WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbonate minerals

  1. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  2. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonate...

  3. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  4. Accelerating Mineral Carbonation Using Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ian M; Harrison, Anna L; Dipple, Gregory M

    2016-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have gained considerable attention for their potential use in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies because they are able to catalyze rapidly the interconversion of aqueous CO2 and bicarbonate. However, there are challenges for widespread implementation including the need to develop mineralization process routes for permanent carbon storage. Mineral carbonation of highly reactive feedstocks may be limited by the supply rate of CO2. This rate limitation can be directly addressed by incorporating enzyme-catalyzed CO2 hydration. This study examined the effects of bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and CO2-rich gas streams on the carbonation rate of brucite [Mg(OH)2], a highly reactive mineral. Alkaline brucite slurries were amended with BCA and supplied with 10% CO2 gas while aqueous chemistry and solids were monitored throughout the experiments (hours to days). In comparison to controls, brucite carbonation using BCA was accelerated by up to 240%. Nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] precipitation limited the accumulation of hydrated CO2 species, apparently preventing BCA from catalyzing the dehydration reaction. Geochemical models reproduce observed reaction progress in all experiments, revealing a linear correlation between CO2 uptake and carbonation rate. Data demonstrates that carbonation in BCA-amended reactors remained limited by CO2 supply, implying further acceleration is possible. PMID:26829491

  5. Ultrasound-Intensified Mineral Carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; François, Davy; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Several aspects of ultrasound-assisted mineral carbonation were investigated in this work. The objectives were to intensify the CO2 sequestration process to improve reaction kinetics and maximal conversion. Stainless steel slags, derived from the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting / Ladle Metallurgy (CC/LM) refining steps, were used for assessing the technical feasibility of this concept, as they are potential carbon sinks and can benefit from reduction in alkalinity (p...

  6. mineral sequestration by wollastonite carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenjin; Fu, Liangjie; Ouyang, Jing; Yang, Huaming

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a new approach to CO2 mineral sequestration using wollastonite carbonation assisted by sulfuric acid and ammonia. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance. The change in Gibbs free energy from -223 kJ/mol for the leaching reaction of wollastonite to -101 kJ/mol for the carbonation reaction indicated that these two reactions can proceed spontaneously. The leached and carbonated wollastonite showed fibrous bassanite and granular calcium carbonate, respectively, while the crystal structure of pristine wollastonite was destroyed and the majority of the Ca2+ in pristine wollastonite leached. The chemical changes in the phases were monitored during the whole process. A high carbonation rate of 91.1 % could be obtained under the action of sulfuric acid and ammonia at 30 °C at normal atmospheric pressure, indicating its potential use for CO2 sequestration.

  7. Ultrasound-intensified mineral carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of ultrasound-assisted mineral carbonation were investigated in this work. The objectives were to intensify the CO2 sequestration process to improve reaction kinetics and maximal conversion. Stainless steel slags, derived from the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting/Ladle Metallurgy (CC/LM) refining steps, were used for assessing the technical feasibility of this concept, as they are potential carbon sinks and can benefit from reduction in alkalinity (pH) by mineral carbonation. Ultrasound was applied by use of an ultrasound horn into the reaction slurry, where mineral carbonation reaction took place at 50 °C for up to 4 h; comparison was made to solely mechanically mixed process. It was found that sonication increases the reaction rate after the initial stage, and permits achieving higher carbonate conversion and lower pH. AOD slag conversion increased from 30% to 49%, and pH decreased from 10.6 to 10.1; CC slag conversion increased from 61% to 73% and pH decreased from 10.8 to 9.9. The enhancement effect of ultrasound was attributed to the removal of passivating layers (precipitated calcium carbonate and depleted silica) that surround the unreacted particle core and inhibit mass transfer. Significant particle size reduction was observed for sonicated powders, compared to particle size growth in the case of stirring-only; D[4,3] values increased without sonication by 74% and 50%, and decreased with sonication by 64% and 52%, respectively for AOD and CC slags. Considerations on scale-up of this technology, particularly with regards to energy efficiency, are also discussed. Highlights: ► Ultrasound increased CaO, AOD and CC slags mineral carbonation rates and conversions. ► Enhancement effect linked to removal of mass transfer inhibiting passivating layers. ►Carbonated particle size grew with stirring-only, and decreased with sonication. ► Lower pH of slags with greater carbonation extent can reduce heavy metal leaching

  8. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O' Connor, W

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  9. Microbially mediated carbon mineralization: Geoengineering a carbon-neutral mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; McCutcheon, J.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic mine tailings are a potentially valuable feedstock for carbon mineralization, affording the mining industry an opportunity to completely offset their carbon emissions. Passive carbon mineralization has previously been documented at the abandoned Clinton Creek asbestos mine, and the active Diavik diamond mine and Mount Keith nickel mine, yet the majority of tailings remain unreacted. Examples of microbe-carbonate interactions at each mine suggest that biological pathways could be harnessed to promote carbon mineralization. In suitable environmental conditions, microbes can mediate geochemical processes to accelerate mineral dissolution, increase the supply of carbon dioxide (CO2), and induce carbonate precipitation, all of which may accelerate carbon mineralization. Tailings mineralogy and the availability of a CO2 point source are key considerations in designing tailings storage facilities (TSF) for optimizing carbon mineralization. We evaluate the efficacy of acceleration strategies including bioleaching, biologically induced carbonate precipitation, and heterotrophic oxidation of waste organics, as well as abiotic strategies including enhancing passive carbonation through modifying tailings management practices and use of CO2 point sources (Fig. 1). With the aim of developing carbon-neutral mines, implementation of carbon mineralization strategies into TSF design will be driven by economic incentives and public pressure for environmental sustainability in the mining industry. Figure 1. Schematic illustrating geoengineered scenarios for carbon mineralization of ultramafic mine tailings. Scenarios A and B are based on non-point and point sources of CO2, respectively.

  10. Cyanobacteria as Biocatalysts for Carbonate Mineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Christer Jansson; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M.; Kamennaya, Nina A.; Trent Northen

    2012-01-01

    Microbial carbonate mineralization is widespread in nature and among microorganisms, and of vast ecological and geological importance. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that trigger and control processes such as calcification, i.e., mineralization of CO2 to calcium carbonate (CaCO3), is limited and literature on cyanobacterial calcification is oftentimes bewildering and occasionally controversial. In cyanobacteria, calcification may be intimately associated with the carbon dioxide-...

  11. Cyanobacteria as Biocatalysts for Carbonate Mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Jansson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate mineralization is widespread in nature and among microorganisms, and of vast ecological and geological importance. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that trigger and control processes such as calcification, i.e., mineralization of CO2 to calcium carbonate (CaCO3, is limited and literature on cyanobacterial calcification is oftentimes bewildering and occasionally controversial. In cyanobacteria, calcification may be intimately associated with the carbon dioxide-(CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM, a biochemical system that allows the cells to raise the concentration of CO2 at the site of the carboxylating enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco up to 1000-fold over that in the surrounding medium. A comprehensive understanding of biologically induced carbonate mineralization is important for our ability to assess its role in past, present, and future carbon cycling, interpret paleontological data, and for evaluating the process as a means for biological carbon capture and storage (CCS. In this review we summarize and discuss the metabolic, physiological and structural features of cyanobacteria that may be involved in the reactions leading to mineral formation and precipitation, present a conceptual model of cyanobacterial calcification, and, finally, suggest practical applications for cyanobacterial carbonate mineralization.

  12. Impacts of Nickel Nanoparticles on Mineral Carbonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Bodor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents experimental results regarding the use of pure nickel nanoparticles (NiNP as a mineral carbonation additive. The aim was to confirm if the catalytic effect of NiNP, which has been reported to increase the dissolution of CO2 and the dissociation of carbonic acid in water, is capable of accelerating mineral carbonation processes. The impacts of NiNP on the CO2 mineralization by four alkaline materials (pure CaO and MgO, and AOD and CC steelmaking slags, on the product mineralogy, on the particle size distribution, and on the morphology of resulting materials were investigated. NiNP-containing solution was found to reach more acidic pH values upon CO2 bubbling, confirming a higher quantity of bicarbonate ions. This effect resulted in acceleration of mineral carbonation in the first fifteen minutes of reaction time when NiNP was present. After this initial stage, however, no benefit of NiNP addition was seen, resulting in very similar carbonation extents after one hour of reaction time. It was also found that increasing solids content decreased the benefit of NiNP, even in the early stages. These results suggest that NiNP has little contribution to mineral carbonation processes when the dissolution of alkaline earth metals is rate limiting.

  13. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  14. Estimation of palaeohydrochemical conditions using carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamiya, H.; Mizuno, T.; Iwatsuki, T.; Yuguchi, T.; Murakami, H.; Saito-Kokubu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term evolution of geochemical environment in deep underground is indispensable research subject for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, because the evolution of geochemical environment would impact migration behavior of radionuclides in deep underground. Many researchers have made efforts previously to elucidate the geochemical environment within the groundwater residence time based on the analysis of the actual groundwater. However, it is impossible to estimate the geochemical environment for the longer time scale than the groundwater residence time in this method. In this case, analysis of the chemical properties of secondary minerals are one of useful method to estimate the paleohydrochemical conditions (temperature, salinity, pH and redox potential). In particular, carbonate minerals would be available to infer the long-term evolution of hydrochemical for the following reasons; -it easily reaches chemical equilibrium with groundwater and precipitates in open space of water flowing path -it reflects the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater at the time of crystallization We reviewed the previous studies on carbonate minerals and geochemical conditions in deep underground and estimated the hydrochemical characteristics of past groundwater by using carbonate minerals. As a result, it was found that temperature and salinity of the groundwater during crystallization of carbonate minerals were evaluated quantitatively. On the other hand, pH and redox potential can only be understood qualitatively. However, it is suggested that the content of heavy metal elements such as manganese, iron and uranium, and rare earth elements in the carbonate minerals are useful indicators for estimating redox potential. This study was carried out under a contract with METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) as part of its R&D supporting program for developing geological disposal technology.

  15. Mineral Carbonation Employing Ultramafic Mine Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, G.; McCutcheon, J.; Power, I. M.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate minerals are an important, stable carbon sink being investigated as a strategy to sequester CO2 produced by human activity. A natural playa (Atlin, BC, CAN) that has demonstrated the ability to microbially-accelerate hydromagnesite formation was used as an experimental model. Growth of microbial mats from Atlin, in a 10 m long flow-through bioreactor catalysed hydromagnesite precipitation under 'natural' conditions. To enhance mineral carbonation, chrysotile from the Clinton Creek Asbestos Mine (YT, CAN) was used as a target substrate for sulphuric acid leaching, releasing as much as 94% of the magnesium into solution via chemical weathering. This magnesium-rich 'feedstock' was used to examine the ability of the microbialites to enhance carbonate mineral precipitation using only atmospheric CO2 as the carbon source. The phototrophic consortium catalysed the precipitation of platy hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O] accompanied by magnesite [MgCO3], aragonite [CaCO3], and minor dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O]. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy indicated that cell exteriors and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) served as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation. In many cases, entire cyanobacteria filaments were entombed in magnesium carbonate coatings, which appeared to contain a framework of EPS. Cell coatings were composed of small crystals, which intuitively resulted from rapid crystal nucleation. Excess nutrient addition generated eutrophic conditions in the bioreactor, resulting in the growth of a pellicle that sealed the bioreactor contents from the atmosphere. The resulting anaerobic conditions induced fermentation and subsequent acid generation, which in turn caused a drop in pH to circumneutral values and a reduction in carbonate precipitation. Monitoring of the water chemistry conditions indicated that a high pH (> 9.4), and relatively high concentrations of magnesium (> 3000 ppm), compared with the natural

  16. Novel biological approaches to carbon mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ian; Kenward, Paul; Harrison, Anna; Dipple, Gregory; Raudsepp, Mati; Wilson, Siobhan; Southam, Gordon

    2015-04-01

    Innovative approaches for accelerating and manipulating fundamental geochemical processes are necessary to develop carbon mineralization as a viable strategy for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Mg-carbonate formation is of interest for both ex situ and in situ CO2 sequestration strategies1. Accordingly, we have investigated approaches to accelerate these water-rock reactions that produce Mg-carbonate minerals using biological approaches. For instance, CO2-limited conditions are encountered in many systems relevant to CO2 sequestration and represent a severe limitation on carbon mineralization. In carbonation experiments, the supply of CO2 was increased with the use of carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of aqueous CO2. The presence of carbonic anhydrase had a dramatic impact on carbonation rates of brucite [Mg(OH)2]2, a mineral of interest for carbon sequestration3. In a CO2-rich aqueous environment, cyanobacteria were able to induce hydrated Mg-carbonate precipitation in microcosm experiments through the alkalinization of their microenvironment and concentration of cations on their cell membranes, which also provide regularly spaced, chemically identical sites for mineral nucleation4. In both lines of investigation, the resulting precipitates were metastable hydrated Mg-carbonate minerals rather then magnesite [MgCO3], the most stable Mg-carbonate and therefore the preferred product forsequestering CO2. Consequently, we have investigated approaches to improve magnesite precipitation rate in these low temperature environments. Inopportunely, rates of magnesite precipitation are severely limited at temperatures below 60 ° C due to the strong hydration of Mg2+ ions in solution5. Yet, carboxyl functional groups (R-COOH) are able to cause desolvation of Mg2+ ions6,7. In microcosm experiments using polystyrene microspheres with a high density of carboxyl groups, we were able to precipitate magnesite at room temperature from slightly

  17. Biomimetic mineralization: encapsulation in calcium carbonate shells

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Susana Costa de

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate biomineralization is a self-assembly process that has been studied to be applied in the biomedical field to encapsulate biomolecules. Advantages of engineering mineral capsules include improved drug loading efficiencies and protection against external environment. However, common production methods result in heterogeneous capsules and subject biomolecules to heat and vibration which cause irreversible damage. To overcome these issues, a microfluidic device was designed, m...

  18. Atom probe tomography (APT) of carbonate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Laiginhas, Fernando; Reinhard, David A; Prosa, Ty J; Martens, Rich L

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) combines the highest spatial resolution with chemical data at atomic scale for the analysis of materials. For geological specimens, the process of field evaporation and molecular ion formation and interpretation is not yet entirely understood. The objective of this study is to determine the best conditions for the preparation and analysis by APT of carbonate minerals, of great importance in the interpretation of geological processes, focusing on the bulk chemical composition. Results show that the complexity of the mass spectrum is different for calcite and dolomite and relates to dissimilarities in crystalochemical parameters. In addition, APT bulk chemistry of calcite closely matches the expected stoichiometry but fails to provide accurate atomic percentages for elements in dolomite under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. For both calcite and dolomite, APT underestimates the amount of oxygen based on their chemical formula, whereas it is able to detect small percentages of elemental substitutions in crystal lattices. Overall, our results demonstrate that APT of carbonate minerals is possible, but further optimization of the experimental parameters are required to improve the use of atom probe tomography for the correct interpretation of mineral geochemistry. PMID:26519815

  19. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation. Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prevent CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere rising to unacceptable levels, carbon dioxide can be separated from the flue gas of, for example, a power plant and subsequently sequestrated. Various technologies for carbon dioxide sequestration have been proposed, such as storage in depleted gas fields, oceans and aquifers. An alternative sequestration route is the so-called 'mineral CO2 sequestration' route in which CO2 is chemically stored in solid carbonates by the carbonation of minerals. As mineral feedstock, rocks that are rich in alkaline earth silicates can be used. Examples are olivine (MgSiO4) and wollastonite (CaSiO3). Mineral CO2 sequestration has some fundamental advantages compared to other sequestration routes. The formed products are thermodynamically stable and therefore the sequestration of CO2 is permanent and safe. Furthermore, the sequestration capacity is large because large suitable feedstock deposits are available worldwide. Finally, the carbonation reactions are exothermic and occur spontaneously in nature. The reaction rates of the process at atmospheric conditions, however, are much too slow for an industrial process. Therefore, research focuses on increasing the reaction rate in order to obtain an industrial viable process. Optimisation of the process conditions is constrained by the thermodynamics of the process. Increasing the temperature and CO2 pressure accelerates the reaction rate, but gaseous CO2 is favoured over mineral carbonates at high temperatures. Using water or another solvent to extract the reactive component from the matrix accelerates the process. Pre-treatment of the mineral by size reduction and thermal or mechanical activation and optimisation of the solution chemistry result in major improvements of the reaction rate. During recent years, laboratory-scale experiments have shown major improvements of the conversion rates by developing various process routes and optimising process conditions. The most

  20. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  1. Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

  2. A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2006-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly

  3. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  4. Mineral protection of soil carbon counteracted by root exudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Bougoure, Jeremy J.; Nico, Peter S.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K.; Kleber, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Multiple lines of existing evidence suggest that climate change enhances root exudation of organic compounds into soils. Recent experimental studies show that increased exudate inputs may cause a net loss of soil carbon. This stimulation of microbial carbon mineralization (`priming’) is commonly rationalized by the assumption that exudates provide a readily bioavailable supply of energy for the decomposition of native soil carbon (co-metabolism). Here we show that an alternate mechanism can cause carbon loss of equal or greater magnitude. We find that a common root exudate, oxalic acid, promotes carbon loss by liberating organic compounds from protective associations with minerals. By enhancing microbial access to previously mineral-protected compounds, this indirect mechanism accelerated carbon loss more than simply increasing the supply of energetically more favourable substrates. Our results provide insights into the coupled biotic-abiotic mechanisms underlying the `priming’ phenomenon and challenge the assumption that mineral-associated carbon is protected from microbial cycling over millennial timescales.

  5. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus

  6. Evaluating the seismic risk of mineral carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-04-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration, in which carbon is captured and stored underground, has been proposed as one way to mitigate the climatic effects of carbon dioxide emissions. One method of geologic carbon sequestration is to inject carbon dioxide in aqueous solution into rocks. However, as the solution fills the pore space in the rocks, the fluid pressure on the rocks increases, potentially increasing the risk of earthquakes. Another option would be to inject carbon dioxide solutions into mafic rocks; the silicate minerals in these rocks react with the carbon dioxide, leaving solid carbonate reaction products, which decrease the amount of pore fluid.

  7. Minerals from Macedonia IV.Discrimination between some carbonate minerals by FTIR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovski, Gligor; Stefov, Viktor; Shoptrajanov, Bojan; Boev, Blazo

    2002-01-01

    The use of FTIR spectroscopy to distinguish between some geologically im­portant carbonate minerals (calcite - CaCO3), aragonite - CaCO3, siderite - FeCO3, magnesite - MgCO3, and dolomite - CaMg(CO3)2 originating from Macedonia and to detect mineral impurities in them is considered. 1t was shown that the series of the studied isomorphous calcite type minerals is an ideal test case for the evaluating the in­fluence of the corresponding cation upon the band frequencies or the carbonate ...

  8. Controls on carbon mineralization in ultramafic mine tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A. L.; Power, I. M.; Dipple, G. M.; Mayer, K. U.; Wilson, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon mineralization in ultramafic mine tailings provides the opportunity to offset a significant portion of CO2 emissions from mining operations if passive mineralization rates are accelerated. To help design acceleration strategies, it is important to determine the controls on carbon mineralization in tailings, and to capture these effects using a reactive transport model to provide better estimation of the rates that could be achieved at different mine sites. For instance, it is likely that climatic variables influence rates of passive carbon mineralization. We use the reactive transport model MIN3P [1] to investigate the degree to which temperature, rainfall, and evaporation control passive carbon mineralization rates, as constrained with field observations from a mine site. Preliminary results suggest that hot and dry climates are most suitable. In addition, experimental evidence suggests that passive carbon mineralization is largely limited by the rate of CO2 supply into pore waters [2]. Acceleration could be achieved in part by supplying CO2-rich gas streams into tailings to carbonate highly reactive low abundance (< ~15 wt.%) phases such as brucite [Mg(OH)2] [3]. Column experiments containing brucite were supplied with 10 vol.% CO2 gas streams to assess the controls on carbon mineralization when the CO2 supply is increased. The influence of heterogeneous water content along the flow path and brucite grain size on carbon mineralization efficiency was investigated. Because water acts as both a reaction medium for CO2 and brucite dissolution and as a reactant to form hydrated carbonate minerals that sequester CO2, the extent of carbon mineralization was found to mimic the water content distribution. At low water content (<15% saturation), the extent of carbonation was extremely limited by the lack of available water. Variations in water content from the pore to the field scale therefore complicate the assessment of the carbon mineralization potential of a

  9. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    ions would enhance the absorption of CO2 into the aerosol even more than the singly or doubly charged ions. Ion containing aerosols also help to catalyze reactions between water and CO2. Hydrated phosphate and silicate ions tend to attract hydrogen atoms from neighboring water molecules to reduce the charged state. When there is CO2 in the vicinity of the ion, the remainder of the water molecule which loses the hydrogen(s) reacts with CO2 to form carbonates. (PO4---) + H2O + CO2 -> (HPO3--) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (HSiO4---) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (H2SiO4--) + (CO3--) In conclusion, highly charged phosphate and silicate ions dissolved in water and aerosolized into small droplets can facilitate both the capture and the mineralization of CO2. This method would be especially effective in a CO2 rich environment such as the exhaust gas of a combustion process. [1] H. Gokturk, "Geoengineering with Charged Droplets," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2011 [2] H. Gokturk, "Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2012

  10. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage

  11. Spectroscopic Identification of Carbonate Minerals in the Martian Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandfield, Joshua L.; Glotch, Timothy D.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2003-08-01

    Thermal infrared spectra of the martian surface indicate the presence of small concentrations (~2 to 5 weight %) of carbonates, specifically dominated by magnesite (MgCO3). The carbonates are widely distributed in the martian dust, and there is no indication of a concentrated source. The presence of small concentrations of carbonate minerals in the surface dust and in martian meteorites can sequester several bars of atmospheric carbon dioxide and may have been an important sink for a thicker carbon dioxide atmosphere in the martian past.

  12. The utilisation of fly ash in CO2 mineral carbonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaschik Jolanta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fixation of CO2 in the form of inorganic carbonates, also known as mineral carbonation, is an interesting option for the removal of carbon dioxide from various gas streams. The captured CO2 is reacted with metal-oxide bearing materials, usually naturally occurring minerals. The alkaline industrial waste, such as fly ash can also be considered as a source of calcium or magnesium. In the present study the solubility of fly ash from conventional pulverised hard coal fired boilers, with and without desulphurisation products, and fly ash from lignite fluidised bed combustion, generated by Polish power stations was analysed. The principal objective was to assess the potential of fly ash used as a reactant in the process of mineral carbonation. Experiments were done in a 1 dm3 reactor equipped with a heating jacket and a stirrer. The rate of dissolution in water and in acid solutions was measured at various temperatures (20 - 80ºC, waste-to-solvent ratios (1:100 - 1:4 and stirrer speeds (300 - 1100 min-1. Results clearly show that fluidised lignite fly ash has the highest potential for carbonation due to its high content of free CaO and fast kinetics of dissolution, and can be employed in mineral carbonation of CO2.

  13. Bioleaching of serpentine group mineral by fungus Talaromyces flavus: application for mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Lianwen, L.; Zhao, L.; Teng, H.

    2011-12-01

    Many studies of serpentine group mineral dissolution for mineral carbonation have been published in recent years. However, most of them focus mainly on either physical and chemical processes or on bacterial function, rather than fungal involvement in the bioleaching of serpentine group mineral. Due to the excessive costs of the magnesium dissolution process, finding a lower energy consumption method will be meaningful. A fungal strain Talaromyces flavus was isolated from serpentinic rock of Donghai (China). No study of its bioleaching ability is currently available. It is thus of great significance to explore the impact of T. flavus on the dissolution of serpentine group mineral. Serpentine rock-inhabiting fungi belonging to Acremonium, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Botryotinia, Cladosporium, Clavicipitaceae, Cosmospora, Fusarium, Monascus, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Talaromyces, Trichoderma were isolated. These strains were chosen on the basis of resistance to magnesium and nickel characterized in terms of minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC). Specifically, the strain Talaromyces flavus has a high tolerance to both magnesium (1 mol/L) and nickel (10 mM/L), and we examine its bioleaching ability on serpentine group mineral. Contact and separation experiments (cut-off 8 000-14 000 Da), as well as three control experiments, were set up for 30 days. At least three repeated tests were performed for each individual experiment. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the bioleaching ability of T. flavus towards serpentine group mineral is evident. 39.39 wt% of magnesium was extracted from lizardite during the bioleaching period in the contact experiment, which showed a dissolution rate at about a constant 0.126 mM/d before reaching equilibrium in 13 days. The amount of solubilized Mg from chrysotile and antigorite were respectively 37.79 wt% and 29.78 wt% in the contact experiment. These results make clear the influence of mineral structure on mineral bioleaching

  14. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M

    2009-08-14

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, K{sub d} is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log K{sub D}). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log K{sub d} values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide K{sub d} values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each

  15. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, Kd is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log KD). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log Kd values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide Kd values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each element of interest in Table

  16. Black Carbon, The Pyrogenic Clay Mineral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most soils contain significant amounts of black carbon, much of which is present as discrete particles admixed with the coarse clay fraction (0.2–2.0 µm e.s.d.) and can be physically separated from the more abundant diffuse biogenic humic materials. Recent evidence has shown that naturally occurring...

  17. Rapid carbon mineralization for permanent disposal of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Juerg M.; Stute, Martin; Snæbjörnsdottir, Sandra Ó.; Oelkers, Eric H.; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Aradottir, Edda S.; Sigfusson, Bergur; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Sigurdardottir, Holmfridur; Gunnlaugsson, Einar; Axelsson, Gudni; Alfredsson, Helgi A.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Mesfin, Kiflom; Taya, Diana Fernandez de la Reguera; Hall, Jennifer; Dideriksen, Knud; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2016-06-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) provides a solution toward decarbonization of the global economy. The success of this solution depends on the ability to safely and permanently store CO2. This study demonstrates for the first time the permanent disposal of CO2 as environmentally benign carbonate minerals in basaltic rocks. We find that over 95% of the CO2 injected into the CarbFix site in Iceland was mineralized to carbonate minerals in less than 2 years. This result contrasts with the common view that the immobilization of CO2 as carbonate minerals within geologic reservoirs takes several hundreds to thousands of years. Our results, therefore, demonstrate that the safe long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions through mineralization can be far faster than previously postulated.

  18. Rapid carbon mineralization for permanent disposal of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Juerg M; Stute, Martin; Snæbjörnsdottir, Sandra Ó; Oelkers, Eric H; Gislason, Sigurdur R; Aradottir, Edda S; Sigfusson, Bergur; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Sigurdardottir, Holmfridur; Gunnlaugsson, Einar; Axelsson, Gudni; Alfredsson, Helgi A; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Mesfin, Kiflom; Taya, Diana Fernandez de la Reguera; Hall, Jennifer; Dideriksen, Knud; Broecker, Wallace S

    2016-06-10

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) provides a solution toward decarbonization of the global economy. The success of this solution depends on the ability to safely and permanently store CO2 This study demonstrates for the first time the permanent disposal of CO2 as environmentally benign carbonate minerals in basaltic rocks. We find that over 95% of the CO2 injected into the CarbFix site in Iceland was mineralized to carbonate minerals in less than 2 years. This result contrasts with the common view that the immobilization of CO2 as carbonate minerals within geologic reservoirs takes several hundreds to thousands of years. Our results, therefore, demonstrate that the safe long-term storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions through mineralization can be far faster than previously postulated. PMID:27284192

  19. Enhancement of Mineral Carbonation of Various Ultramafic Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, J.; Duchesne, J.; Beaudoin, G.; Constantin, M.; Hébert, R.; Larachi, F.; Lemieux, J.; Molson, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Capture of atmospheric CO2 in minerals to form magnesium and/or calcium carbonates is a process for permanent sequestration of CO2. Mineral carbonation occurs naturally in some ultramafic mining waste forming cemented crusts at surface, whereas reaction within the waste piles vents CO2-depleted air at the top of the piles. The purpose of this research is to kinetically enhance the mineral carbonation of different ultramafic mine tailings by addition of neutral organic salts and pH adjustments in order to reach a compromise between solubility of magnesium ions and carbonate precipitation. Real time monitoring of CO2 uptake at atmospheric conditions was performed using the Laval eudiometers, which allows calculation of the rate of the mineral carbonation reaction. Tests were conducted by varying the concentration of CO2 in the gas phase, the tailing water content and the material porosity to determine the optimal carbonation conditions. Subsequently, carbonation tests with different pH and various concentrations of organic salts (or chelate) such as sodium EDTA, sodium oxalate and sodium citrate were evaluated. Preliminary results indicate that CO2 reacts with the total mass of the sample and not only with the layer in contact with the gas phase. The water content for optimal carbonation reaction ranged from 20% and 60% according to the type of tailing investigated. Interstitial water is necessary as solvent for dissolution of Mg ions, but saturated pores reduce diffusion of CO2. A linear relationship was obtained between the CO2 concentration in the gas mixture and the CO2 absorption rate of the mine tailings. Increase of tailings porosity by addition of inert aluminum oxide enhances the carbonation reaction probably by facilitating CO2 diffusion in increased pore space. CO2 uptake was increased by 60% over distilled water, using a saturated solution of sodium citrate (1.5 M) and NaHCO3, by 14 to 19% using a saturated solution of sodium EDTA (0.2 M) and NaHCO3 and

  20. Co-mineralization of alkaline-earth carbonates and silica

    OpenAIRE

    Kellermeier, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the manifold interactions that occur when alkaline-earth metal carbonates are crystallized in the presence of dissolved silica as an additive. The described work subdivides into two main lines of research. On the one hand, an understanding of the potential roles of silica during crystallization was sought on a fundamental level. That is, the mineral - in this case calcium carbonate - was directly precipitated from silica-containing solutions and the effect on gro...

  1. Dynamic response of porous calcium carbonate minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study of the shock-loaded response of calcium carbonate materials is presented in which both dry and water-saturated samples with porosities up to 50 percent are considered. Data are presented for the unloading response from 15.0 and 18.5 GPa, and calculations from a mixture model using a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state with volume-dependent parameters are compared to both the Hugoniot and the isentropic unloading response

  2. Direct Use of Mineral Carbonate for Autotrophy Among Euendolithic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs, and arguably the most important primary producers on the planet, fixing carbon from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the aquatic environment, and directly from atmospheric CO2 in terrestrial systems. Euendolithic cyanobacteria occupy a very specific niche, inside rocks, which can potentially preclude them from easily accessing those carbon pools, and yet, natural euendolithic communities can support food webs in habitats where they are prominent, such as in marine carbonate platforms and desert carbonate outcrops. In a recently proposed model describing the mechanism of cyanobacterial carbonate boring, we postulated that as the organism dissolves the mineral, liberated CO32- anions will be quickly converted to HCO3- and assimilated directly, making the cyanobacterium independent of external DIC pools for autotrophy. We used natural abundance and tracer stable carbon (13C) isotope analyses accompanied by nanoSIMS imaging in model laboratory systems of cultivated cyanobacteria and in natural mixed communities of marine euendoliths to study the ultimate source of carbon in their biomass. Our results clearly demonstrate that endolithic biomass of these cyanobacteria is significantly derived from mineral carbonate, as opposed to free-living or epilithic biomass, where the source is mixed or coming from the dissolved pool, this holds for model cultures as well as natural communities. In fact, we can increase the lifestyle preference of cultures for endolithic growth versus planktonic or benthic growth, by simply imposing an external DIC limitation in the presence of a carbonate substrate. Our results predict that benthic communities (extant or fossil) that rely heavily on primary production by euendolithic primary producers may show 13C signatures that mimic those of the surrounding carbonate substrate rather than from those of the local seawater.

  3. THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF CARBONATED MINERAL WATERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogaru Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbonated water baths represent a method used for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases in some spa resorts in Romania. Carbonated mineral waters are the result of the filtration of depth waters through volcanic soils that contain carbon dioxide. The most important effect is the direct effect of carbon dioxide, which is absorbed through the skin, with an absorption coefficient of 30-35 ml/min/sqm body surface area. An excitation of vascular receptors and a dilation of dermal papillae, responsible for skin erythema, occur. The effects of the carbonated water bath on the cardiovascular system are the following: decrease of peripheral resistance by the direct action of carbon dioxide on arterioles and arteriovenous anastomoses; increase of both systolic and diastolic cardiac output, not by central mechanism as in the case of hot baths, but initially, by passive peripheral vasodilation, without increased venous return; subsequently, by accumulation in the cutaneous venous system, venous return towards the right heart will be increased, with a higher diastolic filling and a higher stroke volume. Carbonated water baths increase arteriolar blood flow in the skin, the vasodilator effect being directly proportional to the carbon dioxide concentration in the mineral bath. The effect of external carbonated water treatment is based on mechanical and thermal action, as well as on the chemical properties of carbon dioxide, its influence being either local or postabsorptive. Carbonated water baths are a therapeutic method that is also used in the treatment facilities of the Baile Tusnad spa resort, under the supervision of qualified medical experts, in a pleasant environment close to nature.

  4. On Serpentinization and Mineral Carbonation of Serpentinite (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, F.; Garrido, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite is chiefly controlled by temperature, protolith composition, and solute activities of intergranular fluids. Despite the enormous carbonation potential of serpentinite, to date the mutual relations of these parameters have received relatively little attention. We present new activity-activity diagrams and geochemical reaction path models to improve our understanding of heterogeneous phase equilibria during mineral carbonation of serpentinite and dunite in a wide range of temperatures (100 to 400 °C). Our calculations highlight the pivotal roles that the activities of aqueous carbon dioxide (aCO2,aq) and silica (aSiO2,aq) play. At low temperatures there is ample thermodynamic driving force for mineral carbonation as the gradients in aCO2,aq and aSiO2,aq set by quartz-magnesite (listvenite) and serpentine-brucite (serpentinite) phase equilibria are extremely steep. With increasing temperature the gradients in aSiO2,aq and aCO2,aq diminish because the stability fields of brucite, serpentine and talc expand towards higher aCO2,aq. Accordingly, the stability field of magnesite contracts. Moreover, the solubility of quartz increases with increasing temperature, which shifts the quartz-magnesite equilibrium to higher aCO2,aq. The combined of effects of both, shrinking geochemical potential gradients and increasing quartz solubility hamper mineral carbonation of serpentinite above 300 °C. Field observations of carbonated serpentinite reveal a rather simple sequence of arrested carbonation reactions, which is typically fossilized as spatially distinct metasomatic zones. A zone of serpentinized peridotite is followed by a zone of serpentine + carbonate, then talc + carbonate and finally quartz + carbonate. Our modeling results are consistent with these observations and suggest that quartz-carbonate alteration is limited to rather low or moderate alteration temperatures while talc-carbonate alteration can take place at much higher

  5. Cost evaluation of CO2 sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cost evaluation of CO2 sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation has been made using either wollastonite (CaSiO3) or steel slag as feedstock. First, the process was simulated to determine the properties of the streams as well as the power and heat consumption of the process equipment. Second, a basic design was made for the major process equipment, and total investment costs were estimated with the help of the publicly available literature and a factorial cost estimation method. Finally, the sequestration costs were determined on the basis of the depreciation of investments and variable and fixed operating costs. Estimated costs are 102 and 77 euro/ton CO2 net avoided for wollastonite and steel slag, respectively. For wollastonite, the major costs are associated with the feedstock and the electricity consumption for grinding and compression (54 and 26 euro/ton CO2 avoided, respectively). A sensitivity analysis showed that additional influential parameters in the sequestration costs include the liquid-to-solid ratio in the carbonation reactor and the possible value of the carbonated product. The sequestration costs for steel slag are significantly lower due to the absence of costs for the feedstock. Although various options for potential cost reduction have been identified, CO2 sequestration by current aqueous carbonation processes seems expensive relative to other CO2 storage technologies. The permanent and inherently safe sequestration of CO2 by mineral carbonation may justify higher costs, but further cost reductions are required, particularly in view of (current) prices of CO2 emission rights. Niche applications of mineral carbonation with a solid residue such as steel slag as feedstock and/or a useful carbonated product hold the best prospects for an economically feasible CO2 sequestration process

  6. Temperature sensitivity of organic carbon mineralization in contrasting lake sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Gudasz, Cristian; Sobek, Sebastian; Bastviken, David; Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature alone explains a great amount of variation in sediment organic carbon (OC) mineralization. Studies on decomposition of soil OC suggest that (1) temperature sensitivity differs between the fast and slowly decomposition OC and (2) over time, decreasing soil respiration is coupled with increase in temperature sensitivity. In lakes, autochthonous and allochthonous OC sources are generally regarded as fast and slowly decomposing OC, respectively. Lake sediments with different contribut...

  7. Does soil fauna increase carbon mineralization or carbon sequestration in soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frouz, Jan

    České Budějovice : Institute of Soil Biology BC AS CR, 2009. s. 22. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /10./. 21.04.2009-24.04.2009, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : soil fauna * carbon mineralization * carbon sequestration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  8. A review of mineral carbonation technologies to sequester CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, A; Uibu, M; Caramanna, G; Kuusik, R; Maroto-Valer, M M

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration includes a portfolio of technologies that can potentially sequester billions of tonnes of CO2 per year. Mineral carbonation (MC) is emerging as a potential CCS technology solution to sequester CO2 from smaller/medium emitters, where geological sequestration is not a viable option. In MC processes, CO2 is chemically reacted with calcium- and/or magnesium-containing materials to form stable carbonates. This work investigates the current advancement in the proposed MC technologies and the role they can play in decreasing the overall cost of this CO2 sequestration route. In situ mineral carbonation is a very promising option in terms of resources available and enhanced security, but the technology is still in its infancy and transport and storage costs are still higher than geological storage in sedimentary basins ($17 instead of $8 per tCO2). Ex situ mineral carbonation has been demonstrated on pilot and demonstration scales. However, its application is currently limited by its high costs, which range from $50 to $300 per tCO2 sequestered. Energy use, the reaction rate and material handling are the key factors hindering the success of this technology. The value of the products seems central to render MC economically viable in the same way as conventional CCS seems profitable only when combined with EOR. Large scale projects such as the Skyonic process can help in reducing the knowledge gaps on MC fundamentals and provide accurate costing and data on processes integration and comparison. The literature to date indicates that in the coming decades MC can play an important role in decarbonising the power and industrial sector. PMID:24983767

  9. Effects of carbon substrate lability on carbon mineralization dynamics of tropical peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Könönen, Mari; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Extensive draining at tropical ombrotrophic peatlands in Southeast Asia has made them global 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. Management practises and fires have led to changed substrate status, which affects microbial processes. Here, we present the first data on how management practises affect carbon (C) mineralization processes at these soils. We compared the carbon mineralization potentials of pristine forest soils to those of drained fire affected soils at various depths, with and without additional labile substrates (glucose, glutamate and NO3-N) and in oxic and anoxic conditions by dedicated ex situ experiments. Carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production) rates were higher in the pristine site peat, which contains more labile carbon due to higher input via vegetation. Production rates decreased with depth together with decreasing availability of labile carbon. Consequently, the increase in production rates after labile substrate addition was relatively modest from pristine site as compared to the managed site and from the top layers as compared to deeper layers. Methanogenesis had little importance in total carbon mineralization. Adding labile C and N enhanced heterotrophic CO2 production more than the sole addition of N. Surprisingly, oxygen availability was not an ultimate requirement for substantial CO2 production rates, but anoxic respiration yielded comparable rates, especially at the pristine soils. Flooding of these sites will therefore reduce, but not completely cease, peat carbon loss. Reintroduced substantial vegetation and fertilization in degraded peatlands can enrich recalcitrant peat with simple C and N compounds and thus increase microbiological activity.

  10. Thermodynamic constraints on mineral carbonation of serpentinized peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Frieder; Garrido, Carlos J.

    2011-10-01

    Carbonation of serpentinite appears to be a promising process to mitigate rising concentrations of atmospheric CO 2. However, given that chemical affinities of mineral carbonation reactions in serpentinized peridotite change drastically with temperature, protolith and the activities of dissolved constituents, this process is incompletely understood. In this report numerical models are used to investigate the heterogeneous phase equilibria and the speciation of intergranular fluids during mineral carbonation of serpentinite/dunite at 100, 200, 300 and 400 °C. The results suggest that temperature-dependent activity gradients of both aqueous carbon dioxide (aCO 2,aq) and aqueous silica (aSiO 2,aq) determine the carbonation potential of serpentinite. At low to moderate temperatures there is ample thermodynamic driving force for the carbonation of serpentinite, as the gradients in aSiO 2,aq and aCO 2,aq set between talc-quartz-magnesite and serpentine-brucite equilibria are steepest. With increasing temperature these activity gradients become smaller because the stability fields of brucite, serpentine and talc expand toward higher aCO 2,aq and aSiO 2,aq while the stability field of magnesite contracts. In addition, the enhanced solubility of quartz toward higher temperatures shifts the talc-quartz-magnesite equilibrium to very high aCO 2,aq. Field observations of carbonated serpentinite reveal a rather simple sequence of arrested carbonation reactions, which is typically fossilized as spatially distinct metasomatic zones. A zone of serpentinized peridotite is followed by a zone of serpentine + carbonate, then talc + carbonate and finally quartz + carbonate. Our modeling results not only reproduce these observations, they also suggest that complete carbonation is favored at low to moderate temperatures. Since complete carbonation of serpentinite is achieved at relatively small fluid to rock ratios at temperatures ≤ 200 °C, prolonged fluid influx at low temperatures

  11. Permanent storage of carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs by mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Jürg M.; Kelemen, Peter B.

    2009-12-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions continue to increase rapidly despite efforts aimed at curbing the release of such gases. One potentially long-term solution for offsetting these emissions is the capture and storage of carbon dioxide. In principle, fluid or gaseous carbon dioxide can be injected into the Earth's crust and locked up as carbonate minerals through chemical reactions with calcium and magnesium ions supplied by silicate minerals. This process can lead to near-permanent and secure sequestration, but its feasibility depends on the ease and vigour of the reactions. Laboratory studies as well as natural analogues indicate that the rate of carbonate mineral formation is much higher in host rocks that are rich in magnesium- and calcium-bearing minerals. Such rocks include, for example, basalts and magnesium-rich mantle rocks that have been emplaced on the continents. Carbonate mineral precipitation could quickly clog up existing voids, presenting a challenge to this approach. However, field and laboratory observations suggest that the stress induced by rapid precipitation may lead to fracturing and subsequent increase in pore space. Future work should rigorously test the feasibility of this approach by addressing reaction kinetics, the evolution of permeability and field-scale injection methods.

  12. Temperature sensitivity of organic carbon mineralization in contrasting lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudasz, Cristian; Sobek, Sebastian; Bastviken, David; Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature alone explains a great amount of variation in sediment organic carbon (OC) mineralization. Studies on decomposition of soil OC suggest that (1) temperature sensitivity differs between the fast and slowly decomposition OC and (2) over time, decreasing soil respiration is coupled with increase in temperature sensitivity. In lakes, autochthonous and allochthonous OC sources are generally regarded as fast and slowly decomposing OC, respectively. Lake sediments with different contributions of allochthonous and autochthonous components, however, showed similar temperature sensitivity in short-term incubation experiments. Whether the mineralization of OC in lake sediments dominated by allochthonous or autochthonous OC has different temperature sensitivity in the longer term has not been addressed. We incubated sediments from two boreal lakes that had contrasting OC origin (allochthonous versus autochthonous), and OC characteristics (C/N ratios of 21 and 10) at 1, 3, 5, 8, 13, and 21°C for five months. Compared to soil and litter mineralization, sediment OC mineralization rates were low in spite of low apparent activation energy (Ea). The fraction of the total OC pool that was lost during five months varied between 0.4 and 14.8%. We estimate that the sediment OC pool not becoming long-term preserved was degraded with average apparent turnover times between 3 and 32 years. While OC mineralization was strongly dependent on temperature as well as on OC composition and origin, temperature sensitivity was similar across lakes and over time. We suggest that the temperature sensitivity of OC mineralization in lake sediments is similar across systems within the relevant seasonal scales of OC supply and degradation.

  13. Soil Organic Carbon Loss: An Overlooked Factor in the Carbon Sequestration Potential of Enhanced Mineral Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzen, Christiana; Harrison, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Weathering of silicate minerals regulates the global carbon cycle on geologic timescales. Several authors have proposed that applying finely ground silicate minerals to soils, where organic acids would enhance the rate of weathering, could increase carbon uptake and mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Silicate minerals such as olivine could replace lime, which is commonly used to remediate soil acidification, thereby sequestering CO2 while achieving the same increase in soil pH. However, the effect of adding this material on soil organic matter, the largest terrestrial pool of carbon, has yet to be considered. Microbial biomass and respiration have been observed to increase with decreasing acidity, but it is unclear how long the effect lasts. If the addition of silicate minerals promotes the loss of soil organic carbon through decomposition, it could significantly reduce the efficiency of this process or even create a net carbon source. However, it is possible that this initial flush of microbial activity may be compensated for by additional organic matter inputs to soil pools due to increases in plant productivity under less acidic conditions. This study aimed to examine the effects of olivine amendments on soil CO2 flux. A liming treatment representative of typical agricultural practices was also included for comparison. Samples from two highly acidic soils were split into groups amended with olivine or lime and a control group. These samples were incubated at 22°C and constant soil moisture in jars with airtight septa lids. Gas samples were extracted periodically over the course of 2 months and change in headspace CO2 concentration was determined. The effects of enhanced mineral weathering on soil organic matter have yet to be addressed by those promoting this method of carbon sequestration. This project provides the first data on the potential effects of enhanced mineral weathering in the soil environment on soil organic carbon pools.

  14. Carbon Mineralization in Acidic, Xeric Forest Soils: Induction of New Activities †

    OpenAIRE

    Tate, Robert L.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon mineralization was examined in Lakehurst and Atsion sands collected from the New Jersey Pinelands and in Pahokee muck from the Everglades Agricultural Area. Objectives were (i) to estimate the carbon mineralization capacities of acidic, xeric Pinelands soils in the absence of exogenously supplied carbon substrate (nonamended carbon mineralization rate) and to compare these activities with those of agriculturally developed pahokee muck, and (ii) to measure the capacity for increased car...

  15. Real Time Pore Structure Evolution during Olivine Mineral Carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xiao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous carbonation of ultramafic rocks has been proposed as a promising method for long-term, secure sequestration of carbon dioxide. While chemical kinetics data indicate that carbonation reaction in olivine is one of the fastest among the mg-bearing minerals, in practice, the factors that limit the extent and rate of carbonation in ultramafic rocks are fluid supply and flux. On the one hand, reaction products could produce passivating layer that prohibits further reactions. On the other hand, the increases in solid volume during carbonation could lead to cracking and create new fluid paths. Whether carbonation in ultramafic rocks is self-limiting or self-sustaining has been hotly debated. Experimental evidence of precipitation of reaction products during olivine carbonation was reported. To date, reaction-driven cracking has not been observed. In this paper, we present the first real-time pore structure evolution data using the x-ray synchrotron microtomography. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solution was injected into porous olivine aggregates and in-situ pore structure change during olivine carbonation at a constant confining pressure (12 MPa) and a temperature of 200oC was captured at 30 min. interval for ~160 hours. Shortly after the experiment started, filling-in of the existing pores by precipitation of reaction products was visible. The size of the in-fills kept increasing as reactions continued. After ~48 hours, cracking around the in-fill materials became visible. After ~60 hours, these cracks started to show a clear polygonal pattern, similar to the crack patterns usually seen on the surface of drying mud. After ~72 hours, some of the cracks coalesced into large fractures that cut-through the olivine aggregates. New fractures continued to develop and at the end of the experiment, the sample was completely disintegrated by these fractures. We also conducted nanotomography experiments on a sub-volume of the reacted olivine aggregate. Orthogonal sets of

  16. Mineral Influence on Microbial Survival During Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, E. U.; Shanahan, T. M.; Wolfe, W. W.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 sequestered in a deep saline aquifer will perturb subsurface biogeochemistry by acidifying the groundwater and accelerating mineral diagenesis. Subsurface microbial communities heavily influence geochemistry through their metabolic processes, such as with dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB). However, CO2 also acts as a sterilant and will perturb these communities. We investigated the role of mineralogy and its effect on the survival of microbes at high PCO2 conditions using the model DIRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Batch cultures of Shewanella were grown to stationary phase and exposed to high PCO2 using modified Parr reactors. Cell viability was then determined by plating cultures after exposure. Results indicate that at low PCO2 (2 bar), growth and iron reduction are decreased and cell death occurs within 1 hour when exposed to CO2 pressures of 10 bar or greater. Further, fatty acid analysis indicates microbial lipid degradation with C18 fatty acids being the slowest lipids to degrade. When cultures were grown in the presence of rocks or minerals representative of the deep subsurface such as carbonates and silicates and exposed to 25 bar CO2, survival lasted beyond 2 hours. The most effective protecting substratum was quartz sandstone, with cultures surviving beyond 8 hours of CO2 exposure. Scanning electron microscope images reveal biofilm formation on the mineral surfaces with copious amounts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) present. EPS from these biofilms acts as a reactive barrier to the CO2, slowing the penetration of CO2 into cells and resulting in increased survival. When biofilm cultures were grown with Al and As to simulate the release of toxic metals from minerals such as feldspars and clays, survival time decreased, indicating mineralogy may also enhance microbial death. Biofilms were then grown on iron-coated quartz sand to determine conversely what influence biofilms may have on mineral dissolution during CO2 perturbation

  17. Numerical models of carbonate hosted gold mineralization, Great Basin Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, M.; Hofstra, A.; Gao, Y.; Sweetkind, D.; Banerjee, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Basin, Nevada contains many modern hydrothermal system and world class gold deposits hosted within Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Temperature profiles, fluid inclusion studies, and isotopic evidence suggest that modern geothermal and fossil hydrothermal systems associated with gold mineralization share many common features including the absence of a clear magmatic source, flow restricted to fault zones, and remarkably high temperatures at shallow depth. While the plumbing of these systems is not well understood, geochemical and isotopic data suggest that fluid circulation along fault zones is relatively deep (greater than 5 km) and comprised of relatively unexchanged Pleistocene meteoric water with small (less than 2.5 per mill) shifts from the MWL. Many fossil ore-forming systems were also dominated by meteoric water, but are usually exhibit shifts of 5 to 15 per mill from the MWL. Here we present two-dimensional numerical models to reconstruct the plumbing of modern geothermal and Tertiary hydrothermal systems in the Great Basin. Multiple tracers are used in our models, including O- and C-isotopic compositions of fluids/rocks, silica transport/ precipitation, and temperature anomalies, to constrain the plumbing of these systems. Our results suggest that both fossil hydrothermal and modern geothermal systems were probably driven by natural convection cells associated with localized high basal heating. We conclude that the fault controlled flow systems responsible for the genesis of Carlin gold mineralization and modern geothermal systems had to be transient in nature. Permeability changes within the carbonate reservoir was probably associated with extensional tectonic events.

  18. Modeling of induced seismicity during mineral carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarushina, V.; Bercovici, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Rapidly developing carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are a promising way of reducing the climate impact of greenhouse gases. These technologies involve injecting large amounts of CO2-bearing fluids underground, which potentially leads to high pore pressure and the conditions for seismic activity in the proximity of the injection site. Previously, we developed a simple conceptual model to estimate the seismic risk of mineral or mafic CCS operations (Yarushina & Bercovici, GRL vol.40, doi:10.1002/grl.50196, 2013). In this model, the storage reservoir is treated as a porous rock with grains that evolve during carbonation reactions. Seismic triggering occurs when local stresses at grain-grain contacts reach the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. We showed that injection of CO2 into reactive mafic or ultramafic rocks potentially reduces seismic risk since carbonation reactions increase the contact area between the rock grains and reduce the local stresses. Here we further develop this model and consider the effect of fluid injection flux and pressure gradients along grain boundaries on induced seismicity. Grain evolution not only changes the stress support but also alters the matrix permeability, which in turn affects the driving pressure gradients and the associated deviatoric stresses. The resulting coupled porous flow, chemical reactive grain-growth and failure model is an important step in understanding the seismic risks of carbon sequestration.

  19. Mineral Carbonation for Long-term CO2 Storage: an Exergy Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zevenhoven, Ron; Kavaliauskaite, Inga

    2004-01-01

    Magnesium oxide-based minerals (serpentine, olivine) may be used for long-term storage of CO2, from combustion of fossil fuels or industrial processes in the form of magnesium carbonate. Large resources of suitable minerals appear to exist in Finland and at many other locations worldwide. The efficiency of mineral carbonation processing can be evaluated using exergy analysis, which will allow for comparing different mineral types characterised by different composition and quality. Other impor...

  20. Mineral carbonation in water-unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A. L.; Dipple, G. M.; Mayer, K. U.; Power, I. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ultramafic mine tailings have an untapped capacity to sequester CO2 directly from air or CO2-rich gas streams via carbonation of tailings minerals [1]. The CO2 sequestration capacity of these sites could be exploited simply by increasing the supply of CO2 into tailings, such as through circulation of air or flue gas from mine site power plants [1,2]. Mine tailings storage facilities typically have heterogeneously distributed pore water [1], affecting both the reactive capacity of the porous medium and the exposure of reactive phases to CO2 [3]. We examine the physical reaction processes that govern carbonation efficiency in variably saturated porous media using meter-scale column experiments containing the tailings mineral, brucite [Mg(OH)2], that were supplied with 10% CO2 gas streams. The experiments were instrumented with water content and gas phase CO2 sensors to track changes in water saturation and CO2concentration with time. The precipitation of hydrated Mg-carbonates as rinds encasing brucite particles resulted in passivation of brucite surfaces and an abrupt shut down of the reaction prior to completion. Moreover, the extent of reaction was further limited at low water saturation due to the lack of water available to form hydrated Mg-carbonates, which incorporate water into their crystal structures. Reactive transport modeling using MIN3P-DUSTY [4] revealed that the instantaneous reaction rate was not strongly affected by water saturation, but the reactive capacity was reduced significantly. Surface passivation and water-limited reaction resulted in a highly non-geometric evolution of reactive surface area. The extent of reaction was also limited at high water content because viscous fingering of the gas streams injected at the base of the columns resulted in narrow zones of highly carbonated material, but left a large proportion of brucite unreacted. The implication is that carbonation efficiency in mine tailings could be maximized by targeting an

  1. Application of Two Exponential Equations in the Study of Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization in Natural Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Huan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study respective using the exponential equation and double exponential equation which are widely used were fitted Pinus massoniana, evergreen broad leaved forest, deciduous oak forest, pine-oak forest, Pinus koraiensis and Pinus tabulaeformis and other six kinds of typical natural forest soil organic carbon mineralization process, it also by fitting curves and cumulative release of CO2 mineralization process analysis and correlation of inert carbon content of soil measured and fitted values of t-test analysis, the two exponential equations in natural forest soil organic carbon mineralization process the application results were evaluated. The results show that the double exponential equation on soil organic carbon mineralization has a better fitting description effect can be more realistically reflect the changes in soil organic carbon mineralization characteristics of the fitting results of insert soil carbon content and measured values a significant difference is not level, the soil can be more accurately reflect the changes of the inert carbon.

  2. Organic carbon production, mineralization and preservation on the Peruvian margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Dale

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon cycling in Peruvian margin sediments (11° S and 12° S was examined at 16 stations from 74 m on the inner shelf down to 1024 m water depth by means of in situ flux measurements, sedimentary geochemistry and modeling. Bottom water oxygen was below detection limit down to ca. 400 m and increased to 53 μM at the deepest station. Sediment accumulation rates and benthic dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes decreased rapidly with water depth. Particulate organic carbon (POC content was lowest on the inner shelf and at the deep oxygenated stations (< 5% and highest between 200 and 400 m in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, 15–20%. The organic carbon burial efficiency (CBE was unexpectedly low on the inner shelf (< 20% when compared to a global database, for reasons which may be linked to the frequent ventilation of the shelf by oceanographic anomalies. CBE at the deeper oxygenated sites was much higher than expected (max. 81%. Elsewhere, CBEs were mostly above the range expected for sediments underlying normal oxic bottom waters, with an average of 51 and 58% for the 11° S and 12° S transects, respectively. Organic carbon rain rates calculated from the benthic fluxes alluded to a very efficient mineralization of organic matter in the water column, with a Martin curve exponent typical of normal oxic waters (0.88 ± 0.09. Yet, mean POC burial rates were 2–5 times higher than the global average for continental margins. The observations at the Peruvian margin suggest that a lack of oxygen does not affect the degradation of organic matter in the water column but promotes the preservation of organic matter in marine sediments.

  3. A Quantitative Investigation of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have led to a substantial increase in carbon dioxide (CO2), a greenhouse gas (GHG), contributing to heightened concerns of global warming. In the last decade alone CO2 emissions increased by 2.0 ppm/yr. globally. In the year 2009, United States and China contributed up to 43.4% of global CO2 emissions. CO2 capture and sequestration have been recognized as promising solutions to mitigate CO2 emissions from fossil fuel based power plants. Typical techniques for carbon capture include post-combustion capture, pre-combustion capture and oxy-combustion capture, which are under active research globally. Mineral carbonation has been investigated as a suitable technique for long term storage of CO2. Sequestration is a highly energy intensive process and the additional energy is typically supplied by the power plant itself. This leads to a reduction in net amount of CO2 captured because of extra CO2 emitted. This paper presents a quantitative analysis of the energy consumption during sequestra...

  4. Stability of Soil Carbon Fractions - Aggregation Versus Mineral Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. W.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    2007-12-01

    of CO2-C (70%) in the recombined fraction is the clay fraction. Nevertheless the recalcitrance of mineral bound C is restricting the positive effects of aggregate disruption on the C turnover. The small fast decomposing C pool of the sand fraction is of minor importance to the total soil respiration balance. CO2-13C signatures showed higher values of the silt and clay fractions in contrast to the sand fraction, indicating a lower bioavailability of 13C-depleted carbon sources in the small fractions. The analyses of CO2-14C showed a shift to the utilization of older C sources with time.

  5. Ex-situ and in-situ mineral carbonation as a means to sequester carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O' Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center is investigating mineral carbonation as a method of sequestering CO2 from coal-fired-power plants. Magnesium-silicate minerals such as serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4] and olivine (Mg2SiO4) react with CO2 to produce magnesite (MgCO3), and the calcium-silicate mineral, wollastonite (CaSiO3), reacts to form calcite (CaCO3). It is possible to carry out these reactions either ex situ (above ground in a traditional chemical processing plant) or in situ (storage underground and subsequent reaction with the host rock to trap CO2 as carbonate minerals). For ex situ mineral carbonation to be economically attractive, the reaction must proceed quickly to near completion. The reaction rate is accelerated by raising the activity of CO2 in solution, heat (but not too much), reducing the particle size, high-intensity grinding to disrupt the crystal structure, and, in the case of serpentine, heat-treatment to remove the chemically bound water. All of these carry energy/economic penalties. An economic study illustrates the impact of mineral availability and process parameters on the cost of ex situ carbon sequestration. In situ carbonation offers economic advantages over ex situ processes, because no chemical plant is required. Knowledge gained from the ex situ work was applied to long-term experiments designed to simulate in situ CO2 storage conditions. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), a multi-layered basaltic lava formation, has potentially favorable mineralogy (up to 25% combined concentration of Ca, Fe2+, and Mg cations) for storage of CO2. However, more information about the interaction of CO2 with aquifers and the host rock is needed. Core samples from the CRBG, as well as samples of olivine, serpentine, and sandstone, were reacted in an autoclave for up to 2000 hours at elevated temperatures and pressures. Changes in core porosity, secondary mineralizations, and both solution and solid chemistry were measured.

  6. Shungites: origin and classification of a new carbon mineral resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivankin, P.F.; Galdobina, L.P.; Kalinin, Yu.K.

    1987-10-01

    The discovery of a new mineral resource in Karelia-shungite- and the confirmation of the finding in the geological literature have a long history. In 1876, local peasants found black stones near the village of Shun'ga, which were taken to be coal and called Olenets anthracite. A discussion began on the nature of this strange anthracite, which did not burn in furnaces. The found of the Karelian geological school, A.A. Inostrantsev, was the first to doubt that Olenets anthracite was really coal, and he named it shungite. Shungites, very unusual, barely combustible high-carbon rocks, have a variety of potential uses. Although details remain obscure, the authors propose a metasomatic origin involving migration and reduction of carbonaceous compounds driven by igneous intrusions. 10 references.

