of MB in the PMR was slower than in the batch reactor, what probably resulted from shorter time of exposure of the catalyst particles to UV irradiation. The MD process could be successfully applied for separation of photocatalyst and by-products from the feed solution

  17. Nano-magnetic particles used in biomedicine: core and coating materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Z; Karimi, L; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications have been developed by many researchers. Separation, immunoassay, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia are enhanced by the use of suitable magnetic nanoparticles and coating materials in the form of ferrofluids. Due to their low biocompatibility and low dispersion in water solutions, nanoparticles that are used for biomedical applications require surface treatment. Various kinds of coating materials including organic materials (polymers), inorganic metals (gold, platinum) or metal oxides (aluminum oxide, cobalt oxide) have been attracted during the last few years. Based on the recent advances and the importance of nanomedicine in human life, this paper attempts to give a brief summary on the different ferrite nano-magnetic particles and coatings used in nanomedicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In situ formation of low friction ceramic coatings on carbon steel by plasma electrolytic oxidation in two types of electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunlong; Jiang Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on Q235 carbon steel was achieved by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in carbonate electrolyte and silicate electrolyte, respectively. The surface and cross-section morphology, phase and elemental composition of PEO coatings were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The bond strength of the coating was determined using a direct pull-off test. The hardness as well as tribological properties of the ceramic coating was primarily studied. The results indicated that the coating obtained in carbonate electrolyte was Fe 3 O 4 , while the coating achieved from silicate electrolyte was proved to be amorphous. Both kinds of coatings showed coarse and porous surface. The Fe 3 O 4 coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte showed a high bonding strength to the substrate up to 20 ± 2 MPa and the value was 15 ± 2 MPa for the amorphous coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte. The micro hardness of the amorphous coating and the Fe 3 O 4 coating was 1001 Hv and 1413 Hv, respectively, which was more than two and three times as that of the Q235 alloy substrate (415 Hv). The friction coefficient exhibited by amorphous coating and Fe 3 O 4 coating was 0.13 and 0.11, respectively, both lower than the uncoated Q235 substrate which ranged from 0.17 to 0.35.

  19. Fabrication and oxidation resistance of titanium carbide-coated carbon fibres by reacting titanium hydride with carbon fibres in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.J.; Li, X.K.; Yuan, G.M.; Cong, Y.; Li, N.; Jiang, Z.Y.; Hu, Z.J.

    2009-01-01

    Using carbon fibres and titanium hydride as a reactive carbon source and a metal source, respectively, a protective titanium carbide (TiC) coating was formed on carbon fibres in molten salts, composed of LiCl-KCl-KF, at 750-950 o C. The structure and morphology of the TiC coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The oxidation resistance of the TiC-coated carbon fibres was measured by thermogravimetric analysis. The results reveal that control of the coating thickness is very important for improvement of the oxidation resistance of TiC-coated carbon fibres. The oxidative weight loss initiation temperature for the TiC-coated carbon fibres increases significantly when an appropriate coating thickness is used. However, thicker coatings lead to a decrease of the carbon fibres' weight loss initiation temperature due to the formation of cracks in the coating. The TiC coating thickness on carbon fibres can be controlled by adjusting the reaction temperature and time of the molten salt synthesis.

  20. Highly stable carbon coated Mg2Si intermetallic nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirat, Andebet Gedamu; Hou, Mengyan; Liu, Yao; Bin, Duan; Sun, Yunhe; Fan, Long; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is an ideal candidate anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, it suffers from rapid capacity fading due to large volume expansion upon lithium insertion. Herein, we design and fabricate highly stable carbon coated porous Mg2Si intermetallic anode material using facile mechano-thermal technique followed by carbon coating using thermal vapour deposition (TVD), toluene as carbon source. The electrode exhibits an excellent first reversible capacity of 726 mAh g-1 at a rate of 100 mA g-1. More importantly, the electrode demonstrates high rate capability (380 mAh g-1 at high rate of 2 A g-1) as well as high cycle stability, with capacity retentions of 65% over 500 cycles. These improvements are attributable to both Mg supporting medium and the uniform carbon coating, which can effectively increase the conductivity and electronic contact of the active material and protects large volume alterations during the electrochemical cycling process.

  1. Gas sensors for ammonia detection based on polyaniline-coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Lifang; Jia Yong; Meng Fanli; Li Minqiang; Liu Jinhuai

    2009-01-01

    Polyaniline-coated multi-wall carbon nanotubes (PANI-coated MWNTs) were prepared by in situ polymerization method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the as-prepared PANI-coated MWNTs. Obtained results indicated that PANI was uniformly coated on MWNTs, and the thickness of the coatings can be controlled by changing the weight ratios of aniline monomer and MWNTs in the polymerization process. Sensors were fabricated by spin-coating onto pre-patterned electrodes, and ammonia gas sensing properties of the as-prepared PANI-coated MWNTs were studied. The results showed a good response and reproducibility towards ammonia at room temperature. In addition, PANI-coated MWNTs exhibited a linear response to ammonia in the range of 0.2-15 ppm. The effects of the thickness of PANI coatings on the gas sensing properties were also investigated in detail. The results suggest a potential application of PANI-coated MWNTs in gas sensor for detecting ammonia.

  2. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  3. Carbon nanotube-coated silicone as a flexible and electrically conductive biomedical material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Makoto; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Totsuka, Yasunori; Watari, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    Artificial cell scaffolds that support cell adhesion, growth, and organization need to be fabricated for various purposes. Recently, there have been increasing reports of cell patterning using electrical fields. We fabricated scaffolds consisting of silicone sheets coated with single-walled (SW) or multi-walled (MW) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and evaluated their electrical properties and biocompatibility. We also performed cell alignment with dielectrophoresis using CNT-coated sheets as electrodes. Silicone coated with 10 μg/cm 2 SWCNTs exhibited the least sheet resistance (0.8 kΩ/sq); its conductivity was maintained even after 100 stretching cycles. CNT coating also improved cell adhesion and proliferation. When an electric field was applied to the cell suspension introduced on the CNT-coated scaffold, the cells became aligned in a pearl-chain pattern. These results indicate that CNT coating not only provides electro-conductivity but also promotes cell adhesion to the silicone scaffold; cells seeded on the scaffold can be organized using electricity. These findings demonstrate that CNT-coated silicone can be useful as a biocompatible scaffold. - Highlights: ► We fabricated a CNT-coated silicone which has conductivity and biocompatibility. ► The conductivity was maintained after 100 cycles of stretching. ► CNT coatings enabled C2C12 cells adhere to the silicone surface. ► Cells were aligned with dielectrophoresis between CNT-coated silicone surfaces.

