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Sample records for carbonate growth modification

  1. Growth, modification and integration of carbon nanotubes into molecular electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatello, Jason P.

    Molecules are the smallest possible elements for electronic devices, with active elements for such devices typically a few Angstroms in footprint area. Owing to the possibility of producing ultra-high density devices, tremendous effort has been invested in producing electronic junctions by using various types of molecules. The major issues for molecular electronics include (1) developing an effective scheme to connect molecules with the present micro- and nano-technology, (2) increasing the lifetime and stabilities of the devices, and (3) increasing their performance in comparison to the state-of-the-art devices. In this work, we attempt to use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the interconnecting nanoelectrodes between molecules and microelectrodes. The ultimate goal is to use two individual CNTs to sandwich molecules in a cross-bar configuration while having these CNTs connected with microelectrodes such that the junction displays the electronic character of the molecule chosen. We have successfully developed an effective scheme to connect molecules with CNTs, which is scalable to arrays of molecular electronic devices. To realize this far reaching goal, the following technical topics have been investigated. (1) Synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (T-CVD) and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques (Chapter 3). We have evaluated the potential use of tubular and bamboo-like MWCNTs grown by T-CVD and PE-CVD in terms of their structural properties. (2) Horizontal dispersion of MWCNTs with and without surfactants, and the integration of MWCNTs to microelectrodes using deposition by dielectrophoresis (DEP) (Chapter 4). We have systematically studied the use of surfactant molecules to disperse and horizontally align MWCNTs on substrates. In addition, DEP is shown to produce impurityfree placement of MWCNTs, forming connections between microelectrodes. We demonstrate the deposition density is tunable by

  2. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  3. Local growth of vertical aligned carbon nanotubes by laserinduced surface modification of coated silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, K; Boehme, R; Ruthe, D; Rudolph, Th; Rauschenbach, B [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e. V. Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    The stimulation of carbon nanotubes (CNT) growth in a thermal CVD process using an acetylene/nitrogen gas mixture by KrF-excimer laser exposure of iron nitrate coated silicon is described. At moderate laser fluences of {approx}1 J/cm{sup 2} the growth of nanotube bundles up to 100 {mu}m consisting of vertical aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNT) is observed. AFM measurements show the formation of nanoparticles in the laser-exposed areas. At this catalytic sites the nanotubes grow and sustain one another and forming the well-defined bundles. Via the laser exposure the control of the catalytic sites formation and consequently the nanotube growth and properties can be achieved.

  4. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miksovsky, J. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Voss, A. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Kozarova, R. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kocourek, T.; Pisarik, P. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Ceccone, G. [Unit Nanobiosciences, European Commission Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); Kulisch, W. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Jelinek, M. [Institute of Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Kladno (Czech Republic); Apostolova, M.D. [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Reithmaier, J.P. [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany); Popov, C., E-mail: popov@ina.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • UNCD and DLC films were modified by UV/O{sub 3} treatments, O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}-containing plasmas. • Surface composition, wettability and surface energy change upon modifications. • Higher efficiency of UNCD modifications was observed. • Cell attachment and growth were influenced by the surface termination and roughness. - Abstract: Diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films possess a set of excellent physical and chemical properties which together with a high biocompatibility make them attractive candidates for a number of medical and biotechnological applications. In the current work thin ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and DLC films were comparatively investigated with respect to cell attachment and proliferation after different surface modifications. The UNCD films were prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the DLC films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films were comprehensively characterized with respect to their basic properties, e.g. crystallinity, morphology, chemical bonding nature, etc. Afterwards the UNCD and DLC films were modified applying O{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} plasmas and UV/O{sub 3} treatments to alter their surface termination. The surface composition of as-grown and modified samples was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Furthermore the films were characterized by contact angle measurements with water, formamide, 1-decanol and diiodomethane; from the results obtained the surface energy with its dispersive and polar components was calculated. The adhesion and proliferation of MG63 osteosarcoma cells on the different UNCD and DLC samples were assessed by measurement of the cell attachment efficiency and MTT assays. The determined cell densities were compared and correlated with the surface properties of as-deposited and modified UNCD and DLC films.

  5. Cell adhesion and growth on ultrananocrystalline diamond and diamond-like carbon films after different surface modifications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšovský, Jan; Voss, A.; Kozarova, R.; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Ceccone, G.; Kulisch, W.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Apostolova, M.D.; Reithmaier, J.P.; Popov, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 297, APR (2014), s. 95-102. ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12069 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ultrananocrystalline diamond films * diamond-like carbon films * surface modification * direct contact cell tests Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169433214001251

  6. Surface modification of carbon fiber by direct growth of zinc oxide nanowalls using a radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc oxide nanowalls have been grown uniformly on a carbon fiber substrate at room temperature using a radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The synthesis process involved two steps; application of catalyst using a solution process and subsequent radio-frequency sputter deposition of zinc oxide. The nanowalls were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy for their microstructure and morphology while their nanostructure was studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Both the X-ray and the electron diffraction techniques were used for crystallographic analysis of the produced nanowalls. Selected area electron diffraction and high resolution lattice image showed highly crystalline structure of the nanowalls. Photoluminescence analysis was carried out for the determination of their optical characteristics which showed a strong ultra violet peak at 393 nm and violet peak centered at 401 nm. The latter is a characteristic peak of zinc oxide which demonstrates oxygen rich composition of nanowalls. - Highlights: • Low temperature growth method • Zinc oxide nanowall growth on carbon fiber • Microstructural analysis using high resolution electron microscopy • X-ray and electron diffraction analysis • Photoluminescence characteristics

  7. Biomolecular Modification of Inorganic Crystal Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Yoreo, J J

    2007-04-27

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures are an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over materials synthesis. Conversely, the failure to prevent or limit tissue mineralization in the vascular, skeletal, and urinary systems is a common source of disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which organisms direct or limit crystallization has long been a central challenge to the biomineralization community. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for either inhibiting crystallization or initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineralizing surfaces. In particular, biomolecules that present carboxyl groups to the growing crystal have been implicated as primary modulators of growth. Here we review the results from a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling (MM) studies to investigate the effect of specific interactions between carboxylate-rich biomolecules and atomic steps on crystal surfaces during the growth of carbonates, oxalates and phosphates of calcium. Specifically, we how the growth kinetics and morphology depend on the concentration of additives that include citrate, simple amino acids, synthetic Asp-rich polypeptides, and naturally occurring Asp-rich proteins found in both functional and pathological mineral tissues. The results reveal a consistent picture of shape modification in which stereochemical matching of modifiers to specific atomic steps drives shape modification. Inhibition and other changes in growth kinetics are shown to be due to a range of mechanisms that depend on chemistry and molecular size. Some effects are well described by classic crystal growth theories, but others, such as step acceleration due to peptide charge and hydrophylicity, were previously unrealized

  8. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  9. Nano-coatings on carbon structures for interfacial modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikollu, Rajasekhar V.

    Surface modification of materials is a rapidly growing field as structures become smaller, more integrated and complex. It opens up the possibility of combining the optimum bulk properties of a material with optimized surface properties such as enhanced bonding, corrosion resistance, reactivity, stress transfer, and thermal, optical or electrical behavior. Therefore, surface functionalization or modification can be an enabling step in a wide variety of modern applications. In this dissertation several surface modification approaches on carbon foam and carbon nano-fibers will be discussed. These are recently developed sp2 graphitic carbon based structures that have significant potential in aerospace, automotive and thermal applications. Influence of surface modification on composite formation and properties have also been investigated. Two types of property changes have been investigated: one for enhancing the surface reactivity and another for surface inertness. Characterization techniques such as X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Contact Angle Measurement, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and mechanical testing are used in this study to find out the influence of these coatings on surface composition, chemistry and morphology. Mechanical testing has been performed on composites and stand alone foam to study the influence of surface modification on physical and mechanical properties of the composite materials. The effectiveness of these coatings on metallic/graphite interface has also been investigated for metal-matrix composite related applications. Additionally, the influence of plasma coatings on nucleation and growth of nanotubes on larger carbon structures (to produce multiscale, multifunctional materials) have also been studied. It is seen that the liquid phase activation treatment introduces oxygen functional groups on the surface, but may cause severe enough degradation that

  10. Ultraviolet modification of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for carbon capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal NS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nikhil S Gopal,1 K Sudhakar2 1The Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, NJ, USA; 2Bioenergy Laboratory, Malauna Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, India Purpose: Carbon dioxide (CO2 levels have been rising rapidly. Algae are single-cell organisms with highly efficient CO2 uptake mechanisms. Algae yield two to ten times more biomass versus terrestrial plants and can grow nearly anywhere. Large scale CO2 sequestration is not yet sustainable due to high amounts of nitrogen (N and phosphate (P needed to grow algae in media. Methods: Mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were created using ultraviolet light (2.2–3 K J/m2 and natural selection using media with 20%–80% lower N and P compared to standard Sueoka's high salt medium. Strains were selected based upon growth in media concentrations varying from 20% to 80% less N/P compared to control. Biomass was compared to wild-type control (CC-125 using direct counts, optical density dry weight, and mean doubling time. Results: Mean doubling time was 20 and 25 hours in the low N and N/P strains, respectively (vs 66 hours in control. Using direct counts, growth rates of mutant strains of low N and N/P cultures were not statistically different from control (P=0.37 and 0.70, respectively. Conclusion: Two new strains of algae, as well as wild-type control, were able to grow while using 20%–40% less N and P. Ultraviolet light-based modification of algae is an inexpensive and alternative option to genetic engineering techniques. This technique might make larger scale biosequestration possible. Keywords: biosequestration, ultraviolet, carbon sequestration, carbon capture, algae

  11. Carbon nanotube modification of microbial fuel cell electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Alireza Ahmadian; D'Angelo, Lorenzo; Omer, Nada; Windiasti, Gracia; Lu, Xiaonan; Xu, Jie

    2016-11-15

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for energy harvesting devices is preferable due to their unique mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. On the other hand, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising devices to recover carbon-neutral energy from the organic matters, and have been hindered with major setbacks towards commercialization. Nanoengineered CNT-based materials show remarkable electrochemical properties, and therefore have provided routes towards highly effective modification of MFC compartments to ultimately reach the theoretical limits of biomass energy recovery, low-cost power production, and thus the commercialization of MFCs. Moreover, these CNT-based composites offer significant flexibility in the design of MFCs that enable their use for a broad spectrum of applications ranging from scaled-up power generation to medically related devices. This article reviews the recent advances in the modification of MFCs using CNTs and CNT-based composites, and the extent to which each modification route impacts MFC power and current generation. PMID:27213269

  12. Homogeneous modification of carbon nanotubes with cellulose acetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Ke

    2009-01-01

    An efficient strategy that comprised shorten, chain extension, active groups introducing and homogeneous reaction tactics, was adopted to modify multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with cellulose acetate (CA). Specially, by utilizing 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine, a reactive intermediate of the MWNTs (MWNT-triazine) was obtained. Suitable solubility of the MWNT-triazine helps make the homogeneous modification become reality. Detailed characterizations further verified that reaction between chloride atoms in the MWNT-triazine and hydroxyl groups in the CA had contributed to the formation of MWNT-CA conjugates. The novel MWNT-CA consists of carbon (76.3%), oxygen (18.4%) and nitrogen (5.3%). With a nanotube-attached CA content of 42.8 wt%, the MWNT-CA is readily soluble in DMSO, NME DMF and DMAc. Confirmation of the CA-based modification route might lead to studies aiming for specific sorption and isolation.

  13. The effect of substrate modification on microbial growth on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, A A

    1998-01-01

    The principle aim of the program was to produce a novel, non-leaching antimicrobial surface for commercial development and future use in the liquid food packaging industry. Antimicrobial surfaces which exist presently have been produced to combat the growth of prokaryotic organisms and usually function as slow release systems. A system which could inhibit eukaryotic growth without contaminating the surrounding 'environment' with the inhibitor was considered of great commercial importance. The remit of this study was concerned with creating a surface which could control the growth of eukaryotic organisms found in fruit juice with particular interest in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Putative antimicrobial surfaces were created by the chemical modification of the test substrate polymers; nylon and ethylvinyl alcohol (EVOH). Surfaces were chemically modified by the covalent coupling of antimicrobial agents known to be active against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as ascertained by the screening process...

  14. Carbon onion growth enhanced by nitrogen incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mass of carbon onions have previously been successfully synthesized via catalytic decomposition of methane using nitrogen as a carrier gas over a Ni/Al catalyst. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of the carbon onions shows that the as-grown carbon onions contained nitrogen and that the nitrogen concentration in the carbon onions increased with an increase in reaction time. When hydrogen is used as a carrier gas, it is found that no carbon onions are obtained, indicating that the carrier gas plays an important role in the synthesis of carbon onions and that there is an intimate relationship between carbon onion growth and nitrogen incorporation

  15. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  16. The effect of substrate modification on microbial growth on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle aim of the program was to produce a novel, non-leaching antimicrobial surface for commercial development and future use in the liquid food packaging industry. Antimicrobial surfaces which exist presently have been produced to combat the growth of prokaryotic organisms and usually function as slow release systems. A system which could inhibit eukaryotic growth without contaminating the surrounding 'environment' with the inhibitor was considered of great commercial importance. The remit of this study was concerned with creating a surface which could control the growth of eukaryotic organisms found in fruit juice with particular interest in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Putative antimicrobial surfaces were created by the chemical modification of the test substrate polymers; nylon and ethylvinyl alcohol (EVOH). Surfaces were chemically modified by the covalent coupling of antimicrobial agents known to be active against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as ascertained by the screening process determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of agents in the desired test medium. During the study it was found that a number of surfaces did appear to inhibit yeast growth in fruit juice, however on further investigation the apparent inhibitory effect was discovered to be the result of un-bound material free in the test medium. On removing the possibility of any un-bound material present on the test surface, by a series of surface washings, the inhibitory effect on yeast growth was eliminated. Of the agents tested only one appeared to have an inhibitory effect which could be attributed to a true antimicrobial surface effect, Amical 48. As there is little known about this agent in the literature, its affect on yeast growth was examined and in particular a proposal for the mode of action on yeast is discussed, providing a plausible explanation for the inhibitory effect observed when this agent is covalently immobilised onto nylon. (author)

  17. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  18. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, M.; Mazzanti, G.; Bosco, S.; Bellucci, S.; Cucina, A.; LeFoche, F.; Carru, G. A.; Mastrangelo, S.; Di Sotto, A.; Masciangelo, R.; Chiaretti, A. M.; Balasubramanian, C.; DeBellis, G.; Micciulla, F.; Porta, N.; Deriu, G.; Tiberia, A.

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  19. Green Growth and Low Carbon Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anders Riel; Tonami, Aki

    This paper ask the question of what makes Low Carbon and Green Growth and Low Carbon Society policy concepts that have not only gained foothold in their countries of origin, but also globally. Autobiography analysis is employed to discover the stories that these concepts tell about developmental ...

  20. Mechano-activated surface modification of calcium carbonate in wet stirred mill and its properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Surface modification of calcium carbonate particles using sodium stearate(SDS) as a modification agent incorporated with the simultaneous wet ultra-fine grinding in the laboratory stirred mill was investigated. The physical properties and application properties of modified calcium carbonate were measured and evaluated. The action mechanism between SDS and calcium carbonate in the modification was studied by infrared spectrometry(IR) and X-ray photoelectron energy spectroscopy(XPS). The results indicate that the crushing mechanic force intensity can obviously influence the modification effect of calcium carbonate because of mechano-chemical effect. The hydrophilic surface of calcium carbonate is turned into hydrophobic after modification. The properties of polyethylene(PE) filled by modified calcium carbonate powder is markedly improved. And the adsorption of SDS could occur by chemical reaction with calcium carbonate surface.

  1. Plasma modification of medical implants by carbon coatings depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabarczyk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main goal was to work out the technology of deposition of carbon layers onto surface of medical implants made of the AISI316L medical steel. So far the results of carried investigations have proved that layers synthesized in RF PACVD process noticeably improve the biotolerance of the medical steel. Positive experimental results concerning the implementation of carbon layers conducted in the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering of the Technical University of Lodz were the basis for attempt of industrial application of the worked out technology.Design/methodology/approach: Carbon layers were manufactured using radio frequency plasma RF PACVD method. The technology was worked out for the surfaces of the intramedullary nails. The investigations were carried out in order to compare obtained synthesis results with the layers deposited under the laboratory conditions. In this work the following are presented: the surface topography investigation, results of nanohardness and adhesion measurements as well as the raman spectra. Medical examination results were presented in our earlier publications. In the description of obtained investigation results are also presented the preliminary results of the medical treatment effects with the use of intramedullary nails covered with the carbon layer.Findings: Carbon layers manufactured onto intramedullary nails presented good mechanical properties. Applied synthesis parameters made it possible to manufacture uniform film onto whole implant surface. Thickness of the layer was varied in the range of 200 – 400 nm, however total modification area contained 3.5 micrometers. Nails covered with the carbon layer positively passed the tests and were admitted into medical trade turnover. Positive medical treatment results were observed especially in case of patients with affirmed allergies onto alloying components contained in medical steels like chromium and nickel.Research limitations

  2. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EijiIwamura; MasanoriYamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process, graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  3. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eiji Iwamura; Masanori Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process,graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  4. Synthesis and chemical modification of carbon nanostructures for materials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Amanda Lynn

    This dissertation explores the structure, chemical reactivities, electromagnetic response, and materials properties of various carbon nanostructures, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphite, and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Efficient production and modification of these unique structures, each with their own distinct properties, will make them more accessible for applications in electronics, materials, and biology. A method is reported for controlling the permittivity from 1--1000 MHz of SWCNT-polymer composites (0.5 wt%) for radio frequency applications including passive RF antenna structures and EMI shielding. The magnitude of the real permittivity varied between 20 and 3.3, decreasing as higher fractions of functionalized-SWCNTs were added. The microwave absorbing properties and subsequent heating of carbon nanotubes were used to rapidly cure ceramic composites. With less than 1 wt% carbon nanotube additives and 30--40 W of directed microwave power (2.45 GHz), bulk composite samples reached temperatures above 500°C within 1 min. Graphite oxide (GO) polymer nanocomposites were developed at 1, 5, and 10 wt% for the purpose of evaluating the flammability reduction and materials properties of the resulting systems. Microscale oxygen consumption calorimetry revealed that addition of GO reduced the total heat release in all systems, and GO-polycarbonate composites demonstrated very fast self-extinguishing times in vertical open flame tests. A simple solution-based oxidative process using potassium permanganate in sulfuric acid was developed for producing nearly 100% yield of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by lengthwise cutting and unraveling of MWCNT sidewalls. Subsequent chemical reduction of the GNRs resulted in restoration of electrical conductivity. The GNR synthetic conditions were investigated in further depth, and an improved method which utilized a two-acid reaction medium was found to produce GNRs with

  5. Improving the durability of methanol oxidation reaction electro-catalysts through the modification of carbon architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin N.

    Carbon materials represent one of the largest areas of studied research today, having integrated applications stretching from energy production and storage to medical use and far beyond. One of these many intriguing applications is fuel cells, which offers the promise of clean electricity through a direct electrochemical energy conversion process. Unfortunately, at the present time the cost per watt-hour produced by fuel cells is more expensive than conventional methods of energy production/storage (i.e. combustion engines, batteries, etc.). Under the umbrella of fuel cell systems, methanol is a promising fuel source because of its high energy density and convenience of direct liquid fuel operation. In this field, recent advancements are bringing direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) closer to commercial viability. However, just as in other fuel cell systems, further improvements are greatly needed, particularly in the area of catalyst durability. This need for improved durability has led to increased research activity focused on improving catalyst stability and utilization. This thesis explores one of the most promising areas of enhancing catalyst-support interactions; namely, modification of carbon support architectures. Through the use of heteroatom modifiers, such as nitrogen, fuel cell support systems can be enhanced in such a way as to improve metal nucleation and growth, catalyst durability and catalytic activity. To this end, this thesis employs advanced characterization techniques to study the changes in catalyst particle morphology before and after nitrogen modification of the support structure. These results clearly show the beneficial effects of nitrogen moieties on carbon structures and help elucidate the effects of nitrogen on the stability of supported catalytic nanoparticles systems. Similarly, the novel concept of post-modifying commercially available supported catalysts with nitrogen ion implantation gives further insight into the behavior of

  6. Surface modification of multiwall carbon nanotubes by sulfonitric treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Sofía; Rendtorff, Nicolás M.; Aglietti, Esteban F.; Sakka, Yoshio; Suárez, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used for electronic, mechanical, and optical devices due to their unique structural and quantum characteristics. The species generated by oxidation on the surface of these materials permit binding new reaction chains, which improves the dispersibility, processing and compatibility with other materials. Even though different acid treatments and applications of these CNT have been reported, relatively few research studies have focused on the relationship between the acid treatment and the formation of nanodefects, specific oxidized species or CNT surface defects. In this work, multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) oxidation at 90 °C was characterized in order to determine the acid treatment effect on the surface. It was found that oxidized species are already present in MWCNT without an acid treatment, but there are not enough to cause water-based dispersion. The species were identified and quantified by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, transmission electron microscopy observations showed not only modifications of the oxidized species, but also morphological damage on the surfaces of MWCNT after being subjected to the acid treatment. This effect was also confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The acid treatment generates higher oxidized species, decreasing the zeta potential in the whole pH range.

  7. Structural Modification in Carbon Nanotubes by Boron Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handuja Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have synthesized boron-incorporated carbon nanotubes (CNTs by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene in a thermal chemical vapor deposition set up using boric acid as the boron source. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies of the synthesized CNT samples showed that there was deterioration in crystallinity and improvement in alignment of the CNTs as the boron content in precursor solution increased from 0% to 15%. Raman analysis of these samples showed a shift of ~7 cm−1in wave number to higher side and broadening of the G band with increasing boron concentration along with an increase in intensity of the G band. Furthermore, there was an increase in the intensity of the D band along with a decrease in its wave number position with increase in boron content. We speculate that these structural modifications in the morphology and microstructure of CNTs might be due to the charge transfer from boron to the graphite matrix, resulting in shortening of the carbon–carbon bonds.

  8. Growth of carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers without strength degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Greef, Niels [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Magrez, Arnaud; Forro, Laszlo [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Couteau, Edina; Locquet, Jean-Pierre [Laboratory of Solid-State Physics and Magnetism, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Seo, Jin Won [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on PAN-based carbon fibers by means of catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique. By using catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon, CNTs can be grown in the temperature range of 650-750 C. However, carbon fibers suffer significant damages resulting in decrease of initial tensile strength. By applying the oxidative dehydrogenation reaction of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} with CO{sub 2}, we found an alternative way to grow CNTs on carbon fibers at low temperatures, such as 500 C. Scanning electron microscope results combined with single fiber tests indicate that this low temperature growth enables homogeneous grafting of CNTs onto carbon fibers without degradation of tensile strength. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Nanocrystalline cobalt oxides for carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2007-09-01

    Thin Films of nanocrystalline cobalt oxide were formed by sol-gel method. Structure, optical properties and surface properties of these films were investigated by numerous characterization techniques. These films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates below 500°C. . Micropatterns of cobalt oxide thin films were also fabricated on glass and silicon substrates by employing a lift-off method. Crystal size of these nanocrystalline cobalt films could be successfully controllable by varying the amount of cobalt precursors and number of layers. These films were used as the seeding layers for carbon nanotube growth in a CVD process By changing the concentration of monomer precursors in the solgel coating solutions, different size nanoclusters hence different size carbon nanotubes could be synthesized in CVD process. This method can be used for controlled growth of carbon nanotubes for many different applications. In this paper, detail of these experimental results will be presented.

  10. SURFACE HYDROPHILIC MODIFICATION FOR CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITES AND ITS EFFECT ON THE BONDING STRENGTH OF HYDROXYAPATITE COATING

    OpenAIRE

    LEILEI ZHANG; HEJUN LI; QIANG SONG; KEZHI LI; JINHUA LU; WEI LI; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.; SHENG CAO

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the bonding strength of hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composites, a surface hydrophilic modification was performed on carbon/carbon composites using a combination of H2O2 and FeSO4 ⋅ 7H2O under ultraviolet irradiation. The hydroxyapatite coating was prepared by an ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition method. The results showed that the surface hydrophilic modification introduced a large number of oxygen-containing functional groups (C=O, C–O and COOH gr...

  11. Multiwalled carbon nanotube CVD synthesis, modification, and composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dali

    Well-aligned carbon multiwall nanotube (MWNT) arrays have been continuously synthesized by a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method involving the pyrolysis of xylene-ferrocene mixtures. The CVD parameters have been studied to selectively synthesize nanotubes with required dimensions. A mixed tip-root growth model has been proposed for the floating catalytic CVD synthesis. Coarsening of the catalyst particle at the root end promoted MWNT wall coarsening (addition of new concentric graphene shells), while the smaller catalyst particle at the tip contributed to MWNT elongation. A two-step process in which ferrocene was fed for only five minutes to nucleate the DTs was developed to understand if a continuous supply of catalyst was necessary for continued growth. The results show that the ferrocene was only necessary for initial nucleation. To simplify the CVD process further, another two-step synthesis method was developed in which the ferrocene was pre-decomposed so that the nanotube nucleation could be isolated from the growth, enabling quantification of growth mechanisms and kinetics. Mass spectra and hydrocarbon analyses of the CVD reactor tail gas were performed to understand the pyrolysis chemistry. Well-aligned N-doped and Ru-doped MWNT arrays have been produced by pyrolysis of pyridine ferrocene mixtures and xylene-ferrocene-ruthenocene mixtures, respectively. Various material characterization techniques were used to measure the dopant distributions and correlate the catalyst phase with the novel nanotube structures. High-temperature annealing has been shown to be a viable means to remove both the catalyst particles and certain microstructural defects within the CVD-derived DTs. The phase transformation of catalyst during annealing has also been studied. Homogeneous distribution of MWNTs in polystyrene matrices was achieved by an ultrasonic assisted solution-evaporation method. Addition of only 1 wt % DTs to polystyrene increased the polymer

  12. Novel method for carbon nanofilament growth on carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Johathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luhrs, Claudia [UNM MECH.ENG.; Terani, Mehran [UNM MECH.ENG.; Al - Haik, Marwan [UNM MECH.ENG.; Garcia, Daniel [UNM MECH.ENG.; Taha, Mahmoud R [UNM MECH.ENG.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber reinforced structural composites such as fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs) have proven to be key materials for blast mitigation due to their enhanced mechanical performance. However, there is a need to further increase total energy absorption of the composites in order to retain structural integrity in high energy environments, for example, blast events. Research has shown that composite failure in high energy environments can be traced to their relatively low shear strength attributed to the limited bond strength between the matrix and the fibers. One area of focus for improving the strength of composite materials has been to create 'multi-scale' composites. The most common approach to date is to introduce carbon nanotubes into a more traditional composite consisting of epoxy with embedded micron scale fibers. The inclusion of carbon nanotubes (CNT) clearly toughens different matrices. Depositing CNT in brittle matrix increases stiffness by orders of magnitude. Currently, this approach to create multiscale composites is limited due to the difficulty of dispersing significant amounts of nanotubes. It has repeatedly been reported that phase separation occurs above relatively low weight percent loading (ca. 3%) due to the strong van der Waals forces between CNTs compared with that between CNT and polymer. Hence, the nanotubes tend to segregate and form inclusions. One means to prevent nanotube or nanofilament agglomeration is to anchor one end of the nanostructure, thereby creating a stable multi-phase structure. This is most easily done by literally growing the CNTs directly on micron scale fibers. Recently, CNT were grown on carbon fibers, both polyacrylonitrile- (PAN-) and pitch-based, by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) using H2 and CH4 as precursors. Nickel clusters were electrodeposited on the fiber surfaces to catalyze the growth and uniform CNT coatings were obtained on both the PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers. Multiwalled CNTs

  13. Activated carbon from pyrolysed sugarcane bagasse: Silver nanoparticle modification and ecotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Suely Patrícia C; Strauss, Mathias; Delite, Fabrício S; Clemente, Zaira; Castro, Vera L; Martinez, Diego Stéfani T

    2016-09-15

    Activated carbon from pyrolysed sugarcane bagasse (ACPB) presented pore size ranges from 1.0 to 3.5nm, and surface area between 1200 and 1400m(2)g(-1) that is higher than commonly observed to commercial activated carbon. The ACPB material was successfully loaded with of silver nanoparticles with diameter around 35nm (0.81wt.%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that the material surface contains metallic/Ag(0) (93.60wt.%) and ionic/Ag(+) states (6.40wt.%). The adsorption capacity of organic model molecules (i.e. methylene blue and phenol) was very efficient to ACPB and ACPB loaded with silver nanoparticles (ACPB-AgNP), indicating that the material modification with silver nanoparticles has not altered its adsorption capacity. ACPB-AgNP inhibited bacteria growth (Escherichia coli), it is a promising advantage for the use of these materials in wastewater treatment and water purification processes. However, ACPB-AgNP showed environmental risks, with toxic effect to the aquatic organism Hydra attenuata (i.e. LC50 value of 1.94mgL(-1)), and it suppressed root development of Lycopersicum esculentum plant (tomato). Finally, this work draw attention for the environmental implications of activated carbon materials modified with silver nanoparticles. PMID:27039274

  14. Growth of Y-shaped Carbon Nanofibers from Ethanol Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Y-shaped carbon nanofibers as a multi-branched carbon nanostructure have potential applications in electronic devices. In this article, we report that several types of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers are obtained from ethanol flames. These Y-shaped carbon nanofibers have different morphologies. According to our experimental results, the growth mechanism of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been discussed and a possible growth model of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been proposed.

  15. Growth of Y-shaped Carbon Nanofibers from Ethanol Flames

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Jin; Zou Xiaoping; Zhang Hongdan; Li Fei; Ren Pengfei; Zhu Guang; Su Yi; Wang Maofa

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Y-shaped carbon nanofibers as a multi-branched carbon nanostructure have potential applications in electronic devices. In this article, we report that several types of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers are obtained from ethanol flames. These Y-shaped carbon nanofibers have different morphologies. According to our experimental results, the growth mechanism of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been discussed and a possible growth model of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been proposed.

  16. Effects of Surface-modification of Carbon Black on the Characteristics of Polymerized Toner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon black was surface-modified to prepare styrene-based suspension polymerized toner with excellent carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles. Carbon black was oxidized first to introduce hydroxyl groups on the surfaces, then esterification between the hydroxyl groups and carboxyl groups of organic acids (oleic acid, palmitic acid, acrylic acid) was followed to obtain organically surface-modified carbon black. The surface-modification of carbon black was confirmed by FTIR. Apparent carbon black dispersibility in the monomer mixture of the binder resin was tested and the particle size of dispersed carbon black was measured by particle size analyzer. Optical micrographs showed that carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles was improved considerably when the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid was used. The polymerized toner prepared with the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid showed ideal particle size and size distribution as a toner

  17. Effects of Surface-modification of Carbon Black on the Characteristics of Polymerized Toner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ho; Kim, Dae Su [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon black was surface-modified to prepare styrene-based suspension polymerized toner with excellent carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles. Carbon black was oxidized first to introduce hydroxyl groups on the surfaces, then esterification between the hydroxyl groups and carboxyl groups of organic acids (oleic acid, palmitic acid, acrylic acid) was followed to obtain organically surface-modified carbon black. The surface-modification of carbon black was confirmed by FTIR. Apparent carbon black dispersibility in the monomer mixture of the binder resin was tested and the particle size of dispersed carbon black was measured by particle size analyzer. Optical micrographs showed that carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles was improved considerably when the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid was used. The polymerized toner prepared with the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid showed ideal particle size and size distribution as a toner.

  18. Modification of computer simulation of normal grain growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李剑; 李世晨; 郑子樵; 刘祖耀; 陈大钦

    2004-01-01

    A set of principles on transition probability was supplied for the physical process of grain growth. In accord with these principles, a modified transition probability considering the influence of temperature was put forward to simulate the normal grain growth relying on temperature and second phase particles. The modified transition probability correctly reflects the dependence of grain growth on the temperature. The effect of different shapes of second phase particles on the grain growth process was taken into account using the modified transition probability.The relationship between the area fraction of second phase particles and the limit of grain size of the matrix was given. The microstructural evolution patterns employed to 2-D were given. The results agree well with the real grain growth process. All these suggest that the modified transition probability is better than the conventional one.

  19. Cathodic carbon peroxidation process. Surface modifications through oxygen bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Simonet, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of oxygen of the air at carbon electrodes in organic aprotic polar solvents in the presence of organic electrophiles such as alkyl iodides may reveal the formation of films of surface-attached alkyl peroxides. Electrochemical charge of carbons (glassy carbon, graphite, industrial coke) in the presence of tetraalkylammonium salt TAAX permits the building of poly-nucleophilic materials that may spontaneously react with air during the work up. This way, a TAA+ hydroperoxydate layer...

  20. The effects of surface modification on carbon felt electrodes for use in vanadium redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We observed the physical and chemical changes on the surface of carbon felts after various surface modifications. ► The surface area and chemistry of functional groups formed on the surface of carbon felt are critical to determine the kinetics of the redox reactions of vanadium ions. ► By incorporation of the surface modifications into the electrode preparation, the electrochemical activity of carbon felts could be notably enhanced. - Abstract: The surface of carbon felt electrodes has been modified for improving energy efficiency of vanadium redox flow batteries. For comparative purposes, the effects of various surface modifications such as mild oxidation, plasma treatment, and gamma-ray irradiation on the electrochemical properties of carbon felt electrodes were investigated at optimized conditions. The cell energy efficiency was improved from 68 to 75% after the mild oxidation of the carbon felt at 500 °C for 5 h. This efficiency improvement could be attributed to the increased surface area of the carbon felt electrode and the formation of functional groups on its surface as a result of the modification. On the basis of various structural and electrochemical characterizations, a relationship between the surface nature and electrochemical activity of the carbon felt electrodes is discussed.

  1. Carbon isotopes as indicators of peatland growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, Christine; Krüger, Jan Paul; von Sengbusch, Pascal; Szidat, Sönke; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    As undisturbed and/or growing peatlands store considerable amounts of carbon and are unique in their biodiversity and species assemblage, the knowledge of the current status of peatlands (growing with carbon sequestration, stagnating or degrading with carbon emissions) is crucial for landscape management and nature conservation. However, monitoring of peatland status requires long term measurements and is only feasible with expert knowledge. The latter determination is increasingly impeded in a scientific world, where taxonomic expert knowledge and funding of long term monitoring is rare. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes depth profiles in peatland soils have been shown to be a useful tool to monitor the degradation of peatlands due to permafrost thawing in Northern Sweden (Alewell et al., 2011; Krüger et al., 2014), drainage in Southern Finland (Krüger et al., 2016) as well as land use intensification in Northern Germany (Krüger et al., 2015). Here, we tackle the questions if we are able to differentiate between growing and degrading peats with the use of a combination of carbon stable (δ13C) and radiogenic isotope data (14C) with peat stratification information (degree of humification and macroscopic plant remains). Results indicate that isotope data are a useful tool to approximate peatland status, but that expert taxonomic knowledge will be needed for the final conclusion on peatland growth. Thus, isotope tools might be used for landscape screening to pin point sites for detailed taxonomic monitoring. As the method remains qualitative future research at these sites will need to integrate quantitative approaches to determine carbon loss or gain (soil C balances by ash content or C accumulation methods by radiocarbon data; Krüger et al., 2016). Alewell, C., R. Giesler, J. Klaminder, J. Leifeld, and M. Rollog. 2011. Stable carbon isotopes as indicators for micro-geomorphic changes in palsa peats. Biogeosciences, 8, 1769-1778. Krüger, J. P., Leifeld, J

  2. Heteronuclear carbon nanotubes: applications to study carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Synthesis of heteronuclear carbon nanotubes and their application for a variety of studies is presented. SWCNTs peapods encapsulating highly 13C enriched fullerenes and double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) based on the peapods were prepared. Raman studies indicate that the inner tubes are highly 13C enriched with no carbon exchange between the two walls during the synthesis. The material enables the straightforward identification of the inner and outer tube vibrational spectra. An inhomogeneous broadening, assigned to the random distribution of 12C and 13C nuclei is observed and is explained by ab initio vibrational analysis. The growth of inner tubes from organic solvents was proven by the use of 13C labeled organic materials such as toluene. The simultaneous encapsulation of fullerenes with the solvents was found crucial as these prevent the solvents from evaporating during the high temperature synthesis of the inner tubes. Nuclear magnetic resonance on the peapods and DWCNTs with highly 13C enriched fullerenes or inner walls proves the significant contrast of the isotope enriched SWCNTs as compared to other carbon phases. The NMR experiment on the DWCNTs yield direct information on the electronic properties of small diameter SWCNTs. The significantly different chemical shift of the inner tubes is related to a curvature effect. Relaxation data on the inner tubes shows a deviation from a Fermi-liquid behavior. (author)

  3. Carbon nanotubes: controlled growth and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Notable progress has been made on the synthesis, properties and uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs in the past two decades. However, the controlled growth of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs with predefined and uniform structures remains a big challenge, and making full use of CNTs in applications still requires great effort. In this article, our strategies and recent progress on the controlled synthesis of SWCNTs by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed, and the applications of CNTs in lithium-ion batteries, transparent conductive films, and as connectors of metal atomic chains are discussed. Finally, future prospects for CNTs are considered.

  4. Carbon Sequestration, Economic Policies and Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Grimaud, André; Rougé, Luc

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of capturing and sequestering some fraction of the CO2 emissions arising from fossil fuel combustion, often labeled as carbon capture and storage (CCS), is drawing an increasing amount of attention in the business and academic communities. We present here a model of endogenous growth in which the use of a non-renewable resource in production yields flows of pollution whose accumulated stock negatively a¤ects welfare. A CCS technology allows, via some effort, for the partial r...

  5. Increased Alignment in Carbon Nanotube Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an array of two or more carbon nanotube (CNT) structures on a coated substrate surface, the structures having substantially the same orientation with respect to a substrate surface. A single electrode, having an associated voltage source with a selected voltage, is connected to a substrate surface after the substrate is coated and before growth of the CNT structures, for a selected voltage application time interval. The CNT structures are then grown on a coated substrate surface with the desired orientation. Optionally, the electrode can be disconnected before the CNT structures are grown.

  6. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We used very simple and effective modification method to treat PAN-based carbon fiber by liquid oxidation and coupling agent. ► Carbon fiber surface functional groups were analyzed by LRS and XPS. ► Proper treatment of carbon fiber can prove an effective way to increase composite's performance. ► Carbon fiber surface modifications by oxidation and APS could strengthen fiber activity and enlarge surface area as well as its roughness. - Abstract: In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H2SO4, KClO3 and silane coupling agent (γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make C-O-R content increase and O-C=O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor performance of the resulting fiber/resin composites.

  7. GENETIC MODIFICATION OF GIBBERELLIC ACID SIGNALING TO PROMOTE CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN TREE ROOTS AND STEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    , flowering onset, floral structure, and vegetative phenology. Most transgenes elicited various levels of height reduction consistent with the roles of GA in elongation growth. Several other growth traits were proportionally reduced, including branch length, internode distance, and leaf length. In contrast to elongation growth, stem diameter growth was much less affected, suggesting that semi-dwarf trees in dense stands might provide high levels of biomass production and carbon sequestration. The severity of phenotypic effects was strongly correlated with transgene expression among independent transgenic events, but often in a non-linear manner, the form of which varied widely among constructs. The majority of semi-dwarfed, transgenic plants showed delayed bud flush and early bud set, and expression of a native GAI transgene accelerated first time flowering in the field. All of the phenotypic changes observed in multiple years were stable over the 3 years of field study. Our results suggest that transgenic modification of GA action may be useful for producing semi-dwarf trees with modified growth and morphology for horticulture and other uses. We studied the poplar C(19) gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2ox) gene subfamily. We show that a set of paralogous gene pairs differentially regulate shoot and root development. ? PtGA2ox4 and its paralogous gene PtGA2ox5 are primarily expressed in aerial organs, and overexpression of PtGA2ox5 produced a strong dwarfing phenotype characteristic of GA deficiency. Suppression of PtGA2ox4 and PtGA2ox5 led to increased biomass growth, but had no effect on root development. By contrast, the PtGA2ox2 and PtGA2ox7 paralogous pair was predominantly expressed in roots, and when these two genes were RNAi-suppressed it led to a decrease of root biomass. ? The morphological changes in the transgenic plants were underpinned by tissue-specific increases in bioactive GAs that corresponded to the predominant native expression of the targeted paralogous gene

  8. Modification of Carbon Nanotube Powder Microelectrode and Nitrite Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeiFangLIU; JunFuHU

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the carbon nanotube powder microelectroes (denoted CNTPME) are remarkably altered by anodic pretreatment and preadsorption of mediators. It seems that anodic pretreatment leads the long and tangled carbon nanotubes to be partially cut shorter, resulting in more openings as shown by TEM. Besides, the anodic pretreatment may adjust the hydrophobicity of nanotubes to match with that of Os(bpy)32+. As a result, the real surface area and the ability of adsorbing mediator Os(bpy)32+ of the nanotubes are markedly increased so as to effectively catalyze NO2- reduction in acidic solution.

  9. Modification of Carbon Nanotube Powder Microelectrode and Nitrite Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the carbon nanotube powder microelectrodes (denoted CNTPME) are remarkably altered by anodic pretreatment and preadsorption of mediators. It seems that anodic pretreatment leads the long and tangled carbon nanotubes to be partially cut shorter, resulting in more openings as shown by TEM. Besides, the anodic pretreatment may adjust the hydrophobicity of nanotubes to match with that of Os(bpy)32+. As a result, the real surface area and the ability of adsorbing mediator Os(bpy)32+ of the nanotubes are markedly increased so as to effectively catalyze NO2- reduction in acidic solution.

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of carbon fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Michelsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibres are continuously treated with dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure in various gas conditions for adhesion improvement in mind. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis indicated that oxygen is effectively introduced onto the carbon fibre surfaces by He, He...... temperature for a month the O/C ratio at the plasma treated surfaces decreased to 0.151, which is close to that of the untreated ones. It can be attributed to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contamination at the plasma treated surfaces....

  11. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  12. Modification of cement concrete by multilayer carbon nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compact structure of protective concrete-conservative on the basis of Portland cement modified by carbon nano-dispersed systems has been studied. Multilayer carbon nano-tubes GraphistrengthTM by 'Arkema' dispersed in hydrodynamic plant in the solution of surfactant Polyplast SP-1 have been used as modifying additives. The bending strength of fine grain concrete has been observed to increase by 45.1% and compression strength - by 96.8%. The concrete strength increase is related to morphological changes of crystalline hydrate new formations providing the formation of less defective structure of cement matrix of high density, preventing the migration of radionuclides into the environment in the process of radioactive waste conservation

  13. Radiation modification of polyethylene nanocomposites with multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied thermomechanical properties of low density polyethylene and its nanocomposites with 1.0 and 2.0 vol.% of multiwalled carbon nanotubes treated by high energy electronic irradiation (Ee = 1.8 MeV) with doses from 0.01 to 5.0 MGy. For doses above 0.03 MGy the relative change of the length essentially differ from lower doses in the range above melting temperature of polyethylene. Therefore, within the range of 0.03...0.05 MGy of absorption dose it exists a threshold value, above which the qualitative change of thermomechanical curves behavior points out the creation of continuous network of crosslinks. The role of fillers, which were multiwalled carbon nanotubes, was studied. Nanotubes enhance the effect of electronic irradiation, leading to an increase of dimensional stability of samples. Also, they affect dependences of crystallinity degree and melting temperature on absorption dose for nanocomposites

  14. Study and modification of the reactivity of carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, P. L., Jr.; Ismail, I. M.; Mahajan, O. P.; Eapen, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The reactivity to air of polyactylonitrile-based carbon fiber cloth was enhanced by the addition of metals to the cloth. The cloth was oxidized in 54 wt% nitric acid in order to increase the surface area of the cloth and to add carbonyl groups to the surface. Metal addition was then achieved by soaking the cloth in metal acetate solution to effect exchange between the metal carbon and hydrogen on the carbonyl groups. The addition of potassium, sodium, calcium and barium enhanced fiber cloth reactivity to air at 573 K. Extended studies using potassium addition showed that success in enhancing fiber cloth reactivity to air depends on: extent of cloth oxidation in nitric acid, time of exchange in potassium acetate solution and the thoroughness of removing metal acetate from the fiber pore structure following exchange. Cloth reactivity increases essentially linearly with increase in potassium addition via exchange.

  15. Ultraviolet modification of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for carbon capture

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal NS; Sudhakar K.