  7. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects on Mineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitman, Thea L.; Zhu, Zihua; Lehmann, Johannes C.

    2014-10-31

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical and active pool in the global C cycle, and the addition of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has been shown to change SOC cycling, increasing or decreasing mineralization rates (often referred to as priming). We adjusted the amount of easily mineralizable C in the soil, through 1-day and 6-month pre-incubations, and in PyOM made from maple wood at 350°C, through extraction. We investigated the impact of these adjustments on C mineralization interactions, excluding pH and nutrient effects and minimizing physical effects. We found short-term increases (+20-30%) in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions in the soil pre-incubated for 6 months. Over the longer term, both the 6-month and 1-day pre-incubated soils experienced net ~10% decreases in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions. This was possibly due to stabilization of SOC on PyOM surfaces, suggested by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally, the duration of pre-incubation affected priming interactions, indicating that there may be no optimal pre-incubation time for SOC mineralization studies. We show conclusively that relative mineralizability of SOC in relation to PyOM-24 C is an important determinant of the effect of PyOM additions on SOC mineralization.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of minerals: Carbonates and silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides an alternative chemical analytical technique that obviates the issues of sample preparation and sample destruction common to most laboratory-based analytical methods. This contribution explores the capability of LIBS analysis to identify carbonate and silicate minerals rapidly and accurately. Fifty-two mineral samples (18 carbonates, 9 pyroxenes and pyroxenoids, 6 amphiboles, 8 phyllosilicates, and 11 feldspars) were analyzed by LIBS. Two composite broadband spectra (averages of 10 shots each) were calculated for each sample to produce two databases each containing the composite LIBS spectra for the same 52 mineral samples. By using correlation coefficients resulting from the regression of the intensities of pairs of LIBS spectra, all 52 minerals were correctly identified in the database. If the LIBS spectra of each sample were compared to a database containing the other 51 minerals, 65% were identified as a mineral of similar composition from the same mineral family. The remaining minerals were misidentified for two reasons: 1) the mineral had high concentrations of an element not present in the database; and 2) the mineral was identified as a mineral with similar elemental composition from a different family. For instance, the Ca-Mg carbonate dolomite was misidentified as the Ca-Mg silicate diopside. This pilot study suggests that LIBS has promise in mineral identification and in situ analysis of minerals that record geological processes

  9. CO2 Sequestraion by Mineral Carbonation of Cement Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, H.; Jang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation with cement materials was investigated in this study. Ca extraction and CO2 injection tests were conducted on three different materials (lime, Portland cement, waste concrete) using different extract reagents (NH4Cl, CH3COOH, HCl, and Deionized water) under ambient temperature and pressure conditions. CO2 gas (99.9%) was injected to either supernatant without solids or suspension with solids obtained from extraction tests at 4 ml/min of flow rate. Ca concentrations were measured from filtered solutions before and after CO2 injection. The chemical and mineralogical composition of raw materials and precipitates were determined using X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The morphology and chemical composition of precipitates were analyzed with Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy equipped with the Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis. For the extraction tests, Ca concentrations of the extracts were related with the CaO content and type of CaO bearing minerals of the materials, regardless of the extraction solutions. Lime had a higher Ca concentration ranging between 942.7 and 39945.0 mg/L in the extracts than waste concrete (188.4 ~ 2978.1 mg/L) in the extracts due to its higher content of CaO (CaO : 24.5% and waste concrete : 20.3%). In contrast, the Portland cement (6346.0 and 28903.5 mg/L) had lower Ca concentrations than lime (94.27 ~ 39945.0 mg/L), even though the Portland cement (56.3%) had a higher CaO content than lime (24.5%). For a given extraction solution, lime had the highest CO2 carbonation efficiency. In addition, for a given material, the CO2 carbonation efficiency was the highest when NH4Cl solution was used as an extraction solution. Results of material analyses indicate that precipitates from the CO2 injection tests consisted of mostly CaCO3, regardless of types of materials and extraction solutions.

  10. Preparation of pure calcium carbonate by mineral carbonation using industrial byproduct FGD gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K.; Kim, W.; Bang, J. H.; Park, S.; Jeon, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is one of the geological approaches for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 gas. Its concept is based on the natural weathering processes in which silicate minerals containing divalent cations such as Ca or Mg are carbonated to CaCO3 or MgCO3 in the reaction with CO2gas. Raw materials for the mineral carbonation have been extended to various industrial solid wastes such as steel slag, ashes, or FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum which are rich in divalent cations. These materials have economic advantages when they are produced in CO2 emission sites. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is such a byproduct obtained in at coal-fired power plants. Recently, we carried out a research on the direct mineral carbonation of FGD gypsum for CO2sequestration. It showed high carbonation reactivity under ambient conditions and the process can be described as follows: CaSO4·2H2O + CO2(g) + 2NH4OH(aq) → CaCO3(s) + (NH4)2SO4(aq) (1) At the early stage of the process, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) exists as a dissolved ion pair during the induction period. High-purity CaCO3 could be precipitated from dissolved calcium carbonate solution extracted during the induction period. The effect of experimental parameters on pure CaCO3 was evaluated: CO2 flow rate (1-3 L/min), ammonia content (4-12%), and solid-to-liquid (S/L) ratio (5-300 g/L). FE-SEM (field-emission scanning electron microscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) study revealed that the precipitated CaCO3 was round-shaped vaterite crystals. The induction time was inversely proportional to the CO2 flow rate and the yield for pure CaCO3 increased with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure CaCO3 decreased with S/L (solid/liquid) ratio. It was 90% (mol/mol) when the S/L ratio was 5 g/L. However, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of dissolved CaCO3.

  11. Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization along an Elevation Gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China

    OpenAIRE

    Guobing Wang; Yan Zhou; Xia Xu; Honghua Ruan; Jiashe Wang

    2013-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) actively participates in the global carbon (C) cycle. Despite much research, however, our understanding of the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization is still very limited. To investigate the responses of SOC mineralization to temperature, we sampled surface soils (0-10 cm) from evergreen broad-leaf forest (EBF), coniferous forest (CF), sub-alpine dwarf forest (SDF), and alpine meadow (AM) along an elevational gradient in the Wuyi Mountai...

  12. A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Charles T., Jr.

    2009-03-01

    Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

  13. Some results from a study of carbon minerals by the thermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otakuziyev, E.; Kasymov, A.K.; Miralimova, N.M.

    1979-01-01

    Using the optimum technique of thermal analysis in carbon-containing shales and hornfels of ancient deposits of the Kyzylkum and Zirabulak-Ziaetdinsk mountains, four groups are revealed of mineral form of carbon, corresponding to the kerite-oxykeriteanthraxolite-shungite-graphite series. Interpretation of the thermograms obtained shows the varying degree of metamorphism of the carbon-containing rock of the areas studied.

  14. Delineation of Magnesium-rich Ultramafic Rocks Available for Mineral Carbon Sequestration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krevor, S.C.; Graves, C.R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral carbon sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester CO2. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made covering the entire United States detailing their geographical distribution and extent, or evaluating their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the continental United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. The focus of the national-scale map is entirely on suitable ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine and serpentine minerals. By combining the map with digital datasets that show non-mineable lands (such as urban areas and National Parks), estimates on potential depth of a surface mine, and the predicted reactivities of the mineral deposits, one can begin to estimate the capacity for CO2 mineral sequestration within the United States. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mineral carbonation of phosphogypsum waste for production of useful carbonate and sulfate salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu-Petteri eMattila

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphogypsum (CaSO4·2H2O waste is produced in large amounts during phosphoric acid (H3PO4 production. Minor quantities are utilized in construction or agriculture, while most of the material is stockpiled, creating an environmental challenge to prevent pollution of natural waters. In principle, the gypsum waste could be used to capture several hundred Mt of carbon dioxide (CO2. For example, when gypsum is converted to ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4 with ammonia (NH3 and CO2, also solid calcium carbonate (CaCO3 is generated. The ammonium sulfate can be utilized as a fertilizer or in other mineral carbonation processes that use magnesium silicate-based rock as feedstock, while calcium carbonate has various uses as e.g. filler material. The reaction extent of the described process was studied by thermodynamic modeling and experimentally as a function of reactant concentrations and temperature. Other essential properties such as purity and quality of the solid products are also followed. Conversion efficiencies of >95% calcium from phosphogypsum to calcium carbonate are obtained. Scalenohedral, rhombohedral and prismatic calcite particles can be produced, though the precipitates contain certain contaminants such as rare earth metals and sulfur from the gypsum. A reverse osmosis membrane cartridge is also tested as an alternative and energy-efficient method of concentrating the ammonium sulfate salt solution instead of the traditional evaporation of the process solution.

  16. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    OpenAIRE

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of ^(13)C and ^(18)O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in ^(13)C^(18)O^(16)O_2^(2−) groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solutio...

  17. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation. Feasibility of enhanced natural weathering as a CO2 emission reduction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonates. Potential advantages of mineral CO2 sequestration compared to, e.g., geological CO2 storage include (1) the permanent and inherently safe sequestration of CO2, due to the thermodynamic stability of the carbonate product formed and (2) the vast potential sequestration capacity, because of the widespread and abundant occurrence of suitable feedstock. In addition, carbonation is an exothermic process, which potentially limits the overall energy consumption and costs of CO2 emission reduction. However, weathering processes are slow, with timescales at natural conditions of thousands to millions of years. For industrial implementation, a reduction of the reaction time to the order of minutes has to be achieved by developing alternative process routes. The aim of this thesis is an investigation of the technical, energetic, and economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. In Chapter 1 the literature published on CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation is reviewed. Among the potentially suitable mineral feedstock for mineral CO2 sequestration, Ca-silicates, more particularly wollastonite (CaSiO3), a mineral ore, and steel slag, an industrial alkaline solid residue, are selected for further research. Alkaline Ca-rich residues seem particularly promising, since these materials are inexpensive and available near large industrial point sources of CO2. In addition, residues tend to react relatively rapidly with CO2 due to their (geo)chemical instability. Various process routes have been proposed for mineral carbonation, which often include a pre-treatment of the solid feedstock (e.g., size reduction and

  18. Research on determining organic carbon in rock and mineral samples by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors introduce results of research on transformation mechanism, temperature and time of organic carbon during analysis of rock and mineral samples by gas chromatography, as well as conditions for eliminating carbonate constituent that may produce carbon dioxide gas. The research has solved the problem of connecting the chemical processing and instrument determination. The newly-established method is characterized by high sensitivity, good exactitude, simple and fast operation, and may be applied to the determination of organic carbon in rock, mineral, as well as sediment samples

  19. Comprehensive analysis of direct aqueous mineral carbonation using dissolution enhancing organic additives.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonfils, Benjamin; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine; Guyot, François; Bodénan, Françoise; Chiquet, Pierre; Bourgeois, Florent

    2012-01-01

    Direct aqueous mineral carbonation using organic anions has been presented by many as a promising strategy for mineral carbonation, on the basis that additives such as oxalate increase the rate and extent of dissolution of magnesium silicates several folds. Through geochemical modelling and detailed solid characterization, this paper discusses and extends our current understanding of this process. The role of disodium oxalate as a dissolution enhancing agent for olivine is thoroughly examined...

  20. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  1. Carbon-mineral adsorbents prepared by pyrolysis of waste materials in the presence of tetrachloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboda, Roman; Charmas, Barbara; Skubiszewska-Zieba, Jadwiga; Chodorowski, Stanislaw; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Gun'ko, Vladimir M; Pokrovskiy, Valery A

    2005-04-01

    Natural bentonite spent in the process of plant oil bleaching was used as an initial material for preparation of carbon-mineral adsorbents. The spent bleaching earth was treated using four procedures: T (thermal treatment); H (hydrothermal treatment); C (thermal treatment with addition of CCl4 vapor); M (modification of porous structure). Raw bentonite, RB (raw bleaching earth), and carbon materials prepared using plant oil were compared. The physicochemical characteristics of the adsorbents were determined using different methods: nitrogen adsorption/desorption, XRD, TEM, and MS-TPD. Carbon-mineral adsorbents contain from 5.23 to 19.92% C (w/w) and carbon adsorbents include from 84.2 to 91.18% C (w/w). Parallel processes of organic substance carbonization, porous structure modification, sublimation or evaporation of metal chlorides, and removal of hydrogen chloride take place during pyrolysis of waste mineral materials in the CCl4 atmosphere. PMID:15752782

  2. Mineralization of carbon dioxide sequestered in volcanogenic sandstone reservoir rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    We proposed to use volcanogenic sandstones for CO2 sequestration. Such sandstones with a relatively high percentage of volcanic rock fragments (VRF) could be a promising target for CO2 sequestration in that they have a sufficient percentage of reactive minerals to allow substantial mineralization of injected scCO2, which provides the most secure form of CO2 storage, but can also be porous and permeable enough to allow injection at acceptable rates. The limitation in using volcanogenic sandsto...

  3. Temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization along an elevation gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobing Wang

    Full Text Available Soil organic carbon (SOC actively participates in the global carbon (C cycle. Despite much research, however, our understanding of the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC mineralization is still very limited. To investigate the responses of SOC mineralization to temperature, we sampled surface soils (0-10 cm from evergreen broad-leaf forest (EBF, coniferous forest (CF, sub-alpine dwarf forest (SDF, and alpine meadow (AM along an elevational gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China. The soil samples were incubated at 5, 15, 25, and 35°C with constant soil moisture for 360 days. The temperature sensitivity of SOC mineralization (Q(10 was calculated by comparing the time needed to mineralize the same amount of C at any two adjacent incubation temperatures. Results showed that the rates of SOC mineralization and the cumulative SOC mineralized during the entire incubation significantly increased with increasing incubation temperatures across the four sites. With the increasing extent of SOC being mineralized (increasing incubation time, the Q(10 values increased. Moreover, we found that both the elevational gradient and incubation temperature intervals significantly impacted Q(10 values. Q(10 values of the labile and recalcitrant organic C linearly increased with elevation. For the 5-15, 15-25, and 25-35°C intervals, surprisingly, the overall Q(10 values for the labile C did not decrease as the recalcitrant C did. Generally, our results suggest that subtropical forest soils may release more carbon than expected in a warmer climate.

  4. Effects of functional groups and soluble matrices in fish otolith on calcium carbonate mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dongni; Li, Zhuo; Gao, Yonghua; Feng, Qingling

    2010-10-01

    Calcium carbonate mineralization is significantly influenced by organic matrices in vivo. The effect mainly relies on functional groups in proteins. In order to study the influence of functional groups on calcium carbonate mineralization, -OH, -NH2 and -COOH groups were grafted onto single crystal silicon chips, and such modified chips were used as substrates in in vitro mineralization experiments. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) test was conducted to examine the grafting efficiency, and the three groups were successfully grafted. Calcium carbonate mineralization on a modified silicon substrate was examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the results showed that the effects of -OH, -NH2 and -COOH groups were quite different. Furthermore, a water-soluble protein matrix (WSM) and an acid-soluble protein matrix (ASM) extracted from fish otolith were adsorbed onto the -COOH-modified silicon substrate, and the effects of the protein matrices on calcium carbonate mineralization were studied. The results showed that both WSM and ASM of lapillus could mediate aragonite crystallization, but the size and morphology of the formed crystals were different. The WSM and ASM of asteriscus adsorbed on the silicon substrate had little effect on calcium carbonate mineralization; almost all the crystals were calcite, while both asteriscus WSM and ASM in solution could mediate vaterite crystals, and the morphologies of vaterite crystal aggregates were different. PMID:20844320

  5. Effects of functional groups and soluble matrices in fish otolith on calcium carbonate mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Dongni; Li Zhuo; Gao Yonghua; Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Calcium carbonate mineralization is significantly influenced by organic matrices in vivo. The effect mainly relies on functional groups in proteins. In order to study the influence of functional groups on calcium carbonate mineralization, -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were grafted onto single crystal silicon chips, and such modified chips were used as substrates in in vitro mineralization experiments. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) test was conducted to examine the grafting efficiency, and the three groups were successfully grafted. Calcium carbonate mineralization on a modified silicon substrate was examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the results showed that the effects of -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were quite different. Furthermore, a water-soluble protein matrix (WSM) and an acid-soluble protein matrix (ASM) extracted from fish otolith were adsorbed onto the -COOH-modified silicon substrate, and the effects of the protein matrices on calcium carbonate mineralization were studied. The results showed that both WSM and ASM of lapillus could mediate aragonite crystallization, but the size and morphology of the formed crystals were different. The WSM and ASM of asteriscus adsorbed on the silicon substrate had little effect on calcium carbonate mineralization; almost all the crystals were calcite, while both asteriscus WSM and ASM in solution could mediate vaterite crystals, and the morphologies of vaterite crystal aggregates were different.

  6. Effects of functional groups and soluble matrices in fish otolith on calcium carbonate mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium carbonate mineralization is significantly influenced by organic matrices in vivo. The effect mainly relies on functional groups in proteins. In order to study the influence of functional groups on calcium carbonate mineralization, -OH, -NH2 and -COOH groups were grafted onto single crystal silicon chips, and such modified chips were used as substrates in in vitro mineralization experiments. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) test was conducted to examine the grafting efficiency, and the three groups were successfully grafted. Calcium carbonate mineralization on a modified silicon substrate was examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the results showed that the effects of -OH, -NH2 and -COOH groups were quite different. Furthermore, a water-soluble protein matrix (WSM) and an acid-soluble protein matrix (ASM) extracted from fish otolith were adsorbed onto the -COOH-modified silicon substrate, and the effects of the protein matrices on calcium carbonate mineralization were studied. The results showed that both WSM and ASM of lapillus could mediate aragonite crystallization, but the size and morphology of the formed crystals were different. The WSM and ASM of asteriscus adsorbed on the silicon substrate had little effect on calcium carbonate mineralization; almost all the crystals were calcite, while both asteriscus WSM and ASM in solution could mediate vaterite crystals, and the morphologies of vaterite crystal aggregates were different.

  7. Mineral Carbonation Potential of CO2 from Natural and Industrial-based Alkalinity Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J.; Kirchofer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is a Carbon Capture and Storage (CSS) technology where gaseous CO2 is reacted with alkaline materials (such as silicate minerals and alkaline industrial wastes) and converted into stable and environmentally benign carbonate minerals (Metz et al., 2005). Here, we present a holistic, transparent life cycle assessment model of aqueous mineral carbonation built using a hybrid process model and economic input-output life cycle assessment approach. We compared the energy efficiency and the net CO2 storage potential of various mineral carbonation processes based on different feedstock material and process schemes on a consistent basis by determining the energy and material balance of each implementation (Kirchofer et al., 2011). In particular, we evaluated the net CO2 storage potential of aqueous mineral carbonation for serpentine, olivine, cement kiln dust, fly ash, and steel slag across a range of reaction conditions and process parameters. A preliminary systematic investigation of the tradeoffs inherent in mineral carbonation processes was conducted and guidelines for the optimization of the life-cycle energy efficiency are provided. The life-cycle assessment of aqueous mineral carbonation suggests that a variety of alkalinity sources and process configurations are capable of net CO2 reductions. The maximum carbonation efficiency, defined as mass percent of CO2 mitigated per CO2 input, was 83% for CKD at ambient temperature and pressure conditions. In order of decreasing efficiency, the maximum carbonation efficiencies for the other alkalinity sources investigated were: olivine, 66%; SS, 64%; FA, 36%; and serpentine, 13%. For natural alkalinity sources, availability is estimated based on U.S. production rates of a) lime (18 Mt/yr) or b) sand and gravel (760 Mt/yr) (USGS, 2011). The low estimate assumes the maximum sequestration efficiency of the alkalinity source obtained in the current work and the high estimate assumes a sequestration efficiency

  8. The extent of carbon mineralization in boreal soils controls compositional changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier Quideau, S.; Oh, S.; Paré, D.

    2013-12-01

    Almost twenty percent of global carbon stocks in vegetation and soil are found in boreal soils, making them the largest terrestrial carbon storehouse in the world. Yet, despite their importance in the global carbon budget, very little is known about the exact nature and decomposition pathways of organic matter in these soils. The overall objective of this study was to examine the effects of vegetation and disturbance (fire and harvest) on: 1) soil organic matter composition, and 2) decomposition-induced changes in composition from a range of representative boreal forest and peatland ecosystems. Forest floor and peat samples (0-10 cm) were obtained from 17 sites along an east-west transect from New Brunswick to British Columbia, Canada. Carbon mineralization rates were measured during a 1-year laboratory incubation at 10 °C. Carbon chemistry in pre- and post-incubation samples was characterized by solid-state ramped-cross-polarization (RAMP-CP) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The percentage of carbon mineralized during incubation ranged from 1 to 24%, and corresponded to significant increases in aromatic, phenolic, and carbonyl carbons. As expected, significant differences in carbon composition pre-incubation were found among vegetation types regardless of disturbance and sampling location. May be more interestingly, comparable differences among samples persisted post-incubation. In addition, decomposition-induced changes in carbon chemistry significantly differed among vegetation types. Samples from Jack pine and Douglas fir stands, which experienced the highest carbon mineralization, also showed the greatest increase in aromatic, phenolic, and carbonyl carbons. Overall, changes in carbon chemistry were significantly correlated to the percentage of carbon mineralized; i.e., the extent of decomposition that the samples underwent.

  9. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, H. Henry [PI, The George Washington University; Xu, Huifang [Co-PI, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2013-07-17

    We have approached the long-standing geochemical question why anhydrous high-Mg carbonate minerals (i.e., magnesite and dolomite) cannot be formed at ambient conditions from a new perspective by exploring the formation of MgCO{sub 3} and Mg{sub x}Ca{sub (1-x)}CO{sub 3} in non-aqueous solutions. Data collected from our experiments in this funding period suggest that a fundamental barrier, other than cation hydration, exists that prevents Mg{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions from forming long-range ordered structures. We propose that this barrier mainly stems from the lattice limitation on the spatial configuration of CO{sub 3} groups in magnesite crystals. On the other hand, the measured higher distribution coefficients of Mg between magnesian calcites formed in the absence and presence of water give us a first direct proof to support and quantify the cation hydration effect.

  10. The Black Lake (Quebec, Canada) mineral carbonation experimental station: CO2 capture in mine waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, G.; Constantin, M.; Duchesne, J.; Dupuis, C.; Entrazi, A.; Gras, A.; Huot, F.; Fortier, R.; Hebert, R.; Larachi, F.; Lechat, K.; Lemieux, J. M.; Molson, J. W. H.; Maldague, X.; Therrien, R.; Assima, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    Passive mineral carbonation of chrysotile mining and milling waste was discovered at the Black Lake mine, southern Québec, 10 years ago. Indurated crusts were found at the surface and within waste piles where mineral and rock fragments are cemented by hydrated magnesium carbonates. A long-term research program has yielded significant insight into the process of CO2 capture from the atmosphere, and how it can be implemented during mining operations. Laboratory experiments show that the waste mineralogy is crucial, brucite being more reactive than serpentine. Partial water saturation, circa 40%, is also critical to dissolve magnesium from minerals, and transport aqueous CO2 to precipitation sites. Grain armoring by iron oxidation induced by dissolved oxygen prevents further reaction. Two experimental cells constructed with milling waste and fitted with various monitoring probes (T, H2O content, leachate) and gas sampling ports, have been monitored for more than 3 years, along with environmental conditions. The interstitial gas in the cells remains depleted in CO2 indicating continuous capture of ambient atmospheric CO2 at rates faster than advection to reaction sites. The energy released by the exothermic mineral carbonation reactions has been observed both in laboratory experiments (up to 4 °C) and in the field. Warm air, depleted to 10 ppmv CO2, vents at the surface of the waste piles, indicating reaction with atmospheric CO2 deep inside the piles. A thermal anomaly, detected by airborne infrared and coincident with a known venting area, was selected for locating a 100 m deep borehole fitted with sensor arrays to monitor active mineral carbonation within the pile. The borehole has intersected areas where mineral carbonation has indurated the milling waste. The borehole will be monitored for the next 3 years to better understand the mineral carbonation process, and its potential to yield recoverable geothermal energy in mining environments.

  11. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  12. Marine meiofauna, carbon and nitrogen mineralization in sandy and soft sediments of Disko Bay, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, S.; Christensen, P.B.; Sørensen, Martin Vinther; Funch, P.; Berg, P.

    2000-01-01

    Organic carbon mineralization was studied in a shallow-water (4 m), sandy sediment and 2 comparatively deep-water (150 and 300 m), soft sediments in Disko Bay, West Greenland. Benthic microalgae inhabiting the shallow-water locality significantly affected diurnal O-2 conditions within the surface...... and was, together with organotrophic O-2 respiration, the most important pathway for carbon mineralization within these sediments. The obtained process rates were comparable to mineralization rates from much warmer localities, suggesting that benthic mineralization in arctic marine environments is...... belonging to Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Gastrotricha, and Protodriloidae (Polychaeta) occurred only at the sandy locality, whereas Kinorhyncha, Foraminifera, and Cumacea (Crustacea) occurred only at the muddy stations. The larger number of meiofauna individuals at the sandy locality may in part be explained...

  13. Carbon and nitrogen mineralization of harvesting residues of Pinus sylvestris L. during aerobic laboratory incubation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon and nitrogen mineralization dynamics of Pinus sylvestris L. harvesting residues, when mixed with an acidic, nitrifying fen peat, were studied during aerobic, laboratory incubation at 20 deg C over 12 weeks. Green needle, brown needle and fine root showed a pattern of curvilinear decline in C mineralization rate with time. The total amounts of C mineralized from those residues, expressed as a percentage of their initial C content, were 52, 41 and 16%. Stem bark and stem wood mineralized more slowly; the value for stem bark was near zero. With the exception of stem bark, the harvesting residues enhanced the mineralization of added 14C- labelled glucose. During the early decomposition of the pine residues, the degree of net N immobilization of mineral N was related to the initial C/N ratio or total N concentration of the residues and net N mineralization was negatively correlated with mineralization of C. The remineralization rate of freshly immobilized N was estimated as seven times faster than the mineralization rate of the more recalcitrant native N from the fen peat. The added pine residues did not influence measurably the nitrification capacity of the fen peat. 40 refs, 3 figs, 7 tabs

  14. Carbon, oxygen and sulfur isotope studies of hydrothermal mineralization in the Gavnunim valley, Makhtesh Ramon, Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quartz and sulfide mineral from polymetallic vein-type mineralization within the quartz syenites of the Gavnunim valley, Makhtesh Ramon, exhibit isotopic composition quite different from the hypothermal ore occurrence. Quartz samples have δ18O in the range 19.2 to 25.3 per mille and the δ34S of sulfides varies from 17.5 to -30.6 per mille. At mineral deposition temperatures of 200-350 degree Celsius this compositional ranges are strongly indicative of isotopic buffering of the fluids by sediments in contact with the intrusive rocks. The distribution of δ13C and δ18O in secondary carbonates is consistent with epigenetic remobilization. The mineralization phenomena in the Gavnunim valley are constraint to the later stages of magmatic activity, when circulating hypothermal fluids moving through the sediments infiltrated fractures within the roof of the igneous body and deposited primary sulfide and gangue minerals. (author)

  15. Migration of dissolved organic carbon in biochars and biochar-mineral complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Lin; Paul Munroe; Stephen Joseph; Rita Henderson

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from a biochar mineral complex (BMC), so as to better understand the interactions between DOC, biochar, clay, and minerals during thermal treatment, and the effects of BMC on amended soils. The BMC was prepared by heating a mixture of a H3PO4-treated saligna biochar from Acacia saligna, clays, other minerals, and chicken manure. The BMC was applied to a sandy loam soil in Western Australia, where wh...

  16. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO(sub 2) emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO(sub 2) capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO(sub 2) emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation before and/or during carbonation may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH)(sub 2) was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH)(sub 2) gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO(sub 2) mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO(sub 2) sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for cost optimization of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process

  17. Soil carbon mineralization following biochar addition associated with external nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudong Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biochar has been attracting increasing attention for its potentials of C sequestration and soil amendment. This study aimed to understand the effects of combining biochar with additional external N on soil C mineralization. A typical red soil (Plinthudults was treated with two biochars made from two types of plantation-tree trunks (soil-biochar treatments, and was also treated with external N (soil-biochar-N treatments. All treatments were incubated for 42 d. The CO2-C released from the treatments was detected periodically. After the incubation, soil properties such as pH, microbial biomass C (MBC, and microbial biomass N (MBN were measured. The addition of biochar with external N increased the soil pH (4.31-4.33 compared to the soil treated with external N only (4.21. This was not observed in the comparison of soil-biochar treatments (4.75-4.80 to soil only (4.74. Biochar additions (whether or not they were associated with external N increased soil MBC and MBN, but decreased CO2-C value per unit total C (added biochar C + soil C according to the model fitting. The total CO2-C released in soil-biochar treatments were enhanced compared to soil only (i.e., 3.15 vs. 2.57 mg and 3.23 vs. 2.45 mg, which was attributed to the labile C fractions in the biochars and through soil microorganism enhancement. However, there were few changes in soil C mineralization in soil-biochar-N treatments. Additionally, the potentially available C per unit total C in soil-biochar-N treatments was lower than that observed in the soil-biochar treatments. Therefore, we believe in the short term, that C mineralization in the soil can be enhanced by biochar addition, but not by adding external N concomitantly.

  18. A Quantitative Investigation of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Muneer; Ehsani, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have led to a substantial increase in carbon dioxide (CO2), a greenhouse gas (GHG), contributing to heightened concerns of global warming. In the last decade alone CO2 emissions increased by 2.0 ppm/yr. globally. In the year 2009, United States and China contributed up to 43.4% of global CO2 emissions. CO2 capture and sequestration have been recognized as promising solutions to mitigate CO2 emissions from fossil fuel based power plants. Typical techniques for carbon c...

  19. Effect of sterilization on mineralization of straw and black carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bobul'ská, Lenka; Bruun, Sander; Fazekašová, Danica

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the role of microorganisms in the degradation of BC (black carbon). CO evolution was measured under sterilized and non-sterilized soil using BC and straw amendments. Black carbon and straw were produced from homogenously C labelled roots of barley (Hordeum...... resistance of BC to microbial degradation. The difference between soil respiration in sterilized and non-sterilized soil with plant material was visible from the beginning of the experiment, unlike with BC amendments where differences only occurred after some days. In addition, the CO evolution from...

  20. Mineral replacements during carbonation of peridotite: implications for carbon dioxide sequestration in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, Andreas; Hövelmann, Jörn; Plümper, Oliver; Austrheim, Hâkon

    2010-05-01

    , together with poorly crystalline serpentine and extremely fine grained talc. Hydrothermal batch experiments (130-160 bar PCO2; 200° C; 1-3 weeks reaction time) show that the alteration product after olivine is the favorable site of reaction presumably due to the large reactive surface area. In contrast, the olivine relicts have reacted to a significantly lesser extend, whereas the serpentine veins remain virtually unreacted. The dissolution of the compartment fillings is followed by nucleation and growth of calcite crystals also revealing that precipitation of calcite is strongly favored over magnesite as soon as the system contains Ca. The preferred precipitation of calcite is also supported by geochemical modeling (using Phreeqc), which shows that the Mg-bearing carbonates (dolomite, magnesite) only form if the fluid is sufficiently depleted in Ca. The compositional and textural differences between different samples as well as different run products from experiments indicate that the described clasts evolved from peridotite due to extreme mobilization of Mg, development of secondary porosity, and infill of carbonates. Mg removed from the clasts is partly consumed by replacement reactions in the vicinity of the clasts where Fe-minerals (almandine) are altered to Mg-minerals (talc). For basins containing abundant peridotite clasts, the outlined process will influence the CO2 and MgO budget. References: IPCC Special report: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, Summary for Policymakers, 2005.

  1. Mineral carbonation: energy costs of pretreatment options and insights gained from flow loop reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequestration of carbon as a stable mineral carbonate has been proposed to mitigate environmental concerns that carbon dioxide may with time escape from its sequestered matrix using alternative sequestration technologies. A method has been developed to prepare stable carbonate products by reacting CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals in aqueous bicarbonate/chloride media at high temperature and pressure. Because this approach is inherently expensive due to slow reaction rates and high capital costs, studies were conducted to improve the reaction rates through mineral pretreatment steps and to cut expenses through improved reactor technology. An overview is given for the estimated cost of the process including sensitivity to grinding and heating as pretreatment options for several mineral feedstocks. The energy costs are evaluated for each pretreatment in terms of net carbon avoided. New studies with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow-loop reactor have yielded information on overcoming kinetic barriers experienced with processing in stirred autoclave reactors. Repeated tests with the flow-loop reactor have yielded insights on wear and failure of system components, on challenges to maintain and measure flow, and for better understanding of the reaction mechanism

  2. Microbial Contribution to Organic Carbon Sequestration in Mineral Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil productivity and sustainability are dependent on soil organic matter (SOM). Our understanding on how organic inputs to soil from microbial processes become converted to SOM is still limited. This study aims to understand how microbes affect carbon (C) sequestration and the formation of recalcit...

  3. Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaquero, M. P.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible changes in the mineral composition of food during frying could be the consequence of losses by leaching, or changes in concentrations caused by exchanges between the food and culinary fat of other compounds. The net result depends on the type of food, the frying fat used and the frying process. Moreover, the modifications that frying produces in other nutrients could indirectly affect the availability of dietary minerals. The most outstanding ones are those that can take place in the fat or in the protein. With respect to the interactions between frying oils and minerals, we have recent knowledge concerning the effects of consuming vegetable oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without turnover, on the nutritive utilization of dietary minerals. The experiments have been carried out in pregnant and growing rats, which consumed diets containing, as a sole source of fat, the testing frying oils or unused oils. It seems that the consumption of various frying oils, with a polar compound content lower or close to the maximum limit of 25% accepted for human consumption, does not alter the absorption and metabolism of calcium, phosphorous, iron or copper. Magnesium absorption from diets containing frying oils tends to increase but the urinary excretion of this element increases, resulting imperceptible the variations in the magnesium balance. The urinary excretion of Zn also increased although its balance remained unchanged. Different studies referring to the effects of consuming fried fatty fish on mineral bioavailability will also be presented. On one hand, frying can cause structural changes in fish protein, which are associated with an increase in iron absorption and a decrease in body zinc retention. The nutritive utilization of other elements such as magnesium, calcium and copper seems to be unaffected. On the other hand; it has been described that an excess of fish fatty acids in the diet produces iron depletion, but when fatty

  4. Reduction of CO2 emissions by mineral carbonation : steelmaking slags as rawmaterial with a pure calcium carbonate end product

    OpenAIRE

    Eloneva, Sanni

    2010-01-01

    Mineral carbonation is one of the options that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions for climate change mitigation purposes. Steel manufacturing, which is one of the biggest industrial sources of CO2 emissions, could benefit from this option by utilizing its own by-products, i.e., steelmaking slags, to combine with CO2. Additional benefits would be achieved if the end product was a pure and marketable calcium carbonate. The utilization of CaCO3 derived from steelmaking s...

  5. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  6. Carbon dioxide exchange of a perennial bioenergy crop cultivation on a mineral soil

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, S. E.; Shurpali, N. J.; O. Peltola; Mammarella, I.; N. Hyvönen; Maljanen, M.; M. Räty; Virkajärvi, P.; Martikainen, P J

    2015-01-01

    One of the strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector is to increase the use of renewable energy sources such as bioenergy crops. Bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during biomass production, field management and transportation. The present study focuses on the cultivation of reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinaceae L.), a perennial bioenergy crop, on a mineral soil. To quantify the CO2 ...

  7. Carbon dioxide exchange of a perennial bioenergy crop cultivation on a mineral soil

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Saara E.; Shurpali, Narasinha J.; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Hyvönen, Niina; Maljanen, Marja; Räty, Mari; Virkajärvi, Perttu; Martikainen, Pertti J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector is to increase the use of renewable energy sources such as bioenergy crops. Bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during biomass production, field management and transportation. The present study focuses on the cultivation of reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinacea L.), a perennial bioenergy crop, on a mineral soil. To quantify the CO2 ex...

  8. Influence of Substrate Mineralogy on Bacterial Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate: Implications for Stone Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carb...

  9. Geology of carbonate aggregate resources of Illinois, Illinois mineral notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, J. H.

    Carbonate rocks ranging in age from Pennsylvanian through Ordovician provide the principal resources for crushed stone production in Illinois. In the northern third of Illinois, dolomite and calcareous dolomite of the Silurian and Ordovician Systems from the bedrock surface are the basis of a large quarrying industry. One of the largest quarries in the United States wins stone from Silurian reefal dolomite at Thornton, near Chicago. Aggregate for skid-resistant asphalt pavement is produced from Devonian chert in extreme southern Illinois.

  10. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian C. Dincă; Gheorghe Spârchez; Maria Dincă; Viorel N. B. Blujdea

    2012-01-01

    Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS) and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determinatio...

  11. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  12. Capture and mineralization of carbon dioxide from coal combustion flue gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Viswatej

    (Proprietary information: PCT/US/2006/49411 and WO/2007/ 081561A) Enormous amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) released by human activity (anthropogenic), may lead to climate changes that could spread diseases, ruin crops, cause intense droughts and floods, and dramatically raise the sea levels, thereby submerging the low lying coastal regions. The objective of this study was to test whether CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from flue gases can be directly captured and converted into carbonate and sulfate minerals respectively through the mineralization process of alkaline solid wastes. A flow-through carbonation process was designed to react flue gases directly with alkaline fly ash, under coal combustion power plant conditions. For the first time, CO2 levels in the flue gas were reduced from 13.6% to 9.7% after the reaction with alkaline fly ash in a reaction time of less than 1 minute. Using a combination of Orion RTM plus multi-gas detector, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, flue gas CO2 mineralization on fly ash particles was detected. This method can simultaneously help in separate, capture, and mineralize anthropogenic CO2 and SO2. Moreover, this process may be environmentally safe and a stable storage for anthropogenic CO2. Capturing anthropogenic CO2 using this mineralization process is an initial step towards developing more efficient methods of reducing industrial point source CO2 emissions into the atmosphere.

  13. Microbially Accelerated Carbonate Mineral Precipitation as a Strategy for in Situ Carbon Sequestration and Rehabilitation of Asbestos Mine Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Jenine; Wilson, Siobhan A; Southam, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    A microbially accelerated process for the precipitation of carbonate minerals was implemented in a sample of serpentinite mine tailings collected from the abandoned Woodsreef Asbestos Mine in New South Wales, Australia as a strategy to sequester atmospheric CO2 while also stabilizing the tailings. Tailings were leached using sulfuric acid in reaction columns and subsequently inoculated with an alkalinity-generating cyanobacteria-dominated microbial consortium that was enriched from pit waters at the Woodsreef Mine. Leaching conditions that dissolved 14% of the magnesium from the serpentinite tailings while maintaining circumneutral pH (1800 ppm, pH 6.3) were employed in the experiment. The mineralogy, water chemistry, and microbial colonization of the columns were characterized following the experiment. Micro-X-ray diffraction was used to identify carbonate precipitates as dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O] and hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O] with minor nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that carbonate mineral precipitates form directly on the filamentous cyanobacteria. These findings demonstrate the ability of these organisms to generate localized supersaturating microenvironments of high concentrations of adsorbed magnesium and photosynthetically generated carbonate ions while also acting as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation. This study is the first step toward implementing in situ carbon sequestration in serpentinite mine tailings via microbial carbonate precipitation reactions. PMID:26720600

  14. Molecular simulation of carbon dioxide, brine, and clay mineral interactions and determination of contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Craig M; Cygan, Randall T

    2014-01-01

    Capture and subsequent geologic storage of CO2 in deep brine reservoirs plays a significant role in plans to reduce atmospheric carbon emission and resulting global climate change. The interaction of CO2 and brine species with mineral surfaces controls the ultimate fate of injected CO2 at the nanoscale via geochemistry, at the pore-scale via capillary trapping, and at the field-scale via relative permeability. We used large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the behavior of supercritical CO2 and aqueous fluids on both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic basal surfaces of kaolinite, a common clay mineral. In the presence of a bulk aqueous phase, supercritical CO2 forms a nonwetting droplet above the hydrophilic surface of kaolinite. This CO2 droplet is separated from the mineral surface by distinct layers of water, which prevent the CO2 droplet from interacting directly with the mineral surface. Conversely, both CO2 and H2O molecules interact directly with the hydrophobic surface of kaolinite. In the presence of bulk supercritical CO2, nonwetting aqueous droplets interact with the hydrophobic surface of kaolinite via a mixture of adsorbed CO2 and H2O molecules. Because nucleation and precipitation of minerals should depend strongly on the local distribution of CO2, H2O, and ion species, these nanoscale surface interactions are expected to influence long-term mineralization of injected carbon dioxide. PMID:24410258

  15. CO2 mitigation potential of mineral carbonation with industrial alkalinity sources in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchofer, Abby; Becker, Austin; Brandt, Adam; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    The availability of industrial alkalinity sources is investigated to determine their potential for the simultaneous capture and sequestration of CO2 from point-source emissions in the United States. Industrial alkalinity sources investigated include fly ash, cement kiln dust, and iron and steel slag. Their feasibility for mineral carbonation is determined by their relative abundance for CO2 reactivity and their proximity to point-source CO2 emissions. In addition, the available aggregate markets are investigated as possible sinks for mineral carbonation products. We show that in the U.S., industrial alkaline byproducts have the potential to mitigate approximately 7.6 Mt CO2/yr, of which 7.0 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 captured through mineral carbonation and 0.6 Mt CO2/yr are CO2 emissions avoided through reuse as synthetic aggregate (replacing sand and gravel). The emission reductions represent a small share (i.e., 0.1%) of total U.S. CO2 emissions; however, industrial byproducts may represent comparatively low-cost methods for the advancement of mineral carbonation technologies, which may be extended to more abundant yet expensive natural alkalinity sources. PMID:23738892

  16. Carbon Mineralization in Two Ultisols Amended with Different Sources and Particle Sizes of Pyrolyzed Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar produced during pyrolysis has the potential to enhance soil fertility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The influence of biochar properties (e.g., particle size) on both short- and long-term carbon (C) mineralization of biochar remains unclear. There is minimal informa...

  17. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time isan actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. Thepresent article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimationsfor other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layersin any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  18. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimations for other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layers in any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  19. Interactions between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic matter: Further implications for the ballast hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    De La Rocha, Christina,; Nowald, N.; Passow, Uta

    2008-01-01

    Correlations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes into sediment traps in the deep sea have previously suggested that interactions between organic matter and minerals play a key role in organic matter flux to the deep. Here experiments were carried out in rolling tanks to observe the incorporation of suspended biogenic minerals ( calcium carbonate coccoliths or silica diatom frustules) into diatom aggregates and examine their influence on aggregate character. Addition of high...

  20. Experimental Investigation and Simplistic Geochemical Modeling of CO2 Mineral Carbonation Using the Mount Tawai Peridotite

    OpenAIRE

    Omeid Rahmani; James Highfield; Radzuan Junin; Mark Tyrer; Amin Beiranvand Pour

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the potential of CO2 mineral carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) derived from the Mount Tawai peridotite (forsterite based (Mg)2SiO4) to produce thermodynamically stable magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) was evaluated. The effect of three main factors (reaction temperature, particle size, and water vapor) were investigated in a sequence of experiments consisting of aqueous acid leaching, evaporation to dryness of the slurry mass, and then gas-solid carbonation under pressurized CO2. The ...

  1. Water-rock interaction during mineral carbonation and volcanic ash weathering

    OpenAIRE

    Helgi Arnar Alfreðsson 1984

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered one of the greatest challenges of this century. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of the means proposed to lower the atmospheric CO2 content. The aim of the CarbFix project in Iceland was to design and test a CO2 re-injection system, in which CO2 from the Hellisheidi geothermal power plant was injected, fully dissolved in water, into basaltic rocks. In this way the carbon is mineralized upon basalt dissolution by the precip...

  2. Theoretical constraints on the effects of pH, salinity, and temperature on clumped isotope signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon species and precipitating carbonate minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, PS; Tripati, AK; Schauble, EA

    2014-01-01

    The use of carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry as a geochemical technique to determine temperature of formation of a carbonate mineral is predicated on the assumption that the mineral has attained an internal thermodynamic equilibrium. If true, then the clumped isotope signature is dependent solely upon the temperature of formation of the mineral without the need to know the isotopic or elemental composition of coeval fluids. However, anomalous signatures can arise under disequilibrium co...

  3. What Are the Time Scales for Carbonate Mineral Sequestration in the Subsurface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steefel, C. I.; Landrot, G.; Bolton, E. W.; Pride, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral trapping of CO2 in the subsurface is acknowledged to be the most secure form of sequestration, but some studies have suggested that the process is extremely slow, perhaps on the order of 10,000 years or more. But what are the arguments for these long time scales based on? Certainly part of it has to do with the slow dissolution rates of silicates needed to provide a source of cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Fe2+) and alkalinity for carbonate precipitation. Rates of dissolution for many silicates are very slow (e.g., albitic plagioclase and chlorite), while other silicate minerals (anorthitic feldspar, olivine) dissolve appreciably faster. Determining which mineral is rate-limiting in the case of the faster dissolving silicates (is it the dissolving silicate or precipitating carbonate?), however, is not always straightforward without a careful analysis of dissolution and precipitation as a coupled process. We use micro-continuum modeling to address the issue of time scales for carbonate mineral trapping of CO2. Two sets of simulations have been carried out: 1) largely generic simulations at the centimeter scale that include heterogeneous distributions of both residually trapped scCO2 and reactive mineral phases (Ca-bearing plagioclase and chlorite), and 2) flow plus diffusion and pure diffusion simulations of the reactivity of a reservoir sandstone from a scCO2 pilot injection site at Cranfield, Mississippi. The first set of simulations are designed specifically to examine the assumption that the reservoir within which carbonate mineral precipitation might occur is well-mixed and therefore characterized everywhere by the low pH values typical of brine in equilibrium with supercritical CO2. Our analysis of physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface materials, especially during the residual trapping stage, suggest that local chemical microenvironments can develop in which pH, alkalinity, and cation concentrations rise sufficiently high that substantial

  4. Modeling reaction-driven cracking during mineral carbonation in peridotite for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukert, A. N.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Matter, J.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    In situ mineral carbonation in mantle peridotite has been proposed as a mechanism for long-term, environmentally benign CO2 sequestration1,2. This process converts peridotite and CO2 to carbonate minerals, like magnesite, in the subsurface, providing permanent and safe storage of the CO2. The volume that can be sequestered in this manner is an open question as peridotite carbonation involves a positive volume change and peridotite aquifers have limited porosity and permeability to accommodate the addition of solid volume. Conversion of peridotite to magnesite results in a volume increase of ~44%, which will fill the existing pore space and could limit the extent of carbonation by reducing porosity and permeability, clogging fluid flow paths, and armoring the reactive surface area. Alternatively, the force of crystallization and changes in fluid pressure from carbonation could act as driving forces for mechanical deformation and fracture propagation within the peridotite, creating new porosity, permeability, and reactive surface area, allowing carbonation to continue3. Natural examples of peridotite that have been entirely converted to magnesite suggest that reactive cracking from mineral carbonation is possible given the right conditions, such as elevated temperature and pCO2 2. Results will be presented from a reactive transport model that has been developed for peridotite carbonation using TOUGHREACT v.24. This model evaluates water and CO2 flow through peridotite fractured at different scales using a multiple continuum mesh. The effect of fluid flow, chemical reactions, and porosity and permeability feedbacks on carbonation rate and extent are explored, as is the effect of temperature. Peridotite carbonation is exothermic, so the release of heat of reaction could be balanced with the fluid injection temperature to maintain the 185oC conditions that facilitate the fastest carbonation rate2. The effect of fluid temperature and flow rate on the rate of carbonation

  5. [Effects of different types of litters on soil organic carbon mineralization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Jun; Pan, Jian-Jun; Chen, Jin-Ying; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Li-Ming; Sun, Bo; Li, Zhong-Pei

    2009-06-15

    Using litter incubation experiment in laboratory, decomposition discrepancies of four typical litters from Zijin Mountain were analyzed. The results show that organic carbon mineralization rates of soil with litters all involve fast and slow decomposition stages, and the differences are that the former has shorter duration,more daily decomposition quantity while the latter is opposite. Organic carbon mineralization rates of soil with litters rapidly reached maximum in the early days of incubation, and the order is soil with Cynodon dactylon litter (CK + BMD) (23.88 +/- 0.62) mg x d(-1), soil with Pinus massoniana litter (CK+ PML) (17.93 +/- 0.99) mg x d(-1), soil with Quercus acutissima litter (CK+ QAC) (15.39 +/- 0.16) mg x d(-1) and soil with Cyclobalanopsis glauca litter (CK + CGO) (7.26 +/- 0.34) mg x d(-1), and with significant difference between each other (p Power curve model can describe the trends of organic carbon mineralization rate and mineralized accumulation amount,which has a good correlation with their change. PMID:19662876

  6. Abiotic CO2 reduction during geologic carbon sequestration facilitated by Fe(II)-bearing minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Brown, G. E.; Thomas, B.; Johnson, N. C.; Rosenbauer, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Redox reactions involving subsurface minerals and fluids and can lead to the abiotic generation of hydrocarbons from CO2 under certain conditions. Depleted oil reservoirs and saline aquifers targeted for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) can contain significant quantities of minerals such as ferrous chlorite, which could facilitate the abiotic reduction of carbon dioxide to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and amorphous carbon (C0). If such reactions occur, the injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) could significantly alter the oxidation state of the reservoir and cause extensive reorganization of the stable mineral assemblage via dissolution and reprecipitation reactions. Naturally occurring iron oxide minerals such as magnetite are known to catalyze CO2 reduction, resulting in the synthesis of organic compounds. Magnetite is thermodynamically stable in Fe(II) chlorite-bearing mineral assemblages typical of some reservoir formations. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that GCS reservoirs buffered by the chlorite-kaolinite-carbonate(siderite/magnesite)-quartz assemblage favor the reduction of CO2 to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and C0, although the extent of abiotic CO2 reduction may be kinetically limited. To investigate the rates of abiotic CO2 reduction in the presence of magnetite, we performed batch abiotic CO2 reduction experiments using a Dickson-type rocking hydrothermal apparatus at temperatures (373 K) and pressures (100 bar) within the range of conditions relevant to GCS. Blank experiments containing CO2 and H2 were used to rule out the possibility of catalytic activity of the experimental apparatus. Reaction of brine-suspended magnetite nanoparticles with scCO2 at H2 partial pressures typical of reservoir rocks - up to 100 and 0.1 bars respectively - was used to investigate the kinetics of magnetite-catalyzed abiotic CO2 reduction. Later experiments introducing ferrous chlorite (ripidolite) were carried out to determine the potential for

  7. Clay mineral continental amplifier for marine carbon sequestration in a greenhouse ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Martin J.; Wagner, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The majority of carbon sequestration at the Earth’s surface occurs in marine continental margin settings within fine-grained sediments whose mineral properties are a function of continental climatic conditions. We report very high mineral surface area (MSA) values of 300 and 570 m2 g in Late Cretaceous black shales from Ocean Drilling Program site 959 of the Deep Ivorian Basin that vary on subcentennial time scales corresponding with abrupt increases from approximately 3 to approximately 18% ...

  8. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes from bamboo charcoal and the roles of minerals on their growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized from bamboo charcoals by chemical vapor deposition in the presence of ethanol vapor. Fresh bamboo culms were first heat treated at 1000–1500 °C to form charcoals. The elemental composition and structure of mineral phases in the bamboo charcoal treated at different temperatures were analyzed. The results showed that Mg2SiO4 and particularly calcium silicate were responsible for the nucleation and growth of MWCNTs at 1200–1400 °C. Transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer observations indicated that the tips of nanotubes synthesized at 1200–1400 °C consist mainly of calcium silicate. Such silicate tips acted as effective catalysts for nanotubes. The growth of MWCNTs followed the vapor–liquid–solid model including an initial decomposition of ethanol vapor into carbon, dissolution of carbon inside molten silicate and final nucleation of nanotubes. -- Graphical abstract: Calcium silicate spheres formed on the surface of the bamboo charcoal after thermal treatments. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by ethanol chemical vapor deposition. The growth of CNTs follows the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism. Uploading of CNTs could increase the specific surface area and the N2 adsorption capacity. Highlights: ► The evolution of minerals in bamboo charcoal under heat treatment is found. ► The roles of minerals in bamboo charcoal in the growth of CNTs are proposed. ► The upload of CNTs increases the specific surface area and the adsorption capacity.

  9. Flue gas CO2 mineralization using thermally activated serpentine: from single- to double-step carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Mischa; Hariharan, Subrahmaniam; Mazzotti, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and utilization by mineralization seeks to combine greenhouse gas emission control with the production of value-added materials in the form of solid carbonates. This experimental work demonstrates that the world's most abundant mineralization precursor, the magnesium (Mg) silicate serpentine, in its thermally activated, partially dehydroxylated form can be carbonated without the use of chemical additives at process temperatures (T) below 90 °C and CO2 partial pressures (pCO2) below 1 bar. A first series of single-step batch experiments was performed varying the temperature and slurry density to systematically assess the precipitation regime of the relevant Mg-carbonates and the fate of silicon (Si) species in solution. The results suggested that the reaction progress was hindered by a passivating layer of re-precipitated silica or quartz, as well as by equilibrium limitations. Concurrent grinding proved effective in tackling the former problem. A double-step strategy proved successful in addressing the latter problem by controlling the pH of the solution. This is achieved by continuously removing the Mg from the dissolution reactor and letting it precipitate at a higher T and a lower pCO2 in a separate reactor, thus yielding a combined T-pCO2-swing-the working principle of a new flue gas mineralization route is presented herein. Simulations and experiments of the different individual steps of the process are reported, in order to make an assessment of its feasibility. PMID:25327589

  10. Experimental Investigation and Simplistic Geochemical Modeling of CO₂ Mineral Carbonation Using the Mount Tawai Peridotite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Omeid; Highfield, James; Junin, Radzuan; Tyrer, Mark; Pour, Amin Beiranvand

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the potential of CO₂ mineral carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) derived from the Mount Tawai peridotite (forsterite based (Mg)₂SiO4) to produce thermodynamically stable magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) was evaluated. The effect of three main factors (reaction temperature, particle size, and water vapor) were investigated in a sequence of experiments consisting of aqueous acid leaching, evaporation to dryness of the slurry mass, and then gas-solid carbonation under pressurized CO2. The maximum amount of Mg converted to MgCO₃ is ~99%, which occurred at temperatures between 150 and 175 °C. It was also found that the reduction of particle size range from >200 to <75 µm enhanced the leaching rate significantly. In addition, the results showed the essential role of water vapor in promoting effective carbonation. By increasing water vapor concentration from 5 to 10 vol %, the mineral carbonation rate increased by 30%. This work has also numerically modeled the process by which CO₂ gas may be sequestered, by reaction with forsterite in the presence of moisture. In both experimental analysis and geochemical modeling, the results showed that the reaction is favored and of high yield; going almost to completion (within about one year) with the bulk of the carbon partitioning into magnesite and that very little remains in solution. PMID:26999082

  11. Experimental Investigation and Simplistic Geochemical Modeling of CO2 Mineral Carbonation Using the Mount Tawai Peridotite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omeid Rahmani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the potential of CO2 mineral carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH2 derived from the Mount Tawai peridotite (forsterite based (Mg2SiO4 to produce thermodynamically stable magnesium carbonate (MgCO3 was evaluated. The effect of three main factors (reaction temperature, particle size, and water vapor were investigated in a sequence of experiments consisting of aqueous acid leaching, evaporation to dryness of the slurry mass, and then gas-solid carbonation under pressurized CO2. The maximum amount of Mg converted to MgCO3 is ~99%, which occurred at temperatures between 150 and 175 °C. It was also found that the reduction of particle size range from >200 to <75 µm enhanced the leaching rate significantly. In addition, the results showed the essential role of water vapor in promoting effective carbonation. By increasing water vapor concentration from 5 to 10 vol %, the mineral carbonation rate increased by 30%. This work has also numerically modeled the process by which CO2 gas may be sequestered, by reaction with forsterite in the presence of moisture. In both experimental analysis and geochemical modeling, the results showed that the reaction is favored and of high yield; going almost to completion (within about one year with the bulk of the carbon partitioning into magnesite and that very little remains in solution.

  12. Carbon cycling and mineral weathering in the Sava River catchment in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global environmental change has been identified as one of the most urgent issues of earth science research. Much research effort has addressed the role of the terrestrial reservoir in modulating carbon storage, and in turn, how the rapid cycling of carbon at the earth's surface over the next few hundreds of years will affect earth's surface environment. The chemical interactions among carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite), organic carbon and the natural hydrologic cycle link the atmospheric and terrestrial carbon reservoirs on short time scales. Among the minerals comprising surface rocks and soils, only carbonate minerals appear capable of maintaining equilibrium in the face of rising atmospheric CO2 injections from fossil fuel burning. Rapid carbonate mineral weathering reactions also largely regulate the pH and ionic strength of terrestrial aquatic systems and so have ecologic and environmental impacts. We are investigating the geochemical dynamics using major elemental, stable isotope, and hydrogeochemical parameters to better understand carbon mass transport of the Sava river drainages in Slovenia. Importantly, the Sava catchment is the largest catchment in Slovenia and at the same time one of the tributary streams of the Danube river, the second largest river in Europe. The weathering of the Danube river represents one of the largest carbon fluxes in the world. Rock weathering contributes a significant portion of HCO3- - to most rivers and thus has a strong influence on their carbon cycle. First results in the Sava River catchment indicate that the watershed exhibit typical 1:2 ratio of divalent cations to bicarbonate ion consistent with simple carbonate mineral dissolution in pure water. The Mg/Ca mole ratios are higher than 0.5 with 1 mol Ca for 0.5 mol Mg, the ratio predicted for equilibration in systems where calcite and dolomite dissolution proceed together. The concentration of DIC is high in the Sava River and lies well above the average

  13. Mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide in San Carlos olivine: An atomic level reaction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Ryan

    Since the late 19th century, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels have been steadily on the rise. Approximately one third of all human emissions come from fossil fuel power plants. As countries become more dependent on electrical energy and bring on line new power plants, these atmospheric CO2 levels will continue to rise, generating strong environmental concern. Potential avenues to address this problem convert the CO2 from the gaseous phase to a liquid, supercritical fluid, or solid state and store it. Oceans, subsurface reservoirs such as depleted oil fields, and terrestrial carbon pools have all been suggested. The essential problem with all of these possible solutions is the issue of permanency. Mineral sequestration of CO2 is a candidate technology for reducing the amount of anthropogenic CO2 that is being released into the atmosphere. Olivine (e.g. forsterite, Mg2SiO4) is a widely available mineral that reacts with CO2 to form magnesite (MgCO3) and silica (SiO2). Magnesite is capable of immobilizing CO2 over geological time periods. Thus the issue of permanency has been addressed. The most promising mineral sequestration process developed to date is aqueous solution mineral carbonation. The solid/aqueous solution reaction interface provides insight to the mechanisms that govern the carbonation reactivity of olivine. Study of these mechanisms at the atomic level is critically important to facilitate engineering new processes that will enhance the reactivity of olivine with CO2 bearing media and to lower process costs. The study of the olivine carbonation reaction herein can be divided into three separate areas of research. The first area is a comprehensive study of olivine under conditions of electron irradiation. Analyzing radiation damage is critical to the verification and reliability of data collected from the samples using electron beam techniques. The next area of research is the analysis of the reaction layer composition and structure using High

  14. Carbon mineralization and carbonate preservation in modern cold-water coral reef sediments on the Norwegian shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Wehrmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral ecosystems are considered hot-spots of biodiversity and biomass production and may be a regionally important contributor to carbonate production. The impact of these ecosystems on biogeochemical processes and carbonate preservation in associated sediments were studied at Røst Reef and Traenadjupet Reef, two modern (post-glacial cold-water coral reefs on the Mid-Norwegian shelf. Sulfate and iron reduction as well as carbonate dissolution and precipitation were investigated by combining pore-water geochemical profiles, steady state modeling, as well as solid phase analyses and sulfate reduction rate measurements on gravity cores of up to 3.2 m length. Low extents of sulfate depletion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC production, combined with sulfate reduction rates not exceeding 3 nmolS cm−3 d−1, suggested that overall anaerobic carbon mineralization in the sediments was low. These data showed that the coral fragment-bearing siliciclastic sediments were effectively decoupled from the productive pelagic ecosystem by the complex reef surface framework. Organic matter being mineralized by sulfate reduction was calculated to consist of 57% carbon bound in –CH2O– groups and 43% carbon in –CH2– groups. Methane concentrations were below 1 μM, and failed to support the hypothesis of a linkage between the distribution of cold-water coral reefs and the presence of hydrocarbon seepage. Iron reduction linked to microbial sulfate reduction buffered the pore-water carbonate system and inhibited acid driven coral skeleton dissolution. A large pool of reactive iron was available leading to the formation of iron sulfide minerals. Constant pore-water Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ concentrations in most cores and decreasing Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations with depth in core 23-18 GC indicated diagenetic carbonate precipitation. This was consistent

  15. Carbon and nitrogen in forest floor and mineral soil under six common European tree species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lars; Schmidt, Inger K.; Callesen, Ingeborg;

    2007-01-01

    after planting the six tree species had different profiles in terms of litterfall, forest floor and mineral soil C and N attributes. Three groups were identified: (1) ash, maple and lime, (2) beech and oak, and (3) spruce. There were significant differences in forest floor and soil C and N contents and......The knowledge of tree species effects on soil C and N pools is scarce, particularly for European deciduous tree species. We studied forest floor and mineral soil carbon and nitrogen under six common European tree species in a common garden design replicated at six sites in Denmark. Three decades...... C/N ratios, also among the five deciduous tree species. The influence of tree species was most pronounced in the forest floor, where C and N contents increased in the order ash = lime = maple mineral soil only in some of the sampled soil layers within 30...