  4. Degradation of modified carbon black/epoxy nanocomposite coatings under ultraviolet exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Kahrizsangi, Ahmad; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Neshati, Jaber; Akbarinezhad, Esmaeil

    2015-10-01

    Degradation of epoxy coatings with and without Carbon Black (CB) nanoparticles under ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to obtain a good dispersion of CB nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. TEM analysis proved a uniform dispersion of modified CB nanoparticles in epoxy coating. The coatings were subjected to UV radiation to study the degradation behavior and then immersed in 3.5 wt% NaCl. The results showed that the electrochemical behavior of neat epoxy coating was related to the formation and development of microcracks on the surface. The occurrence of microcracks on the surface of the coatings and consequently the penetration of ionic species reduced by adding CB nanoparticles into the formulation of the coatings. CB nanoparticles decreased degradation of CB coatings by absorbing UV irradiation. The ATR-FTIR results showed that decrease in the intensity of methyl group as main peak in presence of 2.5 wt% CB was lower than neat epoxy. In addition, the reduction in impedance of neat epoxy coating under corrosive environment was larger than CB coatings. The CB coating with 2.5 wt% nanoparticles had the highest impedance to corrosive media after 2000 h UV irradiation and 24 h immersion in 3.5 wt% NaCl.

  5. A study on coated particle fuel properties and performances and phase-I data base establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Hyo Cheol; Im, Byeong Ju; Yun, Sang Pil; Son, Seung Beom; Lee, Gyeong Hui; Jang, Jeong Nam

    2006-03-01

    For the successful development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor acquisition and generation of the high temperature properties of reactor materials, especially temperature and burn-up dependent properties of coated particle fuel and fuel element, are crucially essential. Recently national project for HTGR for hydrogen production has been kicked off. However, we have had little experience on this new challenges. Therefore, it became necessary to build up the materials properties and fuel performance data base. In this study, a primitive properties and performance DB for coated particle fuel was developed. This database report consists two sections: materials properties and fuel performance. The materials properties has three parts: kernel materials, carbide coating materials, and fuel elements and graphite matrix. UO 2 and UCO belong to kernel materials while PyC, SiC, and ZrC comprises the coating materials section. Thermal, mechanical and physical properties of these materials were collected, reviewed, and summarized. Additionally, the property change induced by manufacture process and irradiation were collected and summarized. Performance data were also collected, reviewed, and analyzed based on the key phenomena and failure mechanism. All of these data will be accessible in the on-line system. These results will be directly used for HTGR fuel design and fabrication and preliminary fuel performance analysis under irradiation

  6. Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA): an integrated system for HTGR coated particle fuel performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Valentine, K.H.

    1980-02-01

    The Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) System, designed and built at ORNL, provides the capability of making statistically accurate failure fraction measurements on irradiated HTGR coated particle fuel. The IMGA records the gamma-ray energy spectra from fuel particles and performs quantitative analyses on these spectra; then, using chemical and physical properties of the gamma emitters it makes a failed-nonfailed decision concerning the ability of the coatings to retain fission products. Actual retention characteristics for the coatings are determined by measuring activity ratios for certain gamma emitters such as 137 Cs/ 95 Zr and 144 Ce/ 95 Zr for metallic fission product retention and 134 Cs/ 137 Cs for an indirect measure of gaseous fission product retention. Data from IMGA (which can be put in the form of n failures observed in N examinations) can be accurately described by the binomial probability distribution model. Using this model, a mathematical relationship between IMGA data (n,N), failure fraction, and confidence level was developed. To determine failure fractions of less than or equal to 1% at confidence levels near 95%, this model dictates that from several hundred to several thousand particles must be examined. The automated particle handler of the IMGA system provides this capability. As a demonstration of failure fraction determination, fuel rod C-3-1 from the OF-2 irradiation capsule was analyzed and failure fraction statistics were applied. Results showed that at the 1% failure fraction level, with a 95% confidence level, the fissile particle batch could not meet requirements; however, the fertile particle exceeded these requirements for the given irradiation temperature and burnup

  7. Coating of Carbon Fiber with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS to Enhance Mechanical Properties and Durability of Carbon/Vinyl Ester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Khan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our continuing quest to improve the performance of polymer composites under moist and saltwater environments has gained momentum in recent years with the reinforcement of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer. The key to mitigate degradation of composites under such environments is to maintain the integrity of the fiber/matrix (F/M interface. In this study, the F/M interface of carbon/vinyl ester composites has been modified by coating the carbon fiber with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. POSS is a nanostructured inorganic-organic hybrid particle with a cubic structure having silicon atoms at the core and linked to oxygen atoms. The advantage of using POSS is that the silicon atoms can be linked to a substituent that can be almost any chemical group known in organic chemistry. Cubic silica cores are ‘hard particles’ and are about 0.53 nm in diameter. The peripheral organic unit is a sphere of about 1–3 nm in diameter. Further, cubic structure of POSS remains intact during the polymerization process and therefore with appropriate functional groups, if installed on the fiber surface, would provide a stable and strong F/M interface. Two POSS systems with two different functional groups; namely, octaisobutyl and trisilanolphenyl have been investigated. A set of chemical and mechanical procedures has been developed to coat carbon fibers with POSS, and to fabricate layered composites with vinyl ester resin. Interlaminar shear and low velocity impact tests have indicated around 17–38% improvement in mechanical properties with respect to control samples made without the POSS coating. Saltwater and hygrothermal tests at various environmental conditions have revealed that coating with POSS reduces water absorption by 20–30% and retains the composite properties.

  8. Studies on the influence of surface pre-treatments on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, J.P.; Resmi, V.G.; Rajan, T.P.D.; Pavithran, C.; Pai, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the hard ceramic particles which find application as structural materials and neutron shielding material due to its high neutron capture cross section. Copper coating on boron carbide particle is essential for the synthesis of metal-ceramic composites with enhanced sinterability and dispersibility. Surface characteristics of the substrate and the coating parameters play a foremost role in the formation of effective electroless coating. The effect of surface pre-treatment conditions and pH on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles has been studied. Surface pre-treatement of B 4 C when compared to acid treated and alkali treated particles were carried out. Uniform copper coating was observed at pH 12 in alkali treated particles when compared to others due to the effective removal of inevitable impurities during the production and processing of commercially available B 4 C. A threshold pH 11 was required for initiation of copper coating on boron carbide particles. The growth pattern of the copper coating also varies depending on the surface conditions from acicular to spherical morphology.

  9. Non-conductive ferromagnetic carbon-coated (Co, Ni) metal/polystyrene nanocomposites films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacs, H., E-mail: helene.takacs@gmail.com [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, Grenoble 38054 (France); LTM-CNRS-UJF, CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, Grenoble 38054 (France); Viala, B.; Hermán, V. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, Grenoble 38054 (France); Tortai, J.-H. [LTM-CNRS-UJF, CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, Grenoble 38054 (France); Duclairoir, F. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC, Grenoble 38054 (France); CEA, INAC, Grenoble 38054 (France)

    2016-03-07

    This article reports non-conductive ferromagnetic properties of metal/polymer nanocomposite films intended to be used for RF applications. The nanocomposite arrangement is unique showing a core double-shell structure of metal-carbon-polystyrene: M/C//P{sub 1}/P{sub 2}, where M = Co, Ni is the core material, C = graphene or carbon is the first shell acting as a protective layer against oxidation, P{sub 1} = pyrene-terminated polystyrene is the second shell for electrical insulation, and P{sub 2} = polystyrene is a supporting matrix (// indicates actual grafting). The nanocomposite formulation is briefly described, and the film deposition by spin-coating is detailed. Original spin-curves are reported and analyzed. One key outcome is the achievement of uniform and cohesive films at the wafer scale. Structural properties of films are thoroughly detailed, and weight and volume fractions of M/C are considered. Then, a comprehensive overview of DC magnetic and electrical properties is reported. A discussion follows on the magnetic softness of the nanocomposites vs. that of a single particle (theoretical) and the raw powder (experimental). Finally, unprecedented achievement of high magnetization (∼0.6 T) and ultra-high resistivity (∼10{sup 10 }μΩ cm) is shown. High magnetization comes from the preservation of the existing protective shell C, with no significant degradation on the particle net-moment, and high electrical insulation is ensured by adequate grafting of the secondary shell P{sub 1}. To conclude, the metal/polymer nanocomposites are situated in the landscape of soft ferromagnetic materials for RF applications (i.e., inductors and antennas), by means of two phase-diagrams, where they play a crucial role.