    2016-01-01

    Nikhil S Gopal,1 K Sudhakar2 1The Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, NJ, USA; 2Bioenergy Laboratory, Malauna Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, India Purpose: Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels have been rising rapidly. Algae are single-cell organisms with highly efficient CO2 uptake mechanisms. Algae yield two to ten times more biomass versus terrestrial plants and can grow nearly anywhere. Large scale CO2 sequestration is not yet sustainable due to high amounts of nitrogen (N) and p...

  16. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley L Gallagher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a glass wastebasket. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction.

  17. STUDY ON THE SURFACE MODIFICATION OF NANOMETER CARBON PARTICLES IN ATMOSPHERIC PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.J. Ge; G.Q. Zhang; Y.M. Liu; X.G. Guo; Z.F. Zhao

    2002-01-01

    The surface modification of nanometer carbon material has been studied by usingan Induced Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma device (IDBD). The experimentalresults show that with different work gases and different discharge conditions, thesurface behaviors of carbon black can be changed according to needs, including theuse of different functional groups and the change of the surface roughness of carbonparticles etc., which increased the grinding and dispersion abilities in binder.

  18. Growth enhancement by soil derived carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grodzinski, B.; Wallis, M.; O' Sullivan, J. (Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role which naturally evolved CO{sub 2} from the soil can play in the early growth and establishment of vegetable transplants in the field. Two planting dates were utilized to examine the effects of the time of tunnel placement on development of a crop of bell peppers, Capsicum annuum L. Ambient CO{sub 2} levels were 340 {plus minus} 4 ppm. In the first 3 weeks of spring (May) CO levels 2 to 3 cm above the soil surface were 420 to 480 ppm. Inside plastic tunnels the upward flux of CO{sub 2} evolved from the soil was restricted effectively raising the tunnel atmosphere to over 3000 ppm even at midday. Data from parallel field and controlled environment chamber experiments support the view that 25-40% of the increase in seedling growth in the field tunnels in the spring was due to enhanced photosynthesis and carbon partitioning into both sugars and starch not merely the elevated temperatures associated with protected structures.

  19. Modification of cellulose nanofibrils with luminescent carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Karoliina; Guo, Jiaqi; Filpponen, Ilari; Laine, Janne; Rojas, Orlando J

    2014-03-10

    Films and hydrogels consisting of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were modified by covalent EDC/NHS coupling of luminescent, water-dispersible carbon dots (CDs). Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) were used to investigate the attachment of CDs on carboxymethylated CNF (CM-CNF). As the first reported use of CD in nanocellulose products, we provide proof-of-concept for the synthesis of transparent and fluorescent nanopaper and for its tunable luminescence as confirmed by confocal microscopy imaging. PMID:24456129

  20. Interfacial Properties Modification of Carbon Fiber/ Polyarylacetylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hong-jun; MA Chong-qi; KUANG Nai-hang; LUAN Shi-lin

    2007-01-01

    This work was dedicated to performing surface oxidation and coating treatments on carbon fibers (CF) and investigating the changes of fiber surface properties after these treatments, including surface composition, relative volume of functional groups, and surface topography with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atom force microscopy (AFM) technology. The results show that,after oxidation treatments, interfacial properties between CF and non-polar polyarylacetylene (PAA) resin are remarkably modified by removing weak surface layers and increasing fiber surface roughness. Coating treatment by high char phenolic resin solution after oxidation makes interface of CF/PAA composites to be upgraded and the interfacial properties further bettered.

  1. Computational studies of small carbon and iron-carbon systems relevant to carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haiming; Rosén, Arne; Harutyunyan, Avetik; Curtarolo, Stefano; Bolton, Kim

    2008-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that dimers and longer carbon strings are more stable than individual atoms on Fe(111) surfaces. It is therefore necessary to consider the formation of these species on the metal surfaces and their effect on the mechanism of single-walled nanotube (SWNT) growth. The good agreement between the trends (energies and structures) obtained using DFT and those based on the Brenner and AIREBO models indicate that these analytic models provide adequate descriptions of the supported carbon systems needed for valid molecular dynamics simulations of SWNT growth. In contrast, the AIREBO model provides a better description of the relative energies for isolated carbon species, and this model is preferred over the Brenner potential when simulating SWNT growth in the absence of metal particles. However, the PM3 semiempirical model appears to provide an even better description for these systems and, given sufficient computer resources, direct dynamics methods based on this model may be preferred. PMID:19198360

  2. Effect of Hybrid Surface Modifications on Tensile Properties of Polyacrylonitrile- and Pitch-Based Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Recent interest has emerged in techniques that modify the surfaces of carbon fibers, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) grafting or polymer coating. Hybridization of these surface modifications has the potential to generate highly tunable, high-performance materials. In this study, the mechanical properties of surface-modified polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based and pitch-based carbon fibers were investigated. Single-filament tensile tests were performed for fibers modified by CNT grafting, dipped polyimide coating, high-temperature vapor deposition polymerized polyimide coating, grafting-dipping hybridization, and grafting-vapor deposition hybridization. The Weibull statistical distributions of the tensile strengths of the surface-modified PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers were examined. All surface modifications, especially hybrid modifications, improved the tensile strengths and Weibull moduli of the carbon fibers. The results exhibited a linear relationship between the Weibull modulus and average tensile strength on a log-log scale for all surface-modified PAN- and pitch-based carbon fibers.

  3. Carbon spheres surface modification and dispersion in polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Vinyl groups were grafted onto the surface of CSs by acryloyl chloride. ► Vinyl-functionalized CSs were dispersed well in organic solvent. ► Non-covalent functionalization was used to functionalize the surface of CSs. ► Functionalized CSs dispersed uniformly in the PMMA matrix with good compatibility. - Abstract: Polymer/carbon spheres (CSs) composite materials, in which polymer was used as continuous phase and CSs as dispersed phase, were synthesized by in situ bulk polymerization. In order to improve CSs dispersibility in polymer matrix and compatibility with polymer matrix, the functional double bonds were introduced onto the surface of CSs by covalent and non-covalent method. Covalent functionalization was accompolished through mixed acid oxidation and subsequent reaction with acryloyl chloride. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform Infrared spectrometry and thermogravimetry were used to characterize the morphology, structure and effect of functionalization of CSs. Vinyl-functionalized CSs by acryloyl chloride were well dispersed in organic solvents, such as DMF, acetone and chloroform. Non-covalent functionalization by surfactant was accompolished by electrostatic interaction. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization enabled CSs to be homogeneously dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix with good compatibility. These studies lay the foundation of preparing the non-close packed three-dimensional carbon-based photonic crystals.

  4. Surface modification of multi-wall carbon nanotube with ultraviolet-curable hyperbranched polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface modification is a general and efficient approach to improve the compatibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) with various matrixes. Here we report the modification of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with hyperbranched polymer which contains UV reactive functional groups. The modification promotes the incorporation of CNT into UV-curable resin, and when cured under UV irradiation to form a homogeneous film, the CNT will be chemically bonded with the matrix by crosslinking photopolymerization. For the unique mechanical properties of CNT, the mechanical properties of the cured MWCNT/UV-curable resin film were greatly improved compared with pure resin film as indicated by the increasing of Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness

  5. Surface modification of multi-wall carbon nanotube with ultraviolet-curable hyperbranched polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Wei; Xu Jianwen [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi Wenfang [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)], E-mail: wfshi@ustc.edu

    2008-04-30

    Surface modification is a general and efficient approach to improve the compatibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) with various matrixes. Here we report the modification of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with hyperbranched polymer which contains UV reactive functional groups. The modification promotes the incorporation of CNT into UV-curable resin, and when cured under UV irradiation to form a homogeneous film, the CNT will be chemically bonded with the matrix by crosslinking photopolymerization. For the unique mechanical properties of CNT, the mechanical properties of the cured MWCNT/UV-curable resin film were greatly improved compared with pure resin film as indicated by the increasing of Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness.

  6. Modification of diamond-like carbon by ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were irradiated with swift heavy ion beams of varying energy and angles of incidence. The irradiation created electrically conducting tracks in the DLC-films by transforming sp3 into sp2 bonds. The DLC-films were analyzed by conductive atomic force microscopy. The images were used to identify ion impact sites, and I-V-Spectroscopy was applied to determine the conductivity of the tracks. High energy ions (2.2 GeV, Au25+) created tracks with ohmic conductivity in the case of perpendicular bombardment, whereas grazing irradiation results in tracks that show mainly tunneling behavior. Low energy ions (100 MeV, Xe23+) created tracks which exhibit tunneling behaviour after perpendicular incidence irradiation, but irradiation under 1 did not result in conductive tracks.

  7. Optical properties of pH-sensitive carbon-dots with different modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Weiguang, E-mail: 11236095@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Wu, Huizhen, E-mail: hzwu@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Ye, Zhenyu, E-mail: yzheny@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Li, Ruifeng, E-mail: hbrook@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Xu, Tianning, E-mail: xtn9886@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Department of Science, Zhijiang College of Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310024 (China); Zhang, Bingpo, E-mail: 11006080@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Carbon dots with unique characters of chemical inertness, low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility, demonstrate important applications in biology and optoelectronics. In this paper we report the optical properties of pH-sensitive carbon dots with different surface modifications. The as-prepared carbon dots can be well dispersed in water by modifying with acid, alkali or metal ions though they tend to form a suspension when being directly dispersed in water. We find that the carbon dots dispersed in water show a new emission and absorption character which is tunable due to the pH-sensitive nature. It is firstly proved that the addition of bivalent copper ions offers a high color contrast for visual colorimetric assays for pH measurement. The effect of surface defects with different modification on the performances of the carbon dots is also explored with a core–shell model. The hydro-dispersed carbon dots can be potentially utilized for cellular imaging or metal ion probes in biochemistry. -- Highlights: • The dispersibility in water of as-prepared carbon dots is effectively improved by the addition of acid, alkali or metal ions. • The effect of hydrolysis on the optical properties of the carbon dots is studied. • The luminescent carbon dots show a pH-sensitive fluorescence and absorption property. • The addition of bivalent copper ions in the post-treated carbon dots offers a high color contrast for visual colorimetric assays for pH measurement. • The effect of surface defects and ligands on the performances of the carbon dots is also explored.

  8. Optical properties of pH-sensitive carbon-dots with different modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dots with unique characters of chemical inertness, low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility, demonstrate important applications in biology and optoelectronics. In this paper we report the optical properties of pH-sensitive carbon dots with different surface modifications. The as-prepared carbon dots can be well dispersed in water by modifying with acid, alkali or metal ions though they tend to form a suspension when being directly dispersed in water. We find that the carbon dots dispersed in water show a new emission and absorption character which is tunable due to the pH-sensitive nature. It is firstly proved that the addition of bivalent copper ions offers a high color contrast for visual colorimetric assays for pH measurement. The effect of surface defects with different modification on the performances of the carbon dots is also explored with a core–shell model. The hydro-dispersed carbon dots can be potentially utilized for cellular imaging or metal ion probes in biochemistry. -- Highlights: • The dispersibility in water of as-prepared carbon dots is effectively improved by the addition of acid, alkali or metal ions. • The effect of hydrolysis on the optical properties of the carbon dots is studied. • The luminescent carbon dots show a pH-sensitive fluorescence and absorption property. • The addition of bivalent copper ions in the post-treated carbon dots offers a high color contrast for visual colorimetric assays for pH measurement. • The effect of surface defects and ligands on the performances of the carbon dots is also explored

  9. The carbon cycle in the old-growth forests

    OpenAIRE

    Motta R

    2008-01-01

    According to a recent paper published in Nature (Luyssaert et al. 2008) the old-growth forests remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and should be considered an important carbon sink at the planetary level. This finding is discussed both in relation to the traditional hypothesis that considered the old-growth forests "neutral" in the carbon balance, and in relation to the present and future importance of this sink at the local and at the planetary level.

  10. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility. PMID:25630300

  11. Enhancing the Properties of Carbon and Gold Substrates by Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Anne Harnisch

    2002-06-27

    The properties of both carbon and gold substrates are easily affected by the judicious choice of a surface modification protocol. Several such processes for altering surface composition have been published in literature. The research presented in this thesis primarily focuses on the development of on-column methods to modify carbon stationary phases used in electrochemically modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC). To this end, both porous graphitic carbon (PGC) and glassy carbon (GC) particles have been modified on-column by the electroreduction of arenediazonium salts and the oxidation of arylacetate anions (the Kolbe reaction). Once modified, the carbon stationary phases show enhanced chromatographic performance both in conventional liquid chromatographic columns and EMLC columns. Additionally, one may also exploit the creation of aryl films to by electroreduction of arenediazonium salts in the creation of nanostructured materials. The formation of mercaptobenzene film on the surface of a GC electrode provides a linking platform for the chemisorption of gold nanoparticles. After deposition of nanoparticles, the surface chemistry of the gold can be further altered by self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation via the chemisorption of a second thiol species. Finally, the properties of gold films can be altered such that they display carbon-like behavior through the formation of benzenehexathiol (BHT) SAMs. BHT chemisorbs to the gold surface in a previously unprecedented planar fashion. Carbon and gold substrates can be chemically altered by several methodologies resulting in new surface properties. The development of modification protocols and their application in the analytical arena is considered herein.

  12. Comparative Study of the Modification of Coal Tar Pitch for Higher Carbonization Yield and Better Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文娟; 李铁虎; 卢萌; 侯翠岭

    2013-01-01

    Parent coal tar pitch (CTP) was modified with boric acid (BA), cinnamaldehyde (CMA) and the mixture of BA and CMA, respectively. The parent CTP and three modified CTPs were characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The four samples were carbonized at different temperatures and resultant carbonized products were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and polarized-light microscopy. The results show that the morphologies and carbonization behaviors of the parent CTP and modified CTPs are quite different. The carbonization yield of the CTP modified with the mixture of BA and CMA is higher than that of CTP modified with BA or CMA only. In addition, the modification of CTP with 7 g of BA and 10 ml of CMA results in an increase in carbonization yield by 5.64%. During the pyrolysis of modified CTPs, the dehydration of BA or the distillation of CMA occurs at the tem-perature lower than 300 °C, and methyl and methylene groups of the modified CTPs disappear gradually as tem-perature rises. Furthermore, the modification of CTP by the mixture of BA and CMA results in more intensive mesophase spheres than other modified CTPs, and the modified CTP is easier to be carbonized to form graphitic carbon.

  13. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently.

  14. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently. PMID:26955791

  15. Melamine Modification of Spherical Activated Carbon and Its Effects on Acetylene Hydrochlorination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Weijie; WANG Xugen; ZHU Mingyuan; ZHANG Haiyang; CHEN Kun; WANG Qinqin; LI Xiaoyan; DAI Bin

    2014-01-01

    Commercial spherical activated carbon (SAC) was modified by impregnation to enhance the catalytic properties of SAC in acetylene hydrochlorination through melamine modification. Different modification conditions for SAC with nitrogen were compared by changing the SAC-Melamine ratios. The effect of carbonization temperature on the modification was also investigated. Surface chemistry and adsorption properties of the modified and unmodified SACs were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), elementary analysis, BET, and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Moreover, the catalytic properties of SAC in acetylene hydrochlorination under differently modified conditions were also investigated. Elemental analysis showed that the nitrogen content of the modified SAC was greatly improved. XPS revealed that nitrogen mainly exists in Pyrrole nitrogen and Pyridine nitrogen. TPD showed that desorption of C2H2 was changed by modification. The conversion rate of acetylene was up to 70%under the following reaction conditions:temperature, 150℃;C2H2 hourly space velocity (GHSV), 36 h-1;feed volume ratio V (HCl)/V (C2H2) = 1.15. The catalytic properties of SAC were improved significantly via melamine modification.

  16. Effect of different chemical modification of carbon nanotubes for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical reduction of oxygen on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) electrodes in 1 M KOH solution has been studied using the rotating ring disc electrode (RDE). The surface modification of CNTs has been estimated by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. The effect of different oxygen functionalities on the surface of carbon nanotube for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is considered in terms of the number of electrons (n) involved. Electrochemical studies indicate that in the case of the modification of CNTs with citric acid and diazonium salts the n values were close to two in the measured potential range, and the electrochemical reduction is limited to the production of peroxide as the final product. In the case of the modification of carbon nanotubes with peroxymonosulphuric acid, in the measured potential range, the n value is close to 4 indicating the four-electron pathway for the ORR. By correlating ORR measurements with the XPS analysis, we propose that the increase in electrocatalytic activity towards the ORR, for CNT can be attributed to the increase in C-O groups on the surface of CNTs after modification with peroxymonosulphuric acid

  17. A REVIEW OF OXYGEN-CONTAINING SURFACE GROUPS AND SURFACE MODIFICATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yongwen; LI Zhong; XI Hongxia; XIA Qibin

    2004-01-01

    This review focused on the recent reports related to the function, characterization and modification of oxygen-containing surface groups of activated carbon (AC). The Oxygen-containing surface groups were briefly described, and the most frequently used techniques for characterization of the oxygen-containing surface groups on ACs were also briefly stated. A detailed discussion of the effects of the oxygen-containing surface groups on the adsorptive capacity of AC was given. The recent progresses in modification of the oxygen-containing surface groups of AC were also reviewed.

  18. Kinetics of Laser-Assisted Carbon Nanotube Growth

    CERN Document Server

    van de Burgt, Yoeri; Mandamparambil, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth is an attractive mask-less process for growing locally aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in selected places on temperature sensitive substrates. The nature of the localized process results in fast carbon nanotube growth with high experimental throughput. Here, we report on detailed investigation of growth kinetics related to physical and chemical process characteristics. Specifically, the growth kinetics is investigated by monitoring the dynamical changes of reflected laser beam intensity during growth. Benefiting from the fast growth and high experimental throughput, we investigate a wide range of experimental conditions and propose several growth regimes. Rate-limiting steps are determined using rate equations linked to the proposed growth regimes, which are further characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), therefore directly linking growth regimes to the structural quality of the CNTs. Activation energies for the differe...

  19. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 μm) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering

  20. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Yijuan [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Deng, Tianzheng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin Fang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Liu Shouxin [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Yongjie [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Feng Feng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Yan [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)], E-mail: yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 {mu}m) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering.

  1. Carbonate platform growth and demise offshore Central Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Michael B.W.; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars H.;

    2013-01-01

    . East of the fault zone, the Triton Carbonate Platform was also initiated during the Early Miocene. Carbonate growth thrived during Early and part of Middle Miocene time and a thick, clean Lower and Middle Miocene carbonate succession cover the Triton Horst and the Qui Nhon Ridge. During the Middle......Miocene carbonate platforms cover a large part of the Central Vietnamese South China Sea margin. Early carbonate deposition took place on two regional platforms separated by a narrow depression developed along the trace of the East Vietnam Boundary Fault Zone. West of the East Vietnam Boundary...... Fault Zone, the Tuy Hoa Carbonate Platform fringes the continental margin between Da Nang and Nha Trang. Here, platform growth initiated during the Early Miocene and continued until Middle Miocene time when regional uplift led to subaerial exposure, termination of platform growth and karstification...

  2. Interfacial load transfer in polymer/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with a nanohybrid shish kebab modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2014-09-10

    Interfacial properties are known to have a critical effect on the mechanical properties of a nanocomposite material system. Here, the interfacial load transfer in a carbon nanotube (CNT)/nylon-11 composite was studied with a CNT/nylon-11 nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) structure modification using Raman spectroscopy. Characterization of the polymer crystal in the NHSK using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the first time indicates that the NHSK structure formed a more perfect crystal structure than the bulk polymer. On the basis of transmission electron microscopy and DSC results, a new growth model for the NHSK crystal is hypothesized, indicating the formation of an initial uniform crystal layer on the CNT prior to the crystallization of the kebabs. Characterization of the nanocomposites using Raman spectroscopy, with the samples heated to introduce interfacial shear stress caused by thermal expansion mismatch, found that the D* band of the CNT in the NHSK/nylon-11 composite displayed a more pronounced shift with an increase in temperature, which is attributed to the NHSK structure being more effective at transferring load from the nylon matrix to the nanotube inclusions. The NHSK structure was also used to fabricate composites with two amorphous polymers, polycarbonate and poly(methyl methacrylate), to investigate the load transfer mechanism. It was found that when the compatibility between the polymer in the NHSK structure and the bulk polymer matrix at the molecular level is sufficiently high, the ensuing mechanical interlocking effect further enhances the interfacial load transfer for polymer nanocomposites. Additional mechanical characterization of polymer nanocomposites with 0.1 wt % NHSK reinforcement demonstrates how the moduli and ultimate tensile strength of the nanocomposites can be improved via this NHSK structure. PMID:25134606

  3. Surface modification of coconut shell based activated carbon for the improvement of hydrophobic VOC removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Liu, Suqin; Liu, Junxin

    2011-08-30

    In this study, coconut shell based carbons were chemically treated by ammonia, sodium hydroxide, nitric acid, sulphuric acid, and phosphoric acid to determine suitable modification for improving adsorption ability of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on granular activated carbons (GAC). The saturated adsorption capacities of o-xylene, a hydrophobic volatile organic compound, were measured and adsorption effects of the original and modified activated carbons were compared. Results showed that GAC modified by alkalis had better o-xylene adsorption capacity. Uptake amount was enhanced by 26.5% and reduced by 21.6% after modification by NH(3)H(2)O and H(2)SO(4), respectively. Compared with the original, GAC modified by acid had less adsorption capacity. Both SEM/EDAX and BET were used to identify the structural characteristics of the tested GAC, while IR spectroscopy and Boehm's titration were applied to analysis the surface functional groups. Relationships between physicochemical characteristics of GAC and their adsorption performances demonstrated that o-xylene adsorption capacity was related to surface area, pore volume, and functional groups of the GAC surface. Removing surface oxygen groups, which constitute the source of surface acidity, and reducing hydrophilic carbon surface favors adsorption capacity of hydrophobic VOCs on carbons. The performances of modified GACs were also investigated in the purification of gases containing complex components (o-xylene and steam) in the stream. PMID:21683520

  4. Covalent modification of carbon surfaces with cyclodextrins by mediated oxidation of β-cyclodextrin monoanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • >Covalent grafting of carbon surfaces by mediated oxidation of cyclodextrin monoanions > The use of ferrocene as redox catalyst to prepare electrochemically modified electrodes. • EPR spectrum of electrochemically generated cyclodextrin radicals. • Electrochemical polymerization of cyclodextrine over glassy carbon surfaces. • Formation of inclusion complexes between ferrocene and β-cyclodextrin in dimethylsulfoxide. - Abstract: The covalent grafting of glassy carbon and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with cyclodextrins is reported in this work. The modification procedure is based in the concept that oxidation of organic anions generates radicals which react with carbon surfaces. These radical species are generated through a redox catalysis mechanism involving the formation of ferrocenium ion, which in turn oxidizes the cyclodextrin monoanion to afford an oxygen-centered free radical that ultimately reacts either in solution or with the surface, affording a strong attachment of cyclodextrin molecules to the carbon surface. The intervention of this radical was established from spectroelectrochemical EPR experiments. Atomic force microscopy imaging showed that the attached organic layer is thick while cyclic voltammetry experiments confirmed that this modified surface behaves as an ultramicroelectrode array. This kind of modification allows incorporate cyclodextrin to an electrode surface without a binder, making the modified electrode useful to be tested in forthcoming sensor studies

  5. Electronic state modification in laser deposited amorphous carbon films by the inclusion of nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Miyajima; Adamopoulos, G; Henley, SJ; V.Stolojan; Tison, Y; Garcia-Caurel, E; Drevillon, B.; Shannon, JM; Silva, SRP

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of the inclusion of nitrogen in amorphous carbon thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition, which results in stress induced modifications to the band structure and the concomitant changes to the electronic transport properties. The microstructural changes due to nitrogen incorporation were examined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and Raman scattering. The band structure was investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry data in the range o...

  6. Surface modification and characterization of carbon black; UV cured colored epoxy composites

    OpenAIRE

    Atif, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Carbon Black is inexpensive widely used industrial filler, but its dispersability in solvents/polymeric media has always been a critical point. As a result either surfactants or higher mechanical forces have been utilized to disperse it well in the media. First part of research was aimed at surface modification of CB to increase its dispersability in different solvents and epoxy that directly effects filler-medium interactions. Type and magnitude of this interaction differs with structure and...

  7. CVD growth and field emission properties of nanostructured carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of the growth mechanisms, electronical and structural properties, and field emissions of carbon films obtained by chemical vapour deposition showed that field emissions from films composed of spatially oriented carbon nanotubes and plate-like graphite nanocrystals exhibit non-metallic behaviour. The experimental evidence of work function local reduction for carbon film materials is reported here. A model of the emission site is proposed and the mechanism of field emission from nanostructured carbon materials is described. In agreement with the model proposed here, the electron emission in different carbon materials results from sp3-like defects in an sp2 network of their graphite-like component. (author)

  8. Economic Growth, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Renewable Energy and Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Carlos LEITÃO

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the correlation between economic growth, carbon dioxide emissions, renewable energy and globalization for the period 1970-2010, using time series (OLS,GMM, unit root test, VEC model, and Granger causality) to Portuguese economy. OLS estimator and GMM model demonstrate that carbon dioxide emissions and renewable energy are positively correlated with economic growth. The econometric models also show that the overall index of globalization has a positive effect...

  9. Evidence for super-exponentially accelerating atmospheric carbon dioxide growth

    CERN Document Server

    Hüsler, Andreas D

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the growth rates of atmospheric carbon dioxide and human population, by comparing the relative merits of two benchmark models, the exponential law and the finite-time-singular (FTS) power law. The later results from positive feedbacks, either direct or mediated by other dynamical variables, as shown in our presentation of a simple endogenous macroeconomic dynamical growth model. Our empirical calibrations confirm that human population has decelerated from its previous super-exponential growth until 1960 to ``just' an exponential growth, but with no sign of more deceleration. As for atmospheric CO2 content, we find that it is at least exponentially increasing and most likely characterized by an accelerating growth rate as off 2009, consistent with an unsustainable FTS power law regime announcing a drastic change of regime. The coexistence of a quasi-exponential growth of human population with a super-exponential growth of carbon dioxide content in the atmosphere is a diagnostic of insignificant impr...

  10. Carbon nanocluster growth inside micropipes during the SiC bulk growth process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanocluster growth inside micropipes has been discovered during the SiC bulk growth process under near-equilibrium conditions. Measurements have been made of the morphology and structure of the carbon crystallites. An isobaric cross-section of the Si–C phase diagram and an isothermal cross-section of the triple Si–C–Ar system have been built. The C-cluster nucleation and growth conditions have been analyzed using a phase diagram. (papers)

  11. Catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI REN ZHONG

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (2.4 g/g catalyst, with large inner diameters were successfully synthesized through pyrolysis of methane on a Ni–Cu–Al catalyst by adding sodium carbonate into the carbon nanotubes growth system. The inner diameter of the carbon nanotubes prepared by this method is about 20–60 nm, while their outer diameter is about 40–80 nm. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed to investigate the morphology and microstructures of the carbon nanotubes. The analyses showed that these carbon nanotubes have large inner diameters and good graphitization. The addition of sodium carbonate into the reaction system brings about a slight decrease in the methane conversion and the yield of carbon. The experimental results showed that sodium carbonate is a mildly toxic material which influenced the catalytic activity of the Ni–Cu–Al catalyst and resulted in the formation of carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters. The growth mechanism of the carbon nanotubes with large inner diameters is discussed in this paper.

  12. Key roles of carbon solubility in single-walled carbon nanotube nucleation and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Maoshuai; Amara, Hakim; Jiang, Hua; Hassinen, Jukka; Bichara, Christophe; Ras, Robin H. A.; Lehtonen, Juha; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Loiseau, Annick

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating the roles played by carbon solubility in catalyst nanoparticles is required to better understand the growth mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Here, we highlight that controlling the level of dissolved carbon is of key importance to enable nucleation and growth. We first performed tight binding based atomistic computer simulations to study carbon incorporation in metal nanoparticles with low solubilities. For such metals, carbon incorporation strongly depends on their structures (face centered cubic or icosahedral), leading to different amounts of carbon close to the nanoparticle surface. Following this idea, we then show experimentally that Au nanoparticles effectively catalyze SWNT growth when in a face centered cubic structure, and fail to do so when icosahedral. Both approaches emphasize that the presence of subsurface carbon in the nanoparticles is necessary to enable the cap lift-off, making the nucleation of SWNTs possible.Elucidating the roles played by carbon solubility in catalyst nanoparticles is required to better understand the growth mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Here, we highlight that controlling the level of dissolved carbon is of key importance to enable nucleation and growth. We first performed tight binding based atomistic computer simulations to study carbon incorporation in metal nanoparticles with low solubilities. For such metals, carbon incorporation strongly depends on their structures (face centered cubic or icosahedral), leading to different amounts of carbon close to the nanoparticle surface. Following this idea, we then show experimentally that Au nanoparticles effectively catalyze SWNT growth when in a face centered cubic structure, and fail to do so when icosahedral. Both approaches emphasize that the presence of subsurface carbon in the nanoparticles is necessary to enable the cap lift-off, making the nucleation of SWNTs possible. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  13. Increase of the Photocatalytic Activity of TiO by Carbon and Iron Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Tryba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of TiO2 by doping of a residue carbon and iron can give enhanced photoactivity of TiO2. Iron adsorbed on the surface of TiO2 can be an electron or hole scavenger and results in the improvement of the separation of free carriers. The presence of carbon can increase the concentration of organic pollutants on the surface of TiO2 facilitating the contact of the reactive species with the organic molecules. Carbon-doped TiO2 can extend the absorption of the light to the visible region and makes the photocatalysts active under visible-light irradiation. It was proved that TiO2 modified by carbon and iron can work in both photocatalysis and photo-Fenton processes, when H2O2 is used, enhancing markedly the rate of the organic compounds decomposition such as phenol, humic acids and dyes. The photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds on TiO2 modified by iron and carbon is going by the complex reactions of iron with the intermediates, what significantly accelerate the process of their decomposition. The presence of carbon in such photocatalyst retards the inconvenient reaction of OH radicals scavenging by H2O2, which occurs when Fe-TiO2 photocatalyst is used.

  14. Carbon nanotubes and carbon onions for modification of styrene-acrylate copolymer based nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merijs-Meri, Remo; Zicans, Janis; Ivanova, Tatjana; Bitenieks, Juris [Institute of Polymer Materials, Riga Technical University, Azenes street 14/24, LV-1048, Riga (Latvia); Kuzhir, Polina; Maksimenko, Sergey [Institute of Nuclear Problems, Belarus State University, Bobruiskaya str. 11, 220030, Minsk (Belarus); Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Moseenkov, Sergey [Boreskov Institute of Catalyst Siberian branch of RAS, pr. Lavrentieva 5, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    Styrene acrylate polymer (SAC) nanocomposites with various carbon nanofillers (multiwalled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs and onion like carbon OLC) are manufactured by means of latex based routes. Concentration of the carbon nanofillers is changed in a broad interval starting from 0.01 up to 10 wt. %. Elastic, dielectric and electromagnetic properties of SAC nanocomposites are investigated. Elastic modulus, electrical conductivity and electromagnetic radiation absorption of the investigated SAC nanocomposites increase along with rising nanofiller content. The effect of the addition of anisometric MWCNTs on the elastic properties of the composite is higher than in the case of the addition of OLC. Higher electrical conductivity of the OLC containing nanocomposites is explained with the fact that reasonable agglomeration of the nanofiller can promote the development of electrically conductive network. Efficiency of the absorption of electromagnetic radiation depends on the development of conductive network within the SAC matrix.

  15. Improvement of Carbon Dioxide Sweep Efficiency by Utilization of Microbial Permeability Profile Modification to Reduce the Amount of Oil Bypassed During Carbon Dioxide Flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Darrel [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Brown, Lewis [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Lynch, F. Leo [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Kirkland, Brenda L. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Collins, Krystal M. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Funderburk, William K. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2010-12-31

    The objective of this project was to couple microbial permeability profile modification (MPPM), with carbon dioxide flooding to improve oil recovery from the Upper Cretaceous Little Creek Oil Field situated in Lincoln and Pike counties, MS. This study determined that MPPM technology, which improves production by utilizing environmentally friendly nutrient solutions to simulate the growth of the indigenous microflora in the most permeable zones of the reservoir thus diverting production to less permeable, previously unswept zones, increased oil production without interfering with the carbon dioxide flooding operation. Laboratory tests determined that no microorganisms were produced in formation waters, but were present in cores. Perhaps the single most significant contribution of this study is the demonstration that microorganisms are active at a formation temperature of 115°C (239°F) by using a specially designed culturing device. Laboratory tests were employed to simulate the MPPM process by demonstrating that microorganisms could be activated with the resulting production of oil in coreflood tests performed in the presence of carbon dioxide at 66°C (the highest temperature that could be employed in the coreflood facility). Geological assessment determined significant heterogeneity in the Eutaw Formation, and documented relatively thin, variably-lithified, well-laminated sandstone interbedded with heavily-bioturbated, clay-rich sandstone and shale. Live core samples of the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw Formation from the Heidelberg Field, MS were quantitatively assessed using SEM, and showed that during MPPM permeability modification occurs ubiquitously within pore and throat spaces of 10-20 μm diameter. Testing of the MPPM procedure in the Little Creek Field showed a significant increase in production occurred in two of the five production test wells; furthermore, the decline curve in each of the production wells became noticeably less steep. This project greatly

  16. Growth limit of carbon onions – A continuum mechanical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todt, Melanie; Bitsche, Robert; Hartmann, Markus A.;

    2014-01-01

    The growth of carbon onions is simulated using continuum mechanical shell models. With this models it is shown that, if a carbon onion has grown to a critical size, the formation of an additional layer leads to the occurrence of a structural instability. This instability inhibits further growth of...... carbon onions and, thus, can be a reason for the limited size of such particles. The loss of stability is mainly evoked by van der Waals interactions between misfitting neighboring layers leading to self-equilibrating stress states in the layers due to mutual accommodation. The influence of the curvature...... model gives insight into mechanisms which are assumed to limit the size of carbon onions and can serve as basis for further investigations, e.g., of the formation of nanodiamonds in the center of carbon onions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Peng; Gan, Wei; Habib, Muhammad; Xu, Weiyu; Fang, Qi; Song, Li

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC) used in several device processing technologies.

  18. Adsorption of butanol vapor on active carbons with nitric acid hydrothermal modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuhe; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xiaomin; Gu, Zhengrong; Gibbons, William; Vu, Han

    2015-11-01

    Butanol can be produced from biomass via fermentation and used in vehicles. Unfortunately, butanol is toxic to the microbes, and this can slow fermentation rates and reduce butanol yields. Butanol can be efficiently removed from fermentation broth by gas stripping, thereby preventing its inhibitory effects. Original active carbon (AC) and AC samples modified by nitric acid hydrothermal modification were assessed for their ability to adsorb butanol vapor. The specific surface area and oxygen-containing functional groups of AC were tested before and after modification. The adsorption capacity of unmodified AC samples was the highest. Hydrothermal oxidation of AC with HNO3 increased the surface oxygen content, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, micropore, mesopore and total pore volume of AC. Although the pore structure and specific surface area were greatly improved after hydrothermal oxidization with 4M HNO3, the increased oxygen on the surface of AC decreased the dynamic adsorption capacity. PMID:26291412

  19. The effect of plasma modification on the sheet resistance of nylon fabrics coated with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-pressure oxygen and argon plasmas were used to pre-treat nylon fabrics, and the modified fabrics, together with the raw fabrics, were subsequently coated with single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by a dip-drying process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy analyses indicated the attachment of SWCNTs onto nylon fabrics. After the coating with SWCNTs, the plasma modified fabrics exhibited sheet resistance of as low as 2.0 kΩ/sq. with respect to 4.9 kΩ/sq. of the raw fabrics, presumably owing to the increase of fibre surface roughness incurred by the plasma modification, which is evidenced by SEM analyses. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicates the incorporation of oxygen functionalities on fibre surfaces in the plasma modification. This is responsible for the variation of the electrical conductance of SWCNT-coated fabrics with the type of plasma and the duration of plasma ablation.

  20. A novel surface modification of carbon fiber for high-performance thermoplastic polyurethane composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yizhen; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xinling; Yang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Properties of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced composites depend largely on the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and the matrix. In the present work, CF was grafted by 4,4‧-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) molecules after electrochemical oxidation treatment. The existence of functional groups introduced to the fiber surface and the changes of surface roughness were confirmed by FTIR, AFM, XPS, SEM and Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the possible applications of this surface modification of carbon fiber, we examined the mechanical properties as well as the friction and wear performance of pristine CF and MDI-CF reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites with 5-30 wt.% fiber contents, and found that the mechanical properties of TPU composites were all significantly improved. It is remarkable that when fiber content was 30 wt.%, the tensile strength of TPU/MDI-CF was increased by 99.3%, which was greater than TPU/CF (53.2%), and the friction loss of TPU/MDI-CF was decreased by 49.09%. The results of DMA and SEM analysis indicated the positive effects of MDI modification on the interfacial bonding between fibers and matrix. We believed that this simple and effective method could be used to the development of surface modified carbon fiber for high-performance TPU.

  1. Carbon nanotube growth on nanozirconia under strong cathodic polarization in steam and carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    nanozirconia acting as a catalyst for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water in a nickel-yttria- stabilized zirconia cermet under strong cathodic polarization. An electrocatalytic mechanism is proposed for the growth of the CNTs. ${{{\\rm {\\rm V......Growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) catalyzed by zirconia nanoparticles was observed in the Ni-yttria doped zirconia (YSZ) composite cathode of a solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) at approximately 875 °C during co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O to produce CO and H 2. CNT was observed to grow under...

  2. Modification of nutrition strategy for improvement of postnatal growth in very low birth weight infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ah Young; Lee, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the effects of modified parenteral nutrition (PN) and enteral nutrition (EN) regimens on the growth of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Methods The study included VLBW infants weighing <1,500 g, admitted to Chungnam National University Hospital between October 2010 and April 2014, who were alive at the time of discharge. Subjects were divided according to 3 periods: period 1 (n=37); prior to the PN and EN regimen being modified, period 2 (n=50); following the PN-only regimen modification, period 3 (n=37); following both PN and EN regimen modification. The modified PN regimen provided 3 g/kg/day of protein and 1 g/kg/day of lipid on the first day of life. The modified EN regimen provided 3.5-4.5 g/kg/day of protein and 150 kcal/kg/day of energy. We investigated growth rate, anthropometric measurements at 40 weeks postconceptional age (PCA) and the incidence of extrauterine growth restriction (EUGR) at 40 weeks PCA. Results Across the 3 periods, clinical characteristics, including gestational age, anthropometric measurements at birth, multiple births, sex, Apgar score, surfactant use and PDA treatment, were similar. Growth rates for weight and height, from time of full enteral feeding to 40 weeks PCA, were higher in period 3. Anthropometric measurements at 40 weeks PCA were greatest in period 3. Incidence of weight, height and head circumference EUGR at 40 weeks PCA decreased in period 3. Conclusion Beginning PN earlier, with a greater supply of protein and energy during PN and EN, is advantageous for postnatal growth in VLBW infants. PMID:27186226

  3. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  4. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejing Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and optical microscopy (OM. The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials.

  5. Climate Constraints on the Carbon Intensity of Economic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Rozenberg, J.; Hallegatte, S.; Narloch, U.

    2015-12-01

    Development and climate goals together constrain the carbon intensity of production. Using a simple and transparent model that represents committed CO2 emissions (i.e. those embedded in installed capital), we explore the carbon intensity of production related to new capital required for different temperature targets across several thousand scenarios. Future pathways consistent with the 2oC target which allow for continued GDP growth require early action to reduce carbon intensity of new production, and either (i) a short lifetime of energy and industry capital (e.g. early retrofit of coal power plants), or (ii) large negative emissions after 2050 (i.e. rapid development and dissemination of carbon capture and sequestration). To achieve the 2oC target, half of the scenarios indicate a carbon intensity of new production between 33 and 73 g CO2/ - much lower than the carbon intensities of the best performing countries today. The average lifespan of energy capital (especially power plants), and industry capital, are critical because they commit emissions far into the future and reduce the budget for new capital emissions. Each year of lifetime added to existing, carbon intensive capital, decreases the carbon intensity of new production required to meet a 2°C carbon budget by 1 to 1.5 g CO2/, and each year of delaying the start of mitigation decreases the required CO2 intensity of new production by 20 to 50 gCO2/$. Constraints on the carbon intensity of new production under a 3°C target are considerably relaxed relative to the 2°C target, but remain daunting in comparison to the carbon intensity of the global economy today. Figure Caption: The relationship between GDP per capita growth, lifetime of energy and industry capital and the required carbon intensity of new production 2013-2050 under a 2°C target.

  6. Fixed Lingual Mandibular Growth Modificator: a new appliance for Class II correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Hasan Alali

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This article demonstrates the description and use of a new appliance for Class II correction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case report of a 10-year 5 month-old girl who presented with a skeletally-based Class II division 1 malocclusion (ANB = 6.5º on a slightly low-angle pattern, with ML-NSL angle of 30º and ML-NL angle of 22.5º. Overjet was increased (7 mm and associated with a deep bite. RESULTS: Overjet and overbite reduction was undertaken with the new appliance, Fixed Lingual Mandibular Growth Modificator (FLMGM. CONCLUSION: FLMGM may be effective in stimulating the growth of the mandible and correcting skeletal Class II malocclusions. Clinicians can benefit from the unique clinical advantages that FLMGM provides, such as easy handling and full integration with bracketed appliance at any phase.

  7. Selective growth of carbon nanotube on silicon substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOT; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) growth of iron oxide-deposited trench-patterns and the locally-ordered CNT arrays on silicon substrate were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) of ethanol vapor. The CNTs were uniformly synthesized with good selectivity on trench-patterned silicon substrates. This fabrication process is compatible with currently used semiconductor-processing technologies,and the carbon-nanotube fabrication process can be widely applied for the development of electronic devices using carbon-nanotube field emitters as cold cathodes and can revolutionize the area of field-emitting electronic devices. The site-selective growth of CNT from an iron oxide nanoparticle catalyst patterned were also achieved by drying-mediated self-assembly technique. The present method offers a simple and cost-effective method to grow carbon nanotubes with self-assembled patterns.

  8. One Carbon Metabolism, Fetal Growth and Long Term Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Kalhan, Satish C.

    2013-01-01

    One carbon metabolism, or methyl transfer, is critical for metabolism in all cells, is involved in the synthesis of purines, pyrimidines, in the methylation of numerous substrates, proteins, DNA and RNA, and in the expression of a number of genes. Serine is the primary endogenous methyl donor to the one carbon pool. Perturbations in methyl transfer due to nutrient and hormonal changes can have profound effect on cell function, growth and proliferation. It is postulated that at critical stages...

  9. Are old-growth forests still able to accumulate carbon?

    OpenAIRE

    Grassi G

    2006-01-01

    A recent paper published in Science (Zhou et al. 2006) reports an unexpectedly high accumulation of carbon in the top 20-cm soil layer in a preserved old-growth forest in southern China during 24 years. This finding is discussed in relation to the traditional “ecological equilibrium” concept and compared to other recent results and hypotheses on this issue. Given the importance of better quantifying and understanding the capacity of accumulating carbon by old-growth forest in the context of t...

  10. Energy loss of /sup 12/C projectiles in different carbon modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stopping cross sections of the three carbon modifications diamond, graphite, and glassy carbon are investigated for carbon projectiles of intermediate velocity. The inverted Doppler-shift attenuation method was used as the experimental technique, and it enabled us to measure the ratios of the three stopping cross sections precisely over a wide energy range. For velocities between 3 and 4 times Bohr's velocity the stopping cross sections of graphite and glassy carbon are found to be 1.036 and 1.072 times larger than that of diamond, respectively. These differences are attributed to binding effects. To understand these effects, we have evaluated the mean ionization potentials utilizing the local-plasma approximation for the inner-shell electrons and the dielectric response function for the valence electrons. The theoretical ratios calculated by inserting these potentials into the Bethe-Bloch stopping-power formula agree well with our experimental results. Furthermore, we have obtained a value of 53.3 +- 4.1 fs for the lifetime of the first excited state of the /sup 12/C nucleus

  11. Electrochemical p-doping modification of carbon nanotubes with Prussian Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Weitz, Ralf Thomas; Burghard, Marko [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, Klaus [Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Institut de Physique des Nanostructures, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Electrochemical modification is an effective method to tune the properties of carbon nanotubes. In this communication, we report on the modification of individual carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by electrodeposition of the molecular magnet Prussian Blue (PB) FeIII{sub 4}[FeII(CN){sub 6}]3{sup *}nH{sub 2}O (n=14-16). While previous studies have primarily addressed the electrocatalytic properties of PB-modified bulk nanotube electrodes,1 the motivation behind the present work is to investigate the influence of inorganic coatings on the charge transport characteristics of individual SWCNTs. The formation of PB under the applied electrochemical conditions has been proven by various characterization techniques. In contrast to metallic SWCNTs whose electrical conductivity remained largely unaffected, semiconducting tubes exhibited a strongly altered behavior after PB deposition. Specifically, in the latter case, the conductance vs. gate voltage curves were substantially shifted toward more positive gate voltages, indicative of enhanced p-type doping of the tubes. Temperature-dependent measurements revealed that the threshold voltage decreases significantly upon cooling, which is attributed to freezing out of the hole transfer from PB to the underlying nanotubes.