  16. Sequestration of carbon dioxide by indirect mineralization using Victorian brown coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The indirect CO2 mineralization by brown coal fly ash has been tested. ► A large CO2 capture capacity of fly ash under mild conditions was achieved. ► The kinetic analysis confirmed a fast reaction rate with low activation energy. ► The fly ash based capture process is highly efficient and cost-effective. - Abstract: The use of an industry waste, brown coal fly ash collected from the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia, has been tested for the post-combustion CO2 capture through indirect minersalization in acetic acid leachate. Upon the initial leaching, the majority of calcium and magnesium in fly ash were dissolved into solution, the carbonation potential of which was investigated subsequently through the use of a continuously stirred high-pressure autoclave reactor and the characterization of carbonation precipitates by various facilities. A large CO2 capture capacity of fly ash under mild conditions has been confirmed. The CO2 was fixed in both carbonate precipitates and water-soluble bicarbonate, and the conversion between these two species was achievable at approximately 60 °C and a CO2 partial pressure above 3 bar. The kinetic analysis confirmed a fast reaction rate for the carbonation of the brown coal ash-derived leachate at a global activation energy of 12.7 kJ/mol. It is much lower than that for natural minerals and is also very close to the potassium carbonate/piperazine system. The CO2 capture capacity of this system has also proven to reach maximum 264 kg CO2/tonne fly ash which is comparable to the natural minerals tested in the literature. As the fly ash is a valueless waste and requires no comminution prior to use, the technology developed here is highly efficient and energy-saving, the resulting carbonate products of which are invaluable for the use as additive to cement and in the paper and pulp industry.

  17. Carbon sources supporting benthic mineralization in mangrove and adjacent seagrass sediments (Gazi Bay, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dehairs

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The origin of carbon substrates used by in situ sedimentary bacterial communities was investigated in an intertidal mangrove ecosystem and in adjacent seagrass beds in Gazi bay (Kenya by δ13C analysis of bacteria-specific PLFA (phospholipid fatty acids and bulk organic carbon. Export of mangrove-derived organic matter to the adjacent seagrass-covered bay was evident from sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC and δ13CTOC data. PLFA δ13C data indicate that the substrate used by bacterial communities varied strongly and that exported mangrove carbon was a significant source for bacteria in the adjacent seagrass beds. Within the intertidal mangrove forest, bacterial PLFA at the surface layer (0-1 cm typically showed more enriched δ13C values than deeper (up to 10 cm sediment layers, suggesting a contribution from microphytobenthos and/or inwelled seagrass material. Under the assumption that seagrasses and mangroves are the dominant potential end-members, the estimated contribution of mangrove-derived carbon to benthic mineralization in the seagrass beds (16-74% corresponds fairly well to the estimated contribution of mangrove C to the sedimentary organic matter pool (21-71% across different seagrass sites. Based on these results and a compilation of literature data, we suggest that allochtonous carbon trapped in seagrass beds may often represent a significant fraction of the substrate for benthic mineralization - both in cases where seagrass C dominates the sediment TOC pool and in cases where external inputs are significant. Hence, it is likely that community respiration data systematically overestimate the role of mineralization in the overall seagrass C budget.

  18. Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-07-09

    A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The major CO2 trapping minerals are dawsonite and ankerite. The CO2 mineral-trapping capacity after 100,000 years reaches about 90 kg per cubic meter of the medium. The CO2 trapping capacity depends on primary mineral composition. Precipitation of siderite and ankerite requires Fe+2 supplied mainly by chlorite and some by hematite dissolution and reduction. Precipitation of dawsonite requires Na+ provided by oligoclase dissolution. The initial abundance of chlorite and oligoclase therefore affects the CO2 mineral trapping capacity. The sequestration time required depends on the kinetic rate of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Dawsonite reaction kinetics is not well understood, and sensitivity regarding the precipitation rate was examined. The addition of CO2 as secondary carbonates results in decreased porosity. The leaching of chemical constituents from the interior of the shale causes slightly increased porosity. The limited information currently available for the mineralogy of natural high-pressure CO2 gas reservoirs is also generally consistent with our simulation. The ''numerical experiments'' give a detailed understanding of the dynamic evolution of a sandstone-shale geochemical system.

  19. Crystal chemical correlations between the mid and near-infrared in carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Laurence; Rutt, Ken J.

    2016-06-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of carbonates have proved important in many disciplines including planetary exploration. Classically bands in the 4000-6000 cm- 1 (2.5-1.67 μm) region are assigned to [CO32-] internal mode combinations and overtones. However band assignments remain equivocal. This study examines three prominent bands ((ca 4505 cm- 1 (2.219 μm), 4900 cm- 1 (2.041 μm) and 5145 cm- 1 (1.944 μm)) from powdered calcite and aragonite group minerals. Results indicate that the bands originate from anharmonic coupling of degenerate internal mode(s) with external (lattice) modes. On this basis it is suggested that NIR data may provide an untapped source of detailed information on lattice mode frequencies and information on the type(s) of the environmental cation(s) in carbonate minerals.

  20. The growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on natural clay minerals (kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of clay minerals - kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite - is studied for synthesis of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes. Particles of iron were used as catalysts. Prior to synthesis, kaolinite and sepiolite were doped by the catalytically active metal, whereas in the case of nontronite the presence was used of this metal in the matrix of this mineral. Synthesis of CNTs was performed by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. The produced nanocomposites were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experiment verified the potential of the three microcrystalline phyllosilicates for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Under the same technology conditions, the type of catalyst carrier affects the morphology and structure of the nanotube product markedly.

  1. Carbon mineralization and oxygen dynamics in sediments with deep oxygen penetration, Lake Superior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiying; Crowe, Sean Andrew; Miklesh, David;

    2012-01-01

    To understand carbon and oxygen dynamics in sediments with deep oxygen penetration, we investigated eight locations (160–318-m depth) throughout Lake Superior. Despite the 2–4 weight percent organic carbon content, oxygen penetrated into the sediment by 3.5 to > 12 cm at all locations. Such deep......, suggesting that temporal variability in deeply oxygenated sediments may be greater than previously acknowledged. The oxygen uptake rates (4.4–7.7 mmol m−2 d−1, average 6.1 mmol m−2 d−1) and carbon mineralization efficiency (∼ 90% of deposited carbon) were similar to those in marine hemipelagic and pelagic...... penetration is explained by low sedimentation rates (0.01–0.04 cm yr−1), high solubility of oxygen in freshwater, and a shallow (∼ 2 cm) bioturbation zone. In response mainly to oxygen variations in the bottom waters, the sediment oxygen penetration varied seasonally by as much as several centimeters...

  2. Natural abundance measurements of 13C indicate increased deep soil carbon mineralization after forest disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diochon, Amanda; Kellman, Lisa

    2008-07-01

    Northern forest soils represent globally important stores of carbon (C), yet there is no consensus about how they are altered by the widespread practice of harvesting that dominates many forested landscapes. Here we present the first study to systematically investigate the utility of δ 13C and C content depth profiles to infer temporal changes in belowground carbon cycling processes following disturbance in a pure C3 ecosystem. We document carbon concentration and δ 13C depth profile enrichment trends consistent with a kinetic fractionation arising from soil organic carbon (SOC) humification across a northern forest chronosequence (1, 15, 45, 80 and 125+ yrs). Reduced soil C storage that coincided with observed soil profile δ 13C-enrichment patterns which intensified following clearcut harvesting, pointed to losses of SOC in the deeper (>20 cm) mineral soil. This study suggests the δ 13C approach may assist in identifying mechanisms responsible for soil C storage changes in disturbed C3 forest ecosystems.

  3. Migration of dissolved organic carbon in biochars and biochar-mineral complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Lin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC from a biochar mineral complex (BMC, so as to better understand the interactions between DOC, biochar, clay, and minerals during thermal treatment, and the effects of BMC on amended soils. The BMC was prepared by heating a mixture of a H3PO4-treated saligna biochar from Acacia saligna, clays, other minerals, and chicken manure. The BMC was applied to a sandy loam soil in Western Australia, where wheat was grown. Liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD tests were carried out on water extracts from the untreated biochar, the BMC, the BMC-amended soil, and on a control soil to measure the DOC concentration. LC-OCD tests provide a fingerprint of the DOC, which allows the fractions of DOC to be determined. Thermal processing enhanced the reaction of the A. saligna biochar with manure, clays and minerals, and affected the distribution of the DOC fractions. Notably, the process leads to immobilization of hydrophobic DOC and to an increase in the concentration of low-molecular-weight neutrals in the BMC. The application of the BMC to soil increases the DOC in the amended soil, especially the biopolymer fraction.

  4. Calibrating the ChemCam LIBS for Carbonate Minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Ollila, Ann M.; Barefield, James E.; Lanza, Nina; Newsom, Horton E.

    2009-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument suite on board the NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover includes the first LIBS instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment using the LIDS technique in order to better understand the in situ signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Our initial results suggest that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between carbonate materials on Mars.

  5. Microbial carbon mineralization in tropical lowland and montane forest soils of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Whitaker, Jeanette; Ostle, Nicholas; McNamara, Niall P.; Nottingham, Andrew T.; Stott, Andrew W.; Bardgett, Richard D.; Salinas, Norma; Ccahuana, Adan J.Q.; Meir, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is affecting the amount and complexity of plant inputs to tropical forest soils. This is likely to influence the carbon (C) balance of these ecosystems by altering decomposition processes e.g. ‘positive priming effects’ that accelerate soil organic matter mineralization. However, the mechanisms determining the magnitude of priming effects are poorly understood. We investigated potential mechanisms by adding 13C labelled substrates, as surrogates of plant inputs, to soils from ...

  6. Microbial carbon mineralization in tropical lowland and montane forest soils of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Whitaker, Jeanette; Ostle, Nicholas; McNamara, Niall P.; Nottingham, Andrew T.; Stott, Andrew W.; Bardgett, Richard D.; Salinas, Norma; Ccahuana, Adan J.Q.; Meir, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is affecting the amount and complexity of plant inputs to tropical forest soils. This is likely to influence the carbon (C) balance of these ecosystems by altering decomposition processes e.g., “positive priming effects” that accelerate soil organic matter mineralization. However, the mechanisms determining the magnitude of priming effects are poorly understood. We investigated potential mechanisms by adding 13C labeled substrates, as surrogates of plant inputs, to soils from a...

  7. Carbon and nitrogen mineralization and persistence of organic residues under conservation and conventional tillage

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvaney, Michael J.; Wood, C.W.; Balkcom, K.S.; D. A. Shannon; Kemble, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Metadata only record Combining high biomass cover crops with in situ organic mulches may achieve adequate weed control for no-till production, but the persistence and nutrient release rates from cover crops and mulches is unknown. This article describes carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates from three organic mulches (mimosa (Albizia julibrissin Durazz.), lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours.) G. Don)), and oat (Avena sativa L.) straw) and one summer cover crop (soybean (Glycine max...

  8. Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The m...

  9. Revisiting carbonate quantification in apatite (bio)minerals: a validated FTIR methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Grunenwald, Anne; Keyser, Christine; Sautereau, Anne-Marie; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand; Drouet, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    International audience Carbonated apatites represent an important class of compounds encountered in many fields including anthropology, archeology, geology, medicine and biomaterials engineering. They constitute, in particular, the mineral part of bones and teeth, are found in sedimentary settings, and are used as biomimetic compounds for the development of bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Whether for assessing the degree of biomimetism of synthetic apatites or for better understanding d...

  10. Energy consumption and net CO2 sequestration of aqueous mineral carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous mineral carbonation is a potentially attractive sequestration technology to reduce CO2 emissions. The energy consumption of this technology, however, reduces the net amount of CO2 sequestered. Therefore, the energetic CO2 sequestration efficiency of aqueous mineral carbonation was studied in dependence of various process variables using either wollastonite (CaSiO3) or steel slag as feedstock. For wollastonite, the maximum energetic CO2 sequestration efficiency within the ranges of process conditions studied was 75% at 200C, 20 bar CO2, and a particle size of <38μm. The main energy-consuming process steps were the grinding of the feedstock and the compression of the CO2 feed. At these process conditions, a significantly lower efficiency was determined for steel slag (69%), mainly because of the lower Ca content of the feedstock. The CO2 sequestration efficiency might be improved substantially for both types of feedstock by, e.g., reducing the amount of process water applied and further grinding of the feedstock. The calculated energetic efficiencies warrant a further assessment of the (energetic) feasibility of CO2 sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation on the basis of a pilot-scale process

  11. Priming effects of leaves of Laurus nobilis L. and 1,8-cineole on carbon mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Kocak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary compounds can have stimulating effect on C cycling and change its rate in soils. We examined how leaves of bay laurel (Laurus nobilis L.; Lauraceae and 1,8-cineole (CIN, one of its constituents, affect soil C mineralization and its rate. Leaves and soil samples of bay laurel were taken from Cukurova University Campus (Adana, Turkey growing naturally under Mediterranean climate conditions. Leaves and CIN were considered as the two forms of organic C sources. After determining the level of 1,8-cineole in leaves by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, soils were mixed with powdered leaves and 1,8-cineole based on their C contents at same and half doses of soil organic C level. Carbon mineralization of all soils was determined over 54 d (28 °C, 80% field capacity. While 1,8-cineole was found as a major constituent of leaves (65% of essential oil, all doses of leaves and CIN increased soil microbial activity. There were significant differences for C mineralization rate between control and all applications (P < 0.05. High C levels of all treatments decreased C mineralization rate compared to control soils. In summary, all treatments stimulated C mineralization and it is possible to conclude that soil microorganisms adapted to use CIN as an energy source.

  12. Mineral Soil Carbon in Managed Hardwood Forests of the Northeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vario, C.; Friedland, A.; Hornig, C.

    2013-12-01

    New England is characterized by extensive forest cover and large reservoirs of soil carbon (C). In northern hardwood forests, mineral soil C can account for up to 50% of total ecosystem C. There has been an increasing demand for forests to serve both as a C sink and a renewable energy source, and effective management of the ecosystem C balance relies on accurate modeling of each compartment of the ecosystem. However, the dynamics of soil C storage with respect to forest use are variable and poorly understood, particularly in mineral soils. For example, current regional models assume C pools after forest harvesting do not change, while some studies suggest that belowground mineral soil C pools can be affected by disturbances at the soil surface. We quantified mineral soil C pools in previously clear-cut stands in seven research or protected forests across New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont. The ages of the sites sampled ranged from recently cleared to those with no disturbance history, with 21 forest stands represented in the study. Within each research forest studied, physical parameters such as soil type, forest type, slope and land-use history (aside from forest harvest) did not vary between the stands of different ages. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 60 cm below the mineral-organic boundary using a gas-powered augur and 9.5-cm diameter drill bit. Samples were collected in 10-cm increments in shallow mineral soil and 15-cm increments from 30-60 cm depth. Carbon, nitrogen (N), pH, texture and soil mineralogy were measured across the regional sites. At Bartlett Experimental Forest (BEF) in New Hampshire, mineral soil biogeochemistry in cut and uncut sites was studied at a finer scale. Measurements included soil temperature to 55 cm depth, carbon compound analyses using Py-GCMS and soil microbial messenger RNA extractions from mineral soil. Finally, we simulated C dynamics after harvesting by building a model in Stella, with a particular

  13. Carbonation of Artificial Silicate Minerals in Soils: Passive Removal of Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, C.; Renforth, P.; Manning, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in global soils is a widely recognised phenomenon, which is amenable to an environmental engineering approach. It is proposed that the use of direct soil engineering, promoting CO2 sequestration by accelerating the activity of reactive mineral substrates, has the potential to harness the significant carbon turnover of the global pedologic system (75 x 10^15 gC/yr [1]) [2][3][4]. Estimates of C capture potential through this process are 100-1000 MTa-1. This study focuses on the ambient carbonation of high-Ca residues as agents of mineral CCS. A synergy of contemporary field observations is presented, alongside data acquired from laboratory testing (acid digestion, optical petrography, SEM, IRMS) of carbonated material recovered from urban brown-field and former industrial sites in north east England. It is demonstrated that urban soils may accumulate ~30 kg/m2 (300 T/ha) of carbon over 10 years as inorganic calcium carbonate, approximately twice the typical organic C content of rural soils, ~17.5 kg/m2 in the UK. Stable isotope data (δ13C and δ18O) confirm that over 90% of the carbon is derived from the atmosphere. Economic and mechanical constraints on experimental performance in industrial batch reactor settings have strongly influenced the contemporary view on the efficacy of mineral CCS for large-scale environmental application [5][6][7]. Effective, low-energy field-scale implementation of mineral CCS through soil engineering would counter many of these concerns. Proof of principle for carbon capture efficacy of artificial silicates in soil engineering has been demonstrated [4]; proof of field scale feasibility will be demonstrated though continuing empirical field observation, engineered field cell construction and laboratory investigation. [1] Schlesinger, W. H., et al. (2000), Biogeochemistry, Vol. 48: 7-20. [2] Lal, R. (2003), Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, 22, pp. 151-184. [3] Manning, D. A. C., (2008), Mineralogical Magazine

  14. Factors contributing to the formation of carbonated mineral water systems in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Goran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are more than 65 occurrences of carbonated mineral water (CMW within the territory of Serbia. More than 93 % of these systems are found in the geotectonic unit referred to as the Vardar Zone and on the fringes of nearby units. To the east, west and north of the Vardar Zone, CMWs are either rare or nonexistent. The area featuring CMWs is characterized by Tertiary magmatism, a complex geology and deep neotectonic structures. Based on δ13C values of CO2 and HCO3 - in several CMWs in Serbia, and also in carbonates and CO2 from liquid inclusions in several hydrothermal deposits around the world, it was concluded that CO2 in the lithosphere of Serbia could originate from hydrothermal carbonates, and carbonates from sedimentary, metamorphic and magmatic rocks. The findings clearly showed that the main generators of CO2 are located in the Vardar Zone and that CO2 degasification is accomplished through temperature metamorphosis of carbonates (dolomite, calcite. Based on the carbonate transformation temperatures and the temperature conditions in the lithosphere of Serbia, the CO2 might be the result of temperature-induced carbonate transformation below a depth of 3 km. Therefore, the conclusion of the study of CMWs in Serbia is that the formation of CMW systems in the lithosphere depends on the geochemical, temperature, and the magmatic and structural-neotectonic conditions.

  15. Microbial and Chemical Enhancement of In-Situ Carbon Mineralization in Geological Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matter, J.; Chandran, K.

    2013-05-31

    Predictions of global energy usage suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere unless major changes are made to the way energy is produced and used. Various carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are currently being developed, but unfortunately little is known regarding the fundamental characteristics of CO{sub 2}-mineral reactions to allow a viable in-situ carbon mineralization that would provide the most permanent and safe storage of geologically-injected CO{sub 2}. The ultimate goal of this research project was to develop a microbial and chemical enhancement scheme for in-situ carbon mineralization in geologic formations in order to achieve long-term stability of injected CO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of CO{sub 2}-mineral-brine systems were systematically performed to develop the in-situ mineral carbonation process that utilizes organic acids produced by a microbial reactor. The major participants in the project are three faculty members and their graduate and undergraduate students at the School of Engineering and Applied Science and at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University: Alissa Park in Earth and Environmental Engineering & Chemical Engineering (PI), Juerg Matter in Earth and Environmental Science (Co-PI), and Kartik Chandran in Earth and Environmental Engineering (Co-PI). Two graduate students, Huangjing Zhao and Edris Taher, were trained as a part of this project as well as a number of graduate students and undergraduate students who participated part-time. Edris Taher received his MS degree in 2012 and Huangjing Zhao will defend his PhD on Jan. 15th, 2014. The interdisciplinary training provided by this project was valuable to those students who are entering into the workforce in the United States. Furthermore, the findings from this study were and will be published in referred journals to disseminate the results. The list of the papers is given at

  16. Redistributed water by saprotrophic fungi triggers carbon mineralization in dry soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhr, Alexander; Borken, Werner; Matzner, Egbert

    2015-04-01

    Summer droughts are common in temperate forests and especially the upper soil horizons experience soil drought. Drought events can be accompanied by negative effects for forest ecosystems but many plants can reduce drought stress by hydraulic redistribution (HR). Similar processes were recently described for ectomycorrhizal networks but no information is available for mycelia networks of saprotrophic fungi. They strongly contribute to belowground nutrient cycling, C and N mineralization. We hypothesize that redistributed water by saprotrophic fungi triggers mineralization of organic matter in soils under drought conditions. The impact of HR by saprotrophic fungi on mineralization was determined using mesocosms comprising two chambers, separated by a 2 mm air gap to prevent bulk flow of water. After inoculation with fungal cultures and a growth phase, both chambers were desiccated. Subsequently, only chamber I was rewetted while chamber II was treated with 13C labelled plant material. CO2 samples were collected over 7 days after rewetting and analyzed for stable isotope ratio. In addition, enzymatic activity of chitinases and cellobiohydrolases in chamber II was determined after 7 days using the soil zymographie method with fluorogenic 4-Methylumbelliferyl-substrates. A negative control was provided by mesocosms in which hyphal connections between the chambers were severed before rewetting. Intact fungal connections between the chambers led to a strong increase in volumetric water content in chamber II after rewetting of chamber I and the CO2 had a higher enrichment in 13C than in the control mescosms with severed connections. Enrichment started 48 h after rewetting and continued for the rest of the experiment. This resulted in a more than two fold higher total carbon mineralization after 7 days in chamber II of mesocosms with intact hyphal connections. In addition, enzyme activities were also strongly increased compared to controls. In conclusion, mycelia networks

  17. CO2 Energy Reactor - Integrated Mineral Carbonation: Perspectives on Lab-Scale Investigation and Products Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael M Santos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the challenges of mineral CO2 sequestration, Innovation Concepts B.V. is developing a unique proprietary Gravity Pressure Vessel (GPV reactor technology, and has focussed on generating reaction products of high economic value. The GPV provides intense process conditions through hydrostatic pressurization and heat exchange integration that harvests exothermic reaction energy, thereby reducing energy demand of conventional reactor designs, in addition to offering other benefits. In this paper, a perspective on the status of this technology and outlook for the future is provided. To date, laboratory-scale tests of the envisioned process have been performed in a tubular rocking autoclave reactor. The mineral of choice has been olivine (~Mg1.6Fe2+0.4(SiO4 + ppm Ni/Cr, although asbestos, steel slags and oil shale residues are also under investigation. The effect of several process parameters on reaction extent and product properties have been tested: CO2 pressure, temperature, residence time, additives (buffers, lixiviants, chelators, oxidizers, solids loading, and mixing rate. The products (carbonates, amorphous silica and chromite have been physically separated (based on size, density and magnetic properties, characterized (for chemistry, mineralogy and morphology and tested in intended applications (as pozzolanic carbon-negative building material. Economically, it is found that product value is the main driver for mineral carbonation, rather than, or in addition to, the sequestered CO2. The approach of using a GPV and focusing on valuable reaction products could thus make CO2 mineralization a feasible and sustainable industrial process.

  18. Differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types in a temperate forest ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Ye-Ming You; Juan Wang; Xiao-Lu Sun; Zuo-Xin Tang; Zhi-Yong Zhou; Osbert Jianxin Sun

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the controls on soil carbon dynamics is crucial for modeling responses of ecosystem carbon balance to global change, yet few studies provide explicit knowledge on the direct and indirect effects of forest stands on soil carbon via microbial processes. We investigated tree species, soil, and site factors in relation to soil carbon density and mineralization in a temperate forest of central China. We found that soil microbial biomass and community structure, extracellular enzyme a...

  19. Mineralization and carbon turnover in subarctic heath soil as affected by warming and additional litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Baath, Erland;

    2007-01-01

    carbon turnover (measured as changes in the pools during a growing-season-long field incubation of soil cores in situ). The mainly N limited bacterial communities had shifted slightly towards limitation by C and P in response to seven growing seasons of warming. This and the significantly increased...... bacterial growth rate under warming may partly explain the observed higher C loss from the warmed soil. This is furthermore consistent with the less dramatic increase in the contents of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic N (DON) in the warmed soil than in the soil from ambient temperature...... during the field incubation. The added litter did not affect the carbon content, but it was a source of nutrients to the soil, and it also tended to increase bacterial growth rate and net mineralization of P. The inorganic N pool decreased during the field incubation of soil cores, especially in the...

  20. Snow Impurities on Central Asian Glaciers: Mineral Dust, Organic & Elemental Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, J.; Kang, S.; Peltier, R.; Sprenger, M.; Guo, J.; Li, Y.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In Central Asia, 90 % of the population depend on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow cover. Accelerated melting can be induced by the deposition of e.g., mineral dust and black carbon that reduce the surface albedo. Data on source regions and chemical characteristics of snow impurities are however scarce in Central Asia. We studied aerosol deposited between summers of 2012 and 2013on three different glaciers in the Kyrgyz Republic. Samples were taken from two snow pits on the glacier Abramov in the northern Pamir and from one snow pit on Ak-Shiirak and Suek in the central Tien Shan. The snow was analyzed for elemental and total organic carbon, major ions and mineral dust. In addition, dissolved organic carbon was speciated by using the Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol spectrometer. Elevated mineral dust concentrations were found on all glaciers during summer and winter with lower annual average concentrations (20 mg l-1)in the northern Pamir (factor 5 to 6). Correlations between dust tracers varied, indicating different source regions. Average EC concentrations showed seasonal variation in the northern Pamir (> 100 μg l-1 in summer, 12) than in summer (glaciers ranged between 0.65 and 1.09, indicating a high degree of oxygenation which suggests long-range transport of the organic snow impurities. Marker substances such as potassium and mercury and their correlations suggest contribution from biomass burning emissions. Atmospheric measurements in August 2013 were conducted to obtain information on background aerosol characteristics in the remote high mountain areas. The average black carbon concentration was 0.26 μg/m³ (± 0.24 μg/m³).

  1. Sequestration of carbon dioxide by indirect mineralization using Victorian brown coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Parikh, Vinay; Zhang, Lian

    2012-03-30

    The use of an industry waste, brown coal fly ash collected from the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia, has been tested for the post-combustion CO(2) capture through indirect minersalization in acetic acid leachate. Upon the initial leaching, the majority of calcium and magnesium in fly ash were dissolved into solution, the carbonation potential of which was investigated subsequently through the use of a continuously stirred high-pressure autoclave reactor and the characterization of carbonation precipitates by various facilities. A large CO(2) capture capacity of fly ash under mild conditions has been confirmed. The CO(2) was fixed in both carbonate precipitates and water-soluble bicarbonate, and the conversion between these two species was achievable at approximately 60°C and a CO(2) partial pressure above 3 bar. The kinetic analysis confirmed a fast reaction rate for the carbonation of the brown coal ash-derived leachate at a global activation energy of 12.7 kJ/mol. It is much lower than that for natural minerals and is also very close to the potassium carbonate/piperazine system. The CO(2) capture capacity of this system has also proven to reach maximum 264 kg CO(2)/ton fly ash which is comparable to the natural minerals tested in the literature. As the fly ash is a valueless waste and requires no comminution prior to use, the technology developed here is highly efficient and energy-saving, the resulting carbonate products of which are invaluable for the use as additive to cement and in the paper and pulp industry. PMID:22326240

  2. CarbFix I: Rapid CO2 mineralization in basalt for permanent carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J. M.; Stute, M.; Snæbjörnsdóttir, S.; Gíslason, S. R.; Oelkers, E. H.; Sigfússon, B.; Gunnarsson, I.; Aradottir, E. S.; Gunnlaugsson, E.; Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide mineralization via CO2-fluid-rock reactions provides the most permanent solution for geologic CO2 storage. Basalts, onshore or offshore, have the potential to store million metric tons of CO2 as (Ca, Mg, Fe) carbonates [1, 2]. However, as of today it was unclear how fast CO2 is converted to carbonate minerals in-situ in a basalt storage reservoir. The CarbFix I project in Iceland was designed to verify in-situ CO2 mineralization in basaltic rocks. Two injection tests were performed at the CarbFix I pilot injection site near the Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in 2012. 175 tons of pure CO2 and 73 tons of a CO2+H2S mixture were injection from January to March 2012 and in June 2013, respectively. The gases were injected fully dissolved in groundwater into a permeable basalt formation between 400 and 800 m depth using a novel CO2 injection system. Using conservative (SF6, SF5CF3) and reactive (14C) tracers, we quantitatively monitor and detect dissolved and chemically transformed CO2. Tracer breakthrough curves obtained from the first monitoring well indicate that the injected solution arrived in a fast short pulse and a late broad peak. Ratios of 14C/SF6, 14C/SF5CF3 or DIC/SF6 and DIC/SF5CF3 are significantly lower in the monitoring well compared to the injection well, indicating that the injected dissolved CO2 reacted. Mass balance calculations using the tracer data reveal that >95% of the injected CO2 has been mineralized over a period of two years. Evidence of carbonate precipitation has been found in core samples that were collected from the storage reservoir using wireline core drilling as well as in and on the submersible pump in the monitoring well. Results from the core analysis will be presented with emphasis on the CO2 mineralization. [1] McGrail et al. (2006) JGR 111, B12201; [2] Goldberg et al. (2008) PNAS 105(29), 9920-9925.

  3. Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of coal combustion fly-ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has led to concerns about global warming. A technology that could possibly contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term geological storage) or the ex-situ mineral sequestration (controlled industrial reactors) of CO2. In the present study, we propose to use coal combustion fly-ash, an industrial waste that contains about 4.1 wt.% of lime (CaO), to sequester carbon dioxide by aqueous carbonation. The carbonation reaction was carried out in two successive chemical reactions, first, the irreversible hydration of lime. CaO + H2O → Ca(OH)2 second, the spontaneous carbonation of calcium hydroxide suspension. Ca(OH)2 + CO2 → CaCO3 + H2O A significant CaO-CaCO3 chemical transformation (approximately 82% of carbonation efficiency) was estimated by pressure-mass balance after 2 h of reaction at 30 deg. C. In addition, the qualitative comparison of X-ray diffraction spectra for reactants and products revealed a complete CaO-CaCO3 conversion. The carbonation efficiency of CaO was independent on the initial pressure of CO2 (10, 20, 30 and 40 bar) and it was not significantly affected by reaction temperature (room temperature '20-25', 30 and 60 deg. C) and by fly-ash dose (50, 100, 150 g). The kinetic data demonstrated that the initial rate of CO2 transfer was enhanced by carbonation process for our experiments. The precipitate calcium carbonate was characterized by isolated micrometric particles and micrometric agglomerates of calcite (SEM observations). Finally, the geochemical modelling using PHREEQC software indicated that the final solutions (i.e. after reaction) are supersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate (0.7 ≤ saturation index ≤ 1.1). This experimental study demonstrates that 1 ton of fly-ash could sequester up to 26 kg of CO2, i.e. 38.18 ton of fly-ash per ton of CO2 sequestered. This confirms the

  4. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This topical report covers Phase 2b, which is the construction phase of pilot demonstration subsystems that make up the integrated plant. The subsystems included are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant is now capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The topical report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. At the end of Phase 2b, the CCMP pilot demonstration is fully ready for testing.

  5. Carbon Isotope Systematics in Mineral-Catalyzed Hydrothermal Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperature and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques. Reduction of CO2 and/or CO during serpentization by mineral surface catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars. With the evidence a recent study has discovered for serpentinization in deeply buried carbon rich sediments, and more showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history, it seems likely that abiotic methane generation via serpentinization reactions may have been common on Mars. Experiments involving mineral-catalyzed hydrothermal organic synthesis processes were conducted at 750 C and 5.5 Kbars. Alkanes, alcohols and carboxylic acids were identified as organic compounds. No "isotopic reversal" of delta C-13 values was observed for alkanes or carboxylic acids, suggesting a different reaction pathway than polymerization. Alcohols were proposed as intermediaries formed on mineral surfaces at experimental conditions. Carbon isotope data were used in this study to unravel the reaction pathways of abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems at high temperatures and pressures. They are instrumental in constraining the origin and evolution history of organic compounds on Mars and other planets.

  6. Mineral elements of subtropical tree seedlings in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Huang

    Full Text Available Mineral elements in plants have been strongly affected by increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and nitrogen (N deposition due to human activities. However, such understanding is largely limited to N and phosphorus in grassland. Using open-top chambers, we examined the concentrations of potassium (K, calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, aluminum (Al, copper (Cu and manganese (Mn in the leaves and roots of the seedlings of five subtropical tree species in response to elevated CO2 (ca. 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1 and N addition (100 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 from 2005 to 2009. These mineral elements in the roots responded more strongly to elevated CO2 and N addition than those in the leaves. Elevated CO2 did not consistently decrease the concentrations of plant mineral elements, with increases in K, Al, Cu and Mn in some tree species. N addition decreased K and had no influence on Cu in the five tree species. Given the shifts in plant mineral elements, Schima superba and Castanopsis hystrix were less responsive to elevated CO2 and N addition alone, respectively. Our results indicate that plant stoichiometry would be altered by increasing CO2 and N deposition, and K would likely become a limiting nutrient under increasing N deposition in subtropics.

  7. Influence of the particle size of activated mineral carbon on the phenol and chlorophenol adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water pollution by phenolic compounds is a problem that requires a solution since these phenolic compounds are not completely biodegradable, they accumulate through the food chains and they are quite toxic when enter in contact with living organisms. In human beings, ingestion or contact of the skin with this type of compounds produces irritation and damages mainly to the liver and kidneys. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (EPA assigned nine phenolic compounds among the 275 most toxic substances in 1991. Phenols are found in wastewater from agriculture and industry, because phenolic compounds are used as pesticides and in diverse industrial activities. The treatment of this type of water is not simple because they are generally composed of a mixture of residuals with different chemical nature A useful method for the removal of phenols is the adsorption by activated carbon, since this material has a great surface area and it can be regenerated. The adsorption process depends, among other factors, on the activated carbon characteristics. When they are modified, their capacity to remove pollutants from the water changes. The effect of activated carbon particle size on the removal of phenolic compounds has not been completely studied. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the influence of the mineral activated carbon particle size on the phenol and 4-chloro phenol adsorption in aqueous solution, on adsorption column system. The results of the present work indicate that the mineral activated carbon particle size has a very important influence on the adsorption of phenol and 4-chloro phenol. When the particles were smaller, the retention quantities of phenol and 4-chloro phenol increased. This behavior was related to the particle characteristics of the mineral activated carbon such as surface area and pore volume, while other factors such as elementary composition of the activated carbon did not influence the adsorption process

  8. Carbonate Mineral Formation under the Influence of Limestone-Colonizing Actinobacteria: Morphology and Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chengliang; Jiang, Jihong; Sun, Henry; Huang, Ying; Tao, Faxiang; Lian, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms and their biomineralization processes are widespread in almost every environment on earth. In this work, Streptomyces luteogriseus DHS C014, a dominant lithophilous actinobacteria isolated from microbial mats on limestone rocks, was used to investigate its potential biomineralization to allow a better understanding of bacterial contributions to carbonate mineralization in nature. The ammonium carbonate free-drift method was used with mycelium pellets, culture supernatant, and spent culture of the strain. Mineralogical analyses showed that hexagonal prism calcite was only observed in the sub-surfaces of the mycelium pellets, which is a novel morphology mediated by microbes. Hemispheroidal vaterite appeared in the presence of spent culture, mainly because of the effects of soluble microbial products (SMP) during mineralization. When using the culture supernatant, doughnut-like vaterite was favored by actinobacterial mycelia, which has not yet been captured in previous studies. Our analyses suggested that the effects of mycelium pellets as a molecular template almost gained an advantage over SMP both in crystal nucleation and growth, having nothing to do with biological activity. It is thereby convinced that lithophilous actinobacteria, S. luteogriseus DHS C014, owing to its advantageous genetic metabolism and filamentous structure, showed good biomineralization abilities, maybe it would have geoactive potential for biogenic carbonate in local microenvironments.

  9. Interactions of 14C-labeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes with soil minerals in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes are often modified to be stable in the aqueous phase by adding extensive hydrophilic surface functional groups. The stability of such CNTs in water with soil or sediment is one critical factor controlling their environmental fate. We conducted a series of experiments to quantitatively assess the association between water dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and three soil minerals (kaolinite, smectite, or shale) in aqueous solution under different sodium concentrations. 14C-labeling was used in these experiments to unambiguously quantify MWCNTs. The results showed that increasing ionic strength strongly promoted the removal of MWCNTs from aqueous phase. The removal tendency is inversely correlated with the soil minerals’ surface potential and directly correlated with their hydrophobicity. This removal can be interpreted by the extended Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (EDLVO) theory especially for kaolinite and smectite. Shale, which contains large and insoluble organic materials, sorbed MWCNTs the most strongly. - Graphical abstract: The stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in an aqueous system containing kaolinite, smectite or shale as model soil minerals is investigated using the 14C-labeling technique. Highlights: ► The interactions between MWCNTs and kaolinite, smectite, or shale were probed. ► Surface potential and hydrophobicity of the particles governs their interactions. ► EDLVO can be used to interpret the interactions. ► Insoluble organic materials in shale strongly sorb MWCNTs.

  10. Carbon sources supporting benthic mineralization in mangrove and adjacent seagrass sediments (Gazi Bay, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bouillon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of carbon substrates used by in situ sedimentary bacterial communities was investigated in an intertidal mangrove ecosystem and in adjacent seagrass beds in Gazi bay (Kenya by δ13C analysis of bacteria-specific PLFA (phospholipid fatty acids and bulk organic carbon. Export of mangrove-derived organic matter to the adjacent seagrass-covered bay was evident from sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC and δ13CTOC data. PLFA δ13C data indicate that the substrate used by bacterial communities varied strongly and that exported mangrove carbon was a significant source for bacteria in the adjacent seagrass beds. Within the intertidal mangrove forest, bacterial PLFA at the surface layer (0-1cm typically showed more enriched δ13C values than deeper (up to 10cm sediment layers, suggesting a contribution from microphytobenthos and/or inwelled seagrass material. Under the simplifying assumption that seagrasses and mangroves are the dominant potential end-members, the estimated contribution of mangrove-derived carbon to benthic mineralization in the seagrass beds (16-74% corresponds fairly well to the estimated contribution of mangrove C to the sedimentary organic matter pool (21-71% across different seagrass sites. Based on the results of this study and a compilation of literature data, we suggest that trapping of allochtonous C is a common feature in seagrass beds and often represents a significant source of C for sediment bacteria - both in cases where seagrass C dominates the sediment TOC pool and in cases where external inputs are significant. Hence, it is likely that data on community respiration rates systematically overestimate the role of in situ mineralization as a fate of seagrass production.

  11. Sclerostin regulates release of bone mineral by osteocytes by induction of carbonic anhydrase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogawa, Masakazu; Wijenayaka, Asiri R; Ormsby, Renee T; Thomas, Gethin P; Anderson, Paul H; Bonewald, Lynda F; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J

    2013-12-01

    The osteocyte product sclerostin is emerging as an important paracrine regulator of bone mass. It has recently been shown that osteocyte production of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is important in osteoclastic bone resorption, and we reported that exogenous treatment of osteocytes with sclerostin can increase RANKL-mediated osteoclast activity. There is good evidence that osteocytes can themselves liberate mineral from bone in a process known as osteocytic osteolysis. In the current study, we investigated sclerostin-stimulated mineral dissolution by human primary osteocyte-like cells (hOCy) and mouse MLO-Y4 cells. We found that sclerostin upregulated osteocyte expression of carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2/Car2), cathepsin K (CTSK/Ctsk), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACP5/Acp5). Because acidification of the extracellular matrix is a critical step in the release of mineral from bone, we further examined the regulation by sclerostin of CA2. Sclerostin stimulated CA2 mRNA and protein expression in hOCy and in MLO-Y4 cells. Sclerostin induced a decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) in both cell types as well as a decrease in extracellular pH (pHo) and the release of calcium ions from mineralized substrate. These effects were reversed in the co-presence of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetozolamide. Car2-siRNA knockdown in MLO-Y4 cells significantly inhibited the ability of sclerostin to both reduce the pHo and release calcium from a mineralized substrate. Knockdown in MLO-Y4 cells of each of the putative sclerostin receptors, Lrp4, Lrp5 and Lrp6, using siRNA, inhibited the sclerostin induction of Car2, Catk and Acp5 mRNA, as well as pHo and calcium release. Consistent with this activity of sclerostin resulting in osteocytic osteolysis, human trabecular bone samples treated ex vivo with recombinant human sclerostin for 7 days exhibited an increased osteocyte lacunar area, an effect that was reversed by the co-addition of acetozolamide. These findings

  12. Microstructural and geo environmental influence of carbonate minerals on the heavy attenuation of Kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption characteristics of soils, which are fundamental to contaminant attenuation, depend on many soil-related and contaminant-related factors. The carbonate-rich soils in semi-arid regions provide the motivation for this study on the role of carbonates on contaminant attenuation. Previous reported studies have shown that carbonates exert considerable influence on the retention of heavy metals in soils. This study investigates kaolinite-calcite-contaminant interaction at different p H values and heavy metals concentrations. Particular attention is paid to the resultant effect on contaminant attenuation. To achieve the stated objectives, several batch equilibrium and XRD analyses were performed. p H control experiments were conducted to evaluate the influence of calcite content on sorption of Zn in the kaolinite-calcite mixtures. The interaction process of the clay fraction and carbonate was monitored through XRD analyses of the soil samples at various stages of the tests. It is concluded that the presence of carbonate minerals in clayey soils causes an increase in heavy metal attenuation of kaolinite

  13. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of hydrothermal minerals from Yellowstone drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199??C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The ??18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, ??-cristobalite, and ??-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8???. About one third of the silica 7samples have ??18O values that are consistent with isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters; most of the other silica samples appear to have precipitated from water enriched in 18O (up to 4.7???) relative to present thermal water, assuming precipitation at present in situ temperatures. Available data on fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures in hydrothermal quartz indicate that silica precipitation occurred mostly at temperatures above those measured during drilling and imply that 15O enrichments in water during silica precipitation were generally larger than those estimated from present conditions. Similarly, clay minerals (celadonite and smectite) have ??18O values higher (by 3.5 to 7.9???) than equilibrium values under present conditions. In contrast, all eight analyzed calcite samples are close to isotopic equilibrium with present thermal waters. The frequent incidence of apparent 18O enrichment in thermal water from which the hydrothermal minerals precipitated may indicate that a higher proportion of strongly 18O-enriched deep hydrothermal fluid once circulated through shallow portions of the Yellowstone system, or that a recurring transient 18O-enrichment effect occurs at shallow depths and is caused either by sudden decompressional boiling or by isotopic exchange at low water/rock ratios in new fractures. The mineralogy and apparent 18O enrichments of hydrothermal fracture-filling minerals are consistent with deposition

  14. Soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization under different tillage systems and Permanent Groundcover cultivation between Orange trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the alterations in carbon and nitrogen mineralization due to different soil tillage systems and groundcover species for intercropped orange trees. The experiment was established in an Ultisol soil (Typic Paleudults originated from Caiuá sandstone in northwestern of the state of Paraná, Brazil, in an area previously cultivated with pasture (Brachiaria humidicola. Two soil tillage systems were evaluated: conventional tillage (CT in the entire area and strip tillage (ST with a 2-m width, each with different groundcover vegetation management systems. The citrus cultivar utilized was the 'Pera' orange (Citrus sinensis grafted onto a 'Rangpur' lime rootstock. The soil samples were collected at a 0-15-cm depth after five years of experiment development. Samples were collected from under the tree canopy and from the inter-row space after the following treatments: (1 CT and annual cover crop with the leguminous Calopogonium mucunoides; (2 CT and perennial cover crop with the leguminous peanut Arachis pintoi; (3 CT and evergreen cover crop with Bahiagrass Paspalum notatum; (4 CT and cover crop with spontaneous B. humidicola grass vegetation; and (5 ST and maintenance of the remaining grass (pasture of B. humidicola. The soil tillage systems and different groundcover vegetation influenced the C and N mineralization, both under the tree canopy and in the inter-row space. The cultivation of B. humidicola under strip tillage provided higher potential mineralization than the other treatments in the inter-row space. Strip tillage increased the C and N mineralization compared to conventional tillage. The grass cultivation increased the C and N mineralization when compared to the others treatments cultivated in the inter-row space.

  15. Design of the passive personal dosimeter for miners using an allyl diglycol carbonate plastic. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarizes the results of the feasibility study on the design and development of a passive personal dosimeter incorporating an allyl diglycol carbonate plastic (CR39) detector, for use by uranium miners. Based upon the feasibility study, a passive personal dosimeter using a capacitor-type electrostatic enhancement device has been designed. Preliminary tests indicate that the prototype could be used in the mine environment to differentiate radon and thoron daughters with a detection efficiency comparable to that of a typical active device. Further study is required, however, into the possible influence in the mine environment of local variations in charged fraction, upon the calibration of this dosimeter

  16. Topsoil organic carbon mineralization and CO2 evolution of three paddy soils from South China and the temperature dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-hui; LI Lian-qing; PAN Gen-xing

    2007-01-01

    Carbon mineralization and its response to climatic warming have been receiving global attention for the last decade.Although the virtual influence of temperature effect is still in great debate,little is known on the mineralization of organic carbon(SOC) of paddy soils of China under warming.SOC mineralization of three major types of China's paddy soils is studied through laboratory incubation for 114 d under soil moisture regime of 70% water holding capacity at 20℃ and 25℃ respectively.The carbon that mineralized as CO2 evolved was measured every day in the first 32 d and every two days in the following days.Carbon mineralized during the 114 d incubation ranged from 3.51 to 9.22 mg CO2-C/gC at 20℃ and from 4.24 to 11.35 mg CO2-C/gC at 25℃ respectively;and a mineralizable C pool in the range of 0.24 to 0.59 gC/kg.varying with difierent soils.The whole course of C mineralization in the 114 d incubation could be divided into three stages of varying rates,representing the three subpools of the total mineralizable C:very actively mineralized C at 1-23 d,actively mineralized C at 24-74 d and a slowly mineralized pool with low and more or 1ess stabilized C mineralization rate at 75-114 d.The calculated Ω10 values ranged from 1.0 to 2.4,varying with the soil types and N status.Neither the total SOC pool nor the labile C pool could account for the total mineralization potential of the soils studied,despite a well correlation of labile C with the shortly and actively mineralized C,which were shown in sensitive response to soil wanning.However,the portion of microbial C pool and the soil C/N ratio controlled the C mineralization and the temperature dependence,Therefore,C sequestration may not result in an increase of C mineralization proportionally.The relative control of C bioavailability and microbial metabolic activity on C mineralization with respect to stabilization of sequestered C in the paddy soils of China is to be further studied.

  17. Modelling soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable lands using legacy soil data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suuster, E; Ritz, Christian; Roostalu, H;

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration is an essential factor in biomass production and soil functioning. SOC concentration values are often obtained by prediction but the prediction accuracy depends much on the method used. Currently, there is a lack of evidence in the soil science literature as...... map for the case study area of Tartu County where the SOC predictions ranged from 0.6 to 4.8%. Our study indicates that predictions using legacy soil maps can be used in national inventories and for up-scaling estimates of carbon concentrations from county to country scales....... to the advantages and shortcomings of the different commonly used prediction methods. Therefore, we compared and evaluated the merits of the median approach, analysis of covariance, mixed models and random forests in the context of prediction of SOC concentrations of mineral soils under arable...

  18. Normalization of stable isotope data for carbonate minerals: Implementation of IUPAC guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Tae; Coplen, Tyler B.; Horita, Juske

    2015-06-01

    Carbonate minerals provide a rich source of geochemical information because their δ13C and δ18O values provide information about surface and subsurface Earth processes. However, a significant problem is that the same δ18O value is not reported for the identical carbonate sample when analyzed in different isotope laboratories in spite of the fact that the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has provided reporting guidelines for two decades. This issue arises because (1) the δ18O measurements are performed on CO2 evolved by reaction of carbonates with phosphoric acid, (2) the acid-liberated CO2 is isotopically fractionated (enriched in 18O) because it contains only two-thirds of the oxygen from the solid carbonate, (3) this oxygen isotopic fractionation factor is a function of mineralogy, temperature, concentration of the phosphoric acid, and δ18O value of water in the phosphoric acid, (4) researchers may use any one of an assortment of oxygen isotopic fractionation factors that have been published for various minerals at various reaction temperatures, and (5) it sometimes is not clear how one should calculate δ18OVPDB values on a scale normalized such that the δ18O value of SLAP reference water is -55.5 ‰ relative to VSMOW reference water. To enable researchers worldwide to publish the same δ18O value (within experimental uncertainty) for the same carbonate sample, we have re-evaluated reported acid fractionation factors for calcite at 25, 50, and 75 °C and propose a revised relation for the temperature dependence of oxygen isotopic acid fractionation factor, αCO2(ACID)-calcite , of where T is temperature in kelvin. At 25 °C, αCO2(ACID)-calcite = 1.01025 , the most commonly accepted value for this quantity. We propose a normalization protocol in which (1) the internationally distributed carbonate isotopic reference materials NBS 18 and NBS 19 are interspersed among carbonate samples analyzed by treatment with phosphoric acid, (2

  19. Effect of Additives and pH on the Formation of Carbonate Mineral by CO2 Sequestration of Cement Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, J.; Lee, H.; Son, B. S.; Oh, J.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 in the atmosphere causes a global warming that is a big issue nowadays. Many studies of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technologies have been studied all over the world. Waste cement is a good source for aqueous carbonation because it is rich in calcium. Therefore, this study was performed to develop the aqueous carbonation method for waste cement powder. Cement paste was made with water/cement ratio of 6:4 and cured for 28 days in water bath. The cement paste was pulverized into a fine powder sizing less than 0.15 mm. To study effect of additives and pH on the formation of carbonate minerals, aqueous carbonation experiments were conducted. The mineral compositions and morphology of carbonate mineral were identified by XRD and SEM/EDS analysis. 1.0 M NaCl and 0.25 M MgCl2 were applied as additives. Aqueous carbonation experiment was conducted with injecting pure CO2 gas (99.9%) to a reactor containing 200 ㎖ of reacting solution. The pH of reacting solution was controled to determine formational condition of carbonate minerals. In 0.25 M MgCl2 solution, calcite was dominant mineral at high pH. More aragonite, however, formed as decreasing pH of solution with injection of CO2. The presence of Mg2+ in solution makes aragonite more dominant than calcite. Aragonite was mainly formed at the high pH of solution with 1.0 M NaCl additive, whereas calcite was more preponderant mineral than aragonite as falling pH. It show that unstable aragonite transformed to calcite as decreasing pH. In no additive solution, vaterite was dominantly formed at the initial stage of experiement, but unstable vaterite transformed to well crystallized calcite with further carbonation.

  20. Effect of potassium salts and distillery effluent on carbon mineralization in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Suresh; Joshi, H C; Pathak, H; Jain, M C; Kalra, N

    2002-07-01

    Distillery effluent, a rich source of potassium, is used for irrigation at many places in the world. A laboratory experiment was conducted to study the influence of potassium salts present in post-methanation distillery effluent (PME) along with two other salts, KCl and K2SO4, on mineralization of carbon in soil. PME oxidized with H2O2, raw PME, KCl and K2SO4 solutions containing K equivalent to 10%, 20%, 40% and 100% of K present in PME were added to the soil separately, maintaining four replications for each treatment and control. Addition of salts up to a certain concentration stimulated C mineralization but a decline was noticed at higher concentrations. All the levels of salts caused higher CO2 evolution than the control suggesting that the presence of K salts enhanced the microbial activity resulting in increased CO2 evolution. The influence of K2SO4 was significantly higher than KCl in stimulating C mineralization in soil. Oxidized effluent had a higher stimulating effect than inorganic salts, showing the influence of other salts accompanying K in the PME. Raw PME, which contained excess organic C, increased CO2 evolution even at the highest salt level (100% PME) signifying the effect of added C on alleviating the salt stress on microbial activity. PMID:12094803

  1. Carbonate minerals in porous media decrease mobility of polyacrylic acid modified zero-valent iron nanoparticles used for groundwater remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limited transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in porous media is a major obstacle to its widespread application for in situ groundwater remediation. Previous studies on nZVI transport have mainly been carried out in quartz porous media. The effect of carbonate minerals, which often predominate in aquifers, has not been evaluated to date. This study assessed the influence of the carbonate minerals in porous media on the transport of polyacrylic acid modified nZVI (PAA-nZVI). Increasing the proportion of carbonate sand in the porous media resulted in less transport of PAA-nZVI. Predicted travel distances were reduced to a few centimeters in pure carbonate sand compared to approximately 1.6 m in quartz sand. Transport modeling showed that the attachment efficiency and deposition rate coefficient increased linearly with increasing proportion of carbonate sand. -- Highlights: •Mobility of nZVI NANOFER 25S was investigated in different saturated porous media. •nZVI transport in carbonate-containing porous media was elucidated and quantified. •Mobility of polyacrylic acid-coated nZVI significantly ceases in carbonate-containing media. •Deposition rate coefficient increases linearly with increasing carbonate content. -- Carbonate minerals in porous aquifers significantly decrease the mobility of commercially available polyacrylic acid modified nanoscale zero-valent iron

  2. Differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types in a temperate forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ye-Ming; Wang, Juan; Sun, Xiao-Lu; Tang, Zuo-Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Osbert Jianxin

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the controls on soil carbon dynamics is crucial for modeling responses of ecosystem carbon balance to global change, yet few studies provide explicit knowledge on the direct and indirect effects of forest stands on soil carbon via microbial processes. We investigated tree species, soil, and site factors in relation to soil carbon density and mineralization in a temperate forest of central China. We found that soil microbial biomass and community structure, extracellular enzyme activities, and most of the site factors studied varied significantly across contrasting forest types, and that the associations between activities of soil extracellular enzymes and microbial community structure appeared to be weak and inconsistent across forest types, implicating complex mechanisms in the microbial regulation of soil carbon metabolism in relation to tree species. Overall, variations in soil carbon density and mineralization are predominantly accounted for by shared effects of tree species, soil, microclimate, and microbial traits rather than the individual effects of the four categories of factors. Our findings point to differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types and highlight the challenge to incorporate microbial processes for constraining soil carbon dynamics in global carbon cycle models.

  3. Evolution of multi-mineral formation evaluation using LWD data in complex carbonates offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, Paolo; Borovskaya, Irina [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical Formation Evaluation using Logging While Drilling (LWD) measurements is a new requisite when drilling in carbonates reservoirs offshore Brazil. These reservoirs are difficult to characterize due to an unusual mixture of the minerals constituting the matrix and affecting rock texture. As wells are getting deeper and more expensive, an early identification of the drilled targets potential is necessary for valuable decisions. Brazil operators have been especially demanding towards service providers, pushing for development of suitable services able to positively identify and quantify not only the presence of hydrocarbons but also their flowing capability. In addition to the standard gamma ray / resistivity / porosity and density measurements, three new measurements have proven to be critical to evaluate complex carbonate formations: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Spectroscopy and Capture Cross-Section (sigma). Under appropriate logging conditions, NMR data provides lithology independent porosity, bound and free fluids fractions, reservoir texture and permeability. Capture Spectroscopy allows assessment of mineral composition in terms of calcite, dolomite, quartz and clay fractions, and in addition highlights presence of other heavier minerals. Finally, sigma allows performing a volumetric formation evaluation without requiring custom optimization of the classical exponents used in all forms of resistivity saturation equations. All these new measurements are inherently statistical and if provided by wireline after drilling the well they may result in significant usage of rig time. When acquired simultaneously while drilling they have three very clear advantages: 1) no extra rig time, 2) improved statistics due to long formation exposure (drilling these carbonates is a slow process and rate of penetration (ROP) rarely exceeds 10 m/hr), 3) less invasion effect and better hole condition. This paper describes the development of two LWD tools performing the

  4. Natural and artificial (90Sr radionuclides in some carbonated mineral waters used in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Marija M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A radiological characterization of 7 different carbonated mineral water samples collected in the local supermarkets in the area of Belgrade (produced in Serbia was carried out. Analysis included determination of gross alpha and gross beta activities. The obtained results showed that the natural activity concentrations of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in carbonated mineral water samples were within World Health Organization recommended levels, except for the Heba Strong and Kiseljak samples where the beta activity exceeds 1 Bq/L. For these two water samples gamma spectrometry analysis was performed as well as determination of 90Sr by oxalic method. The instrumentation used to count the gross alpha and gross beta activities, as well as for 90Sr, was a/b low level proportional counter Thermo Eberline FHT 770 T. Gamma spectrometric measurements were performed using a HPGe Canberra detector with a counting efficiency of 20%. The annual effective dose equivalent due to ingestion of investigated waters was calculated for age group >17, and obtained values are lower than 0.1 mSv recommended reference level. Finally, a comparison of the investigated waters with worldwide data was made. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009

  5. On the role of carbonic anhydrase in the early phase of fish otolith mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R.

    2006-01-01

    The first step in the formation of fish otoliths, calcified structures which are responsible for the internalization of gravitational information, is based on the action of so-called Tether- (T-) cells. These T-cells appear during the very early development of the inner ear and persist only a few hours. They are characterized by a kinocilium, which is in contrast to the kinocilium of the later developing sensory hair cells not mechanosensory, but binds seeding particles containing glycogen, thereby localizing otolith formation (otolith seeding). Beating cilia distributed throughout the ear agitate seeding particles, thereby inhibiting premature agglutination. In the later development, a protein matrix is formed and mineralization/crystallization takes place. Since the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH) plays a prominent role in otolith mineralization (it provides carbonate for CaCO3 precipitation), we were prompted to investigate histochemically using larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus), whether CAH might be present as early as T-cells. Indeed, CAH was present in T-cells with prominent amounts of reaction product being located along the kinocilia and around the seeding particles. These results strongly indicate that kinocilia of T-cells act as structural guides for CAH/bicarbonate transportation towards the early otoliths’ calcification sites. Besides its role in calcification, CAH in the very early stage of otolith seeding may moreover aid in the accretion process of the precursor particles.