  10. The synthesis of a new kind of magnetic coating on carbon fibers by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Rui; Wan Yizao; He Fang; Qi Yu; You Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Luo Honglin, E-mail: hlluo64@yahoo.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Nickel/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (Ni/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NPs) composite coatings on the surface of carbon fiber were prepared by electrodeposition in a nickel-plating bath containing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NPs). The composite of carbon fiber with nanocomposite coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The microstructure observation reveals that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NPs distribute uniformly in the coatings. TG and VSM analysis show that the carbon fibers with Ni/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NPs composite coatings exhibit higher thermal stability and saturation magnetization than carbon fiber with Ni coatings. The result is attributed to the homogeneous distribution of magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} in the composite coatings.

  11. Irradiation performance of coated fuel particles with fission product retaining kernel additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerthmann, R.

    1979-10-01

    The four irradiation experiments FRJ2-P17, FRJ2-P18, FRJ2-P19, and FRJ2-P20 for testing the efficiency of fission product-retaining kernel additives in coated fuel particles are described. The evaluation of the obtained experimental data led to the following results: - zirconia and alumina kernel additives are not suitable for an effective fission product retention in oxide fuel kernels, - alumina-silica kernel additives reduce the in-pile release of Sr 90 and Ba 140 from BISO-coated particles at temperatures of about 1200 0 C by two orders of magnitude, and the Cs release from kernels by one order of magnitude, - effective transport coefficients including all parameters which contribute to kernel release are given for (Th,U)O 2 mixed oxide kernels and low enriched UO 2 kernels containing 5 wt.% alumina-silica additives: 10g sub(K)/cm 2 s -1 = - 36 028/T + 6,261 (Sr 90), 10g Dsub(K)/cm 2 c -2 = - 29 646/T + 5,826 (Cs 134/137), alumina-silica kernel additives are ineffective for retaining Ag 110 m in coated particles. However, also an intact SiC-interlayer was found not to be effective at temperatures above 1200 0 C, - the penetration of the buffer layer by fission product containing eutectic additive melt during irradiation can be avoided by using additives which consist of alumina and mullite without an excess of silica, - annealing of LASER-failed irradiated particles and the irradiation test FRJ12-P20 indicate that the efficiency of alumina-silica kernel additives is not altered if the coating becomes defect. (orig.) [de

  12. Anisotropy variation of crystallographic orientation in pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles by annealing and neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizlik, K.

    1973-04-15

    This document is a translation of those parts of the German report Jul-868-RW concerned with changes in anisotropy as determined using an optical technique on pyrocarbon coatings on fuel particles resulting from annealing and neutron irradiations. Two lists of contents are included, one is for the present document and the other is the full contents of the original report and is included for the generl interest of users.

  13. The emissivity of W coatings deposited on carbon materials for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruset, C.; Falie, D.; Grigore, E.; Gherendi, M.; Zoita, V.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Matthews, G.; Courtois, X.; Bucalossi, J.; Likonen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The emissivity of tungsten coatings deposited on carbon substrates such as CFC and fine grain graphite was measured at the wavelengths of 1.064 μm, 1.75 μm, 3.75 μm and 4.0 μm in the temperature range of 400 °C–1200 °C. • The emissivity of other materials of interest for nuclear fusion such as tungsten and beryllium was measured as well. • The influence of substrate structure and of the viewing angle on the emissivity of W coatings was investigated in detail. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings deposited on carbon materials such as carbon fiber composite (CFC) or fine grain graphite are currently used in fusion devices as amour for plasma facing components (PFC). More than 4000 carbon tiles were W-coated by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation technology for the ITER-like Wall at JET, ASDEX Upgrade and WEST tokamaks. The emissivity of W coatings is a key parameter required by protection systems of the W-coated PFC and also by the diagnostic tools in order to get correct values of temperature and heat loading. The emissivity of tungsten is rather well known, but the literature data refer to bulk tungsten or tungsten foils and not to coatings deposited on carbon materials. The emissivity was measured at the wavelengths of 1.064 μm, 1.75 μm, 3.75 μm and 4.0 μm. It was found that the structure of the substrate has a significant influence on the emissivity values. The temperature dependence of the emissivity in the range of 400 °C–1200 °C and the influence of the viewing angle were investigated as well. The results are given in a table for W coatings and for other materials of interest for fusion such as bulk W and bulk Be.

  14. The emissivity of W coatings deposited on carbon materials for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruset, C., E-mail: ruset@infim.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Falie, D.; Grigore, E.; Gherendi, M.; Zoita, V. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Zastrow, K.-D.; Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE), Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Courtois, X.; Bucalossi, J. [IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 SAINT PAUL LEZ DURANCE (France); Likonen, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The emissivity of tungsten coatings deposited on carbon substrates such as CFC and fine grain graphite was measured at the wavelengths of 1.064 μm, 1.75 μm, 3.75 μm and 4.0 μm in the temperature range of 400 °C–1200 °C. • The emissivity of other materials of interest for nuclear fusion such as tungsten and beryllium was measured as well. • The influence of substrate structure and of the viewing angle on the emissivity of W coatings was investigated in detail. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings deposited on carbon materials such as carbon fiber composite (CFC) or fine grain graphite are currently used in fusion devices as amour for plasma facing components (PFC). More than 4000 carbon tiles were W-coated by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation technology for the ITER-like Wall at JET, ASDEX Upgrade and WEST tokamaks. The emissivity of W coatings is a key parameter required by protection systems of the W-coated PFC and also by the diagnostic tools in order to get correct values of temperature and heat loading. The emissivity of tungsten is rather well known, but the literature data refer to bulk tungsten or tungsten foils and not to coatings deposited on carbon materials. The emissivity was measured at the wavelengths of 1.064 μm, 1.75 μm, 3.75 μm and 4.0 μm. It was found that the structure of the substrate has a significant influence on the emissivity values. The temperature dependence of the emissivity in the range of 400 °C–1200 °C and the influence of the viewing angle were investigated as well. The results are given in a table for W coatings and for other materials of interest for fusion such as bulk W and bulk Be.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Process Parameters in Drilling LM25 Composites Coated with Multi Wall Carbon Nano Tubes Using Sonication Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium based metal matrix composites are widely used in automobile components such as cardan shaft of Chevrolet corvette, disc brake and engine push rod. In this experiment a Hybrid Metal Matrix Composites (HMMC are fabricated and drilled. Drilling is the process of making slots in disc brake and thread in the engine parts. The surface quality of the drilled specimen depends on the speed, feed, drill type and the thrust force. Thrust force plays the major role in drilling the specimen. In this experiment HMMCs are fabricated using two processes-called, sonication and casting. Sonication is the process of coating the carbon nanotubes over the silicon carbide particles (SiCp. Semisolid stir casting is used to reinforce the coated SiCp in the LM 25 alloy. A drilling process is performed on HMMC to analyse the extent to which the input parameters influence the thrust force and Ovality. The tools used for drilling are solid carbide tools of three different diameters. Taguchi’s experimental design is adopted for the drilling operation. A mathematical model is used to determine the influence of input parameters on the outputs thrust force and ovality. This paper proves the combination of N3, f1 and d1 of the carbide tool results in the lowest value of thrust force and ovality while drilling HMMCs. In this work the HMMC is prepared by coating the abrasive nature, silicon carbide particle and there is a good interfacial bonding between the reinforced particle and matrix and the drilling process becomes smoother. The new being of this article is the treated ceramics, SiCp with carbon nanotubes. This HMMC shows the improved mechanical properties compared to other metal matrix composites surveyed in the literatures.