  12. Controlling growth of aligned carbon nanotubes from porous silicon templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fabricating well-aligned carbon nanotubes, especially, on a silicon substrate is very important for their applications. In this paper, an aligned carbon nanotube array has been prepared by pyrolysis of hydrocarbons catalyzed by nickel nanoparticles embedded in porous silicon (PS) templates. High-magnification transmission electron microscopy images confirm that the nanotubes are well graphitized. The PS substrates with pore sizes between 10 and 100 nm play a control role on the growth of carbon nanotubes and the diameters of the tubes increase with the enlargement of the pores of the substrates. However, such a control role cannot be found in the macro-PS substrates.

  13. Post-translational modification of osteopontin: Effects on in vitro hydroxyapatite formation and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boskey, Adele L., E-mail: boskeya@hss.edu [Musculoskeletal Integrity Program, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Christensen, Brian, E-mail: bc@mb.au.dk [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University (Denmark); Taleb, Hayat, E-mail: Talebh@hss.edu [Musculoskeletal Integrity Program, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Sorensen, Esben S., E-mail: ess@mb.au.dk [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thrombin-cleaved fragments of milk-osteopontin effect hydroxyapatite formation differently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N- and C-terminal fragments promoted hydroxyapatite formation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A central fragment inhibited hydroxyapatite formation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding to collagen or hydroxyapatite seed crystals modified these effects. -- Abstract: The manuscript tests the hypothesis that posttranslational modification of the SIBLING family of proteins in general and osteopontin in particular modify the abilities of these proteins to regulate in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Osteopontin has diverse effects on hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral crystallite formation and growth depending on the extent of phosphorylation. We hypothesized that different regions of full-length OPN would also have distinct effects on the mineralization process. Thrombin fragmentation of milk OPN (mOPN) was used to test this hypothesis. Three fragments were tested in a de novo HA formation assay; an N-terminal fragment (aa 1-147), a central fragment (aa 148-204) denoted SKK-fragment and a C-terminal fragment (aa 205-262). Compared to intact mOPN the C- and N-terminal fragments behaved comparably, promoting HA formation and growth, but the central SKK-fragment acted as a mineralization inhibitor. In a seeded growth experiment all fragments inhibited mineral proliferation, but the SKK-fragment was the most effective inhibitor. These effects, seen in HA-formation and seeded growth assays in a gelatin gel system and in a pH-stat experiment were lost when the protein or fragments were dephosphorylated. Effects of the fully phosphorylated protein and fragments were also altered in the presence of fibrillar collagen. The diverse effects can be explained in terms of the intrinsically disordered nature of OPN and its fragments which enable them to interact with their multiple partners.

  14. Post-translational modification of osteopontin: Effects on in vitro hydroxyapatite formation and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Thrombin-cleaved fragments of milk-osteopontin effect hydroxyapatite formation differently. ► N- and C-terminal fragments promoted hydroxyapatite formation and growth. ► A central fragment inhibited hydroxyapatite formation and growth. ► Binding to collagen or hydroxyapatite seed crystals modified these effects. -- Abstract: The manuscript tests the hypothesis that posttranslational modification of the SIBLING family of proteins in general and osteopontin in particular modify the abilities of these proteins to regulate in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Osteopontin has diverse effects on hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral crystallite formation and growth depending on the extent of phosphorylation. We hypothesized that different regions of full-length OPN would also have distinct effects on the mineralization process. Thrombin fragmentation of milk OPN (mOPN) was used to test this hypothesis. Three fragments were tested in a de novo HA formation assay; an N-terminal fragment (aa 1–147), a central fragment (aa 148–204) denoted SKK-fragment and a C-terminal fragment (aa 205–262). Compared to intact mOPN the C- and N-terminal fragments behaved comparably, promoting HA formation and growth, but the central SKK-fragment acted as a mineralization inhibitor. In a seeded growth experiment all fragments inhibited mineral proliferation, but the SKK-fragment was the most effective inhibitor. These effects, seen in HA-formation and seeded growth assays in a gelatin gel system and in a pH-stat experiment were lost when the protein or fragments were dephosphorylated. Effects of the fully phosphorylated protein and fragments were also altered in the presence of fibrillar collagen. The diverse effects can be explained in terms of the intrinsically disordered nature of OPN and its fragments which enable them to interact with their multiple partners.

  15. Chemical bonding modifications of tetrahedral amorphous carbon and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films induced by rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Roy, S.S. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.sinha-roy@ulster.ac.uk; Papakonstantinou, P. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Bain, M.F. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Gamble, H.S. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, J.A. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-22

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films (ta-CN {sub x}), deposited by double bend off plane Filtered Vacuum Cathodic Arc were annealed up to 1000 deg. C in flowing argon for 2 min. Modifications on the chemical bonding structure of the rapidly annealed films, as a function of temperature, were investigated by NEXAFS, X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The interpretation of these spectra is discussed. The results demonstrate that the structure of undoped ta-C films prepared at floating potential with an arc current of 80 A remains stable up to 900 deg. C, whereas that of ta-CN {sub x} containing 12 at.% nitrogen is stable up to 700 deg. C. At higher temperatures, all the spectra indicated the predominant formation of graphitic carbon. Through NEXAFS studies, we clearly observed three {pi}* resonance peaks at the {sup '}N K edge structure. The origin of these three peaks is not well established in the literature. However our temperature-dependant study ascertained that the first peak originates from C=N bonds and the third peak originates from the incorporation of nitrogen into the graphite like domains.

  16. Effects of functional group modification on the thermal properties of nano-carbon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the thermal properties including thermal stability, thermal decomposition activation energy and the thermal enthalpy of nano-carbon clusters (NCCs, including fullerene[60](C60, with a diameter of 0.71 nm), multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs, with a diameter of 10–30 nm and a length of 1–2 µm), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, with a diameter of ∼2 nm and a length of 5–15 µm), ligands of NCC-based terpyridine (NCC-tpy), and NCC-based ruthenium complexes (NCC-tpyRuCl3) were systematically studied by method of simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The results show that the modification of NCCs with terpyridine leads to a decrease in the thermal stability and in the thermal decomposition activation energy (the thermal decomposition activation energy decreased from 174.4 for C60, 144.9 for MWCNTs and 161.2 kJ/mol for SWCNTs to 166.2 for C60-tpy, 119.7 for MWCNT-tpy and 85.0 kJ/mol for SWCNT-tpy). But the modification of NCCs with terpyridine results in an increase in the enthalpy change of NCC thermal decomposition reaction. The introduction of the metal ions through complexation further decreases the thermal stability and the thermal decomposition activation energy of NCC-tpyRuCl3 due to the catalytic oxidation of Ru(III) ions (the activation energy decreases to 124.1 for C60-tpyRuCl3, 106.4 for MWCNT-tpyRuCl3 and 41.2 kJ/mol for SWCNT-tpyRuCl3). The introduction of the metal ions also leads to a decrease in the enthalpy change of the thermal decomposition reaction

  17. [Research on contribution decomposition by industry to China's carbon intensity reduction and carbon emission growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing-Jing; Ye, Bin; Ji, Jun-Ping; Ma, Xiao-Ming

    2014-11-01

    The binding carbon intensity index and the pilot "cap-and-trade" emission trading scheme are two important approaches currently applied by China to mitigate its greenhouse gases emissions. It is of great significance to research the influence mechanism of related factors by industry on the dynamics of national carbon intensity and emission, not only for setting industry-specified intensity reduction target but also for setting industry coverage of the ETS. Two LMDI models were applied in this paper to decompose industry contributions to the changes of China's carbon intensity and carbon emission during the period of 1996-2010. Empirical results showed that: The decline of national carbon intensity was jointly determined by the changes of carbon intensities and the added value proportions of all industries, and the impact of industry carbon intensities was larger. The increase of national carbon emission was jointly determined by the changes of carbon intensities and the added value of all industries. The former had inhibitory effect whist the latter had decisive promoting effect. The five industries making the largest contribution to the changes of national carbon emission and carbon intensity included industries of electricity, nonmetal mineral, ferrous metal, transportation service, chemical materials, which were followed by the industries of agriculture, coal mining and processing, petroleum and natural gas extraction. Petroleum refining and coking industry and construction industry made small contribution to the decline of national carbon intensity, but made large contribution to the growth of national carbon emission. The contributions of service industries to national carbon emission growth showed a rising trend, especially those of transportation service industry, wholesaling, retailing and catering service industry. PMID:25639120

  18. Hybrid membrane using polyethersulfone-modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with silane agent to enhance high performance oxygen separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed matrix membrane comprising carbon nanotubes embedded in polymer matrix have become one of the emerging technologies. This study was investigated in order to study the effect of silane agent modification towards carbon nanotubes (CNT surface at different concentration on oxygen enrichment performances of asymmetric mixed matrix membrane. The modified carbon nanotubes were prepared by treating the carbon nanotubes with chemical modification using Dynasylan Ameo (DA silane agent to allow PES chains to be grafted on carbon nanotubes surface. The results from the FESEM, DSC and FTIR analysis confirmed that chemical modification on carbon nanotubes surface had taken place. Sieve-in-a-cage’ morphology observed shows the poor adhesion between polymer and unmodified CNT. The gas separation performance of the asymmetric flat sheet mixed matrix membranes with modified CNT were relatively higher compared to the unmodified CNT. Hence, coated hollow fiber mixed matrix membrane with chemical modification on CNT surface using (3-aminopropyl-triethoxy methyl silane agent can potentially enhance the gas separation performance of O2 and N2.

  19. Modification process optimization, characterization and adsorption property of granular fir-based activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Granular fir-based activated carbon (GFAC) was modified with H2O2. • Orthogonal array design method was used to optimize the modification process. • Optimized parameters were: aqueous H2O2 concentration 1.0 mol l−1, modification temperature and time 30.0 °C and 4.0 h. • Adsorption capacity of the modified GFAC increased by 500.0% (caramel), 59.7% (methylene blue), 32.5% (phenol), and 15.1% (I2). • The pore structure parameters and surface oxygen groups changed in the modified GFAC. - Abstract: Granular fir-based activated carbon (GFAC) was modified with H2O2, and orthogonal array experimental design method was used to optimize the process. The properties of the original and modified GFAC were characterized by N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) equation, Barett–Joyner–Halenda (BJH) equation, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis, etc. When 10.00 g of GFAC with particle size of 0.25–0.85 mm was modified by 150.0 ml of aqueous H2O2 solution, the optimized conditions were found to be as follows: aqueous H2O2 solution concentration 1.0 mol·l−1, modification temperature 30.0 °C, modification time 4.0 h. Modified under the optimized conditions, decolonization of caramel, methylene blue adsorption, phenol adsorption and iodine number of the modified GFAC increased by 500.0%, 59.7%, 32.5%, and 15.1%, respectively. The original and optimally modified GFAC exhibited adsorption isotherms of hybrid Type I–IV isotherms with H4 hysteresis. BET surface area, micropore area, total pore volume, micropore volume, and microporosity of the modified GFAC increased by 7.33%, 11.25%, 3.89%, 14.23%, 9.91%, respectively. Whereas the average pore width decreased by 3.16%. In addition, the amount of surface oxygen groups (such as carbonyl or carboxyl) increased in the modified GFAC

  20. Low carbon products to design innovative leather processes. Part II: determination of the optimal physical modification of tara

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Casas, Concepció; Diaz, Jorge; Sorolla, Sílvia; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the fruit of the tara bush as a sustainable source for tanning agents and proposes alternatives to chromium and other mineral salts and vegetable extracts. Specifically, physical modifications have been developed in part II of the study to obtain a modified tara with a higher percentage of tannins and with a better level of penetration (see Low carbon products to design innovative leather processes. Part I: determination of the optimal chemical modification of...

  1. Climate indices strongly influence old-growth forest carbon exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Sonia; Falk, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    We present a decade and a half (1998–2013) of carbon dioxide fluxes from an old-growth stand in the American Pacific Northwest to identify ecosystem-level responses to Pacific teleconnection patterns, including the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This study provides the longest, continuous record of old-growth eddy flux data to date from one of the longest running Fluxnet stations in the world. From 1998 to 2013, average annual net ecosystem exchange (F NEE) at Wind River AmeriFlux was ‑32 ± 84 g C m‑2 yr‑1 indicating that the late seral forest is on average a small net sink of atmospheric carbon. However, interannual variability is high (>300 g C m‑2 yr‑1) and shows that the stand switches from net carbon sink to source in response to climate drivers associated with ENSO. The old-growth forest is a much stronger sink during La Niña years (mean F NEE = ‑90 g C m‑2 yr‑1) than during El Niño when the stand turns carbon neutral or into a small net carbon source (mean F NEE = +17 g C m‑2 yr‑1). Forest inventory data dating back to the 1930s show a similar correlation with the lower frequency Pacific North American (PNA) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) whereby higher aboveground net primary productivity (F ANPP) is associated with cool phases of both the PNA and PDO. These measurements add evidence that carbon exchange in old-growth stands may be more sensitive to climate variability across shorter time scales than once thought.

  2. Markov Modeling of Component Fault Growth over a Derived Domain of Feasible Output Control Effort Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Brian; Goebel, Kai; Vachtsevanos, George

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel Markov process formulation of stochastic fault growth modeling, in order to facilitate the development and analysis of prognostics-based control adaptation. A metric representing the relative deviation between the nominal output of a system and the net output that is actually enacted by an implemented prognostics-based control routine, will be used to define the action space of the formulated Markov process. The state space of the Markov process will be defined in terms of an abstracted metric representing the relative health remaining in each of the system s components. The proposed formulation of component fault dynamics will conveniently relate feasible system output performance modifications to predictions of future component health deterioration.

  3. Direct observation of morphological evolution of a catalyst during carbon nanotube forest growth: new insights into growth and growth termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seojeong; Lee, Jaegeun; Kim, Hwan-Chul; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Maruyama, Benji; Stach, Eric A.; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we develop a new methodology for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that enables us to directly investigate the interface between carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays and the catalyst and support layers for CNT forest growth without any damage induced by a post-growth TEM sample preparation. Using this methodology, we perform in situ and ex situ TEM investigations on the evolution of the morphology of the catalyst particles and observe the catalyst particles to climb up through CNT arrays during CNT forest growth. We speculate that the lifted catalysts significantly affect the growth and growth termination of CNT forests along with Ostwald ripening and sub-surface diffusion. Thus, we propose a modified growth termination model which better explains various phenomena related to the growth and growth termination of CNT forests.In this study, we develop a new methodology for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that enables us to directly investigate the interface between carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays and the catalyst and support layers for CNT forest growth without any damage induced by a post-growth TEM sample preparation. Using this methodology, we perform in situ and ex situ TEM investigations on the evolution of the morphology of the catalyst particles and observe the catalyst particles to climb up through CNT arrays during CNT forest growth. We speculate that the lifted catalysts significantly affect the growth and growth termination of CNT forests along with Ostwald ripening and sub-surface diffusion. Thus, we propose a modified growth termination model which better explains various phenomena related to the growth and growth termination of CNT forests. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05547d

  4. Adsorption of crystal violet with diatomite earth&carbon by a modification of hydrothermal carbonization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhuo; Li, Jun; Chen, Guanghui; Bian, Wei; Lu, Yun; Li, Wenjing; Zheng, Zhaoming; Cheng, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    The high colority and difficulty of decolorization are the most important tasks on printing and dyeing wastewater. This study investigates the ability of diatomite earth&carbon (DE&C) as an adsorbent to removal crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicate the importance of functional groups during the adsorption of CV. The obtained N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm values accord with well IUPAC type II. Our calculations determined a surface area of 73.15 m(2) g(-1) for DE&C and an average pore diameter of 10.56 nm. Equilibrium data of the adsorption process fitted very well to the Langmuir model (R(2) > 0.99). The results of kinetics study showed that the pseudo-second-order model fitted to the experimental data well. The thermodynamic parameters were also evaluated. ΔH° 0 and ΔG° dye. Furthermore the positive value of ΔS° reflected good affinity of the CV dye. PMID:27003089

  5. Climate constraints on the carbon intensity of economic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and climate goals together constrain the carbon intensity of production. Using a simple and transparent model that represents committed CO2 emissions (future emissions expected to come from existing capital), we explore the carbon intensity of production related to new capital required for different temperature targets across several thousand scenarios. Future pathways consistent with the 2 °C target which allow for continued gross domestic product growth require early action to reduce carbon intensity of new production, and either (i) a short lifetime of energy and industry capital (e.g. early retrofit of coal power plants), or (ii) large negative emissions after 2050 (i.e. rapid development and dissemination of carbon capture and sequestration). To achieve the 2 °C target, half of the scenarios indicate a carbon intensity of new production between 33 and 73 g CO2/$—much lower than the global average today, at 360 g CO2/$. The average lifespan of energy capital (especially power plants), and industry capital, are critical because they commit emissions far into the future and reduce the budget for new capital emissions. Each year of lifetime added to existing, carbon intensive capital, decreases the carbon intensity of new production required to meet a 2 °C carbon budget by 1.0–1.5 g CO2/$, and each year of delaying the start of mitigation decreases the required CO2 intensity of new production by 20–50 g CO2/$. Constraints on the carbon intensity of new production under a 3 °C target are considerably relaxed relative to the 2 °C target, but remain daunting in comparison to the carbon intensity of the global economy today. (letter)

  6. Improvement in capacitive deionization function of activated carbon cloth by titania modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Min-Woong; Seo, Gon

    2003-04-01

    Activated carbon cloth (ACC) was modified by the reaction between polar groups on its surface and metal alkoxides of titanium, silicon, aluminum and zirconium to enhance its capacitive deionization (CDI) performance. Incorporated state of metals and surface property of modified ACC were deduced from surface analysis results obtained using FE-SEM, XRD, XPS and zeta-potential meter. Titania was highly dispersed on the ACC surface with tetrahedral coordination, and the incorporated titania was effective to decrease physical adsorption of NaCl and to increase electric field adsorption, resulting in a significant enhancement of CDI performance. The negligible contribution of silica, alumina and zirconia modifications suggested that the small oxidation-reduction potential of titania was responsible for the enhancement of the electric field adsorption. Reversibility of adsorption and desorption operation on titania-modified ACC were also discussed relating to its CDI function. PMID:12600380

  7. Human epithelial cells exposed to functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: interactions and cell surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanizza, C; Casciardi, S; Incoronato, F; Cavallo, D; Ursini, C L; Ciervo, A; Maiello, R; Fresegna, A M; Marcelloni, A M; Lega, D; Alvino, A; Baiguera, S

    2015-09-01

    With the expansion of the production and applications of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in several industrial and science branches, the potential adverse effects on human health have attracted attention. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate how chemical functionalization may affect MWCNT effects; however, controversial data have been reported, showing either increased or reduced toxicity. In particular, the impact of carboxylation on MWCNT cytotoxicity is far from being completely understood. The aim of this work was the evaluation of the modifications induced by carboxylated-MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) on cell surface and the study of cell-MWCNT-COOH interactions by means of field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) were incubated with MWCNTs-COOH for different exposure times and concentrations (10 μg/mL for 1, 2, 4 h; 5, 10, 20 μg/mL for 24 h). At short incubation time, MWCNTs-COOH were easily observed associated with plasma membrane and in contact with microvilli. After 24 h exposure, FESEM analysis revealed that MWCNTs-COOH induced evident changes in the cellular surface in comparison to control cells: treated cells showed blebs, holes and a depletion of the microvilli density in association with structure modifications, such as widening and/or lengthening. In particular, an increase of cells showing holes and microvilli structure alterations was observed at 20 μg/mL concentration. FESEM analysis showed nanotube agglomerates, of different sizes, entering into the cell with two different mechanisms: inward bending of the membrane followed by nanotube sinking, and nanotube internalization directly through holes. The observed morphological microvilli modifications, induced by MWCNTs-COOH, could affect epithelial functions, such as the control of surfactant production and secretion, leading to pathological conditions, such as alveolar proteinosis. More detailed studies will be, however, necessary to

  8. Irradiation Modification of Epoxidized Natural Rubber/ ethylene Vinyl Acetate/ carbon Nano tubes Nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of CNTs with irradiation modification on the properties of Epoxidized Natural Rubber/ Ethylene Vinyl Acetate/ Carbon Nano tubes (ENR/EVA/CNTs) nano composites were investigated. The CNTs at various amount (2, 3, 4 and 6 wt%) were incorporated into ENR50 by solving casting method. The ENR/ CNTs were then blended with EVA by mixing in a Brabender Plasticoder at 120 degree Celsius. Next, the samples were irradiated by using electron beam with 3 MeV electron beam machine in a dose range of 50 to 200 kGy. The mechanical properties especially Tensile strength (Ts), modulus at 100 % elongation (M100), elongation at break (Eb) and hardness were studied as a function of radiation dose. The thermal properties of the nano composites was investigated by TGA and DSC. Results showed that the irradiation induced crosslinking lead to further improvement in mechanical properties, thermal properties and compatibility of the nano composites. The irradiation modification up to 150 kGy, has increased the Ts and M100 almost 2 times and a downward trend thereafter. (author)

  9. Modification of Gold Nanoparticles at Carbon Electrodes and the Applications for Arsenic (III Detections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Einaga2

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Modification of carbon, including boron-doped diamond (BDD and glassy carbon (GC, using gold nanoparticle (AuNP was developed by self-assembly technique. This technique is based on electrostatic interaction between citratecapped AuNP to amine terminal groups after surface modification of BDD and GC. The fabricated materials, AuNPBDD and AuNP-GC, were then utilized as electrodes for As3+ detection using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV technique. Anodic stripping voltammograms of both AuNP-BDD and AuNP-GC electrodes showed similar peak potentials of As° oxidation at ~0.21 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in optimum conditions of -500 mV, 180 s, and 100 mV/s for deposition potential, deposition time, and scan rate, respectively. AuNP-BDD shows better performances in the case of wide linear concentration range (0-20 mM and low limit of detection (0.39 μM or 4.64 ppb, whereas those of AuNPGC were linear in the concentration range of 0-10mM with a detection limit of 0.14 μM (13.12 ppb. Excellent reproducibility was shown with RSDs (n=20 of 2.93% and 4.54% at AuNP-BDD and AuNP-GC, respectively. However, decreasing of current responses in 6-concecutive days was found more at AuNP-BDD (~20.1% than that at AuNP-GC (~2.8%.

  10. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC used in several device processing technologies.

  11. The effects of defoliation on carbon allocation: can carbon limitation reduce growth in favour of storage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Erin; Huepenbecker, Sarah; Casper, Brenda B; Helliker, Brent R

    2013-11-01

    There is no consensus about how stresses such as low water availability and temperature limit tree growth. Sink limitation to growth and survival is often inferred if a given stress does not cause non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations or levels to decline along with growth. However, trees may actively maintain or increase NSC levels under moderate carbon stress, making the pattern of reduced growth and increased NSCs compatible with carbon limitation. To test this possibility, we used full and half defoliation to impose severe and moderate carbon limitation on 2-year-old Quercus velutina Lam. saplings grown in a common garden. Saplings were harvested at either 3 weeks or 4 months after treatments were applied, representing short- and longer-term effects on woody growth and NSC levels. Both defoliation treatments maintained a lower total leaf area than controls throughout the experiment with no evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation, and resulted in a similar total biomass reduction. While fully defoliated saplings had lower starch levels than controls in the short term, half defoliated saplings maintained control starch levels in both the short and longer term. In the longer term, fully defoliated saplings had the greatest starch concentration increment, allowing them to recover to near-control starch levels. Furthermore, between the two harvest dates, fully and half defoliated saplings allocated a greater proportion of new biomass to starch than did controls. The maintenance of control starch levels in half defoliated saplings indicates that these trees actively store a substantial amount of carbon before growth is carbon saturated. In addition, the allocation shift favouring storage in defoliated saplings is consistent with the hypothesis that, as an adaptation to increasing carbon stress, trees can prioritize carbon reserve formation at the expense of growth. Our results suggest that as carbon limitation increases, reduced growth is not necessarily

  12. Modification of an apparatus for tumor-suppressor protein crystal growth in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    Some human diseases as tumors are being studied continuously for the development of vaccines against them. And a way of doing that is by means of proteins research. There are some kinds of proteins, like the p53 and p73 proteins, which are tumor suppressors. There are other diseases such as A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases which are protein-related. The determination of how proteins geometrically order themselves, during its biological functions is very necessary to understand how a protein's structure affects its function, to design vaccines that intercede in tumor-protein activities and in other proteins related to those other diseases. The protein crystal growth in microgravity environment produces purer crystallization than on the ground, and it is a powerful tool to produce better vaccines. Several data have already been acquired using ground-based research and in spaceflight experiments aboard the Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions, and in the MIR and in the International Space Station (ISS). Here in this paper, I propose to be performed in the ISS Biological Research Facility (which is being developed), multiple crystal growth of proteins related to cancer (as tumors suppressors and oncoproteins), A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases, for the future obtaining of possible vaccines against them. I also propose a simple and practical equipment, a modification of the crystallization plates (which use a vapor diffusion technique) inside each cylinder of the Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM), with multiple chambers with different sizes. Instead of using some chambers with the same size it is better to use several chambers with different sizes. Why is that? The answer is: the energy associated with the surface tension of the liquid in the chamber is directly related to the circle area of it. So, to minimize the total energy of the surface tension of a proteins liquid -making it more stable

  13. Polygalacturonases from Moniliophthora perniciosa are regulated by fermentable carbon sources and possible post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argôlo Santos Carvalho, Heliana; de Andrade Silva, Edson Mario; Carvalho Santos, Stenio; Micheli, Fabienne

    2013-11-01

    We report the first molecular and in silico analysis of Monilophthora perniciosa polygalacturonases (PGs). Three MpPG genes (MpPG1, MpPG2 and MpPG3) were identified and analyzed at transcriptional level, by RT-qPCR, in dikaryotic M. perniciosa mycelium grown on solid-bran based medium and on liquid medium supplemented with different fermentable and non-fermentable carbon sources. The MpPG genes presented different expression patterns suggesting different individual regulation. However, all are mainly regulated by fermentable carbon sources (galactose and mannose). The integrated analysis of PG gene expression and systems biology (using MpG1 and MpG2 orthologs in Neurospora crassa, named NCU06961 and NCU02369, respectively) allowed identifying some possible mechanism of protein regulation during the necrotrophic fungal phase. MpPG1-NCU06961 and MpPG2-NCU02369 directly or indirectly interacted with central and highly connected proteins involved in protein synthesis and protein regulation associated to post-translational modifications, in cell wall metabolism, and in cellular metabolism related to energy production. This analysis also allowed the identification of key proteins for further studies of M. perniciosa development and/or for disease management, such as MpPG2, a pectin methylesterase, an acetolactate synthase and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SMT3-like. PMID:24140149

  14. Effects of functional group modification on the thermal properties of nano-carbon clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhenyi, E-mail: zywu@xmu.edu.cn [Xiamen University, Department of Chemistry and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Cai, Xueying [Xiamen University, Xiamen Zhongshan Hospital (China); Yang, Zhiquan [South China University of Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Guangzhou Higher Education Mega Centre (China)

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, the thermal properties including thermal stability, thermal decomposition activation energy and the thermal enthalpy of nano-carbon clusters (NCCs, including fullerene[60](C{sub 60}, with a diameter of 0.71 nm), multi-walled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs, with a diameter of 10–30 nm and a length of 1–2 µm), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, with a diameter of ∼2 nm and a length of 5–15 µm), ligands of NCC-based terpyridine (NCC-tpy), and NCC-based ruthenium complexes (NCC-tpyRuCl{sub 3}) were systematically studied by method of simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. The results show that the modification of NCCs with terpyridine leads to a decrease in the thermal stability and in the thermal decomposition activation energy (the thermal decomposition activation energy decreased from 174.4 for C{sub 60}, 144.9 for MWCNTs and 161.2 kJ/mol for SWCNTs to 166.2 for C{sub 60}-tpy, 119.7 for MWCNT-tpy and 85.0 kJ/mol for SWCNT-tpy). But the modification of NCCs with terpyridine results in an increase in the enthalpy change of NCC thermal decomposition reaction. The introduction of the metal ions through complexation further decreases the thermal stability and the thermal decomposition activation energy of NCC-tpyRuCl{sub 3} due to the catalytic oxidation of Ru(III) ions (the activation energy decreases to 124.1 for C{sub 60}-tpyRuCl{sub 3}, 106.4 for MWCNT-tpyRuCl{sub 3} and 41.2 kJ/mol for SWCNT-tpyRuCl{sub 3}). The introduction of the metal ions also leads to a decrease in the enthalpy change of the thermal decomposition reaction.

  15. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  16. Simulation of the dc Plasma in Carbon Nanotube Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A model for the dc plasma used in carbon nanotube growth is presented, and one-dimensional simulations of an acetylene/ammonia/argon system are performed. The effect of dc bias is illustrated by examining electron temperature, electron and ion densities, and neutral densities. Introducing a tungsten filament in the dc plasma, as in hot filament chemical vapor deposition with plasma assistance, shows negligible influence on the system characteristics.

  17. Simulation of the dc plasma in carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the dc plasma used in carbon nanotube growth is presented, and one-dimensional simulations of an acetylene/ammonia/argon system are performed. The effect of dc bias is illustrated by examining electron temperature, electron and ion densities, and neutral densities. Introducing a tungsten filament in the dc plasma, as in hot filament chemical vapor deposition with plasma assistance, shows negligible influence on the system characteristics

  18. Towards carbon nanotube growth into superconducting microwave resonator geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Blien, S.; Götz, K. J. G.; Stiller, P. L.; Mayer, T.; Huber, T.; Vavra, O.; Hüttel, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The in-place growth of suspended carbon nanotubes facilitates the observation of both unperturbed electronic transport spectra and high-Q vibrational modes. For complex structures integrating, e.g., superconducting rf elements on-chip, selection of a chemically and physically resistant material that survives the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process provides a challenge. We demonstrate the implementation of molybdenum-rhenium coplanar waveguide resonators that exhibit clear resonant behavio...

  19. Modification of pure oxygen absorption equipment for concurrent stripping of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Sibrell, P.L.; Montgomery, G.A.; Tsukuda, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The high solubility of carbon dioxide precludes significant desorption within commercial oxygen absorption equipment. This operating characteristic of the equipment limits its application in recirculating water culture systems despite its ability to significantly increase allowable fish loading rates (kg/(L min)). Carbon dioxide (DC) is typically removed by air stripping. This process requires a significant energy input for forced air movement, air heating in cold climates and water pumping. We developed a modification for a spray tower that provides for carbon dioxide desorption as well as oxygen absorption. Elimination of the air-stripping step reduces pumping costs while allowing dissolved nitrogen to drop below saturation concentrations. This latter response provides for an improvement in oxygen absorption efficiency within the spray tower. DC desorption is achieved by directing head-space gases from the spray tower (O2, N2, CO2) through a sealed packed tower scrubber receiving a 2 N NaOH solution. Carbon dioxide is selectively removed from the gas stream, by chemical reaction, forming the product Na 2CO3. Scrubber off-gas, lean with regard to carbon dioxide but still rich with oxygen, is redirected through the spray tower for further stripping of DC and absorption of oxygen. Make-up NaOH is metered into the scrubbing solution sump on an as needed basis as directed by a feedback control loop programmed to maintain a scrubbing solution pH of 11.4-11.8. The spent NaOH solution is collected, then regenerated for reuse, in a batch process that requires relatively inexpensive hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2). A by-product of the regeneration step is an alkaline filter cake, which may have use in bio-solids stabilization. Given the enhanced gas transfer rates possible with chemical reaction, the required NaOH solution flow rate through the scrubber represents a fraction of the spray tower water flow rate. Further, isolation of the water being treated from the atmosphere (1

  20. Growth of tungsten oxide on carbon nanowalls templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua, E-mail: wanghua@dlou.edu.cn [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); College of Fisheries and Life Science, Dalian Ocean University, Dalian 116023 (China); Su, Yan [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Chen, Shuo, E-mail: shuochen@dlut.edu.cn [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Quan, Xie [Faculty of Chemical, Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Tungsten oxide deposited on carbon nanowalls by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. ► This composite has two-dimensional uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. ► Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. - Abstract: In the present work we present a simple approach for coupling tungsten oxide with carbon nanowalls. The two-dimensional carbon nanowalls with open boundaries were grown using plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition, and the subsequent tungsten oxide growth was performed in the same equipment by direct heating of a tungsten filament. The tungsten oxide coating is found to have uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. The method of synthesis described here provides an operable route to the production of two-dimensional tungsten oxide nanocomposites.

  1. SnO2 nanorod arrays: low temperature growth, surface modification and field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Lim, Chiew Keat; Tse, Man Siu; Guo, Jun; Tan, Ooi Kiang

    2012-02-01

    SnO2 nanorod arrays have been deposited on 4 inch SiO2/Si and Si wafers and stainless steel substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition without any high temperature treatment or additional catalysis. The SnO2 nanorods grow up from seed nanocrystals along the [110] preferential direction by a self-catalyzed vapor-solid growth mechanism. The surface of the SnO2 nanorods was modified by ZnO, Pt and Ni nanocrystals. After surface modification, the field emission properties of the SnO2 nanorod arrays are improved. The Ni nanocrystal with sharp tips and edges act as additional field emission sites to SnO2 nanorods and thus the Ni/SnO2/SiO2/Si outperforms other samples due to the synergistic effects of good conductivity and hierarchical sharp apexes. The field enhancement factor of the Ni/SnO2/SiO2/Si increased around 3 times while the turn-on field of 8.0 V μm-1 is about one third of the SnO2/SiO2/Si device.SnO2 nanorod arrays have been deposited on 4 inch SiO2/Si and Si wafers and stainless steel substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition without any high temperature treatment or additional catalysis. The SnO2 nanorods grow up from seed nanocrystals along the [110] preferential direction by a self-catalyzed vapor-solid growth mechanism. The surface of the SnO2 nanorods was modified by ZnO, Pt and Ni nanocrystals. After surface modification, the field emission properties of the SnO2 nanorod arrays are improved. The Ni nanocrystal with sharp tips and edges act as additional field emission sites to SnO2 nanorods and thus the Ni/SnO2/SiO2/Si outperforms other samples due to the synergistic effects of good conductivity and hierarchical sharp apexes. The field enhancement factor of the Ni/SnO2/SiO2/Si increased around 3 times while the turn-on field of 8.0 V μm-1 is about one third of the SnO2/SiO2/Si device. This article was submitted as part of a collection highlighting papers on the 'Recent Advances in Semiconductor Nanowires Research' from ICMAT

  2. Electric field effect in the growth of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaza, E., E-mail: ericvpp@gmail.com; Briceño-Fuenmayor, H. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Laboratorio de Física de Fluidos y Plasma (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Arévalo, J. [Instituto Zuliano de Investigaciones Tecnológicas (INZIT), Unidad de Caracterización y Estructura de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Atencio, R. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Centro de Investigación y Tecnología de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Corredor, L. [Instituto Zuliano de Investigaciones Tecnológicas (INZIT), Unidad de Caracterización y Estructura de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under a controlled electric field in a chemical vapor deposition system is investigated. We evaluate the influence of this external field on the morphological and structural characteristics of CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy results display a large presence of carbonaceous material in the positive plate, which appear to be a consequence of the attraction of electric forces over the electronically unbalanced cracked carbon molecules in the heating zone. We also observe a growth behavior for CNTs, in which catalyst particles are localized either at the bottom or the upper part of the nanotube, depending on the intensity and direction of the electric field. A Raman analysis from all obtained carbon materials shows the presence of two peaks, corresponding to the D ∼ 1340 cm{sup −1} and G ∼ 1590 cm{sup −1} bands attributed to multiwall CNTs. The average diameter of the CNTs is in the range between 90 and 40 nm. These results provide experimental evidence for the dependence of the catalyst and subtract interaction on the growing mechanism, in which weak chemical or electronic interactions could stimulate a top-growing as the strongest base-growing process.

  3. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  4. In situ synthesis and modification of calcium carbonate nanoparticles via a bobbling method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Modified calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles with cubic- and spindle-like configuration were synthesized in situ by the typical bobbling (gas-liquid-solid) method. The modifiers, such as sodium stearate, octadecyl dihydrogen phosphate (ODP) and oleic acid (OA), were used to obtain hydrophobic nanoparticles. The different modification effects of the modifiers were investigated by measuring the active ratio, whiteness and the contact angle. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA analysis) were employed to characterize the obtained products. A preliminary reaction mechanism was discussed. According to the results, the active ratio of CaCO3 modified by ODP was ca. 99.9% and the value of whiteness was 97.3% when the dosage of modifiers reached 2%. The contact angle was 122.25° for the CaCO3 modified in the presence of sodium stearate, ODP and OA. When modified CaCO3 was filled into PVC, the mechanical properties of products were improved greatly such as rupture intensity, pull intensity and fuse temperature. The compatibility and affinity between the modified CaCO3 nanoparticles and the organic matrixes were greatly improved.

  5. Economic Growth And Carbon Emission: A Dynamic Panel Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim BAKIRTAS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between carbon dioxide emission (CO2 and economic growth is one of the crucial topics in environmental economics. This study is aimed to investigatethat problem. In this study, depending on the theory of Environmental Kuznets Curves (EKC, the impact of income in carbon dioxide emission has measured for 34 OECD and5 BRICS countries with using Dynamic Panel Data Analysis. In this regard OECD countries are classified by income groups due to the average per capita income rate ofOECD to solve the homogeneity problem among OECD countries. On the other hand EKC hypothesis analysed by short and long run income elasticity which will be using foran evident that a country reduces CO2 emissions with the income increase in this study. According to the findings of the study, % 36 of the country sample coherent with theEKC hypothesis. The main encouragement for testing this relationship between economic growth and CO2 emission is leading politicians to reconsider the environmental impactswhich are arising from income increase when they are taking a decision to maximizes the economic growth.Keywords: EKC; OECD; Dynamic Panel Data

  6. Modification of bamboo-based activated carbon using microwave radiation and its effects on the adsorption of methylene blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification of bamboo-based activated carbon was carried out in a microwave oven under N2 atmosphere. The virgin and modified activated carbons were characterized by means of low temperature N2 adsorption, acid-base titration, point of zero charge (pHpzc) measurement, FTIR and XPS spectra. A gradual decrease in the surface acidic groups was observed during the modification, while the surface basicity was enhanced to some extent, which gave rise to an increase in the pHpzc value. The species of the functional groups and relative content of various elements and groups were given further analysis using FTIR and XPS spectra. An increase in the micropores was found at the start, and the micropores were then extended into larger ones, resulting in an increase in the pore volume and average pore size. Adsorption studies showed enhanced adsorption of methylene blue on the modified activated carbons, caused mainly by the enlargement of the micropores. Adsorption isotherm fittings revealed that Langmuir and Freundlich models were applicable for the virgin and modified activated carbons, respectively. Kinetic studies exhibited faster adsorption rate of methylene blue on the modified activated carbons, and the pseudo-second-order model fitted well for all of the activated carbons.

  7. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes on hydroxyapatite using MPECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been grown directly on hydroxyapatite by using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). Highlights: ► CNTs have been successfully grown directly on hydroxyapatite using MPECVD. ► Diameter distribution of the CNTs lies in the range from 30 to 70 nm. ► The HA surface is partially transformed to β-TCP during the deposition. ► Grown CNTs have good quality and IG/ID ratio lies between 1.243 and 1.774. - Abstract: For the first time carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully grown directly on hydroxyapatite (HA) by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). Such integration has potential to capitalize on the merits of both HA and CNTs. This type of coating could be useful to improve the interface between bone and the implant. Scanning electron microscope SEM investigations show that; the surface of the CNTs is relatively clean and free of amorphous carbon. The CNTs diameters lie in the range 30–70 nm. In addition HA encapsulation by carbon was observed at a growth temperature 750 °C. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the CNTs are of high quality and the IG/ID ratio lies between 1.243 and 1.774. The changes in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns give an indication that during the plasma deposition the HA-substrate surface is subjected to a temperature sufficient for partial conversion to the β-tricalcium phosphate via dehydroxylation.

  8. The effects of surface modification on the supercapacitive behaviors of novel mesoporous carbon derived from rod-like hydroxyapatite template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A novel porous carbon with rod-like pore structure was prepared using hydroxyapatite as templates. ► The N and O contained mesoporous carbon was obtained by modified by HNO3 solution. ► The role of hydroxyapatite as double-template and mechanism of surface modification were supposed. ► The modified mesoporous carbon exhibited good electrochemical performances. -- Abstract: Novel mesoporous carbon has been synthesized using rod-like nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) particles as templates, sucrose as carbon precursor by polymerizing, carbonizing and the removal of templates with HCl solution. In the process, HA not only acted as an endotemplate but also an exotemplate producing micropores and mesopores. Subsequently, mesoporous carbon was modified by HNO3 solution with different concentration. The morphology, pore structure, and surface functional groups of the as-obtained samples are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller method (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical performance for electrochemical capacitors is evaluated in a 1 M H2SO4 aqueous solution. The results manifest that the structrue of resultant carbon with a high surface area (719.7 m2 g−1) and large pore volume (1.51 cm3 g−1) is the replica of HA. After modification, the surface area and pore volume mesoporous carbons slightly decrease, while their electrochemical performance have been significantly improved with the increase of the capacitance from 125.7 to 170.1 F g−1 and a non-decayed cycle life over 5000 cycles for HA-C-0.15N

  9. Zinc oxide catalyzed growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that zinc oxide can catalyze the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with high efficiency by a chemical vapor deposition process. The zinc oxide nanocatalysts, prepared using a diblock copolymer templating method and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), were uniformly spaced over a large deposition area with an average diameter of 1.7 nm and narrow size distribution. Dense and uniform SWNTs films with high quality were obtained by using a zinc oxide catalyst, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, AFM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  10. Controlled epitaxial graphene growth within removable amorphous carbon corrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, James; Kunc, Jan; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.

    2014-07-01

    We address the question of control of the silicon carbide (SiC) steps and terraces under epitaxial graphene on SiC and demonstrate amorphous carbon (aC) corrals as an ideal method to pin SiC surface steps. aC is compatible with graphene growth, structurally stable at high temperatures, and can be removed after graphene growth. For this, aC is first evaporated and patterned on SiC, then annealed in the graphene growth furnace. There at temperatures above 1200 °C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at the aC corral that provide effective step flow barriers. Aligned step free regions are thereby formed for subsequent graphene growth at temperatures above 1330 °C. Atomic force microscopy imaging supports the formation of step-free terraces on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the aC corrals. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of good graphene sheets on the step-free terraces.

  11. Nucleation, growth and habit modification of n-alkanes and homologous mixtures in the absence and presence of flow improving additives

    CERN Document Server

    Taggart, A M

    1996-01-01

    A detailed study has been performed on the nucleation, growth and habit modification of n-alkanes and homologous mixtures in the absence and presence of flow improving additives in an attempt to gain a clearer appreciation of the interaction mechanisms behind wax / additive crystallisation. Kinetic and structural assessment of melt phase n-alkanes illustrate the different crystallographic forms present within the homologous series. Studies demonstrate the alternating behaviour of the even and odd numbered homologues which converges as a function of increasing molecular weight. Greater crystal lattice stabilities were found for those n-alkanes which have an even carbon number and which crystallise into the triclinic crystal structure. Solid state phase behaviour of the n-alkanes was found to vary depending on the number and parity of n. Nucleation kinetic studies of n-alkanes and homologous mixtures from model diesel fuel solvents (dodecane, m-xylene, decalin, pristane and a dewaxed fuel) are assessed using tu...

  12. Effects of Gas Composition on Highly Efficient Surface Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Cation Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng Chyuan-Yow; Kuo Cheng-Tzu; Tseng Wen-Shou

    2008-01-01

    Abstract High incident energy hydrogen and/or oxygen cations are generated by electron cyclotron resonance system, and then used to highly efficiently modify multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The effects of various H2/O2 gas compositions on the modification process are studied. A systematic characterization method utilizing a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is used to evaluate t...