  6. Factors driving carbon mineralization priming effect in a soil amended with different types of biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely, P.; Tarquis, A. M.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Méndez, A.; Gascó, G.

    2014-03-01

    The effect of biochar on soil carbon mineralization priming effect depends on the characteristics of the raw materials, production method and pyrolysis conditions. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the impact of three different types of biochar on soil CO2 emissions and in different physicochemical properties. For this purpose, a sandy-loam soil was amended with the three biochars (BI, BII and BIII) at a rate of 8 wt % and soil CO2 emissions were measured for 45 days. BI is produced from a mixed wood sieving's from wood chip production, BII from a mixture of paper sludge and wheat husks and BIII from sewage sludge. Cumulative CO2 emissions of biochars, soil and amended soil were well fit to a simple first-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.97. Results shown a negative priming effect in the soil after addition of BI and a positive priming effect in the case of soil amended with BII and BIII. These results can be related with different biochar properties such as ash content, volatile matter, fixed carbon, organic carbon oxidised with dichromate, soluble carbon and metal and phenolic substances content in addition to surface biochar properties. Three biochars increased the values of soil field capacity and wilting point, while effects over pH and cation exchange capacity were not observed.

  7. Factors driving carbon mineralization priming effect in a soil amended with different types of biochar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cely

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of biochar on soil carbon mineralization priming effect depends on the characteristics of the raw materials, production method and pyrolysis conditions. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the impact of three different types of biochar on soil CO2 emissions and in different physicochemical properties. For this purpose, a sandy-loam soil was amended with the three biochars (BI, BII and BIII at a rate of 8 wt % and soil CO2 emissions were measured for 45 days. BI is produced from a mixed wood sieving's from wood chip production, BII from a mixture of paper sludge and wheat husks and BIII from sewage sludge. Cumulative CO2 emissions of biochars, soil and amended soil were well fit to a simple first-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (r2 greater than 0.97. Results shown a negative priming effect in the soil after addition of BI and a positive priming effect in the case of soil amended with BII and BIII. These results can be related with different biochar properties such as ash content, volatile matter, fixed carbon, organic carbon oxidised with dichromate, soluble carbon and metal and phenolic substances content in addition to surface biochar properties. Three biochars increased the values of soil field capacity and wilting point, while effects over pH and cation exchange capacity were not observed.

  8. A Numerical Study on Combining CO2 Mineral Carbonation and Geothermal Energy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in the novel concept of operating Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 instead of water as heat transmission fluid. Initial studies have suggested that CO2 may achieve larger rates of heat extraction, and can offer geologic storage of carbon as an ancillary benefit. A fully developed EGS with CO2 would consist of three distinct zones, (1) a central zone or “core” in which all aqueous phase has been removed by dissolution into the flowing CO2 stream, so that the reservoir fluid is a single supercritical CO2 phase; (2) a surrounding intermediate zone, in which the reservoir fluid consists of a two-phase water-CO2 mixture; and (3) an outer or peripheral zone, in which the reservoir fluid is a single aqueous phase with dissolved CO2. Fluid-rock interactions in EGS operated with CO2 are expected to be vastly different in zones with an aqueous phase present, as compared to the central reservoir zone with anhydrous supercritical CO2. We have performed chemically reactive transport (TOUGHREACT ) modeling to investigate fluid-rock interactions and CO2 mineral carbonation of an EGS operated with CO2. The quartz monzodiorite unit at the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) site at Desert Peak (Nevada) was taken as an example. A geothermal injection well system with supercritical CO2 injection was simulated to (1) investigate mineral dissolution/precipitation and associated porosity changes, and (2) impacts on reservoir growth and longevity, with ramifications for sustaining energy recovery, for estimating CO2 loss rates, and for figuring tradeoffs between power generation and CO2 mineralization (geologic storage).

  9. Carbon and nitrogen pools and mineralization rates in boreal forest soil after stump harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarakka, Lilli; Hyvönen, Riitta; Strömgren, Monika; Palviainen, Marjo; Persson, Tryggve; Olsson, Bengt A.; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko

    2016-04-01

    The use of forest-derived biomass has steadily increased in the Finland and Sweden during the past decades. Thus, more intensive forest management practices are becoming more common in the region, such as whole-tree harvesting, both above- and belowground. Stump harvesting causes a direct removal of carbon (C) in the form of biomass from the stand and can cause extensive soil disturbance, which in turn can result in increased C mineralization. In this study, the effects of stump harvesting on soil C and nitrogen (N) mineralization, and soil surface disturbance were studied at two different clear-felled Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in Central Finland. The treatments were conventional stem-only harvesting combined with mounding (WTH) and stump harvesting (i.e. complete tree harvesting) combined with mounding (WTH+S). Logging residues were removed from all study sites. Soil samples down to a depth of 20 cm were systematically collected from the different soil disturbance surfaces (undisturbed soil, the mounds and the pits) 12-13 years after final harvest. Soil samples were incubated in the laboratory to determine the C and N mineralization rates. In addition, total C and N pools were estimated for each disturbance class and soil layer. Soil C and N pools were lower following stump harvesting, however, no statistically significant treatment effect was detected. Instead, C mineralization responses to treatment intensity was site-specific. C/N-ratio and organic matter content were significantly affected by harvest intensity. The observed changes in C and N pools appear to be related to the intrinsic variation of the surface disturbance and soil characteristics, and harvesting per se, rather than treatment intensity. Long-term studies are however needed to draw long-term conclusions whether stump harvesting significantly changes soil C and nutrient dynamics.

  10. Isotopic fractionation of Mg 2+(aq), Ca 2+(aq), and Fe 2+(aq) with carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bogatko, Stuart A.; Jackson, Virgil E.; Dixon, David A.

    2010-11-01

    Density-functional electronic structure calculations are used to compute the equilibrium constants for 26Mg/ 24Mg and 44Ca/ 40Ca isotope exchange between carbonate minerals and uncomplexed divalent aquo ions. The most reliable calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level predict equilibrium constants K, reported as 10 3ln ( K) at 25 °C, of -5.3, -1.1, and +1.2 for 26Mg/ 24Mg exchange between calcite (CaCO 3), magnesite (MgCO 3), and dolomite (Ca 0.5Mg 0.5CO 3), respectively, and Mg 2+(aq), with positive values indicating enrichment of the heavy isotope in the mineral phase. For 44Ca/ 40Ca exchange between calcite and Ca 2+(aq) at 25 °C, the calculations predict values of +1.5 for Ca 2+(aq) in 6-fold coordination and +4.1 for Ca 2+(aq) in 7-fold coordination. We find that the reduced partition function ratios can be reliably computed from systems as small as M(CO)610- and M(HO)62+ embedded in a set of fixed atoms representing the second-shell (and greater) coordination environment. We find that the aqueous cluster representing the aquo ion is much more sensitive to improvements in the basis set than the calculations on the mineral systems, and that fractionation factors should be computed using the best possible basis set for the aquo complex, even if the reduced partition function ratio calculated with the same basis set is not available for the mineral system. The new calculations show that the previous discrepancies between theory and experiment for Fe 3+-hematite and Fe 2+-siderite fractionations arise from an insufficiently accurate reduced partition function ratio for the Fe 3+(aq) and Fe 2+(aq) species.

  11. Carbon mineralization in mine tailing ponds amended with pig slurries and marble wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Zornoza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective application of organic residues to reclaim soils requires the optimization of the waste management to minimize CO2 emissions and optimize soil C sequestration efficiency. In this study, the short-term effects of pig slurry amendment alone and together with marble waste on organic matter mineralization in two tailing ponds from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain were investigated in a field remediation experiment. The treatments were: marble waste (MW, pig slurry (PS, marble waste + pig slurry (MW+PS, and control. Soil carbon mineralization was determined using a static chamber method with alkali absorption during 70 days. Soil respiration rates in all plots were higher the first days of the experiment owing to higher soil moisture and higher mean air temperature. MW plots followed the same pattern than control plots, with similar respiration rates. The addition of pig slurry caused a significant increase in the respiration rates, although in MW+PS plots, respiration rates were lower than in PS plots. The cumulative quantities of C-CO2 evolved from the pig slurry mineralization were fitted to a first-order kinetic model explaining 90% of the data. This model implies the presence of only one mineralisable pool (C0. The values of the index C0*constant rate/added C were similar for PS plots in both tailing ponds, but lower in the MW+PS treatment, suggesting that the application of marble reduces the degradability of the organic compounds present in the pig slurry. Thus, the application of marble wastes contributes to slow down the loss of organic matter by mineralization.

  12. Isotopic Fractionation of Mg2+(aq), Ca2+(aq), and Fe2+(aq) with Carbonate Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bogatko, Stuart A.; Jackson, Virgil E.; Dixon, David A.

    2010-11-15

    Density functional electronic structure calculations are used to compute the equilibrium constant (the isotope fractionation factor) for 26Mg/24Mg and 44Ca/40Ca isotope exchange between carbonate minerals and uncomplexed divalent aquo ions. The most reliable calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level predict equilibrium constants K, reported as 103ln(K) at 25 °C, of -5.3, -1.1, and +1.1 for 26Mg/24Mg exchange between calcite (CaCO3), magnesite (MgCO3), and dolomite (Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3), respectively, and Mg2+(aq), with positive values indicating enrichment in the mineral phase. For 44Ca/40Ca exchange between calcite and Ca2+(aq), the calculations predict values of +1.5 for Ca2+(aq) in six-fold coordination and +4.1 for Ca2+(aq) in seven-fold coordination. We find that the reduced partition function ratios can be reliably computed from systems as small as M(CO3)610- and M2+(H2O)6 embedded in a set of fixed atoms representing the 2nd shell (and greater) coordination environment. We find that the aqueous cluster representing the aquo ion is much more sensitive to improvements in the basis set than the calculations on the mineral systems, and that fractionation factors should be computed using 2 the best possible basis set for the aquo complex, even if the reduced partition function ratio calculated with the same basis set is not available for the mineral system. The new calculations show that the previous discrepancies between theory and experiment for Fe3+-hematite and Fe2+-siderite fractionations arise from an insufficiently accurate reduced partition function ratio for the Fe3+(aq) and Fe2+(aq) species.

  13. Negative CO2 emissions via subsurface mineral carbonation in fractured peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Matter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Uptake of CO2 from surface water via mineral carbonation in peridotite can be engineered to achieve negative CO2 emissions. Reaction with peridotite, e.g., CO2 + olivine (A), serpentine (B) and brucite (C), forms inert, non-toxic, solid carbonates such as magnesite. Experimental studies show that A can be 80% complete in a few hours with 30 micron powders and elevated P(CO2) [1,2,3]. B is slower, but in natural systems the rate of B+C is significant [4]. Methods for capture of dilute CO2 via mineral carbonation [4,5,6,7] are not well known, though CO2 storage via mineral carbonation has been discussed for decades [8,9]. Where crushed peridotite is available, as in mine tailings, increased air or water flow could enhance CO2 uptake at a reasonable cost [4,5]. Here we focus on enhancing subsurface CO2 uptake from surface water flowing in fractured peridotite, in systems driven by thermal convection such as geothermal power plants. Return of depleted water to the surface would draw down CO2 from the air [6,7]. CO2 uptake from water, rate limited by flow in input and output wells, could exceed 1000 tons CO2/yr [7]. If well costs minus power sales were 0.1M to 1M and each system lasts 10 years this costs < 10 to 100 per ton CO2. As for other CCS methods, upscaling requires infrastructure resembling the oil industry. Uptake of 1 Gt CO2/yr at 1000 t/well/yr requires 1M wells, comparable to the number of producing oil and gas wells in the USA. Subsurface CO2 uptake could first be applied in coastal, sub-seafloor peridotite with onshore drilling. Sub-seafloor peridotite is extensive off Oman, New Caledonia and Papua New Guinea, with smaller amounts off Spain, Morocco, USA, etc. This would be a regional contribution, used in parallel with other methods elsewhere. To achieve larger scale is conceivable. There is a giant mass of seafloor peridotite along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges. Could robotic drills enhance CO2 uptake at a reasonable cost, while fabric chimneys

  14. Trace and Rare Earth Element Geochemistry of Micrite Mound Carbonates and Other Related REE Mineralized Carbonates from Bayan Obo Area in Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiaoyong; Zheng Yongfei; Yang Xueming; Zhang Yuxu; Peng Yang; Qiu Liwen

    2005-01-01

    Geochemical study on trace and rare earth element geochemistry was carried out for different carbonates including the very REE-rich ones in the main ore bodies, a carbonatite dyke and two micrite mounds from Heilaobao far away from the Bayan Obo ore deposit, and Xishan in west Beijing. The results show that both carbonatite dyke and REE mineralized carbonates (dolomite and marble) in the main ore bodies and outside ore bodies have similarities to each other, with very extreme positive anomaly of Ba, Th, Nb, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Pb, medium positive anomaly of Y, Ho, Tb, Er, Yb and negative anomaly of Sc, Ti and Cu. The REE concentration in the mineralized carbonates changes greatly, the total REE content changes from 262×10-6 in both east and west ore deposits to 104562 ×10-6 (10.46%), which is relatively lower than those samples of carbonatite dyke, whose REE contents vary greatly, from 1% up to 20 % of mass fraction. Light REE in the carbonatites are enriched and highly fractionated relative to heavy REE and there is no Eu anomaly. The REE distribution patterns of both mineralized carbonate and carbonatite dyke are of some similarities. However, the sedimentary carbonate micrite of Salinhudong Group in Heilaobao far outside the ore bodies and the pure carbonates from Xishan in Beijing, central part of North China plate, have the similarities in REE distributions with much lower REE contents, which are significantly different from those of carbonatite dyke and REE mineralized carbonate. In Bayan Obo district, both carbonates in the ore deposit and micrite mound outside the ore deposit underwent widespread metasomatism by fluids that resulted in formation of the superlager Fe-Nb-REE mineralization. It appears that the carbonates represent the evolution products of different geological stages.

  15. Carbon dioxide exchange of a perennial bioenergy crop cultivation on a mineral soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Saara E.; Shurpali, Narasinha J.; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Hyvönen, Niina; Maljanen, Marja; Räty, Mari; Virkajärvi, Perttu; Martikainen, Pertti J.

    2016-03-01

    One of the strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector is to increase the use of renewable energy sources such as bioenergy crops. Bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during biomass production, field management and transportation. The present study focuses on the cultivation of reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinacea L.), a perennial bioenergy crop, on a mineral soil. To quantify the CO2 exchange of this RCG cultivation system, and to understand the key factors controlling its CO2 exchange, the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) was measured from July 2009 until the end of 2011 using the eddy covariance (EC) method. The RCG cultivation thrived well producing yields of 6200 and 6700 kg DW ha-1 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Gross photosynthesis (GPP) was controlled mainly by radiation from June to September. Vapour pressure deficit (VPD), air temperature or soil moisture did not limit photosynthesis during the growing season. Total ecosystem respiration (TER) increased with soil temperature, green area index and GPP. Annual NEE was -262 and -256 g C m-2 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Throughout the study period from July 2009 until the end of 2011, cumulative NEE was -575 g C m-2. Carbon balance and its regulatory factors were compared to the published results of a comparison site on drained organic soil cultivated with RCG in the same climate. On this mineral soil site, the RCG had higher capacity to take up CO2 from the atmosphere than on the comparison site.

  16. Development of a technology for obtaining flotation reagent oxane-3 for carbon mineral raw materials of Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey Kalugin; Zhuldyz Shildebaeva; Madina Mametzhanova; Nazym Yelibaeva; Sergey Efremov; Sergey Nechipurenko; Dana Omarova

    2014-01-01

    The paper represents the results of development of a technology for obtaining oxane-3 and its application for enrichment of carbon mineral raw materials. Studies on enrichment of a shungite rock showed that the increase of a pulp temperature to 30°C significantly improves the characteristics and rate of the flotation process. Measured indicators of a shungite rock enrichment using Flotol B were lower in comparison with an enrichment by oxane-3. For schungite mineral, it was established that t...

  17. Calculating carbon mass balance from unsaturated soil columns treated with CaSO₄₋minerals: test of soil carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Soo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2014-12-01

    Renewed interest in managing C balance in soils is motivated by increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and consequent climate change. Here, experiments were conducted in soil columns to determine C mass balances with and without addition of CaSO4-minerals (anhydrite and gypsum), which were hypothesized to promote soil organic carbon (SOC) retention and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) precipitation as calcite under slightly alkaline conditions. Changes in C contents in three phases (gas, liquid and solid) were measured in unsaturated soil columns tested for one year and comprehensive C mass balances were determined. The tested soil columns had no C inputs, and only C utilization by microbial activity and C transformations were assumed in the C chemistry. The measurements showed that changes in C inventories occurred through two processes, SOC loss and SIC gain. However, the measured SOC losses in the treated columns were lower than their corresponding control columns, indicating that the amendments promoted SOC retention. The SOC losses resulted mostly from microbial respiration and loss of CO2 to the atmosphere rather than from chemical leaching. Microbial oxidation of SOC appears to have been suppressed by increased Ca(2+) and SO4(2)(-) from dissolution of CaSO4 minerals. For the conditions tested, SIC accumulation per m(2) soil area under CaSO4-treatment ranged from 130 to 260 g C m(-1) infiltrated water (20-120 g C m(-1) infiltrated water as net C benefit). These results demonstrate the potential for increasing C sequestration in slightly alkaline soils via CaSO4-treatment. PMID:24974014

  18. Carbonate-hosted nonsulphide Zn-Pb mineralization of southern British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Suzanne; Keevil, Halley; Simandl, George J.; Raudsepp, Mati

    2015-12-01

    Many carbonate-hosted sulphide deposits in the Salmo district of southern British Columbia have near-surface Zn- and Pb-bearing iron oxide-rich gossans. The gossans formed when carbonate-hosted, base metal sulphides were subjected to intense supergene weathering processes and metals were liberated by the oxidation of sulphide minerals. Two types of supergene carbonate-hosted nonsulphide deposits, direct replacement (`red ore') and wallrock replacement (`white ore'), are present in the Salmo district. The direct replacement deposits formed by the oxidation of primary sulphides; the base metals passed into solution and were redistributed and trapped within the space occupied by the oxidized portion of the sulphide protore. Depending on the extent of replacement of the sulphides by Zn-, Pb- and Fe-bearing oxides, silicates, carbonates and phosphates, the resulting ore can be called `mixed' (sulphides and nonsulphides) or simply `nonsulphide'. The wallrock replacement deposits formed when base metals liberated by the oxidation of sulphides were transported by circulating supergene solutions down and/or away from the sulphides to form wallrock replacement deposits. The direct replacement nonsulphide zones of the Salmo district overlay the sulphide bodies in which they replaced the sulphides and carbonates, forming large irregular replacement masses, encrustations and open-space fillings. They consist predominantly of hematite, goethite, hemimorphite [Zn4Si2O7(OH)2·H2O], minor hydrozincite [Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6], cerussite [PbCO3] and traces of willemite [Zn2SiO4]. The wallrock replacement zones consist mainly of hemimorphite with local occurrences of iron oxides, hopeite [Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O] and tarbuttite [Zn2(PO4)(OH)]. No remnants of sulphides were observed in the replacement zones. The Salmo nonsulphide deposits were formed by prolonged weathering of Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) mineralization that underwent dissolution and oxidation of the pyrite, sphalerite and galena

  19. Investigation of the potential of coal combustion fly ash for mineral sequestration of CO2 by accelerated carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineral carbonation of alkaline waste materials is being studied extensively for its potential as a way of reducing the increased level of CO2 in the atmosphere. Carbonation converts CO2 into minerals which are stable over geological time scales. This process occurs naturally but slowly, and needs to be accelerated to offset the present rate of emissions from power plants and other emission sources. The present study attempts to identify the potential of coal fly ash as a source for carbon storage (sequestration) through ex-situ accelerated mineral carbonation. In the study, two operational parameters that could affect the reaction process were tested to investigate their effect on mineralization. Coal fly ash was mixed with water to different water-to-solid ratios and samples were carbonated in a pressure vessel at different initial CO2 pressures. Temperature was kept constant at 40 °C. According to the results, one ton of Hazelwood fly ash could sequester 7.66 kg of CO2. The pressure of CO2 inside the vessel has an effect on the rate of CO2 uptake and the water-to-solid ratio affects the weight gain after the carbonation of fly ash. The results confirm the possibility of the manipulation of process parameters in enhancing the carbonation reaction. - Highlights: ► Mineral sequestration CO2 by of coal fly ash is a slow process under ambient conditions. ► It can be accelerated by manipulating the process parameters inside a reactor. ► Initial CO2 pressure and water to solid mixing ratio inside the reactor are two of those operational parameters. ► According to the test results higher CO2 initial pressure gives higher on rates of CO2 sequestration. ► Water to fly ash mixing ratio effect on amount of CO2 sequestered into fly ash

  20. Modulation of the initial mineralization process of SaOS-2 cells by carbonic anhydrase activators and polyphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Schlossmacher, Ute; Neufurth, Meik; Feng, Qingling; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-05-01

    Ca-phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals constitute the mineral matrix of vertebrate bones, while Ca-carbonate is the predominant mineral of many invertebrates, like mollusks. Recent results suggest that CaCO₃ is also synthesized during early bone formation. We demonstrate that carbonic anhydrase-driven CaCO₃ formation in vitro is activated by organic extracts from the demosponge Suberites domuncula as well as by quinolinic acid, one component isolated from these extracts. Further results revealed that the stimulatory effect of bicarbonate (HCO₃ (-)) ions on mineralization of osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells is strongly enhanced if the cells are exposed to inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a linear polymer of phosphate linked by energy-rich phosphodiester bonds. The effect of polyP, administered as polyP (Ca²⁺ salt), on HA formation was found to be amplified by addition of the carbonic anhydrase-activating sponge extract or quinolinic acid. Our results support the assumption that CaCO₃ deposits, acting as bio-seeds for Ca-carbonated phosphate formation, are formed as an intermediate during HA mineralization and that the carbonic anhydrase-mediated formation of those deposits is under a positive-negative feedback control by bone alkaline phosphatase-dependent polyP metabolism, offering new targets for therapy of bone diseases/defects. PMID:24374859

  1. Biomimetic mineralization of calcium carbonate/carboxymethylcellulose microspheres for lysozyme immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous calcium carbonate/carboxymethylcellulose (CaCO3/CMC) microspheres were prepared by the biomimetic mineralization method for lysozyme immobilization via adsorption. The size and morphology of CaCO3/CMC microspheres were characterized by transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potential measurement. The lysozyme immobilization was verified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of pHs and temperatures on lysozyme adsorption were investigated as well. It was revealed that CaCO3/CMC microspheres could immobilize lysozyme efficiently via electrostatic interactions and a maximum adsorption capacity of 450 mg/g was achieved at pH 9.2 and 25 °C. Moreover, it was found that the adsorption process fitted well with the Langmuir isothermal model. In addition, UV, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies showed that lysozyme maintained its original secondary structure during the adsorption/desorption process. Our study therefore demonstrated that CaCO3/CMC microsphere can be used as a cost-effective and efficient support for lysozyme immobilization. - Graphical abstract: CaCO3/CMC microsphere was prepared by a facile biomimetic mineralization method and can be used as an efficient and cost-effective support for lysozyme immobilization. Highlights: ► CaCO3/CMC microspheres were prepared by the biomimetic mineralization method. ► Lysozyme was efficiently immobilized to CaCO3/CMC microspheres via adsorption. ► A maximum adsorption capacity of 450 mg/g was obtained at pH 9.2 and 25 °C. ► The original secondary structure of lysozyme was maintained upon immobilization.

  2. Microbial carbon mineralization in tropical lowland and montane forest soils of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette eWhitaker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is affecting the amount and complexity of plant inputs to tropical forest soils. This is likely to influence the carbon (C balance of these ecosystems by altering decomposition processes e.g. ‘positive priming effects’ that accelerate soil organic matter mineralization. However, the mechanisms determining the magnitude of priming effects are poorly understood. We investigated potential mechanisms by adding 13C labelled substrates, as surrogates of plant inputs, to soils from an elevation gradient of tropical lowland and montane forests. We hypothesised that priming effects would increase with elevation due to increasing microbial nitrogen limitation, and that microbial community composition would strongly influence the magnitude of priming effects. Quantifying the sources of respired C (substrate or soil organic matter in response to substrate addition revealed no consistent patterns in priming effects with elevation. Instead we found that substrate quality (complexity and nitrogen content was the dominant factor controlling priming effects. For example a nitrogenous substrate induced a large increase in soil organic matter mineralization whilst a complex C substrate caused negligible change. Differences in the functional capacity of specific microbial groups, rather than microbial community composition per se, were responsible for these substrate-driven differences in priming effects. Our findings suggest that the microbial pathways by which plant inputs and soil organic matter are mineralized are determined primarily by the quality of plant inputs and the functional capacity of microbial taxa, rather than the abiotic properties of the soil. Changes in the complexity and stoichiometry of plant inputs to soil in response to climate change may therefore be important in regulating soil C dynamics in tropical forest soils.

  3. Vibrational spectra of the hydrated carbonate minerals ikaite, monohydrocalcite, lansfordite and nesquehonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleyshaw, Esther E.; Crump, Gregory; Griffith, William P.

    2003-08-01

    The Raman (200-4000 cm -1) and infrared (600-4000 cm -1) spectra of four rare carbonate hydrate minerals are reported. These are naturally occurring and synthetic ikaite CaCO 3 · 6H 2O, and nesquehonite MgCO 3 · 3H 2O; natural monohydrocalcite CaCO 3 · H 2O, and synthetic lansfordite MgCO 3 · 5H 2O. The spectra of synthetic ikaite partially substituted with 2H 2O and also with 13C were measured, as were those of synthetic deuteriated nesquehonite. Spectra of ikaite and lansfordite, both of which decompose at room temperatures, were measured below 0 °C. Assignments of fundamental modes are proposed.

  4. Sorption recovery of 137Cs and 90Sr with carbonate-containing natural mineral tripolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption characteristics of a carbonate-containing mineral (tripolite) were studied on model aqueous solutions and real waste water in a wide range of pH in the presence of isotopic and nonisotopic carriers and organic impurities. Sorption of 137Cs and 90Sr is adequately described by a power function. Analysis of 137Cs sorption isotherms suggests that radiocesium is adsorbed by ion-exchange mechanism, during which Cs+ ions from the solution exchange mainly with bivalent ions of the sorbent, whereas in 90Sr sorption trivalent ions of the sorbent also participate in the process. Saturation capacity of tripolite with respect to cesium and strontium was evaluated to be 0.3 and 1.0 mg-equiv./g respectively

  5. In Situ Carbon Dioxide Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: New Insights from Lab-scale Flow-through Experiments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouze, P.; Luquot, L.; Andreani, M.; Godard, M.; Peuble, S.

    2010-12-01

    Because carbonates are stable over geological time periods, in situ mineral carbonation is, in theory, a safe technique to trap CO2. It implies however the dissolution of Mg, Ca, and Fe-rich silicates. Therefore, it is mainly restricted to geological formations rich in divalent cations such as ultramafic rocks (peridotite, serpentinite), basalts and zeolite-rich sandstones. CO2 underground storage is an industrial technology that requires predictive modeling tools for assessing feasibility and risks. It means that controlling mechanisms and effective parameters (i.e. used at Darcy scale) as well as uncertainties must be identified. However, dissolution-precipitation processes involve complex coupled mechanisms, strongly controlled by the hydrodynamical and chemical variability of the system at all scales. Specifically, the upscaling from pore scale to Darcy scale is challenging, not only because of the hydrodynamical and mineralogical heterogeneities, but also because of the strong thermodynamic disequilibrium and the relatively high flow rate expected in the vicinity of the CO2 injection. Therefore, reproducing such processes at lab scale, where conditions are fully controlled, is the only way to fully investigate mass transfers, develop pertinent transport-reaction models and measure effective parameters. We present three set of lab experiments during which CO2-saturated brine is injected into (i) peridotites, (ii) olivine-rich basalts and (iii) zeolite-rich sandstones. These experiments show that mass transfers are heterogeneous at pore- and sample-scale: (i) in peridotites, Ca-magnesite and talc precipitate in low flow zones while Si-rich layer develop at olivine surface in higher flow zones, thus providing a mechanism maintaining constant permeability; (ii) in olivine/basaltic matrix, porosity increases upstream due to efficient dissolution of basaltic glass (+/- olivine); precipitation of ankerite is localized in the high porosity zone while serpentine

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate enhance bone mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium hyaluronate (HY, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and HY-functionalized SWCNTs (HY-SWCNTs on the behavior of primary osteoblasts, as well as to investigate the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with these biocomposites. Primary osteoblasts were obtained from the calvarial bones of male newborn Wistar rats (5 rats for each cell extraction. We assessed cell viability using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay and by double-staining with propidium iodide and Hoechst. We also assessed the formation of mineralized bone nodules by von Kossa staining, the mRNA expression of bone repair proteins, and the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with HY, SWCNTs, or HY-SWCNTs. The results showed that treatment with these biocomposites did not alter the viability of primary osteoblasts. Furthermore, deposition of mineralized bone nodules was significantly increased by cells treated with HY and HY-SWCNTs. This can be partly explained by an increase in the mRNA expression of type I and III collagen, osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4. Additionally, the titanium surface treated with HY-SWCNTs showed a significant increase in the deposition of inorganic crystals. Thus, our data indicate that HY, SWCNTs, and HY-SWCNTs are potentially useful for the development of new strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  7. Redistribution of soil water by a saprotrophic fungus enhances carbon mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhr, Alexander; Borken, Werner; Spohn, Marie; Matzner, Egbert

    2015-11-24

    The desiccation of upper soil horizons is a common phenomenon, leading to a decrease in soil microbial activity and mineralization. Recent studies have shown that fungal communities and fungal-based food webs are less sensitive and better adapted to soil desiccation than bacterial-based food webs. One reason for a better fungal adaptation to soil desiccation may be hydraulic redistribution of water by mycelia networks. Here we show that a saprotrophic fungus (Agaricus bisporus) redistributes water from moist (-0.03 MPa) into dry (-9.5 MPa) soil at about 0.3 cm ⋅ min(-1) in single hyphae, resulting in an increase in soil water potential after 72 h. The increase in soil moisture by hydraulic redistribution significantly enhanced carbon mineralization by 2,800% and enzymatic activity by 250-350% in the previously dry soil compartment within 168 h. Our results demonstrate that hydraulic redistribution can partly compensate water deficiency if water is available in other zones of the mycelia network. Hydraulic redistribution is likely one of the mechanisms behind higher drought resistance of soil fungi compared with bacteria. Moreover, hydraulic redistribution by saprotrophic fungi is an underrated pathway of water transport in soils and may lead to a transfer of water to zones of high fungal activity. PMID:26554004

  8. Effect of reactive surface area of minerals on mineralization and carbon dioxide trapping in a depleted gas reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolourinejad, P.; Shoeibi Omrani, P.; Herber, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a long-term (up to 1000 years) geochemical modelling of subsurface CO2 storage was carried out on sandstone reservoirs of depleted gas fields in northeast Netherlands. It was found that mineral dissolution/precipitation has only a minor effect on reservoir porosity. In order to valida

  9. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Constantz; Randy Seeker; Martin Devenney

    2010-06-30

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO{sub 2} to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM{trademark} was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which is a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.

  10. Direct mineral carbonation of steelmaking slag for CO2 sequestration at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushendra Revathy, T D; Palanivelu, K; Ramachandran, A

    2016-04-01

    Rapid increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere has forced the international community towards adopting actions to restrain from the impacts of climate change. Moreover, in India, the dependence on fossil fuels is projected to increase in the future, implying the necessity of capturing CO2 in a safe manner. Alkaline solid wastes can be utilized for CO2 sequestration by which its disposal issues in the country could also be met. The present work focuses to study direct mineral carbonation of steelmaking slag (SS) at room temperature and low-pressure conditions (carbonation of SS was carried out in a batch reactor with pure CO2 gas. The process parameters that may influence the carbonation of SS, namely, CO2 gas pressure, liquid to solid ratio (L/S) and reaction time were also studied. The results showed that maximum sequestration of SS was attained in the aqueous route with a capacity of 82 g of CO2/kg (6 bar, L/S ratio of 10 and 3 h). In the gas-solid route, maximum sequestration capacity of about 11.1 g of CO2/kg of SS (3 bar and 3 h) was achieved indicating that aqueous route is the better one under the conditions studied. These findings demonstrate that SS is a promising resource and this approach could be further developed and used for CO2 sequestration in the country. The carbonation process was evidenced using FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TG analysis. PMID:26681331

  11. Mineralogy and stable isotope compositions of carbonate and sulphide minerals of carbonate crusts associated with gas hydrate-forming cold vents from the NE Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conly, A.G. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Scott, S.D. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Riedel, M. [Natural Resources Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada, Pacific Geoscience Centre

    2005-07-01

    In 2001, the ROPOS submersible sampled 21 specimens of carbonate crusts from 2 gas hydrate fields located offshore Vancouver Island on the northeast Pacific continental margin. The mineralogy and stable isotopic composition of carbonate and sulphide minerals were used to evaluate petrogenesis and the relationship to associated gas hydrate occurrences. The crusts form the upper surface of carbonate and pelagic mud mounds within the gas hydrate fields. The crusts are made up of micritic carbonate with a highly variable morphology that includes blocky, fissile, nodular and mudcemented brecciated forms. The crusts include micritic calcite and dolomite/ferroan dolomite, with up to 30 per cent detrital and authigenic silicates. The finely disseminated sulphide minerals include pyrite and trace amounts of sphalerite. Bulk-rock chemical compositions are mainly homogeneous. Any variations reflect the calcite:dolomite and carbonate:silicate ratios. The {delta}13 C values for bulk carbonate (calcite and dolomite) were presented. No definitive correlation between {delta}13 C value and carbonate mineralogy was noted, but calcite-dominant samples were found to be more depleted. The {delta}34 S values for sulphide were also presented. The carbon isotopic composition of the carbonate is associated with the balance of inorganic and organic carbon species. Bacterial sulphate reduction and/or bacterial fermentation and carbonate reduction processes responsible for the production of methane were found to control the {delta}13 C of the carbon dioxide reservoir in gas hydrate environments. It was shown that methane was the carbon source involved in bacterial sulphate reduction and that the isotopic composition of the CO{sub 2} reservoir may be controlled by fractionation during bacterial carbonate reduction. The range in sulphur isotopes correlates with the bacterial sulphate reduction under partially closed conditions, where the rate of diffusion of sulphate is less than the rate of

  12. Use of laser spectroscopy to measure the 13C/12C and 18O/16O compositions of carbonate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Shaun L L; Dipple, Gregory M; Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas S

    2011-03-15

    The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of carbonate minerals are utilized throughout the earth and environmental sciences for various purposes. Here, we demonstrate the first application of a prototype instrument, based on off-axis integrated cavity output laser spectroscopy, to measure the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of CO(2) gas evolved from the acidification of carbonate minerals. The carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were recorded from absorption spectra of (12)C(16)O(16)O, (13)C(16)O(16)O, and (12)C(16)O(18)O in the near-infrared wavelength region. The instrument was calibrated using CaCO(3) minerals with known δ(13)C(VPDB) and δ(18)O(VSMOW) values, which had been previously calibrated by isotope ratio mass spectrometry relative to the international isotopic standards NBS 18 and NBS 19. Individual analyses are demonstrated to have internal precision (1 SE) of better than 0.15‰ for δ(13)C and 0.6‰ for δ(18)O. Analysis of four carbonate standards of known isotopic composition over 2 months, determined using the original instrumental calibration, indicates that analyses are accurate to better than 0.5‰ for both δ(13)C and δ(18)O without application of standard-sample-standard corrections. PMID:21341717

  13. An economic analysis of the Jim Bridger Power Plant carbon dioxide mineralization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mikol Hans

    Concerns for rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have lead to a myriad of schemes to reduce emissions. Many of these are complicated, expensive, and untried. Coal-fired electrical generation accounts for about 49 percent of U.S. electricity generation. Shifting generation capacity away from coal is the goal of many, yet as this statistic shows, the U.S. has a heavy dependency on coal-fired base-load generation. What is needed is a way to retrofit existing coal fired power plants to mitigate at least some of the giga-tonnes of CO2 released annually. Carbon Capture and Storage in association with greenhouse gases are a major concern in the world today. This thesis is an outgrowth of a research partnership between the University of Wyoming and the Jim Bridger Power Plant (Rocky Mountain Power) to develop a process for capture and mineralization of flue gas carbon dioxide (CO 2) using an accelerated mineral carbonization process with fly ash particles as the absorbent. This process may have several advantages over other approaches because it is an environmentally acceptable, single step process occurring at near ambient pressures and temperatures that can compliment conventional CCS processes. In addition the use of fly ash particles as an absorbent avoids the costs of processing or engineering an absorbent. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the capture costs and economic feasibility of the mineralization process. Two models were used to estimate the capture costs and economic feasibility of the Jim Bridger Power Plant CO2 Mineralization Project (JBP). The first was a cost of capture model which was used to estimate CO2 capture costs and how changes in the CO2 to ash capture ratio and quantities of CO2 captured affect capture costs. The second was a financial feasibility model which considered the time value of money. This second model considered the net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) for the process using different pricing scenarios

  14. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA. This topical report covers Subphase 2a which is the design phase of pilot demonstration subsystems. Materials of construction have been selected and proven in both lab scale and prototype testing to be acceptable for the reagent conditions of interest. The target application for the reactive carbonate material has been selected based upon small-scale feasibility studies and the design of a continuous fiber board production line has been completed. The electrochemical cell architecture and components have been selected based upon both lab scale and prototype testing. The appropriate quality control and diagnostic techniques have been developed and tested along with the required instrumentation and controls. Finally the demonstrate site infrastructure, NEPA categorical exclusion, and permitting is all ready for the construction and installation of the new units and upgrades.

  15. Carbon Mineralization and Nitrogen Transformation During a Long Term Permafrost Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, V. G.; Mack, M. C.; Schuur, E. A. G.

    2014-12-01

    As the limiting nutrient in warming high latitude ecosystems, nitrogen (N) is expected to play a key role in determining the future balance between permafrost carbon (C) losses and increased C sequestration by plants. During decomposition, nitrogen previously locked in soil organic matter is released into the soil solution in the form of dissolved organic molecules following depolymerization by extracellular enzymes. These dissolved organic forms of N can be consumed by the soil microbial community and incorporated in their biomass or mineralized if they are in excess of microbial demand. Once mineralized and released into the soil solutions, N can be lost from the soil system via denitrification. In well drained, low N tussock tundra, however, this pathway is unlikely. Dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and dissolved organic N (DON) are both biologically available to arctic plants. Understanding how the size of these pools changes with depth and continuing decomposition is therefore crucial to projecting the C balance of high latitude systems in a warmer future. N transformations associated with decomposition may differ greatly in surface soils, where a large labile C pool is present and soil has a high C:N ratio, versus deep soils that have a relatively small labile C pool and a lower C:N ratio. In this experiment, the relationship between N availability and C release from permafrost soils was addressed with a 225 day soil incubation performed at 15°C. Seven soil cores were collected from undisturbed, well drained tussock tundra and were partitioned into ten centimeter depth intervals to a depth of 80 cm. Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes were measured throughout the incubation period and were used to assess cumulative carbon losses and determine the size of the labile C pool. Destructive harvests at days 16,34,55,83, 143 and 225 were performed and pools of plant available DON and DIN were measured using 2M KCl extractions. At day 225 the microbial biomass N pool was also

  16. The dynamic controls on carbonate mineral saturation states and ocean acidification in a glacially dominated estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisdorph, Stacey C.; Mathis, Jeremy T.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, a number of studies have shown that the intrusion of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) into the ocean has created an acidification effect leading to the reduction in carbonate mineral saturation states (Ω). However, the uptake of atmospheric CO2 is not the only climate-induced phenomenon that leads to a reduction of Ω in marine environments. Over the past ∼250 years, Glacier Bay, AK (GLBA) has experienced rapid deglaciation leading to an increase in the amount of freshwater entering the marine ecosystem. This excess freshwater discharge is low in total alkalinity and reduces the buffering capacity of surface waters and enhances the vulnerability of the estuary to further reductions in pH. The corresponding reduction in Ω may cause these waters to become corrosive to shell-building organisms. To better understand these processes, we collected monthly samples within GLBA that show the variability in Ω throughout the water column. Low Ω values were well correlated with the timing of maximum glacial discharge events and most prominent within the two regions where tidewater glacial discharge was highest. The saturation state with respect to aragonite reached a minimum of 0.40 at the surface during the summer of 2011 before rebounding to a maximum value of 3.26 in the spring of 2012. Aragonite was undersaturated at the surface throughout the entire bay during fall months (Sept. and Oct.). Here, we present results from a year-long study designed to constrain the effects of glacial freshwater discharge on the marine carbonate system and discern the primary controls on Ω in this pristine estuarine environment.

  17. In vitro formation of Ca-oxalates and the mineral glushinskite by fungal interaction with carbonate substrates and seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kolo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the in vitro formation of Ca-oxalates and glushinskite through fungal interaction with carbonate substrates and seawater as a process of biologically induced metal recycling and neo-mineral formation. The study also emphasizes the role of the substrates as metal donors. In the first experiment, thin sections prepared from dolomitic rock samples of Terwagne Formation (Carboniferous, Viséan, northern France served as substrates. The thin sections placed in Petri dishes were exposed to fungi grown from naturally existing airborne spores. In the second experiment, fungal growth and mineral formation was monitored using only standard seawater (SSW as a substrate. Fungal growth media consisted of a high protein/carbohydrates and sugar diet with demineralized water for irrigation. Fungal growth process reached completion under uncontrolled laboratory conditions. The newly formed minerals and textural changes caused by fungal attack on the carbonate substrates were investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX, x-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The fungal interaction and attack on the dolomitic and seawater substrates resulted in the formation of Ca-oxalates (weddellite CaC2O4·2(H2O, whewellite (CaC2O4·(H2O and glushinskite MgC2O4·2(H2O associated with the destruction of the original hard substrates and their replacement by the new minerals. Both of Ca and Mg were mobilized from the experimental substrates by fungi. This metal mobilization involved a recycling of substrate metals into newly formed minerals. The biochemical and diagenetic results of the interaction strongly marked the attacked substrates with a biological fingerprint. Such fingerprints are biomarkers of primitive life. The formation of glushinskite is of specific importance that is related, besides its importance as a biomineral bearing a recycled Mg, to the possibility of its transformation through diagenetic pathway into an

  18. Fundamental Science for Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Molecular Probes for Understanding Wet CO2 Interaction with Caprock Minerals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, K. M.; White, D.; Murphy, E. M.; Hu, J.; Hoyt, D. W.; Wang, Z.; Lea, A. S.; Schaef, H. T.; McGrail, P.

    2009-12-01

    Capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for minimizing the impacts of greenhouse gases on climate change. A critical issue is to demonstrate in a scientifically defensible manner that CO2 will remain stored over the long-term in the geological formation where it is injected. With regards to mineral-fluid interaction, the majority of previous research has focused on mineral reactivity in aqueous solutions containing CO2. However, at the caprock-fluid interface, interaction with the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) phase itself may become more important as the buoyant plume slowly displaces or dessicates residual aqueous solution. Mechanisms of mineral interfacial reactions with wet or water-saturated CO2 are unknown. The measurement of kinetic and thermodynamic data for mineral transformation reactions in these fluids present unique challenges. New experimental tools under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are enabling in situ characterization of mineral transformation processes in scCO2/H2O fluids with molecular resolution. 29Si and 13C magic angle sample spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of metal carbonation reactions of model magnesium silicate minerals (e.g., Mg2SiO4 forsterite) in scCO2 shows initial transformation to MgCO3 magnesite within 20 hours at 80 atm and 80°C only when water is present for nucleophilic attack on Mg-O-Si. High pressure infrared spectroscopy detects unique spectral signatures for H2O and D2O dissolved in trace quantities (mineral surfaces in contact with scCO2 fluids. High-pressure x-ray diffraction will enable phase identification in situ. Collectively, this set of capabilities provides a unique platform for elucidating the role of water for catalyzing mineral transformation to metal carbonates and provides a means for determining effective kinetic constants. Understanding and accurately representing chemical

  19. The accumulation of organic carbon in mineral soils by afforestation of abandoned farmland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Wei

    Full Text Available The afforestation of abandoned farmland significantly influences soil organic carbon (OC. However, the dynamics between OC inputs after afforestation and the original OC are not well understood. To learn more about soil OC dynamics after afforestation of farmland, we measured the soil OC content in paired forest and farmland plots in Shaanxi Province, China. The forest plots had been established on farmland 18, 24, 48, 100, and 200 yr previously. The natural (13C abundance of soil organic matter was also analyzed to distinguish between crop- and forest-derived C in the afforested soils. We observed a nonlinear accumulation of total OC in the 0-80 cm depth of the mineral soil across time. Total soil OC accumulated more rapidly under forest stands aged 18 to 48 yr than under forest stands aged 100 or 200 yrs. The rate of OC accumulation was also greater in the 0-10 cm depth than in the 10-80 cm depth. Forest-derived OC in afforested soils also accumulated nonlinearly across time, with the greatest increase in the 0-20 cm depth. Forest-derived OC in afforest soils accounted for 52-86% of the total OC in the 0-10 cm depth, 36-61% of the total OC in the 10-20 cm depth, and 11-50% of the total OC in the 20-80 cm depth. Crop-derived OC concentrations in the 0-20 cm depth decreased slightly after afforestation, but there was no change in crop-derived OC concentrations in the 20-80 cm depth. The results of our study support the claim that afforestation of farmland can sequester atmospheric CO(2 by increasing soil OC stocks. Changes in the OC stocks of mineral soils after afforestation appear to be influenced mainly by the input of forest-derived C rather than by the loss of original OC.

  20. The carbon isotope ratios and contents of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaf carbon isotope ratios and 13 kinds of mineral elements were measured on 36 species of common Chinese medicinal plants in a subtropical monsoon forest of Ding Hu Shan in Guangdong Province. The .delta.13C value were from -26.4 to -32.6%, indicating that all of the species belonged the photosynthetic C3 types. The relative lower value of δ13C was observed in the life form of shrubs. The contents of 7 elements (N, P, K, Ca, Na Mg, Si) were dependent upon the species, life form, medicinal function and medicinal part. Herb type medicine and the used medicinal part of leaves or whole plant showed higher levels of above elements than the others. Among the nine groups with different medicinal functions, it was found that more nitrogen was in the leaves of medicinal plants for hemophthisis, hypertension and stomachic troubles, more phosphorus and potassium were in the leaves for cancer and snake bite medicines, but more calcium and magnesium were in the leaves for curing rheumatics. Ferric, aluminium and manganese were the main composition of microelements in leaves. There were higher content of ferric in leaves for hemophthisis medicine, higher zinc in leaves for cold and hypertension medicine, and higher Cup in leaves of stomachic medicine. It was suggested that the pattern of mineral elements in leaves of Chinese medicinal plants reflected the different properties of absorption and accumulation. Some additional effect due to the high content of certain element might be associated with the main function of that medicine

  1. Interactions Between Mineral Surfaces, Substrates, Enzymes, and Microbes Result in Hysteretic Temperature Sensitivities and Microbial Carbon Use Efficiencies and Weaker Predicted Carbon-Climate Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.

    2014-12-01

    We hypothesize that the large observed variability in decomposition temperature sensitivity and carbon use efficiency arises from interactions between temperature, microbial biogeochemistry, and mineral surface sorptive reactions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a numerical model that integrates the Dynamic Energy Budget concept for microbial physiology, microbial trait-based community structure and competition, process-specific thermodynamically ­­based temperature sensitivity, a non-linear mineral sorption isotherm, and enzyme dynamics. We show, because mineral surfaces interact with substrates, enzymes, and microbes, both temperature sensitivity and microbial carbon use efficiency are hysteretic and highly variable. Further, by mimicking the traditional approach to interpreting soil incubation observations, we demonstrate that the conventional labile and recalcitrant substrate characterization for temperature sensitivity is flawed. In a 4 K temperature perturbation experiment, our fully dynamic model predicted more variable but weaker carbon-climate feedbacks than did the static temperature sensitivity and carbon use efficiency model when forced with yearly, daily, and hourly variable temperatures. These results imply that current earth system models likely over-estimate the response of soil carbon stocks to global warming.

  2. Dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization strongly affect co2 emissions following lime application to acidic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission of greenhouse gases from agricultural soils has main contribution to the climatic change and global warming. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen mineralization can affect CO/sub 2/ emission from soils. Influence of DOC and nitrogen mineralization on CO/sub 2/ emissions following lime application to acidic soil was investigated in current study. Laboratory experiment was conducted under aerobic conditions with 25% moisture contents (66% water-filled pore space) at 25 degree C in the dark conditions. Different treatments of lime were applied to acidic soil as follows: CK (control), L (low rate of lime: 0.2g lime / 100 g soil) and H (high rate of lime: 0.5g lime /100g soil). CO/sub 2/ emissions were measured by gas chromatography and dissolved organic carbon, NH4 +-N, NO/sub 3/ --N and soil pH were measured during incubation study. Addition of lime to acidic soil significantly increased the concentration of DOC and N mineralization rate. Higher concentrations of DOC and N mineralization, consequently, increased the CO/sub 2/ emissions from lime treated soils. Cumulative CO/sub 2/ emission was 75% and 71% higher from L and H treatments as compared to CK. The results of current study suggest that DOC and N mineralization are critical in controlling gaseous emissions of CO/sub 2/ from acidic soils following lime application. (author)

  3. Tufa in Northern England: depositional facies, carbonate mineral fabrics, and role of biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, E.; Mawson, M.; Perri, E.; Tucker, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    soil hereabouts, and are gradually being washed down slope. Pisoids vary in size and shape, ranging from rods to sub-spherical forms, up to several cm long or a cm or more in diameter. The external surface is a smooth dull surface of a pale grey-buff colour; the nucleus may be a plant fragment, tufa intraclast or rock fragment. Microfacies Teesdale tufa is characterized by three microfacies all contributing to a basic stromatolitic or laminated microfabric: dendrolite, dense micrite and palisades of sparite. Laminae consist of an irregular alternation of the three microfacies, which vary in abundance within the main depositional facies. Dendrolitic layers are characterized of mineralized, upward-branching cyanobacterial filaments, forming bush-like fans. Coarse sparitic layers consist of palisades of bladed calcite spar characterized by rhombohedral terminations. Micritic layers consist of dark-brown dense laminae with some clotted fabric, composed of dark micritic crystals. In thin-section molds of moss stems are often preserved by a sparitic layer that formed a coating before decay of the moss organic tissues. Cavities are abundant in moss tufa and crusts. They are often empty or in some case filled by detrital particles. Pisoids under the microscope show a cortex characterized by a concentric structure consisting mainly dense micritic layers alternating with sporadic sparitic and/or dendrolitic layers. Calcified cyanobacterial filaments or their molds are very evident in the dendrolitic laminae, but also occur in the other microfacies, being incorporated in both the sparite macro-crystals and the micritic layers. Nanofacies of minerals The mineral composition of the autochthonous carbonate forming tufa is calcite with a few mole% Mg. Sub-hedral crystals of calcite, several tens of microns in size, form sparite crystals. Sub-polygonal micro-crystals and elongate fibres a few microns in size compose dense micrite and calcified filaments. Under extra-high SEM

  4. [Seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon mineralization for two forest types in Xiaoxing'an Mountains, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Lin, Wei; Cui, Xiao-yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization in Xiaoxing'an Mountain, we incubated soil samples collected from virgin Korean pine forest and broad-leaved secondary forest in different seasons in the laboratory and measured the SOC mineralization rate and cumulative SOC mineralization (Cm). We employed simultaneous reaction model to describe C mineralization kinetics and estimated SOC mineralization parameters including soil easily mineralizable C (C1), potentially mineralizable C (C₀). We also analyzed the relations between Cm, C₁and their influencing factors. Results showed that the incubated SOC mineralization rate and Cm for 0-5 cm soil layer decreased from early spring to late autumn, while for 5-10 cm soil layer the seasonal variation was not statistically significant for both forest types. The C₁ in 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers varied from 42.92-92.18 and 19.23-32.95 mg kg⁻¹, respectively, while the C₀ in 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers varied from 863.92-3957.15 and 434.15-865.79 mg · kg⁻¹, respec- tively. Both C₁ and C₀ decreased from early spring to late autumn. The proportions of C₀ in SOC for two forest types were 0.74%-2.78% and 1.11%-1.84% in 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers, respectively, and decreased from early spring to late autumn, indicating that SOC tended to become more stable as a whole from spring to autumn. The Cm and C₀ were significantly positively correlated to in situ soil water content and hot water-extractable carbohydrate content, but were not correlated to in situ soil temperature and cool water-extractable carbohydrate content. We concluded that soil labile organic carbon, soil physical and chemical properties contributed to the seasonal dynamics of SOC mineralization in the forests. PMID:27228587

  5. Development of a technology for obtaining flotation reagent oxane-3 for carbon mineral raw materials of Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Kalugin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the results of development of a technology for obtaining oxane-3 and its application for enrichment of carbon mineral raw materials. Studies on enrichment of a shungite rock showed that the increase of a pulp temperature to 30°C significantly improves the characteristics and rate of the flotation process. Measured indicators of a shungite rock enrichment using Flotol B were lower in comparison with an enrichment by oxane-3. For schungite mineral, it was established that the obtained heterocyclic compound can replace existing industrial flotation reagents in enrichment processes.

  6. Substrate quality alters microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadamma, S.; Mayes, M. A.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is dependent on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial processing of carbon (C), and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly-labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol). The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils, despite an initial delay in respiration. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days was sufficient to model decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch) with three pools, but was insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid) and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality imparts considerable control on microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and added substrates.

  7. Substrate quality alters the microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadamma, S.; Mayes, M. A.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is dependent, among other factors, on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial decomposition of carbon (C), and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol). The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days were sufficient to model the decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch) with three pools, but were insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid) and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality exerts considerable control on the microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and complex substrates.

  8. Substrate quality alters microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jagadamma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC is dependent on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial processing of carbon (C, and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly-labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol. The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils, despite an initial delay in respiration. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days was sufficient to model decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch with three pools, but was insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality imparts considerable control on microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and added substrates.

  9. Synthesis of iron-based chemical looping sorbents integrated with pH swing carbon mineral sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ray; Lee, Dong Hyun; Fan, Liang-Shih; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2009-12-01

    The previously developed pH swing carbon mineral sequestration immobilizes the gaseous CO2 into a thermodynamically stable solid, MgCO3, using Mg-bearing minerals such as serpentine. This mineral carbonation technology is particularly promising since it generates value-added solid products: high surface area silica, iron oxide, and magnesium carbonate, while providing a safe and permanent storage option for CO2. By carefully controlling the pH of the system, these solids products can be produced with high purity. This study focuses on the synthesis of iron oxide particles as a chemical looping sorbent in order to achieve the integration between carbon capture and storage technologies. Since the solubility of Fe in aqueous phase is relatively low at neutral pH, the effect of the weak acid and chelating agents on the extraction of Fe from serpentine was investigated. The synthesized iron-based chemical looping sorbent was found to be as effective as commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles at converting syngas into high purity H2, while producing a sequestration-ready CO2 stream. PMID:19908801

  10. The efficiency of CO{sub 2} sequestration via carbonate mineralization with simulated wastewaters of high salinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignardi, S., E-mail: silvano.mignardi@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Sapienza Universita di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); De Vito, C.; Ferrini, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Sapienza Universita di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Martin, R.F. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2A7 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Salinity generally strongly affects the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution. This would seem to involve a reduction of the efficiency of the carbonate mineralization process with the objective to sequester this greenhouse gas. On the contrary, we demonstrate here that with a more concentrated solution of magnesium chloride, the residence time of CO{sub 2} is enhanced in the aqueous medium because of a reduced tendency to produce CO{sub 2(g)}. Experiments intended to simulate more closely the Mg-rich wastewaters that are industrially available have been carried out using solutions differing in Mg concentration (7, 16, 32 g L{sup -1} Mg). A comparison of the efficiency of the CO{sub 2} mineralization process among sets of experiments shows that the reduction of the efficiency, to about 65%, was lower than that expected, as the low degree of CO{sub 2} degassing results in the enhanced availability of carbonic ions to react with Mg ions to form stable carbonate minerals over a longer time.

  11. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocities of macroscopic organic aggregates (marine snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Iversen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted, Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted, and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted. Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d−1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregate of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study vary between 0.08 d−1 and 0.20 d−1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The calculated carbon remineralization length scale due to microbial respiration and sinking velocity of mm-large marine aggregates was higher for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to opal-ballasted aggregates. It varied between 0.0002 m−1 and 0.0030 m−1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size.

  12. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocity of marine snow aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, M. H.; Ploug, H.

    2010-09-01

    Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material) and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted), Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted), and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted). Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d-1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than those of aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregates of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study) vary between 0.08 d-1 and 0.20 d-1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The carbon-specific respiration rate per meter settled varied between 0.0002 m-1 and 0.0030 m-1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size. It was lower for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to that of similar sized opal ballasted aggregates.

  13. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocity of marine snow aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Iversen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted, Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted, and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted. Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d−1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than those of aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregates of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study vary between 0.08 d−1 and 0.20 d−1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The carbon-specific respiration rate per meter settled varied between 0.0002 m−1 and 0.0030 m−1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size. It was lower for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to that of similar sized opal ballasted aggregates.

  14. Ballast minerals and the sinking carbon flux in the ocean: carbon-specific respiration rates and sinking velocities of macroscopic organic aggregates (marine snow)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, M. H.; Ploug, H.

    2010-05-01

    Recent observations have shown that fluxes of ballast minerals (calcium carbonate, opal, and lithogenic material) and organic carbon fluxes are closely correlated in the bathypelagic zones of the ocean. Hence it has been hypothesized that incorporation of biogenic minerals within marine aggregates could either protect the organic matter from decomposition and/or increase the sinking velocity via ballasting of the aggregates. Here we present the first combined data on size, sinking velocity, carbon-specific respiration rate, and composition measured directly in three aggregate types; Emiliania huxleyi aggregates (carbonate ballasted), Skeletonema costatum aggregates (opal ballasted), and aggregates made from a mix of both E. huxleyi and S. costatum (carbonate and opal ballasted). Overall average carbon-specific respiration rate was ~0.13 d-1 and did not vary with aggregate type and size. Ballasting from carbonate resulted in 2- to 2.5-fold higher sinking velocities than aggregates ballasted by opal. We compiled literature data on carbon-specific respiration rate and sinking velocity measured in aggregate of different composition and sources. Compiled carbon-specific respiration rates (including this study) vary between 0.08 d-1 and 0.20 d-1. Sinking velocity increases with increasing aggregate size within homogeneous sources of aggregates. When compared across different particle and aggregate sources, however, sinking velocity appeared to be independent of particle or aggregate size. The calculated carbon remineralization length scale due to microbial respiration and sinking velocity of mm-large marine aggregates was higher for calcite ballasted aggregates as compared to opal-ballasted aggregates. It varied between 0.0002 m-1 and 0.0030 m-1, and decreased with increasing aggregate size.

  15. Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

    2013-09-01

    In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for

  16. Preferential formation of 13C- 18O bonds in carbonate minerals, estimated using first-principles lattice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Eiler, John M.