  16. Performance Analysis Review of Thorium TRISO Coated Particles during Manufacture, Irradiation and Accident Condition Heating Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Thorium, in combination with high enriched uranium, was used in all early high temperature reactors (HTRs). Initially, the fuel was contained in a kernel of coated particles. However, particle quality was low in the 1960s and early 1970s. Modern, high quality, tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles with thorium oxide and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) had been manufactured since 1978 and were successfully demonstrated in irradiation and accident tests. In 1980, HTR fuels changed to low enriched uranium UO 2 TRISO fuels. The wide ranging development and demonstration programme was successful, and it established a worldwide standard that is still valid today. During the process, results of the thorium work with high quality TRISO fuel particles had not been fully evaluated or documented. This publication collects and presents the information and demonstrates the performance of thorium TRISO fuels.This publication is an outcome of the technical contract awarded under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy, initiated in 2012. It is based on the compilation and analysis of available results on thorium TRISO coated particle performance in manufacturing and during irradiation and accident condition heating tests

  17. New developments in image-based characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jeffery R.; Aykac, Deniz; Hunn, John D.; Kercher, Andrew K.; Morris, Robert N.

    2006-02-01

    We describe in this paper new developments in the characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel using optical microscopy and digital imaging. As in our previous work, we acquire optical imagery of the fuel pellets in two distinct manners that we refer to as shadow imaging and cross-sectional imaging. In shadow imaging, particles are collected in a single layer on an optically transparent dish and imaged using collimated back-lighting to measure outer surface characteristics only. In cross-sectional imaging, particles are mounted in acrylic epoxy and polished to near-center to reveal the inner coating layers for measurement. For shadow imaging, we describe a curvaturebased metric that is computed from the particle boundary points in the FFT domain using a low-frequency parametric representation. We also describe how missing boundary points are approximated using band-limited interpolation so that the FFT can be applied. For cross-section imaging, we describe a new Bayesian-motivated segmentation scheme as well as a new technique to correct layer measurements for the fact that we cannot observe the true mid-plane of the approximately spherical particles.

  18. Silver (Ag) Transport Mechanisms in TRISO coated particles: A Critical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I J van Rooyen; J H Neethling; J A A Engelbrecht; P M van Rooyen; G Strydom

    2012-10-01

    Transport of 110mAg in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE’s fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  19. Silver (Ag) transport mechanisms in TRISO coated particles: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooyen, I.J. van, E-mail: isabella.vanrooyen@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Dunzik-Gougar, M.L. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Idaho State University, ID (United States); Rooyen, P.M. van [Philip M. van Rooyen Network Consultants, Midlands Estates (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    Transport of {sup 110m}Ag in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE's fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  20. Particle morphology of hydroxyapatite and its influence on the properties of biocomposite plasma coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnikova I.P.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to identify patterns of change in the properties of biocompatible coatings during modernization of its structure by changing the morphology and crystallinity of the starting powder particles of hydroxyapatite (HA for agglomeration and subsequent grinding. Material and methods. We investigated the morphology, degree of crystallinity and internal tension in HA powder with a particle size of 40-90 microns in the initial state and after the agglomeration process and structure piasmasprayed HA coatings application methods ray analysis (XRF and XRD on DRON-3, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectrometer Nicolet 6700, optical (MIM-8 and atomic force microscopy (SMM-2000, the laser microprobe (Spectrum 2000. Results: It was shown that change in particle morphology HA agglomerated and subsequently grinding increases the uniformity of the porous structure, its crystallinity, reduce internal stresses developing surface morphology of the coating and its nanostructuring. Conclusion. It is recommended for the improvement of characteristics of the porous structure (uniformity, strength, adhesion, and the surface morphology of implant to use agglomerating starting powders and their subsequent grinding.

  1. Quality control of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Mitsunobu

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of the coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors is characterized by the fact that the size of the target product to be controlled is very small, and the quantity is very large. Accordingly, the sampling plan and the method of evaluating the population through satisfically treating the measured data of the samples are the important subjects to see and evaluate the quality of a batch or a lot. This paper shows the fabrication process and the quality control procedure for the coated fuel particles. The development work of a HTGR was started by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1969, and as for the production technology for coated fuel particles, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. has continued the development work. The pilot plan with the capacity of about 40 kg/year was established in 1972. The fuel product fabricated in this plant was put to the irradiation experiment and out-of-pile evaluation test. In 1983, the production capacity was expanded to 200 kg/year, and the fuel compacts for the VHTRC in JAERI were produced for two years. The basic fuel design, the fabrication process, the quality control, the process control and the quality assurance are reported. For the commercial product, the studies from the viewpoint of production and quality control costs are required. (Kako, I.)

  2. Visual and reversible carbon dioxide sensing enabled by doctor blade coated macroporous photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Han; Suen, Shing-Yi; Yang, Hongta

    2017-11-15

    With significant impacts of carbon dioxide on global climate change, carbon dioxide sensing is of great importance. However, most of the existing sensing technologies are prone to interferences from carbon monoxide, or suffer from the use of sophisticated instruments. This research reports the development of reproducible carbon dioxide sensor using roll-to-roll compatible doctor blade coated three-dimensional macroporous photonic crystals. The pores are functionalized with amine groups to allow the reaction with carbon dioxide in the presence of humidity. The adsorption of carbon dioxide leads to red-shift and amplitude reduction of the optical stop bands, resulting in carbon dioxide detection with visible readout. The dependences of the diffraction wavelength on carbon dioxide partial pressure for various amine-functionalized photonic crystals and different humidities in the environment are systematically investigated. In addition, the reproducibility of carbon dioxide sensing has also been demonstrated in this research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Boron carbide-coated carbon material, manufacturing method therefor and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Hyakki, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plasma facing material suitable to a thermonuclear device. The material comprises a carbon material formed by converting the surface of a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material comprising a carbon matrix and carbon fibers to a boron carbide, the material has a surface comprising vertically or substantially vertically oriented carbon fibers, and the thickness of the surface converted to boron carbide is reduced in the carbon fiber portion than in the carbon matrix portion. Alternatively, a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material containing carbon fibers having a higher graphitizing degree than the carbon matrix is converted to boron carbide on the surface where the carbon fibers are oriented vertically or substantially vertically. The carbon fiber-reinforced material is used as a base material, and a resin material impregnated into a shaped carbon fiber product is carbonized or thermally decomposed carbon is filled as a matrix. The material of the present invention has high heat conduction and excellent in heat resistance thereby being suitable to a plasma facing material for a thermonuclear device. Electric specific resistivity of the entire coating layer can be lowered, occurrence of arc discharge is prevented and melting can be prevented. (N.H.)