  13. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  14. IAA stimulates pollen tube growth and mediates the modification of its wall composition and structure in Torenia fournieri

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Juan-Zi; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Xue-lian; Pang, Dai-wen; Zhao, Jie

    2008-01-01

    The effects of several hormones on pollen tube growth were compared in Torenia fournieri and it was found that IAA was the most effective, stimulating pollen tube growth and causing the shank part of pollen tubes to be slender and straighter. The role of IAA was investigated by studying the changes in ultrastructure and PM H+-ATPase distribution in the pollen tubes and the modification of the tube wall. Using the fluorescent marker FM4-64, together with transmission electron microscopy, it wa...

  15. Effects of oxygen on multiwall carbon nanotubes growth by PECVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-mei ZHANG; Ya-bo FU; Qiang CHEN; Yue-fei ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grown by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD)-type plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method in downstream. The temperature was 973 K and the com-positions of gases were methane, hydrogen and oxygen in the total pressure of 0.05 MPa. The effect of O2 concen-tration in the mixture on the configuration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was investigated in detail. Results from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmis-sion electron microscope (TEM) showed that CNTs grown in CH4/H2 (38.6%/61.4%, volume) mixture have many defects and contained disordered graphitic materials. With the addition of appropriate amount of O2 (~0.67%), high-purity CNTs could be obtained. However, no CNT, even no carbon matrix existed under the condition of an excessive oxygen concentration (> 1.0%, volume) in the mixture. In order to understand the role of O2 during CNTs growth, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was in-situ employed and the results predicted that the improve-ment of CNTs quality in O2 addition was attributed to the effect of OH oxidation from the reaction of atomic oxygen with hydrogen in the plasma.

  16. Experimental study of different carbon dust growth mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory experiments are proposed to understand the growth mechanisms of spherical carbonous particulates observed in Tokamak dust samples. Examples can be reproduced when carbon is injected in a plasma discharge by sputtering. The particulates morphology, size, structure, mass density depend on the discharge geometry and parameters. At relatively low pressure, nano-metric primary particles are observed either individually or in the form of spherical agglomerates. The charge threshold from which the agglomeration process is stopped by Coulomb repulsion is established. At higher pressure, the produced grains have a high surface porosity never observed at low pressure, this change being due to a difference in the kinetic energy of the surface deposited species. A comparison was done of the surface structure of laboratory dusts and pieces of carbon deposits from the Toroidal Pumped Limiter of Tore Supra. The observed differences can be explained by different production mechanisms and by the fact that the Tokamak deposits could have undergo heating yielding structural graphitization. Further studies are under way in order to obtain a better understanding of the various particulate morphologies. For instance, we plan to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and to complete the XANES structure analysis by Raman spectroscopy. A correlation between the new diagnostics results and the transport of neutral and ion species in our discharges is expected. (authors)

  17. Preparation of activated carbon with highly developed mesoporous structure from Camellia oleifera shell through water vapor gasification and phosphoric acid modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Camellia oleifera shell as starting material, production of activated carbon rich in mesoporous structure has been investigated with water vapor gasification followed by phosphoric acid modification. This method is found to be very effective in increasing the mesoporous ratio of the activated carbon. The micropores of the activated carbon gasified by water vapor (raw activated carbon) serve as channels for phosphoric acid impregnation to enlarge the pore size. Results of the activated carbon modified by phosphoric acid (final activated carbon) show a high mesoporous ratio of 61%, which is twice as high as that of raw activated carbon. Such modification also increases the BET surface area and total pore volume to 1608 m2/g and 1.17 cm3/g, respectively. The final activated carbon exhibits high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and iodine, with the adsorption values of methylene blue and iodine increasing from 180 to 1012 mg/g to 330 and 1326 mg/g, respectively. The present preparation is a convenient yet promising method to combine gasification and modification to obtain activated carbon with highly developed mesoporous structures. -- Highlights: → C. oleifera shell is good feedstock for high adsorb capacity activated carbon. → Combining gasification and modification obtain highly developed mesoporous structures. → Mesoporous volume and ratio increase from 0.81 cm3/g and 33% to 1.17 cm3/g and 61%. → The final activated carbon exhibits high adsorption capacity.

  18. Green growth: Policies for transition towards low carbon economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Thorvald

    2012-11-01

    For the next fifty years and beyond, the world faces twin challenges: -Enhancing economic opportunities and living standards for a growing global population; -Addressing the environmental threats that, if left largely unaddressed, could undermine our abilities for longer term economic growth and development and the ability to reduce poverty. For twenty years the world community has attempted to face up to these challenges, notably global warming by a 'top down' international negotiation process under the auspices of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The paper discusses why this process has failed so far. To get out of this impasse, a 'bottom up' policy framework for green growth based on national preferences, possibilities and policies should be considered and is discussed in some detail. However, while green growth may enhance the transition towards low-carbon economies in the short and medium term, it is argued that a 'Global Green Deal' with regional and global rules of the game is needed to reduce the risk for unsustainable development in the longer term.(auth)

  19. Effects of Surface Area and Flow Rate on Marine Bacterial Growth in Activated Carbon Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Shimp, Robert J.; Pfaender, Frederic K.

    1982-01-01

    The colonization of granular activated carbon columns by bacteria can have both beneficial and potentially detrimental consequences. Bacterial growth on the carbon surface can remove adsorbed organics and thus partially regenerate the carbon bed. However, growth can also increase the levels of bacteria in the column effluents, which can adversely affect downstream uses of the treated water. This study of a sand column and several activated carbon columns demonstrated that considerable marine ...

  20. Nanoscale zirconia as a nonmetallic catalyst for graphitization of carbon and growth of single- and multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Stephen A; Baumann, Theodore F; Bayer, Bernhard C; Blume, Raoul; Worsley, Marcus A; MoberlyChan, Warren J; Shaw, Elisabeth L; Schlögl, Robert; Hart, A John; Hofmann, Stephan; Wardle, Brian L

    2009-09-01

    We report that nanoparticulate zirconia (ZrO(2)) catalyzes both growth of single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and graphitization of solid amorphous carbon. We observe that silica-, silicon nitride-, and alumina-supported zirconia on silicon nucleates single- and multiwall carbon nanotubes upon exposure to hydrocarbons at moderate temperatures (750 degrees C). High-pressure, time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of these substrates during carbon nanotube nucleation and growth shows that the zirconia catalyst neither reduces to a metal nor forms a carbide. Point-localized energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) confirms catalyst nanoparticles attached to CNTs are zirconia. We also observe that carbon aerogels prepared through pyrolysis of a Zr(IV)-containing resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer aerogel precursor at 800 degrees C contain fullerenic cage structures absent in undoped carbon aerogels. Zirconia nanoparticles embedded in these carbon aerogels are further observed to act as nucleation sites for multiwall carbon nanotube growth upon exposure to hydrocarbons at CVD growth temperatures. Our study unambiguously demonstrates that a nonmetallic catalyst can catalyze CNT growth by thermal CVD while remaining in an oxidized state and provides new insight into the interactions between nanoparticulate metal oxides and carbon at elevated temperatures. PMID:19663436

  1. Radiation-curing of acrylate composites including carbon fibres: A customized surface modification for improving mechanical performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Arnaud; Pietras-Ozga, Dorota; Ponsaud, Philippe; Kowandy, Christelle; Barczak, Mariusz; Defoort, Brigitte; Coqueret, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    The lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured acrylate-based composites reinforced with carbon-fibre with respect to the thermosettable analogues was investigated from the viewpoint of chemical interactions at the interface between the matrix and the carbon material. XPS analysis of representative commercial carbon fibres revealed the presence of a significant amount of chemical functions potentially exerting an adverse effect on the initiation and propagation of the free radical polymerization initiated under high energy radiation. The EB-induced polymerization of n-butyl acrylate as a simple model monomer was conducted in the presence of various aromatic additives exhibiting a strong inhibiting effect, whereas thiols efficiently sensitize the initiation mechanism and undergo transfer reactions. A method based on the surface modification of sized fibres by thiomalic acid is proposed for overcoming the localized inhibition phenomenon and for improving the mechanical properties of the resulting acrylate-based composites.

  2. Molecular simulation of the carbon nanotube growth mode during catalytic synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Soumik; Naha, Sayangdev; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2008-01-01

    Catalyzed growth of carbon nanostructures occurs mainly through two modes, i.e., base growth when the metal nanoparticle remains at the bottom of the nanotube, or when it is lifted by the growing carbon nanostructure due to tip growth. A correct prediction of the dominant growth mode depends on the energy gain due to the addition of C atoms from the carbon-metal catalyst solution to the graphene sheets forming the carbon nanostructures. We determine this energy gain through atomistic scale mo...

  3. Growth of Ag nanocrystals on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Ag-carbon nanotube interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhenXia; LI XinNian; REN CuiLan; YONG ZhenZhong; ZHU JianKang; LUO WenYun; FANG XiaoMing

    2009-01-01

    The experimental investigations on the interaction between Ag-nanocrystal particles (Ag-NCPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in Ag-nanocrystal particles/carbon nanotubes (Ag-NCPs/CNTs) hybrid structures were reported.The growth of Ag-NCPs on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was carried out by thermal evaporation deposition.High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that Ag-NCPs had the crystal lattice feature of face-centered cube (fcc).The growth of Ag-NCPs on MWCNTs induced the cross-section deformation of MWCNT.The ex-perimental results also showed that the synthesized Ag-NCPs/CNTs hybrid structure appeared as quasi-one dimensional nanowires containing the Ag-NCP/CNT hetero-junction.There was local cross-section deformation on MWCNTs at the interface of hetero-junction.These results involve the Important topic about fundamental and practical studies for structure of MNCPs on CNTs and also find clues to further research of Ag nanocrystal growing on MWCNTs and related Ag-CNT interaction.

  4. Growth of Ag nanocrystals on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Ag-carbon nanotube interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The experimental investigations on the interaction between Ag-nanocrystal particles (Ag-NCPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in Ag-nanocrystal particles/carbon nanotubes (Ag-NCPs/CNTs) hybrid structures were reported. The growth of Ag-NCPs on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was carried out by thermal evaporation deposition. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that Ag-NCPs had the crystal lattice feature of face-centered cube (fcc). The growth of Ag-NCPs on MWCNTs induced the cross-section deformation of MWCNT. The experimental results also showed that the synthesized Ag-NCPs/CNTs hybrid structure appeared as quasi-one dimensional nanowires containing the Ag-NCP/CNT hetero-junction. There was local cross-section deformation on MWCNTs at the interface of hetero-junction. These results involve the important topic about fundamental and practical studies for structure of MNCPs on CNTs and also find clues to further research of Ag nanocrystal growing on MWCNTs and related Ag-CNT interaction.

  5. GENOME ENABLED MODIFICATION OF POPLAR ROOT DEVELOPMENT FOR INCREASED CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    designated as a bioenergy crop by the U.S. Department of Energy, as a result of research following the oil embargo. Populus species also serve as model trees for plant molecular biology research. In this article, we will review recent progress in the genetic improvement of Populus, considering both classical breeding and genetic engineering for bioenergy, as well as in using transgenics to elucidate gene functionality. A perspective for future improvement of Populus via functional genomics will also be presented. The role of gibberellins (GAs) in regulation of lateral root development is poorly understood. We show that GA-deficient (35S:PcGA2ox1) and GA-insensitive (35S:rgl1) transgenic Populus exhibited increased lateral root proliferation and elongation under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, and these effects were reversed by exogenous GA treatment. In addition, RNA interference suppression of two poplar GA 2-oxidases predominantly expressed in roots also decreased lateral root formation. GAs negatively affected lateral root formation by inhibiting lateral root primordium initiation. A whole-genome microarray analysis of root development in GA-modified transgenic plants revealed 2069 genes with significantly altered expression. The expression of 1178 genes, including genes that promote cell proliferation, growth, and cell wall loosening, corresponded to the phenotypic severity of the root traits when transgenic events with differential phenotypic expression were compared. The array data and direct hormone measurements suggested crosstalk of GA signaling with other hormone pathways, including auxin and abscisic acid. Transgenic modification of a differentially expressed gene encoding an auxin efflux carrier suggests that GA modulation of lateral root development is at least partly imparted by polar auxin transport modification. These results suggest a mechanism for GA-regulated modulation of lateral root proliferation associated with regulation of plant allometry during

  6. Functional Materials Based on Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes for Biomedical and Environmental Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mashat, Afnan

    2015-05-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), they have gained much interest in many science and engineering fields. The modification of CNTs by introducing different functional groups to their surface is important for CNTs to be tailored to fit the need of specific applications. This dissertation presents several CNT-based systems that can provide biomedical and environmental advantages. In this research, polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were used to coat CNTs through hydrogen bonding. The release of doxorubicin (DOX, an anticancer drug) from this system was controlled by temperature. This system represents a promising method for incorporating stimuli triggered polymer-gated CNTs in controlled release applications. To create an acid responsive system CNTs were coated with 1,2-Distearoyl-snglycero- 3-Phosphoethanolamine-N-[Amino(Polyethylene glycol)2000]-(PE-PEG) and Poly(acrylic acid) modified dioleoy lphosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PE-PAA). An acidlabile linker was used to cross-link PAA, forming ALP@CNTs, thus making the system acid sensitive. The release of DOX from ALP@CNTs was found to be higher in an acidic environment. Moreover, near infrared (NIR) light was used to enhance the release of DOX from ALP@CNTs. A CNT-based membrane with controlled diffusion was prepared in the next study. CNTs were used as a component of a cellulose/gel membrane due to their optical property, which allows them to convert NIR light into heat. Poly(Nisopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) was used due to its thermo-sensitivity. The properties of both the CNTs and PNIPAm’s were used to control the diffusion of the cargo from the system, under the influence of NIR. CNTs were also used to fabricate an antibacterial agent, for which they were coated with polydopamine (PDA) and decorated with silver particles (Ag). Galactose (Gal) terminated with thiol groups conjugated with the above system was used to strengthen the bacterial targeting ability. The antibacterial activity of

  7. Nucleation, growth and habit modification of n-alkanes and homologous mixtures in the absence and presence of flow improving additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study has been performed on the nucleation, growth and habit modification of n-alkanes and homologous mixtures in the absence and presence of flow improving additives in an attempt to gain a clearer appreciation of the interaction mechanisms behind wax / additive crystallisation. Kinetic and structural assessment of melt phase n-alkanes illustrate the different crystallographic forms present within the homologous series. Studies demonstrate the alternating behaviour of the even and odd numbered homologues which converges as a function of increasing molecular weight. Greater crystal lattice stabilities were found for those n-alkanes which have an even carbon number and which crystallise into the triclinic crystal structure. Solid state phase behaviour of the n-alkanes was found to vary depending on the number and parity of n. Nucleation kinetic studies of n-alkanes and homologous mixtures from model diesel fuel solvents (dodecane, m-xylene, decalin, pristane and a dewaxed fuel) are assessed using turbidity as the method of crystallite detection. Saturation temperatures are found to be related to both alkane structure and molecular chain length for all solvent systems. N-alkane solubilities are lower for n-alkane like solvents. The width of the meta stable zone varies as a function of solvent in order of dodecane ≅ pristane 19H40 and solvent m-xylene. Wax precipitation from distillate fuels in the presence of flow improving additives (di-alkyl di-amino xylene, phthalic acid and sulphobenzene acid derivatives and high molecular weight polymers) reveal responsive wax crystal nucleator and growth inhibitor additives. The crystal morphology of heptacosane, C27H56 to simulate a model wax crystal is assessed in addition to its response to blocker 'tailor made' additives: methyl substituted C27H56 and di-alkyl substituted phenyl additives [additive (A) and (B)]. Pure C27H56 reveals a thin lozenge shaped platelet. All additives studied induce growth inhibition

  8. Surface modification of carbon fibers and its effect on the fiber–matrix interaction of UHMWPE based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukov, D.I., E-mail: dil_chukov@yahoo.com; Stepashkin, A.A.; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Both chemical and thermal treatments of UKN 5000 carbon fibers allow one to obtain well-developed surface. • The changes of structure and properties of VMN-4 fibers after both thermal and chemical oxidation are insignificant due to more perfect initial structure of these fibers. • The oxidative treatment of carbon fibers allows one to improve the interfacial interaction in the UHMWPE-based composites. • The oxidative treatment of the fibers allows one to a triple increase of Young’s modulus of the modified fibers reinforced UHMWPE composites. -- Abstract: The PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were subjected to thermal and chemical oxidation under various conditions. The variation in the surface morphology of carbon fibers after surface treatment was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the tensile strength of carbon fibers changed after surface modification. The interaction between the fibers and the matrix OF ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was characterized by the Young modulus of produced composites. It was shown that the Young modulus of composites reinforced with modified carbon fibers was significantly higher than that of composites reinforced with non-modified fibers.

  9. Modification of Activated Carbon by Means of Microwave Heating and Its Effects on the Pore Texture and Surface Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of typical Activated Carbons (coal based AC and coconut shell based AC were modified in a flow of N0 gas has been carried out using a microwave device operating at 2450 MHz and different input power, instead of a conventional furnace. The samples were analyzed by means of low temperatureN0 adsorption, elemental analysis and Boehm titration. The results show that microwave heating is an effective means of activated carbon modification. The temperature of activated carbon increases rapidly under microwave heating and then gradual increase to a quasi-stationary temperature. The pore texture of activated carbon changes slightly after microwave treatment and the two activated carbons still keep rich pore structure. The oxygen functional groups decompose and evolve with the form of CO and CO2. This in turn gives rise to a significant decrease in oxygen content. These changes of oxygen contents increase as the microwave input power increases. During microwave treatment, a gradual decrease in the surface acidic functional groups is observed. More important, with the removal of the surface acidic groups, the number of the basic group increased gradually, the activated carbon with oxygen functional groups become basic properties material.

  10. Surface modification of carbon fibers and its effect on the fiber–matrix interaction of UHMWPE based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Both chemical and thermal treatments of UKN 5000 carbon fibers allow one to obtain well-developed surface. • The changes of structure and properties of VMN-4 fibers after both thermal and chemical oxidation are insignificant due to more perfect initial structure of these fibers. • The oxidative treatment of carbon fibers allows one to improve the interfacial interaction in the UHMWPE-based composites. • The oxidative treatment of the fibers allows one to a triple increase of Young’s modulus of the modified fibers reinforced UHMWPE composites. -- Abstract: The PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were subjected to thermal and chemical oxidation under various conditions. The variation in the surface morphology of carbon fibers after surface treatment was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the tensile strength of carbon fibers changed after surface modification. The interaction between the fibers and the matrix OF ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was characterized by the Young modulus of produced composites. It was shown that the Young modulus of composites reinforced with modified carbon fibers was significantly higher than that of composites reinforced with non-modified fibers

  11. Growth of carbon nanofibers on carbon fabric with Ni nanocatalyst prepared using pulse electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulse electrodeposition (PED) technique was utilized to deposit nanosized (≤10 nm) Ni catalysts on carbon fabric (CF). Via an in situ potential profile, the PED technique can control the Ni catalyst loading, which is an important parameter for the growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on CF. The preparation of CNF-coated CF (carpet-like CF) was carried out in a thermal chemical vapor deposition system with an optimum loading of Ni catalysts deposited in the PED pulse range from 20 to 320 cycles. CNFs grown at 813 K using different pulse cycles had a narrow diameter distribution, around 15 ± 5 nm to 29 ± 7 nm; they have a hydrophobic surface, like lotus leaves. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed the graphene structural transformation of CNFs with the growth temperature. Solid wire CNFs were initially grown at 813 K with graphene edges exposed on the external surface. At elevated growth temperatures (1073 and 1173 K), bamboo-like CNFs were obtained, with herringbone structures and intersectional hollow cores

  12. Carbon nanotube growth on nanozirconia under strong cathodic polarization in steam and carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Zhang, Wei; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    observed. Apart from the CNTs, graphitic layers covering zirconia nanoparticles are also widely observed. This work describes nano-zirconia acting as a catalyst for the growth of CNT during electrochemical conversion of CO2 and H2O in a Ni-YSZ cermet under strong cathodic polarization. An electrocatalytic......Growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) catalyzed by zirconia nanoparticles was observed in the Ni-yttria doped zirconia (YSZ) composite cathode of a solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) at approximately 875 °C during co-electrolysis of CO2 and H2O to produce CO and H 2. CNT was observed to grow under...... large cathodic polarizations specifically at the first 1 to 2 μm Ni-YSZ active cathode layer next to the YSZ electrolyte. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that the CNTs are multi-walled with diameters of approximately 20 nm and the catalyst particles have diameters in the...

  13. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  14. Keratinocyte Growth Inhibition through the Modification of Wnt Signaling by Androgen in Balding Dermal Papilla Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, Tomoko; Matsuda, Ken-ichi; Inui, Shigeki; Takenaka, Hideya; Katoh, Norito; Itami, Satoshi; Kishimoto, Saburo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Context/Objective: Androgen induces androgenetic alopecia (AGA), which has a regressive effect on hair growth from the frontal region of the scalp. Conversely, Wnt proteins are known to positively affect mammalian hair growth. We hypothesized that androgen reduces hair growth via an interaction with the Wnt signaling system. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of androgen on Wnt signaling in dermal papilla (DP) cells.

  15. Markov Modeling of Component Fault Growth Over A Derived Domain of Feasible Output Control Effort Modifications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper introduces a novel Markov process formulation of stochastic fault growth modeling, in order to facilitate the development and analysis of...

  16. Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotrees with branched carbon nanofibers synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhanbing; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Lee, Chang Seok; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Pribat, D.

    2014-01-01

    Y- and comb-type carbon nanotrees formed from branched carbon nanofibres grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Different growth mechanisms are proposed for the two types of nanotrees based on the observed and reconstituted dynamic transformations of the catalyst particles during synthesis. However, the splitting of the larger catalyst particles is required for both kinds of nanotrees, whatever the involved growth mechanism. The c...

  17. Surface modification, characterization and adsorptive properties of a coconut activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xincheng; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Kang; Xie, Xinping; Hu, Yiming

    2012-08-01

    A coconut activated carbon was modified using chemical methods. Different concentration of nitric acid oxidation of the conventional sample produced samples with weakly acidic functional groups. The oxidized samples were characterized by scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, Bothem method, pH titration, adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and the adsorption mechanism of activated carbons was investigated. The results showed that BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbons were decreased after oxidization process, while acidic functional groups were increased. The surface morphology of oxidized carbons looked clean and eroded which was caused by oxidization of nitric acid. The oxidized carbons showed high adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and chemical properties of activated carbon played an important role in adsorption of metal ions and organic pollutants.

  18. Surface modification, characterization and adsorptive properties of a coconut activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coconut activated carbon was modified using chemical methods. Different concentration of nitric acid oxidation of the conventional sample produced samples with weakly acidic functional groups. The oxidized samples were characterized by scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, Bothem method, pH titration, adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and the adsorption mechanism of activated carbons was investigated. The results showed that BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbons were decreased after oxidization process, while acidic functional groups were increased. The surface morphology of oxidized carbons looked clean and eroded which was caused by oxidization of nitric acid. The oxidized carbons showed high adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and chemical properties of activated carbon played an important role in adsorption of metal ions and organic pollutants.

  19. Catalytic CVD Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes: Towards High Yield and Low Temperature Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Mionić

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD is currently the most flexible and economically attractive method for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Although its principle is simple, the precisely controlled growth of carbon nanotubes remains very complex because many different parameters influence the growth process. In this article, we review our recent results obtained on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via CCVD. We discuss the role of the catalyst and the catalyst support. Our recent results obtained from the water assisted growth and the equimolar C2H2-CO2 reaction are also discussed. Both procedures lead to significantly enhanced carbon nanotube growth. In particular, the latter allows growing carbon nanotubes on diverse substrate materials at low temperatures.

  20. Simple Predicting Method for Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Based on Tensile Strength of Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Three types of fatigue tests for an annealed carbon steel containing carbon of 0.42 % were carried out on smooth specimens and specimens with a small blind hole in order to investigate the fatigue crack growth law. A simple predicting method for crack growth rates has been proposed involving strength σb and the relation between cyclic stress and strain. The validity of proposed method has been confirmed by experiments on several carbon steels with different loadings.

  1. Effect of applied environmental stress on growth, photosynthesis, carbon allocation, and hydrocarbon production in Euphorbia lathyris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photosynthetic activity was reduced by salinity stress, but is was found to be less sensitive than growth. Salinity stress also caused changes in the concentrations of specific cations. Moderate water stress had little effect on growth, but large changes in hydrocarbon production were still observed. Carbon allocation experiments with radiolabeled carbon indicated that carbon for latex production was supplied by nearby leaves, with some translocation down the stem also occurring

  2. Effect of surface modification of activated carbon on its adsorption capacity for NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Xiao-mei; ZHU Shu-quan; ZHANG Wen-hui

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effects of carbon surface characteristics on NH3 adsorption, coal-based and coconut shell activated carbons were modified by treatment with oxidants. The surface properties of the carbons were characterized by low temperature nitrogen sorption, by Boehm's titrations and by XPS techniques. NH3 adsorption isotherms of the original and the modified carbons were determined. The results show that the carbons were oxidized by HNO3 and (NH4)2S2O8, and that there was an increase in oxygen containing functional groups on the surface. However, the pore-size distribution of the coal-based carbons was changed after KMnO4 treatment. It was found that the NH3 adsorption capacity of the modified carbons was enhanced and that the most pronounced enhancement results from (NH4)2S2O8 oxidation. Under our experimental conditions, the capacity is positively corrected to the number of surface functional groups containing oxygen, and to the number of micro-pores. Furthermore, an empirical model of the relationship between NH3 adsorption and multiple factors on the carbon surface was fit using a complex regression method.

  3. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) whereas composition and energy distribution functions of positive ions were obtained by electron probe microanalyzer, elastic recoil detection analysis, and mass-energy analyzer (MEA). It has been observed that the compressive stress decreases with increasing acetylene partial pressure, showing an abrupt change from -5.0 to -1.6 GPa at an acetylene partial pressure of 0.012 Pa. TEM micrographs show that by increasing the acetylene partial pressure in the plasma from 0 to 0.012 Pa, the microstructure of the coating changes from polycrystalline to amorphous. MEA results show that the most probable energy of positive ions bombarding the substrate during deposition in pure argon and argon/acetylene atmosphere is the same. Based on the results, it is concluded that the huge variation in the compressive stress at low acetylene partial pressures is due to a change in the microstructure of the coating from polycrystalline to amorphous and not to the energy of positive ions bombarding the film

  4. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering

  5. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  6. Associations between Prenatal Exposure to Black Carbon and Memory Domains in Urban Children: Modification by Sex and Prenatal Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney J Cowell

    Full Text Available Whether fetal neurodevelopment is disrupted by traffic-related air pollution is uncertain. Animal studies suggest that chemical and non-chemical stressors interact to impact neurodevelopment, and that this association is further modified by sex.To examine associations between prenatal traffic-related black carbon exposure, prenatal stress, and sex with children's memory and learning.Analyses included N = 258 mother-child dyads enrolled in a Boston, Massachusetts pregnancy cohort. Black carbon exposure was estimated using a validated spatiotemporal land-use regression model. Prenatal stress was measured using the Crisis in Family Systems-Revised survey of negative life events. The Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML2 was administered at age 6 years; outcomes included the General Memory Index and its component indices [Verbal, Visual, and Attention Concentration]. Relationships between black carbon and WRAML2 index scores were examined using multivariable-adjusted linear regression including effect modification by stress and sex.Mothers were primarily minorities (60% Hispanic, 26% Black; 67% had ≤12 years of education. The main effect for black carbon was not significant for any WRAML2 index; however, in stratified analyses, among boys with high exposure to prenatal stress, Attention Concentration Index scores were on average 9.5 points lower for those with high compared to low prenatal black carbon exposure (P3-way interaction = 0.04.The associations between prenatal exposure to black carbon and stress with children's memory scores were stronger in boys than in girls. Studies assessing complex interactions may more fully characterize health risks and, in particular, identify vulnerable subgroups.

  7. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization has been developed for surface modification of carbon nanotubes with polymers for the first time. - Highlights: • Surface modification of CNTs via mussel inspired chemistry. • Preparation of aminated polymers through free radical polymerization. • Functionalized CNTs with aminated polymers via Michael addition reaction. • Highly dispersed CNTs in organic and aqueous solution. - Abstract: In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  8. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization has been developed for surface modification of carbon nanotubes with polymers for the first time. - Highlights: • Surface modification of CNTs via mussel inspired chemistry. • Preparation of aminated polymers through free radical polymerization. • Functionalized CNTs with aminated polymers via Michael addition reaction. • Highly dispersed CNTs in organic and aqueous solution. - Abstract: In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites

  9. Growth of carbon nanostructures on carbonized electrospun nanofibers with palladium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the mechanism of the formation of carbon nanostructures on carbon nanofibers with Pd nanoparticles by using different carbon sources. The carbon nanofibers with Pd nanoparticles were produced by carbonizing electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers including Pd(Ac)2. Such PAN-based carbon nanofibers were then used as substrates to grow hierarchical carbon nanostructures. Toluene, pyridine and chlorobenzine were employed as carbon sources for the carbon nanostructures. With the Pd nanoparticles embedded in the carbonized PAN nanofibers acting as catalysts, molecules of toluene, pyridine or chlorobenzine were decomposed into carbon species which were dissolved into the Pd nanoparticles and consequently grew into straight carbon nanotubes, Y-shaped carbon nanotubes or carbon nano-ribbons on the carbon nanofiber substrates. X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to capture the mechanism of formation of Pd nanoparticles, regular carbon nanotubes, Y-shaped carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-ribbons. It was observed that the Y-shaped carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-ribbons were formed on carbonized PAN nanofibers containing Pd-nanoparticle catalyst, and the carbon sources played a crucial role in the formation of different hierarchical carbon nanostructures

  10. Strong Metal-Support Interaction: Growth of Individual Carbon Nanofibers from Amorphous Carbon Interacting with an Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO/Ni nanopar......The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO....../Ni nanoparticles, devoid of any gaseous carbon source and external heating and stimulated by an electron beam in a 300 kilo volt transmission electron microscope....

  11. IMPROVEMENT OF EFFICIENCY OF GREY CAST IRON MODIFICATION DUE TO INTRODUCTION OF CARBON MODIFIER INTO COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Lovshenko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that introduction carbon into modifier composition and increase of its dispersion degree due to spatter on high-melting particles or due to mechanical alloying increases modifier efficiency for grey cast iron.

  12. Possible mediators for modification of carbon substrate based electodes for construction of biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotzian, P.; Brázdilová, P.; Bartoš, M.; Beyene, N. W.; Švancara, I.; Vlček, Milan; Kalcher, K.; Vytřas, K.

    Galway : National University of Ireland , 2004. s. 149. [International Conference on Electoanalysis /10./. 06.06.2004-10.06.2004, Galway] Keywords : carbon substrate Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  13. Combined modification of a TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst with two different carbon forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansón-Casaos, Alejandro, E-mail: alanson@icb.csic.es [Instituto de Carboquímica ICB-CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castán 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Tacchini, Ignacio; Unzue, Andrea; Martínez, M. Teresa [Instituto de Carboquímica ICB-CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castán 4, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-04-01

    Hydrothermally synthesized titanate nanotubes were carbon-doped through a thermal treatment in the presence of glucose followed by blending with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A series of TiO{sub 2}-based materials was prepared with various initial glucose contents and two SWCNT types, resulting in total carbon contents from 0.3 wt.% to nearly 26 wt.%. Electron microscopy observations indicated that titanate nanotubes were converted into nanorods during the thermal treatment, and X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed that all the treated materials mostly consisted of anatase TiO{sub 2}. Glucose pyrolysis caused changes in the infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra of the titania material, indicating an interaction between the inserted carbon atoms and titanium atoms. Raman spectra of SWCNT/C/TiO{sub 2} hybrids showed characteristic bands of both the SWCNT and anatase TiO{sub 2} phases. SWCNT/C/TiO{sub 2} multicomponent materials demonstrated substantially better photocatalytic activities than P25 TiO{sub 2} for methylene blue degradation under visible light irradiation. Independently from its origin, the presence of carbon caused a strong increase in the TiO{sub 2} visible light absorption. However, the results obtained with the C/TiO{sub 2} and SWCNT/C/TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts clearly showed different photocatalysis mechanisms depending on the carbon form.

  14. Combined modification of a TiO2 photocatalyst with two different carbon forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansón-Casaos, Alejandro; Tacchini, Ignacio; Unzue, Andrea; Martínez, M. Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Hydrothermally synthesized titanate nanotubes were carbon-doped through a thermal treatment in the presence of glucose followed by blending with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A series of TiO2-based materials was prepared with various initial glucose contents and two SWCNT types, resulting in total carbon contents from 0.3 wt.% to nearly 26 wt.%. Electron microscopy observations indicated that titanate nanotubes were converted into nanorods during the thermal treatment, and X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed that all the treated materials mostly consisted of anatase TiO2. Glucose pyrolysis caused changes in the infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra of the titania material, indicating an interaction between the inserted carbon atoms and titanium atoms. Raman spectra of SWCNT/C/TiO2 hybrids showed characteristic bands of both the SWCNT and anatase TiO2 phases. SWCNT/C/TiO2 multicomponent materials demonstrated substantially better photocatalytic activities than P25 TiO2 for methylene blue degradation under visible light irradiation. Independently from its origin, the presence of carbon caused a strong increase in the TiO2 visible light absorption. However, the results obtained with the C/TiO2 and SWCNT/C/TiO2 photocatalysts clearly showed different photocatalysis mechanisms depending on the carbon form.

  15. Combined modification of a TiO2 photocatalyst with two different carbon forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermally synthesized titanate nanotubes were carbon-doped through a thermal treatment in the presence of glucose followed by blending with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A series of TiO2-based materials was prepared with various initial glucose contents and two SWCNT types, resulting in total carbon contents from 0.3 wt.% to nearly 26 wt.%. Electron microscopy observations indicated that titanate nanotubes were converted into nanorods during the thermal treatment, and X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed that all the treated materials mostly consisted of anatase TiO2. Glucose pyrolysis caused changes in the infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra of the titania material, indicating an interaction between the inserted carbon atoms and titanium atoms. Raman spectra of SWCNT/C/TiO2 hybrids showed characteristic bands of both the SWCNT and anatase TiO2 phases. SWCNT/C/TiO2 multicomponent materials demonstrated substantially better photocatalytic activities than P25 TiO2 for methylene blue degradation under visible light irradiation. Independently from its origin, the presence of carbon caused a strong increase in the TiO2 visible light absorption. However, the results obtained with the C/TiO2 and SWCNT/C/TiO2 photocatalysts clearly showed different photocatalysis mechanisms depending on the carbon form.

  16. Structural and surface modifications of carbon nanotubes when submitted to high temperature annealing treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillejos, E. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Bachiller-Baeza, B. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Cadenas, M.; Gallegos-Suarez, E. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Ramos, I. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Guerrero-Ruiz, A. [Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamargo-Martinez, K., E-mail: katia@incar.csic.es [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Martinez-Alonso, A.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), pristine and heat-treated at 2873 K, were comparatively characterized using HRTEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, Raman spectroscopy and immersion calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing at 2873 K produced removal of amorphous phases, ordering of graphene layers and structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immersion enthalpies in organic liquids indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between aromatic molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a chemical vapour deposition procedure using acetylene as source of carbon, iron pentacarbonyl as catalyst and an inert carrier gas. An aliquot of these MWCNTs was heat-treated at 2873 K under inert atmosphere (Ar). The two carbon nanotube samples where characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, Raman spectroscopy, and immersion calorimetry in toluene, methanol and methylcyclohexane. HRTEM images confirmed that high-temperature treatment removed amorphous carbon, the graphene layers being better graphitized, and also some structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores took place. Immersion enthalpies in toluene, in which molecules are present as aromatic functions, indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between such molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs.

  17. Effects of Surface Modification of Nanodiamond Particles for Nucleation Enhancement during Its Film Growth by Microwave Plasma Jet Chemical Vapour Deposition Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Chii-Ruey Lin; Da-Hua Wei; Minh-Khoa BenDao; Hong-Ming Chang; Wei-En Chen; Jen-Ai Lee

    2014-01-01

    The seedings of the substrate with a suspension of nanodiamond particles (NDPs) were widely used as nucleation seeds to enhance the growth of nanostructured diamond films. The formation of agglomerates in the suspension of NDPs, however, may have adverse impact on the initial growth period. Therefore, this paper was aimed at the surface modification of the NDPs to enhance the diamond nucleation for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films which could be used in photovoltaic applications. H...

  18. N-Terminal Modification with Pseudo-Bifunctional PEG-Hexadecane Markedly Improves the Pharmacological Profile of Human Growth Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Ji, Shaoyang; Hu, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) has been used to treat children with short stature, renal failure, and Turner's syndrome. However, clinical application of hGH suffers from its short plasma half-life and low bioavailability. PEGylation and albumin binding are two of the most effective approaches to prolong the plasma half-life of hGH. However, the steric shielding effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and albumin can drastically decrease the bioactivity of hGH, which is opposite to the increased pharmacokinetics (PK). In the present study, a long-acting hGH with markedly improved pharmacological profile was rationally designed and prepared by N-terminal modification of hGH with pseudo-bifunctional PEG-hexadecane by using PEG (3.5 kDa or 10 kDa) as the linker. PEGylation and albumin binding with hexadecane can increase the hydrodynamic volume and decrease the immunogenicity of hGH, which thereby markedly increases the PK of hGH. Since N-terminus is far from the bioactive domain of hGH, N-terminal modification of hGH can minimize the steric shielding effects on the bioactive domain of hGH. Hexadecane-bound albumin can be slowly released from hGH during the in vivo circulation, which can slowly restore the bioactivity of hGH. Thus, the high bioactivity of PEG-hexadecane modified hGH (hGH-PEG-HD) was synergistically achieved by N-terminal modification with pseudo-bifunctional PEG-hexadecane and slow-release of albumin. The high pharmacodynamics (PD) of hGH-PEG-HD was due to the synergistic effect of the high bioactivity and the overall increased PK. PMID:25849255

  19. Microbial Growth and Air Pollutants in the Corrosion of Carbonate Rocks: Results from Laboratory and Outdoor Experimental Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, B.; Poli, G.; Pitzurra, L.

    2003-04-01

    Microorganisms and atmospheric pollution are primary causes of deterioration of materials exposed to open air. Due to the variety of chemical-mineralogical compositions and textures, stone represents a variegated substrate that interacts with environmental fluids and particulate, and is a selective environment for biological proliferation. Carbonate rocks, in particular, are highly exposed to environmental decay and extremely susceptible to acid attack caused by atmospheric pollutants and metabolic acid production. The aim of this work is to study the combined effect of microbial contamination and atmospheric pollutants in the weathering of carbonate rocks by means of laboratory and outdoor exposure tests. Laboratory experiments performed on carbonate rocks allowed evaluation of the influence of the gas mixture in the chemical modifications of the lithic substrate, and formulation of a kinetic model of sulphation. The obtained results suggest that nucleation alternates with growth as leading processes in the development of sulphation. In particular, nucleation of the reaction products is the leading process in the initial period of sulphation, which is characterized by a marked slowdown of the reaction progress, whereas growth of the products is the leading process in the subsequent period of resumption of sulphation. In situ experiments performed by exposing limestone specimens at two air monitoring stations in Perugia with different degrees of urban air pollution showed high levels of fungal colonization at early times and the presence of weathering products (i.e. gypsum) in the longer term. Results point to a combined effect of microbial colonization and atmospheric pollutants in promoting the weathering of stone through acid attack within the film of water present on the surface of the exposed material, and through the oxidation of metal sulphide particulate pollutant to sulphate. Laboratory tests assaying the extent of fungal colonization and/or chemical

  20. Whey Induced-Modifications in Growth, Photosynthetic Characteristics, Protein patterns and Water Relations of Wheat Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    S.A. Haroun; Ibrahim, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of presoaking of wheat grains in cheese whey at different concentrations (0, 25, 50 and 100 %) on growth vigor of wheat seedlings and some physiological criteria. Whey treatment at 50% level induced a marked increase in shoot length, shoot fresh and dry masses and total leaf area of wheat plants as compared with control plants. On the other hand, the other used whey concentrations had no significant effect on the abovementioned criteria...

  1. Modification of Growth Kinetics of Colony-Forming Units in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of haemopoietic colonies in the spleens of heavily irradiated recipient mice after intravenous injection of haemopoietic cells has led to a technique for assay of haemopoietic progenitor cells in a tissue. If the recipient's spleen is taken out shortly after injection and its cells are intravenously retransplanted into secondary recipients, the number of colonies observed in the secondary recipients spleen gives an idea of the fraction of primarily injected colony-forming units (CFUs) lodging and proliferating in the primary recipient's spleen. It is generally believed that the fraction recovered two hours after injection, the so-called f factor, is of importance because these CFUs are responsible for the colonies observed later. A detailed study of the growth kinetics of the injected CFUs in the spleen arid femur of irradiated recipients showed that the recoverable fraction of injected CFUs decreased between two hours and one day after injection, and later showed an exponential growth pattern. This early dip in the growth curve was the subject of further study. It has been found that pretreatment of the donor and/or the recipient may change the dip in the growth curve of CFUs lodging in the spleen of the recipients. It is suggested that this dip is associated with differentiation of stem cells and that conditions may be produced where the haemopoietic progenitor cells can be induced to start proliferating immediately whereas their early differentiation, which is associated with loss of colony-forming ability, can be at least partially blocked. An analysis of the factors that cause such changes in the kinetics of transplanted CFUs may be useful in elucidating the conditions which contribute to the occurrence of leukaemia in irradiated mice. (author)

  2. MODIFICATION OF PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLER USING SODIUM SILICATE/ZINC CHLORIDE BASED MODIFIERS TO IMPROVE ACID-RESISTANCE AND USE OF THE MODIFIED FILLER IN PAPERMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the acid-resistant property of papermaking grade precipitated calcium carbonate filler and to obtain modified filler in powder form, sodium silicate/zinc chloride based modifiers were used in filler modification, and the use of modified filler in papermaking of deinked pulp derived from recycled newspaper was also preliminarily investigated. Under the preliminarily optimized experimental conditions, when sodium silicate, zinc chloride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and phosphoric acid with dosages of 10 wt%, 3 wt%, 1 wt% and 0.2 wt%, respectively, were used as modifiers, and when the temperature, aging time, and PCC concentration during the filler modification process was 70 oC, 7 h and 9.1 wt%, respectively, the acid-resistant property of filler was significantly improved after modification, as evaluated using alum consumption and pH methods. The use of modified precipitated calcium carbonate filler prepared under the optimized conditions provided considerably more brightness and light scattering improvement in comparison to unmodified filler, and filler modification was found to have only negligible influence on tensile and burst strength of the paper, air permeability of the paper, and retention performance of the filler. Surface analysis of the modified filler using XPS and SEM confirmed the occurring of surface encapsulation and modification of precipitated calcium carbonate filler when the relevant modifiers were used in filler modification. The encapsulating effect of modifiers on filler was thought to be favorable to improvement in acid-resistant property, and optical properties of the filled paper.

  3. Covalent modification of carbon nanotubes with ferrocene-lysine derivative for electrochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yizhi; Petryk, Michael; Diakowski, Piotr M.; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2009-05-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were chemically modified with a ferrocene-lysine conjugate and the material was deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) and the surfaces were evaluated for their ability to act as electrochemical sensors for chemical warfare agent (CWA) mimics methylphosphonic acid (MPA), ethylmethylphosphonate (EMP) and diethyl cyanophosphonate (DECP).

  4. Early diagenetic growth of carbonate concretions in the upper Doushantuo Formation in South China and their significance for the assessment of hydrocarbon source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jin; ZHANG ShiHong; JIANG GanQing; ZHAO QingLe; LI HaiYan; SHI XiaoYing; LIU JunLai

    2008-01-01

    Mineralogical and textural characteristics and organic carbon composition of the carbonate concretions from the upper Doushantuo Formation (ca.551 Ma) in the eastern Yangtze Gorge area reveal their early diagenetic (shallow) growth in organic-rich shale.High organic carbon content (up to 10%) and abundance of framboidal pyrites in the hosting shale suggest an anoxic or euxinic depositional environment.Well-preserved cardhouse clay fabrics in the concretions suggest their formation at 0-3 m burial depth, likely associated with microbial decomposition of organic matter and anaerobic oxidation of methane.Gases through decomposition of organic matter and/or from methanogenesis created bubbles and cavities, and anaerobic methane oxidation at the sulfate reduction zone resulted in carbonate precipitation, filling in bubbles and cavities to form spherical structures of the concretions.Rock pyrolysis analyses show that the carbonate concretions have lower total organic carbon (TOC) content but higher effective carbon than those in the host rocks.This may be caused by enclosed organic matter in pores of the concretions so that organic matter was protected from further modification during deep burial and maintained high hydrocarbon generating potential even in over-matured source rock.As a microbialite sensu latu, concretions have special growth conditions and may provide important information on the microbial activities in depositional and early burial environments.