    2006-05-01

    Equilibrium constants for internal isotopic exchange reactions of the type: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca13C16O3↔Ca13C18O16O2+Ca12C16O3 for individual CO 32- groups in the carbonate minerals calcite (CaCO 3), aragonite (CaCO 3), dolomite (CaMg(CO 3) 2), magnesite (MgCO 3), witherite (BaCO 3), and nahcolite (NaHCO 3) are calculated using first-principles lattice dynamics. Calculations rely on density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) with norm-conserving planewave pseudopotentials to determine the vibrational frequencies of isotopically substituted crystals. Our results predict an ˜0.4‰ excess of 13C18O16O22- groups in all studied carbonate minerals at room-temperature equilibrium, relative to what would be expected in a stochastic mixture of carbonate isotopologues with the same bulk 13C/ 12C, 18O/ 16O, and 17O/ 16O ratios. The amount of excess 13C18O16O22- decreases with increasing temperature of equilibration, from 0.5‰ at 0 °C to <0.1‰ at 300 °C, suggesting that measurements of multiply substituted isotopologues of carbonate could be used to infer temperatures of ancient carbonate mineral precipitation and alteration events, even where the δ 18O of coexisting fluids is uncertain. The predicted temperature sensitivity of the equilibrium constant is ˜0.003‰/°C at 25 °C. Estimated equilibrium constants for the formation of 13C18O16O22- are remarkably uniform for the variety of minerals studied, suggesting that temperature calibrations will also be applicable to carbonate minerals not studied here without greatly compromising accuracy. A related equilibrium constant for the reaction: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca12C17O16O2↔Ca12C18O17O16O+Ca12C16O3 in calcite indicates formation of 0.1‰ excess 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- at 25 °C. In a conventional phosphoric acid reaction of carbonate to form CO 2 for mass-spectrometric analysis, molecules derived from 13C18O16O22- dominate (˜96%) the mass 47 signal, and 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- contributes most of the remainder (3%). This suggests

  17. Carbonate mineral saturation states in the East China Sea: present conditions and future scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-C. Chou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To assess the impact of rising atmospheric CO2 and eutrophication on the carbonate chemistry of the East China Sea shelf waters, saturation states (Ω for two important biologically relevant carbonate minerals – calcite (Ωc and aragonite (Ωa – were calculated throughout the water column from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and total alkalinity (TA data collected in spring and summer of 2009. Results show that the highest Ωc (∼9.0 and Ωa (∼5.8 values were found in surface water of the Changjiang plume area in summer, whereas the lowest values (Ωc = ∼2.7 and Ωa = ∼1.7 were concurrently observed in the bottom water of the same area. This divergent behavior of saturation states in surface and bottom waters was driven by intensive biological production and strong stratification of the water column. The high rate of phytoplankton production, stimulated by the enormous nutrient discharge from the Changjiang, acts to decrease the ratio of DIC to TA, and thereby increases Ω values. In contrast, remineralization of organic matter in the bottom water acts to increase the DIC to TA ratio, and thus decreases Ω values. The projected result shows that continued increases of atmospheric CO2 under the IS92a emission scenario will decrease Ω values by 40–50% by the end of this century, but both the surface and bottom waters will remain supersaturated with respect to calcite and aragonite. Nevertheless, superimposed on such Ω decrease is the increasing eutrophication, which would mitigate or enhance the Ω decline caused by anthropogenic CO2 uptake in surface and bottom waters, respectively. Our simulation reveals that, under the combined impact of eutrophication and augmentation of atmospheric CO2, the bottom water of the Changjiang plume area will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite (Ωa = ∼0.8 by the end of this century, which would threaten the health of the benthic ecosystem.

  18. Molecular Simulations of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerisit, S.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium is a major groundwater contaminant at uranium processing and mining sites as a result of intentional and accidental discharges of uranium-containing waste products into subsurface environments. Recent characterization has shown that uranium preferentially associates with intragrain and intra-aggregate domains in some of the uranium-contaminated sediments collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford Site [1, 2]. In these sediments, uranium existed as precipitated and/or adsorbed phases in grain micropores with nano- to microscale sizes. Desorption and diffusion characterization studies and continuum-scale modeling indicated that ion diffusion in the microfractures is a major mechanism that led to preferential uranium concentration in the microfracture regions and will control the future mobility of uranium in the subsurface sediments [1, 3-4]. However, the diffusion properties of uranyl species in the intragrain regions, especially at the solid-liquid interface, are still poorly understood. Therefore, a general aim of this work is to provide atomic-level insights into the contribution of microscopic surface effects to the slow diffusion process of uranyl species in porous media with nano- to microsized fractures. In this presentation, we will first present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of feldspar-water interfaces to investigate their interfacial structure and dynamics and establish a theoretical framework for subsequent simulations of water and ion diffusion at these interfaces [5]. We will then report on MD simulations carried out to probe the effects of confinement and of the presence of the mineral surface on the diffusion of water and electrolyte ions in nanosized feldspar fractures [6]. Several properties of the mineral-water interface were varied, such as the fracture width, the ionic strength of the contacting solution, and the surface charge. Our calculations reveal a 2.0-2.5 nm interfacial region within which the diffusion properties of

  19. 二氧化碳矿物封存技术现状及展望%Current status and outlook of carbon dioxide mineral carbonation technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兵兵; 王慧敏; 曾尚红; 苏海全

    2012-01-01

    面对温室效应带来的生态灾难,利用各种技术封存固定CO2成为了关键,CO2矿物封存是其中最环保、最安全、最永恒的CO2固定方式。本文从封存方案、反应机理及碳化原料三方面详细介绍了CO2矿物封存技术的基本原理,并全面概述了CO2矿物封存的技术路线,其中包括直接碳化路线以及以酸浸出工艺、熔盐碳化工艺、铵盐浸出工艺以及生物浸出工艺为代表的间接碳化路线。同时结合国内外研究进展分析了各种CO2矿物封存技术的优缺点及其产业化前景,并提出今后我国CO2矿物封存技术研究和发展应更加注重从资源综合利用的角度考虑,将CO2看做是廉价碳资源材料,积极推进碳捕获、利用与封存项目的实施。%Facing the ecological disaster caused by greenhouse effect,the key is to seal the huge carbon dioxide using various CO2 storage technologies.Carbon dioxide mineral sequestration is one of the most environment-friendly,secure and permanent technology.This paper introduces the basic principle of CO2 mineral carbonation in terms of sequestration solutions,reaction kinetics and carbonation materials,and various process routes of CO2 mineral carbonation are described,including direct mineral carbonation and indirect mineral carbonation,such as acid extraction,molten salt process,ammonia extraction and bioleaching.Meanwhile,combined with the research and development of CO2 mineral carbonation techniques both in China and the rest of the world,the advantages and disadvantages of present researches and commercialization prospect are also discussed.Moreover,it is proposed that the next key point of research and development of CO2mineral carbonation techniques is to pay more attention to resources utilization,regarding CO2 as cheap carbon source,and promoting carbon capture,utilization and sequestration(CCUS) project.

  20. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Greg H; Carroll, Susan A; Bourcier, William L; Singleton, Michael J; Smith, Megan M; Aines, Roger D

    2013-06-18

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 10(5)-fold increase in OH(-) concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite or an ultramafic mineral. After electrolysis, full equilibration of the alkalized solution with air led to a significant pH reduction and as much as a 45-fold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. This demonstrated significant spontaneous air CO2 capture, chemical conversion, and storage as a bicarbonate, predominantly as NaHCO3. The excess OH(-) initially formed in these experiments apparently resulted via neutralization of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, by reaction with the base mineral silicate at the anode, producing mineral sulfate and silica. This allowed the NaOH, normally generated at the cathode, to go unneutralized and to accumulate in the bulk electrolyte, ultimately reacting with atmospheric CO2 to form dissolved bicarbonate. Using nongrid or nonpeak renewable electricity, optimized systems at large scale might allow relatively high-capacity, energy-efficient (<300 kJ/mol of CO2 captured), and inexpensive (<$100 per tonne of CO2 mitigated) removal of excess air CO2 with production of carbon-negative H2. Furthermore, when added to the ocean, the produced hydroxide and/or (bi)carbonate could be useful in reducing sea-to-air CO2 emissions and in neutralizing or offsetting the effects of ongoing ocean acidification. PMID:23729814

  1. CO2 emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CONordicPlus) and use of serpentinites in energy and metal industry (ECOSERP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineral carbonation has been investigated at Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), laboratory of energy engineering and environmental protection since year 2000. The Finnish Technology Agency Tekes and the Finnish Recovery Boiler Committee are funding through the ClimBus technology programme, in conjunction with the Nordic Energy Research Programme, the research regarding the application of ex situ mineral carbonation processes. One aspect is to verify the possible use of mineral carbonation for the separation, utilisation and long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the pulp and paper industry. The Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) has been screening since 2004 the location, quality and suitability of the Finnish processed serpentine and stopped serpentinite storage of mines and in situ serpentinite bodies of ultramafic rock formations for mineral carbonation of CO2. Tekes and the GTK are funding development work through the ClimBus technology programme on the utilisation of serpentine and serpentinite for CO2 sequestration purposes, based on economical and environmental evaluation of mineral and mining processing operations. Also the options for other use of serpentine and serpentinite are evaluated. The most promising magnesium and calcium-based sources for carbonation are by products of mining processes of ultramafic rocks (such as serpentinites and serpentine) and steelmaking slags. Carbonated minerals could possibly be used as paper coating materials (PCC), fillers or construction materials. For magnesium carbonate new markets and applications must be developed. (orig.)

  2. CO2 emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2 Nordic Plus) and use of serpentinites in energy and metal industry (ECOSERP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract Mineral carbonation has been investigated at Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), laboratory of energy engineering and environmental protection since year 2000. The Finnish Technology Agency Tekes and the Finnish Recovery Boiler Committee are funding through the ClimBus technology programme, in conjunction with the Nordic Energy Research Programme, the research regarding the application of ex situ mineral carbonation processes. One aspect is to verify the possible use of mineral carbonation for the separation, utilisation and long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the pulp and paper industry. The Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) has been screening since 2004 the location, quality and suitability of the Finnish processed serpentine and stoped serpentinite storage of mines and in situ serpentinite bodies of ultramafic rock formations for mineral carbonation of CO2. Tekes and the GTK are funding development work through the ClimBus technology programme on the utilisation of serpentine and serpentinite for CO2 sequestration purposes, based on economical and environmental evaluation of mineral and mining processing operations. Also the options for other use of serpentine and serpentinite are evaluated. The most promising magnesium- and calcium-based sources for carbonation are by-products of mining processes of ultramafic rocks (such as serpentinites and serpentine) and steelmaking slags. Carbonated minerals could possibly be used as paper coating materials (PCC), fillers or construction materials. For magnesium carbonate new markets and applications must be developed. (orig.)

  3. The Formation of Carbonate Minerals and the Mobility of Heavy Metals during Water-CO2-Mafic Rock Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Jonas

    basaltic host rock and liberates cations. Ideally, the cations react with the dissolved CO2 and form long time stable carbonate minerals. However, dissolution of the basaltic rock can lead to mobility of toxic metals, which is a potential threat to groundwater supplies and surface waters. Besides carbonate...... with the process of carbonation, and (2) they can form a passivating layer, which inhibit dissolution of the basaltic material and slow down the carbonation process. The purpose of this thesis was to identify formation products, relevant to CarbFix, and assess their ability to immobilize toxic metals...... analyzed for 74 elements. The effluent was alkaline and high release rates of mainly S, Na, Ca, Mg, F and Cl were observed during the first 10 minutes. After 12 hours, the most abundant element released was Si. Secondary phases of Al and Fe precipitated on the ash surfaces and these were suspected of...

  4. Heat optimisation of a staged gas-solid mineral carbonation process for long-term CO2 storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonation of magnesium silicates offers an interesting option for CO2 emission mitigation in Finland, a country with large resources of serpentine-type minerals. Wet processes using aqueous solutions show reasonable chemical kinetics combined with poor energy economy. A dry, gas-solid process with slower chemical kinetics (demonstrated previously), but better energy economy could be an alternative. This paper addresses the energy economy of a two- or three-stage gas-solid process for magnesium silicate carbonation. It involves production of reactive magnesium as magnesium oxide or hydroxide in an atmospheric pressure step, followed by carbonation at elevated pressures that allow for reasonable carbonation reaction kinetics under conditions where magnesium carbonate is thermodynamically stable. For a feasible large-scale process the kinetics in the individual reactors must be fast enough, while the heat produced in the carbonation step must be sufficient to compensate for energy inputs to the preceding step(s). Results give reactor temperature combinations that allow for operation at a negative or zero energy input, for given carbonation reactor pressure and degree of carbonation conversion, and other process energy requirements. Softwares used were HSC and Aspen Plus. Also, some results from gas-solid kinetics studies with magnesium oxide-based materials at the pressures considered are included. (author)

  5. Inventario mundial de la calidad del carbon mineral (WoCQI) [The world coal quality inventory (WoCQI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.; Lovern, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Los oficiales encargados de la politica comercial de cada pais requieren informacion clara y precisa sobre el recurso del carbon mineral, particularmente sobre sus propiedades y caracteristicas, para tomar decisiones bien fundamentadas con respecto al mejor uso de los recursos naturales, necesidades de importacion y oportunidades de exportacion, objetivos de politica interna y externa, oportunidades de transferencia tecnologica, posibilidades de inversion externa, estudios ambientales y de salud, y asuntos relacionados con el uso de productos secundarios y su disposicion.

  6. Evidence for passive mineral carbonation from carbon isotope geochemistry of interstitial air in mine wastes from the Dumont Nickel Project (Abitibi, Quebec).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, A.; Beaudoin, G.; Molson, J. W. H.; Plante, B.; Lemieux, J. M.; Kandji, E. H. B.

    2014-12-01

    Natural weathering of ultramafic rocks in mine tailings allows the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 through the formation of magnesium carbonates. The Dumont Nickel Project (DNP) is being studied to estimate the CO2 sequestration potential of future mining residues and to evaluate the impact of mineral carbonation on the quality of mine waste drainage water. For this purpose, experimental cells were built and instrumented in 2011. The first was constructed using milling waste and the second with mining waste. Laboratory characterization of residues and field observations will be combined to propose a quantitative model of mineral carbonation and metal leaching. A decrease of CO2 concentration in the mining waste cell, from atmospheric concentrations (~390 ppmv) near the surface of the cell to ~100 ppmv near the bottom, reflects active CO2 consumption by the residues. This cell contains mining waste with a large grain size distribution ranging from blocks (carbonation, the carbon isotopic composition of the interstitial gases was analysed in-situ with a WS-CRDS instrument. An increase of d13C(air) from -8‰ to ~2 ‰ is correlated with the decrease in CO2 concentration within the cell, and can be explained by dissolution of atmospheric CO2 in interstitial water (Dco2-DIC 11‰) in the DNP mining residues. As gas advection is slow, CO2 supply driven by diffusion is the limiting step in the experimental cell. CO2 dissolution in interstitial water under this limited CO2 supply condition enriches 13C in residual CO2 in interstitial air. Optimized mineral carbonation reactions in DNP mining waste will require an unconstrained CO2 supply.

  7. New strategies for submicron characterization the carbon binding of reactive minerals in long-term contrasting fertilized soils: implications for soil carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jian; He, Xinhua; Hao, Jialong; Zhou, Ying; Zheng, Lirong; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong; Yu, Guanghui

    2016-06-01

    Mineral binding is a major mechanism for soil carbon (C) stabilization. However, the submicron information about the in situ mechanisms of different fertilization practices affecting organo-mineral complexes and associated C preservation remains unclear. Here, we applied nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) to examine differentiating effects of inorganic versus organic fertilization on interactions between highly reactive minerals and soil C preservation. To examine such interactions, soils and their extracted colloids were collected during a 24-year long-term fertilization period (1990-2014) (no fertilization, control; chemical nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) fertilization, NPK; and NPK plus swine manure fertilization, NPKM). The results for different fertilization conditions showed a ranked soil organic matter concentration with NPKM > NPK > control. Meanwhile, oxalate-extracted Al (Alo), Fe (Feo), short-range ordered Al (Alxps), Fe (Fexps), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ranked with NPKM > control > NPK, but the ratios of DOC / Alxps and DOC / Fexps ranked with NPKM > NPK > control. Compared with the NPK treatment, the NPKM treatment enhanced the C-binding loadings of Al and Fe minerals in soil colloids at the submicron scale. Furthermore, a greater concentration of highly reactive Al and Fe minerals was presented under NPKM than under NPK. Together, these submicron-scale findings suggest that both the reactive mineral species and their associations with C are differentially affected by 24-year long-term inorganic and organic fertilization.

  8. Use of 14C-uniformly labelled maize for studying carbon mineralization and humification in three soils (oxisol, mollisol, Andosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maize plants have been grown for 120 days in a 14CO2 atmosphere under controlled conditions. At the end of this period, the whole plants were dried after the roots have been removed from the substrate culture. The uniformity of labelling of plant materials was then checked by selective extractions. After nine weeks, no very significant differences appear between the total mineralized carbon originating from the different parts of the plants. But differences in mineralization rate were significant during the first two weeks, particularly for water-soluble extracts and even for stalks and leaves. Other results appear as radioactive and total carbon balance before and after incubation. Quite 30% of the added material was mineralized in the three soil samples after nine weeks. The clearest differences were evident in the humified fraction percentage. For instance, in the horizon of the typic Andosol, are the least light fraction and the greatest alkali-soluble humified compounds; this is also true for total carbon. Humus formation is proved to be strongly influenced by soil mineralogy and humus type

  9. Short-term dynamics of carbon and nitrogen using compost, compost-biochar mixture and organo-mineral biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Ian; Xu, Cheng-Yuan; Wallace, Helen M; Joseph, Stephen; Pace, Ben; Bai, Shahla Hosseini

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to examine the effects of different organic treatments including compost (generated from cattle hide waste and plant material), compost mixed with biochar (compost + biochar) and a new formulation of organo-mineral biochar (produced by mixing biochar with clay, minerals and chicken manure) on carbon (C) nitrogen (N) cycling. We used compost at the rate of 20 t ha(-1), compost 20 t ha(-1) mixed with 10 t ha(-1) biochar (compost + biochar) and organo-mineral biochar which also contained 10 t ha(-1) biochar. Control samples received neither of the treatments. Compost and compost + biochar increased NH4 (+) -N concentrations for a short time, mainly due to the release of their NH4 (+) -N content. Compost + biochar did not alter N cycling of the compost significantly but did significantly increase CO2 emission compared to control. Compost significantly increased N2O emission compared to control. Compost + biochar did not significantly change N supply and also did not decrease CO2 and N2O emissions compared to compost, suggesting probably higher rates of biochar may be required to be added to the compost to significantly affect compost-induced C and N alteration. The organo-mineral biochar had no effect on N cycling and did not stimulate CO2 and N2O emission compared to the control. However, organo-mineral biochar maintained significantly higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC) than compost and compost + biochar from after day 14 to the end of the incubation. Biochar used in organo-mineral biochar had increased organic C adsorption which may become available eventually. However, increased DOC in organo-mineral biochar probably originated from both biochar and chicken manure which was not differentiated in this experiment. Hence, in our experiment, compost, compost + biochar and organo-mineral biochar affected C and N cycling differently mainly due to their different content. PMID:26924699

  10. Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals and industrial wastes as a Novel Carbon Capture and Storage Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is attributed to rising consumption of fossil fuels around the world. The development of solutions to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is one of the most urgent needs of today's society. One of the most stable and long-term solutions for storing CO2 is via carbon mineralization, where minerals containing metal oxides of Ca or Mg are reacted with CO2 to produce thermodynamically stable Ca- and Mg-carbonates that are insoluble in water. Carbon mineralization can be carried out in-situ or ex-situ. In the case of in-situ mineralization, the degree of carbonation is thought to be limited by both mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction kinetics, and must be well understood to predict the ultimate fate of CO2 within geological reservoirs. While the kinetics of in-situ mineral trapping via carbonation is naturally slow, it can be enhanced at high temperature and high partial pressure of CO2. The addition of weak organic acids produced from food waste has also been shown to enhance mineral weathering kinetics. In the case of the ex-situ carbon mineralization, the role of these ligand-bearing organic acids can be further amplified for silicate mineral dissolution. Unfortunately, high mineral dissolution rates often lead to the formation of a silica-rich passivation layer on the surface of silicate minerals. Thus, the use of novel solvent mixture that allows chemically catalyzed removal of this passivation layer during enhanced Mg-leaching surface reaction has been proposed and demonstrated. Furthermore, an engineered biological catalyst, carbonic anhydrase, has been developed and evaluated to accelerate the hydration of CO2, which is another potentially rate-limiting step of the carbonation reaction. The development of these novel catalytic reaction schemes has significantly improved the overall efficiency and sustainability of in-situ and ex-situ mineral carbonation technologies and allowed direct

  11. Mineral Occurrence, Translocation, and Weathering in Soils Developed on Four Types of Carbonate and Non-carbonate Alluvial Fan Deposits in Mojave Desert, Southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; McDonald, E. V.

    2007-12-01

    Soil geomorphology and mineralogy can reveal important clues about Quaternary climate change and geochemical process occurring in desert soils. We investigated (1) the mineral transformation in desert soils developed on four types of alluvial fans (carbonate and non-carbonate) under the same conditions of climate and landscape evolution; and (2) the effects of age, parent materials, and eolian processes on the transformation and translocation of the minerals. Four types of alluvial-fan deposits along the Providence Mountains piedmonts, Mojave Desert, southeastern California, USA were studied: (1) carbonate rocks, primarily limestone and marble (LS), (2) fine-grained rhyodacite and rhyolitic tuff mixed with plutonic and carbonate rocks (VX), (3) fine- to coarse- grained mixed plutonic (PM) rocks, and (4) coarse-grained quartz monzonite (QM). These juxtaposed fan deposits are physically correlated in a small area (about 20 km by 15 km) and experienced the same climatic changes in the late Pleistocene and Holocene. The soils show characteristic mineral compositions of arid/semiarid soils: calcite is present in nearly all of the samples, and a few of the oldest soils contain gypsum and soluble salts. Parent material has profound influence on clay mineral composition of the soils: (1) talc were observed only in soils developed on the volcanic mixture fan deposits, and talc occurs in all horizons; (2) palygorskite occur mainly in the petrocalcic (Bkm) of old soils developed on the LS and VX fan deposits, indicating pedogenic origin; (3) chlorite was observed mainly in soils developed on VX fan deposits (all ages) and on some LS deposits, but it is absent in soils developed on PM and QM fan deposits; and (4) vermiculite was common throughout soils developed on plutonic rock fan deposits. These mineralogical differences suggest that minerals in the soils are primarily inherited from their parent materials and that mineral weathering in this area was weak. Except the

  12. Decomposition, nitrogen and carbon mineralization from food and cover crop residues in the central plateau of Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M J; Mulvaney, M J; Hodges, S C; Thompson, T L; Thomason, W E

    2016-01-01

    Cover crops are a major focus of conservation agriculture efforts because they can provide soil cover and increase nutrient availability after their mineralization in cropping systems. To evaluate the effect of residue type and placement on rate of decomposition and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mineralization, residues from two food crops, maize (Zea mays L.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and two promising cover crops, sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) and sorghum sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench x S. bicolor var. Sudanese [Piper] Stapf) were used in a litterbag study in the Central Plateau region of Haiti from May to September, 2013. Residues were placed in litterbags at a rate equivalent to 3.25 Mg residue ha(-1) either on the soil surface or buried at 15 cm to represent a tilled and no-tillage system, respectively. Initial C:N ratios were: maize > common bean > sorghum sudangrass > sunn hemp. Highest residue mass loss rates and C and N mineralization generally occurred in the reverse order. Overall, surface-placed residues decomposed more slowly with 40 and 17 % of initial residue mass of surface and buried residues, respectively, remaining at 112 days. Carbon and N mineralization was higher when residues were buried. Net N mineralization of buried residues was 0.12, 0.07, 0.06, and 0.03 g N g residue(-1) for sunn hemp, sorghum sudangrass, maize, and common bean, respectively over 112 days. To achieve the goal of increasing nutrient supply while maintaining year-round cover, a combination of grass and legume cover crops may be required with benefits increasing over multiple seasons. PMID:27429883

  13. Interactive control of minerals, wildfire, and erosion on soil carbon stabilization in conifer ecosystems of the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2014-12-01

    Answering the question of what controls the fate and stabilization of organic carbon in forest soils is central to understanding the role of western US ecosystems in mitigating climate change, optimizing forest management, and quantifying local and regional terrestrial carbon budgets. Over half of forest soil C is stored belowground, stabilized by a number of separate, but interacting physical, chemical and biological mechanisms. Here we synthesize data from a series of field and laboratory studies focused on identifying mineral, physical, and landscape position controls on belowground C stabilization mechanisms in western U.S. conifer ecosystems. Results from these studies demonstrate an important for role for short-range-order Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides and Al-humus complexes in C stabilization, and that the soil mineral assemblage moderates C cycling via control on partitioning of C into physical fractions ("free", "occluded", "mineral") with varying MRT and chemistry. Measures of occluded fraction chemical composition by 13C-NMR indicate this fraction is 2-5 times more enriched in pyrogenic C than the bulk soil and that this fraction is on the order of ~25 to 65% charred materials. Radiocarbon analyses of a large set of conifer soil samples from California and Arizona further indicate the occluded fraction is generally older than either the free light or mineral fraction. In particular, soil C in convergent, water and sediment gathering portions of the landscape are enriched in long MRT charred materials. These results indicate an important role for the interaction of soil mineral assemblage, wildfire, and erosion in controlling belowground C storage and stabilization in western conifer forests. Drought and wildfire are expected to increase with climate change and thus may exert significant control on belowground C storage directly through biochemical and physical changes in aboveground biomass, production of charred materials, and indirectly via post

  14. Peridotite dissolution and carbonation rates at fracture surfaces under conditions relevant for in situ mineralization of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, R.; Spiers, C. J.; Drury, M. R.; Kandianis, M. T.

    2013-04-01

    Whereas the dissolution of pure single phases (e.g. olivine and other mafic minerals) has been the focus of many studies, no investigation has been reported on the progress of reactions at and within polymineralic, transgranular fracture surfaces cutting peridotites. We document experiments that address the evolution of dissolving peridotite surfaces, and the rates of dissolution and carbonation reactions that occur at these surfaces, under both open- and closed-system conditions relevant for in situ CO2-sequestration. The results of experiments, conducted under quasi-open system conditions, on solid samples of peridotite whose surfaces were taken as an analogue of free fracture surfaces, demonstrate apparent rates of olivine dissolution at the free surfaces that are equivalent to or upwards of 100 times greater than those determined for pure olivine under similar conditions. This increase in apparent olivine dissolution rate is ascribed to fluid penetration along grain boundaries and veins, which resulted in increased accessibility of reactive olivine surface area. Apparent dissolution rates under closed system conditions, where serial olivine dissolution and magnesite precipitation take place, are ˜1 order of magnitude slower owing to changes in fluid composition and pH. In both of these reaction environments, it is apparent that serpentinized veins and mineral grain boundaries within the peridotite allowed fluids to penetrate the rock and to promote the release of divalent metals and silica from within the sample or simulated fracture walls. These results indicate that the microstructure of free (fracture) surfaces exerts a dominant control on peridotite dissolution and carbonation rates, relative to the proportion of highly reactive minerals that compose such ultramafic rock. The rapid dissolution we observe under open system conditions implies that CO2-mineralization may be viable, in open systems, if the composition of injected fluids can be maintained at or

  15. Influence of the particle size of activated mineral carbon on the phenol and chlorophenol adsorption; Influencia del tamano de particula de carbon mineral activado sobre la adsorcion de fenol y clorofenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia M, A

    2001-07-01

    Water pollution by phenolic compounds is a problem that requires a solution since these phenolic compounds are not completely biodegradable, they accumulate through the food chains and they are quite toxic when enter in contact with living organisms. In human beings, ingestion or contact of the skin with this type of compounds produces irritation and damages mainly to the liver and kidneys. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (EPA assigned nine phenolic compounds among the 275 most toxic substances in 1991. Phenols are found in wastewater from agriculture and industry, because phenolic compounds are used as pesticides and in diverse industrial activities. The treatment of this type of water is not simple because they are generally composed of a mixture of residuals with different chemical nature A useful method for the removal of phenols is the adsorption by activated carbon, since this material has a great surface area and it can be regenerated. The adsorption process depends, among other factors, on the activated carbon characteristics. When they are modified, their capacity to remove pollutants from the water changes. The effect of activated carbon particle size on the removal of phenolic compounds has not been completely studied. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the influence of the mineral activated carbon particle size on the phenol and 4-chloro phenol adsorption in aqueous solution, on adsorption column system. The results of the present work indicate that the mineral activated carbon particle size has a very important influence on the adsorption of phenol and 4-chloro phenol. When the particles were smaller, the retention quantities of phenol and 4-chloro phenol increased. This behavior was related to the particle characteristics of the mineral activated carbon such as surface area and pore volume, while other factors such as elementary composition of the activated carbon did not influence the adsorption process

  16. Accelerated mineral carbonation of stainless steel slags for CO2 storage and waste valorization: effect of process parameters on geochemical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; Van Bouwel, Jens; Vandevelde, Ellen; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the mineral carbonation of stainless steel slags in search for a technically and economically feasible treatment solution that steers these waste residues away from costly disposal in landfills and into valuable applications. Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting (CC) slags prove ideal for mineral carbonation as their powdery morphology forgoes the need for milling and provides sufficient surface area for high reactivity towards direct aqueous carbonatio...

  17. Ultra-fine grinding and mechanical activation of mine waste rock using a high-speed stirred mill for mineral carbonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-jie Li; Michael Hitch

    2015-01-01

    CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation can permanently store CO2 and mitigate climate change. However, the cost and reaction rate of mineral carbonation must be balanced to be viable for industrial applications. In this study, it was attempted to reduce the carbonation costs by using mine waste rock as a feed stock and to enhance the reaction rate using wet mechanical activation as a pre-treatment method. Slurry rheological properties, particle size distribution, specific surface area, crystallinity, and CO2 sequestration reaction efficiency of the initial and mechanically activated mine waste rock and olivine were characterized. The results show that serpentine acts as a catalyst, in-creasing the slurry yield stress, assisting new surface formation, and hindering the size reduction and structure amorphization. Mechanically activated mine waste rock exhibits a higher carbonation conversion than olivine with equal specific milling energy input. The use of a high-speed stirred mill may render the mineral carbonation suitable for mining industrial practice.

  18. Mineral associated and aggregate-occluded soil carbon decreased with increasing nitrogen and residue input for three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Heitkamp, Felix

    2016-04-01

    Cropland soils may be a source or sink for atmospheric CO2. Therefore, effects of cropland management and fertilization on soil organic carbon (SOC) can be assessed best in long-term experiments. Generally, it is assumed that change in SOC is linearly related to C-input into the soil. However, recently it has been shown that residue incorporation resulted to only small extents in the increase of SOC levels. This gives rise to environmental concerns regarding the efficient use of crop residue. Such concerns are also applicable for the well designed and documented long-term experiment of Puch, Germany, in a silt-loam soil. The crop rotation is winter barley - winter wheat - silage maize. Five organic amendments were combined with N-fertiliser rates. The levels of organic amendments are unamended control (CON), straw was removed; farmyard manure (FYM), straw was removed; straw incorporation (STR); slurry application (SLU), straw was removed; and straw incorporation combined with slurry application (STSL). Three levels of mineral fertilizer application were selected: no nitrogen (N0); medium, 100 kg N ha-1year-1 (N2); and high, 200 kg N ha-1 year-1 (N4). These treatments resulted in a wide range of mean annual carbon input (1 - 5 t C ha-1 year-1). We hypothesize that the amount of soil carbon stored in different fractions will increase with C-input, but the effect will decrease in the order free light fraction (f-LF), occluded light fraction (o-LF) and heavy mineral-associated fraction (HF). Soil samples were fractionated by density using sodium polytungstate (1.6 g cm-3). Compared to the starting value SOC was lost in STR and CON and increased in SLU and STSL, whereas FYM showed no differences to initial carbon stocks. However, N additions resulted in only slightly increase in SOC contents with reference to C-input. The lower amount of o-LF carbon in CON and STR demonstrated the low ability of crop residue in comparison to animal manures to build up SOC contents

  19. Origin of Ultra-Deep Diamonds: Chemical Interaction of Ca-CARBONATE and the Earth's Lower Mantle Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, A. V.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.; Litvin, Yu. A.

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of the work is experimental study of physicochemical conditions of origin of ultra-deep diamonds in the substance of the Earth's lower mantle (LM) based on the experimental criterium of syngenesis of diamond and primary inclusions of LM mineral. Magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O, Mg-Fe perovskite (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O3 and Ca-perovskite CaSiO3 mainly present the LM substance and are frequently disclosed as primary inclusions in ultra-deep diamonds together with Ca-, (Ca, Mg, Fe)-, Na-Ca-carbonates. For the upper mantle conditions, the mantle-carbonatite conception of diamond genesis was developed based on the effects of congruent melting of carbonates and complete liquid miscibility of carbonate-silicate melts. Melting of Ca-carbonate and CaCO3 - (Mg,Fe)O, CaCO3 - (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O3 systems, stability of the melts and their decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 16 to 55 GPa and temperatures of 1600 to 3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. It was determined that melting of Ca-carbonate is congruent at the PT-conditions of the lower mantle and characterized by an expanded field of liquid Ca-carbonate phase. We observed formation of graphite (below 16 GPa) and diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the CaCO3 melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. Also it was shown that CaCO3 - (Mg,Fe)O - (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O3 system is capable to form diamonds together with Ca-carbonate, magnesiowustite and perovskite as syngenesis minerals at PT-conditions of the lower mantle. We observed formation diamond (between 40 and 55 GPa) on decomposition of the CaCO3 from CaCO3 - (Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O3 melt at temperatures above 2000 K. The experimental data on phase relations at the melting and decomposition of CaCO3 and CaCO3-(Mg,Fe)O-(Mg,Fe)(Si,Al)O3 system as well as diamond crystallization are applied to the problem of formation of natural ultra

  20. Slowing the rate of loss of mineral wetlands on human dominated landscapes - Diversification of farmers markets to include carbon (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, I. F.; Badiou, P.; Lobb, D.

    2013-12-01

    Canada is the fourth-largest exporter of agriculture and agri-food products in the world (exports valued at 28B), but instability of agriculture markets can make it difficult for farmers to cope with variability, and new mechanisms are needed for farmers to achieve economic stability. Capitalizing on carbon markets will help farmers achieve environmentally sustainable economic performance. In order to have a viable carbon market, governments and industries need to know what the carbon capital is and what potential there is for growth, and farmers need financial incentives that will not only allow them to conserve existing wetlands but that will also enable them to restore wetlands while making a living. In southern Ontario, farmers' needs to maximize the return on investment on marginal lands have resulted in loss of 70-90% of wetlands, making this region one of the most threatened region in terms of wetland degradation and loss in Canada. Our project establishes the role that mineral wetlands have in the net carbon balance by contributing insight into the potential benefits to carbon management provided by wetland restoration efforts in these highly degraded landscapes. The goal was to establish the magnitude of carbon offsets that could be achieved through wetland conservation (securing existing carbon stocks) and restoration (creating new carbon stocks). The experimental design was to focus on (1) small (0.2-2.0 ha) and (2) isolated (no inflow or outflow) mineral wetlands with the greatest restoration potential that included (3) a range of restoration ages (drained (0 yr), 3 yr, 6 yr, 12 yr, 20 yr, 35 yr, intact marshes) to capture potential changes in rates of carbon sequestration with restoration age of wetland. From each wetland, wetland soil carbon pools samples were collected at four positions: centre of wetland (open-water); emergent vegetation zone; wet meadow zone where flooding often occurs (i.e., high water mark); and upland where flooding rarely

  1. Effect of tree species on carbon stocks in forest floor and mineral soil and implications for soil carbon inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulp, C.J.E.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Verburg, P.H.; Waal, de R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Forest soil organic carbon (SOC) and forest floor carbon (FFC) stocks are highly variable. The sampling effort required to assess SOC and FFC stocks is therefore large, resulting in limited sampling and poor estimates of the size, spatial distribution, and changes in SOC and FFC stocks in many count

  2. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States); Gilliam, Ryan [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States); Seeker, Randy [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This final report details all development, analysis, design and testing of the project. Also included in the final report are an updated Techno-Economic Analysis and CO2 Lifecycle Analysis. The subsystems included in the pilot demonstration plant are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant was proven to be capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing it into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The final report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. The report also discusses the results of the fully integrated operation of the facility. Fiber cement boards have been produced in this facility exclusively using reactive calcium carbonate from captured CO2 from flue gas. These boards meet all US and China appropriate acceptance standards. Use demonstrations for these boards are now underway.

  3. Factors driving the carbon mineralization priming effect in a sandy loam soil amended with different types of biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cely, P.; Tarquis, A. M.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Méndez, A.; Gascó, G.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of biochar on the soil carbon mineralization priming effect depends on the characteristics of the raw materials, production method and pyrolysis conditions. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the impact of three different types of biochar on physicochemical properties and CO2 emissions of a sandy loam soil. For this purpose, soil was amended with three different biochars (BI, BII and BIII) at a rate of 8 wt% and soil CO2 emissions were measured for 45 days. BI is produced from a mixed wood sieving from wood chip production, BII from a mixture of paper sludge and wheat husks and BIII from sewage sludge. Cumulative CO2 emissions of biochars, soil and amended soil were well fit to a simple first-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.97. Results show a negative priming effect in the soil after addition of BI and a positive priming effect in the case of soil amended with BII and BIII. These results can be related to different biochar properties such as carbon content, carbon aromaticity, volatile matter, fixed carbon, easily oxidized organic carbon or metal and phenolic substance content in addition to surface biochar properties. Three biochars increased the values of soil field capacity and wilting point, while effects over pH and cation exchange capacity were not observed.

  4. Carbon sources supporting benthic mineralization in mangrove and adjacent seagrass sediments (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    OpenAIRE

    BOUILLON, S; Moens, T.; F. Dehairs

    2004-01-01

    The origin of carbon substrates used by in situ sedimentary bacterial communities was investigated in an intertidal mangrove ecosystem and in adjacent seagrass beds in Gazi bay (Kenya) by δ13C analysis of bacteria-specific PLFA (phospholipid fatty acids) and bulk organic carbon. Export of mangrove-derived organic matter to the adjacent seagrass-covered bay was evident from sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC) and δ13CTOC data. PLFA δ13C data indicate tha...

  5. Recent (<4 year old) Leaf Litter is Not a Major Source of Microbial Carbon in a Temperate Forest Mineral Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Christiane [University of California, Irvine; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine; Froberg, Mats J. [Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet; Cisneros dozal, Luz Maria [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Zhang, Dachun [University of California, Irvine; Xu, Xiamei [University of California, Irvine; Santos, Guaciara [University of California, Irvine; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Microbial communities in soil A horizons derive their carbon from several potential sources: organic carbon (C) transported down from overlying litter and organic horizons, root-derived C, or soil organic matter. We took advantage of a multi-year experiment that manipulated the {sup 14}C isotope signature of surface leaf litter inputs in a temperate forest at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, USA, to quantify the contribution of recent leaf litter C to microbial respiration and biomarkers in the underlying mineral soil. We observed no measurable difference (< {approx}40{per_thousand} given our current analytical methods) in the radiocarbon signatures of microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) isolated from the top 10 cm of mineral soil in plots that experienced 3 years of litterfall that differed in each year by {approx}750{per_thousand} between high-{sup 14}C and low-{sup 14}C treatments. Assuming any difference in {sup 14}C between the high- and low-{sup 14}C plots would reflect C derived from these manipulated litter additions, we estimate that <6% of the microbial C after 4 years was derived from the added 1-4-year-old surface litter. Large contributions of C from litter < 1 year (or >4 years) old (which fell after (or prior to) the manipulation and therefore did not differ between plots) are not supported because the {sup 14}C signatures of the PLFA compounds (averaging 200-220{per_thousand}) is much higher that of the 2004-5 leaf litter (115{per_thousand}) or pre-2000 litter. A mesocosm experiment further demonstrated that C leached from {sup 14}C-enriched surface litter or the O horizon was not a detectable C source in underlying mineral soil microbes during the first eight months after litter addition. Instead a decline in the {sup 14}C of PLFA over the mesocosm experiment likely reflected the loss of a pre-existing substrate not associated with added leaf litter. Measured PLFA {Delta}{sup 14}C signatures were higher than those measured in bulk

  6. Carbon storage and nutrient mobilization from soil minerals by deep roots and rhizospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Harrison, Robert; Stupak, Inge;

    2016-01-01

    Roots mobilize nutrients via deep soil penetration and rhizosphere processes inducing weathering of primary minerals. These processes contribute to C transfer to soils and to tree nutrition. Assessments of these characteristics and processes of root systems are important for understanding long...

  7. Projected changes in mineral soil carbon of European croplands and grasslands, 1990-2080

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, J.; Smith, P.; Wattenbach, M.; Zaehle, S.; Hiederer, R.; Jones, R.J.A.; Montanarella, L.; Rounsevell, M.D.A.; Reginster, I.; Ewert, F.

    2005-01-01

    We present the most comprehensive pan-European assessment of future changes in cropland and grassland soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to date, using a dedicated process-based SOC model and state-of-the-art databases of soil, climate change, land-use change and technology change. Soil carbon change

  8. Experimental Study of Abiotic Organic Synthesis at High Temperature and Pressure Conditions: Carbon Isotope and Mineral Surface Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, P. B.

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic organic synthesis processes have been proposed as potential mechanisms for methane generation in subseafloor hydrothermal systems on Earth, and on other planets. To better understand the detailed reaction pathways and carbon isotope fractionations in this process under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, hydrothermal experiments at high temperature (750 C) and pressure (0.55 GPa) were performed using piston cylinder apparatus. Formic acid was used as the source of CO2 and H2, and magnetite was the mineral catalyst. The chemical and carbon isotopic compositions of dissolved organic products were determined by GC-C-MS-IRMS, while organic intermediaries on the mineral catalyst were characterized by Pyrolysis-GC-MS. Among experimental products, dissolved CO2 was the dominant carbon species with a relative abundance of 88 mol%. Dissolved CH4 and C2H6 were also identified with a mole ratio of CH4 over C2H6 of 15:1. No dissolved CO was detected in the experiment, which might be attributable to the loss of H2 through the Au capsule used in the experiments at high temperature and pressure conditions and corresponding conversion of CO to CO2 by the water-gas shift reaction. Carbon isotope results showed that the 13C values of CH4 and C2H6 were -50.3% and -39.3% (V-PDB), respectively. CO2 derived from decarboxylation of formic acid had a (sigma)C-13 value of -19.2%, which was 3.2% heavier than its source, formic acid. The (sigma)C-13 difference between CO2 and CH4 was 31.1%, which was higher than the value of 9.4% calculated from theoretical isotopic equilibrium predictions at experimental conditions, suggesting the presence of a kinetic isotope effect. This number was also higher than the values (4.6 to 27.1%) observed in similar experiments previously performed at 400 C and 50 MPa with longer reaction times. CH4 is 11.0% less enriched in C-13 than C2H6. Alcohols were observed as carbon compounds on magnetite surfaces by Pyrolysis-GC-MS, which confirms

  9. Study Effect of Carbon: Nitrogen Ratio on the Minerals Weathering by Using Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *A. K. Ali

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study conducted to investigate the effect of soil C:N ratio under different tree types characterized by similarity in all soil forming factors (climate, parent material, topography, organisms ,time located north of Iraq , difference between them was just in the composition rate of organic matter produce by different tree types which due to variation in c:n ratio, some clay fraction of studied pedons in surface and subsurface horizon has been tested under scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction, the result of SEM emages showed that the green grain forest was the higher effected soil through weathering signs which was very clear , clay samples showed breakness of mineral layers and edges also the minerals appear in different size and shapes and that correlated with decrement in C:N ratio in tree types , the results showed there is series of changes in mineral morphological features , then mineral particles surfaces in green grain and pine forest appear irregular and complicated especially in pine forest samples as well as the minerals in green grain forest appear spongy like shape which due to swelling and expansion sequence for mineral interlayer. images for wild pears and oak forests showed the mineral surfaces was in the exfoliation state where the exfoliation tracks appear very clear whereas some of them exposed to edge weathering indicated by appearance of edges in pale color which can recognize from surface zone which caused by bleaching process resulting from interlayer cation removal by the weathering process which probably be potassium or iron absence of complication state and restricted in exfoliation process associated with edge weathering of exfoliated surfaces explain weathering intensity reduction as compared with green grain and pine forest and less weathering intensity found in almond tree type which was more C:N ratio value. If we focused on the C:N ration results we can recognize the variation in this value

  10. Contribution to the application of nuclear microprobe in geochemistry. Carbon and nitrogen microanalysis in glasses and minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological complexity of geological materials implies the use of microanalysis techniques utilization. Nuclear microprobe allows selective and no destructive light elements determination, through nuclear reactions. Nuclear microanalysis has been used to characterize carbon and nitrogen in volatile phase dissolved in magmatic samples. The application of some microanalysis techniques in geochemistry are discussed, nuclear microprobe theory and techniques are developed. Minerals, glasses and glassy inclusions are described, and more particularly, the interest of these investigations. Optimal conditions of carbon and nitrogen analysis (12C(d.p)13C and 14N(d,p)15N reaction respectively), as deuteron energy and observation angle are studied. A methodology has been established for this purpose. Several results are exposed: Punctual analysis, carbon concentration profile in depth surface scanning, surficial mapping in glassy inclusions. The carbon content interpretation in glassy inclusions measured conveniently for the first time agrees with data obtained through other techniques. In conclusion, degazing schedule improvements require more analysis. Perspective research axis are evocated

  11. Carbonic anhydrase is not the only factor regulating otolith mineralization in fish in dependence of the gravitational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R.

    2006-01-01

    Earlier experiments have shown, that fish otolith growth and mineralization is slowed down by hypergravity (hg). The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH) provides carbonate and, thus, plays a major role in otolith calcification. Indeed, CAH reactivity in inner ear maculae is downregulated by hg. The following experiment was designed in order to elucidate as of whether CAH is the only factor regulating otolith mineralization in dependence of the gravity vector: A first group of larval cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) was reared in normal aquarium water at 1 g (1 g-Aq). A second group received hg (3 g, 7 days) as a physical factor to decrease CAH reactivity (3 g-Aq). A third group (1 g-AZ) was (at 1 g) treated with azetazolamide (AZ; 1 g/l), an inhibitor of CAH (the AZ-concentration used resulted in a complete inhibition of CAH as had been proven by a biochemical assessment of enzyme activity). The last group was maintained both in AZ and at hg (3 g-AZ). Both the saccular and utricular otoliths (sagittae and lapilli, respectively) of the 1 g-AZ group showed a decrease in otolith growth (surface area) as compared to the 1 g-Aq animals (1 g-AZ < 1 g-Aq). Similar results were obtained when comparing 3 g-Aq with 1 g-Aq samples (3 g-Aq < 1 g-Aq). Regarding sagittae, AZ treatment had no significant additional effect on otolith mineralization under hg (3 g-AZ = 1 g-AZ). In case of lapilli, however, growth received a further reduction when reared in 3 g-AZ (i.e., 3 g-AZ < 1 g-AZ). Thus, in lapilli, hg and AZ added their effects on otolith growth. This finding clearly indicates that hg does not only act on otolith growth via a regulation of CAH activity.

  12. [Soil organic carbon mineralization of Black Locust forest in the deep soil layer of the hilly region of the Loess Plateau, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin-Xin; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Yang, Kai

    2012-11-01

    The deep soil layer (below 100 cm) stores considerable soil organic carbon (SOC). We can reveal its stability and provide the basis for certification of the deep soil carbon sinks by studying the SOC mineralization in the deep soil layer. With the shallow soil layer (0-100 cm) as control, the SOC mineralization under the condition (temperature 15 degrees C, the soil water content 8%) of Black Locust forest in the deep soil layer (100-400 cm) of the hilly region of the Loess Plateau was studied. The results showed that: (1) There was a downward trend in the total SOC mineralization with the increase of soil depth. The total SOC mineralization in the sub-deep soil (100-200 cm) and deep soil (200-400 cm) were equivalent to approximately 88.1% and 67.8% of that in the shallow layer (0-100 cm). (2) Throughout the carbon mineralization process, the same as the shallow soil, the sub-deep and deep soil can be divided into 3 stages. In the rapid decomposition phase, the ratio of the mineralization or organic carbon to the total mineralization in the sub-deep and deep layer (0-10 d) was approximately 50% of that in the shallow layer (0-17 d). In the slow decomposition phase, the ratio of organic carbon mineralization to total mineralization in the sub-deep, deep layer (11-45 d) was 150% of that in the shallow layer (18-45 d). There was no significant difference in this ratio among these three layers (46-62 d) in the relatively stable stage. (3) There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the mineralization rate of SOC among the shallow, sub-deep, deep layers. The stability of SOC in the deep soil layer (100-400 cm) was similar to that in the shallow soil layer and the SOC in the deep soil layer was also involved in the global carbon cycle. The change of SOC in the deep soil layer should be taken into account when estimating the effects of soil carbon sequestration in the Hilly Region of the Loess Plateau, China. PMID:23323422

  13. Storage and stability of organic carbon in soils as related to depth, occlusion within aggregates, and attachment to minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schrumpf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models suggest that stability of organic carbon (OC in soil depends on the source of plant litter, occlusion within aggregates, incorporation in organo-mineral complexes, and location within the soil profile. Density fractionation is a useful tool to study the relevance of OC stabilization in aggregates and in association with minerals, but it has rarely been applied to full soil profiles. We aim to determine factors shaping the depth profiles of physically unprotected and mineral associated OC and test their relevance for OC stability across a range of European soils that vary in vegetation, soil types, parent material, and land use. At each of the 12 study sites, 10 soil cores were sampled to 60 cm depth and subjected to density separation. Bulk soil samples and density fractions (free light fractions – fLF, occluded light fractions – oLF, heavy fractions – HF were analysed for OC, total nitrogen (TN, δ14C, and Δ14C. Bulk samples were also incubated to determine CO2 evolution per g OC in the samples (specific mineralization rates as an indicator for OC stability. Depth profiles of OC in the light fraction (LF-OC matched those of roots for undisturbed grassland and forest sites, suggesting that roots are shaping the depth distribution of LF-OC. Organic C in the HF declined less with soil depth than LF-OC and roots, especially at grassland sites. The decrease in Δ14C (increase in age of HF-OC with soil depth was related to soil pH as well as to dissolved OC fluxes. This indicates that dissolved OC translocation contributes to the formation of subsoil HF-OC and shapes the Δ14C profiles. The LF at three sites were rather depleted in 14C, indicating the presence of fossil material such as coal and lignite, probably inherited from the parent material. At the other sites, modern Δ14C signatures and positive correlations between specific mineralization rates and fLF-OC indicate the fLF is a potentially available energy and

  14. Effect of temperature on the oxygen isotope composition of carbon dioxide (δ18O) prepared from carbonate minerals by reaction with polyphosphoric acid: An example of the rhombohedral CaCO 3-MgCO 3 group minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephen F.

    2010-11-01

    Measurement of the ratio of 18O to 16O in CO 2(δ18O) produced from rhombohedral carbonate minerals in the compositional range CaCO 3-MgCO 3 by reaction with polyphosphoric acid (PPA), at temperatures of between 25 and 110 °C, shows that values of δ18O are linearly correlated ( r o > 0.99) with the reciprocal of absolute reaction temperature (K/ T). This observation is consistent with earlier studies documenting the effect of temperature on the kinetic fractionation of oxygen isotopes between parent carbonate and product CO 2 and H 2O during acid decomposition. However, analysis of the resultant data reveals: (1) a progressive increase in dδ18O/dT-1 with increasing Mg content, and (2) a significant variation in dδ18O/dT-1 between individual samples of carbonate of identical lattice symmetry and similar chemical composition. The overall increase in gradient with increasing Mg content is assumed to reflect cation radius dependent factors that control the bonding environment at the interface between the metal cation exposed at the surface of the reacting carbonate solid and a H 2CO 3 transitional species during disproportionation of H 2CO 3 to CO 2 and H 2O ("cluster model" of Guo et al., 2009). Phase-specific variations in dδ18O/dT-1 might result from differences in lattice structure variables (e.g., degree of lattice distortion, extent of positional disorder, and non-ideal mixing of substituent cations where carbonates depart from end-member compositions). Lattice structure variables may be dependent on geochemical conditions pertaining at the time of carbonate precipitation (e.g., biosynthetic versus inorganic precipitates) and suggests that dδ18O/dT-1 has the potential to vary, within limits, in response to both the chemical composition and structure of each carbonate sample. Because the oxygen isotope composition of carbonate minerals (δ18O) measured on the VPDB scale is defined by the oxygen isotope composition of CO 2 prepared from NBS19 (calcite) by

  15. Carbon Sequestration and Nitrogen Mineralization in Soil Cooperated with Organic Composts and Bio-char During Corn (Zea mays) Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joung-Du; Lee, Sun-Ill; Park, Wu-Gyun; Choi, Yong-Su; Hong, Seong-Gil; Park, Sang-Won

    2014-05-01

    Objectives of this study were to estimate the carbon sequestration and to evaluate nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in soils cooperated with organic composts and bio-char during corn cultivation. For the experiment, the soil used in this study was clay loam types, and application rates of chemical fertilizer and bio-char were recommended amount after soil test and 2 % to soil weight, respectively. The soil samples were periodically taken at every 15 day intervals during the experimental periods. The treatments were consisted of non-application, cow manure compost, pig manure compost, swine digestate from aerobic digestion system, their bio-char cooperation. For the experimental results, residual amount of inorganic carbon was ranged from 51 to 208kg 10a-1 in soil only cooperated with different organic composts. However it was estimated to be highest at 208kg 10a-1 in the application plot of pig manure compost. In addition to bio-char application, it was ranged from 187.8 to 286kg 10a-1, but was greatest accumulated at 160.3kg 10a-1 in the application plot of cow manure compost. For nitrogen mineralization and nitrification rates, it was shown that there were generally low in the soil cooperated with bio-char compared to the only application plots of different organic composts except for 71 days after sowing. Also, they were observed to be highest in the application plot of swine digestate from aerobic digestion system. For the loss of total inorganic carbon (TIC) by run-off water, it was ranged from 0.18 to 0.36 kg 10a-1 in the different treatment plots. Also, with application of bio-char, total nitrogen was estimated to be reduced at 0.42(15.1%) and 0.38(11.8%) kg 10a-1 in application plots of the pig manure compost and aerobic digestate, respectively.

  16. Microbially mediated carbonation of marine alkaline minerals: Potential for concrete crack healing

    OpenAIRE

    Jonkers, H.M.; Palin, D.; Flink, P.J.; Thijssen, A.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete constructions in the marine environment suffer from chemical attack of sea salts which can induce damage to both the concrete matrix and embedded steel reinforcement. For example, ingress of sulfate and chloride ions can respectively result in detrimental ettringite formation and enhanced corrosion of the steel rebars. The first degradation mechanism is due to development of expansive minerals within the concrete matrix, a process where increased internal pressure can result in crack...

  17. Selective adhesion and mineral deposition by osteoblasts on carbon nanofiber patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Khang, Dongwoo; Sato, Michiko; Price, Rachel L.; Ribbe, Alexander E; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to develop better orthopedic implants, osteoblast (bone-forming cells) adhesion was determined on microscale patterns (30 μm lines) of carbon nanofibers placed on polymer substrates. Patterns of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on a model polymer (polycarbonate urethane [PCU]) were developed using an imprinting method that placed CNFs in selected regions. Results showed the selective adhesion and alignment of osteoblasts on CNF patterns placed on PCU. Results also showed greater attracti...

  18. Towards zero-waste mineral carbon sequestration via two-way valorization of ironmaking slag

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Yi Wai; Santos, Rafael; Elsen, Jan; Meesschaert, Boudewijn; Martens, Johan; Van Gerven, Tom

    2014-01-01

    A three-stage process was developed to transform blast furnace slag (BFS) into two valuable products: precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and zeolitic materials. The conceptualized process aims to simultaneously achieve sustainable CO2 sequestration and solid waste elimination. Calcium is first selectively extracted by leaching with an organic acid, followed by carbonation of the leachate to precipitate CaCO3. In parallel, the hydrothermal conversion of the extracted solid residues in alkali...

  19. Aboveground carbon stocks in oil palm plantations and the threshold for carbon-neutral vegetation conversion on mineral soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khasanah, N.; Noordwijk, van M.; Ningsih, H.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon (C) footprint of palm oil production is needed to judge emissions from potential biofuel use. Relevance includes wider sustainable palm oil debates. Within life cycle analysis, aboveground C debt is incurred if the vegetation replaced had a higher C stock than oil palm plantations. Our st

  20. Suevites from the Rochechouart Impact Crater, France, and the Lake Mien Impact Crater, Sweden: The Search for Robust Carbon Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, R. M.; Langenhorst, F.; Stoffler, D.; Pillinger, C. T.; Gilmour, I.