  4. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%

  5. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  6. Twin carbons: The carbonization of cellulose or carbonized cellulose coated with a conducting polymer, polyaniline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bober, Patrycja; Kovářová, Jana; Pfleger, Jiří; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava; Novák, I.; Berek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 109, November (2016), s. 836-842 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cellulose * carbon * polyaniline Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  7. Preparation and pigmented polyester coating of saw dust particle board using ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darsono; Sugiarto Danu; Anik Sunarni

    2010-01-01

    Experiments on the preparation and pigmented polyester coating of saw dust particle board have been conducted using ultra-violet (UV) radiation curing. The adhesive used for preparation of particle board was the mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol residue as by product of clover oil distillation. Dry saw dust (20 – 40 mesh) was mixed with adhesive at concentration of 16 % b.w. The mixture then was hot pressed at 160, 170, and 180 kg/cm 2 , temperature of 160 °C for 30 minutes. Particle boards obtained have the density of 0.85 - 92 g/cm 3 , water content of 5.4 – 6.8 % and thickness swelling 45 – 62 % ( 2 hr immersion) and unmeasurable for 24 hr immersion due to brittle condition. It was found that particle boards have properties of modulus of rupture = 64 – 71 kgf/cm 2 , modulus of elasticity = 402 – 447 kgf/ cm 2 , and internal bond of 0.52 – 0.57 kgf/cm 2 . Cured coating made of the mixture of polyester resin, photoinitiator (2 and 3 % b.w) and pigment (1 and 2 % b.w) on particle board and irradiated at 1 – 4 m/min have pendulum hardness = 25.0 – 63.9 sec, pencil hardness = HB – 2H, % remaining = 92 – 100 %, glossy = 42.3 – 58.8 %, and color value of L = 54.3 – 73.9, a = -1.3 – 1.9, and b = 0.4 – 3.3. The cured coatings resist to chemical, solvent and stain, except against 10 % NaOH solution and red permanent marker stain. (author)

  8. The significance of strength of silicon carbide for the mechanical integrity of coated fuel particles for HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.; Scheer, A.; Schuster, H.; Taeuber, K.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and pyrocarbon are used as coating material for the HTR fuel particles. The PyC shell having a certain strength acts as a pressure vessel for the fission gases whereas the SiC shell has to retain the solid fission products in the fuel kernel. For measuring the strength of coating material the so-called Brittle Ring Test was developed. Strength and Young's modulus can be measured simultaneously with this method on SiC or PyC rings prepared out of the coating material of real fuel particles. The strength measured on the ring under a certain stress distribution which is characteristic for this method is transformed with the aid of the Weibull formalism for brittle fracture into the equivalent strength of the spherical coating shell on the fuel particle under uniform stress caused by the fission gas pressure. The values measured for the strength of the SiC were high (400-700MN/m 2 ), it could therefore be assumed that a SiC layer might contribute significantly also to the mechanical strength of the fuel coating. This assumption was confirmed by an irradiation test on coated particles with PyC-SiC-PyC coatings. There were several particles with all PyC layers broken during the irradiation, whereas the SiC layers remained intact having to withstand the fission gas pressure alone. This fact can only be explained assuming that the strength of the SiC is within the range of the values measured with the brittle ring test. The result indicates that, in optimising the coating of a fuel particle, the PyC layers of a multilayer coating should be considered alone as prospective layers for the SiC. The SiC shell, besides acting as a fission product barrier, is then also responsible for the mechanical integrity of the particle

  9. Black Carbon Absorption at the Global Scale Is Affected by Particle-Scale Diversity in Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (E(sub abs)) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find E(sub abs) = 1 - 1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models.

  10. Separation of silicon carbide-coated fertile and fissile particles by gas classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1976-07-01

    The separation of 235 U and 233 U in the reprocessing of HTGR fuels is a key feature of the feed-breed fuel cycle concept. This is attained in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor by coating the fissile (Th- 235 U) particles and the fertile (Th- 233 U) particles separately with silicon carbide (SiC) layers to contain the fission products and to protect the kernels from burning in the head-end reprocessing steps. Pneumatic (gas) classification based on size and density differences is the reference process for separating the SiC-coated particles into fissile and fertile streams for subsequent handling. Terminal velocities have been calculated for the +- 2 sigma ranges of particle sizes and densities for ''Fissile B''--''Fertile A'' particles used in the FSV reactor. Because of overlapping particle fractions, a continuous pneumatic separator appears infeasible; however, a batch separation process can be envisioned. Changing the gas from air to CO 2 and/or the temperature to 300 0 C results in less than 10 percent change in calculated terminal velocities. Recently reported work in gas classification is discussed in light of the theoretical calculations. The pneumatic separation of fissile and fertile particles needs more study, specifically with regard to (1) measuring the recoveries and separation efficiencies of actual fissile and fertile fractions in the tests of the pneumatic classifiers; and (2) improving the contactor design or flowsheet to avoid apparent flow separation or flooding problems at the feed point when using the feed rates required for the pilot plant

  11. Optically and biologically active mussel protein-coated double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-02

    A method of dispersing strongly bundled double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) via a homogeneous coating of mussel protein in an aqueous solution is presented. Optical activity, mechanical strength, as well as electrical conductivity coming from the nanotubes and the versatile biological activity from the mussel protein make mussel-coated DWNTs promising as a multifunctional scaffold and for anti-fouling materials. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Nine years of carbon coating development for the SPS upgrade: achievements and heritage.

    CERN Document Server

    Taborelli, Mauro; Costa Pinto, Pedro; Cruikshank, Paul

    2015-01-01

    CERN has succeeded in producing carbon coatings that eradicate electron cloud in accelerators without any beam conditioning or in situ heating. Investing about 1 MCHF and dedicating 31 FTE (28 man-years, staff and associate members) in 9 years in the framework of LIU-SPS, CERN has increased: technological competences in thin-film coatings, worldwide visibility in surface characterisation, and capability in electron cloud measurement. Future projects are still benefiting from such an investment.

  13. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes black coatings from roll-to-roll deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goislard de Monsabert, Thomas; Papciak, L.; Sangar, A.; Descarpentries, J.; Vignal, T.; de Longiviere, Xavier; Porterat, D.; Mestre, Q.; Hauf, H.

    2017-09-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) have recently attracted growing interest as a very efficient light absorbing material over a broad spectral range making them a superior coating in space optics applications such as radiometry, optical calibration, and stray light elimination. However, VACNT coatings available to-date most often result from batch-to-batch deposition processes thus potentially limiting the manufacturing repeatability, substrate size and cost efficiency of this material.