  5. Early diagenetic growth of carbonate concretions in the upper Doushantuo Formation in South China and their significance for the assessment of hydrocarbon source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mineralogical and textural characteristics and organic carbon composition of the carbonate concretions from the upper Doushantuo Formation (ca. 551 Ma) in the eastern Yangtze Gorge area reveal their early diagenetic (shallow) growth in organic-rich shale. High organic carbon content (up to 10%) and abundance of framboidal pyrites in the hosting shale suggest an anoxic or euxinic depositional environment. Well-preserved cardhouse clay fabrics in the concretions suggest their formation at 0-3 m burial depth, likely associated with microbial decomposition of organic matter and anaerobic oxidation of methane. Gases through decomposition of organic matter and/or from methanogenesis created bubbles and cavities, and anaerobic methane oxidation at the sulfate reduction zone resulted in carbonate precipitation, filling in bubbles and cavities to form spherical structures of the concretions. Rock pyrolysis analyses show that the carbonate concretions have lower total organic carbon (TOC) content but higher effective carbon than those in the host rocks. This may be caused by enclosed organic matter in pores of the concretions so that organic matter was protected from further modification during deep burial and maintained high hydrocarbon generating potential even in over-matured source rock. As a microbialite sensu latu, concretions have special growth conditions and may provide important information on the microbial activities in depositional and early burial environments.

  6. Low Carbon Green Growth in Asia: What is the Scope for Regional Cooperation?

    OpenAIRE

    Anbumozhi, Venkatachalam

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a framework to assess the scope of collaboration among countries that are pursuing low-carbon green growth. Much of the policy studies in the area of low-carbon green growth have focused on individual countries or a group of countries. Little attention is given to how countries can work together to pursue the lowcarbon green growth agenda. Developing Asia has been witnessing rapid growth in economic activities, both at the sub-regional level and Asia-Pacific wide. There is...

  7. The effect of various carbon sources on the growth of single-celled cyanophyta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, I. A.; Sidorenkova, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    In 19 strains of unicellular blue-green algae, belonging to general Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece, the capacity of growth under mixotrophic conditions in mineral media with organic carbon sources (carbohydrates, polyols) was investigated. At moderate light intensity (1200 lx) and 0.5% of carbon source there was revealed: (1) Stimulation of growth; (2) Partial or complete inhibition of growth; (3) No influence of carbohydrate and polyols on the growth of some algae strains. Three physiological groups for the investigated strains have been outlined on the basis of data obtained. The possibility of using the differences revealed in classification of unicellular blue-green algae is discussed.

  8. The modification of heparin for self-assembled multilayer film loaded with growth factor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumorek, Marta Maria; Kubies, Dana; Filová, Elena; Kasoju, Naresh; Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Houska, Milan; Matějka, R.; Staňková, Ľubica; Bačáková, Lucie; Rypáček, František

    Riva del Garda: Elsevier, 2015. P2.110. [International Symposium Frontiers in Polymer Science /4./ - POLY 2015. 20.05.2015-22.05.2015, Riva del Garda] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1857; GA ČR GPP108/12/P624; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : heparin * albumin * growth factor Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (FGU-C)

  9. Modification of the actions of some neuroactive drugs by growth hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, L.C.; Cotzias, G.C.

    1976-02-01

    The flat serum growth hormone (GH) patterns of untreated parkinsonian patients develop diurnal rises during treatment with levodopa. This chronic exposure to excesses of GH might lead to the eventual emergence of the ''on-off'' phenomenon, which would indicate a need for animal experiments. Pretreatment of mice with GH increased (1) cerebral dopa and dopamine concentrations in levodopa-treated mice, (2) cerebral accumulation of injected tritiated apomorphine and tritiated thymidine, and (3) behavioral responses to levodopa, L-m-tyrosine, apomorphine hydrochloride, and oxotremorine. (auth)

  10. A simple method to synthesize carbon nanofibers with a parallel growth mode and their capacitive properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanofibers with a parallel growth mode were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a nickel catalyst precursor and acetylene carbon source gas at 550 °C, the growth mechanism and growth model of which were discussed and established, respectively. In the case of no pretreatment, the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area and total pore volume of the as-synthesized carbon nanofibers were 214 m2·g−1 and 0.36 cm3·g−1, respectively. The maximum specific capacitance of the carbon nanofibers was 205.8 F·g−1, examined at a 0.20 V·s−1 sweep rate. The structure and morphology of the carbon nanofibers were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). (paper)

  11. Effects of gas pressure and plasma power on the growth of carbon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of gas pressure and plasma power on the growth of carbon-based nanostructures (CNSs) have been studied in detail. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) and carbon nanowalls (CNWs) were synthesized on glass substrates via radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RFPECVD) technique. Surface morphologies of the films have been studied by SEM and TEM. When the gas pressure increases from 120 to 300 Pa, the deposited carbon material changes from MWCNTs to carbon nanowalls (CNWs). Additionally, the density of carbon nanostructures increases with the gas pressure. The radio frequency (RF) plasma power ranging from 600 to 2400 W was applied during the activation and deposition process. The plasma enhances the decomposition of carbon atoms to deposit onto the surfaces of catalyst particles. Whereas an exorbitant RF plasma power can destroy the already deposited carbon nanostructures.

  12. Growth of Graphene Nanoribbons and Carbon Onions from Polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-Song; LU Bing-An; XIE Er-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons and carbon onions are directly prepared by electron beam irradiation of polyacrylonitrile and expanded polystyrene nanofibers,respectively.By controlling the irradiation process in a high resolution transmission electron microscope,the number of layers of the graphene nanoribbons,as well as the dimension of the carbon onions,can be controlled.It is found that the initial diameter of the nanofiber has a strong effect on the final results.A mechanism is proposed to explain the transformation of polymer nanofibers to carbon nanostructures under electron beam irradiation.This supposes that the polymer nanofibers are first carbonized and then graphitized as a result of the high energy electrons.According to the mechanism,it is believed that all polymer nanofibers could be carbonized and then converted to graphene nanoribbons by proper electron beam irradiation.

  13. Modification of cation-exchange properties of activated carbon by treatment with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of inorganic cations by high-surface-area activated carbon can be increased by an order of magnitude by controlled exposure to high concentrations of nitric acid at elevated temperatures. Distribution coefficients of cations are also increased. Oxidation treatment causes some loss in particle strength. Acid strength of the functional groups from the nitric acid treatment is greater than those of the starting material. Surface area measurements from small-angle neutron scattering indicate that the increase in effective ion-exchange capacity is not accompanied by gross changes in the structure of the material. 13C-NMR on solid samples suggests that the concentration of carboxyl and phenolic functional groups in the carbon is increased by the treatment

  14. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of single walled carbon nanotube thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishalli; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Srivastava, Alok; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-04-01

    Thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method and irradiated with swift heavy ions, carbon and nickel each of energy 60 MeV. The ion beams have different electronic energy loss (Se) values and the samples were exposed to various irradiation doses. The irradiated films were characterized using Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy results indicate the competing processes of defect creation and healing (annealing) of SWCNTs at lower fluences, while at higher fluences defect creation or damage dominates. In UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy we find that there is decrease in the intensity of characteristic peaks with every increasing fluence, indicating decrease in the optically active states with irradiation.

  15. MORPHOLOGY MODIFICATION OF CARBON CHROME MOLYBDENUM STEEL STRUCTURE INFLUENCED BY HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of temperature and time parameters of thermal treatment on structural change and properties of carbon chromium molybdenum steel has been studied. It has been shown that there are considerable areas with grainy morphology of cementite after high temperature tempering in the structure of steel. It assures reduction of steel microhardness by 25%, and there are no substantial structural changes after medium temperature tempering.

  16. MORPHOLOGY MODIFICATION OF CARBON CHROME MOLYBDENUM STEEL STRUCTURE INFLUENCEDBY HEAT TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Lutsenko, V.; Anelkin, N.; Golubenko, T.; Scherbakov, V.; Lutsenko, O.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of temperature and time parameters of thermal treatment on structural change and properties of carbon chromium molybdenum steel has been studied. It has been shown that there are considerable areas with grainy morphology of cementite after high temperature tempering in the structure of steel. It assures reduction of steel microhardness by 25%, and there are no substantial structural changes after medium temperature tempering.

  17. Morphology modification of carbon chrome molybdenum steel structure influenced by heat treatment

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Lutsenko; N. L. Anelkin; T. N. Golubenko; Scherbakov, V. I.; O. V. Lutsenko

    2011-01-01

    The influence of temperature and time parameters of thermal treatment on structural change and properties of carbon chromium molybdenum steel has been studied. It has been shown that there are considerable areas with grainy morphology of cementite after high temperature tempering in the structure of steel. It assures reduction of steel microhardness by 25%, and there are no substantial structural changes after medium temperature tempering.

  18. Impregnation and surface modification of polymers in liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Alm, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) of silicone rubber and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) produced in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) are studied. The purpose is to increase the hydrophilicity of silicone without loosing transparency and make a suitable contact lens material. The compatibility between CO2 and silicone is quantified by applying the Flory-Huggins interaction approach. The compatibility is modeled as a function of pressure and temperature revea...

  19. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ruslana Vasylkovska; Natalia Petriv; Halyna Semchyshyn

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) meta...

  20. Gravity Effects in Carbon Nanotube Growth by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition. The sizes of these carbon nanotubes (CNT) are quite uniform and the length of the tube is up to several tens of micrometers. With the substrate surface normal either along or against the gravity vector, different growth orientations of CNT are observed by scanning electron microscopy although the Raman spectra are similar for samples synthesized at different locations. These results suggest the gravitation effects in the growth of long and small diameter CNT.

  1. Supramolecular modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with β-cyclodextrin for better dispersibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi, E-mail: 15828515724@163.com, E-mail: heyi@swpu.edu.cn; Xu, Zhonghao [Southwest Petroleum University, State Key Lab of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation (China); Yang, Qiangbin; Wu, Feng; Liang, Lv [Southwest Petroleum University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-01-15

    A novel hybrid material based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes was synthesized using organic synthesis, and the structures of multi-walled carbon nanotube derivatives were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscope. The analytical results indicated that β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was anchored to the surface of Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, OD: 10–20 nm, length: 10–30 μm) and dispersion experiments exhibited that the introduction of β-CD onto the MWCNTs would dramatically enhance the dispersion of MWCNTs in both ethanol and water media; the suspensions were found to be very stable for 2 months, and the results of this technique confirmed the experimental results. This novel technique would provide a new, simple, and facile route to prepare the modified nanomaterials based on silane-coupling agent and β-CD, and the obtained modified nanomaterials have great potential practical significance and theoretical value to develop the novel organic–inorganic hybrid material, which was very useful for water treatment and biological medicine.

  2. Modification of tribomechanical properties of commercial TiN coatings by carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical vapour deposited commercial TiN coatings of about 2μm thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1x1017 and 8x1017ionscm-2. An ultra-microhardness apparatus (UMIS-2000) was used to measure hardness, and a pin-on-disc machine (CSEM tribometer) with a sapphire ball was used to measure wear, friction and adhesion. Carbon implantation induced a significant improvement in ultra-microhardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose φcrit is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by implantation. Proton elastic scattering (PES) measurements show loss of nitrogen after implantation by up to 27%. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analysis indicated that some implanted carbon has diffused out from the implanted region towards the TiN surface. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible second phase formation. ((orig.))

  3. Microstructure modification during the growth of TiN hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TiN hard coatings are deposited using reactive magnetron sputtering with variations of the bias voltage during the deposition. The correlations between the bias voltage and the generation of structural gradients in TiN are investigated. Using X-ray diffraction, partly combined with definite film removals, residual stresses and textures are measured in dependence on the distance to the surface. Accompanying studies using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) support the results of X-ray investigations. It is shown that a depth profile of residual stresses and textures can be generated tailor-made. The formation of these gradients is mainly influenced by the applied bias voltage in each layer of the coating. Growth selection processes are interrupted due to a high nucleation rate in each layer. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Diamond film growth with modification properties of adhesion between substrate and diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setasuwon P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond film growth was studied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD. A special equipment was build in-house, employing a welding torch, and substrate holder with a water-cooling system. Acetylene and oxygen were used as combustion gases and the substrate was tungsten carbide cobalt. It was found that surface treatments, such as diamond powder scratching or acid etching, increase the adhesion and prevent the film peel-off. Diamond powder scratching and combined diamond powder scratching with acid etching gave the similar diamond film structure with small grain and slightly rough surface. The diamond film obtained with both treatments has high adhesion and can withstand internal stress better than ones obtained by untreated surface or acid etching alone. It was also found that higher substrate temperature produced smoother surface and more uniform diamond grain.

  5. Examining carbon emissions economic growth nexus for India: A multivariate cointegration approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study probes cointegration and causality between carbon emissions and economic growth for India using ARDL bounds testing approach complemented by Johansen-Juselius maximum likelihood procedure in a multivariate framework by incorporating energy supply, investment and employment for time span 1971-2006. The study fails to establish long-run equilibrium relationship and long term causality between carbon emissions and economic growth; however, there exists a bi-directional short-run causality between the two. Hence, in the short-run, any effort to reduce carbon emissions could lead to a fall in the national income. This study also establishes unidirectional short-run causality running from economic growth to energy supply and energy supply to carbon emissions. The absence of causality running from energy supply to economic growth implies that in India, energy conservation and energy efficiency measures can be implemented to minimize the wastage of energy across value chain. Such measures would narrow energy demand-supply gap. Absence of long-run causality between carbon emissions and economic growth implies that in the long-run, focus should be given on harnessing energy from clean sources to curb carbon emissions, which would not affect the country's economic growth.

  6. The kinetics of Scenedesmus obliquus microalgae growth utilizing carbon dioxide gas from biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microalgae Scenedesmus obliquus was cultured in a laboratory photobioreactor to determine the efficacy of using biogas as a carbon source for the microalgae's growth. The biogas contained ∼60% CH4 and ∼40% CO2, and was derived from an anaerobic digester operating from animal wastes, and an anaerobic reactor utilizing high strength wastewater. The results showed that biogas is a viable carbon source for microalgae growth and that significant portions of the biogas' CO2 can be utilized for algae growth, resulting in a biogas having a high concentration of methane. This paper develops the kinetic expressions for the algae's growth by assuming an autocatalytic reaction between carbon substrate and microalgae. The maximum specific growth rate and biomass productivity of S. obliquus were 0.56 d−1 and 0.145 g L−1d−1 respectively. The biomass contained 51.8% carbon and higher heating value (HHV) was 22.9 MJ kg−1. - Highlights: • Biogas is a viable carbon source for microalgae growth. • Biomass production rate and characteristics were assessed. • Scenedesmus obliquus can adjust to grow with high concentration of CO2 in the carbon source

  7. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Radish Sprouts: Root Growth Reduction and Modifications in the Nutritional Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuverza-Mena, Nubia; Armendariz, Raul; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-01-01

    Reports indicate that silver nanoparticles (nAg) are toxic to vegetation, but little is known about their effects in crop plants. This study examines the impacts of nAg on the physiology and nutritional quality of radish (Raphanus sativus) sprouts. Seeds were germinated and grown for 5 days in nAg suspensions at 0, 125, 250, and 500 mg/L. Seed germination and seedling growth were evaluated with traditional methodologies; the uptake of Ag and nutrients was quantified by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and changes in macromolecules were analyzed by infrared (IR) spectroscopy. None of the nAg concentrations reduced seed germination. However, the water content (% of the total weight) was reduced by 1.62, 1.65, and 2.54% with exposure to 125, 250, and 500 mg/L, respectively, compared with the control. At 500 mg/L, the root and shoot lengths were reduced by 47.7 and 40%, with respect to the control. The seedlings exposed to 500 mg/L had 901 ± 150 mg Ag/kg dry wt and significantly less Ca, Mg, B, Cu, Mn, and Zn, compared with the control. The infrared spectroscopy analysis showed changes in the bands corresponding to lipids (3000-2800 cm(-1)), proteins (1550-1530 cm(-1)), and structural components of plant cells such as lignin, pectin, and cellulose. These results suggest that nAg could significantly affect the growth, nutrient content and macromolecule conformation in radish sprouts, with unknown consequences for human health. PMID:26909084

  8. Growth Temperature Effect on Carbon Nano tubes Formation by Spray Pyrolysis Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nano tubes has been produced by using spray pyrolysis method with no carrier gas. Carbon nano tubes were formulated from a mixture a ferrocene and benzene with certain ratio and then the mixture were injected by the sprayer into the furnace. Growth temperature was optimized in the range of 650 until 850 oC to get the high quality of carbon nano tubes. These were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). (author)

  9. Elevated pressure of carbon dioxide affects growth of thermophilic Petrotoga sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Schippers, Axel; Schlömann, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a promising new technology which reduces carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and thereby decelerates global warming. During CCS, carbon dioxide is captured from emission sources (e.g. fossil fuel power plants or other industries), pressurised, and finally stored in deep geological formations, such as former gas or oil reservoirs as well as saline aquifers. However, with CCS being a very young technology, there are a number of unknown factors that need to be investigated before declaring CCS as being safe. Our research investigates the effect of high carbon dioxide concentrations and pressures on an indigenous microorganism that colonises a potential storage site. Growth experiments were conducted using the thermophilic thiosulphate-reducing bacterium Petrotoga sp., isolated from formation water of the gas reservoir Schneeren (Lower Saxony, Germany), situated in the Northern German Plain. Growth (OD600) was monitored over one growth cycle (10 days) at different carbon dioxide concentrations (50%, 100%, and 150% in the gas phase), and was compared to control cultures grown with 20% carbon dioxide. An additional growth experiment was performed over a period of 145 days with repeated subcultivation steps in order to detect long-term effects of carbon dioxide. Cultivation over 10 days at 50% and 100% carbon dioxide slightly reduced cell growth. In contrast, long-term cultivation at 150% carbon dioxide reduced cell growth and finally led to cell death. This suggested a more pronounced effect of carbon dioxide at prolonged cultivation and stresses the need for a closer consideration of long-term effects. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a sterilising effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures

  10. Growth of graphene films from non-gaseous carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James; Sun, Zhengzong; Yan, Zheng; Ruan, Gedeng; Peng, Zhiwei

    2015-08-04

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides methods of forming graphene films by: (1) depositing a non-gaseous carbon source onto a catalyst surface; (2) exposing the non-gaseous carbon source to at least one gas with a flow rate; and (3) initiating the conversion of the non-gaseous carbon source to the graphene film, where the thickness of the graphene film is controllable by the gas flow rate. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to graphene films made in accordance with the methods of the present disclosure.

  11. Modification of multiwall carbon nanotubes with ruthenium(II) terpyridine complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Huayang [Clark Atlanta University, Chemistry Department (United States); Wu Jie [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Jeilani, Yassin A. [Spelman College, Department of Chemistry (United States); Ingram, Conrad W.; Harruna, Issifu I., E-mail: iharruna@cau.edu [Clark Atlanta University, Chemistry Department (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, 1-3 {mu}M in length and 20-25 nm in diameter) were initially functionalized with a 2,2 Prime :6 Prime 2 Double-Prime -terpyridine-chelated ruthenium(II) complex by covalent amidation. The resulting functionalized ruthenium MWCNTs (RuMWCNTs, 1-2 {mu}M in length and 10-20 nm in diameter) were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermogravimetric experiments of RuMWCNTs show that the functional group coverage of terpyridine-rutheniun-terpyridine (tpy-Ru-tpy) is 0.7036 mmol/1.0 g carbon. The XPS results show N1s and Ru3d{sup 5/5} signals, confirming the presence of tpy-Ru-tpy groups on the surface of MWCNTs. The FTIR spectra of the RuMWCNTs display the typical stretching mode of the carboxyl group (amide I) and a combination of amide N-H and C-N stretching mode (amide II). The Raman D- and G-line peak intensity ratio of RuMWCNTs (ID/IG 2.21) exceeds that of pristine MWCNTs (ID/IG 1.93), suggesting covalent bonding of tpy-Ru-tpy to MWCNTs and supporting the disruption of the graphitic integrity due to the proposed covalent functionalization. High-resolution SEM images confirm that tpy-Ru-tpy moieties are interconnected or attached as aggregated structures (100-200-nm range) on the surfaces of the carbon nanotubes after functionalization. The electrical property of RuMWCNTs depicts higher resistance (10.10 M Ohm-Sign ) than that of OX-MWCNTs (15.38 k Ohm-Sign ).

  12. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O3 attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides

  13. Modifications of corrosion products during galvanic treatment of reinforced carbonated concrete

    OpenAIRE

    BOUTEILLER, Véronique; TONG, Yun Yun; Joiret, Suzanne; MARIE VICTOIRE, Elisabeth; BERNARD, Marie Claude

    2009-01-01

    Application of a cathodic current on a rebar in concrete is often used to produce (consume) hydroxyl anions (hydronium cations) in order to rise up the pH of carbonated concrete. Corrosion products around the rebars can be modified by the treatment. One way to assess the efficiency of this rehabilitation process is to analyze the corrosion products before and after treatment. However iron II compounds are highly sensitive to aerial oxidation. An in-situ Raman study has been undertaken, on a s...

  14. Synthesis-modification integration: one-step fabrication of boronic acid functionalized carbon dots for fluorescent blood sugar sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pengfei; Xia, Yunsheng

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we have presented a novel strategy to fabricate fluorescent boronic acid modified carbon dots (C-dots) for nonenzymatic blood glucose sensing applications. The functionalized C-dots are obtained by one-step hydrothermal carbonization, using phenylboronic acid as the sole precursor. Compared with conventional two-step fabrication of nanoparticle-based sensors, the present "synthesis-modification integration" strategy is simpler and more efficient. The added glucose selectively leads to the assembly and fluorescence quenching of the C-dots. Such fluorescence responses can be used for well quantifying glucose in the range of 9-900 μM, which is 10-250 times more sensitive than that of previous boronic acid based fluorescent nanosensing systems. Due to "inert" surface, the C-dots can well resist the interferences from various biomolecules and exhibit excellent selectivity. The proposed sensing system has been successfully used for the assay of glucose in human serum. Due to simplicity and effectivity, it exhibits great promise as a practical platform for blood glucose sensing. PMID:24694081

  15. Chemical modification of hygroscopic magnesium carbonate into superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent suitable for removal of oil spill in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent powder was developed by surface modification of commercially available hygroscopic magnesium carbonate with palmitic acid. • The sorbent powder is capable of scavenging oil for about three times its weight. • Reusability test of the sorbent powder infers the retention of hydrophobic as well as oleophilic character even after three times of re-use. • The powder was found to possess sufficient buoyancy, high rate of uptake and selectivity towards oil which is necessary for oil spill clean-ups. - Abstract: The wettability of hygroscopic magnesium carbonate has been modified to develop a superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent for oil spill clean-ups via a simple chemical process using palmitic acid. The prepared material was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Wettability test infers that the sorbent has a static water contact angle of 154 ± 1°, thereby indicating its superhydrophobic character. The sorbent was capable of scavenging oil for about three times its weight, as determined from oil sorption studies, carried out using the sorbent on model oil-water mixture. Interestingly, the chemically modified sorbent has high selectivity, buoyancy, and rate of uptake of oil. Further, the reusability studies confirm the repeatable usage of the sorbent and its efficacy in oil spill remediation

  16. Chemical modification of hygroscopic magnesium carbonate into superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent suitable for removal of oil spill in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patowary, Manoj [Advanced Technology Development Center, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Ananthakrishnan, Rajakumar, E-mail: raja.iitchem@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Pathak, Khanindra [Department of Mining Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent powder was developed by surface modification of commercially available hygroscopic magnesium carbonate with palmitic acid. • The sorbent powder is capable of scavenging oil for about three times its weight. • Reusability test of the sorbent powder infers the retention of hydrophobic as well as oleophilic character even after three times of re-use. • The powder was found to possess sufficient buoyancy, high rate of uptake and selectivity towards oil which is necessary for oil spill clean-ups. - Abstract: The wettability of hygroscopic magnesium carbonate has been modified to develop a superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent for oil spill clean-ups via a simple chemical process using palmitic acid. The prepared material was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Wettability test infers that the sorbent has a static water contact angle of 154 ± 1°, thereby indicating its superhydrophobic character. The sorbent was capable of scavenging oil for about three times its weight, as determined from oil sorption studies, carried out using the sorbent on model oil-water mixture. Interestingly, the chemically modified sorbent has high selectivity, buoyancy, and rate of uptake of oil. Further, the reusability studies confirm the repeatable usage of the sorbent and its efficacy in oil spill remediation.

  17. Experimental Modification of Rat Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function During and After Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymer, W. C.; Salada, T.; Nye, P.; Grossman, E. J.; Lane, P. K.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Space-flown rats show a number of flight-induced changes in the structure and function of pituitary Growth Hormone (GH) cells after in vitro postflight testing. To evaluate the possible effects of microgravity on GH cells themselves, freshly dispersed rat anterior pituitary gland cells were seeded into vials containing serum +/- 1 micron HydroCortisone (HC) before flight. Five different cell preparations were used: the entire mixed-cell population of various hormone-producing cell types, cells of density less than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 1), cells of density greater than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 2), and cells prepared from either the dorsal or ventral part of the gland. Relative to ground control samples, bioactive GH released from dense cells during flight was reduced in HC-free medium but was increased in HC-containing medium. Band I and mixed cells usually showed opposite HC-dependent responses. Release of bioactive GH from ventral flight cells was lower; postflight responses to GH-releasing hormone challenge were reduced, and the cytoplasmic area occupied by GH in the dense cells was greater. Collectively, the data show that the chemistry and cellular makeup of the culture system modifies the response of GH cells to microgravity. As such, these cells offer a system to identify gravisensing mechanisms in secretory cells in future microgravity research.

  18. Modification of the cellular heat sensitivity of cucumber by growth under supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation on the thermal sensitivity of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was studied using UV-B-sensitive cv Poinsett 76 and UV-B-resistant cv Ashley grown under control and elevated (300 mW m-2) UV-B radiation levels. Using both cotyledon and leaf discs, the ability of the tissue to reduce triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) was determined after treatment at 50 degrees C for various times. Semilogarithmic plots of TTC reduction as a function of time at 50 degrees were curvilinear. They were monophasic for the control cucumber and biphasic for cucumber grown in the presence of elevated UV-B. Treatment of cucumber plants at 37 degrees C for 24 h or of tissue discs at acute UV-B levels for 1 h further modified their response to elevated temperature. These results suggest that growth of cucumber under enhanced UV-B radiation levels increased its ability to withstand elevated temperatures. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Effects of roof modifications on growth performance and physiological changes of crossbred beef heifers (Bos indicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titaporn Khongdee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to examine and evaluate growth performance and physiological changes of cattle raised under normal roof versus a modified roof. Ten Hindu Brazil x Brahman heifers were used in the experiment. The animals were divided randomly into two groups. They were used to evaluate the effects of modified roofing on the subjects’ physiological responses to heat stress and performance under hot humid conditions. It was found that the modified roof (MR offered a more efficient way to lower heat stress in the cattle than the normal roof (NR. The difference was sufficient to enable the NR at 14:00 p.m. to have a THI higher (P<0.001 than that of the MR. Roof temperature of the MR (35.67±4.28°C was found to be lower (P<0.01 than that of the NR (44.49±7.61°C. Rectal temperature (RT and average rate of gain (ADG of the cattle kept under MR (39.02°C; 0.632 kg/d was lower (P<0.01 and higher (P<0.01, respectively than the NR (40.05 °C; 0.350 kg/d cattle

  20. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  1. Surface modification of carbon black for the reinforcement of polycarbonate/acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B.B. [School of Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Chen, Y. [School of materials Engineering, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wang, F. [School of Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Hong, R.Y., E-mail: rhong@suda.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China); College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • CB was modified through the method of oxygen plasma treatment. • Surface modified CB applied in PC/ABS blends. • The treated CB showed better compatibility in PC/ABS blends. • PC/ABS blends with treated CB showed better mechanical and thermal properties. - Abstract: The surface of carbon black was modified by oxygen plasma treatment for different times (10, 20 and 30 min). In order to increase the applicability of carbon black (CB), functional groups were grafted on the generally inert surface of CB using oxygen plasma. The surface compositional and structural changes that occurred on CB were investigated by SEM, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and BET. Subsequently, CB reinforced polycarbonate (PC)/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) composites were prepared by internal batch mixing with the addition of different content of CB (3, 6, 9, 12 wt%). The morphology of PC/ABS/CB (7/3/6 wt%) nanocomposites was studied through scanning electron microscopy. Observations of SEM images showed that the plasma-treated CB had a better dispersion in the blend matrix. Moreover, the mechanical tests showed that the tensile strength and impact strength were improved by 32.4% and 22.5%, respectively, with the addition of plasma-treated CB. In addition, the thermal stability was improved and glass transition temperatures of both PC and ABS increased as shown by TGA and DSC, respectively.

  2. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  3. Surface modification of oil fly ash and its application in selective capturing of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaumi, Ali L.; Hussien, Ibnelwaleed A.; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    2013-02-01

    Oil fly ash from power generation plants was activated with 30% NH4OH and used for selective adsorption of carbon dioxide from CO2/N2 mixture. The treated samples were characterized for their surface area, morphology, crystalline phase, chemical composition and surface functional groups. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed an increase in the carbon contents from 45 to 73 wt% as a result of leaching out metal oxides. XRD proved that chemical activation of ash resulted in diminishing of major crystalline phases of zeolite, and other alumino-silicates leaving only quartz and mullite. BET analysis showed an increase in surface area from 59 to 318 m2/g after chemical activation and the pore volume increased from 0.0368 to 0.679 cm3/g. This increase in pore volume is supported by the results of SEM, where more micropores were opened with well-defined particle sizes and porous structure. The TGA of the treated fly ash showed stability at higher temperature as the weight loss decreased with increasing temperature. For treated ash, the FTIR displayed new peaks of amine functional group. The treated ash was used for the removal of CO2 from CO2/N2 mixture and the maximum adsorption/capturing capacity was found to be 240 mg/g. This capacity increases with increase in initial gas concentration, inlet flow rate and temperature suggesting the endothermic nature of the interaction between the gas molecules and the surface of the ash.

  4. Surface modification of carbon black for the reinforcement of polycarbonate/acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CB was modified through the method of oxygen plasma treatment. • Surface modified CB applied in PC/ABS blends. • The treated CB showed better compatibility in PC/ABS blends. • PC/ABS blends with treated CB showed better mechanical and thermal properties. - Abstract: The surface of carbon black was modified by oxygen plasma treatment for different times (10, 20 and 30 min). In order to increase the applicability of carbon black (CB), functional groups were grafted on the generally inert surface of CB using oxygen plasma. The surface compositional and structural changes that occurred on CB were investigated by SEM, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and BET. Subsequently, CB reinforced polycarbonate (PC)/acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) composites were prepared by internal batch mixing with the addition of different content of CB (3, 6, 9, 12 wt%). The morphology of PC/ABS/CB (7/3/6 wt%) nanocomposites was studied through scanning electron microscopy. Observations of SEM images showed that the plasma-treated CB had a better dispersion in the blend matrix. Moreover, the mechanical tests showed that the tensile strength and impact strength were improved by 32.4% and 22.5%, respectively, with the addition of plasma-treated CB. In addition, the thermal stability was improved and glass transition temperatures of both PC and ABS increased as shown by TGA and DSC, respectively

  5. Synthesis, alignment, growth mechanism and functional properties of carbon nanotubes and their hybrid materials with inorganic and biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The present work comprises a novel method for selective growth of carbon nanotubes, study of their growth mechanism as well as synthesis and application of their various hybrid materials. An experimental setup is established to grow carbon nanotubes using water assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Various growth parameters were scrutinized carefully and a growth mechanism is put forth for the same method. A new methodology to prepare different hybrid materials of aligned carbon nanotube...

  6. Effects of experimental conditions on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nitride nanocone arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically aligned carbon nitride nanocone (CNNC) arrays were prepared on Ni-covered (100) silicon wafers by an abnormal glow discharge plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition method. In order to control the growth of the CNNC arrays, the distance of the anode tip to the substrate surface was adjusted for it affected the contents and activities of the species in the plasmas leading to the CNNC growth. Based on the characterization of the as-grown thin films and the analysis of the growth environments, the effects of the experimental conditions on the growth of the CNNC arrays were studied and their growth mechanism was discussed. The tip−substrate distance strongly affects the CNNC growth. Under appropriate experimental conditions, the vertically-aligned and intact CNNC arrays with the β-C3N4 microstructure and the minimum tip curvature diameter of only 3–4 nm could be fabricated. This kind of CNNC arrays have many potential applications, such as tips for microscopes, electron-emitting units in field emission displays, electron-capture electrodes of solar cells etc. - Highlights: ►Vertically aligned carbon nitride nanocone arrays were prepared. ►An abnormal glow discharge plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition method. ►Tip-substrate distance strongly affects the growth of carbon nitride nanocones. ►The growth mechanism of carbon nitride nanocones is discussed

  7. Mechanisms for catalytic carbon nanofiber growth studied by ab initio density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Rostrup-Nielsen, Jens;

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms and energetics of graphene growth catalyzed by nickel nanoclusters were studied using ab initio density functional theory calculations. It is demonstrated that nickel step-edge sites act as the preferential growth centers for graphene layers on the nickel surface. Carbon is transported...

  8. Intracellular modification of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor by normal human foreskin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular processing of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) in normal human foreskin fibroblasts was examined after incubation with saturating concentrations of [125I]EGF. This report describes the column chromatographic separation of multiple processed forms of EGF generated by human foreskin fibroblasts and their structural characterization. More than 95% of the cell-bound [125I]EGF was converted into multiple forms, which were separated into four distinct peaks of radioactivity using columns of Bio-Gel P-150 equilibrated with 0.2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. These were designated peaks 1-4. Cellular generation of these four peaks was dependent on culture conditions. Differences in absolute and relative amounts of peaks 1-4 were observed as a function of time of incubation at 37 C. In addition, chromatographic profiles of cell-associated 125I varied in relation to cell density. The radioactivity in peak 1 comigrated with 125I-labeled native EGF on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels (pH 9.5), whereas peaks 2 and 3 exhibited more rapid electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobilities of the radioactivity in peaks 2 and 3 were indistinguishable from those of chemically prepared derivatives of [125I]EGF which were lacking either one or six amino acid residues from the carboxyterminus, respectively. The EGF receptor bound the radioactive material in peak 2 with an affinity equal to or greater than that of EGF; however, the radioactivity in peak 3 was bound to a much lesser extent. The radiolabel in both peaks 2 and 3 was greater than 95% precipitable by antiserum to native EGF. The labeled material in peak 4 was composed of [125I]monoiodotyrosine, 125I-, and an unidentified peptide. None of the radiolabeled compounds in peak 4 interacted with the EGF receptor or with antiserum to native EGF

  9. Unraveling the growth of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between the main operational variables during the growth of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition is studied. In this contribution, we report the influence of the carbon source (i.e. acetylene, ethylene and propylene), the reaction/activation temperature, the rate of heating, the reaction time, the metal loading, and the metallic nanoparticle size and distribution on the growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes. Fe/Al thin films deposited onto silicon samples by electron-beam evaporation are used as catalyst. A phenomenological growth mechanism is proposed to explain the interaction between these multiple factors. Three different outcomes of the synthesis process are found: i) formation of forests of non-aligned, randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotubes, ii) growth of vertically aligned tubes with a thin and homogeneous carbonaceous layer on the top, and iii) formation of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. This carbonaceous layer (ii) has not been reported before. The main requirements to promote vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth are determined. (paper)

  10. Growth and morphology of carbon nanostructures on nickel oxide nanoparticles in catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, M.; Sil, A.; Ray, S.

    2014-07-01

    The present study explores the conditions favorable for the growth of cylindrical carbon nanostructures such as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and carbon nanofiber by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method using nickel oxide-based catalyst nanoparticles of different average sizes as well as different levels of doping by copper oxide. The role of doping and the average size have been related to the observed melting behavior of nanoparticles of nickel oxide by thermal and diffraction analysis, and the importance of melting has been highlighted in the context of growth of cylindrical nanostructures. In the reducing environment prevailing in the CCVD chamber due to decomposition of flowing acetylene gas at elevated temperature, there is extensive reduction of oxide nanoparticles. Lack of melting and faster flow of carbon-bearing gases favor the formation of a carbon deposit cover over the catalyst nanoparticles giving rise to the formation of nanobeads. Melting allows rapid diffusion of carbon from the surface to inside catalyst particles, and reduced flow of gas lowers the rate of carbon deposit, both creating conditions favorable for the formation of cylindrical nanostructures, which grows around the catalyst particles. Smaller particle size and lower doping favor growth of MWCNT, while growth of fiber is commonly observed on larger particles having relatively higher level of doping.

  11. Dietary intake, growth and development of children with ADHD in a randomized clinical trial of Ritalin and Melatonin co-administration: Through circadian cycle modification or appetite enhancement?

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed-Ali Mostafavi; Mohammad Reza Mohammadi; Payam Hosseinzadeh; Mohammad Reza Eshraghian; Shahin Akhondzadeh; Mohammad.Javad Hosseinzadeh-Attar; Elham Ranjar; Seyed. Mohammad-Ali Kooshesh; Seyed-Ali Keshavarz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: It is postulated that ritalin may adversely affect sleep, appetite, weight and growth of some children with ADHD. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate melatonin supplementation effects on dietary intake, growth and development of children with ADHD treated with ritalin through circadian cycle modification and appetite mechanisms.Method: After obtaining consent from parents, 50 children aged 7-12 with combined form of AD/HD were randomly divided into two groups based on gender blocks: on...

  12. Theoretical study of the nucleation/growth process of carbon clusters under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, N; Soulard, L; Los, J H; Fasolino, A

    2008-07-14

    We used molecular dynamics and the empirical potential for carbon LCBOPII to simulate the nucleation/growth process of carbon clusters both in vacuum and under pressure. In vacuum, our results show that the growth process is homogeneous and yields mainly sp(2) structures such as fullerenes. We used an argon gas and Lennard-Jones potentials to mimic the high pressures and temperatures reached during the detonation of carbon-rich explosives. We found that these extreme thermodynamic conditions do not affect substantially the topologies of the clusters formed in the process. However, our estimation of the growth rates under pressure are in much better agreement with the values estimated experimentally than our vacuum simulations. The formation of sp(3) carbon was negligible both in vacuum and under pressure which suggests that larger simulation times and cluster sizes are needed to allow the nucleation of nanodiamonds. PMID:18624553

  13. The surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zongshuang; Qiu, Li; Yang, Yongzhen; Chen, Yongkang; Liu, Xuguang

    2015-10-01

    The effects of surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphology, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites have been investigated. MWCNTs were treated with mixed acids to obtain acid-functionalized MWCNTs. Then the acid-functionalized MWCNTs were modified with ethanolamine (named e-MWCNTs). The MWCNT/PEEK composites were prepared by a solution-blending method. A more homogeneous distribution of e-MWCNTs within the composites was found with scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated a clear increase in the storage modulus of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites because of the improved interfacial adhesion strength between e-MWCNTs and PEEK. Furthermore, the presence of e-MWCNTs caused an enhancement in the glass transition temperature of the composites. Wear tests have shown that the friction coefficient of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites decreased significantly during the test after the running-in period. This suggests that there is an obvious improvement in tribological properties of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites. Overall, the e-MWCNT/PEEK composites have exhibited improved properties and are promising for their applications in industry.

  14. Growth of forest of single-walled carbon nanotubes at inhomogeneous fluxes from plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of forest of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is studied using a deposition model. The inhomogeneity in deposition of neutrals from plasma on the SWCNTs, which is typical for growth of the nano structures in PECVD, is accounted for. It is investigated how the growth rate and the residence time of carbon atoms on SWCNT surfaces depend on the SWCNT length and the decay length characterizing deposition of neutral fluxes on the SWCNTs. The obtained results can be used for optimizing the synthesis of related nano assembles in low-temperature plasma-assisted nano fabrication

  15. A multivariate causality test of carbon dioxide emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper uses multivariate co-integration Granger causality tests to investigate the correlations between carbon dioxide emissions, energy consumption and economic growth in China. Some researchers have argued that the adoption of a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption as a long term policy goal will result in a closed-form relationship, to the detriment of the economy. Therefore, a perspective that can make allowances for the fact that the exclusive pursuit of economic growth will increase energy consumption and CO2 emissions is required; to the extent that such growth will have adverse effects with regard to global climate change. (author)

  16. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslana Vasylkovska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast.

  17. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  18. Biomolecular modification of carbon nanotubes for studies of cell adhesion and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2011-12-01

    We report a strategy for tailoring and patterning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for biospecific cell studies. We synthesized a new electroactive hydroquinone terminated pyrene molecule to tailor CNTs. These modified CNTs can be oxidized and chemoselectively reacted with oxyamine tethered ligands to generate various ligand tethered CNTs. A cell adhesive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD) is immobilized to the CNTs and a new microfluidic patterning method is employed to generate multiplex patterned surfaces for biospecific cell adhesion and migration studies. This work demonstrates the integration of a new functionalization strategy to immobilize a variety of ligands to CNTs for a range of potential drug delivery, tissue imaging and cellular behavior studies and a microfluidic patterning strategy for generating complex high-throughput surfaces for biotechnological and cell based assay applications.

  19. Easy modification of glassy carbon electrode for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Soundappan; Tsai, Tsung-Hsuan; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2009-04-15

    A glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been modified by electrochemical oxidation in mild acidic media (0.1 mol l(-1) H(2)SO(4)) and could be applied for individual and simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). Oxidized GCE shows a single redox couple (E(0)'=-2.5 mV) which is based on the formation functional groups during the electrochemical pretreatment process. Proposed GCE successfully decreases the over potentials for the oxidation process of these species (AA, DA and UA) comparing with bare GCE. The oxidized GCE has its own simplicity, stability, high sensitivity and possesses the potential for simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:19162467

  20. Modification of glassy carbon surfaces by atmospheric pressure cold plasma torch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Junge; Kusano, Yukihiro; Leipold, Frank;

    2006-01-01

    The effect of plasma treatment on glassy carbon (GC) surfaces was studied with adhesion improvement in mind. A newly constructed remote plasma source was used to treat GC plates. Pure He and a dilute NH3/He mixture were used as feed gases. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed for plasma...... torch diagnostics. The treatment resulted in surface etching, substantially enhanced by NH3, as well as a roughening of the surface as measured by atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the treated area showed an increased wettability indicating the addition of polar functional groups to the surface. X......-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the introduction of several oxygen and nitrogen containing surface functional groups. The adhesion to epoxy was dramatically improved after exposure to either plasma, the effect being largest when NH3 was present in the feed gas. © 2006 The Japan Society of Applied Physics....

  1. Modification of glassy carbon electrodes by 4-chloromethylphenyl units and D-glucosaminic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, Christelle; Ghodbane, Ouassim [Departement de Chimie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CP 8888 succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3P8 (Canada); Wayner, Danial D.M. [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Belanger, Daniel [Departement de Chimie, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CP 8888 succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3P8 (Canada)], E-mail: belanger.daniel@uqam.ca

    2009-11-01

    The present work is dealing with the attachment of D-glucosaminic acid (D-GA) on glassy carbon electrode by two different methods. Firstly, the electrode was modified by chloromethylphenyl groups by reduction of 4-chloromethylphenyldiazonium cations followed by the nucleophilic substitution of the chlorine by the amine functionality of D-GA and secondly by the direct immobilization of the amine terminated molecule. The generality of the nucleophilic substitution reaction and the direct immobilization of an amine were also demonstrated with reactants bearing an electroactive ferrocene moiety; 4-nitrophenylferrocene (NFc) and 4-ferrocenylaniline (FcA). The surfaces modified with FcA and NFc were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and the D-GA modified electrodes were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A preliminary evaluation of the efficiency of these surface modifiers to prevent protein adsorption was realized by scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Acetylene-Accelerated Alcohol Catalytic CVD Growth of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    R. Xiang; Einarsson, E.; Okawa, J.; Miyauchi, Y.; Maruyama, S.

    2008-01-01

    Addition of only 1% of acetylene into ethanol was found to enhance the growth rate of singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by up to ten times. Since acetylene is a byproduct of the thermal decomposition of ethanol, this suggests an alternative fast reaction pathway to the formation of SWNTs from ethanol via byproducts of decomposition. This accelerated growth, however, only occurred in the presence of ethanol, whereas pure acetylene at the same partial pressure resulted in negligible growth ...