    1995-09-01

    Suevite from the 24km Ries crater in southern Germany has recently been shown to contain diamond, lonsdaleite and silicon carbide (1). These minerals are of impact, not meteoritic, origin and probably formed by a combination of shock and plasma processes with the contribution due to each mechanism yet to be resolved (1). Diamonds are increasingly becoming an accepted impact signature and have been reported for several Ukranian impact craters including Zapadnaya (2) and also for the Popigai impact crater in Siberia (3). We have also found diamonds associated with the K/T boundary event 65 Ma ago in North America (4) and Mexico (5). The genesis of suevite at the Ries is thought to be within a fireball at very high temperatures and travelling at high velocities. Shocked minerals are associated with the suevite as are the high pressure polymorphs of quartz namely coesite and stishovite (6). Such an extreme temperature and pressure history for the suevite make it an ideal rock type to search for impact diamonds, we are therefore endeavouring to study other suevites from further impact craters, including Rochechouart and Mien. The 165-200 Ma Rochechouart impact crater in the Massif Central, France, is thought to have originally been some 20 km across and therefore is very similar in size to the Ries (7). The basement material of gneisses and granites is also akin to the Ries and as such makes it an ideal candidate for diamond poltypes and possibly silicon carbide. Lake Mien in Sweden has no outcrops of suevite breccia but does have glacial erratic blocks of suevite. The impact crater is only some 7-9 km in size and has an age of 120 Ma (8). It affords a useful method of investigating the importance of size as a controlling factor in formation of carbon impact minerals. The samples were treated with an acid demineralization procedure first developed for the extraction of diamond from meteorites and modified for the particular needs of studying terrestrial samples

  1. Equilibrium of Groundwater with Carbonate Minerals of the Water-Bearing Rocks under Anthropogenic Impact (by the example of Kishinev, Moldova)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents calculation results of equilibrium of groundwater in Kishenev with a variety of secondary carbonate minerals. It is shown that the groundwater-rock system is in equilibrium with some minerals, such as calcite, magnesite, dolomite, siderite, but at the same time is not in equilibrium with strontianite. It indicates that secondary mineral precipitation is possible. Specific nitrate chemical water type, which is rarely observed in nature and characterized by the presence of anthropogenic impact in this territory, in some cases is of higher saturation as compared to calcite, dolomite and magnesite due to the fact that nitrate ion content increases with the increase of calcium content

  2. Shrinkage Cracking: A mechanism for self-sustaining carbon mineralization reactions in olivine rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xing, T.; Xiao, X.; De Andrade, V. J. D.; Karato, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    The hydration and carbonation of olivine results in an up to ~44% increase in solid molar volume, which may choke off of fluid supply and passivate reactive surfaces, thus preventing further carbonation reactions. The carbonation of olivine has ben studied extensively in the laboratory. To date, observations from these experimental studies indicate that carbonation reaction rates generally decrease with time and the extent of carbonation is limited in olivine rocks. Field studies, however, show that 100% hydration and carbonation occur naturally in ultramafic rocks. The disagreement between the laboratory results under controlled conditions and the field observations underlines the lack of understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the self-sustaining carbonation interaction in nature. We developed a state-of-the-art pressurized hydrothermal cell that is transparent to X-rays to characterize the real-time evolution of pore geometry during fluid-rock interaction using in-situ synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography. Through a time series of high-resolution 3-dimensional images, we document the microstructural evolution of a porous olivine aggregate reacting with a sodium bicarbonate solution at elevated pressure and temperature conditions. We observed porosity increases, near constant rate of crystal growth, and pervasive reaction-induced fractures. Based on the nanometer scale tomography data, we propose that shrinkage cracking is the mechanism responsible for producing new reactive surface and keep the carbonation reaction self-sustaining in our experiment. Shrinkage cracks are commonly observed in drying mud ponds, cooling lava flows and ice wedge fields. Stretching of a contracting surface bonded to a substrate of nearly constant dimensions leads to a stress buildup in the surface layer. When the stress exceeds the tensile strength, polygonal cracks develop in the surface layer. In our experiments, the stretching mismatch between the surface and interior of

  3. Mineral CO2 sequestration in basalts and ultra-basic rocks: impact of secondary silicated phases on the carbonation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of carbonates constitutes a stable option for carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration, and is prone to play a significant role in reducing emissions of anthropic origin. However, our comprehension of the carbonation mechanism, as well as of the kinetics limitations encountered during this chemical reaction, remains poorly developed. Though there is a large number of studies focusing on the dissolution kinetics of basic silicates and on the precipitation of carbonates, few have inquired about the impact that the formation of non-carbonated secondary phases can have on these reaction's kinetics. It is the approach chosen here, as only solid knowledge of the global carbonation mechanism can make this process predictive and efficient. Experimental data on dissolution and carbonation have therefore been determined in batch reactors, on relevant minerals and rocks. Firstly, we studied the carbonation of olivine (a major phase within peridotites and minor within basalts) at 90 deg. C and under pCO2 of 280 bars. The dissolution of San Carlos olivine (Mg1.76Fe0.24SiO4) is slowed down by the formation of a surface silica gel, when the fluid reaches equilibrium with amorphous silica. The transport of species to the reactive medium becomes the limiting step of the process, slowing down the dissolution process of San Carlos olivine by 5 orders of magnitude. However, this passivation doesn't occur during the alteration of Ca-olivine (Ca2SiO4), though a surface silica layer does form. This comparison suggests that it isn't the structure of the silicate but its chemical composition, which controls the transport properties through the interfacial layer. The second part explores the effects of organic ligands and of temperature variations on the formation of those phases. The addition of citrate at 90 deg. C increases the kinetics of San Carlos olivine by one order of magnitude, and allows the release of enough Mg in the aqueous medium to form carbonates, before

  4. Mineral control of soil carbon storage with reforestation of abandoned pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Spiotta, E.; Silver, W. L.; Swanston, C. W.; Torn, M. S.; Burton, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    We applied CP MAS 13C-NMR spectroscopy and radiocarbon modeling to soil C density fractions to track changes in the quality and turnover of C with forest regrowth on former pasturelands. Our results showed that inter-aggregate, unattached particulate organic C (free light fraction) and C located inside soil aggregates (occluded light fraction) represent distinct soil C pools. The signal intensity of the O-alkyl region, representing cellulose, decreased with mineral-association, while alkyl C, attributed to waxy compounds and microbially resynthesized lipids, increased from the free to the occluded light fractions. The alkyl/O-alkyl ratio changed consistently with changes in C-to-N and δ15N across different land cover types, and thus appears to be a reliable index of humification. In contrast to cellulose, proteins, lipids and lignin did not show any consistent trends, suggesting different controls on their decomposition. Greater variability in the chemical makeup of the occluded light fraction suggests that it represents material in different stages of decay. Mean residence times (MRT) of the free light C were significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 yrs) than for the occluded fraction (7.3 ± 0.8 yrs). The occluded fraction in active pastures and secondary forests in the earliest stage of succession had shorter MRT than in primary forests and older secondary forests, which would be explained by lower aggregate stability and faster cycling rates in disturbed versus undisturbed soils. The mineral associated C in the disturbed soils had slower cycling C (MRT = 98.9 ± 10.6 yrs) than the undisturbed sites (65.8 ± 2.1 yrs), most likely due to a preferential loss of labile C in the first. Incorporation of C into soil aggregates afforded some protection from decomposition, but the main mechanism of stabilization was direct mineral association. As the sorptive capacity of a soil is dependent on its mineral composition, it appears that the Oxisols at our sites have reached

  5. Organo-mineral interactions promote greater soil organic carbon stability under aspen in semi-arid montane forests in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Miegroet, H.; Roman Dobarco, M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest species influence soil organic carbon (SOC) storage through litter input, which in interaction with soil microclimate, texture and mineralogy, lead to different SOC stabilization and storage patterns. We sampled mineral soil (0-15 cm) across the ecotone between aspen (Populus tremuloides) and mixed conifers stands (Abies lasiocarpa and Pseudotsuga menziesii) in semi-arid montane forests from Utah, to investigate the influence of vegetation vs. site characteristics on SOC stabilization, storage and chemistry. SOC was divided into light fraction (LF), mineral-associated SOC in the silt and clay fraction (MoM), and a dense subfraction > 53 μm (SMoM) using wet sieving and electrostatic attraction. SOC decomposability and solubility was derived from long term laboratory incubations and hot water extractions (HWE). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study differences in chemical functional groups in LF and MoM. Vegetation cover did not affect SOC storage (47.0 ± 16.5 Mg C ha-1), SOC decomposability (cumulative CO2-C release of 93.2 ± 65.4 g C g-1 C), or SOC solubility (9.8 ± 7.2 mg C g-1 C), but MoM content increased with presence of aspen [pure aspen (31.2 ± 15.1 Mg C ha-1) > mixed (25.7 ± 8.8 Mg C ha-1) > conifer (22.8 ± 9.0 Mg C ha-1)]. Organo-mineral complexes reduced biological availability of SOC, indicated by the negative correlation between silt+clay (%) and decomposable SOC per gram of C (r = -0.48, p = 0.001) or soluble SOC (r = -0.59, p plant or microbial origin. FTIR spectra clustered by sites with similar parent material rather than by vegetation cover. This suggests that initial differences in litter chemistry between aspen and conifers converged into similar MoM chemistry within sites.

  6. Effect of the synthetic carbon-mineral sorbent and antibiotics on the development of combined radiation and thermal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Male Wistar rats exposed to whole-body γ-irradiation at the dose of 7.5 Gy. Full sickness thermal bum 15% of body surface inflicted immediately after irradiation. Experimental study of the therapeutic efficacy of enterosorption alone or in combination with antibiotics doxycyclin and cyprofloxacyn performed. The strong decrease of bacterial endotoxemia, toxic oligopeptides' level and general blood toxicity revealed after treatment compared with non-treated animals with combined injuries. Corrections of postirradiation intestinal disbacteriosis revealed too. The best result observed when carbon mineral sorbent and antibiotics administered daily within the first 10-14 days after combined injury. Survival of treated animals increased up to 80% (all rats of control group died during 30 days after combined injury)

  7. A note on the molecular water content in uranyl carbonate mineral andersonite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, Jakub; Čejka, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2015), s. 181-187. ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : andersonite * uranyl carbonate * crystal structure * molecular water Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  8. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ON ORGANIC CARBON MINERALIZATION IN SOIL, USING RECOMBINANT STREPTOMYCES STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purified lignin peroxidase was added to sterile and nonsterile silt loam soil to study the effects of bacterial lignin peroxidase ALip-P3 of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A on the rate of organic carbon turnover in soil. ignin peroxidase ALip-P3 appears to affect the short-term tur...

  9. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno;

    2013-01-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg−1) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC...

  10. Quantitative assessment of elemental carbon in the lungs of never smokers, cigarette smokers and coal miners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhalation exposure to particulates such as cigarette smoke and coal dust is known to contribute to the development of chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to estimate the amount of elemental carbon (EC) deposits from autopsied lung samples from cigarette smokers, ...

  11. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  12. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes on clay minerals and its application to a hydrogen peroxide biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, H.-L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Jehng, J.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jmjehng@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on clay minerals, and the development of biosensors based on Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au and Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-Glucose oxidase (GOD) composite films for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and glucose, respectively. The CNTs are synthesized on nickel cation exchanged clay mineral platelets. From field-emission scanning electron microscope images, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transfer infrared and thermogravimetric analysis results, the clay layers are exfoliated and delaminated after the growth of CNTs on them. The mixed hybrid film of Nafion, CNT/Clay, Au particles and GOD is coated on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or glucose. This film exhibits a detection limit of 5.0 x 10{sup -5} M for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a sensitivity of 280 nA mM{sup -1}. In addition, the amperometric response for glucose containing 2.0 mg mL{sup -1} GOD in the Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-GOD modified GC electrode exhibits a sensitivity of 620 nA mM{sup -1} with a linear range up to 1850 {mu}M. A higher sensitivity and shorter response time are observed with increasing GOD content in the composite matrix film. Besides, the highest sensitivity of 2032 nA mM{sup -1} is obtained with the addition of the 10.0 mg mL{sup -1} GOD in the composite film. Consequently, the CNT/Clay/Nafion medium can probably be a useful electrode for the development of sensors due to its high sensitivity and applicability.

  13. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas. Phase I. Final Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO2 to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM(trademark) was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which is a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.

  14. Influence of surface passivation and water content on mineral reactions in unsaturated porous media: Implications for brucite carbonation and CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Anna L.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Power, Ian M.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of mineral reactive surface area is an important control on the progress of carbon mineralization reactions that sequester anthropogenic CO2. Dry conditions in unsaturated porous media and the passivation of reactive surface area by secondary phase precipitation complicate predictions of reactive surface during carbon mineralization reactions. Unsaturated brucite [Mg(OH)2] bearing column experiments were used to evaluate the effects of water saturation and hydrous Mg-carbonate precipitation on reaction of brucite with 10% CO2 gas streams at ambient conditions. We demonstrate that a lack of available water severely limits reaction progress largely due to the requirement of water as a reactant to form hydrated Mg-carbonates. The precipitation of a poorly crystalline carbonate phase in the early stages of the reaction does not significantly hinder brucite dissolution, as the carbonate coating remains sufficiently permeable. It is postulated that the conversion of this phase to substantially less porous, crystalline nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] results in passivation of the brucite surface. Although a mechanistic model describing the passivating effect of nesquehonite remains elusive, reactive transport modeling using MIN3P-DUSTY confirms that conventional geometric surface area update models do not adequately reproduce observed reaction progress during brucite carbonation, while an empirically based model accounting for surface passivation is able to capture the transient evolution of CO2 uptake. Both water limits and surface passivation effects may limit the efficiency of CO2 sequestration efforts that rely on the conversion of mafic and ultramafic rock to carbonate minerals.

  15. Magnesium chloride as a leaching and aragonite-promoting self-regenerative additive for the mineral carbonation of calcium-rich materials

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; Bodor, Marius; Dragomir, Paul; Vraciu, Andreea; Vlad, Maria; Van Gerven, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Two approaches for the intensification of the mineral carbonation reaction are combined and studied in this work, namely: (i) the calcium leaching and aragonite promoting effects of magnesium chloride (MgCl2), and (ii) the passivating layer abrasion effect of sonication. The alkaline materials subjected to leaching and carbonation tests included lime, wollastonite, steel slags, and air pollution control (APC) residue. Batch leaching tests were conducted with varying concentrations of additive...

  16. Behaviors of clay minerals in dilute sulphuric acid and sodium carbonate leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution properties and acid consumption of kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite and their dewatered products roasted at temperature 600-800 deg C in dilute sulphuric acid are studied. The results indicate that the dissolubility of kaolinite is smaller, montmorillonite is greater and illite is between them. But after roasting at temperature 600-800 deg C, the dissolubility of dewatered kaolinite is greater, dewatered montmorillonite is much smaller, and the dewatered illite is between them. The study on reaction products of kaolinite with sodium carbonate in pressurized sodium carbonate leaching indicates that the reaction product is the colloid multiple sodium silicate at lower temperature (below 120 deg C), the crystalline hydroxysodalite at higher temperature (above 160 deg C)

  17. The Effects of Three Mineral Nitrogen Sources and Zinc on Maize and Wheat Straw Decomposition and Soil Organic Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ogunniyi Jumoke Esther; GUO Chun-hui; TIAN Xiao-hong; LI Hong-yun; ZHOU Yang-xue

    2014-01-01

    highest total organic carbon (TOC) concentration (11.59 mg kg-1). The incorporation of wheat straw resulted in higher microbial biomass accumulation in soils relative to that of the maize straw application. The results demonstrate that mineral N sources can affect the ability of microorganisms to decompose straw, as well as the soil carbon concentrations.

  18. Effect of Simulated Acid Rain on Potential Carbon and Nitrogen Mineralization in Forest Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Xue-Jun; ZHOU Guo-Yi; HUANG Zhong-Liang; LIU Ju-Xiu; ZHANG De-Qiang; LI Jiong

    2008-01-01

    Acid rain is a serious environmental problem worldwide. In this study, a pot experiment using forest soils planted with the seedlings of four woody species was performed with weekly treatments of pH 4.40, 4.00, 3.52, and 3.05 simulated acid rain (SAR) for 42 months compared to a control of pH 5.00 lake water. The cumulative amounts of C and N mineralization in the five treated soils were determined after incubation at 25 ℃ for 65 d to examine the effects of SAR treatments.For all five treatments, cumulative CO2-C production ranged from 20.24 to 27.81 mg kg-1 dry soil, net production of available N from 17.37 to 48.95 mg kg-1 dry soil, and net production of NO-3-N from 9.09 to 46.23 mg kg-1 dry soil. SAR treatments generally enhanced the emission of CO2-C from the soils; however, SAR with pH 3.05 inhibited the emission.SAR treatments decreased the net production of available N and NO3-N. The cumulative CH4 and N2O productions from the soils increased with increasing amount of simulated acid rain. The cumulative CO2-C production and the net production of available N of the soil under Acmena acuminatissima were significantly higher (P≤0.05) than those under Schima superba and Cryptocarya concinna. The mineralization of soil organic C was related to the contents of soil organic C and N, but was not related to soil pH. However, the overall effect of acid rain on the storage of soil organic matter and the cycling of important nutrients depended on the amount of acid deposition and the types of forests.

  19. The Accumulation of Organic Carbon in Mineral Soils by Afforestation of Abandoned Farmland

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xiaorong; Qiu, Liping; Shao, Mingan; Zhang, Xingchang; Gale, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The afforestation of abandoned farmland significantly influences soil organic carbon (OC). However, the dynamics between OC inputs after afforestation and the original OC are not well understood. To learn more about soil OC dynamics after afforestation of farmland, we measured the soil OC content in paired forest and farmland plots in Shaanxi Province, China. The forest plots had been established on farmland 18, 24, 48, 100, and 200 yr previously. The natural 13C abundance of soil organic mat...

  20. Precipitation kinetics of Mg-carbonates, influence of organic ligands and consequences for CO2 mineral sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forming magnesium carbonate minerals through carbonation of magnesium silicates has been proposed as a safe and durable way to store carbon dioxide, with a possibly high potential to offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. To date however, chemical reactions involved in this process are facing strong kinetic limitations, which originate in the low reactivity of both Mg-silicates and Mg-carbonates. Numerous studies have focused on the dissolution of Mg-silicates, under the questionable hypothesis that this step limits the whole process. This thesis work focuses instead on the mechanisms and rates of formation of magnesium carbonates, which are the final products of carbonation reactions. The first part of the work is dedicated to studying the influence on magnesite precipitation kinetics of three organic ligands known to accelerate Mg-silicates dissolution rates: oxalate, citrate and EDTA. With help of mixed-flow reactor experiments performed between 100 and 150 C, we show that these ligands significantly reduce magnesite growth rates, through two combined mechanisms: (1) complexation of Mg2+ cations in aqueous solution, which was rigorously estimated from a thermodynamic database established through a critical review of the literature, and (2) adsorption of ligands to a limited number of surface sites, leading to a decrease of the precipitation rate constant. The observed growth inhibition is maximal with citrate. We then used hydrothermal atomic force microscopy to probe the origin of the documented growth inhibition. Our observations show that citrate and oxalate interact with the crystal growth process on magnesite surface, modifying the shape of growth hillocks as well as the step generation frequency through spiral growth. We also show that the ligands adsorb preferentially on different kink-sites, which is probably related to their different structures and chemical properties. We propose that the stronger magnesite growth inhibition caused by citrate is related

  1. Assessment of grain-scale homogeneity and equilibration of carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of minerals in carbonate-bearing metamorphic rocks by ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, John M.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Kita, Noriko T.; Valley, John W.

    2010-11-01

    Nineteen samples of metamorphosed carbonate-bearing rocks were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios by ion microprobe with a ˜5-15 μm spot, three from a regional terrain and 16 from five different contact aureoles. Contact metamorphic rocks further represent four groups: calc-silicate marble and hornfels (6), brucite marble (2), samples that contain a reaction front (4), and samples with a pervasive distribution of reactants and products of a decarbonation reaction (4). The average spot-to-spot reproducibility of standard calcite analyses is ±0.37‰ (2 standard deviations, SD) for δ 18O and ±0.71‰ for δ 13C. Ten or more measurements of a mineral in a sample that has uniform isotope composition within error of measurement can routinely return a weighted mean with a 95% confidence interval of 0.09-0.16‰ for δ 18O and 0.10-0.29‰ for δ 13C. Using a difference of >6SD as the criterion, only four of 19 analyzed samples exhibit significant intracrystalline and/or intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 13C at the 100-500 μm scale, with differences within individual grains up to 3.7‰. Measurements are consistent with carbon isotope exchange equilibrium between calcite and dolomite in five of six analyzed samples at the same scale. Because of relatively slow carbon isotope diffusion in calcite and dolomite, differences in δ 13C can survive intracrystalline homogenization by diffusion during cooling after peak metamorphism and likely represent the effects of prograde decarbonation and infiltration. All but 2 of 11 analyzed samples exhibit intracrystalline differences in δ 18O (up to 9.4‰), intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 18O (up to 12.5‰), and/or disequilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations among calcite-dolomite, calcite-quartz, and calcite-forsterite pairs at the 100-500 μm scale. Inhomogeneities in δ 18O and δ 13C are poorly correlated with only a single mineral (dolomite) in a single sample exhibiting both. Because of relatively

  2. Quantification of carbon mineralization with reactive and non-reactive tracers in Icelandic basalts at the CARFIX site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stute, M.; Matter, J.; Gíslason, S. R.; Snæbjörnsdóttir, S.; Oelkers, E. H.; Gunnarsson, I.; Aradottir, E. S.; Sigfússon, B.; Alfreðsson, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    The CARBFIX project near Reykjavik in Iceland includes is a field-based pilot injection to study the feasibility of permanent CO2 (and H2S) storage in permeable basalt formations [1]. Pure CO2 and CO2/H2S mixtures from the Hellisheidi geothermal power plant were dissolved downhole in groundwater and injected into a permeable confined basalt formation at about 500m depth below ground. We are using non-reactive (sodium fluorescein, SF5CF3, and SF6) and reactive (14C and 13C) tracers in the project to characterize subsurface CO2 transport and in situ CO2-water-rock reactions. In January 2012, 170 tons of pure CO2 tagged with 14C and SF6 were injected followed by 73 tons of a CO2/H2S mixture starting in June 2012. Samples were collected from injection and monitoring wells in evacuated serum glass bottles with butyl stoppers and analyzed by AMS and mass spectrometry for carbon isotopes, by fluorometry for Na-fluorescein and by gas chromatography for SF6 and SF5CF3. Tracer breakthrough curves obtained from the first downstream monitoring well indicate that the injected water arrives in a fast short pulse and a late broad peak. 14C/SF6 and DIC/SF6 ratios are considerably lower in the monitoring wells as compare to the injection well. Evidence for carbonate precipitation was also found in the pump and on the pump lines in the monitoring well. The 14C/12C ratio of the precipitated carbon is the same as that of the DIC during injection and in the monitoring well, but distinct from ambient groundwater background. Mass balance calculations suggest that about 90% of the injected CO2 has been mineralized over a period of only 2 years. [1] Gislason et al. (2010), Int. J. Greenh. Gas Con. 4, 537-545.

  3. Carbon mineralization and nutrient availability in calcareous sandy soils amended with woody waste biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Ahmed H; Usman, Adel R A; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul; Ok, Yong Sik; Ahmad, Mahtab; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I

    2015-11-01

    Many studies have reported the positive effect of biochar on soil carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvement in acidic soils. However, biochar may have different impacts on calcareous sandy soils. A 90-day incubation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of woody waste biochar (10 g kg(-1)) on CO2-C emissions, K2SO4-extractable C and macro-(N, P and K) and micro-(Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) nutrient availability in the presence or absence of poultry manure (5 g kg(-1) soil). The following six treatments were applied: (1) conocarpus (Conocarpus erectus L.) waste (CW), (2) conocarpus biochar (BC), (3) poultry manure (PM), (4) PM+CW, (5) PM+BC and (6) untreated soil (CK). Poultry manure increased CO2-C emissions and K2SO4-extractable C, and the highest increases in CO2-C emission rate and cumulative CO2-C and K2SO4-extractable C were observed for the PM+CW treatment. On the contrary, treatments with BC halted the CO2-C emission rate, indicating that the contribution of BC to CO2-C emissions is negligible compared with the soils amended with CW and PM. Furthermore, the combined addition of PM+BC increased available N, P and K compared with the PM or BC treatments. Overall, the incorporation of biochar into calcareous soils might have benefits in carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvement. PMID:26037818

  4. The Impact of Afforestation on the Carbon Stocks of Mineral Soils Across the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellock, M.; Laperle, C.; Kiely, G.; Reidy, B.; Duffy, C.; Tobin, B.

    2009-04-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century forests accounted for only 1% of the total Irish land cover (Pilcher & Mac an tSaoir, 1995). However, due to the efforts of successive governments there has been rapid afforestation since the 1960s resulting in a 10.0% forest land cover as of 2007 (The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food, 2007). A large proportion of this afforestation took place after the mid-1980s and was fueled by government grant incentive schemes targeted at private landowners (Renou & Farrell 2005). Consequently, 54% of forests are less than 20 years old (Byrne, 2006). This specific land use change provides an opportunity for Ireland to meet international obligations set forth by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC, 1992). These obligations include the limitation of greenhouse gas emissions to 13% above 1990 levels. In order to promote accountability for these commitments, the UNFCCC treaty and the Kyoto Protocol (Kyoto Protocol, 1997) mandate signatories to publish greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories for both greenhouse gas sources and removals by sinks. Article 3.3 of the Kyoto Protocol allows changes in C stocks due to afforestation, reforestation, and deforestation since 1990 to be used to offset inventory emissions. Therefore, due to the rapid rate of afforestation and its increased carbon sequestration since 1990, Ireland has the potential to significantly offset GHG emissions. There is little known as to the impacts of afforestation on the carbon stocks in soils over time, and even less known about the impact on Irish soils. The FORESTC project aims to analyse this impact by undertaking a nationwide study using a method similar to that of the paired plot method in Davis and Condron, 2002. The study will examine 42 forest sites across Ireland selected randomly from the National Forest Inventory (National Forest Inventory, 2007). These 42 sites will be grouped based on the forest type which includes

  5. Mineral carbonation of serpentinite in the San Andreas Fault: Implications for aseismic creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, F.; Goldsby, D. L.; Lin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present a new model that highlights the impact of peridotite-water-CO2 interactions on aseismic creep in the San Andreas Fault (SAF) zone. Serpentinization of peridotite is commonly invoked as the cause of aseismic slip (creep) observed in the SAF of central and northern California, as the creeping section coincides with the mapped extent of the Coast Range ophiolite (Irwin and Barnes, 1975). However, more recently it has been demonstrated that serpentinization alone cannot account for the high rates of aseismic slip (Moore et al., 1996). Moore and Rymer (2007) hypothesized that the reaction of silica-rich fluids with serpentinite causes the formation of mechanically weak talc, which is presently held responsible for fault-zone weakening in this area. While silica-metasomatism can transform serpentinite into steatite (talc rock), the common and widespread occurrence of CO2-rich springs in the fault zone, and silica-carbonate altered serpentinite, points to carbonation (i.e., CO2-metasomatism) of serpentinite as the major cause of fault-zone weakening in central and northern California. Initial results of our field program, mineralogical analyses and friction experiments will be presented, which highlight the evolution in shear strength from serpentine, to soapstone (talc-magnesite rock), to listvenite (quartz-magnesite rock), the final product of CO2-metasomatism.

  6. ATOMIC-LEVEL MODELING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: A SYNERGETIC APPROACH TO OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO(sub 2) emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO(sub 2) capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO(sub 2) emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide mineral carbonation is a leading process candidate, which generates the stable naturally occurring mineral magnesite (MgCO(sub 3)) and water. Key to process cost and viability are the carbonation reaction rate and its degree of completion. This process, which involves simultaneous dehydroxylation and carbonation is very promising, but far from optimized. In order to optimize the dehydroxylation/carbonation process, an atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms involved is needed. In this investigation Mg(OH)(sub 2) was selected as a model Mg-rich lamellar hydrocide carbonation feedstock material due to its chemical and structural simplicity. Since Mg(OH)(sub 2) dehydroxylation is intimately associated with the carbonation process, its mechanisms are also of direct interest in understanding and optimizing the process. The aim of the current innovative concepts project is to develop a specialized advanced computational methodology to complement the ongoing experimental inquiry of the atomic level processes involved in CO(sub 2) mineral sequestration. The ultimate goal is to integrate the insights provided by detailed predictive simulations with the data obtained from optical microscopy, FESEM, ion beam analysis, SIMS, TGA, Raman, XRD, and C and H elemental analysis. The modeling studies are specifically designed to enhance the synergism with, and complement the analysis of, existing mineral-CO(sub 2) reaction process studies being carried out under DOE UCR Grant DE-FG2698-FT40112. Direct contact between the simulations and the experimental

  7. Integrating microbial physiology and physiochemical principles in soils with the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Wieder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous modeling efforts document divergent responses of microbial explicit soil biogeochemistry models when compared to traditional models that implicitly simulate microbial activity, particularly following environmental perturbations. However, microbial models are needed that capture current soil biogeochemical theories emphasizing the relationships between litter quality, functional differences in microbial physiology, and the physical protection of microbial byproducts in forming stable soil organic matter (SOM. To address these limitations we introduce the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS model. In MIMICS, the turnover of litter and SOM pools are governed by temperature sensitive Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the activity of two physiologically distinct microbial functional types. The production of microbial residues through microbial turnover provides inputs to SOM pools that are considered physically or chemically protected. Soil clay content determines the physical protection of SOM in different soil environments. MIMICS adequately simulates the mean rate of leaf litter decomposition observed at a temperate and boreal forest sites, and captures observed effects of litter quality on decomposition rates. Initial results from MIMICS suggest that soil C storage can be maximized in sandy soils with low-quality litter inputs, whereas high-quality litter inputs may maximize SOM accumulation in finely textured soils that physically stabilize microbial products. Assumptions in MIMICS about the degree to which microbial functional types differ in the production, turnover, and stabilization of microbial residues provides a~mechanism by which microbial communities may influence SOM dynamics in mineral soils. Although further analyses are needed to validate model results, MIMICS allows us to begin exploring theoretical interactions between substrate quality, microbial community abundance, and the formation of stable SOM.

  8. The effect of alginates, fucans and phenolic substances from the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora in calcium carbonate mineralization in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, L. T.; Amado Filho, G. M.; Fernandez, M. S.; Arias, J. L.; Farina, M.

    2011-04-01

    The mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) in the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora is a biologically induced process and is restricted to the cell wall surface. It has been suggested that the CaCO 3 crystallization that occurs over the thallus cell wall surface is induced by changes in the surface pH caused by a local efflux of OH -, Ca ++ and HCO3- ions. However, no studies on the roles of the P. gymnospora cell wall components in this mineralization process had been performed. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of a subset of P. gymnospora cell wall molecules on CaCO 3 crystallization in vitro. The molecules tested were the anionic polysaccharides alginates and fucans (with potential nucleation activity) and phenolic substances (secondary metabolites with amphipathic property). The crystallization assays were performed using polystyrene microbridges as the crystallization apparatus. Crystals formed in the microbridges were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the results confirmed that the phenolic substances have the specific capability of changing the morphology of calcite crystals grown in vitro by inducing an elongated morphology in the direction of the c-axis. This morphology is similar to that induced by molecules that attach to { h k 0}-crystal planes. It was also shown that the alginates and the fucans do not specifically modulate the morphology of the growing crystals. In fact, these crystals exhibited a rounded shape due to the slower growth rates of several new crystal planes that appeared in the place of the original corners and edges.

  9. Parameterizations for narrowband and broadband albedo of pure snow and snow containing mineral dust and black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Cheng; Brandt, Richard E.; Warren, Stephen G.

    2015-06-01

    The reduction of snow spectral albedo by black carbon (BC) and mineral dust, both alone and in combination, is computed using radiative transfer modeling. Broadband albedo is shown for mass fractions covering the full range from pure snow to pure BC and pure dust, and for snow grain radii from 5 µm to 2500 µm, to cover the range of possible grain sizes on planetary surfaces. Parameterizations are developed for opaque homogeneous snowpacks for three broad bands used in general circulation models and several narrower bands. They are functions of snow grain radius and the mass fraction of BC and/or dust and are valid up to BC content of 10 ppm, needed for highly polluted snow. A change of solar zenith angle can be mimicked by changing grain radius. A given mass fraction of BC causes greater albedo reduction in coarse-grained snow; BC and grain radius can be combined into a single variable to compute the reduction of albedo relative to pure snow. The albedo reduction by BC is less if the snow contains dust, a common situation on mountain glaciers and in agricultural and grazing lands. Measured absorption spectra of mineral dust are critically reviewed as a basis for specifying dust properties for modeling. The effect of dust on snow albedo at visible wavelengths can be represented by an "equivalent BC" amount, scaled down by a factor of about 200. Dust has little effect on the near-IR albedo because the near-IR albedo of pure dust is similar to that of pure snow.

  10. Experimental Observations of the Patterns of Fungi-Mineral Surfaces Interactions with Muscovite, Biotite, Bauxite, Chromite, Hematite, Galena, Malachite, Manganite and Carbonate Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, P.

    2006-12-01

    In an in vitro experimental work, mineral substrates of muscovite, biotite, bauxite, chromite, hematite, galena, malachite, manganite and carbonate were exposed to free fungal growth and interaction in Petri dishes under open conditions. All of the experimental minerals were examined by XRD for identity and purity. The 12-week experiment resulted in significant alteration of the mineral substrates. SEM, EDX, and XRD analysis showed secondary mineral biomineralization represented by different crystal morphologies of Ca- and Mg- oxalates (weddelite: CaC2O4·2H2O, whewellite CaC2O4·H2O and glushinskite: MgC2O4·2H2O), struvite: (NH4) MgPO4·6H2O, gypsum CaSO4.2H2O, and possible dolomite. Metals bioleached from the substrates included: Fe, Pb, S, Cu, Al as single crystals or aggregates, amorphous layers, amorphous aggregates, and linear forms influenced by the fungal filaments. Bauxite and manganite showed the strongest cases of bioleaching where Fe and Al were fungally extracted and deposited as separate mineral species from the Al-Fe oxides mixture, while Ca and S were extracted from the manganite substrate and deposited as gypsum. The bioleached metals were either deposited on the mineral substrates, attached to fungal filaments, embedded in the fungal mycelium or in the extracellular polysaccharide substance (EPS) layer. The EDX microanalysis of the fungal hyphae frequently revealed metal content adsorbed on the hyphae sheath surface. During the short period of the experiment, fungal interaction with the mineral surfaces produced significant biomechanical and biochemical bioweathering features: strong pitting of the mineral surfaces, exfoliation, tunnelling, dissolution, honeycomb-alveolar structures, perforations, fragmentation, and cementation. One important aspect of these interactions is the strong affinity of fungal hyphae to mineral surfaces. The fungi engulfed whole blocks of minerals in the hyphal network, irrespective of mineral surface topography with

  11. Does temperature of charcoal creation affect subsequent mineralization of soil carbon and nitrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier-Bergeron, S.; Bradley, R.; Munson, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fire is the most common form of natural disturbance of boreal forest ecosystems and has primordial influence on successional processes. This may be due in part to the pre-disturbance vegetation development stage and species composition, but these successional pathways could also vary with differences in fire behavior and consequently in fire intensity, defined as the energy released during various phases of a fire. Fire intensity may also affect soil C and N cycling by affecting the quality of the charcoal that is produced. For example, the porosity of coal tends to increase with increasing temperature at which it is produced Higher porosity would logically increase the surface area to which dissolved soil molecules, such as tannins and other phenolics, may be adsorbed. We report on a microcosm study in which mineral and organic soils were jointly incubated for eight weeks with a full factorial array of treatments that included the addition of Kalmia tannins, protein, and wood charcoal produced at five different temperatures. A fourth experimental factor comprised the physical arrangement of the material (stratified vs. mixed), designed to simulate the effect of soil scarification after fire and salvage harvest. We examined the effects of these treatments on soil C and N mineralisation and soil microbial biomass. The furnace temperature at which the charcoal was produced had a significant effect on its physico-chemical properties; increasing furnace temperatures corresponded to a significant increase in % C (P<0.001), and a significant decrease in %O (P<0.001) and %H (P<0.001). Temperature also had significant impacts on microporosity (surface area and volume). Temperature of production had no effect (P=0.1355) on soil microbial biomass. We observed a linear decreasing trend (P<0.001) in qCO2 with increasing temperature of production, which was mainly reflected in a decline in basal respiration. Finally, we found a significant interaction (P=0.010) between

  12. Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of China’s Non-Metallic Mineral Products Industry: Present State, Prospects and Policy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available China is the largest non-metallic mineral producer in the world and one of the key consumers of four major non-metallic mineral products, including cement, refractories, plate glass and ceramics. The non-metallic mineral products industry’s rapid growth has brought about a large demand for energy. The present study provides an overview of China’s non-metallic mineral products industry in terms of production, energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. In this industry, the energy efficiency is relatively low and the level of carbon dioxide emission is much higher than developed countries’ average. This study interprets the effects of some newly issued policies and analyses the influential factors in achieving energy conservation and emission reduction goals. It also discusses the prospects for saving energy and emission reduction in the industry. Retrofitting facilities and using new production technologies is imperative. Additionally, implementing market-based policies, promoting industrial transformation and effective international cooperation would help decrease carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption.

  13. Effects of minerals in ferric bauxite on sodium carbonate decomposition and volatilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡文韬; 王化军; 刘欣伟; 孙传尧

    2015-01-01

    Direct reduction is an emerging technology for ferric bauxite utilization. However, because of sodium volatilization, its sodium carbonate consumption is considerably higher than that in ordinary bauxite processing technology. TG-DSC and XRD were applied to detecting phase transformation and mass loss in direct reduction to reveal the mechanism on sodium volatilization. The results show that the most significant influence factor of ferric bauxite on sodium volatilization in direct reduction system is its iron content. Sodium volatilization is probably ascribed to the instability of amorphous substances structure. Amorphous substances are the intermediate-products of the reaction, and the volatilization rate of sodium increases with its generating rate. These amorphous substances are volatile, thus, more sodium is volatilized with its generation. A small amount of amorphous substances are generated in the reaction between Na2CO3and Al2O3; thus, only 3.15% of sodium is volatilized. Similarly, the volatilization rate is 1.87% in the reaction between Na2CO3and SiO2. However, the volatilization rate reaches 7.64% in the reaction between Na2CO3 and Fe2O3 because of the generation of a large amount of amorphous substances.

  14. Changes in carbon stocks of Danish agricultural mineral soils between 1986 and 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Olesen, Jørgen E; Kristensen, Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    To establish a national inventory of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and their change over time, soil was sampled in 1986, 1997 and 2009 in a Danish nation-wide 7-km grid and analysed for SOC content. The average SOC stock in 0–100-cm depth soil was 142 t C ha−1, with 63, 41 and 38 t C ha−1 in the...... 0–25, 25–50 and 50–100 cm depths, respectively. Changes at 0–25 cm were small. During 1986–97, SOC in the 25–50-cm layer increased in sandy soils while SOC decreased in loam soils. In the subsequent period (1997–2009), most soils showed significant losses of SOC. From 1986 to 2009, SOC at 0–100 cm...... decreased in loam soils and tended to increase in sandy soils. This trend is ascribed to dairy farms with grass leys being abundant on sandy soils while cereal cropping dominates on loamy soils. A statistical model including soil type, land use and management was applied separately to 0–25, 25–50 and 50...

  15. Carbon and Nitrous Oxide Exchange from a Bioenergy Crop Cultivation on a Mineral Soil Measured with Eddy Covariance Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, S.; Shurpali, N.; Martikainen, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Increased concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG; CO2, CH4, N2O) in the atmosphere have been linked to anthropogenic activities. Energy production based on fossil fuels is the main sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Strategies to reduce CO2 emissions include use of bioenergy crops as energy source. To evaluate the real atmospheric value of bioenergy, knowledge on CO2 and N2O balances of ecosystems under bioenergy crop cultivation is needed. Reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinaceae L.) is increasingly being used as a bioenergy crop in the Nordic countries. It grows well in northern Europe as it tolerates flooding, requires short growing season and thrives well under low temperatures. Currently RCG is cultivated on an area of about 19000 ha in Finland and it is the highest yielding grass grown for energy purpose in Finland. The long rotation period (about ten years) of RCG cultivation without tilling favors carbon allocation into soil. First results from RCG cultivations on peat soil show that it is a promising land use option on such soils favoring soil carbon sequestration with low N2O emissions (Hyvönen et al. 2009; Shurpali et al. 2009). In order to devise a sound bioenergy policy based on this grass, studies on soils with variable characteristics under different climatic and hydrological regimes is urgently needed. Micrometeorological eddy covariance technique is suitable to study GHG fluxes at an ecosystem level (Baldocchi 2003). It is useful for continuous, direct and long-term measurements. Eddy covariance technique has been successfully used for measuring CO2 exchange in various ecosystems. The eddy covariance technique has also been used to measure N2O emissions (Denmead 2008). Aims of this study are to quantify the CO2 and N2O exchange of RCG cultivation on a mineral soil employing eddy covariance technique and to identify the key factors controlling the gas exchange. The study site on mineral soil is located in Eastern Finland. RCG was sown in spring

  16. Synthesis of sodium caseinate-calcium carbonate microspheres and their mineralization to bone-like apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhewu; Liang, Guobin; Jin, Lin; Wang, Zhenling; Xing, Chao; Jiange, Qing; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-06-01

    Phosphoproteins can induce and stabilize calcium carbonate (CaCO3) vaterite, which has desirable features for high reactivity. The purpose of this study was to synthesize bioactive CaCO3 microspheres for bone regeneration. Sodium caseinate (NaCas)-containing CaCO3 microspheres, with the crystal phase of vaterite, were synthesized by fast precipitation in an aqueous solution of CaCl2, Na2CO3, and 2 mg/mL of NaCas. The uniform microspheres exhibited rougher surfaces and lower negative charges than CaCO3 particles without NaCas addition. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) of the microspheres showed characteristic peaks or bands corresponding to phosphate and hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves exhibited approximately 5% weight loss below 600 °C due to the decomposition of NaCas. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed lath-like hydroxyapatite (HAp) on the surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) revealed that the agglomerates were composed of Ca, C, O, P, Na, and Mg elements, and the Ca/P ratios ranged from 1.53 to 1.56. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibited peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite. The results of this study demonstrated that the addition of NaCas induced the formation of vaterite microspheres which possesses an enhanced apatite formation after soaking in SBF at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. These NaCas-CaCO3 microspheres may be a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

  17. An Overview of the Studies on Black Carbon and Mineral Dust Deposition in Snow and Ice Cores in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; XU Baiqing; MING Jing

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the most eff ective insoluble light-absorbing particulate (ILAP), which can strongly absorb solar radiation at visible wavelengths. Once BC is deposited in snow via dry or wet process, even a small amount of BC could signifi cantly decrease snow albedo, enhance absorption of solar radiation, accelerate snow melting, and cause climate feedback. BC is considered the second most important component next to CO2 in terms of global warming. Similarly, mineral dust (MD) is another type of ILAP. So far, little attention has been paid to quantitative measurements of BC and MD deposition on snow surface in the midlatitudes of East Asia, especially over northern China. In this paper, we focus on reviewing several experiments performed for collecting and measuring scavenging BC and MD in the high Asian glaciers over the mountain range (such as the Himalayas) and in seasonal snow over northern China. Results from the surveyed literature indicate that the absorption of ILAP in seasonal snow is dominated by MD in the Qilian Mountains and by local soil dust in the Inner Mongolian region close to dust sources. The detection of BC in snow and ice cores using modern techniques has a large bias and uncertainty when the snow sample is mixed with MD. Evidence also indicates that the reduction of snow albedo by BC and MD perturbations can signifi cantly increase the net surface solar radiation, cause surface air temperature to rise, reduce snow accumulation, and accelerate snow melting.

  18. In situ mineralization of anticancer drug into calcium carbonate monodisperse nanospheres and their pH-responsive release property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiezhu; Wan, Zhanghui; Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Haihong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Nan; Chen, Zhenhua; Mei, Xifan; Ren, Xiuli

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we facilitated the preparation of uniform calcium carbonate nanospheres and the encapsulation of anticancer drug (Doxorubicin, Dox) in one step by a facile bio-inspired mineralization method at room temperature. Hesperidin (Hesp), a natural originated flavanone glycoside, was introduced as crystallization modifier. The obtained Dox encapsulated CaCO3 nanospheres (Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs) having a narrow size range of ~200nm. The drug loading/release studies reveal that these Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs have a drug loading efficiency (DLE) of 83% and drug loading content (DLC) of 14wt%. Besides, the release of Dox from Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs was pH depended. At pH=7.4, only a small amount (~28%) of Dox was released. While at pH=5.0, all amount of incorporated Dox was released. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) image reveals the Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs can internalize the cells. These results suggest the Dox@CaCO3-Hesp NSs can be potentially used to utilize pH-responsive delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:27040233

  19. The Carbonate-Hosted Willemite Deposits in the Zambesi Metamorphic Belt (Zambia): a "Franklin-Type" Mineralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, M.; Terracciano, R.

    2009-05-01

    The Zambian willemite (Zn2SiO4) deposits occur in metasedimentary carbonate rocks of Proterozoic age. The most important orebodies are located in the dolomites of the Katangan Supergroup at Kabwe, and contain both Zn-Pb sulfides and willemite. The Star Zinc and Excelsior prospects (Lusaka area), discovered in the early twenties and since then subjected to sporadic exploration, are hosted in the highly metamorphic lithotypes of the late Proterozoic Zambezi Supracrustal sequence. In the above-mentioned prospects willemite occurs epigenetically along joints and fissures of the Cheta Fm, consisting mainly of limestone and dolomite marbles, with minor quartz-muscovite schists and feldspathic quartzite. On a local scale, the Star Zinc deposit displays open-space filling, colloform and vuggy textures. Structural analysis resulted in two main fracture trends hosting willemite mineralization: E-W and N-S, the latter being compatible with the Riedel shears related to the pan-African Mwembeshi dislocation zone. Willemite is associated with specular hematite and replaces the Zn- spinels franklinite and gahnite. Calcite commonly replaces willemite. The luminescence of the willemite, observed under cathodic light varies from dull to bright green with recurrent zonations. The green color, however, cannot be attributed to anomalous Mn contents: at Star Zinc Mn is absent in both willemite and franklinite. The Zn-Be bearing sulfosilicate genthelvite [Zn4Be3(SiO4)3S] occurs as a minor phase in irregular aggregates and may contain micrometric inclusions of Fe-Sr-Ba-Fe sulfates. Fluorapatite is also recurrent in the mineral association. At both Star Zinc and Excelsior Zn-Pb sulfides are totally absent, while native silver, as well as traces of germanium and cadmium have been locally detected. Thermometric analyses of willemite inclusions from both prospects result in the following Th: 200-240 °C, and salinities: 8 to 16 wt% NaCl. The zinc spinels franklinite and gahnite are commonly

  20. Storage and stability of organic carbon in soils as related to depth, occlusion within aggregates, and attachment to minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schrumpf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual models suggest that stability and age of organic carbon (OC in soil depends on the source of plant litter, occlusion within aggregates, incorporation in organo-mineral complexes, and location within the soil profile. Various tools like density fractionation, mineralization experiments, and radiocarbon analyses have been used to study the importance of these mechanisms. We systematically apply them to a range of European soils to test whether general controls emerge even for soils that vary in vegetation, soil types, parent material, and land use. At each of the 12 study sites, 10 soil cores were sampled in 10 cm depth intervals to 60 cm depth and subjected to density separation. Bulk soil samples and density fractions (free light fractions – fLF, occluded light fractions – oLF, heavy fractions – HF were analysed for OC, total nitrogen (TN, δ13C, and Δ14C. Bulk samples were also incubated to determine mineralizable OC.

    Declining OC-normalized CO2 release and increasing age with soil depth confirm greater stability of OC in subsoils across sites. Depth profiles of LF-OC matched those of roots, which in turn reflect plant functional types in soil profiles not subject to ploughing. Modern Δ14C signatures and positive correlation between mineralizable C and fLF-OC indicate the fLF is an easily available energy and nutrient source for subsurface microbes. Fossil C derived from the geogenic parent material affected the age of OC especially in the LF at three study sites. The overall importance of OC stabilization by binding to minerals was demonstrated by declining OC-normalized CO2 release rates with increasing contributions of HF-OC to bulk soil OC and the low Δ14C values of HF-OC. The stability of HF-OC was greater in subsoils than in topsoils; nevertheless, a portion of HF-OC was active throughout the profile. The decrease in Δ14C (increase

  1. Implications of changing from grazed or semi-natural vegetation to forestry for carbon stores and fluxes in upland organo-mineral soils in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the UK, as organo-mineral soils are a significant store of soil organic carbon (SOC, they may become increasingly favoured for the expansion of upland forestry. It is important, therefore, to assess the likely impacts on SOC of this potentially major land use change. Currently, these assessments rely on modelling approaches which assume that afforestation of organo-mineral soils is "carbon neutral". This review evaluates this assumption in two ways. Firstly, UK information from the direct measurement of SOC change following afforestation is examined in the context of international studies. Secondly, UK data on the magnitude and direction of the major fluxes in the carbon cycle of semi-natural upland ecosystems are assessed to identify the likely responses of the fluxes to afforestation of organo-mineral soils. There are few directly relevant measurements of SOC change following afforestation of organo-mineral soils in the UK uplands but there are related studies on peat lands and agricultural soils. Overall, information on the magnitude and direction of change in SOC with afforestation is inconclusive. Data on the accumulation of litter beneath conifer stands have been identified but the extent to which the carbon held in this pool is incorporated into the stable soil carbon reservoir is uncertain. The effect of afforestation on most carbon fluxes is small because the fluxes are either relatively minor or of the same magnitude and direction irrespective of land use. Compared with undisturbed moorland, particulate organic carbon losses increase throughout the forest cycle but the data are exclusively from plantation conifer forests and in many cases pre-date current industry best practice guidelines which aim to reduce such losses. The biggest uncertainty in flux estimates is the relative magnitude of the sink for atmospheric carbon as trees grow and mature compared with that lost during site preparation and harvesting. Given the size of this

  2. Coupling Physics, Biology and Terrestrial Runoff to Ocean Acidification and Carbonate Mineral Suppression in the Pacific-Arctic Region (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, J. T.; Cross, J. N.; Shake, K. L.

    2010-12-01

    Rising CO2 levels in the atmosphere and ocean have lead to an anthropogenically induced acidification phenomenon in high latitude seas. These areas are projected to become persistently undersaturated with respect to important carbonate minerals as early as mid-century and seasonal aragonite undersaturations have already been observed in surface and shallow subsurface waters over of the continental shelf seas surrounding Alaska. Some calcifying marine organisms, including pteropods, foraminifers, mollusks, and coralline algae that could be susceptible to reduced calcification rates under increasing ocean acidity are keystone species in the Pacific-Arctic region. Recent observations along the only long term time-series in the northern Gulf of Alaska found that the high seasonal and spatial variability of the carbonate parameters are largely controlled by physical circulation and glacial discharge. In general, surface DIC and TA concentrations decreased between May and September due to primary production and dilution from the region’s numerous glacial sources. Conversely, concentrations of DIC and TA increased in the bottom waters of the inner shelf between May and September likely due to a combination of remineralization of exported organic matter and seasonally induced upwelling. Analysis of the calcite and aragonite saturation states (Ω) showed an increase in the surface layer from May to September. However, in the bottom waters over the inner shelf the Ω of calcite and aragonite was suppressed and aragonite undersaturations were observed within 50 m of the surface. In the Bering Sea, prior to sea ice retreat in 2008, calcite and aragonite Ω ranged from 1.3 to 3.2 and 0.8 to 2.0 respectively in the upper 30 m over the shelf. Two inshore stations likely impacted by the outflows of the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers showed aragonite undersaturation (0.91 - 0.84) from the surface to the bottom. In summer, DIC concentrations in the upper 30 m were drawn down by

  3. Two-step accelerated mineral carbonation and decomposition analysis for the reduction of CO₂ emission in the eco-industrial parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seok; Wang, Li Pang; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Fujita, Toyohisa

    2014-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions are a leading contributor to the negative effects of global warming. Globally, research has focused on effective means of reducing and mitigating CO₂ emissions. In this study, we examined the efficacy of eco-industrial parks (EIPs) and accelerated mineral carbonation techniques in reducing CO₂ emissions in South Korea. First, we used Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) analysis to determine the trends in carbon production and mitigation at the existing EIPs. We found that, although CO₂ was generated as byproducts and wastes of production at these EIPs, improved energy intensity effects occurred at all EIPs, and we strongly believe that EIPs are a strong alternative to traditional industrial complexes for reducing net carbon emissions. We also examined the optimal conditions for using accelerated mineral carbonation to dispose of hazardous fly ash produced through the incineration of municipal solid wastes at these EIPs. We determined that this technique most efficiently sequestered CO₂ when micro-bubbling, low flow rate inlet gas, and ammonia additives were employed. PMID:25079989

  4. Carbon mineralization and pyrite oxidation in groundwater: Importance for silicate weathering in boreal forest soils and stream base-flow chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Organic compounds is mineralized during later transport in deep groundwater aquifers. → Carbonic acid generated by this process stimulates dissolution of silicate minerals. → Protons derived from pyrite oxidation also affects weathering in deep groundwater. → The identified weathering mechanisms affect base-flow chemistry in boreal streams. - Abstract: What role does mineralized organic C and sulfide oxidation play in weathering of silicate minerals in deep groundwater aquifers? In this study, how H2CO3, produced as a result of mineralization of organic matter during groundwater transport, affects silicate weathering in the saturated zone of the mineral soil along a 70 m-long boreal hillslope is demonstrated. Stream water measurements of base cations and δ18O are included to determine the importance of the deep groundwater system for downstream surface water. The results suggest that H2CO3 generated from organic compounds being mineralized during the lateral transport stimulates weathering at depths between 0.5 and 3 m in the soil. This finding is indicated by progressively increasing concentrations of base cations-, silica- and inorganic C (IC) in the groundwater along the hillslope that co-occur with decreasing organic C (OC) concentrations. Protons derived from sulfide oxidation appear to be an additional driver of the weathering process as indicated by a build-up of SO42- in the groundwater during lateral transport and a δ34S per mille value of +0.26-3.76 per mille in the deep groundwater indicating S inputs from pyrite. The two identified active acids in the deep groundwater are likely to control the base-flow chemistry of streams draining larger catchments (>1 km2) as evident by δ18O signatures and base cation concentrations that overlap with that of the groundwater.

  5. Prediction of mineral scale formation in geothermal and oilfield operations using the Extended UNIQUAC model - Part II. Carbonate-scaling minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafafila, Ada; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2006-01-01

    Two additional parameters to account for the pressure dependency of solubility are added to the Extended UNIQUAC model presented by Thomsen and Rasmussen (1999). The improved model has been used for correlation and prediction of vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium for different carbonate systems (CaCO...

  6. Collembolans feeding on soil affect carbon and nitrogen mineralization by their influence on microbial and nematode activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaneda, Satoshi; Kaneko, N.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 3 (2008), s. 435-442. ISSN 0178-2762 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Collembola * mineral soil * nitrogen mineralization Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.446, year: 2008

  7. Benthic solute exchange and carbon mineralization in two shallow subtidal sandy sediments: Effect of advective pore-water exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cook, Perran L. M.; Wenzhofer, Frank; Glud, Ronnie N.;

    2007-01-01

    proceeded predominantly through sulfate reduction when benthic mineralization rates were high and advective pore-water flow low as a result of poorly developed topography. Previous studies of benthic mineralization in shallow sandy sediments have generally ignored these dynamics and, hence, have overlooked...

  8. Dynamics of bacterial metabolic profile and community structure during the mineralization of organic carbon in intensive swine farm wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Land application of intensive swine farm wastewater has raised serious environmental concerns due to the accumulation and microbially mediated transformation of large amounts of swine wastewater organic C (SWOC. Therefore, the study of SWOC mineralization and dynamics of wastewater microorganisms is essential to understand the environmental impacts of swine wastewater application. We measured the C mineralization of incubated swine wastewaters with high (wastewater H and low (wastewater L organic C concentrations. The dynamics of bacteria metabolic profile and community structure were also investigated. The results showed that SWOC mineralization was properly fitted by the two-simultaneous reactions model. The initial potential rate of labile C mineralization of wastewater H was 46% higher than that of wastewater L, whereas the initial potential rates of recalcitrant C mineralization of wastewaters H and L were both around 23 mg L-1 d-1. The bacterial functional and structural diversities significantly decreased for both the wastewaters during SWOC mineralization, and were all negatively correlated to specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; P < 0.01. The bacteria in the raw wastewaters exhibited functional similarity, and both metabolic profile and community structure changed with the mineralization of SWOC, mainly under the influence of SUVA254 (P < 0.001. These results suggested that SWOC mineralization was characterized by rapid mineralization of labile C and subsequent slow decomposition of recalcitrant C pool, and the quality of SWOC varied between the wastewaters with different amounts of organic C. The decreased bio-availability of dissolved organic matter affected the dynamics of wastewater bacteria during SWOC mineralization.

  9. Dikes and mineralization in uraniferous apatite deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the age relationships between dike bodies and the mineralization in deposits of uraniferous apatites in carbonate rocks is reconsidered. The post-ore history of apatite mineralization reveals a combination of polygenic mineral associations

  10. Oxalate formation under the hyperarid conditions of the Atacama desert as a mineral marker to provide clues to the source of organic carbon on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z. Y.; Fernández-Remolar, D. C.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Applin, D. M.; Chong Díaz, M.; Fernandez-Sampedro, M. T.; García-Villadangos, M.; Huang, T.; Xiao, L.; Parro, V.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the detection and characterization of the organic minerals weddellite (CaC2O4 · 2H2O) and whewellite (CaC2O4 · H2O) in the hyperarid, Mars-like conditions of the Salar Grande, Atacama desert, Chile. Weddellite and whewellite are commonly of biological origin on Earth and have great potential for preserving records of carbon geochemistry and possible biological activity on Mars if they are present there. Weddellite and whewellite have been found as secondary minerals occurring inside the lower detrital unit that fills the Salar Grande basin. The extremely low solubility of most oxalate minerals inhibits detection of oxalate by ion chromatography (IC). Crystalline oxalates, including weddellite and whewellite, were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The association of weddellite with surface biota and its presence among subsurface detrital materials suggest the potential of a biological origin for Salar Grande weddellite and whewellite. In this regard, biological activity is uniquely capable of concentrating oxalates at levels detectable by XRD. The complementary detection of oxalate-bearing phases through IC in the upper halite-rich unit suggests the presence of a soluble oxalate phase in the basin that is not detected by XRD. The formation, transport, and concentration of oxalate in the Salar Grande may provide a geochemical analogue for oxalate-bearing minerals recently suggested to exist on Mars.

  11. In Situ 13C NMR at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures Investigating the Conversion of CO2 to Magnesium and Calcium Carbonate Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface, J. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Skemer, P. A.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We have constructed specialized NMR hardware to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies of unmixed heterogeneous mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Specifically, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine efficacy of carbonate formation in various geological reservoirs. Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals. When CO2 reacts with the calcium or magnesium in a mineral or rock sample, the 13C chemical shift, linewidth, lineshape, and relaxation times change dramatically. This change can be monitored in situ and provide instantaneous and continuous characterization that maps the chemistry that is taking place. For example, on the pathway to MgCO3 formation, there are a number of phases of Mg(OH)x(H2O)y(CO3)z that are apparent via NMR spectroscopy. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative characterization of multiple metastable mineral phases in pure forms and in mixtures. Results are confirmed via powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy of aquo- hydro- carbonato- magnesium species and calcium carbonate species. We also have monitored the 13C spectroscopy to analyze the phase of CO2 (liquid, supercritical, or gas) and its conversion into other forms, such as bicarbonate and carbonate species, providing a "window" into the in situ pH of the reacting system. Reference: 'In Situ

  12. Mineralization of carbon and nitrogen from fresh and anaerobically stored sheep manure in soils of different texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    insignificant or slightly negative in the three soil-sand mixtures (100% soil+0% quartz sand; 50% soil+50% quartz sand; 25% soil+75% quartz sand). After 84 days, the cumulative CO2 evolution and the net mineralization of N from the fresh manure were highest in the soil-sand mixutre with the lowest clay content...... (4% clay); 28% fo the manure C and 18% of the manure N were net mineralized. There was no significant difference between the soil-sand mixtures containing 8% and 16% clay, in which 24% of the manure C and -1% to 4% of the manure N were net mineralized. The higher net mineralization of N in the soil......A sandy loam soil was mixed with three different amounts of quartz sand and incubated with ((NH4)-N-15)(2)SO4 (60 mu g N g(-1) soil) and fresh or anaerobically stored sheep manure (60 mu g g(-1) soil). The mineralization-immobilization of N and the mineralization of C were studied during 84 days of...

  13. Direct electrolytic dissolution of silicate minerals for air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production

    OpenAIRE

    Rau, Greg H.; Carroll, Susan A.; Bourcier, William L.; Singleton, Michael J.; Smith, Megan M.; Aines, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the direct coupling of silicate mineral dissolution with saline water electrolysis and H2 production to effect significant air CO2 absorption, chemical conversion, and storage in solution. In particular, we observed as much as a 105-fold increase in OH− concentration (pH increase of up to 5.3 units) relative to experimental controls following the electrolysis of 0.25 M Na2SO4 solutions when the anode was encased in powdered silicate mineral, either wollastonite o...

  14. Microbial Biomass Carbon Trends in Black and Red Soils Under Single Straw Application: Effect of Straw Placement, Mineral N Addition and Tillage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying trends in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) under contrasting management conditions is important in understanding the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) in soils and in ensuring their sustainable use. Against such a background, a 60-day greenhouse simulation experiment was carried out to study the effects of straw placement, mineral N source, and tillage on SMBC dynamics in two contrasting soils, red soil (Ferrasol) and black soil (Acrisol). The treatments included straw addition + buried (T1);straw addition + mineral N (T2); and straw addition + tillage (T3). Straw was either buried in the soil or placed on the surface. Sampling was done every 15 days. Straw placement, addition of external mineral N sources (Urea, 46 % N) and soil type affected SMBC. SMBC levels decreased with exposure durations (15 days, 30 days, 45 days, and 60 days). Rate of SMBC fixation was more in buried straw than in surface placed straw at all sampling dates in both soils. Addition of an external N source significantly increased SMBC level. Soil pH increased in both soil types, with a greater increase in black soil than in red soil. The study could not, however, statistically account for the effect of tillage on SMBC levels because of the limited effect of our tillage method due to the artificial barrier to mechanical interference supplied by the mesh bags,although differences in absolute values were quite evident between treatments T1 and T3.``

  15. Pre-treatment of Used-Cooking Oil as Feed Stocks of Biodiesel Production by Using Activated Carbon and Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Syah Putra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many low-cost feedstock i.e. used-cooking oil (UCO for the production of biodiesel fuel (BDF has contained a large amount of water and high proportion of free fatty acids (FFAs. Therefore, a pre-treatment process to reduce the water content (<0.1 wt.% and FFAs (<2.0 wt.% were necessary in order to avoid an undesirable side reactions, such as saponification, which could lead to serious problem of product separation and low fatty acid methyl ester (FAME yield. . In this study, a pre-treatment process of used cooking oil as a feedstock for the production of BDF by using various adsorbents such as Activated Carbon (AC and various clay minerals, for example Smectite (S, Bentonite (B, Kaolinite (K, and Powdered Earthenware (PE were evaluated. The oil obtained from pre-treatment was compared with oil without pre-treatment process. In this study, we reported a basic difference in material ability to the oil, depending on the adsorption condition with respect to the physico-chemical parameters, e.g. refractive index (R, density (ρ, FFAs, and water content (W. The results showed that the water content and FFAs in the oil has decreased when using AC as an adsorbent compared with clay minerals. However, the refractive index of oil has similar with the oil without pre-treatment process as well; meanwhile, the density of oil has increased after the pre-treatment process by using clay minerals.