  14. Carbon decorative coatings by dip-, spin-, and spray-assisted layer-by-layer assembly deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinkee; Kang, Sang Wook

    2011-09-01

    We performed a comparative surface analysis of all-carbon nano-objects (multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) or graphene oxide (GO) sheets) based multilayer coatings prepared using three widely used nanofilm fabrication methods: dip-, spin-, and spray-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition. The resultant films showed a marked difference in their growth mechanisms and surface morphologies. Various carbon decorative coatings were synthesized with different surface roughness values, despite identical preparation conditions. In particular, smooth to highly rough all-carbon surfaces, as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were readily obtained by manipulating the LbL deposition methods. As was confirmed by the AFM and SEM analyses, this finding indicated the fundamental morphological evolution of one-dimensional nano-objects (MWNT) and two-dimensional nano-objects (GO) by control of the surface roughness through the deposition method. Therefore, an analysis of the three LbL-assembly methods presented herein may offer useful information about the industrial use of carbon decorative coatings and provide an insight into ways to control the structures of multilayer coatings by tuning the morphologies of carbon nano-objects.

  15. Hybrid polyacrylamide/carbon coating on sulfur cathode for advanced lithium sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tao; Yuan, Yan; Hong, Bo; Cao, Huawei; Zhang, Kai; Lai, Yanqing; Liu, Yexiang; Huang, Zixin

    2017-01-01

    Commercialized conductive slurry consisting of polyacrylamide (PAM) and two kinds of carbon black was coated on the surface of sulfur cathode. The hybrid PAM/C coating not only physically blocks but also chemically anchors polysulfides within the cathode, confining their out-diffusion and shuttle. Besides, the flexible and highly-conductive coating layer buffers volume change of the cathode during discharge-charge process and reduces charge transfer resistance. A specific capacity of as high as ∼900 mAh g −1 after 300 cycles is demonstrated for the PAM/C coated cathode, which is a significant improvement of reversible capacity and cycle capability compared to uncoated or conventional PVDF/C coated cathode.

  16. Surface functionalization of carbon nanofibers by sol-gel coating of zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao Dongfeng [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Changzhou Textile Garment Institute, Changzhou 213164 (China); Wei Qufu [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)], E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn; Zhang Liwei; Cai Yibing; Jiang Shudong [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2008-08-15

    In this paper the functional carbon nanofibers were prepared by the carbonization of ZnO coated PAN nanofibers to expand the potential applications of carbon nanofibers. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning. The electrospun PAN nanofibers were then used as substrates for depositing the functional layer of zinc oxide (ZnO) on the PAN nanofiber surfaces by sol-gel technique. The effects of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization on the surface morphology and structures of the nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results of SEM showed a significant increase of the size of ZnO nanograins on the surface of nanofibers after the treatments of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization. The observations by SEM also revealed that ZnO nanoclusters were firmly and clearly distributed on the surface of the carbon nanofibers. FTIR examination also confirmed the deposition of ZnO on the surface of carbon nanofibers. The XRD analysis indicated that the crystal structure of ZnO nanograins on the surface of carbon nanofibers.

  17. Microporous polystyrene particles for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliva, Maria; Armatas, Gerasimos S; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2012-02-07

    This study presents the synthesis of microporous polystyrene particles and the potential use of these materials in CO(2) capture for biogas purification. Highly cross-linked polystyrene particles are synthesized by the emulsion copolymerization of styrene (St) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in water. The cross-link density of the polymer is varied by altering the St/DVB molar ratio. The size and the morphology of the particles are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Following supercritical point drying with carbon dioxide or lyophilization from benzene, the polystyrene nanoparticles exhibit a significant surface area and permanent microporosity. The dried particles comprising 35 mol % St and 65 mol % DVB possess the largest surface area, ∼205 m(2)/g measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and ∼185 m(2)/g measured by the Dubinin-Radushkevich method, and a total pore volume of 1.10 cm(3)/g. Low pressure measurements suggest that the microporous polystyrene particles exhibit a good separation performance of CO(2) over CH(4), with separation factors in the range of ∼7-13 (268 K, CO(2)/CH(4) = 5/95 gas mixture), which renders them attractive candidates for use in gas separation processes.

  18. Depositing nanometer-sized particles of metals onto carbon allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Fallbach, Michael J. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Delozier, Donavon M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A process for depositing nanometer-sized metal particles onto a substrate in the absence of aqueous solvents, organic solvents, and reducing agents, and without any required pre-treatment of the substrate, includes preparing an admixture of a metal compound and a substrate by dry mixing a chosen amount of the metal compound with a chosen amount of the substrate; and supplying energy to the admixture in an amount sufficient to deposit zero valance metal particles onto the substrate. This process gives rise to a number of deposited metallic particle sizes which may be controlled. The compositions prepared by this process are used to produce polymer composites by combining them with readily available commodity and engineering plastics. The polymer composites are used as coatings, or they are used to fabricate articles, such as free-standing films, fibers, fabrics, foams, molded and laminated articles, tubes, adhesives, and fiber reinforced articles. These articles are well-suited for many applications requiring thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, antibacterial activity, catalytic activity, and combinations thereof.

  19. Prediction of TRISO coated particle performances for a one-pass deep burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-02-15

    In the present studies, TRISO coated particle performances have been investigated for incinerating plutonium and minor actinides by the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, whose fresh fuel is fabricated after the uranium extraction (UREX) process applied to Light Water Reactors irradiated fuel. The analyses divide into two parts: in the first part, the latest design of the reactor core proposed by General Atomics, which takes advantage of four fuel rings, has been modeled in deep details by the Monte Carlo MCNP code and a burnup process has been simulated by the MCB code. In the second part, the TRISO coated particle performances have been investigated by the PANAMA code with the goal of verifying the design constraints proposed by General Atomics. During burnup, the refueling and shuffling schedule followed the one-pass deep burn concept, where the fuel is utilized, since fabrication for the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, without any reprocessing until the final disposal into the geological repository. During the reactor operation, the fast fluence on all TRISO particles layers has been evaluated and the production of the key fission products monitored. During an hypothetical reactor accident scenario, the TRISO particle failure fraction has been estimated.

  20. Prediction of TRISO coated particle performances for a one-pass deep burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    In the present studies, TRISO coated particle performances have been investigated for incinerating plutonium and minor actinides by the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, whose fresh fuel is fabricated after the uranium extraction (UREX) process applied to Light Water Reactors irradiated fuel. The analyses divide into two parts: in the first part, the latest design of the reactor core proposed by General Atomics, which takes advantage of four fuel rings, has been modeled in deep details by the Monte Carlo MCNP code and a burnup process has been simulated by the MCB code. In the second part, the TRISO coated particle performances have been investigated by the PANAMA code with the goal of verifying the design constraints proposed by General Atomics. During burnup, the refueling and shuffling schedule followed the one-pass deep burn concept, where the fuel is utilized, since fabrication for the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, without any reprocessing until the final disposal into the geological repository. During the reactor operation, the fast fluence on all TRISO particles layers has been evaluated and the production of the key fission products monitored. During an hypothetical reactor accident scenario, the TRISO particle failure fraction has been estimated