  3. Chemical modification of multiwalled carbon nanotube with a bifunctional caged ligand for radioactive labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The findings of this work describe a new method that can be utilised to radioactively label multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) powders with the use of a bi-functional cage ligand. -- Abstract: Carboxyl-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been successfully radiolabelled with cobalt-57 (57Co) (T1/2 = 270 days) via the attachment of the bifunctional caged ligand MeAMN3S3sar. In this study MeAMN3S3sar has been synthesized and coupled to MWCNTs to form the conjugate MWCNT–MeAMN3S3sar. Synthesis was confirmed with nuclear magnetic resonance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the conjugation. Non-radioactive labelling of this conjugate was completed with Cu(II) ions to confirm the stability of the MeAMN3S3sar after coupling with the MWCNTs. The complexation of the Cu(II) was also confirmed with XPS. Transmission electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that the coupling reaction had a negligible effect on the size and shape of the MWCNTs. Radiolabelling of the MWCNT–MeAMN3S3sar conjugate and pristine (untreated) MWCNTs (non-specific) with the gamma-emitting radioactive isotope 57Co were compared. The radiolabelling efficiency of the MWCNT–MeAMN3S3sar conjugate was significantly higher (95% vs. 0.1%) (P ⩽ 0.001) than for the unconjugated pristine MWCNTs. This will allow for the potential tracking of nanoparticle movement in vitro and in vivo

  4. Initial stage of growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes: modeling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because there are different pathways to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a common mechanism for the synthesis of CNTs does not likely exist. However, after carbon atoms are liberated from carbon-containing precursors by catalysts or from pure carbon systems, a common feature, the nucleation of CNTs by electron mediation, does appear. We studied this feature using the initial stage of growth of single wall CNTs (SWCNTs) by transition metal nano-particle catalysts as the working example. To circumvent the bottleneck due to the size and simulation time, we used a model in which the metal droplet is represented by a jellium, and the effect of collisions between the carbon atoms and atoms of the catalyst is captured by charge transfers between the jellium and the carbon. The simulations were performed using a transferable semi-empirical Hamiltonian to model the interactions between carbon atoms in jellium. We annealed different initial configurations of carbon clusters in jellium as well as in a vacuum. We found that in jellium, elongated open tubular structures, precursors to the growth of SWCNTs, are formed. Our model was also shown to be capable of mimicking the continued growth when more atoms were placed near the open end of the tubular structure. (paper)

  5. The solar photovoltaics wedge: pathways for growth and potential carbon mitigation in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenge of stabilizing global carbon emissions over the next 50 years has been framed in the context of finding seven 1.0 Gton C/year carbon reduction wedges. Solar photovoltaics (PV) could provide at least one carbon wedge, but will require significant growth in PV manufacturing capacity. The actual amount of installed PV capacity required to reach wedge-level carbon reductions will vary greatly depending on the mix of avoided fuels and the additional emissions from manufacturing PV capacity. In this work, we find that the US could reduce its carbon emissions by 0.25 Gton C/year, equal to the fraction of a global carbon wedge proportional to its current domestic electricity use, by installing 792-811 GW of PV capacity. We evaluate a series of PV growth scenarios and find that wedge-level reductions could be met by increasing PV manufacturing capacity and annual installations by 0.95 GW/year/year each year from 2009 to 2050 or by increasing up to 4 GW/year/year for a period of 4-17 years for early and late growth scenarios. This challenge of increasing PV manufacturing capacity and market demand is significant but not out of line with the recent rapid growth in both the global and US PV industry. We find that the rapid growth in PV manufacturing capacity leads to a short term increase in carbon emissions from the US electric sector. However, this increase is small, contributing less than an additional 0.3% to electric sector emissions for less than 4.5 years, alleviating recent concern regarding carbon emissions from rapid PV growth scenarios.

  6. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai;

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing the...... environment friendly approach of faster and better electronics. In order to exploit the potential of SWCNTs in the electronic industry fully, selective growth of either conducting or semiconducting tubes is of high importance. Understanding the mechanism for growth of SWCNTs is of great importance for...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution of the...

  7. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Growth from Graphite Layers-a Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuntuan FANG; Min ZHU; Yongshun WANG

    2003-01-01

    The growth of single-wall carbon nanotube from graphite layers is studied by tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. Given temperature of 2500 K or 3500 K and an interval of 0.25 nm for the two layers of graphite, a single-wall carbon nanotube with a zigzag shell will be produced. On the other conditions the carbon nanotube cannot grow or grows with too many defects. All carbon nanotube ends have pentagons which play an important role during the tube ends closing.

  8. Critical role of surface chemical modifications induced by length shortening on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussy Cyrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Given the increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNT in composite materials and their possible expansion to new areas such as nanomedicine which will both lead to higher human exposure, a better understanding of their potential to cause adverse effects on human health is needed. Like other nanomaterials, the biological reactivity and toxicity of CNT were shown to depend on various physicochemical characteristics, and length has been suggested to play a critical role. We therefore designed a comprehensive study that aimed at comparing the effects on murine macrophages of two samples of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT specifically synthesized following a similar production process (aerosol-assisted CVD, and used a soft ultrasonic treatment in water to modify the length of one of them. We showed that modification of the length of MWCNT leads, unavoidably, to accompanying structural (i.e. defects and chemical (i.e. oxidation modifications that affect both surface and residual catalyst iron nanoparticle content of CNT. The biological response of murine macrophages to the two different MWCNT samples was evaluated in terms of cell viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and oxidative stress. We showed that structural defects and oxidation both induced by the length reduction process are at least as responsible as the length reduction itself for the enhanced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative response observed with short (oxidized compared to long (pristine MWCNT. In conclusion, our results stress that surface properties should be considered, alongside the length, as essential parameters in CNT-induced inflammation, especially when dealing with a safe design of CNT, for application in nanomedicine for example.

  9. A new method for surface modifications of carbon steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Dondokovich Dugar-Zhabon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional treatment method involving implantation of ions into solids immersed in a high voltage pulse discharge ignited on the left-hand-branch of the Paschen curve was elaborated about fifteen years ago. This method, named 3DII for short, has been used in the equipment JUPITER (Joint Universal Plasma and Ion Technologies Experimental Reactor for practical purposes. Hereafter, the need for better means to improve the metal surface protection against aggressive media prompted an elaboration of the MOSMET concept which is based on a hybrid treatment involving the processes of implantation and deposition. It is significant that the processes can be set into action simultaneously or separately. In this article, the conditions of hybrid treatment of AISI SAE 1010, 1020 y 1045 carbon steels, their subsequent electrochemical diagnostics and corrosion test results are described. The corrosion rate of the samples treated by titanium hybrid discharge is found approximately an order of magnitude smaller as compared to the non-treated samples.

  10. Removal of oil droplets from water using carbonized rice husk: enhancement by surface modification using polyethylenimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Yang, Hongta; Petit, Camille; Chen, Shen-Yi

    2015-06-01

    Carbonized rice husk (CRH) is a promising material to separate oil from water owing to its abundance, low-cost, and environmentally benign characteristics. However, CRH's performance is somewhat limited by its similar surface charge to that of oil, leading to repulsive interactions. To improve the separation efficiency of CRH, CRH was modified via impregnation with a cationic biocompatible polymer, polyethlyenimine (PEI) to form PEI-CRH. The modified sample exhibits a remarkably higher (10-50 times) oil/water (O/W) separation efficiency than that of the unmodified one. Small PEI-CRH particles (about 64 μm) are found to adsorb oil droplets faster and larger quantities than bigger particles (about 113 and 288 μm). PEI-CRH exhibits higher separation efficiency at high temperatures owing to the destabilization of the emulsion. It is also found that the oil adsorption mechanism involves a chemical interaction between PEI-CRH and oil droplets. The addition of NaCl considerably improves the separation efficiency, while the addition of a cationic surfactant has the opposite effect. In acidic emulsions, PEI-CRH adsorbs more oil than in neutral or basic conditions owing to favorable attractive forces between oil droplets and the surface of PEI-CRH. PEI-CRH can be easily regenerated by washing with ethanol. These promising features of PEI-CRH indicate that PEI-CRH could be an efficient and low-cost adsorbent for the O/W separation applications. PMID:25529491

  11. Growth processes and surface properties of diamondlike carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we compare the deposition processes and surface properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films from filtered pulsed cathodic arc discharge (PCAD) and hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-plasma source ion implantation. The ion energy distributions (IEDs) of filtered-PCAD at various filter inductances and Ar gas pressures were measured using an ion energy analyzer. The IEDs of the carbon species in the absence of background gas and at low gas pressures are well fitted by shifted Maxwellian distributions. Film hardness and surface properties show a clear dependence on the IEDs. ta-C films with surface roughness at an atomic level and thin (0.3-0.9 nm) graphitelike layers at the film surfaces were deposited at various filter inductances in the highly ionized plasmas with the full width at half maximum ion energy distributions of 9-16 eV. The a-C:H films deposited at higher H/C ratios of reactive gases were covered with hydrogen and sp3 bonded carbon-enriched layers due to the simultaneous interaction of hydrocarbon species and atomic hydrogen. The effects of deposited species and ion energies on film surface properties were analyzed. Some carbon species have insufficient energies to break the delocalized π(nC) bonds at the graphitelike film surface, and they can govern film formation via surface diffusion and coalescence of nuclei. Dangling bonds created by atomic hydrogen lead to uniform chemisorption of hydrocarbon species from the ECR plasmas. The deposition processes of ta-C and a-C:H films are discussed on the basis of the experimental results

  12. Amorphous carbon for structured step bunching during graphene growth on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, James; Kunc, Jan; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt

    2014-03-01

    Structured growth of high quality graphene is necessary for technological development of carbon based materials. Specifically, control of the bunching and placement of surface steps under epitaxial graphene on SiC is an important consideration for graphene device production. We demonstrate lithographically patterned evaporated amorphous carbon as a method to pin SiC surface steps. Evaporated amorphous carbon is an ideal step-flow barrier on SiC due to its chemical compatibility with graphene growth and its structural stability at high temperatures, as well as its patternability. The amorphous carbon is deposited in vacuum on SiC prior to graphene growth. In the graphene furnace at temperatures above 1200°C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at these amorphous carbon barriers, forming an aligned step free region for graphene growth at temperatures above 1330°C. AFM imaging and Raman spectroscopy support the formation of quality step-free graphene sheets grown on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the carbon grid.

  13. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhi; Daly, Michael; Clémence, Lopez; Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L.; Devine, Declan M.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO3 thermoplastic composite's interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the "complex" process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the "complex" surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the "complex" treatment process, the CaCO3 particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the "dry" treated CaCO3 composites. Furthermore, "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites have a significantly higher tensile strength than the composites containing untreated and "dry" treated CaCO3. This is mainly because the "wet" and "complex" treatment processes have increased adsorption density of stearate, which enhances the interfacial interaction between matrix and filler. These results confirm that the chemical adsorption of the surfactant ions at the solid-liquid interface is higher than at other interface. From this study, it was concluded that the utilization of the "complex" method minimised the negative effects of void

  14. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. X.; Lv, J. C.; Ren, Y.; Zhi, T.; Chen, J. Y.; Zhou, Q. Q.; Lu, Z. Q.; Gao, D. W.; Jin, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O2 plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N2 or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics also increased with the increasing SWCNT concentration, curing time and curing temperature in the range studied. Plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters had signally influence on the antistatic property of plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics. Therefore, adequate parameters should be carefully selected for the optimum antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics.

  15. Synthesis and Growth Mechanism of Carbon Filaments by Chemical Vapor Deposition without Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhe Liu; Feng Li; Shuo Bai

    2009-01-01

    Carbon filaments with diameter from several to hundreds micrometers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of methane without catalyst. The morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the carbon filament were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical testing. The results show that the carbon filament is inverted cone shape and grows up along the gas flow direction. The stem of it is formed of annular carbon layers arranged in a tree ring structure while the head is made up of concentrical layers. The tensile strength of the carbon filament is increased after graphitization for the restructuring and growing large of graphene. The growth mechanism of carbon filament was proposed according to the results of two series of experiments with different deposition time and intermittent deposition cycles.

  16. Water soluble carbon nano-onions from wood wool as growth promoters for gram plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkar, Sumit Kumar; Roy, Manas; Babar, Dipak Gorakh; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-11-01

    Water-soluble carbon nano-onions (wsCNOs) isolated from wood wool--a wood-based pyrolysis waste product of wood, can enhance the overall growth rate of gram (Cicer arietinum) plants. Treatment of plants with upto 30 μg mL-1 of wsCNOs for an initial 10 day period in laboratory conditions led to an increase in the overall growth of the plant biomass. In order to examine the growth stimulating effects of wsCNOs under natural conditions, 10 day-old plants treated with and without wsCNOs were transplanted into soil of standard carbon and nitrogen composition. We observed an enhanced growth rate of the wsCNOs pre-treated plants in soil, which finally led to an increased productivity of plants in terms of a larger number of grams. On analyzing the carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) content for the shoot and fruit sections of the plants treated with and without wsCNOs, only a minor difference in the composition was noticed. However, a slight increase in the percentage of carbon and hydrogen in shoots reflects the synthesis of more organic biomass in the case of treated plants. This work shows that wsCNOs are non-toxic to plant cells and can act as efficient growth stimulants which can be used as benign growth promoters.

  17. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel

  18. Growth, characterisation and electronic applications of amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, S

    2000-01-01

    temperature on GaAs, has been studied and concluded to be satisfactory on the basis of good adherence and low leakage currents. Such a structure was motivated by the applicability in Metal Insulator Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MISFET). My thesis proposes solutions to a number of riddles associated with the material, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, (a-C:H). This material has lately generated interest in the electronic engineering community, owing to some remarkable properties. The characterisation of amorphous carbon films, grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been reported. The coexistence of multiple phases in the same a-C:H film manifests itself in the inconsistent electrical behaviour of different parts of the film, thus rendering it difficult to predict the nature of films. For the first time, in this thesis, a reliable prediction of Schottky contact formation on a-C:H films is reported. A novel and simple development on a Scanning Electron Microscope, configu...

  19. Does ozone exposure alter growth and carbon allocation of mycorrhizal plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, L.C.; Gamon, J.A. (California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Andersen, C.P. (Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Ozone is known to adversely affect plant growth. However, it is less clear how ozone affects belowground processes. This study tests the hypothesis that ozone alters growth and carbon allocation of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) plants. Two ecotypes of Elymus glaucus (blue wild rye) were exposed to mycorrhizal inoculation and episodic ozone exposures simulating atmospheric conditions in the Los Angeles Basin. Preliminary results show that effects of ozone on growth were subtle. In both ecotypes, growth of aboveground biomass was not affected by ozone while root growth was decreased. In most treatments, mycorrhizal inoculation decreased growth of leaves and stems, but had no significant effect on root growth. Three-way ANOVA tests indicated interactive effects between ecotype, mycorrhiza and ozone. Further experimental work is needed to reveal the biological processes governing these responses.

  20. Carbon sequestration potential of second-growth forest regeneration in the Latin American tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazdon, Robin L; Broadbent, Eben N; Rozendaal, Danaë M A; Bongers, Frans; Zambrano, Angélica María Almeyda; Aide, T Mitchell; Balvanera, Patricia; Becknell, Justin M; Boukili, Vanessa; Brancalion, Pedro H S; Craven, Dylan; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S; Cabral, George A L; de Jong, Ben; Denslow, Julie S; Dent, Daisy H; DeWalt, Saara J; Dupuy, Juan M; Durán, Sandra M; Espírito-Santo, Mario M; Fandino, María C; César, Ricardo G; Hall, Jefferson S; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis; Jakovac, Catarina C; Junqueira, André B; Kennard, Deborah; Letcher, Susan G; Lohbeck, Madelon; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Massoca, Paulo; Meave, Jorge A; Mesquita, Rita; Mora, Francisco; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Muscarella, Robert; Nunes, Yule R F; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana; Orihuela-Belmonte, Edith; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Pérez-García, Eduardo A; Piotto, Daniel; Powers, Jennifer S; Rodríguez-Velazquez, Jorge; Romero-Pérez, Isabel Eunice; Ruíz, Jorge; Saldarriaga, Juan G; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Schwartz, Naomi B; Steininger, Marc K; Swenson, Nathan G; Uriarte, Maria; van Breugel, Michiel; van der Wal, Hans; Veloso, Maria D M; Vester, Hans; Vieira, Ima Celia G; Bentos, Tony Vizcarra; Williamson, G Bruce; Poorter, Lourens

    2016-05-01

    Regrowth of tropical secondary forests following complete or nearly complete removal of forest vegetation actively stores carbon in aboveground biomass, partially counterbalancing carbon emissions from deforestation, forest degradation, burning of fossil fuels, and other anthropogenic sources. We estimate the age and spatial extent of lowland second-growth forests in the Latin American tropics and model their potential aboveground carbon accumulation over four decades. Our model shows that, in 2008, second-growth forests (1 to 60 years old) covered 2.4 million km(2) of land (28.1% of the total study area). Over 40 years, these lands can potentially accumulate a total aboveground carbon stock of 8.48 Pg C (petagrams of carbon) in aboveground biomass via low-cost natural regeneration or assisted regeneration, corresponding to a total CO2 sequestration of 31.09 Pg CO2. This total is equivalent to carbon emissions from fossil fuel use and industrial processes in all of Latin America and the Caribbean from 1993 to 2014. Ten countries account for 95% of this carbon storage potential, led by Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Venezuela. We model future land-use scenarios to guide national carbon mitigation policies. Permitting natural regeneration on 40% of lowland pastures potentially stores an additional 2.0 Pg C over 40 years. Our study provides information and maps to guide national-level forest-based carbon mitigation plans on the basis of estimated rates of natural regeneration and pasture abandonment. Coupled with avoided deforestation and sustainable forest management, natural regeneration of second-growth forests provides a low-cost mechanism that yields a high carbon sequestration potential with multiple benefits for biodiversity and ecosystem services. PMID:27386528

  1. The effect of growth parameters on the height and density of carbon nanotube forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Robert W.

    Carbon nanotube forests (CNTFs) are grown using an injection chemical vapor deposition method. Images of CNTFs are taken using a scanning electron microscope and are used to measure their height and density. Growth parameters are systematically varied to determine their effect on the height and density of CNTFs. Investigations of CNTF density as a function of distance from the growth substrate reveal that diffusion can be a limiting factor on CNTF growth. Our findings indicate that height and density are related and that each growth parameter has multi-dimensional effects.

  2. Modification of 1018 carbon steel corrosion process in alkaline sour medium with a formulation of chemical corrosion inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia, Policarpo [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Departamento de Quimica, Area de Electroquimica, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico DF (Mexico); Gonzalez, Ignacio [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Departamento de Quimica, Area de Electroquimica, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: igm@xanum.uam.mx

    2005-08-10

    This work is focused on researching corrosion mechanism modifications of 1018 carbon steel in alkaline sour medium (0.1 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S and 10 ppm CN{sup -}) using inhibitor formulation (IHF) composed of hydroxyoleic imidazoline (C{sub 12}H{sub 42}ON{sub 2}), HI, and aminoether (C{sub 20}H{sub 28}O{sub 3}N{sub 2}), AE. The accelerated formation of corrosion products was thereby carried out in the presence of the formulation alone and of each of its components separately; these films were subsequently characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The study in the presence of the IHF components revealed that the films formed have different nature, because their physical and chemical properties such as thickness, porosity and (electronic and ionic) conductivity are determined by the media where they are grown. The film formed in the presence of HI has a homogeneous, non-porous topography that impairs the diffusion process of H{sup 0}, in addition, its electronic conductivity is above that observed in the film formed with AE. Then, it was determined that the film formed with IHF presents some distinctive component characteristics which interact in a complementary way improving film passivity.

  3. Review: role of carbon sources for in vitro plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mehwish; Ahmad, Touqeer; Sablok, Gaurav; Standardi, Alvaro; Hafiz, Ishfaq Ahmad

    2013-04-01

    In vitro plant cells, tissues and organ cultures are not fully autotrophic establishing a need for carbohydrates in culture media to maintain the osmotic potential, as well as to serve as energy and carbon sources for developmental processes including shoot proliferation, root induction as well as emission, embryogenesis and organogenesis, which are highly energy demanding developmental processes in plant biology. A variety of carbon sources (both reducing and non-reducing) are used in culture media depending upon genotypes and specific stages of growth. However, sucrose is most widely used as a major transport-sugar in the phloem sap of many plants. In micropropagation systems, morphogenetic potential of plant tissues can greatly be manipulated by varying type and concentration of carbon sources. The present article reviews the past and current findings on carbon sources and their sustainable utilization for in vitro plant tissue culture to achieve better growth rate and development. PMID:23212616

  4. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán de Villoria, R; Figueredo, S L; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A; Slocum, A H; Wardle, B L

    2009-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al2O3 catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of approximately 1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s(-1). Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport. PMID:19752503

  5. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al2O3 catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of ∼1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s-1. Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport.

  6. An old-growth subtropical Asian evergreen forest as a large carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Schaefer, Douglas; Yu, Gui-Rui; Liang, Naishen; Song, Qing-Hai

    2011-03-01

    Old-growth forests are primarily found in mountain ranges that are less favorable or accessible for land use. Consequently, there are fewer scientific studies on old-growth forests. The eddy covariance method has been widely used as an alternative approach to studying an ecosystem's carbon balance, but only a few eddy flux sites are located in old-growth forest. This fact will hinder our ability to test hypotheses such as whether or not old-growth forests are carbon neutral. The eddy covariance approach was used to examine the carbon balance of a 300-year-old subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest that is located in the center of the largest subtropical land area in the world. The post-QA/QC (quality assurance and control) eddy covariance based NEP was ˜ 9 tC ha -1 yr -1, which suggested that this forest acts as a large carbon sink. The inventory data within the footprint of the eddy flux show that ˜6 tC ha -1 yr -1 was contributed by biomass and necromass. The large-and-old trees sequestered carbon. Approximately 60% of the biomass increment is contributed by the growth of large trees (DBH > 60 cm). The high-altitude-induced low temperature and the high diffusion-irradiation ratio caused by cloudiness were suggested as two reasons for the large carbon sink in the forest we studied. To analyze the complex structure and terrain of this old-growth forest, this study suggested that biometric measurements carried out simultaneously with eddy flux measurements were necessary.

  7. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes enter broccoli cells enhancing growth and water uptake of plants exposed to salinity

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Ballesta, Mª Carmen; Zapata, Lavinia; Chalbi, Najla; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes have been shown to improve the germination and growth of some plant species, extending the applicability of the emerging nano-biotechnology field to crop science. Results In this work, exploitation of commercial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in control and 100 mM NaCl-treated broccoli was performed. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that MWCNTs can enter the cells in adult plants with higher accumulation under salt stress. Positive effect of MWC...

  8. Hydrogen-free spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition method for the carbon nanotube growth: Parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the absence of hydrogen at low carrier gas flow rates has been used for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A parametric study of the carbon nanotube growth has been conducted by optimizing various parameters such as temperature, injection speed, precursor volume, and catalyst concentration. Experimental observations and characterizations reveal that the growth rate, size and quality of the carbon nanotubes are significantly dependent on the reaction parameters. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the morphology, structure and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes. The synthesis process can be applied to both semiconducting silicon wafer and conducting substrates such as carbon microfibers and stainless steel plates. This approach promises great potential in building various nanodevices with different electron conducting requirements. In addition, the absence of hydrogen as a carrier gas and the relatively low synthesis temperature (typically 750 deg. C) qualify the spray pyrolysis CVD method as a safe and easy way to scale up the CNT growth, which is applicable in industrial production.

  9. Carbon ion radiotherapy with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor for refractory gastrointestinal carcinomas in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combined effect of carbon ion radiotherapy with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor on refractory gastrointestinal carcinomas in mice. As a preliminary experiment, we assessed the sensitization effect of gemcitabine (GEM) on carbon ion radiotherapy for tumor cells and the normal tissues by using SCCVII of C3H mice. Tumor cells treated with low linear energy transfer (LET) carbon ion irradiation showed the sensitizing effect of GEM. However, no sensitizating effect was shown for the normal tissue irradiated with either low LET or with high LET. (author)

  10. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  11. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon sinks in China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, P.; Zhu, J.; Hu, H; Guo, Z.; Pan, Y.; R. Birdsey; J. Fang

    2015-01-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area) and forest growth (increase in biomass density). Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms that control forest C sinks and is helpful for developing sustainable forest management poli...

  12. Optimized inorganic carbon regime for enhanced growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Egan J. Lohman; Gardner, Robert D; Pedersen, Todd; Peyton, Brent M; Cooksey, Keith E; Gerlach, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background Large-scale algal biofuel production has been limited, among other factors, by the availability of inorganic carbon in the culture medium at concentrations higher than achievable with atmospheric CO2. Life cycle analyses have concluded that costs associated with supplying CO2 to algal cultures are significant contributors to the overall energy consumption. Results A two-phase optimal growth and lipid accumulation scenario is presented, which (1) enhances the growth rate and (2) the...

  13. Study of Composite Interface Fracture and Crack Growth Monitoring Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bily, Mollie A.; Kwon, Young W.; Pollak, Randall D.

    2010-08-01

    Interface fracture of woven fabric composite layers was studied using Mode II fracture testing. Both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites were used with a vinyl ester resin. First, the single-step cured (i.e., co-cured) composite interface strength was compared to that of the two-step cured interface as used in the scarf joint technique. The results showed that the two-step cured interface was as strong as the co-cured interface. Carbon nanotubes were then applied to the composite interface using two-step curing, and then followed by Mode II fracture testing. The results indicated a significant improvement of the interface fracture toughness due to the dispersed carbon nanotube layer for both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites. The carbon nanotube layer was then evaluated as a means to monitor crack growth along the interface. Because carbon nanotubes have very high electrical conductivity, the electrical resistance was measured through the interface as a crack grew, thus disrupting the carbon nanotube network and increasing the resistance. The results showed a linear relationship between crack length and interface resistance for the carbon fiber composites, and allowed initial detection of failure in the E-glass fiber composites. This study demonstrated that the application of carbon nanotubes along a critical composite interface not only improves fracture properties but can also be used to detect and monitor interfacial damage.

  14. Peat growth and carbon accumulation rates during the holocene in boreal mires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is based on accumulation processes in northern mires. In the first study, problems concerning carbon 14 dating of peat were examined by fractionation of bulk peat samples and 14C AMS dating of the separate fractions. In the following studies, peat cores from twelve Swedish mire sites were investigated. Macrofossil analysis was performed on the sampled cores to describe and classify the plant communities during mire development. Between 6 to 18 14C AMS datings were performed on one core from each mire in order to estimate the peat growth and carbon accumulation rates for the identified plant communities. Different fractions within single peat bulk samples gave considerably differing 14 C ages. The range in age differed between mire types and depth. For accurate 14C dating, moss-stems, preferably of Sphagnum spp. are recommended. Both autogenic and allogenic factors, e.g. climate and developmental stage, respectively, were identified as important influences on carbon accumulation. Both peat growth and carbon accumulation rates differed between plant communities. The major factors explaining the variations in accumulation rates of the different plant communities were the amount of Carex and Sphagnum remains and the geographical position of the mire. Carbon accumulation rates decrease along with development in most mires. The results indicate that some mires may have alternated between being carbon sinks and sources, at least over the last several hundred years. The inter-annual variation in carbon accumulation is probably explained by climatic variations

  15. Growth of carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber: a linear electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-stage effect has been revisited through growing carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber with a thickness of 11 μm. A prepared linear electron source exhibits a turn-on field as low as 0.4 V μm-1 and an extremely high field enhancement factor of 19 300, when compared with those results from reference nanotube emitters grown on flat silicone wafer; 3.0 V μm-1 and 2500, respectively. In addition, we introduce a novel method to grow nanotubes uniformly around the circumference of carbon fibers by using direct resistive heating on the continuously feeding carbon threads. These results open up not only a new path for synthesizing nanocomposites, but also offer an excellent linear electron source for special applications such as backlight units for liquid crystal displays and multi-array x-ray sources.

  16. Does carbon availability control temporal dynamics of radial growth in Norway spruce (Picea abies)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Swidrak, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation of coniferous species exposed to soil dryness revealed early culmination of maximum growth in late spring prior to occurrence of more favourable environmental conditions, i.e., repeated high rainfall events during summer (Oberhuber et al. 2014). Because it is well known that plants can adjust carbon allocation patterns to optimize resource uptake under prevailing environmental constraints, we hypothesize that early decrease in radial stem growth is an adaptation to cope with drought stress, which might require an early switch of carbon allocation to belowground organs. Physical blockage of carbon transport in the phloem through girdling causes accumulation and depletion of carbohydrates above and below the girdle, respectively, making this method quite appropriate to investigate carbon relationships in trees. Hence, in a common garden experiment we will manipulate the carbon status of Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings by phloem blockage at different phenological stages during the growing season. We will present the methodological approach and first results of the study aiming to test the hypothesis that carbon status of the tree affects temporal dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation in conifers under drought. Acknowledgment The research is funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): P25643-B16 "Carbon allocation and growth of Scots pine". Reference Oberhuber W, A Gruber, W Kofler, I Swidrak (2014) Radial stem growth in response to microclimate and soil moisture in a drought-prone mixed coniferous forest at an inner Alpine site. Eur J For Res 133:467-479.

  17. Sustainable development and low carbon growth strategy for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For India, sustainable strategy means one that is economically, environmentally and socially sustainable. This calls for rapid economic growth to deal with poverty and human development. However, the relatively meagre energy resources of the country pose a huge challenge. At the same time concern for climate change has raised the bar on the use of the one energy resource that India has in some abundance, namely coal. India's strategy for sustainable development has to explore all options of reducing energy needs, enhancing efficiency of use of conventional energy resources and develop new and renewable sources. The paper identifies various technical options, their potential roles and alternative policy measures to realize them in a cost effective manner. Even for the same objectives different policy instruments are available and how one chooses a particular instrument is often critical for the success. Self-implementing incentive compatible policy that does not create vested interests that would get entrenched should be preferred. -- Highlights: ► Energy efficiency is critical for sustainable development. ► India can reduce its emission intensity by 25 % by 2020 as proposed by India at Copenhagen. ► With a more aggressive effort even 35% reduction is attainable even with 8% or 9% growth. ► Energy efficient appliances, vehicles, buildings and industrial processes are needed. ► Policies that incentivize adoption of these pose critical challenges.

  18. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotubes from bamboo charcoal and the roles of minerals on their growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized from bamboo charcoals by chemical vapor deposition in the presence of ethanol vapor. Fresh bamboo culms were first heat treated at 1000–1500 °C to form charcoals. The elemental composition and structure of mineral phases in the bamboo charcoal treated at different temperatures were analyzed. The results showed that Mg2SiO4 and particularly calcium silicate were responsible for the nucleation and growth of MWCNTs at 1200–1400 °C. Transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer observations indicated that the tips of nanotubes synthesized at 1200–1400 °C consist mainly of calcium silicate. Such silicate tips acted as effective catalysts for nanotubes. The growth of MWCNTs followed the vapor–liquid–solid model including an initial decomposition of ethanol vapor into carbon, dissolution of carbon inside molten silicate and final nucleation of nanotubes. -- Graphical abstract: Calcium silicate spheres formed on the surface of the bamboo charcoal after thermal treatments. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by ethanol chemical vapor deposition. The growth of CNTs follows the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism. Uploading of CNTs could increase the specific surface area and the N2 adsorption capacity. Highlights: ► The evolution of minerals in bamboo charcoal under heat treatment is found. ► The roles of minerals in bamboo charcoal in the growth of CNTs are proposed. ► The upload of CNTs increases the specific surface area and the adsorption capacity.

  19. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and ozone concentrations alter LAI through changes in phenology and leaf growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaves are critical for harvesting light energy, taking up carbon dioxide (CO2) and transpiring water for cooling. Changes in leaf growth, expansion or development can integrate across the plant canopy and growing season to significantly impact productivity, yield and plant-atmosphere fluxes. Althou...

  20. Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Clay: Unique Nanostructured Filler for High-Performance Polymer Nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Wei-De; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi

    2006-01-01

    High-performance composites are produced using nanostructured clay-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrids as a reinforcing filler. The intercalation of iron particles between the clay platelets serves as the catalyst for the growth of CNTs, while the platelets are exfoliated by the CNTs, forming the unique 3

  1. Low-temperature growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-temperature synthesis (450-560 deg. C) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on a triple-layered catalyst, Al/Fe/Mo, was performed using aromatic hydrocarbon radicals which were produced from the pyrolysis of C2H2. Two approaches were used; in the first, these hydrocarbon radicals were produced using a high-temperature heater (830 deg. C), but the substrate where the SWCNTs were grown was placed on a thermal insulator above it such that the substrate was at a much lower temperature. In the second approach, a heated nozzle system operating at 830 deg. C was used to introduce the hydrocarbon radicals onto the substrate which was located a few centimetres below it. Both these approaches rely on the thermal dissociation and recombination of C2H2 for the formation of complex high-order radicals, i.e. C6H9, C5H9, C6H13, whose presence was confirmed by in situ mass spectroscopy. The density of SWCNTs deposited could be correlated directly with the concentration of these precursors

  2. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10-0.12 h(-1)), biomass (0.7-0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14-0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  3. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Abad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10–0.12 h−1, biomass (0.7–0.8 g cells/g Substrate and product (0.14–0.15 g DHA/g cells yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct.

  4. Synthesis and growth kinetics of carbon nanocoils using Sn-Fe-O xerogel film catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanocoils (CNCs) were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method using tin-iron-oxide (Sn-Fe-O) xerogel film catalyst. The Sn-Fe-O catalyst was prepared by a low-cost sol–gel method using stannous acetate and ferric acetate as precursors. The growth kinetics of CNCs were monitored by a thermogravimetric analyzer, and the experimental result was correlated using one-dimensional tip growth kinetic model. The kinetic model consists of three steps: (1) dissociative chemisorption of acetylene and formation of encapsulating carbon on a leading face of the catalyst, (2) diffusion and reduction of Sn-Fe-O catalyst in bulk structure, and (3) carbon cluster nucleation on a tailing face of the catalyst. (paper)

  5. The Effect of Gasification Biochar on Soil Carbon Sequestration, Soil Quality and Crop Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika

    New synergies between agriculture and the energy sector making use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production and recycling recalcitrant residuals to soil may offer climate change mitigation potential through the substitution of fossil fuels and soil carbon sequestration. However, concerns...... and pot and field experiments was used to study the effect of straw and wood biochar on carbon sequestration, soil quality and crop growth. Overall, the biochar amendment improved soil chemical and physical properties and plant growth and showed a potential for soil carbon sequestration without having...... have been raised about the potential negative impacts of incorporating bioenergy residuals (biochar) in soil and increasing the removal of crop residues such as straw, possibly reducing important soil functions and services for maintaining soil quality. Therefore, a combination of incubation studies...

  6. The growth of N-doped carbon nanotube arrays on sintered Al2O3 substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically oriented bamboo-like nitrogen-containing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were grown on an alumina (Al2O3) substrate by the injection chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using ethanol as a carbon source and ethylenediamine as a nitrogen source. The substrate is a sintered Al2O3 plate with a rough surface consisting of polycrystalline Al2O3 micro-grains. The concentration of ferrocene in ethanol played a major role in the growth of CNT arrays. Aligned multi-walled CNT arrays were obtained under optimized catalyst concentrations (0.015 g/ml) and growth temperature (900 deg. C) with the height of the arrays attaining 160 μm after the growth for 1 h. The growth of CNT occurred predominately between 30 and 40 min and ceased growth beyond 60 min. X-ray photoelectronic spectrum detects the incorporation of nitrogen atoms in the CNTs with an atomic ratio of 1.2%. The present study indicates that it is possible to grow high quality carbon nanotube arrays over a cheap alumina substrate of a rough surface

  7. A NOVEL PARAMETER FOR EVALUATING THE FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH RATE IN CARBON STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.S.Wang; S.Q.Zhu; N.Kawagoishi; H.Nisitani

    2001-01-01

    A novel parameter is suggested for evaluating the fatigue crack growth rate in carbonsteels.Fatigue crack propagation tests of an annealed 0.42% carbon steel were carriedout under different conditions to investigate the relationship between this dominatingparameter and the crack opening displacement (COD).A new equation of fatiguecrack growth rate is formulated in terms of the suggested parameter.The physicalmeanings of the material parameters in this equation are explored experimentally.Considering the relation of crack growth and deformation properties,a simple andapplicable method is proposed to evaluate the fatigue crack growth rate.It is alsoobserved that the material parameters in the fatigue crack growth rate equation ofcarbon steels are related linearly to the material strength.The results are in a goodagreement with experimental results.

  8. Human population and atmospheric carbon dioxide growth dynamics: Diagnostics for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsler, A. D.; Sornette, D.

    2014-10-01

    We analyze the growth rates of human population and of atmospheric carbon dioxide by comparing the relative merits of two benchmark models, the exponential law and the finite-time-singular (FTS) power law. The later results from positive feedbacks, either direct or mediated by other dynamical variables, as shown in our presentation of a simple endogenous macroeconomic dynamical growth model describing the growth dynamics of coupled processes involving human population (labor in economic terms), capital and technology (proxies by CO2 emissions). Human population in the context of our energy intensive economies constitutes arguably the most important underlying driving variable of the content of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Using some of the best databases available, we perform empirical analyses confirming that the human population on Earth has been growing super-exponentially until the mid-1960s, followed by a decelerated sub-exponential growth, with a tendency to plateau at just an exponential growth in the last decade with an average growth rate of 1.0% per year. In contrast, we find that the content of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has continued to accelerate super-exponentially until 1990, with a transition to a progressive deceleration since then, with an average growth rate of approximately 2% per year in the last decade. To go back to CO2 atmosphere contents equal to or smaller than the level of 1990 as has been the broadly advertised goals of international treaties since 1990 requires herculean changes: from a dynamical point of view, the approximately exponential growth must not only turn to negative acceleration but also negative velocity to reverse the trend.

  9. Growth dynamics of inner tubes inside cobaltocene-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, M. V.; Kramberger, Christian; Saito, Takeshi; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized cobaltocene-filled 1.7-nm-mean diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and transformed them into double-walled carbon nanotubes by annealing at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C for 2 h in vacuum. We analyze the temperature-dependent inner tube growth inside the filled SWCNTs by Raman spectroscopy. The changes in intensity of the Raman peaks of inner tubes with the diameters ranging from 0.832 to 1.321 nm with increasing annealing temperature are traced. It is revealed that the growth temperatures of larger diameter inner tubes are higher than the ones of smaller diameter tubes. A decrease in the diameter of the inner tubes by ~0.4 nm leads to a decrease in the growth temperature by ~200 °C.

  10. Controlling the growth of vertically aligned single walled carbon nanotubes from ethanol for electrochemical supercapacitor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M.A.; Mohamed, M.A.; Shikoh, E.; Fujiwara, A.; Shimoda, T. [Japan Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been proven suitable for use as electrodes in electrochemical capacitors (EC). In this study, alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD) was used to grow vertically-aligned SWCNTs (VASWCNTs). An aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-supported cobalt (Co) catalyst and high purity ethanol carbon feedstock was used for the growth process. The Al layer and Co thin films were deposited using an electron beam evaporator. CNT growth was optimized using Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates. An atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to characterize the synthesis of the catalyst nanoparticles and their subsequent growth. Raman spectrum of the samples demonstrated peaks of radial breathing mode (RBM) from 100 to 250 per cm. Results demonstrated that the CNTs were successfully grown on the conducting metal substrate using the ACCVD process. 4 refs.

  11. Carbon-assisted nucleation and vertical growth of high-quality ZnO nanowire arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Cheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed a carbon-assisted physical-vapor-deposition method for the growth of highly aligned ZnO nanowire arrays on any flat substrates in large area. Amorphous carbon (a-C films acted as the preferential nucleation sites to facilitate the growth of high-quality ZnO nanowire array patterns. The ultrathin a-C films can effectively retard the inclined growth of ZnO nanowires at the edge of the a-C patterns. The investigations of the nanowire structures, photoluminescence and electrical transport properties have shown that the ZnO nanowires were well crystallized and the formation of defects in the nanowires was largely suppressed.

  12. Study on Suface Modification of Barium Carbonate Powders with Stearic Acid%硬脂酸对碳酸钡表面改性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铭; 霍冀川; 刘树信

    2011-01-01

    采用硬脂酸对碳酸钡进行表面改性,研究改性剂用量、改性温度和改性时间等因素对碳酸钡表面改性的影响.采用粒度分析、红外光谱、热重分析、扫描电镜、X射线衍射及润湿性实验对改性前后的碳酸钡进行表征.结果表明:在硬脂酸用量为1.5%(质量分数),改性温度为80℃,改性时间为30 min的条件下制备的产品性能优良,活化指数达99.2%.碳酸钡经硬脂酸改性后,粒度由4.56 μm减小至4.19 μm;硬脂酸在碳酸钡表面发生吸附键合,形成新的化学键;改性后的碳酸钡表面性质由亲水变为疏水.%The surface modification of barium carbonate powders by stearic acid was investigated. The impact of modifier dosage, modification temperature and modification time on the surface modification of barium carbonate powders were studied. The unmodified and modified barium carbonate were both tested with the particle size distribution, FTIR, TG-DSC, SEM, XRD and the experiments of wettability. The results showed that the products with excellent modification effect as well as 99.2% activation exponential were prepared in the conditions of 80 ℃, with 1.5% stearic acid added (mass fraction) and stirring for 30 min. The particle size of barium carbonate reduced from 4.56 u.m to 4.19 μm. The stearic acid molecules occurred adsorbing bond on the surface of barium carbonate, forming new chemical bonds, and the surface property of barium carbonatemodified with stearic acid was changed from hydrophilicity tohydrophobicity.

  13. Modification of glassy carbon electrode with a polymer/mediator composite and its application for the electrochemical detection of iodate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► FAD and PEDOT are combined to modify the glassy carbon electrode for IO3− sensing. ► The doping of FAD into PEDOT matrix can almost be viewed as an irreversible process. ► The optimal cycle number for preparing the GCE/PEDOT/FAD electrode is found to be 9. ► The detection limit of the GCE/PEDOT/FAD electrode for IO3− is found to be 0.16 μM. ► The GCE/PEDOT/FAD electrode possesses enough selectivity toward IO3−. - Abstract: A modified glassy carbon electrode was prepared by depositing a composite of polymer and mediator on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The mediator, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) were electrochemically deposited as a composite on the GCE by applying cyclic voltammetry (CV). This modified electrode is hereafter designated as GCE/PEDOT/FAD. FAD was found to significantly enhance the growth of PEDOT. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) analysis was performed to study the mass changes in the electrode during the electrodeposition of PEDOT, with and without the addition of FAD. The optimal cycle number for preparing the modified electrode was determined to be 9, and the corresponding surface coverage of FAD (ΓFAD) was ca. 5.11 × 10−10 mol cm−2. The amperometric detection of iodate was performed in a 100 mM buffer solution (pH 1.5). The GCE/PEDOT/FAD showed a sensitivity of 0.78 μA μM−1 cm−2, a linear range of 4–140 μM, and a limit of detection of 0.16 μM for iodate. The interference effects of 250-fold Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Fe2+, Cl−, NO3−, I−, SO42− and SO32−, with reference to the concentration of iodate were negligible. The long-term stability of GCE/PEDOT/FAD was also investigated. The GCE/PEDOT/FAD electrode retained 82% of its initial amperometric response to iodate after 7 days. The GCE/PEDOT/FAD was also applied to determine iodate in a commercial salt.

  14. Crystallographic growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes on few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Aram; Hunley, Patrick D.; Nasseri, Mohsen; Boland, Mathias J.; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Hudak, Bethany M.; Guiton, Beth S.; Strachan, Douglas R.

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid carbon nanotube and graphene structures are emerging as an exciting material system built from a common sp2 carbon backbone. Such hybrid systems have promise for use in improving the performance of energy storage and high-speed electronic applications. Towards the attainment of such hybrid materials, the catalytic growth and crystallographic alignment of these integrated structures are investigated along with the atomic-scale features of their interfaces. The catalytic activity of nanoparticles to form carbon nanotubes on the surface of few-layer graphene is tuned through precise feedstock application. Through careful materials synthesis, the interfaces of these hybrid carbon nanotube - graphene systems are investigated through ultra-high resolution electron microscopy.

  15. Formation and growth mechanisms of ion-induced iron-carbon nanocomposites at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation of graphite surfaces with a simultaneous Fe supply have resulted into the development of various types of carbon nanocomposites. Their morphologies - diameter, density, length and apex angle strongly depend on the ratios of Fe deposition rate (DFe) to ion sputtering rate (Sion). By optimizing the ratio of DFe/Sion (2.40%), the denser and well-aligned Fe-carbon nanocomposite fibers (Fe-CNFs) could be obtained, whose average length and diameter were 0.95 μm and 17 nm, respectively. As confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, the Fe-CNFs with amorphous-like or fine-polycrystalline phase were surely composed of carbon and Fe. Two types of growth models have been employed to explain the formation of metal-carbon nanocomposites.