  16. A kinetic approach to evaluate salinity effects on carbon mineralization in a plant residue-amended soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NOURBAKHSH Farshid; SHEIKH-HOSSEINI Ahmad R.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of salinity stress and plant residue quality on C mineralization kinetics in soil is not well understood. A laboratory experiment was conducted to study the effects of salinity stress on C mineralization kinetics in a soil amended with alfalfa, wheat and corn residues. A factorial combination of two salinity levels (0.97 and 18.2 dS/m) and four levels of plant residues (control, alfalfa, wheat and corn) with three replications was performed. A first order kinetic model was used to describe the C mineralization and to calculate the potentially mineralizable C. The CO2-C evolved under non-saline condition, ranged from 814.6 to 4842.4 mg CO2-C/kg in control and alfalfa residue-amended soils, respectively. Salinization reduced the rates of CO2 evolution by 18.7%, 6.2% and 5.2% in alfalfa, wheat and corn residue-amended soils, respectively. Potentially mineralizable C (Co)was reduced significantly in salinized alfalfa residue-treated soils whereas, no significant difference was observed for control treatments as well as wheat and corn residue-treated soils. We concluded that the response pattern of C mineralization to salinity stress depended on the plant residue quality and duration of incubation.

  17. Carbon Isotope Measurements of Experimentally-Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products by Pyrolysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the C isotope composition of mineral catalyzed organic compounds derived from high temperature and high pressure synthesis. These experiments make use of an innovative pyrolysis technique designed to extract and measure C isotopes. To date, our experiments have focused on the pyrolysis and C isotope ratio measurements of low-molecular weight intermediary hydrocarbons (organic acids and alcohols) and serve as a proof of concept for making C and H isotope measurements on more complicated mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and intermediary products produced during high temperature and high pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. The impetus for this work stems from recently reported observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [1-4], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Martian history [5-7]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization reactions [8,9]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [10-12]. Further, recent experiments by Fu et al. [13] focus on examining detailed C isotope measurements of hydrocarbons produced by surface-catalyzed mineral reactions. Work described in this paper details the experimental techniques used to measure intermediary organic reaction products (alcohols and organic acids).

  18. Data compilation, synthesis, and calculations used for organic-carbon storage and inventory estimates for mineral soils of the Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Gary R.; Markewich, Helaine W.

    2004-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey investigations of environmental controls on carbon cycling in soils and sediments of the Mississippi River Basin (MRB), an area of 3.3 x 106 square kilometers (km2), have produced an assessment tool for estimating the storage and inventory of soil organic carbon (SOC) by using soil-characterization data from Federal, State, academic, and literature sources. The methodology is based on the linkage of site-specific SOC data (pedon data) to the soil-association map units of the U.S. Department of Agriculture State Soil Geographic (STATSGO) and Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) digital soil databases in a geographic information system. The collective pedon database assembled from individual sources presently contains 7,321 pedon records representing 2,581 soil series. SOC storage, in kilograms per square meter (kg/m2), is calculated for each pedon at standard depth intervals from 0 to 10, 10 to 20, 20 to 50, and 50 to 100 centimeters. The site-specific storage estimates are then regionalized to produce national-scale (STATSGO) and county-scale (SSURGO) maps of SOC to a specified depth. Based on this methodology, the mean SOC storage for the top meter of mineral soil in the MRB is approximately 10 kg/m2, and the total inventory is approximately 32.3 Pg (1 petagram = 109 metric tons). This inventory is from 2.5 to 3 percent of the estimated global mineral SOC pool.

  19. Confocal Raman microscopy as a tool to describe different mineral and organic phases at high spatial resolution within marine biogenic carbonates: case study on Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nouet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine biogenic carbonates formed by invertebrates (e.g. corals and mollusk shells represent complex composites of one or more mineral phases and organic molecules. This complexity ranges from the macroscopic structures observed with the naked eye down to sub micrometric structures only revealed by micro analytical techniques. Understanding to what extent and how organisms can control the formation of these structures requires that the mineral and organic phases can be identified and their spatial distribution related. Here we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman microscopy applied to cross sections of a shell of Nerita undata to describe the distribution of calcite and aragonite including their crystallographic orientation with high lateral resolution (∼300 nm. Moreover, spatial distribution of functional groups of organic compounds can be simultaneously acquired, allowing to specifically relate them to the observed microstructures. The data presented in this case study highlights the possible new contributions of this method to the description of modalities of Nerita undata shell formation, and what could be expected of its application to other marine biogenic carbonates. Localization of areas of interest would also allow further investigations using more localized methods, such as TEM that would provide complementary information on the relation between organic molecules and crystallographic lattice.

  20. Carbon mineralization in Arctic sediments northeast of Svalbard: Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction as principal anaerobic respiratory pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, Verona; Nickel, Maren; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2006-01-01

    Carbon oxidation rates and pathways were determined in 3 sediments at latitude 79 degrees to 81 degrees N in the Barents Sea, where the ice cover restricts primary production to a few months of the year. Oxygen uptake (1.5 to 3.5 imnol m(-2) d(-1)) and sulfate reduction (= 60 mu mol cm(-3)) and Fe......(III) (>= 108 mu mol cm(-3)), dissimilatory Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction contributed between 69 and >= 90% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in the upper 10 cm of the sediments. At 2 of the 3 stations, sulfate reduction rates were below our detection limit of 1 nmol cm(-3) d(-1). Solid Mn and Fe(III) were...... and sulfate reduction at 5 to 10 cm. Rates of microbial carbon oxidation were low compared to those in fjords on the west and south coasts of Svalbard. This is in accordance with the limited organic carbon supply by primary and secondary productivity caused by long periods of ice coverage....

  1. Preliminary experiments dealing with improvement of the ratio of nitrogen mineralizing to carbon mineralizing microorganisms in return sludge of wastewater treatment plants. Final report; Vorversuche zur Verbesserung des Verhaeltnisses von stickstoffverarbeitenden zu kohlenstoffverarbeitenden Mikroorganismen im Rueckfuehrungsschlamm von Klaeranlagen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholmes, P.; Wolff, E.K.

    1996-08-01

    The relevant biological component of return sludge consist of so-called `Schlammflocken` in which different carbon as well as nitrogen mineralizing organisms can be found. It was our aim, to analyse the ratio between the biology activities of nitrogen and carbon metabolising organisms in return sludge from conventional biological wastewater treatment plants and to develop corresponding methods for improvement of this ratio. On a semi-technical scale return sludge passes a separator for conditioning and is applied on top of a moving clear-phase for differential sedimentation. Selected fractions of the sediment are returned to the sewage treatment plant. Thereby it is possible to increase the quality of return sludge with respect to its activity in nitrogen metabolism. In the future this will lead to much higher efficiency of nitrogen compound degrading wastewater treatment plants. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die biologische Komponente des Rueckfuehrungsschlammes besteht aus sogenannten `Schlammflocken`, in denen unterschiedliche Organismen wie C-Mineralisierer und N-Mineralisierer angesiedelt sind. Unser Ziel war es, fuer Rueckfuehrungsschlaemme aus konventionellen biologischen Klaeranlagen das Verhaeltnis der biologischen Aktivitaeten von Stickstoff- und Kohlenstoffmineralisierern zu analysieren und Methoden zu dessen Verbesserung zu entwickeln. Im halbtechnischen Massstab passiert Ruecklaufschlamm zur Flockenkonditionierung einen Separator und wird nach Resuspendierung des Kammerinhalts in einen Stroemungskanal zur differentiellen Sedimentation einer fliessenden Klarphase ueberschichtet. Ein bezueglich der Nitrifiziererleistung ausgesuchter Teil des so konditionierten Rueckschlammes wird dann wieder eingespeist. Auf diese Weise ist es moeglich, die Qualitaet des Rueckfuehrungsschlammes hinsichtlich seiner Nitrifiziererleistung merklich zu erhoehen. Dies wird in Zukunft erlauben, Klaerwerkskapazitaeten wesentlich besser auszunutzen. (orig.)

  2. Mineralization, geochemistry, fluid inclusion and sulfur stable isotope studies in the carbonate hosted Baqoroq Cu-Zn-As deposit (NE Anarak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Jazi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Baqoroq Cu-Zn-As deposit is located northeast of the town ofAnarak in Isfahan province, in theeast central areaof Iran. Copper mineralization occursin upper cretaceous carbonate rocks.Studyof thegeologyof the Nakhlak area, the location ofa carbonate-hosted base metaldeposit, indicatesthe importance of stratigraphic, lithological and structural controls in the placement of this ore deposit. (Jazi et al., 2015.Some of the most world’s most important epigenetic, stratabound and discordant copperdeposits are the carbonate hosted Tsumeb and Kipushi type deposits,located in Africa. The Baqoroq deposit is believed to be of this type. Materials and methods In the current study, fifty rock samples were collected from old tunnels and surface mineralization. Twenty-two thin sections, ten polished sections and four thin-polished sections were prepared for microscopic study. Ten samples were selected for elemental analysis by ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry by the Zar Azma Company (Tehran and AAS (Atomic absorption spectrometry at the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Seven doubly polished sections of barite mineralization were prepared for microthermometric analysis. Homogenization and last ice-melting temperatures were measured using a Linkam THMSG 600 combined heating and freezing stage at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Sulfur isotopes of five barite samples were determined by the Iso-Analytical Ltd. Company of the UK. The isotopic ratios are presented in per mil (‰notation relative to the Canyon Diablo Troilite. Results The upper Cretaceoushost rocks of the Baqoroq deposit include limestone, sandstone, and conglomerate units. Mineralization is controlled by two main factors: lithostratigraphy and structure. Epigenetic Cu-Zn mineralizationoccurs in ore zones as stratabound barite and barite-calcite veins and minor disseminated mineralization. Open space filling occurred as breccia matrix

  3. 一株碳酸钙矿化菌的分离与鉴定%Isolation and Identification of a Bacterial Strain Inducing Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振远; 李广悦; 丁德馨; 王永东; 胡南

    2014-01-01

    基于微生物诱导碳酸钙沉积的岩土工程加固技术是一种环境友好的新技术。碳酸钙矿化菌是该技术应用的前提。为获得具有诱导碳酸钙沉积能力的菌株,采用选择性富集培养、平板分离方法从土壤中分离得到了一株具有尿素分解能力的菌株,细菌诱导产生的沉积物检测结果表明该菌株具有诱导碳酸钙沉积能力。通过形态学、革兰氏染色和16 S rDNA序列同源性分析鉴定该菌株为巴斯德芽孢杆菌。%Biocementation through microbial calcium carbonate precipitation is an innova-tive and environmentally friendly rock and soil reinforcement technique in geotechnical en-gineering. The bacteria inducing mineralization of calcium carbonate is a prerequisite to im-plement the biological treatment process. In order to obtain the strain with ability to induce CaCO3 precipitation,a ureolytic strain was isolated from soil using selective enrichment cul-ture and plate screening techniques. The precipites induced by this stain were examined, and the results showed it was capable of inducing calcium carbonate mineralization. The strain was identified as Sporosarcina pasteurii based on morphology,Gram stain and 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

  4. Influence of Residue and Nitrogen Fertilizer Additions on Carbon Mineralization in Soils with Different Texture and Cropping Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Xianni Chen; Xudong Wang; Matt Liebman; Michel Cavigelli; Michelle Wander

    2014-01-01

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil]) comparing conventional grain systems (Conv) amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med) and longer (Long), more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double...

  5. Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2010-05-01

    Estimation of the efficiency of hydrocarbon mineralization in soil by measuring CO2-emission and variations in the isotope composition of carbon dioxide E. Dubrovskaya1, O. Turkovskaya1, A. Tiunov2, N. Pozdnyakova1, A. Muratova1 1 - Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, RAS, Saratov, 2 - A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, RAS, Moscow, Russian Federation Hydrocarbon mineralization in soil undergoing phytoremediation was investigated in a laboratory experiment by estimating the variation in the 13С/12С ratio in the respired СО2. Hexadecane (HD) was used as a model hydrocarbon pollutant. The polluted soil was planted with winter rye (Secale cereale) inoculated with Azospirillum brasilense strain SR80, which combines the abilities to promote plant growth and to degrade oil hydrocarbon. Each vegetated treatment was accompanied with a corresponding nonvegetated one, and uncontaminated treatments were used as controls. Emission of carbon dioxide, its isotopic composition, and the residual concentration of HD in the soil were examined after two and four weeks. At the beginning of the experiment, the CO2-emission level was higher in the uncontaminated than in the contaminated soil. After two weeks, the quantity of emitted carbon dioxide decreased by about three times and did not change significantly in all uncontaminated treatments. The presence of HD in the soil initially increased CO2 emission, but later the respiration was reduced. During the first two weeks, nonvegetated soil had the highest CO2-emission level. Subsequently, the maximum increase in respiration was recorded in the vegetated contaminated treatments. The isotope composition of plant material determines the isotope composition of soil. The soil used in our experiment had an isotopic signature typical of soils formed by C3 plants (δ13C,-22.4‰). Generally, there was no significant fractionation of the carbon isotopes of the substrates metabolized by the

  6. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  7. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  8. Evaluation of first-row transition metal oxides supported on clay minerals for catalytic growth of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we employed various transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) loaded on different smectite clays (laponite and montmorillonite) as catalysts in synthesis of carbon nanostructures (mainly nanotubes) and we report the effect of the nature of the catalytic centers and type of aluminosilicate layers in the morphology, quality and structure on the final products. Owing to their unique swelling, ion-exchange and intercalation properties smectite clays were easily, uniformly and reproducibly loaded with metal cations. Different homoionic forms of montmorillonite and laponite were prepared containing first-row transition metals and the synthesis of carbon nanostructures was carried out at 700 deg. C using an acetylene/nitrogen mixture. A variety of analytical techniques (XRD, Raman, SEM, TEM and thermal analysis) were used to fully characterize the final materials. Iron-, cobalt-, nickel- and manganese-exchanged clays showed to be effective catalysts for the production of carbon nanotubes, while acetylene decomposition over copper-exchanged clays resulted to the creation of carbon spheres. The resulting hybrid systems are particularly attractive for polymer reinforcing applications since the combined action of clay-carbon nanotubes in polymer matrixes can provide outstanding properties to the resulting composite materials

  9. Carbon and Nitrogen Mineralization in Relation to Soil Particle-Size Fractions after 32 Years of Chemical and Manure Application in a Continuous Maize Cropping System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Andong; Xu, Hu; Shao, Xingfang; Zhu, Ping; Zhang, Wenju; Xu, Minggang; Murphy, Daniel V

    2016-01-01

    Long-term manure application is recognized as an efficient management practice to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation and nitrogen (N) mineralization capacity. A field study was established in 1979 to understand the impact of long-term manure and/or chemical fertilizer application on soil fertility in a continuous maize cropping system. Soil samples were collected from field plots in 2012 from 9 fertilization treatments (M0CK, M0N, M0NPK, M30CK, M30N, M30NPK, M60CK, M60N, and M60NPK) where M0, M30, and M60 refer to manure applied at rates of 0, 30, and 60 t ha-1 yr-1, respectively; CK indicates no fertilizer; N and NPK refer to chemical fertilizer in the forms of either N or N plus phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). Soils were separated into three particle-size fractions (2000-250, 250-53, and fractions was used to evaluate the effect of long-term manure, in combination with/without chemical fertilization application, on the accumulation and mineralization of SOC and total N in each fraction. Results showed that long-term manure application significantly increased SOC and total N content and enhanced C and N mineralization in the three particle-size fractions. The content of SOC and total N followed the order 2000-250 μm > 250-53μm > 53 μm fraction, whereas the amount of C and N mineralization followed the reverse order. In the fraction, the M60NPK treatment significantly increased the amount of C and N mineralized (7.0 and 10.1 times, respectively) compared to the M0CK treatment. Long-term manure application, especially when combined with chemical fertilizers, resulted in increased soil microbial biomass C and N, and a decreased microbial metabolic quotient. Consequently, long-term manure fertilization was beneficial to both soil C and N turnover and microbial activity, and had significant effect on the microbial metabolic quotient. PMID:27031697

  10. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liapis, Ioannis, E-mail: iliapis@sidenor.vionet.gr [AEIFOROS SA, 12th km Thessaloniki-Veroia Rd, PO Box 59, 57008 Ionia, Thessaloniki (Greece); Papayianni, Ioanna [Laboratory of Building Materials, Department of Civil Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Addition of 10% perlite decreases specific weight of the slag by approx. 7.5%. • Slag-crucible interaction and thin coating layer result in variations in XRF. • XRD shows high glass content and smaller crystalline sizes due to rapid cooling. • SEM shows higher homogeneity and lower crystallisation for SiO{sub 2}/CaO-rich samples. • Physical properties (LA, PSV, AAV) of modified slag show limited deterioration. - Abstract: Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  11. Carbon dioxide emissions from semi-arid soils amended with biochar alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José M; Nieto, M Aurora; López-de-Sá, Esther G; Gascó, Gabriel; Méndez, Ana; Plaza, César

    2014-06-01

    Semi-arid soils cover a significant area of Earth's land surface and typically contain large amounts of inorganic C. Determining the effects of biochar additions on CO2 emissions from semi-arid soils is therefore essential for evaluating the potential of biochar as a climate change mitigation strategy. Here, we measured the CO2 that evolved from semi-arid calcareous soils amended with biochar at rates of 0 and 20tha(-1) in a full factorial combination with three different fertilizers (mineral fertilizer, municipal solid waste compost, and sewage sludge) applied at four rates (equivalent to 0, 75, 150, and 225kg potentially available Nha(-1)) during 182 days of aerobic incubation. A double exponential model, which describes cumulative CO2 emissions from two active soil C compartments with different turnover rates (one relatively stable and the other more labile), was found to fit very well all the experimental datasets. In general, the organic fertilizers increased the size and decomposition rate of the stable and labile soil C pools. In contrast, biochar addition had no effects on any of the double exponential model parameters and did not interact with the effects ascribed to the type and rate of fertilizer. After 182 days of incubation, soil organic and microbial biomass C contents tended to increase with increasing the application rates of organic fertilizer, especially of compost, whereas increasing the rate of mineral fertilizer tended to suppress microbial biomass. Biochar was found to increase both organic and inorganic C contents in soil and not to interact with the effects of type and rate of fertilizer on C fractions. As a whole, our results suggest that the use of biochar as enhancer of semi-arid soils, either alone or combined with mineral and organic fertilizers, is unlikely to increase abiotic and biotic soil CO2 emissions. PMID:24632059

  12. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Addition of 10% perlite decreases specific weight of the slag by approx. 7.5%. • Slag-crucible interaction and thin coating layer result in variations in XRF. • XRD shows high glass content and smaller crystalline sizes due to rapid cooling. • SEM shows higher homogeneity and lower crystallisation for SiO2/CaO-rich samples. • Physical properties (LA, PSV, AAV) of modified slag show limited deterioration. - Abstract: Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector

  13. Comparison of calcium carbonate and aluminium hydroxide as phosphate binders on biochemical bone markers, PTH(1-84), and bone mineral content in dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, B; Jensen, J D; Nielsen, H K;

    1991-01-01

    Bone mineral content, estimated by single-photon absorptiometry of the forearm, serum values of intact parathyroid hormone (PTH(1-84], osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D3), and aluminium were determined during treatment with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) or...... aluminium hydroxide (Al(OH)3) in 11 dialysis patients participating in a randomised cross-over study. Each treatment period lasted 6 months. Serum phosphorus was maintained in the range 1.5-2.0 mmol/l. During Al(OH)3 treatment bone mineral content (BMC) decreased by 11% per half-year (mean), but only by 3......% per half-year during CaCO3 treatment (P less than 0.05). Comparing the CaCO3 and Al(OH)3 periods the following differences were found: serum calcium increased during CaCO3 treatment, PTH(1-84) decreased (79% of initial values during CaCO3 versus 196% during Al(OH)3, mean area under curve, P less than...

  14. CO2 sequestration using waste concrete and anorthosite tailings by direct mineral carbonation in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ghacham, Alia; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Mineral carbonation (MC) represents a promising alternative for sequestering CO2. In this work, the CO2 sequestration capacity of the available calcium-bearing materials waste concrete and anorthosite tailings is assessed in gas-solid-liquid and gas-solid routes using 18.2% flue CO2 gas. The objective is to screen for a better potential residue and phase route and as the ultimate purpose to develop a cost-effective process. The results indicate the possibility of removing 66% from inlet CO2 using waste concrete for the aqueous route. However, the results that were obtained with the carbonation of anorthosite were less significant, with 34% as the maximal percentage of CO2 removal. The difference in terms of reactivity could be explained by the accessibility to calcium. In fact, anorthosite presents a framework structure wherein the calcium is trapped, which could slow the calcium dissolution into the aqueous phase compared to the concrete sample, where calcium can more easily leach. In the other part of the study concerning gas-solid carbonation, the results of CO2 removal did not exceed 15%, which is not economically interesting for scaling up the process. The results obtained with waste concrete samples in aqueous phase are interesting. In fact, 34.6% of the introduced CO2 is converted into carbonate after 15 min of contact with the gas without chemical additives and at a relatively low gas pressure. Research on the optimization of the aqueous process using waste concrete should be performed to enhance the reaction rate and to develop a cost-effective process. PMID:26292776

  15. 不同植被配置下土壤碳矿化潜力%Soil carbon mineralization potential under different configuration of vegetation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玉燕; 贾晓红; 赵昕; 陈国雄; 高艳红; 吴攀

    2011-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from the plots of different vegetation configuration (Cara-gana korshinskii, Artemisia ordosica, and C. Korshinskii-A. Ordosica) in Shapotou region of Ningxia Province, Northwest China, and an incubation was conducted to study the mineralization potential of soil carbon and the litter decomposition in soil. During 103 days incubation, no significant differences were observed in the soil carbon mineralization under the same vegetation configuration and with or without litter addition, but the mineralization rate of soil carbon was higher under the vegetation configuration with high density C. Korshinskii. There was a significant difference (P=0.047) in the soil CO2-C release from the single row of A. Ordosica and from the double rows of C. Korshinskii under C. Korshinskii-A. Ordosica and without litter addition, but no significant difference under the other vegetation configurations and with or without litter addition. Overall, the soil carbon mineralization potential under C. Korshinskii was higher than that under Artemisia ordosica and C. Korshinskii-A. Ordosica. At early phase, the decomposition rate of the litters in soil was in the order of C. Korshinskii-A. Ordosica > A. Ordosica > C. Korshinskii. After 40 days incubation, the decomposition rate of the litters tended to be the same. The higher decomposition rate of annual plant litter could be attributed to its high C and N contents and its high C/N ratio. The soil amended with A. Ordosica litter under C. Korshinskii had a higher potential of carbon mineralization than the soil amended with C. Korshinskii litter under A. Ordosica, because of the differences in the litter chemical composition and the soil nutrient availability. However, a turning point appeared during incubation, due to the higher C and N contents and the higher C/N ratio of C. Korshinskii litter. Under different vegetation configuration, the soil carbon mineralization potential was higher under the canopy than

  16. Effect of fresh green waste and green waste compost on mineral nitrogen, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide from a Vertisol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of organic waste amendments to a horticultural soil, prior to expected risk periods, could immobilise mineral N, ultimately reducing nitrogen (N) losses as nitrous oxide (N2O) and leaching. Two organic waste amendments were selected, a fresh green waste (FGW) and green waste compost (GWC) as they had suitable biochemical attributes to initiate N immobilisation into the microbial biomass and organic N forms. These characteristics include a high C:N ratio (FGW 44:1, GWC 35:1), low total N (14%). Both products were applied at 3 t C/ha to a high N (plus N fertiliser) or low N (no fertiliser addition) Vertisol soil in PVC columns. Cumulative N2O production over the 28 day incubation from the control soil was 1.5 mg/N2O/m2, and 11 mg/N2O/m2 from the control + N. The N2O emission decreased with GWC addition (P 2O emissions by 38% by the conclusion of the incubation. Analysis of mineral N concentrations at 7, 14 and 28 days identified that both FGW and GWC induced microbial immobilisation of N in the first 7 days of incubation regardless of whether the soil environment was initially high or low in N; with the FGW immobilising up to 30% of available N. It is likely that the reduced mineral N due to N immobilisation led to a reduced substrate for N2O production during the first week of the trial, when soil N2O emissions peaked. An additional finding was that FGW + N did not decrease cumulative N2O emissions compared to the control + N, potentially due to the fact that it stimulated microbial respiration resulting in anaerobic micro sites in the soil and ultimately N2O production via denitrification. Therefore, both materials could be used as post harvest amendments in horticulture to minimise N loss through nitrate-N leaching in the risk periods between crop rotations. The mature GWC has potential to reduce N2O, an important greenhouse gas.

  17. 潮汐湿地土壤碳矿化及其对电子受体响应研究进展%Research Progress in Soil Carbon Mineralization and Its Response to Electron Acceptors in Tidal Wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘婷; 王维奇; 曾从盛

    2012-01-01

    Tidal saline wetland is one of the most important wetland types, which is influenced by the level and salinity of the tidal water. The process of soil carbon mineralization is also unique. The latest advances in studies of soil carbon mineralization and its response to electron acceptors in tidal saline wetlands were reviewed. The results showed: Besides aerobic carbon mineralization, ferric and sulfate reduction were the important pathways of carbon mineralization; The rate of soil carbon mineralization was higher in mangrove than in saltmarsh,and carbon dioxide was the main products of soil carbon mineralization; The contribution of different electron acceptors was slightly different due to habitat difference, and it was controlled by the quantity of elcetron acceptors and donors; Tide, salinity and biology disturbance were the key factors affecting the carbon mineralization of tidal saline wetland.%潮汐湿地是一种重要的湿地类型,受周期性变化的潮汐水位和盐分等特殊因子的影响,其土壤碳矿化过程亦具独特性,综述了潮汐湿地土壤碳矿化及其对电子受体响应的最新研究进展.结果表明,潮汐湿地土壤碳矿化除有氧碳矿化外,三价铁和硫酸盐还原过程主导的厌氧碳矿化也是土壤碳矿化的重要途径;潮汐湿地类型中的红树林土壤碳矿化速率高于盐沼土壤碳矿化速率,并均以二氧化碳为土壤碳矿化的主要产物;生境的差异使不同电子受体在土壤碳矿化中的作用有所不同,并受到电子受体和电子供体数量的调节;潮汐、盐分、生物干扰等是影响潮汐湿地土壤碳矿化过程的主要因子.

  18. Using HySpex SWIR-320m hyperspectral data for the identification and mapping of minerals in hand specimens of carbonate rocks from the Ankloute Formation (Agadir Basin, Western Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baissa, Rachid; Labbassi, Kamal; Launeau, Patrick; Gaudin, Anne; Ouajhain, Brahim

    2011-08-01

    Nowadays the development of sensors for acquiring hyperspectral images has contributed greatly to the identification of different constituents of the earth's surface and therefore to the improvement of cartographic products. Carbonate rocks are often altered by physical and chemical processes. The natural tendency in most carbonate sediments is that primary porosity is substantially reduced by cementation and compaction during post-depositional. For example the subaerial meteoric diagenetic (freshwater) was promoted as a means of explaining porosity evolution in carbonates. These processes lead to the formation of new carbonate minerals with highly variable phase crystallization. Frequently, with the optical microscope, the precise identification and discrimination of these phases are beyond the resolving power of the eye, which makes mapping mineralogical microfacies difficult. It requires, first, the use of staining techniques. This work proposes to study hand specimens of the carbonate facies of Jurassic age in the Agadir Basin, using hyperspectral imagery provided by the camera HySpex SWIR-320m, at wavelengths ranging from 1300 to 2500 nm. These images offer the possibility to identify with precision the different carbonate minerals and to allow diagenetic facies characterization. The approach is to calculate an index of carbonate, called the Normalized Difference Carbonate Index or NDCI, to study the deepening of the main absorption band of carbonates and a supervised classification method based on the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) to study the overall shape of reflection spectra of carbonates and to map other accessory minerals. This method has allowed the development of mineralogical maps supplemented by their degrees of diagenesis.

  19. ``What comes up … must come down'': Peat carbon and mineral-interactions in Arctic Coastal tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, T. K.; Lipson, D.; Crook, N. P.; Miller, K.; Bozzolo, F.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal arctic tundra is a significant landscape unit above 65o N, and in the absence of significant nitrate, sulfate or manganese, these wet, permafrost-influenced soils have few electron acceptors readily available to support microbial anaerobiosis. Based on morphological criteria and satellite photos, we selected 4 drained, thaw-lake basins (DTLBs) of vastly differing ages - 50 to 5500 years, based on 14C-dating efforts near Barrow AK. Replicate 100m transects for each thawed-lake basin were collected using a towable 500 MHz ground-penetrating radar system. Inspection of the raw profiles in the field further suggested points along which 20m-length common-midpoint gathers were also obtained to discriminate contrasting propagation speeds within the top 0.5 m of the surface. At later visits, several SIPRE cores were taken to 0.5 m-depth, and the cores stored frozen until analysis. The cores were measured, and physical/color and mineral data collected to correlate with the CMP velocity-profiles. The point of these measurements was to ascertain the minimum-depth to mineral material below the surficial peats, and to build-up a profile of basin age versus mineral-depth. Availability of inorganic reducing agents may provide a significant constraint on soil microbial C-processing. Minimum-tension microlysimeters (PTFE and iron-free) were deployed along replicate transects in each of 5 basins, and filtered soil-pore water was collected from 0-10 cm, as was filtered, acidified standing water from early June-Sept of both 2009 and 2010. Results of inorganic analyses are presented in a separate poster. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor seasonal patterns in DOC composition, and fluorescence emission intensity of soil pore-water was inversely proportional to basin age - humic signature emission spectra peaked sharply at 445 nm, and a broader secondary maximum occurred at 500 nm. Fluorescence emission varied 5-fold among basins, and decreased at all sites as soil

  20. Massive barite deposits and carbonate mineralization in the Derugin Basin, Sea of Okhotsk: precipitation processes at cold seep sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Jens; Bollwerk, Sandra M.; Derkachev, Alexander; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Suess, Erwin

    2002-10-01

    An area of massive barite precipitations was studied at a tectonic horst in 1500 m water depth in the Derugin Basin, Sea of Okhotsk. Seafloor observations and dredge samples showed irregular, block- to column-shaped barite build-ups up to 10 m high which were scattered over the seafloor along an observation track 3.5 km long. High methane concentrations in the water column show that methane expulsion and probably carbonate precipitation is a recently active process. Small fields of chemoautotrophic clams ( Calyptogena sp., Acharax sp.) at the seafloor provide additional evidence for active fluid venting. The white to yellow barites show a very porous and often layered internal fabric, and are typically covered by dark-brown Mn-rich sediment; electron microprobe spectroscopy measurements of barite sub-samples show a Ba substitution of up to 10.5 mol% of Sr. Rare idiomorphic pyrite crystals (˜1%) in the barite fabric imply the presence of H 2S. This was confirmed by clusters of living chemoautotrophic tube worms (1 mm in diameter) found in pores and channels within the barite. Microscopic examination showed that micritic aragonite and Mg-calcite aggregates or crusts are common authigenic precipitations within the barite fabric. Equivalent micritic carbonates and barite carbonate cemented worm tubes were recovered from sediment cores taken in the vicinity of the barite build-up area. Negative δ 13C values of these carbonates (>-43.5‰ PDB) indicate methane as major carbon source; δ 18O values between 4.04 and 5.88‰ PDB correspond to formation temperatures, which are certainly below 5°C. One core also contained shells of Calyptogena sp. at different core depths with 14C-ages ranging from 20 680 to >49 080 yr. Pore water analyses revealed that fluids also contain high amounts of Ba; they also show decreasing SO 42- concentrations and a parallel increase of H 2S with depth. Additionally, S and O isotope data of barite sulfate (δ 34S: 21.0-38.6‰ CDT; δ 18O

  1. Thermoelectric behavior of carbon fiber reinforced lightweight concrete with mineral admixtures%炭纤维增强轻质矿粉混凝土的热电行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bahar Demirel; Salih Yazicioglu

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced concrete can be used to sense temperature owing to the Seebeck effect caused by the p-type conductivity of short carbon fibers. Both the temperature sensing ability of the carbon fiber reinforced lightweight concrete and the influence of mineral admixtures on the Seebeck effect were investigated by measuring the thermo electric power of six Portland cement-based concretes with or without carbon fibers or mineral admixtures (fly ash, silica fume). It was found that the carbon fiber reinforced lightweight concretes had a Seebeck effect similar to the carbon fiber reinforced normal concrete, but their Seebeck coefficients were decreased by mineral admixtures. Carbon fiber reinforced lightweight concrete with mineral admixtures can be used as a thermal sensor in buildings.%炭纤维增强混凝土能用来感知温度,其因在于短炭纤维的P-型传导性引起的塞贝克(Seebeck)效应所致.通过测量添加炭纤维或矿质掺和物(飞灰、硅土粉)前后六种波特兰水泥基混凝土的热电功率,研究了炭纤维增强轻质混凝土热敏的能力及其矿质掺合物对Seebeck效应的影响.结果表明: 炭纤维增强轻质混凝土具有类似于炭纤维增强标准混凝土的Seebeck效应,只是Seebeck系数因掺合了矿粉而减低.掺有矿粉的炭纤维增强轻质混凝土可用作建筑物的热传感器.

  2. Self-healing of early age cracks in cement-based materials by mineralization of carbonic anhydrase microorganism

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Chunxiang; Chen, Huaicheng; Ren, Lifu; Luo, Mian

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the self-healing potential of early age cracks in cement-based materials incorporating the bacteria which can produce carbonic anhydrase. Cement-based materials specimens were pre-cracked at the age of 7, 14, 28, 60 days to study the repair ability influenced by cracking time, the width of cracks were between 0.1 and 1.0 mm to study the healing rate influenced by width of cracks. The experimental results indicated that the bacteria showed excellent repairing ability...

  3. Calcium carbonate mineralization: X-ray microdiffraction probing of the interface of an evaporating drop on a superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Angelo; Burghammer, Manfred; Di Cola, Emanuela; Reynolds, Michael; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian

    2011-07-01

    The liquid/air interface of calcium bicarbonate solution drops was probed by synchrotron radiation microbeam scattering. The drops were deposited on a nanopatterned superhydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) surface and raster-scanned during evaporation by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The appearance of about 200-nm-size calcite crystallites at the interface could be spatially resolved at the onset of crystallization. Diffuse scattering from the interface is attributed to a dense nanoscale amorphous calcium carbonate phase. Calcite was found to be the major phase in the solid residue with vaterite as minor phase. PMID:21663321

  4. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  5. Mineral resources of the Desolation Canyon, Turtle Canyon, and Floy Canyon Wilderness Study Areas, Carbon Emery, and Grand counties, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the Desolation Canyon, Turtle Canyon, and Floy Canyon Wilderness Study Areas which include 242,000 acres, 33,690 acres, and 23,140 acres. Coal deposits underlie all three study areas. Coal zones in the Blackhawk and Nelsen formations have identified bituminous coal resources of 22 million short tons in the Desolation Canyon Study Area, 6.3 million short tons in the Turtle Canyon Study Area, and 45 million short tons in the Floy Canyon Study Area. In-place inferred oil shale resources are estimated to contain 60 million barrels in the northern part of the Desolation Canyon area. Minor occurrences of uranium have been found in the southeastern part of the Desolation Canyon area and in the western part of the Floy Canyon area. Mineral resource potential for the study areas is estimated to be for coal, high for all areas, for oil and gas, high for the northern tract of the Desolation Canyon area and moderate for all other tracts, for bituminous sandstone, high for the northern part of the Desolation Canyon area, and low for all other tracts, for oil shale, low in all areas, for uranium, moderate for the Floy Canyon area and the southeastern part of the Desolation Canyon area and low for the remainder of the areas, for metals other than uranium, bentonite, zeolites, and geothermal energy, low in all areas, and for coal-bed methane unknown in all three areas

  6. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianni; Wang, Xudong; Liebman, Matt; Cavigelli, Michel; Wander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil]) comparing conventional grain systems (Conv) amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med) and longer (Long), more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double exponential model was used to estimate the size (Ca, Cs) and decay rates (ka, ks) of active and slow C pools which we compared with total particulate organic matter (POM) and occluded-POM (OPOM). The high-SOC IAsoil containing highly active smectite clays maintained smaller labile pools and higher decay rates than the low-SOC MDsoil containing semi-active kaolinitic clays. Net SOC loss was greater (2.6 g kg(-1); 8.6%) from the IAsoil than the MDsoil (0.9 g kg(-1), 6.3%); fractions and coefficients suggest losses were principally from IAsoil's resistant pool. Cropping history did not alter SOC pool size or decay rates in IAsoil where rotation-based differences in OPOM-C were small. In MDsoil, use of diversified rotations and manure increased ka by 32% and ks by 46% compared to Conv; differences mirrored in POM- and OPOM-C contents. Residue addition prompted greater increases in Ca (340% vs 230%) and Cs (38% vs 21%) and decreases in ka (58% vs 9%) in IAsoil than MDsoil. Reduced losses of SOC from residue-amended MDsoil were associated with increased OPOM-C. Nitrogen addition dampened CO2-C release. Clay type and C saturation dominated the IAsoil's response to external inputs and made labile and stable fractions more vulnerable to decay. Trends in OPOM suggest aggregate protection influences C turnover in the low active MDsoil. Clay charge and OPOM-C contents were better predictors of soil C dynamics than clay or POM-C contents. PMID:25078458

  7. Influence of residue and nitrogen fertilizer additions on carbon mineralization in soils with different texture and cropping histories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianni Chen

    Full Text Available To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil] comparing conventional grain systems (Conv amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med and longer (Long, more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double exponential model was used to estimate the size (Ca, Cs and decay rates (ka, ks of active and slow C pools which we compared with total particulate organic matter (POM and occluded-POM (OPOM. The high-SOC IAsoil containing highly active smectite clays maintained smaller labile pools and higher decay rates than the low-SOC MDsoil containing semi-active kaolinitic clays. Net SOC loss was greater (2.6 g kg(-1; 8.6% from the IAsoil than the MDsoil (0.9 g kg(-1, 6.3%; fractions and coefficients suggest losses were principally from IAsoil's resistant pool. Cropping history did not alter SOC pool size or decay rates in IAsoil where rotation-based differences in OPOM-C were small. In MDsoil, use of diversified rotations and manure increased ka by 32% and ks by 46% compared to Conv; differences mirrored in POM- and OPOM-C contents. Residue addition prompted greater increases in Ca (340% vs 230% and Cs (38% vs 21% and decreases in ka (58% vs 9% in IAsoil than MDsoil. Reduced losses of SOC from residue-amended MDsoil were associated with increased OPOM-C. Nitrogen addition dampened CO2-C release. Clay type and C saturation dominated the IAsoil's response to external inputs and made labile and stable fractions more vulnerable to decay. Trends in OPOM suggest aggregate protection influences C turnover in the low active MDsoil. Clay charge and OPOM-C contents were better predictors of soil C dynamics than clay or POM-C contents.

  8. Long-distance correlation of Basal Chotec Event sections using magnetic susceptibility (Barrandian-vs-Nevada) and lateral and vertical variations in fine-grained non-carbonate mineral phases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koptíková, Leona; Berkyová, S.; Hladil, Jindřich; Slavík, Ladislav; Schnabl, Petr; Frána, Jaroslav; Böhmová, Vlasta

    Tashkent: State Committee of the Republic of Uzbekistan on Geology and Mineral Resources ; Institute of Petroleum Geology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2008 - (Kim, A.; Salimova, F.; Meshchankina, N.), s. 60-62 ISBN N. [Conference Global alignements of Lower Devonian carbonate and clastic sequences (SDS/IGCP Project 499 joint field meeting). Kitab State Geological Reserve (UZ), 25.08.2008-03.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB307020602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : magnetic suscetibility * correlation * Barrandian * Nevada * mineral phases Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  9. Effect of humic acid on pyrene removal from water by polycation-clay mineral composites and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radian, Adi; Mishael, Yael

    2012-06-01

    Pyrene removal by polycation-montmorillonite (MMT) composites and granulated activated carbon (GAC) in the presence of humic acid (HA) was examined. Pyrene, HA, and sorbent interactions were characterized by FTIR, fluorescence and zeta measurements, adsorption, and column filtration experiments. Pyrene binding coefficients to the macromolecules were in the order of PVPcoS (poly-4-vinylpiridine-co-styrene) > HA > PDADMAC (poly diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium-chloride), correlating to pyrene-macromolecules compatibility. Electrostatic interactions explained the high adsorption of HA to both composites (∼100%), whereas HA adsorption by GAC was low. Pyrene removal by the composites, unlike GAC, was enhanced in the presence of HA; removal by PDADMAC-MMT increased from ∼50 (k(d) = 2.2 × 10(3) kg/L) to ∼70% (k(d) = 2.4 × 10(3) kg/L) in the presence of HA. This improvement was attributed to the adsorption of pyrene-HA complexes. PVPcoS-MMT was most efficient in removing pyrene (k(d) = 1.1 × 10(4) kg/L, >95% removal) which was explained in terms of specific π donor-π acceptor interactions. Pyrene uptake by column filters of GAC reached ∼50% and decreased to ∼30% in the presence of HA. Pyrene removal by the PVPcoS-MMT filter was significantly higher (100-85% removal), exhibiting only a small decrease in the presence of HA. The utilization of HA as an enhancing agent in pollutant removal is novel and of major importance in water treatment. PMID:22545663

  10. Mineral resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M.L.C.M.; Ierland, van E.C.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Worrell, E.

    2016-01-01

    The extractable ores of the world's geologically scarcest mineral resources (e.g. antimony, molybdenum and zinc) may be exhausted within several decades to a century, if their extraction continues to increase. This paper explores the likelihood that these scarce mineral resources can be conserved

  11. Mineralization (calcification) of coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R; Wachowiak, J

    1994-01-01

    Mineralogical investigations of calcifications located in coronary vessels were performed on the material obtained from the endarterectomized arteries of 18 patients (15 M, 3 F, aged 36-65) during surgical revascularization procedures consisting in coronary artery bypass grafting. The samples were tested using scanning microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe and neutron activation spectroscopy. The results of analyses were calculated with the use of computer programmes. Two types of mineralization were determined: 1. secret mineralization identified as higher than normal content of elements in biological tissues, not demonstrating any mineral grains, and 2. apparent mineralization, appearing micro- and macroscopically as grains composed mainly of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonate groups, i.e. a mineral identical with apatite present in bones, or as calcification of other tissues (heart valves, lungs etc.). The authors suggest that the phenomenon of mineralization should be taken into consideration in the preventive treatment of coronary atheriosclerosis. PMID:7808039

  12. Mineral Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Optimal intakes of elements, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, copper, zinc and iodine, can reduce individual risk factors including those related to cardiovascular diseases among humans and animals. In order to meet the need for vitamins, major minerals, trace minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, it is necessary to include a full spectrum programme that can deliver all of the nutrients in the right ratio. Minerals are required for normal growth, activities of muscles, skeletal development (such as calcium), cellular activity, oxygen transport (copper and iron), chemical reactions in the body, intestinal absorption (magnesium), fluid balance and nerve transmission (sodium and potassium), as well as the regulation of the acid base balance (phosphorus). The chapter discusses the chemical and instrumentation techniques used for estimation of minerals such as N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, B and Mb. PMID:26939263

  13. [Mineralization of heart valves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R

    1992-01-01

    Mineralization (calcification) of heart valves (mitral, aortic and aortic bioprosthesis) have been analyzed using; histology, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning microscopy, atomic absorption and electron microprobe. Obtained results showed the presence of two type of mineralization. First type is represented by grains composed of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonates. This mineralization is seen macroscopically. Second type of mineralization is possible to determine only using chemical methods. It is represented by biological structures containing amount of Ca, P and other elements higher then normal heart valves. This second type of the mineralization conducts to the changes of physical features of the tissue. Both types of calcification develops because of the defects of atomic structure of biological components of heart valves (mainly collagen). These defects show the presence of free atomic bindings i.e. electric potential. Because of this, they are able to react with surrounding free joints, starting calcification. Defects of biological structures of heart valves are the results of infections, mechanical destruction of the valves etc. Calcification may be stopped on different stages of its development: or as secret calcification or may pass to the stage seen as apatite grains. PMID:1342999

  14. Transformation of organic carbon, trace element, and organo-mineral colloids in the mixing zone of the largest European Arctic river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Pokrovsky

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine behavior of organic carbon (OC and trace elements (TE was studied for the largest European sub-Arctic river, which is the Severnaya Dvina; this river is a deltaic estuary covered in ice during several hydrological seasons: summer (July 2010, 2012 and winter (March 2009 baseflow, and the November–December 2011 ice-free period. Colloidal forms of OC and TE were assessed using three pore size cutoff (1, 10, and 50 kDa using an in-situ dialysis procedure. Conventionally dissolved ( The most important result of this study is the elucidation of the behavior of the "truly" dissolved low molecular weight LMW fraction containing Fe, OC, and a number of insoluble elements. The concentration of the LMW fraction either remains constant or increases its relative contribution to the overall dissolved ( Overall, the observed decrease of the colloidal fraction may be related to the coagulation of organo-ferric colloids at the beginning of the mixing zone and therefore the replacement of the HMW1 kDa–0.22 μm portion by the LMW fraction. These patterns are highly reproducible across different sampling seasons, suggesting significant enrichment of the mixing zone by the most labile (and potentially bioavailable fraction of the OC, Fe and insoluble TE. The size fractionation of the colloidal material during estuarine mixing reflects a number of inorganic and biological processes, the relative contribution of which to element speciation varies depending on the hydrological stage and time of year. In particular, LMW ligand production in the surface horizons of the mixing zone may be linked to heterotrophic mineralization of allochthonous DOM and/or photodestruction. Given the relatively low concentration of particulate vs. dissolved load of most trace elements, desorption from the river suspended material was less pronounced than in other rivers in the world. As a result, the majority of dissolved components exhibited either a conservative (OC and

  15. Mineral Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Jordan’s natural resources are very limited: water is scarce, there is little arable land and the country has few sources of energy (fig. I.11). Jordan’s mineral industry has a long history: flint was used in prehistoric times and early copper mining started in Wadi Faynan during the Chalcolithic Period. The following is a brief presentation of Jordan’s resources. Mining and investments will be studied in Part 3. Figure I.11 — Jordan Mineral Resources. NRA 2012 Phosphates The Jordanian Natur...

  16. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  17. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay

  18. 矿物掺合料混凝土碳化分析的非线性多场耦合模型%Multi-field coupled model for concrete carbonation with mineral admixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余波; 成荻; 杨绿峰

    2014-01-01

    Considering the influences of the type and quantity of the mineral admixtures ,a nonlinear multi-field coupled model for car-bonation analysis of concrete with mineral admixtures was established and verified by combining the rule of diffusion of CO 2 within con-crete with the law of conservation of mass for carbonatable substances.The diffusion coefficient of CO 2,the coefficient of reaction rate be-tween CO2 and carbonatable substances,and the kind and dosage of the carbonatable substances were adopted as the governing parameters in the proposed model.According to the Fick's second law of diffusion and the balance chemical equations ,a nonlinear multi-field coupled model for carbonation analysis of concrete with mineral admixtures was established based on the mechanism of cement hydration ,second hydration of minerals and concrete carbonation first.Then,computation expressions of model parameters,such as the diffusion coefficient of CO2 within concrete,the coefficient of reaction rate between CO2 and carbonatable substances,and the amount of the carbonatable sub-stances,were developed by taking into account the influences of the temperature,relative humidity,water to binder ratio,and mineral ad-mixtures on carbonation.The proposed model was verified by comparing with experimental data and the influences of the temperature ,rel-ative humidity,water to binder ratio and mineral admixtures on carbonation depth were quantificationally investigated based on the distri-bution of CO2,carbonatable substances and the pH value within the concrete.%考虑矿物掺合料种类和掺量的影响,结合混凝土中CO2的扩散规律以及可碳化物质的质量守恒定律,以CO2扩散系数、碳化反应速率系数和混凝土中可碳化物质的量为控制参数,研究建立了矿物掺合料混凝土碳化分析的非线性多场耦合模型,并利用试验数据进行了对比验证。首先基于水泥水化、矿物掺合料二次水化以及混凝土碳化

  19. Hydrothermal minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    ridge system, sulfide minerals crystallize from the hot water directly onto the volcanic rocks surrounding the hydrothermal vent leading to the formation of hollow, chimney like sulfide structure through which the hot water continues to flow... systems, which are in turn an integral component of global mid-ocean ridge system. Hydrothermal systems are composed of convection cells in the crust and upper mantle through which seawater freely circulates reacting with magmatic material, which...

  20. Authigenic minerals: Biologically influenced and induced organomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Organominerals are minerals precipitated by interactions with organic matter without enzymatic control. Organomineralization of authigenic carbonate minerals depends on two key components: (1) the "carbonate alkalinity engine" impacting the calcium carbonate saturation index and (2) the organic matrix comprised of extracellular organic matter (EOM), which provides a template for carbonate nucleation. The alkalinity engine can be "intrinsic" when microbial metabolisms increase supersaturation or lower the kinetic barrier of precipitation, or "extrinsic" when the physicochemical environment creates the conditions for mineral formation. The organic matrix produced by various communities within the microbial mats is known to influence nucleation, morphology and mineralogy of minerals through binding of cations. By playing with these two key components, three types of authigenic minerals can be formed: (1) a purely physicochemical precipitation on an abiotic substrate, (2) a precipitation "influenced" by the presence of an organic matrix but resulting from a physicochemical forcing (environmentally driven), or (3) a "microbially-induced" precipitation, in which both supersaturation and organic matrix are resulting from microbial activity. In this keynote, we will review important processes involved in the precipitation of authigenic carbonate minerals in modern microbial mats and open the discussion on the potential use of authigenic carbonate minerals as biosignatures in the fossil record.

  1. Interactive effects of belowground organic matter input, increased precipitation and clipping on soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a temperate steppe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Ma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter (SOM inputs, increased precipitation and clipping (reducing belowground photosynthates allocation are predicted to affect soil C and N cycling in temperate grassland ecosystems. However, the interactive effects between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil C and N mineralization in temperate steppes are still poorly understood. A field manipulation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of SOM inputs, increased precipitation, clipping and their interactions on soil C and N mineralization in a temperate steppe of northeastern China from 2010 to 2011. The results showed that SOM inputs significantly increased soil C mineralization rate (CMR and net N mineralization rate (NMR. Increased precipitation-induced enhancement of soil CMR essentially ceased after the first year, stimulation of soil NMR and NNR continued into the second year. However, clipping only marginally decreased soil CMR and NMR during the two years. There were significant synergistic interactions between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil CMR and NMR, as SOM inputs (or increased precipitation showed greater effects on soil CMR and NMR under clipped plots than under unclipped plots, which could be explained by the relative shifts in soil microbial community structure because of bacterial biomass increases, and by the relative decreases in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biomass due to the reduction of belowground photosynthates allocation. These results highlight the importance of plants in mediating the responses of soil C and N mineralization to potentially increased SOM and precipitation by controlling belowground photosynthates allocation in the temperate steppe. Thus, the findings have important implications for improving prediction of C and N sequestration potential and its feedbacks to climate change in temperate steppe ecosystems.

  2. Changes in plant functional groups, litter quality, and soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization with sheep grazing in an Inner Mongolian Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, N.N.; Ojima, D.S.; Belnap, J.; Shiping, W.; Yanfen, W.; Chen, Z.

    2004-01-01

    This study reports on changes in plant functional group composition, litter quality, and soil C and N mineralization dynamics from a 9-year sheep grazing study in Inner Mongolia. Addressed are these questions: 1) How does increasing grazing intensity affect plant community composition? 2) How does increasing grazing intensity alter soil C and N mineralization dynamics? 3) Do changes in soil C and N mineralization dynamics relate to changes in plant community composition via inputs of the quality or quantity of litter? Grazing plots were set up near the Inner Mongolia Grassland Ecosystem Research Station (IMGERS) with 5 grazing intensities: 1.3, 2.7, 4.0, 5.3, and 6.7 sheep ha -1??yr-1. Plant cover was lower with increasing grazing intensity, which was primarily due to a dramatic decline in grasses, Carex duriuscula, and Artemisia frigida. Changes in litter mass and percentage organic C resulted in lower total C in the litter layer at 4.0 and 5.3 sheep ha-1??yr-1 compared with 2.7 sheep ha -1??yr-1. Total litter N was lower at 5.3 sheep ha-1??yr-1 compared with 2.7 sheep ha -1??yr-1. Litter C:N ratios, an index of litter quality, were significantly lower at 4.0 sheep ha-1??yr -1 relative to 1.3 and 5.3 sheep ha-1??yr -1. Cumulative C mineralized after 16 days decreased with increasing grazing intensity. In contrast, net N mineralization (NH4+ + NO3-) after a 12-day incubation increased with increasing grazing intensity. Changes in C and N mineralization resulted in a narrowing of CO2-C:net Nminratios with increasing grazing intensity. Grazing explained 31% of the variability in the ratio of CO 2-C:net Nmin. The ratio of CO2-C:net N min was positively correlated with litter mass. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between litter mass and A. frigida cover. Results suggest that as grazing intensity increases, microbes become more C limited resulting in decreased microbial growth and demand for N.

  3. Beneficial role of ZnO photocatalyst supported with porous activated carbon for the mineralization of alizarin cyanin green dye in aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    P. Muthirulan; M. Meenakshisundararam; Kannan, N

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation depicts the development of a simple and low cost method for the removal of color from textile dyeing and printing wastewater using ZnO as photocatalyst supported with porous activated carbon (AC). Photocatalytic degradation studies were carried out for water soluble toxic alizarin cyanin green (ACG) dye in aqueous suspension along with activated carbon (AC) as co-adsorbent. Different parameters like concentration of ACG dye, irradiation time, catalyst concentration a...

  4. Effect of freezing-thawing on the carbon and nitrogen mineralization in Changbai Mountain%冻融对长白山森林土壤碳氮矿化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾国晶; 周永斌; 代力民; 周旺明

    2012-01-01

    长白山地区秋末春初常常存在冻融过程,冻融过程影响土壤水分分布而改变土壤理化性质.通过室内模拟实验,研究了冻融过程(-20~15℃)对长白山阔叶红松(Pinus koraiensis)林和白桦(Betula platyphylla)林土壤有机碳和氮矿化过程的影响.结果表明,经过3次冻融循环,冻融处理土壤矿化速率显著高于对照处理,但经过多次冻融循环过程,冻融处理抑制土壤有机碳矿化过程,对照处理土壤有机碳矿化速率高于冻融处理(P=0.019).在培养结束后,冻融处理的阔叶红松林和白桦林土壤无机氮质量分数,分别是对照处理的1.88倍和1.96倍;冻融次数也是影响土壤有机氮矿化的一个重要因素,35次冻融循环后,阔叶红松林和白桦林土壤中无机氮分别提高了2.10倍和2.81倍.冻融循环促进了土壤有机氮的矿化,有利于土壤中有效氮的累积,为春季植物生长提供足够的氮素,但也潜在增加了土壤中无机氮流失的风险.%There are many freezing-thawing cycles (FTC) during the late autumn and early spring in ChangbaiMoutain. Freezing-thawing cycles affected the availability of soil water significantly, which would influence the soil physical, chemical and biological characteristics. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of freezing-thawing cycles (-20-15℃)on the carbon and nitrogen mineralization of Broadleaved-Korean pine mixed forests (HS) and Birch forest (BH) soils. The results showed that the carbon mineralization rate of freezing-thawing treatment was higher than control treatment after the third freezing-thawing cycles. But, with the numbers of freezing-thawing increasing, the freezing-thawing restrained the carbon mineralization, and the carbon mineralization rate of control treatment was higher than freezing-thawing (/MI.0I9). The inorganic nitrogen concentration in soil of HS and BH were 1.88 and 1.96 times as that of the control treatment

  5. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  6. Insulating and sheathing materials of electric and optical cables: common test methods part 4-1: methods specific to polyethylene and polypropylene compounds – resistance to environmental stress cracking – measurement of the melt flow index – carbon black and/or mineral filler content measurement in polyethylene by direct combustion – measurement of carbon black content by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) – assessment of carbon black dispersion in polyethylene using a microscope

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Specifies the test methods to be used for testing polymeric insulating and sheathing materials of electric cables for power distribution and telecommunications including cables used on ships. Gives the methods for measurements of the resistance to environmental stress cracking, for wrapping test after thermal ageing in air, for measurement of melt flow index and for measurement of carbon black and/or mineral filler content, which apply to PE and PP coumpounds, including cellular compounds and foam skin for insulation.

  7. Study of the reactivity of pure minerals in presence of CO2 at the supercritical state. Measurement of the portlandite carbonation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency on the long term of CO2 geological storage will rely on trapping mechanisms and good sealing properties of the cap rock and the eventual access wells. A series of experiments has been devised to observe and quantify the reactivity of portlandite with supercritical CO2. The portlandite has been chosen as a key component of calcium-rich cement for its interest in borehole cement degradation. Initial carbonation rates have been measured under different conditions: pressure 160 bar, temperatures 80, 120, and 200 C and with various amount of water. SEM observations show that the reacting fluid state (absence or presence of liquid phase) controls strongly the carbonation behaviour and the reaction path. A specific geochemical model has been developed in order to account for the particular conditions of our experiments. These results (portlandite carbonation rate and water-poor geochemical system modelling techniques) should be useful to simulate well-bore cement degradation. (author)

  8. Experimental Studies on the Interaction of scCO2 and scCO2-SO2 With Rock Forming Minerals at Conditions of Geologic Carbon Storages - First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzinger, J.; Wilke, F.; Wiersberg, T.; Vasquez Parra, M.

    2010-12-01

    Co-injection of SO2 (plus possibly NOx and O2) during CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers may cause stronger brine acidification than CO2 alone. Because of that, we investigate chemical corrosion of rocks and rock-forming minerals with impure supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at possible storage conditions of >73.7 bar and >31°C. Contaminates were chosen with respect to the composition of CO2 captured industrially from coal-fired power plants using the oxyfuel technology. The resulting data should build a base for the long-term prediction of the behavior of CO2 in geologic storage reservoirs. Experiments of up to 1000 hrs duration have been performed with 10 natural mineral concentrates (calcite, dolomite, siderite, anhydrite, hematite, albite, microcline, kaolinite, muscovite, biotite) in 3n NaCl solution and pure scCO2 or scCO2+SO2 (99.5+0.5 vol%). The NaCl reaction fluid resembles the average salinity of deep formation waters of the North German Basin and is not free of oxygen. To increase reaction rates all minerals were ground and the reagents agitated either by stirring or shaking in autoclaves of about one liter in volume. The autoclaves consist of Hastelloy™ or ferromagnetic stainless steel fully coated with PTFE. We used in average 15 g of solids, 700 ml liquid, and the vessels were pressurized up to 100 bars with CO2 or CO2-SO2 mixture. Experiments were run at temperatures up to 90°C. Before, during and after the experiments small amounts fluids were sampled and analyzed for dissolved constituents and pH. Solid phases were characterized by XRF, XRD, and EMPA before and after the experiments. Pure scCO2 corrodes all carbonates, reacts only slightly with anhydrite, albite, and microcline at a minimum pH of 4, and does not recognizably interact with the others. After the experiment, albite has gained in a, not yet fully identified, carbonate phase which might be dawsonite. Reaction fluids of the experiments with scCO2+SO2 have mostly lower pH than using scCO2

  9. Estoques totais de carbono orgânico e seus compartimentos em argissolo sob floresta e sob milho cultivado com adubação mineral e orgânica Total stocks of organic carbon and its pools in acrisols under forest and under maize cultivated with mineral and organic fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. C. Leite

    2003-10-01

    were: a to evaluate the effect of maize production systems under organic and mineral fertilization on total organic carbon (TOC and total nitrogen (TN stocks and on organic carbon pools (C in an Acrisol; and b to estimate the contribution of these systems in the atmospheric CO2 sequestration or emission. The production systems included two levels of organic compost: level 0 (control and level 1 (40 m³ ha-1; and three levels of mineral fertilizer (0, 1 and 2, which correspond to 0,250 (AM1, and 500 kg ha-1 (AM2 of the 4-14-8 formula. Organic and mineral fertilizer were combined and applied during 16 years. As a reference of the steady state, soil samples were collected from an adjacent area of the same soil type, under secondary Atlantic Forest (AF. Where organic compost was added, the production systems presented higher organic C and N soil storage, light fraction carbon (C LF and labile carbon (C L than production systems without fertilization or with mineral fertilizer only. This confirms the importance of organic fertilizer utilization as a management strategy to improve soil quality. However, the soil under AF showed higher values of organic C and N storage and carbon pools than soils under production systems. Due to their higher sensitivity, the stocks of the C LF and C L were more severely decreased than the TOC stocks and thus, may be used as indicators of the anthropogenic impact or the influence of management alterations on the soil organic matter.