  1. Fission-product behaviour in irradiated TRISO-coated particles: Results of the HFR-EU1bis experiment and their interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrachin, M.; Dubourg, R.; Groot, S. de; Kissane, M.P.; Bakker, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The microstructure and FPs in UO 2 TRISO particles (10% FIMA, 1573 K) were studied. → Very large porosities (>10 μm) were observed in the high temperature particles. → Significant Xe and Cs releases from the kernel were observed. → Mo and Ru are mainly present in the metallic precipitates in the kernel. - Abstract: It is important to understand fission-product (FP) and kernel micro-structure evolution in TRISO-coated fuel particles. FP behaviour, while central to severe-accident evaluation, impacts: evolution of the kernel oxygen potential governing in turn carbon oxidation (amoeba effect and pressurization); particle pressurization through fission-gas release from the kernel; and coating mechanical resistance via reaction with some FPs (Pd, Cs, Sr). The HFR-Eu1bis experiment irradiated five HTR fuel pebbles containing TRISO-coated UO 2 particles and went beyond current HTR specifications (e.g., central temperature of 1523 K). This study presents ceramographic and EPMA examinations of irradiated urania kernels and coatings. Significant evolutions of the kernel (grain structure, porosity, metallic-inclusion size, intergranular bubbles) as a function of temperature are shown. Results concerning FP migration are presented, e.g., significant xenon, caesium and palladium release from the kernel, molybdenum and ruthenium mainly present in metallic precipitates. The observed FP and micro-structural evolutions are interpreted and explanations proposed. The effect of high flux rate and high temperature on fission-gas behaviour, grain-size evolution and kernel swelling is discussed. Furthermore, Cs, Mo and Zr behaviour is interpreted in connection with oxygen-potential. This paper shows that combining state-of-the-art post-irradiation examination and state-of-the-art modelling fundamentally improves understanding of HTR fuel behaviour.

  2. Frictional properties of self-adaptive chromium doped tungsten–sulfur–carbon coatings at nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zekonyte, J., E-mail: j.zekonyte@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC – Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, P-3030 788 Coimbra (Portugal); Polcar, T. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Department of Control Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are excellent dry lubricants forming thin (∼10 nm) tribolayer that simultaneously protects the coating from environmental attack and provides low friction. In this paper, we focus on nanoscale frictional properties of chromium doped tungsten–sulfur–carbon (WSC–Cr) coatings with various Cr content. Friction force microscopy was used to investigate friction force as a function of load. A non-linear contact area dependence on the normal force was observed. The calculated interfacial shear strength was relatively low in the region of 70–99 MPa. Friction coefficient decreased with increased applied load independently of chromium content in the coatings.

  3. Ultrathin Hydrophobic Coatings Obtained on Polyethylene Terephthalate Materials in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide with Co-Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumeeva, T. Yu.; Prorokova, N. P.

    2018-02-01

    The surface properties of ultradisperse polytetrafluoroethylene coatings on polyethylene terephthalate materials modified in a supercritical carbon dioxide medium with co-solvent additions (aliphatic alcohols) were analyzed. An atomic force microscopy study revealed the peculiarities of the morphology of the hydrophobic coatings formed in the presence of co-solvents. The contribution of the co-solvents to the formation of the surface layer with a low surface energy was evaluated from the surface energy components of the modified polyester material. The stability of the coatings against dry friction was analyzed.

  4. Hierarchical Mn₂O₃ Microspheres In-Situ Coated with Carbon for Supercapacitors with Highly Enhanced Performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Feilong; Lu, Shuang; Peng, Lifang; Zhou, Jing; Kong, Jinming; Jia, Dianzeng; Li, Feng

    2017-11-23

    Porous Mn₂O₃ microspheres have been synthesized and in-situ coated with amorphous carbon to form hierarchical C@Mn₂O₃ microspheres by first producing MnCO₃ microspheres in solvothermal reactions, and then annealing at 500 °C. The self-assembly growth of MnCO₃ microspheres can generate hollow structures inside each of the particles, which can act as micro-reservoirs to store biomass-glycerol for generating amorphous carbon onto the surfaces of Mn₂O₃ nanorods consisting of microspheres. The C@Mn₂O₃ microspheres, prepared at 500 °C, exhibit highly enhanced pseudocapacitive performances when compared to the particles after annealed at 400 °C and 600 °C. Specifically, the C@Mn₂O₃ microspheres prepared at 500 °C show high specific capacitances of 383.87 F g -1 at current density of 0.5 A g -1 , and excellent cycling stability of 90.47% of its initial value after cycling for 5000 times. The asymmetric supercapacitors assembled with C@Mn₂O₃ microspheres after annealed at 500 °C and activated carbon (AC) show an energy density of up to 77.8 Wh kg -1 at power density of 500.00 W kg -1 , and a maximum power density of 20.14 kW kg -1 at energy density of 46.8 Wh kg -1 . We can attribute the enhanced electrochemical performances of the materials to their three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structure in-situ coated with carbon.

  5. Hierarchical Mn2O3 Microspheres In-Situ Coated with Carbon for Supercapacitors with Highly Enhanced Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Feilong; Lu, Shuang; Peng, Lifang; Zhou, Jing; Kong, Jinming; Jia, Dianzeng; Li, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Porous Mn2O3 microspheres have been synthesized and in-situ coated with amorphous carbon to form hierarchical C@Mn2O3 microspheres by first producing MnCO3 microspheres in solvothermal reactions, and then annealing at 500 °C. The self-assembly growth of MnCO3 microspheres can generate hollow structures inside each of the particles, which can act as micro-reservoirs to store biomass-glycerol for generating amorphous carbon onto the surfaces of Mn2O3 nanorods consisting of microspheres. The C@Mn2O3 microspheres, prepared at 500 °C, exhibit highly enhanced pseudocapacitive performances when compared to the particles after annealed at 400 °C and 600 °C. Specifically, the C@Mn2O3 microspheres prepared at 500 °C show high specific capacitances of 383.87 F g−1 at current density of 0.5 A g−1, and excellent cycling stability of 90.47% of its initial value after cycling for 5000 times. The asymmetric supercapacitors assembled with C@Mn2O3 microspheres after annealed at 500 °C and activated carbon (AC) show an energy density of up to 77.8 Wh kg−1 at power density of 500.00 W kg−1, and a maximum power density of 20.14 kW kg−1 at energy density of 46.8 Wh kg−1. We can attribute the enhanced electrochemical performances of the materials to their three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structure in-situ coated with carbon. PMID:29168756

  6. Hierarchical Mn2O3 Microspheres In-Situ Coated with Carbon for Supercapacitors with Highly Enhanced Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feilong Gong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Porous Mn2O3 microspheres have been synthesized and in-situ coated with amorphous carbon to form hierarchical C@Mn2O3 microspheres by first producing MnCO3 microspheres in solvothermal reactions, and then annealing at 500 °C. The self-assembly growth of MnCO3 microspheres can generate hollow structures inside each of the particles, which can act as micro-reservoirs to store biomass-glycerol for generating amorphous carbon onto the surfaces of Mn2O3 nanorods consisting of microspheres. The C@Mn2O3 microspheres, prepared at 500 °C, exhibit highly enhanced pseudocapacitive performances when compared to the particles after annealed at 400 °C and 600 °C. Specifically, the C@Mn2O3 microspheres prepared at 500 °C show high specific capacitances of 383.87 F g−1 at current density of 0.5 A g−1, and excellent cycling stability of 90.47% of its initial value after cycling for 5000 times. The asymmetric supercapacitors assembled with C@Mn2O3 microspheres after annealed at 500 °C and activated carbon (AC show an energy density of up to 77.8 Wh kg−1 at power density of 500.00 W kg−1, and a maximum power density of 20.14 kW kg−1 at energy density of 46.8 Wh kg−1. We can attribute the enhanced electrochemical performances of the materials to their three-dimensional (3D hierarchical structure in-situ coated with carbon.