  16. Marine microalgae growth and carbon partitioning as a function of nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tomásia; Fernandes, Igor; Andrade, Carlos A P; Cordeiro, Nereida

    2016-08-01

    To understand in which way the structural differences of three marine microalgae (Nannochloropsis gaditana, Rhodomonas marina and Isochrysis sp.) affect their carbon partitioning, growth and applicability; a stoichiometric imbalance was imposed by steady carbon and other nutrients variation. Towards high nutrients concentrations/low carbon availability a decrease of 12-51% in C/N microalgae ratio was observed and maximum cell densities were achieved. Moreover, linear correlation between the nutrient input and microalgae protein content were observed. The macromolecular ratios pointed that carbohydrate was the main contributor for the C/N decrement. Although lipid content in R. marina remained constant throughout the experiment, a rise of 37-107% in N. gaditana and Isochrysis sp. was verified. Lipid fractions revealed high percentages of glycolipids in all microalgae (57-73% of total lipids). The present study shows an easy way to understand and modulate microalgae carbon partitioning relying on the field of application. PMID:27179298

  17. Support effect on carbon nanotube growth by methane chemical vapor deposition on cobalt catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the support on carbon nanotube production by methane chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on cobalt catalysts was investigated. N2 physisorption, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and H2 and CO chemisorption techniques were used to characterize the structure of cobalt catalysts supported on different metal oxides (Al2O3, SiO2, Nb2O5 and TiO2). Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used for the characterization and quantification of produced carbon species. On carbon nanotube growth, the catalyst produced three main carbon species: amorphous carbon, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). The characterization techniques showed that the catalyst selectivity to each kind of nanotube depended on the cobalt particle size distribution, which was influenced by the textural properties of the support. Co/TiO2 showed the highest selectivity towards single wall nanotube formation. This high selectivity results from the narrow size distribution of cobalt particles on TiO2. (author)

  18. Amazon old-growth forest wind disturbance and the regional carbon balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. Q.; Negron Juarez, R. I.; Marra, D. M.; Roberts, D. A.; Hurtt, G. C.; Lima, A.; Higuchi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Estimating the carbon balance of a landscape is challenging. A key problem is determining whether or not measurements made in plots are representative of the carbon state of a larger region. A key parameter for calculating landscape carbon balance is the return frequency of episodic disturbances. If disturbances are clustered and occur more frequently than the time required for biomass recovery, a spatial mixture of patches in different stages of recovery occurs. Under these shifting steady-state mosaic conditions, quantifying the mean state of ecosystem attributes such as carbon balance or tree species diversity is difficult. In this study, satellite remote sensing (Landsat) was coupled with field investigations to create ~25 year landscape-scale disturbance chronosequence for old-growth forest in the Central Amazon. The detected disturbances were caused by strong storms which resulted in tree mortality events ranging from small clusters of 7-10 downed trees, to large contiguous blowdowns larger than 30 ha in size. Using the chronosequence, a cumulative probability distribution function was developed, which followed a power law, and was used to parameterize a forest carbon balance model. Results demonstrate that for power law exponents less than about 2.0, the spatial scale at which forest carbon balance establishes is much larger than generally expected. Ultimately, an increase in wind disturbance frequency and/or intensity with a warming climate has the potential to cause a net loss of carbon from Amazon forests to the atmosphere.

  19. Energy consumption, carbon emissions and economic growth in Saudi Arabia: An aggregate and disaggregate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to examine the relationship among economic growth, carbon emissions and energy consumption at the aggregate and disaggregate levels. For the aggregate energy consumption model, we use total energy consumption per capita and CO2 emissions per capita based on the total energy consumption. For the disaggregate analysis, we used oil, gas and electricity consumption models along with their respective CO2 emissions. The long-term income elasticities of carbon emissions in three of the four models are positive and higher than their estimated short-term income elasticities. These results suggest that carbon emissions increase with the increase in per capita income which supports the belief that there is a monotonically increasing relationship between per capita carbon emissions and per capita income for the aggregate model and for the oil and electricity consumption models. The long- and short-term income elasticities of carbon emissions are negative for the gas consumption model. This result indicates that if the Saudi Arabian economy switched from oil to gas consumption, then an increase in per capita income would reduce carbon emissions. The results also suggest that electricity is less polluting than other sources of energy. - Highlights: • Carbon emissions increase with the increase in per capita income in Saudi Arabia. • The income elasticity of CO2 is negative for the gas consumption model. • The income elasticity of CO2 is positive for the oil consumption model. • The results suggest that electricity is less polluting than oil and gas

  20. Growth characteristics of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition using carbon tetrabromide precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon tetrabromide (CBr4) precursor and Cu foil can be used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene. • High yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr4 precursor. • CBr4 precursor is a new alternative for use in the mass production of graphene. • Low bond dissociation energy of CBr4 allows lower temperature growth (800 °C) of high-quality graphene film, compared to that (1000 °C) of methane used CVD. - Abstract: A carbon tetrabromide (CBr4) precursor was employed for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene, and the graphene growth characteristics as functions of the following key factors were then investigated: growth time, growth temperature, and the partial pressure of the precursor. The graphene was transferred onto a SiO2/Si substrate and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the electrical properties were measured through the fabrication of field-effect transistors. Our results show that high yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr4 precursor. Thus, CBr4 precursor is a new alternative candidate for use in the mass production of graphene

  1. Growth characteristics of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition using carbon tetrabromide precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Taejin; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [Nanodevice Laboratory, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Ki-Yeung; Kim, Soo-Hyun [Nano-Devices and Process Laboratory, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Dae-Dong, Gyeongsan-Si 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jusang [Nanodevice Laboratory, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [Nanodevice Laboratory, School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Carbon tetrabromide (CBr{sub 4}) precursor and Cu foil can be used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene. • High yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr{sub 4} precursor. • CBr{sub 4} precursor is a new alternative for use in the mass production of graphene. • Low bond dissociation energy of CBr{sub 4} allows lower temperature growth (800 °C) of high-quality graphene film, compared to that (1000 °C) of methane used CVD. - Abstract: A carbon tetrabromide (CBr{sub 4}) precursor was employed for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene, and the graphene growth characteristics as functions of the following key factors were then investigated: growth time, growth temperature, and the partial pressure of the precursor. The graphene was transferred onto a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the electrical properties were measured through the fabrication of field-effect transistors. Our results show that high yield and controllable growth are possible via CVD used with a CBr{sub 4} precursor. Thus, CBr{sub 4} precursor is a new alternative candidate for use in the mass production of graphene.

  2. Effect of carbon source on growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hongjin; WANG Guangce

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrophic culture of microalgae to develop methods of increasing biomass productivity and storage lipids has brought new insight to commercial biodiesel production. To understand the relationship between heterotrophy and lipid production, the effects of carbon sources on the growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01 was studied. The alga exhibited an increased growth rate in response to the addition of carbon sources, which reached the stationary phase after 48 h at 30°C. In addition, glucose and NaAc had a significant effect on the lipid accumulation during the early-stationary phase. Specifically, the lipid content was 0.237±0.026 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.272±0.041 g L~(-1) when glucose was used as the carbon source, whereas the lipid content reached 0.287±0.018 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.288±0.008 g L~(-1) when NaAc was used as the carbon source. The neutral lipid content was found to first decrease and then increase over time during the growth phase. A glucose concentration of 20 mmol L~(-1) gave the maximal lipid yield and the optimum harvest time was the early-stationary phase.

  3. Calcium carbonate growth in the presence of water soluble cellulose ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium carbonate precipitation was performed in the presence of methyl cellulose (MC) and two kinds of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC FD-10000, HEC FD-30000). The results demonstrated that the final product morphology and structure of CaCO3 crystals are highly sensitive to the concentration of the cellulose ethers aqueous solution. By precisely controlling their concentrations, all these three cellulose ethers solutions have the ability of protecting metastable vaterite from thermodynamically transforming into stable calcite. The intermediate products investigation showed to some extent the phase transformation of calcium carbonate in its growing process from metastable vaterite to calcite and indicated that the calcium carbonate crystal growth in HEC solutions occurs through dissolution and reprecipitation process. Calcium carbonate growth in both presence of HEC and ethanol or Mg2+ was also examined. This work demonstrates the potential of water soluble cellulose ethers in controlling biominerals crystallization and growth. The results are revelatory for biomineralization and fabricating new organic-inorganic hybrids based on cellulose derivatives.

  4. Growth rate and calcium carbonate accumulation of Halimeda macrolobaDecaisne (Chlorophyta: Halimedaceae in Thai waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaruwan Mayakun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Halimeda macroloba Decaisne can utilize the CO2 used for carbon fixation in photosynthesis and use bicarbonate as the main carbon source for calcification. Although Halimeda has been recognized as a carbon sink species, the calcium accumulation of Halimeda species in Thai waters remain poorly understood. In this study, the highest density of H. macroloba was 26 thalli/m2 and Halimeda quickly produced 1-2 new segments/thallus/day or 20.1 mg dry weight/thallus/day. Its calcium carbonate accumulation rate was 16.6 mg CaCO3 /thallus/day, or 82.46 % per thallus. In Thailand, however, only three scientific papers of growth rate and CaCO3 accumulation rate of H. macroloba have been found and collected. Of these records, the mean density was 26-104 thalli/m2 . The growth rate of H. macroloba was around 1-2 mg dry weight/day and the CaCO3 accumulation rate varied around 41-91%. Thus, Halimeda has a great potential to decrease the carbon dioxide concentration in the ocean.

  5. Carbon nanotube synthesis: from large-scale production to atom-by-atom growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraordinary electronic, thermal and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) closely relate to their structure. They can be seen as rolled-up graphene sheets with their electronic properties depending on how this rolling up is achieved. However, this is not the way they actually grow. Various methods are used to produce carbon nanotubes. They all have in common three ingredients: (i) a carbon source, (ii) catalyst nanoparticles and (iii) an energy input. In the case where the carbon source is provided in solid form, one speaks about ‘high temperature methods’ because they involve the sublimation of graphite which does not occur below 3200 °C. The first CNTs were synthesized by these techniques. For liquid or gaseous phases, the generic term of ‘medium or low temperature methods’ is used. CNTs are now commonly produced by these latter techniques at temperatures ranging between 350 and 1000 °C, using metal nanoparticles that catalyze the decomposition of the gaseous carbon precursor and make the growth of nanotubes possible. The aim of this review article is to give a general overview of all these methods and an understanding of the CNT growth process. (topical review)

  6. The effect of pigeon yolk sac fluid on the growth behavior of calcium carbonate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Cheng, Haixia; Shen, Xinyu; Tong, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Previous experiments have proved that thermodynamically unstable calcium carbonate vaterite can exist for long periods in the yolk sac of a pigeon embryo. The aim of this article was to demonstrate the effect of in vitro mineralization of yolk sac fluid on calcium carbonate by direct precipitation. Experiments were conducted using pigeon yolk sac fluid and using lecithin extracted from pigeon yolk sac fluid as a control to investigate the regulating effects of the organic components in the embryo on the formation of the calcium carbonate precipitate. Multiple characterization methods were employed to study the various morphological patterns, sizes, crystal growth, and crystal phase transformations of the calcium carbonate precipitates as regulated by the yolk sac fluid extracted at different stages of incubation. The experimental results demonstrate that as the incubation proceeds towards the later stages, the composition and environmental features of the yolk sac fluid become more favorable for the formation of relatively unstable calcium carbonate phases with high energies of the vaterite state. The experiments conducted with extracted lecithin as the template for crystal growth yielded similar results. A large amount of organic molecules with polar functional groups carried by the yolk sac fluid have strong effects and can both initially induce the crystallization and regulate the aggregation of calcium carbonate. Furthermore, this regulation process is found to be closely related to the lecithin contained in yolk sac fluid. These observations confirm the changes in yolk sac fluid composition during incubation have significant effects on the production of vaterite, which implicates the calcium transport during embryo growth. PMID:25681477

  7. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  8. Aerosynthesis: Growth of Vertically-aligned Carbon Nanofibres with Air DC Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kodumagulla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertically-aligned carbon nanofibres (VACNFs have been synthesized in a mixture of acetone and air using catalytic DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Typically, ammonia or hydrogen is used as an etchant gas in the mixture to remove carbon that otherwise passivates the catalyst surface and impedes growth. Our demonstration of the use of air as the etchant gas opens up the possibility that ion etching could be sufficient to maintain the catalytic activity state during synthesis. It also demonstrates a path toward growing VACNFs in the open atmosphere.

  9. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jie, E-mail: jie.sun@chalmers.se; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Nam, Youngwoo [Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cole, Matthew T. [Electrical Engineering Division, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, CB3 0FA Cambridge (United Kingdom); Teo, Kenneth B. K. [AIXTRON Nanoinstruments Ltd., Swavesey, CB24 4FQ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Woo Park, Yung [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-14

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000 °C growth temperature.

  10. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000 °C growth temperature

  11. Dynamic Recrystallization and Grain Growth Behavior of 20SiMn Low Carbon Alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Lanfeng; ZHONG Yuexian; MA Qingxian; YUAN Chaolong; MA Lishen

    2008-01-01

    A senes of thermodynamics experiments were used to optimize the hot forging process of 20SiMn low-carbon alloy steel.A dynamic recrystallization and grain growth model was developed for the 20SiMn steel for common production conditions of heavy forgings by doing a nonlinear curve fit of the expenment data.Optimized forging parameters were developed based on the control of the dynamic recrystallization and the MnS secondary phase.The data shows that the initial grain size and the MnS secondary phase all affect the behavior of the 20SiMn dynamic recrystallization and grain growth.

  12. Post-translational modification of osteopontin: Effects on in vitro hydroxyapatite formation and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boskey, Adele L.; Christensen, Brian Søndergaard; Taleb, Hayat;

    2012-01-01

    The manuscript tests the hypothesis that posttranslational modification of the SIBLING family of proteins in general and osteopontin in particular modify the abilities of these proteins to regulate in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Osteopontin has diverse effects on hydroxyapatite (HA) mine...

  13. Genotypic variation in transpiration efficiency, carbon-isotope discrimination and carbon allocation during early growth in sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transpiration efficiency of dry matter production (W), carbon-isotope discrimination (Δ) and dry matter partitioning were measured on six sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genotypes grown for 32 days in a glasshouse. Two watering regimes, one well watered (HW) and the other delivering half the water used by the HW plants (LW), were imposed. Four major results emerged from this study: Three was significant genotypic variation in W in sunflower and this was closely reflected in Δ for both watering treatments; the low watering regime caused a decrease in Δ but no change in W; nonetheless the genotypic ranking for either Δ or W was not significantly altered by water stress; a positive correlation between W and biomass accumulation occurred among genotypes of HW plants; ρ, the ratio of total plant carbon content to leaf area, was positively correlated with W and negatively correlated with Δ. These results are discussed with reference to the connection between transpiration efficiency and plant growth, indicating that Δ can be used to select for W among young sunflower plants. However, selection for W may be accompanied by changes in other important plant growth characteristics such as ρ. 19 refs., 4 figs

  14. Combinatorial Optimization of Heterogeneous Catalysts Used in the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Verma, Sunita; Delzeit, Lance; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2000-01-01

    Libraries of liquid-phase catalyst precursor solutions were printed onto iridium-coated silicon substrates and evaluated for their effectiveness in catalyzing the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The catalyst precursor solutions were composed of inorganic salts and a removable tri-block copolymer (EO)20(PO)70(EO)20 (EO = ethylene oxide, PO = propylene oxide) structure-directing agent (SDA), dissolved in ethanol/methanol mixtures. Sample libraries were quickly assayed using scanning electron microscopy after CVD growth to identify active catalysts and CVD conditions. Composition libraries and focus libraries were then constructed around the active spots identified in the discovery libraries to understand how catalyst precursor composition affects the yield, density, and quality of the nanotubes. Successful implementation of combinatorial optimization methods in the development of highly active, carbon nanotube catalysts is demonstrated, as well as the identification of catalyst formulations that lead to varying densities and shapes of aligned nanotube towers.

  15. Role of the catalyst in the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbuena, Perla B; Zhao, Jin; Huang, Shiping; Wang, Yixuan; Sakulchaicharoen, Nataphan; Resasco, Daniel E

    2006-05-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to analyze the physical state of the catalyst, and the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes under typical temperature and pressure conditions of their experimental synthesis, emphasizing the role of the catalyst/substrate interactions. It is found that a strong cluster/substrate interaction increases the cluster melting point, modifying the initial stages of carbon dissolution and precipitation on the cluster surface. Experiments performed on model Co-Mo catalysts clearly illustrate the existence of an initial period where the catalyst is formed and no nanotube growth is observed. To quantify the nature of the Co-Mo2C interaction, quantum density functional theory is applied to characterize structural and energetic features of small Co clusters deposited on a (001) Mo2C surface, revealing a strong attachment of Co-clusters to the Mo2C surface, which may increase the melting point of the cluster and prevent cluster sintering. PMID:16792351

  16. Otolith Growth and macular Carbonic Anhydrase Reactivity in larval Fish after Development at simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, U.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    Otolith growth in terms of mineralisation mainly depends on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). CA is located in specialized, mitochondria-rich macular cells (ionocytes), which are involved in the endolymphatic ion exchange, and the enzyme is responsible for the provision of the pH-value necessary for otolithic calcium carbonate deposition. Since it has been shown earlier that hypergravity slows down inner ear otolith growth in developing fish via a down-regulation of CA reactivity, we were prompted to elucidate whether (simulated) microgravity would possibly yield opposite effects. Therefore, larval siblings of cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were housed in a submersed, two-dimensional clinostat (tube) during their development. Subsequently, the "physical capacity" (i.e., size) of the otoliths was measured, CA was histochemically demonstrated in ionocytes, and enzyme reactivity was determined densitometrically. The respective data will be communicated at the meeting. Acknowledgement: This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (FKZ: 50 WB 9997).

  17. Effects of ferrite catalyst concentration and water vapor on growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Cao, Thi; Chuc Nguyen, Van; Thanh Tam Ngo, Thi; Le, Trong Lu; Loc Nguyen, Thai; Tran, Dai Lam; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Phan, Ngoc Minh

    2014-12-01

    In this study Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used as catalysts for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The effect of catalyst concentration and water vapor during the CVD process on the properties of the VA-CNTs was investigated. Monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles (4.5-9.0 nm diameter) prepared by thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate compounds were spin-coated on clean silicon substrates which served as a platform for VA-CNTs growth. The results indicated that the length, density and growth rate of CNTs were strongly affected by the catalyst concentration. CNTs grown at 0.026 g ml-1 Fe3O4 catalyst had greater length, density and growth rates than those obtained at 0.01 and 0.033 g ml-1 Fe3O4 catalyst. Addition of water during the CVD process had drastically improved CNTs growth. The length and growth rate of obtained CNTs were 40 μm and 1.33 μm min-1, respectively. The results provided insights into the role of Fe3O4 catalyst and water vapor during VA-CNTs growth process by CVD method and the obtained information might serve as a starting point for further optimization of VA-CNTs synthesis.

  18. Heterogeneous growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases at the (101¯4) calcite surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Man; Ilton, Eugene S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of surface precipitates to form heteroepitaxially is an important factor that controls the extent of heterogeneous growth. In this work, the growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases on (10-14) calcite surfaces is compared for a range of initial saturation states with respect to otavite (CdCO3) and sphaerocobaltite (CoCO3), two isostructural metal carbonates that exhibit different lattice misfits with respect to calcite. Calcite single crystals were reacted in static conditions for 16 hours with CdCl2 and CoCl2 aqueous solutions with initial concentrations 0.3 ≤ [Cd2+]0 ≤ 100 μM and 25 ≤ [Co2+]0 ≤ 200 μM. The reacted crystals were imaged in situ with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed ex situ with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images of Cd-reacted crystals showed the formation of large islands elongated along the direction, clear evidence of heteroepitaxial growth, whereas surface precipitates on Co-reacted crystals were small round islands. Deformation of calcite etch pits in both cases indicated the incorporation of Cd and Co at step edges. XPS analysis pointed to the formation of a Cd-rich (Ca,Cd)CO3 solid solution coating atop the calcite substrate. In contrast, XPS measurements of the Co-reacted crystals provided evidence for the formation of a mixed hydroxy-carbonate cobalt phase. The combined AFM and XPS results suggest that the lattice misfit between CoCO3 and CaCO3 ( 15% based on surface areas) is too large to allow for heteroepitaxial growth of a pure cobalt carbonate phase on calcite surfaces in aqueous solutions and at ambient conditions. The use of the satellite structure of the Co 2p3/2 photoelectron line as a tool for determining the nature of cobalt surface precipitates is also discussed.

  19. Evaluation of salt tolerance in wheat genotypes using growth and carbon isotopes discrimination technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted in green house to select suitable salt tolerant wheat genotypes on the basis of growth performance and carbon isotopes discrimination (CID) technique. Nine newly developed double haploids (DH) wheat genotypes were tested under gravel culture, along with salt tolerant (LU-26s) and high yielding (Sarsabz) checks. The crop was irrigated by non-saline (control) and saline (12dS/m) water and raised up to maturity, growth parameters (i.e. plant height, plant biomass, productive tillers, spike length, number of spiklets/spike, number of grains / spike, grain weight/ spike and grain yield/ 15 plants) were recorded after harvesting. Plant samples (straw) were collected and were analyzed for carbon isotopic ratio (C12/ C13) from IAEA laboratories Vienna Austria. The data showed that there was significant decrease in all the growth parameters due to salinity. On the basis of performance in different growth parameters it was found that wheat genotypes V3-DH, V9-DH, V10-DH, V13-DH, and LU-26s had good response at 12dSm-1, thus can be categorized as better performing genotypes. Studies on carbon isotopes discrimination (CID) showed a decreasing trend under salinity. Mean CID values were 20.86 and 17.49 under two environments (non saline and saline, respectively), showing an overall 19% decrease under salinity. Generally the wheat genotypes having higher grain yield also had high carbon isotopes discrimination (CID). The relationship between grain yield and CID was positive (R2 = 0.695). The genotypes V10-DH, V13-DH with lower decrease in CID (i.e. 1.2 and 11.0%, respectively), also had high grain yield under salinity. Therefore the studies suggest that we can include CID technique as one of the selection criteria for salt tolerance. (author)

  20. Carbon policy in a high-growth economy: The case of China

    OpenAIRE

    Bretschger, Lucas; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread concern that an international agreement on stringent climate policies will not be reached because it would imply too high costs for fast growing economies like China. To quantify these costs we develop a general equilibrium model with fully endogenous growth. The framework includes disaggregated industrial and energy sectors, endogenous innovation, and sector-specific investments. We find that the implementation of Chinese government carbon policies until 2020 causes a wel...

  1. Nanocomposite Scaffold for Chondrocyte Growth and Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Effects of Carbon Nanotube Surface Functionalization

    OpenAIRE

    Chahine, Nadeen O.; Collette, Nicole M.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Genetos, Damian C.; Loots, Gabriela G

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the long-term biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. We hypothesized that SWNT nanocomposite scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering can provide an improved molecular-sized substrate for stimulation of chondrocyte growth, as well as structural reinforcement of the scaffold's mechanical properties. The effect of SWNT surface functionalization (-COOH or -PEG) on chondrocyte viability and bioc...

  2. Investigating the growth mechanism and optical properties of carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2013-10-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared using flame synthesis and then characterized using transmission electron microscopy. We found that the flame method yields both crystalline TiO2 and amorphous TiO 2 NPs. TEM analysis revealed that only the crystalline TiO 2 NPs were coated with carbon. Based on this observation, we proposed a growth model for the diffusion and precipitation of carbon atoms in TiO 2 NPs. The optical properties of TiO2 NPs were investigated by performing valence electron energy loss spectrometry analysis. We observed that carbon-coated TiO2 NPs have higher absorption in the visible range due to their lower band-gap energy. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Decorating multiwalled carbon nanotubes with zinc oxide nano-crystallines through hydrothermal growth process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChenSha; QIAO YingJie; LI YuMing

    2012-01-01

    Multiwalled-carbon nanotubes coated with nano-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) was prepared by in situ growth of nano zinc oxide on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes through hydrothermal method.X-ray diffraction,transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques were used to characterize the samples.It was observed that a layer of nano-crystalline ZnO with the wurtzite hexagonal crystal structure was uniformly coated on the nanotube surfaces with good adhesion,which resulted in the formation of a novel ZnO-nanotube nano composite.In this work,the carbon nanotubes decorated by metal oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route which is suitable for the large-scale production with low cost.

  4. Photosynthate consumption and carbon turnover in the rhizosphere depending on plant species and growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The root tissue which can be isolated from soils represents only part of the total plant carbon incorporation. Between 20 and 40% of the photosynthetic production of plants is expended for root growth and root metabolism. This indicates a striking turnover of energy in the rhizosphere, because relatively litle root-derived organic matter remains there until harvest time. Plant species and variety, soil conditions and temperature were shown to be the most decisive factors governing the assimilate consumption of plant root systems. A special technique is described which enables to study how this extensive turnover affects the surrounding soil depending on its proximity to the roots. Plant-derived carbon can be detected up to 20mm away from the roots. A priming effect has been found on the decomposition of soil organic matter. This explains why, in spite of the rhizo-deposition mentioned, no net-accumulation of carbon in the rhizosphere has been found. (Author)

  5. Carbon nanotube-based sensor and method for detection of crack growth in a structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Kite, Marlen T. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between the resistance of a carbon nanotube and its strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a corresponding change in the electrical properties of the conductors, thereby enabling detection of crack growth in the structure.

  6. Growth of carbon structures on chrysotile surface for organic contaminants removal from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Bruno R S; Soares, Érico A R; Teixeira, Ana Paula C; Ardisson, José D; Fernandez-Outon, Luis E; Amorim, Camila C; Lago, Rochel M; Moura, Flávia C C

    2016-09-01

    Amphiphilic magnetic composites were produced based on chrysotile mineral and carbon structures by chemical vapor deposition at different temperatures (600-900 °C) and cobalt as catalyst. The materials were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry, adsorption and desorption of N2, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, and thermal analysis showed an effective growth of carbon structures in all temperatures. It was observed that at 800 and 900 °C, a large amount of carbon structures are formed with fewer defects than at 600 and 700 °C, what contributes to their stability. In addition, the materials present magnetic phases that are important for their application as catalysts and adsorbents. The materials have shown to be very active to remove the oil dispersed in a real sample of emulsified wastewater from biodiesel production and to remove methylene blue by adsorption and oxidation via heterogeneous Fenton mechanism. PMID:27343867

  7. A Simple Surface Modification of NiO Cathode with TiO2 Nano-Particles for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TiO2-modified Ni powders, prepared by the simple method (ball-milling and subsequent annealing) without resorting to any complex coating process, eventually form nickel titanate passive layer at high temperature. It as good corrosion resistance in molten carbonates media and higher electrical conductivity at high temperature. In addition, the modified cathode increases the degree of lithiation during the operation of MCFC. These positive effects provide a decrease in the internal resistance and improve the cell performance. Results obtained from this study can be applied to develop the surface modification of cathode materials and the performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) are efficient energy conversion devices to convert chemical energy into electrical energy through the electrochemical reaction. Because of a lot of advantages of MCFC operated at high temperature, many researchers have been trying to apply it to large-scaled power generations, marine boats, and so on. Among various cathode materials, nickel oxide, NiO, is the most widely used cathode for MCFCs due to its stability and high electrical conductivity, but the degradation of cathode material, so-called NiO dissolution, prevents a long-term operation of MCFC. In order to overcome the drawback, numerous studies have been performed. One of the most useful ways to enhance the surface property and maintain the bulk property of the host materials is the surface modification. The most common modification method is coating and these coating procedures which need some complicated steps with the use of organic materials, but it restricts the large-scale fabrication. In this study, to improve the electrochemical performance, we have prepared an alternative MCFC cathode material, TiO2-modified NiO, by simple method without resorting to any complex coating process. Results obtained in this study can provide an effective way to mass-produce the cathode materials applied

  8. Growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on nickel-coated silicon wafer beneath sputtered amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth of crystalline silicon nanowire of controllable diameter directly from Si wafer opens up another avenue for its application in solar cells and optical sensing. Crystalline Si nanowire can be directly grown from Si wafer upon rapid thermal annealing in the presence of the catalyst such as nickel (Ni). However, the accompanying oxidation immediately changes the crystalline Si nanowire to amorphous SiOx. In this study, amorphous carbon layer was sputtered to on top of the catalyst Ni layer to retard the oxidation. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the wires and oxidation process. A model was developed to explain the growth and oxidation process of the crystalline Si nanowire. - Highlights: ► Carbon was sputtered on nickel to retard the oxidation of silicon nanowires. ► Silicon core was controlled by carbon layer thickness and annealing duration. ► An oxidation-accompanying solid–liquid–solid growth mechanism was developed

  9. Influence of tungsten on the carbon nanotubes growth by CVD process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of tungsten (W) on the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process over a metal Fe-W catalyst incorporated into a silica matrix is reported. A W molar content in Fe/SiO2 up to 10% was studied. The incorporation of only 2% of W substantially modifies the crystalline phases and the crystalline degree of the catalyst during the MWNTs synthesis. This fact seems to have a strong influence on the type and yield of the carbonaceous species obtained by the CVD of acetylene, at 600 deg. C and 180 Torr, over each catalyst. Tungsten interacts with iron within the matrix, diminishing the catalytic activity of the metal nanoparticles, and both, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are obtained when tungsten is present. The results obtained support the hypothesis of a base growth model for carbon nanotubes indicating a strong interaction between silica matrix and Fe/W nanoparticles, independently of the content of W.

  10. Influence of tungsten on the carbon nanotubes growth by CVD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)], E-mail: mescobar@qi.fcen.uba.ar; Rubiolo, Gerardo H. [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Moreno, M. Sergio [Centro Atomico Bariloche, (8400) S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)

    2009-06-24

    The effect of tungsten (W) on the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process over a metal Fe-W catalyst incorporated into a silica matrix is reported. A W molar content in Fe/SiO{sub 2} up to 10% was studied. The incorporation of only 2% of W substantially modifies the crystalline phases and the crystalline degree of the catalyst during the MWNTs synthesis. This fact seems to have a strong influence on the type and yield of the carbonaceous species obtained by the CVD of acetylene, at 600 deg. C and 180 Torr, over each catalyst. Tungsten interacts with iron within the matrix, diminishing the catalytic activity of the metal nanoparticles, and both, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are obtained when tungsten is present. The results obtained support the hypothesis of a base growth model for carbon nanotubes indicating a strong interaction between silica matrix and Fe/W nanoparticles, independently of the content of W.

  11. Growth dynamics of carbon-metal particles and nanotubes synthesized by CO2 laser vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokai, F.; Takahashi, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Iijima, S.

    To study the growth of carbon-Co/Ni particles and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by 20 ms CO2 laser-pulse irradiation of a graphite-Co/Ni (1.2 at.%) target in an Ar gas atmosphere (600 Torr), we used emission imaging spectroscopy and shadowgraphy with a temporal resolution of 1.67 ms. Wavelength-selected emission images showed that C2 emission was strong in the region close to the target (within 2 cm), while for the same region the blackbody radiation from the large clusters or particles increased with increasing distance from the target. Shadowgraph images showed that the viscous flow of carbon and metal species formed a mushroom or a turbulent cloud spreading slowly into the Ar atmosphere, indicating that particles and SWNTs continued to grow as the ejected material cooled. In addition, emission imaging spectroscopy at 1200 °C showed that C2 and hot clusters and particles with higher emission intensities were distributed over much wider areas. We discuss the growth dynamics of the particles and SWNTs through the interaction of the ambient Ar with the carbon and metal species released from the target by the laser pulse.

  12. Carbon black directed synthesis of ultrahigh mesoporous carbon aerogels

    OpenAIRE

    Macías, Carlos; Haro Remón, Marta; Rasines, Gloria; Parra Soto, José Bernardo; Ovín Ania, María Concepción

    2013-01-01

    [EN] A simple modification of the conventional sol–gel polymerization of resorcinol–formaldehyde mixtures allowed a facile preparation of ultrahigh mesoporous carbon gels. In the conventional synthesis the growth of the cluster polymer particles leading to the development of the porosity is controlled by the R/C ratio. In the presence of a carbon conductive additive, the polymerization of the reactants proceeded through the formation of less-branched polymer clusters resulting in carbon gels ...

  13. Understanding the Role of Nitrogen in Plasma-Assisted Surface Modification of Magnetic Recording Media with and without Ultrathin Carbon Overcoats

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J.; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Kundu, Shreya; Tripathy, S; Bhatia, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel scheme of pre-surface modification of media using mixed argon-nitrogen plasma is proposed to improve the protection performance of 1.5 nm carbon overcoats (COC) on media produced by a facile pulsed DC sputtering technique. We observe stable and lower friction, higher wear resistance, higher oxidation resistance, and lower surface polarity for the media sample modified in 70%Ar + 30%N2 plasma and possessing 1.5 nm COC as compared to samples prepared using gaseous compositions of 100%Ar...

  14. Removal of two waterborne pathogenic bacterial strains by activated carbon particles prior to and after charge modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, Henk J; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Engels, Eefje; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Bjorkquist, David W; Mitchell, Michael D; Van der Mei, Henny C

    2006-11-01

    Waterborne diseases constitute a threat to public health despite costly treatment measures aimed at removing pathogenic microorganisms from potable water supplies. This paper compared the removal of Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by negatively and positively charged types of activated carbon particles. Both strains display bimodal negative zeta-potential distributions in stabilized water. Carbon particles were suspended to an equivalent external geometric surface area of 700 cm2 in 250 mL of a bacterial suspension, with shaking. Samples were taken after different durations for plate counting. Initial removal rates were less elevated for the positively charged carbon particle than expected, yielding the conclusion that bacterial adhesion under shaking is mass-transport limited. After 360 min, however, the log-reduction of the more negatively charged R. terrigena in suspension was largest for the positively charged carbon particles as compared with the negatively charged ones, although conditioning in ultrapure or tap water of positively charged carbon particles for 21 days eliminated the favorable effect of the positive charge due to counterion adsorption from the water. Removal of the less negatively charged E. coli was less affected by aging of the (positively charged) carbon particles, confirming the role of electrostatic interactions in bacterial removal by activated carbon particles. The microporous, negatively charged coconut carbon performed less than the mesoporous, positively charged carbon particle prior to conditioning but did not suffer from loss of effect after conditioning in ultrapure or tap water. PMID:17144313

  15. Drawing Circuits with Carbon Nanotubes: Scratch-Induced Graphoepitaxial Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Amorphous Silicon Oxide Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jin; Chung, Yoon Jang; Kim, Yun Ho; Han, Jeongho; Lee, Young-Kook; Kong, Ki-jeong; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Young Kuk; Kim, Byoung Gak; Lee, Jeong-O

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the orientations of nanomaterials on arbitrary substrates is crucial for the development of practical applications based on such materials. The aligned epitaxial growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on specific crystallographic planes in single crystalline sapphire or quartz has been demonstrated; however, these substrates are unsuitable for large scale electronic device applications and tend to be quite expensive. Here, we report a scalable method based on graphoepitaxy for the aligned growth of SWNTs on conventional SiO2/Si substrates. The “scratches” generated by polishing were found to feature altered atomic organizations that are similar to the atomic alignments found in vicinal crystalline substrates. The linear and circular scratch lines could promote the oriented growth of SWNTs through the chemical interactions between the C atoms in SWNT and the Si adatoms in the scratches. The method presented has the potential to be used to prepare complex geometrical patterns of SWNTs by ‘drawing' circuits using SWNTs without the need for state-of-the-art equipment or complicated lithographic processes. PMID:24924480

  16. Synthesis of poly(ester-carbonate) with a pendant acetylcholine analog for promoting neurite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dongming; Ma, Lie; Gao, Changyou

    2014-10-01

    The modification of biodegradable polyesters with bioactive molecules has become an important strategy for controlling neuron adhesion and neurite outgrowth in nerve regeneration. In this study we report a biodegradable poly(ester-carbonate) with a pendant acetylcholine analog, which a neurotransmitter for the enhancement of neuron adhesion and outgrowth. The acetylcholine-functionalized poly(ester-carbonate) (Ach-P(LA-ClTMC)) was prepared by copolymerizing l-lactide (LA) and 5-methyl-5-chloroethoxycarbonyl trimethylene carbonate (ClTMC), followed by quaternization with trimethylamine. The acetylcholine analog content could be modulated by changing the molar feeding fraction of ClTMC. The incorporation of the acetylcholine analog improved the hydrophilicity of the films, but the acetylcholine analog content did not significantly influence the surface morphology of the acetylcholine-functionalized films. The results of PC12 cell culture showed that the acetylcholine analog promoted cell viability and neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner. The longest length of neurite and the percentage of cells bearing neurites were obtained on the Ach-P(LA-ClTMC)-10 film. All the results indicate that the integration of the acetylcholine analog at an appropriate fraction could be an effective strategy for optimizing the existing biodegradable polyesters for nerve regeneration applications. PMID:24998182

  17. Liquid-Phase Epitaxial Growth of Highly Oriented and Crystalline MOF Thin Films: Post-Synthetic Modification and Different Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhengbang

    2015-01-01

    The studies for this PhD thesis showed the preparation, characterization and application of new-type surface-mounted metal-organic frameworks (SURMOFs). The aims were to: (1) heteroepitaxially grow MOF-on-MOF multilayer systems with huge lattice mismatch; (2) modify azide-based SURMOFs using alkyne-azide click chemistry; (3) chemically pattern SURMOFs using postsynthetic modification (PSM); (4) engineer UHM-3 SURMOFs with quantitative Cu(I) defects using postsynthetic thermal treatment.

  18. Carbon Isotope Fractionations Associated with Methanotrophic Growth with the Soluble and Particulate Methane Monooxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Summons, Roger E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Growth experiments with the RuMP-type methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), have demonstrated that biomass and lipid biomarkers are significantly depleted in C-13 compared to the substrate methane and that the extent of fractionation is dependent on whether cells express the soluble (s) or particulate (p) methane monooxygenase (MMO). The presence or absence of the characteristic sMMO subunits was monitored using SDS-polyacrylamide gels. In M. capsulatus grown with no Cu supplementation, the characteristic sMMO subunits were observed in the soluble fraction throughout the entire growth period and biomass was depleted in C-13 by approximately 14,700 relative to substrate methane. In cells grown with 5uM Cu, no sMMO bands were observed and a greater fractionation of approximately 27,700 in resultant biomass was obtained. Methanol growth experiments with M. capsulatus and with a RuMP methylotroph, Methylophilus methylotrophus, in which biomass measurements yielded depletions in C-13 of 9 and 5%(sub o), respectively, suggest that oxidation of methane is the major fractionation step. Growth of M. capsulatus at a low level of oxygen, approximately 0.5%, had no significant effect on carbon isotope fractionation by either sMMO or pMMO. These observations are significant for identification of molecular biomarkers; and methanotrophic contributions to carbon isotope composition in natural environments.

  19. Effect of reactor temperature on direct growth of carbon nanomaterials on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edzatty, A. N.; Syazwan, S. M.; Norzilah, A. H.; Jamaludin, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    Currently, carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) are widely used for various applications due to their extraordinary electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this work, CNMs were directly grown on the stainless steel (SS316) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Acetone was used as a carbon source and argon was used as carrier gas, to transport the acetone vapor into the reactor when the reaction occurred. Different reactor temperature such as 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C were used to study their effect on CNMs growth. The growth time and argon flow rate were fixed at 30 minutes and 200 ml/min, respectively. Characterization of the morphology of the SS316 surface after CNMs growth using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that the diameter of grown-CNMs increased with the reactor temperature. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) was used to analyze the chemical composition of the SS316 before and after CNMs growth, where the results showed that reduction of catalyst elements such as iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) at high temperature (700 - 900 °C). Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the nano-sized hills were in the range from 21 to 80 nm. The best reactor temperature to produce CNMs was at 800 °C.

  20. TOR Signaling Promotes Accumulation of BZR1 to Balance Growth with Carbon Availability in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Jia-Ying; Roh, Jeehee; Marchive, Chloé; Kim, Seong-Ki; Meyer, Christian; Sun, Yu; Wang, Wenfei; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-07-25

    For maintenance of cellular homeostasis, the actions of growth-promoting hormones must be attenuated when nutrient and energy become limiting. The molecular mechanisms that coordinate hormone-dependent growth responses with nutrient availability remain poorly understood in plants [1, 2]. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator that integrates nutrient and energy signaling to regulate growth and homeostasis in both animals and plants [3-7]. Here, we show that sugar signaling through TOR controls the accumulation of the brassinosteroid (BR)-signaling transcription factor BZR1, which is essential for growth promotion by multiple hormonal and environmental signals [8-11]. Starvation, caused by shifting of light-grown Arabidopsis seedlings into darkness, as well as inhibition of TOR by inducible RNAi, led to plant growth arrest and reduced expression of BR-responsive genes. The growth arrest caused by TOR inactivation was partially recovered by BR treatment and the gain-of-function mutation bzr1-1D, which causes accumulation of active forms of BZR1 [12]. Exogenous sugar promoted BZR1 accumulation and seedling growth, but such sugar effects were largely abolished by inactivation of TOR, whereas the effect of TOR inactivation on BZR1 degradation is abolished by inhibition of autophagy and by the bzr1-1D mutation. These results indicate that cellular starvation leads sequentially to TOR inactivation, autophagy, and BZR1 degradation. Such regulation of BZR1 accumulation by glucose-TOR signaling allows carbon availability to control the growth promotion hormonal programs, ensuring supply-demand balance in plant growth. PMID:27345161

  1. Wood phenology, not carbon input, controls the interannual variability of wood growth in a temperate oak forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpierre, Nicolas; Berveiller, Daniel; Granda, Elena; Dufrêne, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Although the analysis of flux data has increased our understanding of the interannual variability of carbon inputs into forest ecosystems, we still know little about the determinants of wood growth. Here, we aimed to identify which drivers control the interannual variability of wood growth in a mesic temperate deciduous forest. We analysed a 9-yr time series of carbon fluxes and aboveground wood growth (AWG), reconstructed at a weekly time-scale through the combination of dendrometer and wood density data. Carbon inputs and AWG anomalies appeared to be uncorrelated from the seasonal to interannual scales. More than 90% of the interannual variability of AWG was explained by a combination of the growth intensity during a first 'critical period' of the wood growing season, occurring close to the seasonal maximum, and the timing of the first summer growth halt. Both atmospheric and soil water stress exerted a strong control on the interannual variability of AWG at the study site, despite its mesic conditions, whilst not affecting carbon inputs. Carbon sink activity, not carbon inputs, determined the interannual variations in wood growth at the study site. Our results provide a functional understanding of the dependence of radial growth on precipitation observed in dendrological studies. PMID:26619197

  2. Nitrogen-mediated Carbon Nanotube Growth: Diameter reduction, metallicity, bundle dispersability, and bamboo formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube growth in the presence of nitrogen has been the subject of much experimental scrutiny, sparking intense debate about the role of nitrogen in the formation of diverse structural features, including shortened length, reduced diameters, and bamboo-like multilayered nanotubules. In this letter, the origin of these features is elucidated using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques, showing that N acts as a surfactant during growth. N doping enhances the formation of smaller diameter tubes and it can also promote tube closure which includes a relatively large amount of N atoms into the tube lattice, leading to bamboo-like structures. Our findings demonstrate that the mechanism is independent of the tube chirality and suggest a simple procedure for controlling the growth of bamboo-like nanotube morphologies.

  3. Role of atomic transverse migration in growth of diamond-like carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tian-Bao; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Wang Hui

    2007-01-01

    The growth of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of impact angle on film structure is carefully studied, which shows that the transverse migration of the incident atoms is the main channel of film relaxation. A transverse-migration-induced film relaxation model is presented to elucidate the process of film relaxation which advances the original model of subplantation. The process of DLC film growth on a rough surface is also investigated, as well as the evolution of microstructure and surface morphology of the film. A preferential-to-homogeneous growth mode and a smoothing of the film are observed, which are due to the transverse migration of the incident atoms.

  4. Substrate engineering for Ni-assisted growth of carbon nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of carbon multi-walled nano-tubes (MWCNTs) using metal catalyst (e.g. Ni, Co, and Fe) has been extensively investigated during the last decade. In general, the physical properties of CNTs depend on the type, quality and diameter of the tubes. One of the parameters which affects the diameter of a MWCNT is the size of the catalyst metal islands. Considering Ni as the metal catalyst, the formed silicide layer agglomerates (island formation) after a thermal treatment. One way to decrease the size of Ni islands is to apply SiGe as the base for the growth. In this study, different methods based on substrate engineering are proposed to change/control the MWCNT diameters. These include (i) well-controlled oxide openings containing Ni to miniaturize the metal island size, and (ii) growth on strained or partially relaxed SiGe layers for smaller Ni silicide islands.