  10. Laboratory study of the impact of model soil organic carbon content and mineral matter on TCE sorption behaviors%模拟土样有机碳和矿物质对TCE吸附贡献的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩璐; 何江涛; 张晶; 张坤峰

    2011-01-01

    was reduced with the increasing amount of the organic matters. The sorption contribution rate of minerals was less than 5% when the organic carbon content was more than 0. 82%, and even could be neglected when the organic carbon content was higher than 1 %. Also the original concentration of the TCE could affect the capacity of the sorption and the sorption contribution of the organic carbon and minerals insome way. The Freundlich sorption model was used to simulate the TCE isotherm sorption patterns in two segments, with Ce = 500 ng/L as the boundary. The fitting exponential of Freundlich (n) decreased with the increasing TCE concentration. Besides, the contribution rate of the organic carbon increased while that of the minerals went down with the increasingly higher TCE concentration. When the TCE concentration varied from 50 to 500 μg/L and f∝ was 0.16%, the sorption contribution rate of minerals fluctuated in the range of 28% ~ 16% and decreased to 3% - 1 % at f∝ equal to 1 %, whereas the TCE concentration almost had nothing to do with their contributions.

  11. Proton induced luminescence of minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo del Castillo, H.; Millan, A.; Calderon, T. [Depto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ctra. Colmenar, km. 15, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Beneitez, P. [Departamento Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ruvalcaba S, J.L. [lFUNAM, Circuito de la lnvestigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of Ionoluminescence (IL) for several minerals commonly found in jewellery pieces and/or artefacts of historical interest. Samples including silicates and non-silicates (native elements, halide, oxide, carbonate and phosphate groups) have been excited with a 1.8 MeV proton beam, and IL spectra in the range of 200- 900 nm have been collected for each one using a fiber optic coupled spectrometer. Light emissions have been related to Cr{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Pr{sup 3+} ions, as well as intrinsic defects in these minerals. Results show the potential of IL for impurity characterization with high detection limits, local symmetry studies, and the study of the origin of minerals. (Author)

  12. Beneficial role of ZnO photocatalyst supported with porous activated carbon for the mineralization of alizarin cyanin green dye in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Muthirulan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation depicts the development of a simple and low cost method for the removal of color from textile dyeing and printing wastewater using ZnO as photocatalyst supported with porous activated carbon (AC. Photocatalytic degradation studies were carried out for water soluble toxic alizarin cyanin green (ACG dye in aqueous suspension along with activated carbon (AC as co-adsorbent. Different parameters like concentration of ACG dye, irradiation time, catalyst concentration and pH have also been studied. The pseudo first order kinetic equation was found to be applicable in the present dye-catalyst systems. It was observed that photocatalytic degradation by ZnO along with AC was a more effective and faster mode of removing ACG from aqueous solutions than the ZnO alone.

  13. Laboratory of minerals purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratory of minerals purification was organized in 1962 where with application of modern physical and chemical methods were investigated the mechanism of flotation reagents interaction with minerals' surface, was elaborated technologies on rising complexity of using of republic's minerals

  14. Hydrolysis of cellobiose by β-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger in the presence of soil solid phases: minerals, biochar, and activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Lammirato, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of different soil solid phases on the extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose to glucose. Montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite and wood char did not adsorb cellobiose whereas they adsorbed 10, 70, 70, 99 % respectively of β-glucosidase from Aspergillus niger. The hydrolysis rate decreased with increasing enzyme adsorption; wood char, for instance, reduced it by 30 %. Activated carbon adsorbed almost 100 % of both cellobiose and β-glucosidase and in...

  15. Calcium phosphate mineralization is widely applied in crustacean mandibles

    OpenAIRE

    Shmuel Bentov; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Jenny Tynyakov; Lilah Glazer; Amir Sagi

    2016-01-01

    Crustaceans, like most mineralized invertebrates, adopted calcium carbonate mineralization for bulk skeleton reinforcement. Here, we show that a major part of the crustacean class Malacostraca (which includes lobsters, crayfishes, prawns and shrimps) shifted toward the formation of calcium phosphate as the main mineral at specified locations of the mandibular teeth. In these structures, calcium phosphate is not merely co-precipitated with the bulk calcium carbonate but rather creates speciali...

  16. Mineral Spectroscopy Server

    OpenAIRE

    Rossman, George R.

    2010-01-01

    This server provides information about mineralogy and is primarily dedicated to providing information about color in minerals and access to data on Mineral Absorption Spectra in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum and Raman spectra of minerals. Most data on the server were obtained in the Caltech mineral spectroscopy labs. Other types of spectroscopic data on minerals are also available. Visible, near-infrared and infrared absorption spectra are available for a number of minerals...

  17. Trade in mineral resources

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of current thinking on the economics of international trade in mineral resources. I first define what is meant by trade in mineral resources. I then discuss patterns of trade in mineral resources. The paper then moves on to the five topics requested by the World Trade Organization: theoretical and empirical literature on international trade in minerals; trade impacts of mineral abundance and the resource curse; the political economy of mineral trade in resource-ab...

  18. Mineralização de carbono e de nitrogênio provenientes de composto de lixo urbano em argissolo Carbon and nitrogen mineralization in an ultisol fertilized with urban waste compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Mantovani

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Estudos da mineralização do C e do N em solos que receberam aplicação de composto de lixo urbano são importantes para avaliar o comportamento desse resíduo no solo e dar subsídios para definir as doses adequadas às culturas, com vistas em atender à necessidade de N das plantas. Foram realizados dois experimentos em condições de laboratório com o objetivo de avaliar a mineralização de C e de N em um Argissolo textura média adubado com composto de lixo urbano. No primeiro experimento, utilizou-se delineamento inteiramente ao acaso, com cinco tratamentos e três repetições, com os tratamentos constituídos de cinco doses de composto de lixo urbano, equivalentes a 0, 30, 60, 90 e 120 t ha-1. No segundo experimento, empregou-se esquema fatorial, com delineamento inteiramente ao acaso e três repetições, combinando as mesmas cinco doses de composto de lixo urbano utilizadas no primeiro experimento e 11 tempos de incubação (0, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70, 84, 98, 112 e 126 dias. Os maiores aumentos de N-NO3- no solo foram obtidos até os 42 dias de incubação, independentemente da dose de composto de lixo aplicada, percebendo-se, a partir dos 70 dias, tendência de estabilização. A fração de mineralização de C-orgânico em C-CO2 menor do que 2 % em 168 dias indica que o composto de lixo urbano é material que contribui para aumentar os estoques de matéria orgânica do solo. Na ausência de adubação nitrogenada complementar, a fração de mineralização de N-orgânico de 12 % em 126 dias evidencia que o composto de lixo urbano apresenta potencial fertilizante de liberação lenta de N para as plantas.Studies about nitrogen and carbon mineralization in soils amended with urban waste compost are important to evaluate the reactions of this waste in soil and to define the best rates for crops. Two experiments were carried out under laboratory conditions to evaluate carbon and nitrogen mineralization in an Ultisol fertilized with

  19. Preliminary Nanosims Analysis of Carbon Isotope of Carbonates in Calcium-Aluminum-Rich Inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Paque, J. M.; Burnett, D. S.; Eiler, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Carbonate minerals observed in primitive meteorites are products of either terrestrial weathering or aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Most of the carbonate minerals in carbonaceous chondrites occur primarily as isolated grains in matrix, as crosscutting veins, or as replacement minerals in chondrules [e.g., 1, 2]. A few calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) have been reported containing carbonate minerals as well [2, 3]. The C and O isotopes of carbonates in c...

  20. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  1. 桂东南志留纪热水沉积成矿的碳氧同位素证据%Carbon and oxygen isotopic evidences of hydrothermal sedimentary mineralization in Silurian period in southeastern Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨斌; 刘建明; 杨雁童; 陈燕; 阚靖

    2016-01-01

    志留系地层是桂东南博白―岑溪地区铅锌矿床的主要赋矿层位,产出佛子冲和东桃等层状铅锌矿床,其直接赋矿围岩均为下志留统碎屑岩地层中的层状绿色岩和碳酸盐岩夹层。碳、氧同位素测试结果显示,赋矿层位中碳酸盐岩夹层的δ18 O 值显著低于正常海相灰岩,在δ18 O-δ13 C 图解上碳酸盐岩夹层和矿石中方解石样品投点均集中分布在基性-超基性岩浆岩和花岗岩区及附近。该碳酸盐岩夹层的形成与海底热水沉积作用有关,类似于现代海底烟囱中的低温喷口产物。桂东南志留纪热水沉积成矿作用可以概括为电解成矿机制。%Silurian stratum is the main ore-bearing horizon of Pb-Zn deposits in Bobai-Cenxi area of southeastern Guangxi,where occurs the stratified Pb-Zn deposits in Fozichong and Dongtao.Their directly ore-bearing wall rocks are stratified green rocks and carbonate rock interlayers in clastic rock strata of lower Silurian series. The results of carbon and oxygen isotope detection show that theδ1 8 O value of the carbonate rock interlayers inside the ore-bearing horizon is lower than that of normal marine limestone.The plotted points of calcite sampling in the carbonate rock interlayer and ores on theδ1 8 O-δ1 3 C diagram are intensively distributed along the basic-ultrabasic magmatite,granite and their peripheral area.The formation of the carbonate rock inter-layer is closely related to submarine hydrothermal sedimentation,which is similar to the products of low-temperature vents in modern submarine chimneys.The Silurian hydrothermal-sedimentary mineralization in southeastern Guangxi can be summarized as a kind of electrolytic bath metallogenic mechanism.

  2. Influence of the diversion of Bear River into Bear Lake (Utah and Idaho) on the environment of deposition of carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, W.E.; Forester, R.M.; Bright, Jordon; Anderson, R.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Bear River, the largest river in the Great Basin, had some of its flow diverted into Bear Lake through a series of canals constructed between 1911 and 1918, turning Bear Lake into a reservoir. The prediversion lake had an unusually high Mg2+ : Ca2+ ratio (38 by weight), which resulted in precipitation of CaCO3 as aragonite. The amount and mineralogy of the carbonate did not change immediately after the diversion, but during the middle of the 20th century, high-Mg calcite began to precipitate. In contrast, at the time of diversion there were very distinct changes in the isotopic composition of the carbonate that clearly define the time of diversion within the sediments. Sediment-trap studies show that the CaCO3 polymorph that precipitates in the epilimnion of the lake today is high-Mg calcite. Samples in sediment traps placed 2 m above the bottom of the lake in 45 m of water (bottom traps) contain predominantly aragonite and quartz, with lesser amounts of high-Mg and low-Mg calcite and dolomite. Isotopic evidence from the sediments shows that the aragonite that accumulated in the bottom sediment traps and that constitutes the bulk of postdiversion sediments is reworked and redistributed from shallow sites to deep sites. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  3. Mineralization by nanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and in commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. Previous models for stone formation have lead to a hypothesis that an elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity are important lithogenic factors. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4 at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Due to their specific macromolecules, nanobacteria can produce apatite very efficiency in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and rapidly mineralizing most of available calcium and phosphate. This can be also monitored by (superscript 85)Sr incorporation and provides a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. Recently, bacteria have been implicated in the formation of carbonate (hydroxy)fluorapatite in marine sediments. Apatite grains are found so commonly in sedimentary rocks that apatite is omitted in naming the stone. To prove that apatite and other minerals are formed by bacteria would implicate that the bacteria could be observed and their actions followed in stones. We have started to approach this in two ways. Firstly, by the use of sensitive methods for detecting specific bacterial components, like antigens, muramic acid and nucleic acids, that allow for detecting the presence of bacteria and, secondly, by follow-up of volatile bacterial metabolites observed by continuous monitoring with ion mobility spectrometry, IMCELL, working like an artificial, educatable smelling nose. The latter method might allow for remote real time detection of bacterial metabolism, a signature of life, in rocks via fractures of drillholes with or without

  4. Clay Minerals and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrahman Dalgıç; Orhan Kavak

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine clay minerals, which take very importantplace in relationships of minerals and human health. They have high areadensity, adsorption capacity, rheological properties, chemical inertia and verylow or nontoxic effects to human health. So, they are widely used in medicaltreatments. Commercially used clay minerals are; smectit, polygrstite, caoliniteand talc. The other clay minerals are under investigations for medicaltreatments.

  5. Mineralogy and geochemistry of phosphate minerals and brannerite from the Proterozoic Carbon Leader Reef gold and uranium placer deposit, Witwatersrand, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttrium-phosphate, the most common phosphate phase, is closely associated with detrital uraninite. It is assumed having formed by the reaction of mobile phosphate with Y and HREE liberated from the lattice of detrital uraninite, during diagenesis and/or metamorphism of the sediments. Authigenic brannerite (UTi2-3O6-8) is well-defined microscopically and geochemically. Textural relationships indicate that both titanium migrated to uraninite, forming brannerite, and mobile uranium caused the 'branneritization' of rutile/leucoxene. Microprobe analyses demonstrate that brannerite from the Carbon Leader Reef displays a distinct and small variation of UO2/TiO2 ratios, which lie close to the theoretical value of 1.117 for UTi3O8, in contrast to uraniferous leucoxene/brannerite from other Witwatersrand-type deposits, the latter showing a wide scatter of UO2/TiO2 ratios. (orig./HP)

  6. How will organic carbon stocks in mineral soils evolve under future climate? Global projections using RothC for a range of climate change scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gottschalk

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We use a soil carbon (C model (RothC, driven by a range of climate models for a range of climate scenarios to examine the impacts of future climate on global soil organic carbon (SOC stocks. The results suggest an overall global increase in SOC stocks by 2100 under all scenarios, but with a different extent of increase among the climate model and emissions scenarios. The impacts of projected land use changes are also simulated, but have relatively minor impacts at the global scale. Whether soils gain or lose SOC depends upon the balance between C inputs and decomposition. Changes in net primary production (NPP change C inputs to the soil, whilst decomposition usually increases under warmer temperatures, but can also be slowed by decreased soil moisture. Underlying the global trend of increasing SOC under future climate is a complex pattern of regional SOC change. SOC losses are projected to occur in northern latitudes where higher SOC decomposition rates due to higher temperatures are not balanced by increased NPP, whereas in tropical regions, NPP increases override losses due to higher SOC decomposition. The spatial heterogeneity in the response of SOC to changing climate shows how delicately balanced the competing gain and loss processes are, with subtle changes in temperature, moisture, soil type and land use, interacting to determine whether SOC increases or decreases in the future. Our results suggest that we should stop looking for a single answer regarding whether SOC stocks will increase or decrease under future climate, since there is no single answer. Instead, we should focus on improving our prediction of the factors that determine the size and direction of change, and the land management practices that can be implemented to protect and enhance SOC stocks.

  7. How will organic carbon stocks in mineral soils evolve under future climate? Global projections using RothC for a range of climate change scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gottschalk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a soil carbon (C model (RothC, driven by a range of climate models for a range of climate scenarios to examine the impacts of future climate on global soil organic carbon (SOC stocks. The results suggest an overall global increase in global SOC stocks by 2100 under all scenarios, but with a different extent of increase among the climate model and emissions scenarios. Projected land use changes are also simulated, but have relatively small impacts at the global scale. Whether soils gain or lose SOC depends upon the balance between C inputs and decomposition. Changes in net primary production (NPP change C inputs to the soil, whilst decomposition usually increases under warmer temperatures, but can also be slowed by decreased soil moisture. Underlying the global trend of increasing SOC under future climate is a complex pattern of regional SOC change. SOC losses are projected to occur in northern latitudes where higher SOC decomposition rates due to higher temperatures are not balanced by increased NPP, whereas in tropical regions, NPP increases override losses due to higher SOC decomposition. The spatial heterogeneity in the response of SOC to changing climate shows how delicately balanced the competing gain and loss processes are, with subtle changes in temperature, moisture, soil type and land use, interacting to determine whether SOC increases or decreases in the future. Our results suggest that we should stop asking the general question of whether SOC stocks will increase or decrease under future climate since there is no single answer. Instead, we should focus on improving our prediction of the factors that determine the size and direction of change, and the land management practices that can be implemented to protect and enhance SOC stocks.

  8. Soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization under different tillage systems and Permanent Groundcover cultivation between Orange trees Mineralização do carbono e nitrogênio sob diferentes preparos de solo e coberturas permanentes intercalares em pomar de laranjeira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the alterations in carbon and nitrogen mineralization due to different soil tillage systems and groundcover species for intercropped orange trees. The experiment was established in an Ultisol soil (Typic Paleudults originated from Caiuá sandstone in northwestern of the state of Paraná, Brazil, in an area previously cultivated with pasture (Brachiaria humidicola. Two soil tillage systems were evaluated: conventional tillage (CT in the entire area and strip tillage (ST with a 2-m width, each with different groundcover vegetation management systems. The citrus cultivar utilized was the 'Pera' orange (Citrus sinensis grafted onto a 'Rangpur' lime rootstock. The soil samples were collected at a 0-15-cm depth after five years of experiment development. Samples were collected from under the tree canopy and from the inter-row space after the following treatments: (1 CT and annual cover crop with the leguminous Calopogonium mucunoides; (2 CT and perennial cover crop with the leguminous peanut Arachis pintoi; (3 CT and evergreen cover crop with Bahiagrass Paspalum notatum; (4 CT and cover crop with spontaneous B. humidicola grass vegetation; and (5 ST and maintenance of the remaining grass (pasture of B. humidicola. The soil tillage systems and different groundcover vegetation influenced the C and N mineralization, both under the tree canopy and in the inter-row space. The cultivation of B. humidicola under strip tillage provided higher potential mineralization than the other treatments in the inter-row space. Strip tillage increased the C and N mineralization compared to conventional tillage. The grass cultivation increased the C and N mineralization when compared to the others treatments cultivated in the inter-row space.No presente trabalho, foi avaliada a mineralização do Carbono e Nitrogênio devido ao cultivo intercalar de diferentes coberturas permanentes em pomar de laranjeira. O experimento foi

  9. Acumulação de nitrogênio e carbono no solo pela adubação orgânica e mineral contínua na cultura do milho Nitrogen and carbon accumulation in soil through continuous organic and mineral fertilization of maize crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celsemy E. Maia

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, avaliou-se o efeito do uso contínuo das adubações orgânica e mineral na cultura do milho e sobre a acumulação e a disponibilidade do nitrogênio em um Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo. Estudou-se a produção de milho em função das doses de 0 e 40 m³ ha-1 ano-1 de composto orgânico (palhada de soja e feijão com esterco bovino, combinadas com 0, 250 e 500 kg ha-1 ano-1 da fórmula 4-14-8 aplicados no plantio, e 0, 100 e 200 kg ha-1 ano-1 de sulfato de amônio em cobertura. O uso contínuo da adubação orgânica aumentou a produtividade de milho com o efeito da adubação química sendo menos expressivo. Observou-se, ainda, aumento do C total. Com base nos resultados observados, pôde-se concluir que o uso contínuo da adubação orgânica proporcionou aumento na reserva (N total e na disponibilidade de N, sendo essas características pouco influenciadas pela adubação química.This study aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous use of the organic and mineral fertilization in maize crop and on the accumulation and availability of nitrogen in a Cambic Yellow Red Podzol. The maize yield was evaluated as a function of doses from 0 to 40 m³ ha-1 year-1 of the organic compost (beans and soybean straw with manure combined with 0, 250 and 500 kg ha-1 year-1 of the formula 4-14-8 applied at the planting time, and the application of 0, 100 and 200 kg ha-1 year-1 of ammonium sulphate. The plots consisted of eight furrows (8 m length 1.0 m apart from each other in a randomized experimental block design with four replications. The results showed that the continuous use of the organic fertilization increased maize productivity, whereas the chemical fertilization showed less expressive effects. Increases in both the total carbon and KMnO4- oxidized carbon were observed. The results also show that the continuous use of the organic fertilization provided an increase in total N reserve and availability of N, while the chemical

  10. Carbon capture using wastes: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Gunning, Peter; Hills, Colin; Araizi, Paris; Maries , Alan; Wray, David

    2014-01-01

    Potential key strategies for the management of anthropogenic CO2 emissions include mineral carbonation and storage in oil wells and in the oceans. In Europe, a large-scale demonstration of carbon capture and storage (CCS) has recently been given the go-ahead, and the application of mineral carbonation technology (MCT) to serpentine and olive-type minerals. Although less controversial in its approach, MCT involves intensive pre-treatment of the mineral feedstock, and a consequent high sequestr...

  11. The Bio-accessibility of Synthetic Fe-Organo Complexes in Subsurface Soil with Elevated Temperature: a Proxy for the Vulnerability of Mineral Associated Carbon to Warming Rachel C. Porras, Peter S. Nico, and Margaret Torn Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, R. C.; Hicks Pries, C.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, subsurface soils (>30 cm) represent an important reservoir of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the vulnerability of this deep SOC and, in particular mineral-associated SOC, to warming, and its potential to amplify the effects of climate change is highly uncertain. To gain insight into the bio-accessibility and temperature sensitivity of mineral-associated organic C, we conducted a series of incubations using soils collected from three depths (0-10, 50-60, and 80-90 cm) under coniferous forest. The soils are moderately acidic (mean pH=6.5) sandy, mixed, mesic Ultic Haploxeralfs. To understand how mechanisms controlling SOC bio-accessibilty or temperature sensitivity differ with depth and with the properties of Fe-organo complexes (i.e.,degree of crystallinity, amount of reactive surface area, or surface saturation), we used a 13C labeled glucose substrate to prepare synthetic Fe-organo complexes spanning a range of crystallinity and mineral surface saturation. The synthetic Fe-organo complexes were then added to soil from three depths. The soils containing the 13C labeled Fe-organo adduct were incubated at two temperatures (ambient and +4°C) and respired 13CO2 was measured and used to estimate flux rates. Differences in measured 13CO2 fluxes as a function of depth, surface loading, and mineral properties are discussed in terms of their implications for the temperature sensitivity of mineral protected organic carbon in subsurface soils.

  12. Biohydrometallurgy for nonsulfidic minerals - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, N.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology of Delhi, New Delhi (India). Center for Energy Studies

    2004-05-01

    Bioleaching is a technology applicable to metal extraction from low-grade ores, ore beneficiation, coal beneficiation, metal detoxification, and recovery of metals from waste materials. The technology is environmentally sound and it may lower operational cost and energy requirement. Whereas leaching of sulfidic minerals using chemolithoautotrophic bacteria is the most studied and commercially exploitable aspect of mineral biotechnology today, there is a dearth of literature on the dissolution of nonsulfidic minerals. Biohydrometallurgy of nonsulfidic minerals involves the action of heterotrophic microorganisms. Heterotrophic bacteria and fungi have the potential for producing acidic metabolites that are able to solubilize oxide, silicate, carbonate and hydroxide minerals by reduction, acidolysis and complexation mechanisms. It is an important aspect of biohydrometallugy that requires development to meet future needs.

  13. Biochar from swine manure solids: influence on carbon sequestration and Olsen phosphorus and mineral nitrogen dynamics in soil with and without digestate incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Marchetti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in biochar (BC has grown dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the fact that its incorporation into soil reportedly enhances carbon sequestration and fertility. Currently, BC types most under investigation are those obtained from organic matter (OM of plant origin. As great amounts of manure solids are expected to become available in the near future, thanks to the development of technologies for the separation of the solid fraction of animal effluents, processing of manure solids for BC production seems an interesting possibility for the recycling of OM of high nutrient value. The aim of this study was to investigate carbon (C sequestration and nutrient dynamics in soil amended with BC from dried swine manure solids. The experiment was carried out in laboratory microcosms on a silty clay soil. The effect on nutrient dynamics of interaction between BC and fresh digestate obtained from a biogas plant was also investigated to test the hypothesis that BC can retain nutrients. A comparison was made of the following treatments: soil amended with swine manure solids (LC, soil amended with charred swine manure solids (LT, soil amended with wood chip (CC, soil amended with charred wood chip (CT, soil with no amendment as control (Cs, each one of them with and without incorporation of digestate (D for a total of 10 treatments. Biochar was obtained by treating OM (wood chip or swine manure with moisture content of less than 10% at 420°C in anoxic conditions. The CO2-C release and organic C, available phosphorus (P (Olsen P, POls and inorganic (ammonium+nitrate nitrogen (N (Nmin contents at the start and three months after the start of the experiment were measured in the amended and control soils. After three months of incubation at 30°C, the CO2-C emissions from soil with BC (CT and LT, ±D were the same as those in the control soil (Cs and were lower than those in the soils with untreated amendments (CC and LC, ±D. The organic C content

  14. Mineral distributions at the developing tendon enthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G Schwartz

    Full Text Available Tendon attaches to bone across a functionally graded interface, "the enthesis". A gradient of mineral content is believed to play an important role for dissipation of stress concentrations at mature fibrocartilaginous interfaces. Surgical repair of injured tendon to bone often fails, suggesting that the enthesis does not regenerate in a healing setting. Understanding the development and the micro/nano-meter structure of this unique interface may provide novel insights for the improvement of repair strategies. This study monitored the development of transitional tissue at the murine supraspinatus tendon enthesis, which begins postnatally and is completed by postnatal day 28. The micrometer-scale distribution of mineral across the developing enthesis was studied by X-ray micro-computed tomography and Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Analyzed regions were identified and further studied by histomorphometry. The nanometer-scale distribution of mineral and collagen fibrils at the developing interface was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. A zone (∼20 µm exhibiting a gradient in mineral relative to collagen was detected at the leading edge of the hard-soft tissue interface as early as postnatal day 7. Nanocharacterization by TEM suggested that this mineral gradient arose from intrinsic surface roughness on the scale of tens of nanometers at the mineralized front. Microcomputed tomography measurements indicated increases in bone mineral density with time. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the mineral-to-collagen ratio on the mineralized side of the interface was constant throughout postnatal development. An increase in the carbonate concentration of the apatite mineral phase over time suggested possible matrix remodeling during postnatal development. Comparison of Raman-based observations of localized mineral content with histomorphological features indicated that development of the graded mineralized interface is linked

  15. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  16. Accelerated glacier melt on Snow Dome, Mount Olympus, Washington, USA, due to deposition of black carbon and mineral dust from wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspari, Susan; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Delaney, Ian; Dixon, Daniel; Painter, Thomas H.

    2015-04-01

    Assessing the potential for black carbon (BC) and dust deposition to reduce albedo and accelerate glacier melt is of interest in Washington because snow and glacier melt are an important source of water resources, and glaciers are retreating. In August 2012 on Snow Dome, Mount Olympus, Washington, we measured snow surface spectral albedo and collected surface snow samples and a 7 m ice core. The snow and ice samples were analyzed for iron (Fe, used as a dust proxy) via inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry, total impurity content gravimetrically, BC using a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), and charcoal through microscopy. In the 2012 summer surface snow, BC (54 ± 50 µg/L), Fe (367±236 µg/L) and gravimetric impurity (35 ± 18 mg/L) concentrations were spatially variable, and measured broadband albedo varied between 0.67-0.74. BC and dust concentrations in the ice core 2011 summer horizon were a magnitude higher (BC = 3120 µg/L, Fe = 22000 µg/L, and gravimetric impurity = 1870 mg/L), corresponding to a modeled broadband albedo of 0.45 based on the measured BC and gravimetric impurity concentrations. The Big Hump forest fire is the likely source for the higher concentrations. Modeling constrained by measurements indicates that the all-sky 12 h daily mean radiative forcings in summer 2012 and 2011 range between 37-53 W m-2 and 112-149 W m-2, respectively, with the greater forcings in 2011 corresponding to a 29-38 mm/d enhancement in snowmelt. The timing of the forest fire impurity deposition is coincident with an increase in observed discharge in the Hoh River, highlighting the potential for BC and dust deposition on glaciers from forest fires to accelerate melt.

  17. 三江平原草甸湿地土壤有机碳矿化对C/N的响应%Effects of Amendment C/N Ratio on Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization of Meadow Marshes in Sanjiang Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦晶鑫; 刘景双; 王洋; 赵光影

    2009-01-01

    An incubation expericment with typical Deyeuxia angustifolia meadow soil and artificial forest soil in the Sanjiang plain was conducted under different soil C/N ( I : 9-10, II : 11-12, III: 13-16, IV : 16-22) to examine the responses of soil organic carbon ( SOC ) mineralization to C/N changes. The result showed that during the period of 36d incubation, the SOC accumulative losses of two kinds of soils under high C/N treatment were a-bout 2.78 and 2.68 times as much as that under low C/N, respectively. SOC mineralization rates for both the two kinds of soils were higher in the first 4 days of incubation, and became stable as the time prolonged. The dynamics of SOC mineralization of two kinds of soil preferably followed the first-order kinetics, and the C_0 and C_0/ SOC values increased exponentially with the increasing of C/N. The regression analysis also found that there were significant linear or conic relationships between the accumulative loss and mineralization rate of SOC and C/ N, which explained that C/N was the key factor in affecting the sequestration of SOC in wetland.%模拟研究了三江平原典型草甸小叶章湿地及人工林地土壤有机碳(SOC)矿化在4种C/N(Ⅰ:9-10,Ⅱ:11-12,Ⅲ:13-16,Ⅳ:16-22)处理下的变化特征,分析了SOC矿化对C/N的响应.结果表明:在36天的培养期内,高C/N处理下两种土壤的SOC累积矿化量分别是低C/N时的2.78和2.68倍,两种土壤SOC矿化量对C/N变化的响应不存在显著差异;不同C/N处理下,两种土壤SOC的矿化速率均在前期(0~4天)较高,随着培养时间的延长逐渐降低,并趋于稳定;一级动力学方程能较好的描述两种土壤的SOC矿化动态,其C_0和C_0/SOC值均随C/N的增加而增加;回归分析表明,试验C/N(9-22)范围内湿草甸土和林地土的SOC累积矿化量及矿化速率分别与C/N呈显著的线性和二次曲线关系,C/N是影响湿地土壤有机碳富集程度的关键因素.

  18. Construction Minerals Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes construction minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  19. Mineral Resources Data System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Mineral resource occurrence data covering the world, most thoroughly within the U.S. This database contains the records previously provided in the Mineral Resource...

  20. Chelated minerals for poultry

    OpenAIRE

    SL Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Organic minerals have been subject of an increasing number of investigations recently. These compounds can be considered the most significant event regarding commercial forms of minerals targeting animal supplementation in the last decades. Minerals, especially metals, are usually supplemented in poultry feeds using cheap saline sources and have never required a lot of attention in terms of quality. On the other hand, definitions of organic minerals are very broad and frequently lead to confu...

  1. Mineral Supply Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Faced with shortcomings in its mineral supply, it’s imperative for China to balance its desire for reserves with its current economic needs Mineral resources are the corner- stone of materials needed for China’s national economic and social development.The country even counts on its mineral resources to satisfy 90 percent of its energy demands and over 95

  2. Quantifying carbon fixation in trace minerals from processed kimberlite: A comparative study of quantitative methods using X-ray powder diffraction data with applications to the Diavik Diamond Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Siobhan A., E-mail: swilson@eos.ubc.ca [Mineral Deposit Research Unit, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, 6339 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Raudsepp, Mati; Dipple, Gregory M. [Mineral Deposit Research Unit, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, 6339 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    The capacity of mine waste to trap CO{sub 2} is, in some cases, much larger than the greenhouse gas production of a mining operation. In mine tailings, the presence of secondary carbonate minerals that trap CO{sub 2} can therefore represent substantial fixation of this greenhouse gas. The abilities of three methods of quantitative phase analysis to measure trace nesquehonite (MgCO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) in samples of processed kimberlite have been assessed: the method of reference intensity ratios (RIR), the internal standard method, and the Rietveld method with X-ray powder diffraction data. Tests on synthetic mixtures made to resemble processed kimberlite indicate that both the RIR and Rietveld methods can be used accurately to quantify nesquehonite to a lower limit of approximately 0.5 wt.% for conditions used in the laboratory. Below this value, estimates can be made to a limit of approximately 0.1 wt.% using a calibration curve according to the internal standard method. The RIR method becomes increasingly unreliable with decreasing abundance of nesquehonite, primarily as a result of an unpredictable decline in preferred orientation of crystallites. For Rietveld refinements, structureless pattern fitting was used to account for planar disorder in lizardite by considering it as an amorphous phase. Rietveld refinement of data collected from specimens that were serrated to minimize preferred orientation of crystallites gives rise to systematic overestimates of refined abundances for lizardite and underestimates for other phases. The resulting pattern of misestimates may be mistaken for the effect of amorphous and/or nanocrystalline material in samples. This effect is mitigated by collecting data from non-serrated specimens, which typically give relative errors on refined abundances for major and minor phases in the range of 5-20%. However, relative error can increase rapidly for abundances less than 5 wt.%. Nonetheless, absolute errors are sufficiently small that

  3. Rheological Characterization of Bioinspired Mineralization in Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regitsky, Abigail; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    With increasing amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere linked to potentially catastrophic climate change, it is critical that we find methods to permanently sequester and store CO2. Inspired by the natural biomineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), one future goal of this project is to understand the mechanisms of CaCO3 mineralization in order to ultimately optimize a bioinspired hydrogel system, which produces high value industrial powders that consume CO2 as a feedstock. Along the way, we are developing a rheological technique to study mineral nucleation and growth events by measuring the modulations in mechanical properties of a hydrogel system during mineralization. Our initial system consists of a gelatin hydrogel matrix, which is preloaded with calcium ions, and an aqueous solution of carbonate ions, which are allowed to diffuse through the gel to initiate the mineralization process. In order to monitor how the growth of minerals affects the mechanical properties of the gel network, we measure the storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli of the system in situ. Future work will focus on modifying the properties of the minerals formed by changing the polymer used in the hydrogel network and adding other organic molecules into the system.

  4. Fissure minerals, literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a review of methods used for direct and indirect dating of tectonic events. Isotope geochemistry including stable isotopes as well as fission track- dating, fluid inclusion and thermoluminescens techniques have been considered. It has been concluded that an investigation of tectonic (and thermal) events should start with a detailed study of the mineral phases grown in seald fissures as well as minerals from fissure walls. This study should include phase identification, textures as well as mineral chemistry. The information from this study is fundamental for the decision of further investigations. Mineral chemistry including isotopes and fluid inclusion studies will give an essential knowledge about crystallization conditions for fissure minerals concerned. Direct dating using fission tracks as well as radioactive isotopes could be useful for some minerals. Application of thermoluminescens dating on fissure minerals is doubtful. (Auth.)

  5. Chelated minerals for poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SL Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic minerals have been subject of an increasing number of investigations recently. These compounds can be considered the most significant event regarding commercial forms of minerals targeting animal supplementation in the last decades. Minerals, especially metals, are usually supplemented in poultry feeds using cheap saline sources and have never required a lot of attention in terms of quality. On the other hand, definitions of organic minerals are very broad and frequently lead to confusion when decision-making becomes necessary. Organic minerals include any mineral bound to organic compounds, regardless of the type of existing bond between mineral and organic molecules. Proteins and carbohydrates are the most frequent candidates in organic mineral combinations. Organic fraction size and bond type are not limitations in organic mineral definition; however, essential metals (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Mn can form coordinated bonds, which are stable in intestinal lumen. Metals bound to organic ligands by coordinated bonds can dissociate within animal metabolism whereas real covalent bonds cannot. Chelated minerals are molecules that have a metal bound to an organic ligand through coordinated bonds; but many organic minerals are not chelates or are not even bound through coordinated bonds. Utilization of organic minerals is largely dependent on the ligand; therefore, amino acids and other small molecules with facilitated access to the enterocyte are supposed to be better utilized by animals. Organic minerals with ligands presenting long chains may require digestion prior to absorption. After absorption, organic minerals may present physiological effects, which improve specific metabolic responses, such as the immune response. Many studies have demonstrated the benefits of metal-amino acid chelates on animal metabolism, but the detection positive effects on live performance is less consistent.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2964, 2966, 3064, and 3066, Shah-Esmail (617), Reg-Alaqadari (618), Samandkhan-Karez (713), Laki-Bander (611), Jahangir-Naweran (612), and Sreh-Chena (707) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Flotabilidade da apatita e minerais de ganga provenientes de minério sílico-carbonatado com oleato de sódio Floatability of apatite and gangue minerals from silicate-carbonate ores with sodium oleate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelly dos Santos Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O beneficiamento dos minérios fosfáticos com ganga silicatada e carbonatada é estritamente necessário para aumentar a produção de concentrados fosfáticos e para suprir a demanda nacional de fertilizantes. Visando a processar esses minérios, esse trabalho estudou, através de testes de microflotação e medidas de potencial zeta, o efeito do oleato de sódio, do amido de milho e da carboximetilcelulose (CMC na superfície dos minerais puros originários do minério sílico-carbonatado de Catalão/GO. Os resultados obtidos mostraram a possibilidade de separação seletiva da apatita, por flotação direta em pH igual a 9, usando-se oleato de sódio como coletor, na ausência de depressores, o que seria inviável industrialmente. Tanto a CMC como o amido deprimem a dolomita, mas não são seletivos, pois deprimem, também, a apatita. O amido apresenta ação depressora sobre a apatita mais forte que a CMC.The processing of phosphate ores containing silicates and carbonates in the gangue is strictly necessary to increase phosphate rock production to meet the Brazilian demand for fertilizers. Aiming at the processing of these ores, this investigation addressed, via microfl otation and zeta potential determinations, the effect of sodium oleate, corn starch and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC on the surfaces of pure minerals from the Catalão/GO silicate-carbonate deposit. The results suggested the possibility of selective apatite concentration via direct fl otation at pH = 9, using sodium oleate as collector, in the absence of depressants; a route that would be industrially unfeasible. Both, CMC and starch, act as dolomite depressants, but the action is not selective, for apatite is also depressed by these reagents. Starch is a stronger apatite depressant than CMC.

  8. Metallic mineral deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, M J; van Leeuwen, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    This account concentrates on the the primary metallic mineral deposits and occurrences in Sumatra, in particular the recent discoveries of gold, tin and base metals. The residual and placer deposits are given less emphasis, as no significant discoveries have been made in recent years. The history of mineral exploration and discovery in Indonesia has been reviewed recently by van Leeuwen (1993, 1994), documenting the change in emphasis of mineral-based activities from western to eastern I...

  9. Radioactive minerals in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, there is given the review of the radioactive minerals which contain uranium and thorium and their occurrence in the Slovakia. Chemical composition of most often occurred uranium minerals of West Carpaty was confirmed with wave-dispersion, occasionally energy-dispersion-roentgen microanalysis. Their identification was confirmed by roentgen diffraction or electron diffraction. Homogeneity, occasionally heterogeneity of studied samples was verified by scanning line electron microscope. The development of the uranium mineralization is given, too

  10. Reagan issues mineral policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  11. Brazilian minerals annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistics of Brazilian mineral resources and production in 1976 are presented. Data included refer also to economic aspects, market, taxes, governments incentives, manpower, exportation, importation, etc

  12. Brazilian minerals annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistics of Brazilian mineral resources and production in 1977 are presented. Data included refer also to economic aspects, market, taxes, government incentives, manpower, exportation, importation, etc

  13. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  14. Mineral commodity summaries 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2015 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials

  15. Luobusaite: A New Mineral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Wenji; SHI Nicheng; FANG Qingsong; LI Guowu; XIONG Ming; YANG Jingsui; RONG He

    2006-01-01

    A group of mantle minerals including about 70-80 subtypes of minerals are discovered from a podiform chromitite in Tibet, China. Recovered minerals include diamond, coesite, moissanite,wustite, Fe-silides and a new mineral, luobusaite. All of these minerals were hand-picked from heavy-mineral separates of the podiform chromitite in the mantle peridotite of an ophiolite. The grains of luobusaite are as host mineral with inclusions of native silicon or as an intergrowth with native silicon and Fe-Si phase. Luobusaite occurs as irregular grains, with 0.1-0.2 mm in size, consisting of very finegrained aggregates. The mineral is steel-grey in color, metallic luster, and opaque. The empirical formula (based on 2 for Si) is Fe0.83Si2, according to the chemical compositions of luobusaite. X-ray powder-diffraction data: orthorhombic system, space group Cmca, a = 9.874 (14) (A), b = 7.784 (5) (A), c=7.829(7) (A), Z=16.

  16. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  17. Surface miner MTS 1250

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D. [MAN TAKRAF Foerdertechnik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Mining and Machinery Planning dept.

    1999-10-01

    The German manufacturer MAN TAKRAF Foerdertechnik GmbH has developed a new series of surface miners with capacities ranging between 500-2000 bm{sup 3}/h. The Surface Miner MTS 1250, launched at MINETIME '99, is described in this article. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  18. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  19. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  20. Lithium mineral waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Constantin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological surveys showed that Romania basement contains a variety of balneary resources located within on the surface crust. Mineral waters are spread over more than 20% of the country at different depths, with a wide range of physical, chemical and therapeutic properties depending on their genesis.Balneary resources are represented mainly by therapeutic minerals that the physicochemical properties answer the needs of medical and prophylactic maintenance, enhancement and restoration of health, work capacity and physical and mental comfort of the individual.The surface waters arising from a natural source or updated by drilling and whose physical and chemical characteristics that may exert dynamic pharmaco-therapeutic are considered therapeutic mineral waters. Mineral waters are waters that have a variable content of salts, gas, minerals, radioactive elements, which gives them therapeutic properties. In the past, name of mineral water was attributed to all shallow or groundwater mineral water that could be used for therapeutic purposes. In recent years, mineral water that could be used for therapeutic purposes have been given the name of curative water.Lithium arouses a great scientific interest because, although his structure is so simple, easy to analyze, with chemical and physical properties well established the myriad of the effects on biological systems by influencing many cellular processes and molecular and the mechanism of action are still unclear generates a mystery that modern science attempting to decipher.

  1. Mineral industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the history and growth of the mineral industry in Australia and its significance to the nation's economic growth and overseas trade, particularly over the last twenty years during which time production of coal, iron ore, manganese and mineral sands has increased greatly and new discoveries of petroleum, bauxite and nickel have given rise to major new industries. Australia ranks fourteenths in the value of world trade and is among the world's largest exporters of alumina, iron ore, mineral sands, coal, lead, zinc and nickel. Some details of production, processing and exports of the major minerals are given. Comment is made on the policies and roles of the six State Governments and the Federal Government in respect of ownership and control of the mining, processing and exporting of both energy and non-energy minerals. (orig.)

  2. Underground mineral extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  3. Taxation of unmined minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the Kentucky Revenue Cabinet which began implementing its controversial unmined minerals tax program. The Revenue Cabinet should complete its first annual assessment under this program in December, 1989. The Revenue Cabinet's initial efforts to collect basic data concerning the Commonwealth's coal bearing lands has yielded data coverage for 5 million of Kentucky's 10 million acres of coal lands. Approximately 1000 detailed information returns have been filed. The returns will be used to help create an undeveloped mineral reserves inventory, determine mineral ownership, and value mineral reserves. This new program is run by the Revenue Cabinet's Mineral Valuation Section, under the Division of Technical Support, Department of Property Taxation. It has been in business since September of 1988

  4. Uraniferous mineralizations in the Kuusamo Schist Belt, northeastern Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kouveraara Co-Cu-Au mineralization was found in 1982 with the aid of a geophysical ground survey. This survey was connected with research on the Kouvervaara uranium mineralization in the Early Proterozoic Kuusamo Schist Belt, located just south of the Arctic Circle. In further work, using the Kouvervaara sulphide mineralization as a reference, six Co and Au bearing sulphide mineralizations were discovered, with the help of low altitude aerial geophysical techniques. The Co-Au mineralizations, hosted by the Sericite Quartzite Formation, occur within the hydrothermally altered zones. These zones consist of chloritization, carbonatization, sulphidization, sericitization and albitization, the latter being the most extensive. Excluding the Juomasuo mineralization, uranium is only a trace element in these mineralizations. Other characteristic trace elements are molybdenum and tungsten. The Sivakkaharju and Konttiaho Co-Au-U-Mo mineralizations were found by radiometric ground surveys carried out in 1985 and 1986. These hydrothermal mineralizations occur within brecciated quartz-albite-carbonate rocks and are good manifestations of the positive correlation between uranium and gold in the Kuusamo area. Compared with the other sulphide mineralizations, the Au, U, and Mo contents are remarkably high. Genetically, the mineralizations in the Kuusamo area are associated with deep seated fracture and fault zones, controlled by ancient intracontinental hot spot activity and continental rifting. (author). 31 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Nickel Extraction from Olivine: Effect of Carbonation Pre-Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael M.; Aldo Van Audenaerde; Yi Wai Chiang; Remus I. Iacobescu; Pol Knops; Tom Van Gerven

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we explore a novel mineral processing approach using carbon dioxide to promote mineral alterations that lead to improved extractability of nickel from olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4). The precept is that by altering the morphology and the mineralogy of the ore via mineral carbonation, the comminution requirements and the acid consumption during hydrometallurgical processing can be reduced. Furthermore, carbonation pre-treatment can lead to mineral liberation and concentration of metals i...

  6. Mineralização do carbono orgânico em solos tratados com lodo de curtume Mineralization of the organic carbon in soils treated with tannery sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martin Martines

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a mineralização do carbono orgânico do lodo de curtume, aplicado em solos com diferentes classes texturais, de modo a caracterizar a cinética do processo de mineralização e auxiliar na elaboração de normas técnicas sobre o uso agrícola desse material. Foram conduzidos experimentos de incubação por 105 dias, em laboratório, utilizando-se três solos: Nitossolo Vermelho eutroférrico típico (NVef, Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico típico (LVAd e Neossolo Quartzarênico órtico típico (RQo. O lodo de curtume utilizado nos experimentos foi composto de uma mistura, na proporção de 1:1, do lodo do caleiro e do lodo primário da estação de tratamento de efluentes, resultante da precipitação dos efluentes gerados no processo, com exceção dos efluentes que contêm cromo. As doses aplicadas (base seca no NVef e LVAd foram equivalentes a 0, 6, 12, 24 e 36 Mg ha-1 e a 0, 3, 6, 12 e 24 Mg ha-1 no RQo. Não se observa prejuízo à atividade microbiana dos solos, avaliada por meio da respiração basal, e a mineralização do carbono adicionado por meio do lodo de curtume é intensa nos primeiros 15 a 20 dias de incubação.The objective of this work was to evaluate the mineralization of the organic carbon derived from the tannery sludge applied in increasing doses on soils with different textures, to evaluate the decomposition kinetics, as well as to learn about the impact of this residue on the soil microbial community. This knowledge will be helpful for the establishment of technical rules about the agricultural use of the tannery sludges. Incubation experiments were carried out in the laboratory for 105 days, using three soils: a Kandiudalfic Eutrudox (NVef, a Typic Hapludox (LVAd and a Typic Quartzipsamment (RQo. Tannery sludge used in these experiments was composed of a mixture of liming sludge and the primary sludge from the wastewater treatment station, in the proportion 1:1, with the

  7. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2008 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2007 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. National reserves and reserve base information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves and reserve base estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves and reserve base information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, common business practice, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves and reserve base information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported reserves and reserve base information carried for years without alteration because no new information is available; historically reported reserves and reserve base reduced by the amount of historical production; and company reported reserves. International minerals availability studies conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, before 1996, and estimates of identified resources by an international collaborative effort (the International Strategic Minerals

  8. Mineral Industry in Egypt-Part I: Metallic Mineral Commodities

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Zaher M. Abouzeid; Abdel-Aziz M. Khalid

    2011-01-01

    This The mineral potential in Egypt is quite high. Almost all sorts of industrial minerals such as metallic and non-metallic commodities exist in commercial amounts. However, Egypt imports many of the mineral commodities needed for the local mineral industries. The main reason for this is that the investors, either the governmental or the private sectors, refrain from investing into the mineral industry for prospecting, evaluation, and developing the mining and mineral processing technologies...

  9. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  10. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  11. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  12. Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online DRI Tool Daily Value (DV) Tables Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Multivitamin/mineral ... Vitamin K lowers the drug's effectiveness and doctors base the medicine dose partly on the amount of ...

  13. Quantitative spectrographic determination of zirconium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method described in the following report permits the quantitative determination of zirconium in minerals and rocks in a 0,02-100% of ZrO2 concentration rate. The excitation is carried out by a 10 ampere continuous current arc among carbon electrodes, and placing the sample in a crater of 2 mm depth. For low concentrations a dilution of the sample with the same weight as its own in carbon powder and with 1/25 of its weight of Co3O4 (internal patron) is carried out. Line Zr 2571,4, Co 2585,3 and Co 2587,2 are used. (Author) 6 refs

  14. Coastal placer minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Gujar, A.R.

    plagioclase weathers first while quartz remains unaltered. Transport: The weathered material would be transported by natural agents such as water, wind and glaciers. Humans to a large extent (e.g., by quarrying and mining) and animals and birds... at Chavara (Kerala) and Manavalakurichi (Tamil Nadu). The IREL started production after renovating the mineral separation plants that belonged previously to the Travancore Minerals Ltd. and was jointly owned by the central and state governments of Kerala...

  15. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  16. Lithium mineral waters

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu Constantin; Munteanu Diana

    2011-01-01

    Hydrological surveys showed that Romania basement contains a variety of balneary resources located within on the surface crust. Mineral waters are spread over more than 20% of the country at different depths, with a wide range of physical, chemical and therapeutic properties depending on their genesis.Balneary resources are represented mainly by therapeutic minerals that the physicochemical properties answer the needs of medical and prophylactic maintenance, enhancement and restoration of hea...

  17. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features

  18. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  19. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  20. Non-autoclaved aerated concrete with mineral additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'ina, L. V.; Rakov, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of joint grinding of Portland cement clinker, silica and carbonate components and mineral additives to specific surface of 280 - 300 m2/kg on the properties (strength, average density and thermal conductivity) of non-autoclaved aerated concrete, and the porosity of the hardened cement paste produced from Portland cement clinker with mineral additives. The joint grinding of the Portland cement clinker with silica and carbonate components and mineral additives reduces the energy consumption of non-autoclaved aerated concrete production. The efficiency of mineral additives (diopside, wollastonite) is due to the closeness the composition, the type of chemical bonds, physical and chemical characteristics (specific enthalpy of formation, specific entropy) to anhydrous clinker minerals and their hydration products. Considering the influence of these additions on hydration of clinker minerals and formation of hardened cement paste structure, dispersed wollastonite and diopside should be used as mineral additives. The hardness and, consequently, the elastic modulus of diopside are higher than that of hardened cement paste. As a result, there is a redistribution of stresses in the hardened cement paste interporous partitions and hardening, both the partitions and aerated concrete on the whole. The mineral additives introduction allowed to obtain the non-autoclaved aerated concrete with average density 580 kg/m3, compressive strength of 3.3 MPa and thermal conductivity of 0.131 W/(m.°C).

  1. Organic Mineral Complex Component and Distribution Character of Organic Carbon for High Yield Soil of the Corn Belt of the Songliao Plain%松辽平原玉米带高产土壤有机无机复合体组成及有机碳分布的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雅娟; 赵兰坡; 张志丹; 姜亦梅

    2012-01-01

    The paper studied the organic mineral complex component and distribution character of organic carbon of black soil under various cultivation pattern by means of ultrasonic dispersion and particle assortment method, in order to discuss the different fertilizer and farming methods of soil organic inorganic compound composition and distribution of organic carbon impact. The high yield soil of Songliao Plain was used as the object of study. The results showed that, organic mineral complex in black soil the finesand size complex was protagonist, about 40%-70% of the total quality. The clay size complex and the silty size complex were marginalia. The result after comparing with the control group soil showed that, the storage of clay size complex is lower than control group soil, the mean difference was 5.05% and 7.60%. The comparing with particle size distribution showed that the silty size complex decreased about 0.1%-3.7%, the finesand size complex and the clay size complex creased about 0.1%-5%. The organic carbon primarily consisted in the small granule diameter of organic mineral complex. There was a accumulation tendency for organic carbon to the small granule diameter of organic mineral complex (A1>A2>A3). The result after comparing with the control group soil showed that, the content of organic carbon in organic mineral complexes was higher than control group soil (No.l>No.6, No.l0>No.l4), and the reserves of organic carbon of clay size complex was lower than control group soil (No.lNo.6, No.l0>No.l4).%为了探讨不同施肥和耕作方式对土壤有机无机复合体组成及有机碳分布的影响,采用超声波分散、颗粒大小分组法对松辽平原玉米高产土壤进行研究.结果表明,土壤中有机无机复合体以细砂复合体为主,约占40%~70%,粘粒、粉粒复合体次之;与对照相比,高产土壤粘粒复合体含量较小,平均差值为5.05%和7.60%;结合无机颗粒对比,粉粒、细砂复

  2. Mineralization of cellulose in frozen boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Segura, Javier; Sparrman, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Soils of high-latitude ecosystems store a large fraction of the global soil carbon. In boreal forests, the microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) during winter can affect the ecosystems net carbon balance. Recent research has shown that microorganisms in the organic surface layer of boreal forest soil can mineralize and grow on simple, soluble monomeric substrates under frozen conditions. However, any substantial impacts of microbial activity in frozen soils on long-term soil carbon balances ultimately depends on whether soil microorganisms can utilize and grow the more complex, polymeric constituents of SOM. In order to evaluate the potential for soil microorganisms to metabolize carbon polymers at low temperatures, we incubated boreal forest soil samples amended with [13C]-cellulose and studied the microbial catabolic and anabolic utilization of the substrate under frozen and unfrozen conditions (-4 and +4°C). Freezing of the soil markedly reduced microbial utilization of the cellulose. The [13C]-CO2 production rate in the samples at +4°C were 0.52 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1 while rates in the frozen samples (-4°C) were 0.01 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1. However, newly synthetized [13C]-enriched cell membrane lipids, PLFAs, were detected in soil samples incubated both above and below freezing, confirming that cellulose can sustain also anabolic activity of the microbial populations under frozen conditions. The reduced metabolic rates induced by freezing indicate constraints on exoenzymatic activity, as well as substrate diffusion rates that we can attribute to reduced liquid water content of the frozen soil. We conclude that the microbial population in boreal forest soil has the capacity to metabolize, and grow, on polymeric substrates at temperatures below zero, which involves maintaining exoenzymatic activity in frozen soils. This capacity manifests the importance of SOM mineralization during the winter season and its importance for the net carbon balance of

  3. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  4. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  5. Physico-chemical characteristics of activated carbons based on a copolymer of furfural and mineral raw materials of the Republic of Kazakhstan and their application in extracting gold from industrial solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanagat Kishibayev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons are widely used in different industries for cleaning a variety of natural objects from of technogenic pollutants. In the article presents the results of physico-chemical investigations of activated carbons. The investigations on the sorption of gold in cyanide solutions activated sorbent based on furfural and sorbent based on shungit.

  6. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  7. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  8. Application of mineral binders during briquetting of zircon concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper studies a possibility to use mineral binders for briqueting zircon-blaring concentrates subject to chloride treatment in shaft furnaces. The effect of chloride treatment time and carbon content in the brickets on concentrates component break-down is investigated. Efficiency of mineral binder (bentonite and sodium silicate) application is confirmed: power consumption and treatment time decrease 8-10 times, a high level of concentrate break-down is achieved

  9. Marine Mineral Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    exploration requires knowledge of mineral deposits and models of their formation, of geophysical and geochemical exploration methods, and of data evaluation and interpretation methods. These topics are described in detail by an international group of authors. A short description is also given of marine......The past 20 years have seen extensive marine exploration work by the major industrialized countries. Studies have, in part, been concentrated on Pacific manganese nodule occurrences and on massive sulfides on mid-oceanic ridges. An international jurisdictional framework of the sea-bed mineral...... resources was negotiated by the United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III). A most important outcome of this conference was the establishment of an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of at least 200 nautical miles for all coastal states and the recognition of a deep-sea regime. Mineral deposits...

  10. Assessing screening criteria for the radiocarbon dating of bone mineral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Ricardo, E-mail: ldv1452@gmail.com [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Huels, Matthias [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Nadeau, Marie-Josee; Grootes, Pieter M. [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Garbe-Schoenberg, C.-Dieter [Institute of Geosciences, Marine Climate Research and ICPMS Lab, Kiel University, Ludewig-Meyn-Str. 10, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Hollund, Hege I. [Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology, The VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lotnyk, Andriy [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Material Science, Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification (IOM), Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Kienle, Lorenz [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Material Science, Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon dating of bone mineral (carbonate in the apatite lattice) has been the target of sporadic research for the last 40 years. Results obtained by different decontamination protocols have, however, failed to provide a consistent agreement with reference ages. In particular, quality criteria to assess bone mineral radiocarbon dating reliability are still lacking. Systematic research was undertaken to identify optimal preservation criteria for bone mineral in archeological bones. Six human long bones, originating from a single site, were radiocarbon-dated both for collagen and apatite, with the level of agreement between the dates providing an indication of exogenous carbon contamination. Several techniques (Histology, FTIR, TEM, LA-ICP-MS) were employed to determine the preservation status of each sample. Research results highlight the importance of a micro-scale approach in establishing bone preservation, in particular the use of trace element concentration profiles demonstrated its potential use as a viable sample selection criterion for bone carbonate radiocarbon dating.

  11. Assessing screening criteria for the radiocarbon dating of bone mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon dating of bone mineral (carbonate in the apatite lattice) has been the target of sporadic research for the last 40 years. Results obtained by different decontamination protocols have, however, failed to provide a consistent agreement with reference ages. In particular, quality criteria to assess bone mineral radiocarbon dating reliability are still lacking. Systematic research was undertaken to identify optimal preservation criteria for bone mineral in archeological bones. Six human long bones, originating from a single site, were radiocarbon-dated both for collagen and apatite, with the level of agreement between the dates providing an indication of exogenous carbon contamination. Several techniques (Histology, FTIR, TEM, LA-ICP-MS) were employed to determine the preservation status of each sample. Research results highlight the importance of a micro-scale approach in establishing bone preservation, in particular the use of trace element concentration profiles demonstrated its potential use as a viable sample selection criterion for bone carbonate radiocarbon dating.

  12. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  13. Spatial Arrangment of Organic Compounds on a Model Mineral Surface: Implications for Soil Organic Matter Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Ambaye, Haile Arena [ORNL; Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Kilbey, S. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lokitz, Bradley S [ORNL; Lauter, Valeria [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the mineral organic carbon interface may influence the extent of stabilization of organic carbon compounds in soils, which is important for global climate futures. The nanoscale structure of a model interface was examined here by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose and amphiphilic stearic acid, onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3). Neutron reflectometry, a technique which provides depth-sensitive insight into the organization of the thin films, indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid, a result that was verified by water contact angle measurements.