  7. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.X., E-mail: cxwang@mail.dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Lv, J.C. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Ren, Y. [School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019 (China); Zhi, T.; Chen, J.Y.; Zhou, Q.Q. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Lu, Z.Q.; Gao, D.W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Jin, L.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PET was finished by plasma treatment and SWCNT coating to improve antistatic property. • Plasma modification had a positive effect on SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. • O{sub 2} plasma was more effective in SWCNT coating than Ar plasma in the shorter time. • Antistatic enhanced and then declined with enhancing treatment time and output power. • Antistatic increased with increasing concentration, curing time, curing temperature. - Abstract: This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O{sub 2} plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N{sub 2} or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the

  8. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.X.; Lv, J.C.; Ren, Y.; Zhi, T.; Chen, J.Y.; Zhou, Q.Q.; Lu, Z.Q.; Gao, D.W.; Jin, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PET was finished by plasma treatment and SWCNT coating to improve antistatic property. • Plasma modification had a positive effect on SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. • O 2 plasma was more effective in SWCNT coating than Ar plasma in the shorter time. • Antistatic enhanced and then declined with enhancing treatment time and output power. • Antistatic increased with increasing concentration, curing time, curing temperature. - Abstract: This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O 2 plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N 2 or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the plasma treated

  9. Room temperature diamond-like carbon coatings produced by low energy ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, A., E-mail: a.markwitz@gns.cri.nz [Department for Ion Beam Technologies, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, B.; Leveneur, J. [Department for Ion Beam Technologies, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2014-07-15

    Nanometre-smooth diamond-like carbon coatings (DLC) were produced at room temperature with ion implantation using 6 kV C{sub 3}H{sub y}{sup +} ion beams. Ion beam analysis measurements showed that the coatings contain no heavy Z impurities at the level of 100 ppm, have a homogeneous stoichiometry in depth and a hydrogen concentration of typically 25 at.%. High resolution TEM analysis showed high quality and atomically flat amorphous coatings on wafer silicon. Combined TEM and RBS analysis gave a coating density of 3.25 g cm{sup −3}. Raman spectroscopy was performed to probe for sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} bonds in the coatings. The results indicate that low energy ion implantation with 6 kV produces hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings with a sp{sup 3} content of about 20%. Results highlight the opportunity of developing room temperature DLC coatings with ion beam technology for industrial applications.

  10. Friction and wear performance of bearing ball sliding against diamond-like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenjiang; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Kar, Satyananda; Li, Dangjuan; Su, Junhong

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the tribological properties of bearing steel ball (Japan standard, SUJ2) sliding against tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) coatings and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings. The reciprocating sliding testes are performed with ball-on-plate friction tester in ambient air condition. Analysis of friction coefficient, wear volume and microstructure in wear scar are carried out using optical microscopy, atom force morphology (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the SUJ2 on ta-C coating has low friction coefficient (around 0.15) but high wear loss. In contrast, the low wear loss of SUJ2 on a-C:H coating with high (around 0.4) and unsteady friction coefficient. Some Fe2O3, FeO and graphitization have been found on the wear scar of SUJ2 sliding against ta-C coating. Nearly no oxide materials exist on the wear scar of SUJ2 against a-C:H coating. The mechanism and hypothesis of the wear behavior have been investigated according to the measurement results. This study will contribute to proper selection and understand the tribological performance of bearing steels against DLC coatings.

  11. Characterization of calcium carbonate sorbent particle in furnace environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Soo [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae Hee [Environment Sensor System Research Center, KIST 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Keel, Sang In; Yun, Jin Han; Min, Tai Jin [Environmental Systems Research Division, KIMM 104 Sinseongno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Soo, E-mail: sskim@kaist.ac.kr [Aerosol and Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion system is a promising technology to control CO{sub 2} and NO{sub X} emissions. Furthermore, sulfation reaction mechanism under CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheric condition in a furnace may lead to in-furnace desulfurization. In the present study, we evaluated characteristics of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) sorbent particles under different atmospheric conditions. To examine the physical/chemical characteristics of CaCO{sub 3}, which is used as a sorbent particle for in-furnace desulfurization in the oxy-fuel combustion system, they were injected into high temperature drop tube furnace (DTF). Experiments were conducted at varying temperatures, residence times, and atmospheric conditions in a reactor. To evaluate the aerosolizing characteristics of the CaCO{sub 3} sorbent particle, changes in the size distribution and total particle concentration between the DTF inlet and outlet were measured. Structural changes (e.g., porosity, grain size, and morphology) of the calcined sorbent particles were estimated by BET/BJH, XRD, and SEM analyses. It was shown that sorbent particles rapidly calcined and sintered in the air atmosphere, whereas calcination was delayed in the CO{sub 2} atmosphere due to the higher CO{sub 2} partial pressure. Instead, the sintering effect was dominant in the CO{sub 2} atmosphere early in the reaction. Based on the SEM images, it was shown that the reactions of sorbent particles could be explained as a grain-subgrain structure model in both the air and CO{sub 2} atmospheres.

  12. Influence of hydroxyapatite coating thickness and powder particle size on corrosion performance of MA8M magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonmez, S. [Hakkari University, Dept. of Biomedical Eng., 30000 Hakkari (Turkey); Aksakal, B., E-mail: baksakal@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Chemical Metallurgy Faculty, Dept. of Metall and Mater Eng., Istanbul (Turkey); Dikici, B. [Yuzuncu Yil University, Dept. of Mechanical Eng., 65080 Van (Turkey)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is the primary concern in biomedical applications. Micron and nano-scale hydroxyapatite (HA) was coated successfully on MA8M magnesium alloy substrates by using a sol–gel deposition. In this study, the effects of coating thicknesses and HA powder particle sizes on the adhesion strength and corrosion behavior were investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in a Ringer solution. The coatings before and after corrosion tests were characterized by adhesion tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The micro-scale-HA coated Mg substrates were more corrosion resistant than the nano-scale-HA coatings. The anodic activity of the micro-scale-HA coatings increased with increased coating thickness and the corrosion resistance of Mg substrates decreased. Corrosion susceptibilities of the nano-scale-HA coated samples were affected inversely. The coated film provided good barrier characteristics and achieved good corrosion protection for Mg substrates when compared to substrates without coatings. For micro-scale-HA coatings, anodic and cathodic activities were more intense for thicker films. When HA coatings are compared to nano-scale HA coatings, the micro-scale-HA coatings produced better current density values. Overall, as shown in Fig. 1, the best corrosion behavior of the Mg alloys was achieved using micro-scale HA