  5. Direct growth of graphene on gallium nitride using C2H2 as carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhao, Yun; Yi, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Guo-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Duan, Rui-Rei; Huang, Peng; Wang, Jun-Xi; Li, Jin-Min

    2016-04-01

    Growing graphene on gallium nitride (GaN) at temperatures greater than 900°C is a challenge that must be overcome to obtain high quality of GaN epi-layers. We successfully met this challenge using C2H2 as the carbon source. We demonstrated that graphene can be grown both on copper and directly on GaN epi-layers. The Raman spectra indicated that the graphene films were about 4-5 layers thick. Meanwhile, the effects of the growth temperature on the growth of the graphene films were systematically studied, and 830°C was found to be the optimum growth temperature. We successfully grew high-quality graphene films directly on gallium nitride.

  6. Effects of gamma radiation on stem diameter growth, carbon gain and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effects of gamma radiation on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning, 19-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) were given variable doses (0–40 Gy) from a 60Co gamma source. Exposure of plants to gamma radiation caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that very low doses of radiation could induce morphological growth changes. Carbohydrate analysis of plants exposed to 40 Gy demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less in stems 18 days after exposure compared with control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content of the roots of plants exposed to 40 Gy was not significantly different from non-irradiated plants 18 days after exposure. (author)

  7. Carbon changes in conterminous US forests associated with growth and major disturbances: 1992-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Daolan; Ducey, Mark J [Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Heath, Linda S; Smith, James E, E-mail: daolan.zheng@unh.edu [USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    We estimated forest area and carbon changes in the conterminous United States using a remote sensing based land cover change map, forest fire data from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity program, and forest growth and harvest data from the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis Program. Natural and human-associated disturbances reduced the forest ecosystems' carbon sink by 36% from 1992 to 2001, compared to that without disturbances in the 48 states. Among the three identified disturbances, forest-related land cover change contributed 33% of the total effect in reducing the forest carbon potential sink, while harvests and fires accounted for 63% and 4% of the total effect, respectively. The nation's forests sequestered 1.6 {+-} 0.1 Pg (10{sup 15} petagram) carbon during the period, or 0.18 Pg C yr{sup -1}, with substantial regional variation. The southern region of the United States was a small net carbon source whereas the greater Pacific Northwest region was a strong net sink. Results of the approach fit reasonably well at an aggregate level with other related estimates of the current forest US greenhouse gas inventory, suggesting that further research using this approach is warranted.

  8. Effect of precursors on the growth of carbon filaments onto clay surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful growth of carbon filaments on two different precursors, i.e., the pristine sodium-montmorillonite (Na+MMT), which undergoes reflux at 100 deg. C (r-MMT), and the Na+MMT exchanged with Fe3+ ions (MMT(Fe)), was attained through chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The products obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Refluxing can make the Fe3+ ions in the octahedral layer of Na+MMT migrate to the interlayer and exchange with Na+ ions. Furthermore, through calcination at 500 deg. C, the Fe3+ ions migrate again to the surface of the clay layer and form iron oxides, which can serve as precursors for the deposition of carbon. Although r-MMT contained less iron than the MMT(Fe), the ultimate yield of carbon components grown was almost the same, indicating that the iron species in r-MMT possess higher catalytic activity. However, on the surface of r-MMT, CVD hardly generated carbon nanotubes with a clear hollow structure but that those with a carbon fiber structure instead.

  9. Carbon changes in conterminous US forests associated with growth and major disturbances: 1992-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We estimated forest area and carbon changes in the conterminous United States using a remote sensing based land cover change map, forest fire data from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity program, and forest growth and harvest data from the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis Program. Natural and human-associated disturbances reduced the forest ecosystems' carbon sink by 36% from 1992 to 2001, compared to that without disturbances in the 48 states. Among the three identified disturbances, forest-related land cover change contributed 33% of the total effect in reducing the forest carbon potential sink, while harvests and fires accounted for 63% and 4% of the total effect, respectively. The nation's forests sequestered 1.6 ± 0.1 Pg (1015 petagram) carbon during the period, or 0.18 Pg C yr-1, with substantial regional variation. The southern region of the United States was a small net carbon source whereas the greater Pacific Northwest region was a strong net sink. Results of the approach fit reasonably well at an aggregate level with other related estimates of the current forest US greenhouse gas inventory, suggesting that further research using this approach is warranted.

  10. Simulation of RCC Crack Growth Due to Carbon Oxidation in High-Temperature Gas Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, E. V.; Levin, D. A.; Picetti, Donald J.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    The carbon wall oxidation technique coupled with a CFD technique was employed to study the flow in the expanding crack channel caused by the oxidation of the channel carbon walls. The recessing 3D surface morphing procedure was developed and tested in comparison with the arcjet experimental results. The multi-block structured adaptive meshing was used to model the computational domain changes due to the wall recession. Wall regression rates for a reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples, that were tested in a high enthalpy arcjet environment, were computationally obtained and used to assess the channel expansion. The test geometry and flow conditions render the flow regime as the transitional to continuum, therefore Navier-Stokes gas dynamic approach with the temperature jump and velocity slip correction to the boundary conditions was used. The modeled mechanism for wall material loss was atomic oxygen reaction with bare carbon. The predicted channel growth was found to agree with arcjet observations. Local gas flow field results were found to affect the oxidation rate in a manner that cannot be predicted by previous mass loss correlations. The method holds promise for future modeling of materials gas-dynamic interactions for hypersonic flight.

  11. Effects of assimilable organic carbon and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Liu

    Full Text Available Assimilable organic carbon (AOC is one of the most important factors affecting the re-growth of microorganisms in drinking water. High AOC concentrations result in biological instability, but disinfection kills microbes to ensure the safety of drinking water. Free chlorine is an important oxidizing agent used during the disinfection process. Therefore, we explored the combined effects of AOC and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water using flow cytometry (FCM. The initial AOC concentration was 168 μg.L(-1 in all water samples. Without free chlorine, the concentrations of intact bacteria increased but the level of AOC decreased. The addition of sodium hypochlorite caused an increase and fluctuation in AOC due to the oxidation of organic carbon. The concentrations of intact bacteria decreased from 1.1 × 10(5 cells.mL(-1 to 2.6 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.6 mg.L(-1 to 4.8 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.3 mg.L(-1 due to free chlorine originating from sodium hypochlorite. Additionally, free chlorine might be more obviously affected AOC concentrations than microbial growth did. These results suggested that AOC and free chlorine might have combined effects on microbial growth. In this study, our results showed concentrations determined by FCM were higher than those by HPC, which indicated that some E. coli detected by FCM might not be detected using HPC in drinking water. The level of free chlorine might restrain the consumption of AOC by inhibiting the growth of E. coli; on the other hand, chlorination might increase the level of AOC, thereby increase the potential for microbial growth in the drinking water network.

  12. Measuring Carbon Balance in the Amazon Basin: Woody Vegetation Dynamics in an Old-Growth Tropical Rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutyra, L.; Hutyra, L.; Pyle, E. H.; Rice, A.; Saleska, S. R.; de Camargo, P. B.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2001-12-01

    To address the question of Amazonian carbon balance we are using ground-based biometry measurements combined with whole-system CO2 fluxes via eddy covariance at an old-growth tropical forest (Tapajos National Forest, Santarem, Para, Brazil). Here, we focus on the biometry measurements (see Saleska, et al. abstract for discussion of eddy covariance), which include woody growth increment, tree recruitment and mortality, litterfall, and stocks of biomass as coarse woody debris and forest floor litter. Biometry measurements provide an independent check on carbon balance via eddy covariance, and also elucidate the ecological and climatic controls on the interannual carbon balance. Here, we characterize woody vegetation structure, present results of the first 2 years of above ground woody increment growth, and discuss the initial year of litter collection. Initial results indicate an approximate carbon balance between high growth rates and high damage and mortality rates.

  13. Understanding the role of nitrogen in plasma-assisted surface modification of magnetic recording media with and without ultrathin carbon overcoats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Neeraj; Yeo, Reuben J; Satyanarayana, Nalam; Kundu, Shreya; Tripathy, S; Bhatia, C S

    2015-01-01

    A novel scheme of pre-surface modification of media using mixed argon-nitrogen plasma is proposed to improve the protection performance of 1.5 nm carbon overcoats (COC) on media produced by a facile pulsed DC sputtering technique. We observe stable and lower friction, higher wear resistance, higher oxidation resistance, and lower surface polarity for the media sample modified in 70%Ar + 30%N2 plasma and possessing 1.5 nm COC as compared to samples prepared using gaseous compositions of 100%Ar and 50%Ar + 50%N2 with 1.5 nm COC. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that the surface modification process does not affect the microstructure of the grown COC. Instead, the improved tribological, corrosion-resistant and oxidation-resistant characteristics after 70%Ar + 30%N2 plasma-assisted modification can be attributed to, firstly, the enrichment in surface and interfacial bonding, leading to interfacial strength, and secondly, more effective removal of ambient oxygen from the media surface, leading to stronger adhesion of the COC with media, reduction of media corrosion and oxidation, and surface polarity. Moreover, the tribological, corrosion and surface properties of mixed Ar + N2 plasma treated media with 1.5 nm COCs are found to be comparable or better than ~2.7 nm thick conventional COC in commercial media. PMID:25586898

  14. Electron-beam assisted selective growth of graphenic carbon thin films on SiO2/Si and quartz substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Knyazev, Maxim; Sedlovets, Daria; Trofimov, Oleg; Redkin, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    The first selective growth of graphenic carbon thin films on silicon dioxide is reported. A preliminary e-beam exposure of the substrate is found to strongly affect the process of such films growth. The emphasis is placed on the influence of substrate exposure on the rate of carbon deposition. The explanation of this effect is proposed. The data of electrical and optical measurements and the results of atomic force and scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies are reported. ...

  15. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.; Zhu, J.; Hu, H.; Guo, Z.; Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.; Fang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area) and forest growth (increase in biomass density). Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms that control forest C sinks and it is helpful for developing sustainable forest management policies in the face of climate change. Using the Forest Identity concept and forest inventory data, this study quantified the spatial and temporal changes in the relative contributions of forest areal expansion and increased biomass growth to China's forest biomass C sinks from 1977 to 2008. Over the last 30 years, the areal expansion of forests has been a larger contributor to C sinks than forest growth for planted forests in China (62.2 % vs. 37.8 %). However, for natural forests, forest growth has made a larger contribution than areal expansion (60.4 % vs. 39.6 %). For all forests (planted and natural forests), growth in area and density has contributed equally to the total C sinks of forest biomass in China (50.4 % vs. 49.6 %).The relative contribution of forest growth of planted forests showed an increasing trend from an initial 25.3 % to 61.0 % in the later period of 1998 to 2003, but for natural forests, the relative contributions were variable without clear trends, owing to the drastic changes in forest area and biomass density over the last 30 years. Our findings suggest that afforestation will continue to increase the C sink of China's forests in the future, subject to sustainable forest growth after the establishment of plantations.

  16. Surface modification of carbon fibers by a polyether sulfone emulsion sizing for increased interfacial adhesion with polyether sulfone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haojie [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shouchun, E-mail: zschun@sxicc.ac.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Lu, Chunxiang [National Engineering Laboratory for Carbon Fiber Technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • A polyether sulfone emulsion (PES) sizing was prepared for the first time. • The sizing enhanced the surface activity and wettability of carbon fibers. • Compared to the original sizing, the PES emulsion sizing resulted in an 18.4% increase in the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber/PES composites. • Important influences of emulsifier on the fiber surface and composite interface were demonstrated. • The reinforcing mechanisms are the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility in composites. - Abstract: Interests on carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites are growing rapidly, but the challenges with poor interfacial adhesion have slowed their adoption. In this work, a polyether sulfone (PES) emulsion sizing was prepared successfully for increased interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. To obtain a high-quality PES emulsion sizing, the key factor, emulsifier concentration, was studied by dynamic light scattering technique. The results demonstrated that the suitable weight ratio of PES to emulsifier was 8:3, and the resulting PES emulsion sizing had an average particle diameter of 117 nm and Zeta potential of −52.6 mV. After sizing, the surface oxygen-containing functional groups, free energy and wettability of carbon fibers increased significantly, which were advantageous to promote molecular-level contact between carbon fiber and PES. Finally, short beam shear tests were performed to evaluate the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. The results indicated that PES emulsion sizing played a critical role for the enhanced interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/PES composites, and a 26% increase of interlaminar shear strength was achieved, because of the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility between carbon fiber and PES.

  17. Surface modification of carbon fibers by a polyether sulfone emulsion sizing for increased interfacial adhesion with polyether sulfone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A polyether sulfone emulsion (PES) sizing was prepared for the first time. • The sizing enhanced the surface activity and wettability of carbon fibers. • Compared to the original sizing, the PES emulsion sizing resulted in an 18.4% increase in the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber/PES composites. • Important influences of emulsifier on the fiber surface and composite interface were demonstrated. • The reinforcing mechanisms are the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility in composites. - Abstract: Interests on carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites are growing rapidly, but the challenges with poor interfacial adhesion have slowed their adoption. In this work, a polyether sulfone (PES) emulsion sizing was prepared successfully for increased interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. To obtain a high-quality PES emulsion sizing, the key factor, emulsifier concentration, was studied by dynamic light scattering technique. The results demonstrated that the suitable weight ratio of PES to emulsifier was 8:3, and the resulting PES emulsion sizing had an average particle diameter of 117 nm and Zeta potential of −52.6 mV. After sizing, the surface oxygen-containing functional groups, free energy and wettability of carbon fibers increased significantly, which were advantageous to promote molecular-level contact between carbon fiber and PES. Finally, short beam shear tests were performed to evaluate the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. The results indicated that PES emulsion sizing played a critical role for the enhanced interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/PES composites, and a 26% increase of interlaminar shear strength was achieved, because of the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility between carbon fiber and PES

  18. Seasonal changes in stable carbon isotope ratios within annual growth rings of Pinus radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stable isotope composition of photosynthetically assimilated carbon (δ13C) is determined by the ratio of the leaf internal CO2 concentration (ci) to that of the ambient air (ca), and so reflects the contribution of both stomatal conductance (gs) and the rate of photosynthesis (A). Assimilated carbon which is subsequently laid down as wood in annual growth rings may therefore represent a time integrated record of physiological responses by the whole tree to seasonal changes in the environmental variables regulating growth. We analysed the stable carbon isotope composition of Pinus radiata wood collected from two plantation forest sites in New Zealand which differ markedly in temperature, rainfall and soil characteristics. For both sites, discs were cut from the stem of several trees near ground level and whole wood samples were taken from within individual annual growth rings over a number of years. At one site, diameter bands were installed over the 1994 - 1996 growing seasons in order to date precisely the formation of wood during that time. Trees at each site consistently showed a seasonal pattern in the stable isotope composition of wood within individual growth rings. The amplitude of seasonal δ13C variation at the wet and dry sites were 1-2 per thousand and 4 per thousand respectively. Mean δ13C values from the wet site were 3 per thousand more 13C depleted than those from the dry site implying lower water-use efficiency (carbon assimilation per unit transpiration). A process-based, model of stomatal conductance and CO2 assimilation was combined with a soil-water balance model to estimate the average daily leaf-level intercellular CO2 concentration (ci). Over two growing seasons at each site there was generally good agreement between mean canopy-level ci derived from the tree-ring δ13C data and modelled leaf-level ci levels. Further, the ratio of annual CO2 assimilation to transpiration estimated by the model for each site correlated with the

  19. Carbon : nickel nanocomposite templates - predefined stable catalysts for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkhanova, Svetlana; Haluska, Miro; Hübner, René; Kunze, Tim; Keller, Adrian; Abrasonis, Gintautas; Gemming, Sibylle; Krause, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Carbon : nickel (C : Ni) nanocomposite templates (NCTs) were used as catalyst precursors for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two NCT types of 2 nm thickness were prepared by ion beam co-sputtering without (type I) or with assisting Ar+ ion irradiation (type II). NCT type I comprised Ni-rich nanoparticles (NPs) with defined diameter in an amorphous carbon matrix, while NCT type II was a homogenous C : Ni film. Based on the Raman spectra of more than 600 individual SWCNTs, the diameter distribution obtained from both types of NCT was determined. SWCNTs with a selective, monomodal diameter distribution are obtained from NCT type I. About 50% of the SWCNTs have a diameter of (1.36 +/- 0.10) nm. In contrast to NCT type I, SWCNTs with a non-selective, relatively homogeneous diameter distribution from 0.80 to 1.40 nm covering 88% of all SWCNTs are obtained from NCT type II. From both catalyst templates predominantly separated as-grown SWCNTs are obtained. They are free of solvents or surfactants, exhibit a low degree of bundling and contain negligible amounts of MWCNTs. The study demonstrates the advantage of predefined catalysts for diameter-controlled SWCNT synthesis in comparison to in situ formed catalysts.Carbon : nickel (C : Ni) nanocomposite templates (NCTs) were used as catalyst precursors for diameter-controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Two NCT types of 2 nm thickness were prepared by ion beam co-sputtering without (type I) or with assisting Ar+ ion irradiation (type II). NCT type I comprised Ni-rich nanoparticles (NPs) with defined diameter in an amorphous carbon matrix, while NCT type II was a homogenous C : Ni film. Based on the Raman spectra of more than 600 individual SWCNTs, the diameter distribution obtained from both types of NCT was determined. SWCNTs with a selective, monomodal diameter distribution are obtained from NCT

  20. Growth and carbon fixation rate of calcareous algae cricosphaera carterae. Sekkaiso cricosphaera carterae no zoshoku to tanso kotei sokudo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, M.; Furusaki, S. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Shigematsu, K. (Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)); Shigeta, K. (Kanagawa Prefectural Office, Yokohama (Japan))

    1993-09-10

    Notice has been given on a calcareous alga among micro marine algae that play an important role in carbon circulation, and the representative alga, Cricosphaera carterae was cultured to discuss growth and carbon fixation rate experimentally. It was found that nutrient salt is taken in more actively in the bright period during which no fission occurs, and less actively during the growth stage in the dark period. Dependence of nitrate concentration on specific growth rate was measured with semi-continuous culture and two formulas were formulated. The specific growth rate was 0.53/d at an average nitrogen concentration on the ocean surface of 15 mg/m[sup 3]. The maximum specific growth rate was 0.9/d, and the fixing ratio of inorganic carbon to organic carbon was roughly 0.1. Further, the alga was cultured with CO2 concentration doubled (to 715 ppm), where no large difference was discovered in the growth and the inorganic carbon fixation. From these findings, the carbon fixation amount due to algae on the entire earth was calculated to roughly 4 billion tons per year. 23 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. In-Situ Growth of Carbon Nanotubes in a Microreactor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kona, Silpa; Harnett, Cindy

    2010-03-01

    This work presents an approach to the in-situ growth of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) inside a micro scale environment using thermal chemical vapor deposition technique (Thermal CVD). Microreactors provide an ideal environment for exploration of extreme nanomaterial growth conditions, because they provide homogenous reactant temperature and concentrations, and the ability to work safely and economically at high temperatures and pressures over a broad range of flows. The study of Carbon Nanotube synthesis inside sub-mm channels and microfabricated reactors is of interest both fundamentally and for applications such as chromatographic channels. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also excellent materials to be used as gas sensing elements as they exhibit changes in their electronic properties on being exposed to gases and are of interest in developing gas sensors operating at room temperature. Such micro scale CNT based sensing devices offer several practical advantages over the current sensors designs available, along with opening up avenues for a more efficient and better way of sensing gases.

  2. The effect of synthesis time on graphene growth from palm oil as green carbon precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifairus, M. J.; Hamid, S. B. Abd; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene is the new material that arises after carbon nanotubes (CNTs) era and has extraordinary optical, electronic and mechanical properties compared to CNTs. The 2D graphene is the sp2 carbon allotropes compared to other dimensionality. It also can be in three forms that are zero-dimensional, one-dimensional or three-dimensional. The different dimensionality also called fullerenes, nanotubes and graphite. Therefore, the graphene is known as centre potential materials in expanding research area than others ever. The 2cm × 2cm silicon wafer was seeded with nickel (Ni) at different thickness by using sputter coater. The palm oil, carbon source, was placed in the precursor furnace and the silicon was placed in the second furnace (deposition furnace). The palm oil will mix with Nitrogen gas was used as carrier gas in the CVD under certain temperature and pressure to undergo pyrolysis proses. The deposition temperature was set at 1000 °C. The deposition time varied from 3 minutes, 5 minutes and 7 minutes. The graphene was growth at ambient pressure in the CVD system. Electron microscopy and Raman Spectrometer revealed the structural properties and surface morphology of the grapheme on the substrate. The D and G band appear approximately at 1350 cm-1 and 1850 cm-1. It can be concluded that the growth of graphene varies at different deposition time.

  3. Kinetics of austenite grain growth in medium-carbon niobium-bearing steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-li ZHAO; Jie SHI; Wen-quan CAO; Mao-qiu WANG; Gang XIE

    2011-01-01

    In order to locate a reasonable heating system, the austenite grain growth behavior of Nb microalloyed medium carbon steel has been experimentally studied at various austenitizing temperatures and for different holding times. It is indicated that austenite grain growth increases with increasing austenitizing temperatures and holding times. Particularly when the austenitizing temperature was above 1100 ℃, austenite grains grew rapidly, and an abnormal austenite grain growth was observed. When the austenitizing temperature was lower than 1100 ℃, austenite grain size and growth rate were small. The activation energy of grain growth in the tested steel is 397 679.5 J/mol. To ensure an absence of coarse grains in microstructures, the heating technology of the tested steel should be controlled for 1 h at 1100 ℃. The relationships of austenite average grain size with soaking temperature and time of tested steel were obtained by mathematical calculation, and austenite average grain size was found to be in agreement with the measured size for different holding times.

  4. The contribution of foreign direct investment to clean energy use, carbon emissions and economic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper investigates the contributions of foreign direct investment (FDI) net inflows to clean energy use, carbon emissions, and economic growth. The paper employs cointegration tests to examine a long-run equilibrium relationship among the variables and fixed effects models to examine the magnitude of FDI contributions to the other variables. The paper analyzes panel data of 19 nations of the G20 from 1971 to 2009. The test results indicate that FDI has played an important role in economic growth for the G20 whereas it limits its impact on an increase in CO2 emissions in the economies. The research finds no compelling evidence of FDI link with clean energy use. Given the results, the paper discusses FDI's potential role in achieving green growth goals. - Highlights: ► FDI inflows strongly lead to economic growth in the G20. ► FDI inflows lead to an increase in energy use in the G20. ► FDI inflows are in no relation to CO2 emissions in the G20. ► FDI inflows are in no relation to clean energy use in the G20. ► Economic growth is in negative relation to CO2 emissions in the G20

  5. Influence of Ni Catalyst Layer and TiN Diffusion Barrier on Carbon Nanotube Growth Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mérel Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dense, vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes were synthesized on TiN electrode layers for infrared sensing applications. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and Ni catalyst were used for the nanotubes synthesis. The resultant nanotubes were characterized by SEM, AFM, and TEM. Since the length of the nanotubes influences sensor characteristics, we study in details the effects of changing Ni and TiN thickness on the physical properties of the nanotubes. In this paper, we report the observation of a threshold Ni thickness of about 4 nm, when the average CNT growth rate switches from an increasing to a decreasing function of increasing Ni thickness, for a process temperature of 700°C. This behavior is likely related to a transition in the growth mode from a predominantly “base growth” to that of a “tip growth.” For Ni layer greater than 9 nm the growth rate, as well as the CNT diameter, variations become insignificant. We have also observed that a TiN barrier layer appears to favor the growth of thinner CNTs compared to a SiO2 layer.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Dendritic Growth of Continuously Cast High Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiling; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2015-01-01

    Considering the influence of the latent heat released during the solidification of high carbon liquid steel, a cellular automaton (CA) model coupled with the heat transfer was developed to investigate the growth of equiaxed dendrites which is controlled by the solute diffusion during the continuous casting process. Additionally, the growth of columnar dendrites and primary dendrite arm spacings were predicted and measured. The results show that the CA model is able to describe the growth behavior of equiaxed dendrites, especially at 5 K to 7 K melt undercoolings, and the approach adjusting the cooling medium temperature is reliable to keep the undercooling condition stable for equiaxed dendrites although its hysteresis is reinforced as the pre-set undercooling increases. With the increase of the melt undercooling, the growth of equiaxed dendrites becomes faster, and the thickness of dendritic arms increases slightly, however, the thickness of the diffusion layer in front of dendritic tips keeps constant. The growth of thin and tiny columnar dendrites will be confined due to the competition and absorbed by neighboring strong columnar dendrites, giving rise to the coarsening of columnar dendrites, which is observed both from the experimental observation and the numerical simulation. With the decrease of the cooling intensity, columnar dendrites get sparser, primary dendrite arm spacings increase, and secondary dendritic arms become undeveloped.

  7. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Crystallite growth kinetics of TiO2 surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO prepared by a coprecipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TiO2 powder surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO was obtained. • Phase transformation from anatase to rutile was hindered by ZnO added. • Growth kinetic of anatase TiO2 nanocrystallites in T-9Z powders was described as: DA,92=2.42×105×exp(-39.9×103/RT). • Growth kinetic of rutile TiO2 nanocrystallites in T-9Z powders was described as: DR,92=8.49×105×exp(-47.6×103/RT) rutile TiO2. -- Abstract: The nanocrystallite growth of TiO2 surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO prepared by a coprecipitation process has been studied. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and UV–VIS–NIR spectrophotometry have been utilized to characterize the TiO2 nanocrystallites surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO (denoted by T-9Z). The DTA result shows that the anatase TiO2 first formed at 533 K and the completion of anatase TiO2 crystallization occurred at 745 K for the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders. XRD results reveal that the anatase and rutile TiO2 coexist when the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders were calcined at 523–973 K for 2 h. When the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders were calcined at 973 K for 2 h, rutile TiO2 was the major phase, and the minor phases were anatase TiO2 and Zn2Ti3O8. The phase was composed of the rutile TiO2 and Zn2TiO4 for the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders after calcination at 1273 K for 2 h. The growth kinetics of TiO2 nanocrystallites in T-9Z powders were described as: DA,92=2.42×105×exp(-39.9×103/RT)and DR,92=8.49×105×exp(-47.6×103/RT) for anatase and rutile TiO2 nanocrystallites respectively. The analysis results of UV/VIS/NIR spectra reveal that the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders after calcination have a red-shifted effect with increasing calcination temperature and can be used as a UVA-attenuating agent

  9. Influence of the Tussock Growth Form on Arctic Ecosystem Carbon Stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curasi, S.; Rocha, A. V.; Sonnentag, O.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Myers-Smith, I. H.; Fetcher, N.; Mack, M. C.; Natali, S.; Loranty, M. M.; Parker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of plant growth forms on ecosystem carbon (C) cycling has been under appreciated. In arctic tundra, environmental factors and plant traits of the sedge Eriophorum vaginatum cause the formation of mounds that are dense amalgamations of belowground C called tussocks. Tussocks have important implications for arctic ecosystem biogeochemistry and C stocks, but the environmental and biological factors controlling their size and distribution across the landscape are poorly understood. In order to better understand how landscape variation in tussock size and density impact ecosystem C stocks, we formed the Carbon in Arctic Tussock Tundra (CATT) network and recruited an international team to sample locations across the arctic. The CATT network provided a latitudinal and longitudinal gradient along which to improve our understanding of tussocks' influence on ecosystem structure and function. CATT data revealed important insights into tussock formation across the arctic. Tussock density generally declined with latitude, and tussock size exhibited substantial variation across sites. The relationship between height and diameter was similar across CATT sites indicating that both biological and environmental factors control tussock formation. At some sites, C in tussocks comprised a substantial percentage of ecosystem C stocks that may be vulnerable to climate change. It is concluded that the loss of this growth form would offset C gains from projected plant functional shifts from graminoid to shrub tundra. This work highlights the role of plant growth forms on the magnitude and retention of ecosystem C stocks.

  10. Crack-Growth Behavior of Laser Surface-Alloyed Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šturm, Roman; Žnidaršič, Matjaž; Grum, Janez

    2013-09-01

    Crack-growth behavior of Nd:YAG laser surface-alloyed as-received low-carbon steel Fe360B was evaluated. Thin surface layer was alloyed with silicon carbide SiC. During laser surface alloying process SiC powder dissolved in the melted pool. The surface-alloyed layer had as-solidified structure composed mainly of dendrites of ferrite, fine martensite needles, and retained austenite. The micro-hardness of the laser surface-alloyed layer was about 850 HV0.1. In laser surface-alloyed layer compressive residual stresses of average amount of σ RS = -100 MPa were obtained. In crack-growth tests comparison between specimens of as-received low-carbon steel Fe360B and the same steel with laser-alloyed surface was made. As the crack propagation was perpendicular to the interface between the laser-alloyed layers and the base metal, laser surface-alloyed specimens exhibited higher crack-growth resistance in the low stress intensity factor range Δ K th than as-received steel specimens.

  11. Effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University (DTU), Shahbad Daulatpur, Bawana Road, Delhi 110 042 (India)

    2015-04-15

    The present paper examines the effect of different carrier gases and their flow rates on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A theoretical model is developed incorporating the charging rate of the carbon nanotube, kinetics of all the plasma species, and the growth rate of the CNTs because of diffusion and accretion of ions on the catalyst nanoparticle. The three different carrier gases, i.e., argon (Ar), ammonia, and nitrogen, are considered in the present investigation, and flow rates of all the three carrier gases are varied individually (keeping the flow rates of hydrocarbon and hydrogen gas constant) to investigate the variations in the number densities of hydrocarbon and hydrogen ions in the plasma and their consequent effects on the height and radius of CNT. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that Ar favors the formation of CNTs with larger height and radius whereas ammonia contributes to better height of CNT but decreases the radius of CNT, and nitrogen impedes both the height and radius of CNT. The present work can serve to the better understanding of process parameters during growth of CNTs by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

  12. Effects of carbon nanotubes incorporation on the grain growth and properties of WC/Co nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Faming; Sun Jianfei; Shen Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)

    2005-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combining unique mechanical and physical properties could offer a kind of nanosized reinforcements for composite materials. Incorporating of CNTs to develop advance engineering composites has become an interesting concept, but the cermets based CNTs composites have been less focused. WC-Co-CNTs nanocomposites were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) to investigate the effects of CNTs incorporation on the grain growth and mechanical properties of WC-Co nanocomposites. Experimental results show that CNTs could preserve their tubular structures in high temperature SPS process, some CNTs are surviving in the WC-Co fracture surfaces featured bridging and pulling out manner. The interaction between the CNTs and the matrix has a retardation effect of grain growth of WC, but CNTs additions could be resulted in an increase of carbon content in the binder phase that causes enhanced tendency of grain growth, either of which plays the dominated role depending on the CNTs content. The WC-10Co-0.5wt% CNTs nanocomposites possess superior hardness to toughness combinations, which hardness is about 15% and fracture toughness is about 40% higher than that of the pure nano-WC-10Co cermets consolidated under the same process. (orig.)

  13. CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

    2009-01-01

    The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT “forests” have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel® foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 °C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel® electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of

  14. Low temperature plasma processing for cell growth inspired carbon thin films fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Piao, Jin Xiang; Jin, Su Bong; Lee, Jung Heon; Tajima, Satomi; Hori, Masaru; Han, Jeon Geon

    2016-09-01

    The recent bio-applications (i.e. bio-sensing, tissue engineering and cell proliferation etc.) are driving the fundamental research in carbon based materials with functional perspectives. High stability in carbon based coatings usually demands the high density deposition. However, the standard techniques, used for the large area and high throughput deposition of crystalline carbon films, often require very high temperature processing (typically >800 °C in inert atmosphere). Here, we present a low temperature (thermal treatments. It is found that the control over plasma power density and pulsed frequency governs the density and kinetic energy of carbon ions participating during the film growth. Subsequently, it controls the contents of sp(3) and sp(2) hybridizations via conversion of sp(2) to sp(3) hybridization by ion's energy relaxation. The role of plasma parameters on the chemical and surface properties are presented and correlated to the bio-activity. Bioactivity tests, carried out in mouse fibroblast L-929 and Sarcoma osteogenic (Saos-2) bone cell lines, demonstrate promising cell-proliferation in these films. PMID:27036854

  15. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon sinks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.; Zhu, J.; Hu, H.; Guo, Z.; Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.; Fang, J.

    2015-06-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area) and forest growth (increase in biomass density). Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms that control forest C sinks and is helpful for developing sustainable forest management policies in the face of climate change. Using the Forest Identity concept and forest inventory data, this study quantified the spatial and temporal changes in the relative contributions of forest areal expansion and increased biomass growth to China's forest C sinks from 1977 to 2008. Over the last 30 years, the areal expansion of forests was a larger contributor to C sinks than forest growth for all forests and planted forests in China (74.6 vs. 25.4 % for all forests, and 62.4 vs. 37.8 % for plantations). However, for natural forests, forest growth made a larger contribution than areal expansion (60.4 vs. 39.6 %). The relative contribution of forest growth of planted forests showed an increasing trend from an initial 25.3 to 61.0 % in the later period of 1998 to 2003, but for natural forests, the relative contributions were variable without clear trends owing to the drastic changes in forest area and biomass density over the last 30 years. Our findings suggest that afforestation can continue to increase the C sink of China's forests in the future subject to persistently-increasing forest growth after establishment of plantation.

  16. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon sinks in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area and forest growth (increase in biomass density. Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms that control forest C sinks and is helpful for developing sustainable forest management policies in the face of climate change. Using the Forest Identity concept and forest inventory data, this study quantified the spatial and temporal changes in the relative contributions of forest areal expansion and increased biomass growth to China's forest C sinks from 1977 to 2008. Over the last 30 years, the areal expansion of forests was a larger contributor to C sinks than forest growth for all forests and planted forests in China (74.6 vs. 25.4 % for all forests, and 62.4 vs. 37.8 % for plantations. However, for natural forests, forest growth made a larger contribution than areal expansion (60.4 vs. 39.6 %. The relative contribution of forest growth of planted forests showed an increasing trend from an initial 25.3 to 61.0 % in the later period of 1998 to 2003, but for natural forests, the relative contributions were variable without clear trends owing to the drastic changes in forest area and biomass density over the last 30 years. Our findings suggest that afforestation can continue to increase the C sink of China's forests in the future subject to persistently-increasing forest growth after establishment of plantation.

  17. Fullerenic particles for the growth of carbon nanowall-like flowers on multilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermoune, Abdeladim; Hilke, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of stacks of planar graphene layers with open edges that grow almost vertically on a substrate. Their morphology makes them a promising material for field emission, batteries, light absorbers and enhanced detectors for electrochemical and gas sensors. However, three main challenges prevent the fast development of CNWs: the synthesis is energetically demanding, poorly transferable to suitable substrates, and the growth mechanism is not understood. Here, we present a simple method to grow carbon nanowall-like flowers on multilayer graphene through fullerenic particles using thermal CVD and copper. The hydrophobicity of the fabricated hybrid material facilitates its transfer to any substrate. Our findings can boost the understanding of the physical properties and the practical applicability of CNWs. At the same time, our work is a concrete example of the role of multilayer graphene as a platform to one-step synthesis of new transferable graphenic materials.

  18. The growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on natural clay minerals (kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of clay minerals - kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite - is studied for synthesis of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes. Particles of iron were used as catalysts. Prior to synthesis, kaolinite and sepiolite were doped by the catalytically active metal, whereas in the case of nontronite the presence was used of this metal in the matrix of this mineral. Synthesis of CNTs was performed by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. The produced nanocomposites were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experiment verified the potential of the three microcrystalline phyllosilicates for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Under the same technology conditions, the type of catalyst carrier affects the morphology and structure of the nanotube product markedly.

  19. The study of growth of some biofilms on carbon steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the steps of growth of some biofilms on carbon steel metallic surfaces are emphasized. These biofilms are produced by bacteria that are usually present in Danube water, i.e. iron oxidizing bacteria and sulphate-reducing bacteria. The understanding of grown of the biofilms and of the way in which their containing microorganisms are involved in the initiation or acceleration of metallic surfaces corrosion constitutes one first step in finding some methods for diminishing or preventing the microbiologically induced corrosion. The tests consisted of a long time immersion (100 days) of some carbon steel samples (SA106gr.B) in inoculated media, and then the biofilms were studied by SEM technique. Also, the following aspects were monitored at the end of experiments: the macroscopic and microscopic aspect of the surfaces of metallic samples (metallographs made with a Neophot microscope); the gravimetric assessment of the change in weight of the coupons compared to their initial weight. (authors)

  20. Surface morphology stabilization by chemical sputtering in carbon nitride film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buijnsters, J G [Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vazquez, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-07

    We have studied the influence of chemical sputtering effects on the morphology of carbon nitride films grown on silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition. This study has been performed by comparing the evolution of their morphology with that of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown under similar conditions, where these effects are not present. When chemical sputtering effects operate we observe a film surface stabilization for length scales in the 60-750 nm range after a threshold roughness of about 3-4 nm has been developed. This stabilization is explained on the basis of the re-emission of nitrogen etching species, which is confirmed by growth experiments on microstructured substrates. (fast track communication)

  1. Controlled Growth of Semiconducting and Metallic Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be either semiconducting or metallic depending on their chiral angles and diameters. The use of SWCNTs in electronics has long been hindered by the fact that the as-prepared SWCNTs are usually a mixture of semiconducting and metallic ones. Therefore, controlled synthesis of SWCNTs with a uniform electrical type or even predefined chirality has been a focus of carbon nanotube research in recent years. In this Perspective, we summarize recent progress on the controlled growth of semiconducting and metallic SWCNTs by in situ selective etching and by novel catalyst design. The advantages and mechanisms of these approaches are analyzed, and the challenges are discussed. Finally, we predict possible breakthroughs and future trends in the controlled synthesis and applications of SWCNTs. PMID:27149629

  2. Contribution of radicals and ions in catalyzed growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes from low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a low-temperature, low-pressure reactive plasma is investigated using a multiscale numerical simulation, including the plasma sheath and surface diffusion modules. The plasma-related effects on the characteristics of SWCNT growth are studied. It is found that in the presence of reactive radicals in addition to energetic ions inside the plasma sheath area, the effective carbon flux, and the growth rate of SWCNT increase. It is shown that the concentration of atomic hydrogen and hydrocarbon radicals in the plasma plays an important role in the SWCNT growth. The effect of the effective carbon flux on the SWCNT growth rate is quantified. The dependence of the growth parameters on the substrate temperature is also investigated. The effects of the plasma sheath parameters on the growth parameters are different in low- and high-substrate temperature regimes. The optimum substrate temperature and applied DC bias are estimated to maximize the growth rate of the single-walled carbon nanotubes

  3. Contribution of radicals and ions in catalyzed growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes from low-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvi, Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, and Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Xu, S. [Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, and Institute of Advanced Studies, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Foroutan, G. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sahand University of Technology, 51335-1996 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ostrikov, K. [Institute for Future Environments and School of Chemistry, Physics, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience Center Australia (PNCA), Manufacturing Flagship, CSIRO, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); School of Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    The growth kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a low-temperature, low-pressure reactive plasma is investigated using a multiscale numerical simulation, including the plasma sheath and surface diffusion modules. The plasma-related effects on the characteristics of SWCNT growth are studied. It is found that in the presence of reactive radicals in addition to energetic ions inside the plasma sheath area, the effective carbon flux, and the growth rate of SWCNT increase. It is shown that the concentration of atomic hydrogen and hydrocarbon radicals in the plasma plays an important role in the SWCNT growth. The effect of the effective carbon flux on the SWCNT growth rate is quantified. The dependence of the growth parameters on the substrate temperature is also investigated. The effects of the plasma sheath parameters on the growth parameters are different in low- and high-substrate temperature regimes. The optimum substrate temperature and applied DC bias are estimated to maximize the growth rate of the single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  4. Energy consumption-economic growth relationship and carbon dioxide emissions in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper applies the panel unit root, heterogeneous panel cointegration and panel-based dynamic OLS to re-investigate the co-movement and relationship between energy consumption and economic growth for 30 provinces in mainland China from 1985 to 2007. The empirical results show that there is a positive long-run cointegrated relationship between real GDP per capita and energy consumption variables. Furthermore, we investigate two cross-regional groups, namely the east China and west China groups, and get more important results and implications. In the long-term, a 1% increase in real GDP per capita increases the consumption of energy by approximately 0.48-0.50% and accordingly increases the carbon dioxide emissions by about 0.41-0.43% in China. The economic growth in east China is energy-dependent to a great extent, and the income elasticity of energy consumption in east China is over 2 times that of the west China. At present, China is subject to tremendous pressures for mitigating climate change issues. It is possible that the GDP per capita elasticity of carbon dioxide emissions would be controlled in a range from 0.2 to 0.3 by the great effort. - Research Highlights: → The long-run cointegrated relationship between real GDP per capita and energy consumption in China is examined. → GDP per capita elasticity of carbon dioxide emissions is estimated. → Economic growth in east China is energy-dependent to a great extent, and relies on the consumption of the energy more than the west China.

  5. Evolution of graphene growth on Cu and Ni studied by carbon isotope labeling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xuesong; Cai, Weiwei; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2009-01-01

    Large-area graphene is a new material with properties that make it desirable for advanced scaled electronic devices1. Recently, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene and few-layer graphene using hydrocarbons on metal substrates such as Ni and Cu has shown to be a promising technique2-5. It has been proposed in recent publications that graphene growth on Ni occurs by C segregation2 or precipitation3, while that on Cu is by surface adsorption5. In this letter, we used a carbon isotope lab...

  6. Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Large Scale by Methane Decomposition with Deactivation Inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yu; Zhili Li; Cheng Zhang; Feng Peng; Hongjuan Wang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of additives containing iron or nickel during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by methane decomposition on Mo/MgO catalyst were investigated. Ferrocene and nickel nitrate were introduced as deactivation inhibitors by in-situ evaporation during CVD. The precisely controlled in-situ introduction of these inhibitors increased the surface renewal of catalyst, and therefore prevented the catalyst from deactivation. Using this method, aligned multi-walled CNTs with parallel mesopores can be produced on a large scale.

  7. The effect of carbon dioxide on growth of juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran, Damian; Støttrup, Josianne

    2011-01-01

    substantially reduced with increasing CO2 dosage. The size-specific growth trajectories of fish reared under the medium and high CO2 treatments were approximately 2.5 and 7.5 times lower (respectively) than that of fish in the low treatment. Size variance and mortality rate was not significantly different...... experiments using marine fish species. The test concentrations were recalculated from the reported carbonate chemistry conditions, and indicated that the CO2 concentration effect threshold may have been overestimated in two of these studies. Our study suggests that juvenile Atlantic cod are more susceptible...

  8. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant–microbe interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Nicole E.; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H.; Norton, Jeanette M.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant–soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant–microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant–soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1...

  9. Understanding the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes via the ``cluster volume to surface area" model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandati, Sreekanth; Kunstmann, Jens; Boerrnert, Felix; Schoenfelder, Ronny; Ruemmeli, Mark; Kar, Kamal K.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2010-03-01

    The influence of mixed catalysts for the high yield production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been studied systematically. Based on extensive experimental data a ``Catalyst Volume to Surface Area'' (CVSA) model was developed to understand the influence of the process parameters on the yield and CNT diameter distribution [1]. In our study, we present a refined version of the CVSA model developed by combining experiments and simulations. We discuss our current understanding of the growth mechanism and how the model might be used to increase CNT yields by using mixed catalysts.[4pt] [1] S. Tetali et al., ACS Nano (2009), DOI: 10.1021/nn9012548.

  10. A Novel Catalyst Deposition Technique for the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, A.; Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a technique at NASA's Ames Research Center by which carbon nanotubes (NT) can be grown. The project had several goals which included: 1) scaleability, 2) ability to control single wall nanotube (SWNT) and multiwall nanotube (MWNT) formation, 3) ability to control the density of nanotubes as they grow, 4) ability to apply standard masking techniques for NT patterning. Information regarding the growth technique includes its use of a catalyst deposition process. SWNTs of varying thicknesses can be grown by changing the catalyst composition. Demonstrations are given of various methods of masking including the use of transmission electron microscopic (TEM) grids.

  11. Shock tube measurements of growth constants in the branched-chain ethane-carbon monoxide-oxygen system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, R. S.; Brabbs, T. A.; Snyder, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Exponential free radical growth constants have been measured for ethane carbon monoxide oxygen mixtures by monitoring the growth of oxygen atom concentration as manifested by CO flame band emission. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 1200 to 1700 K. The data were analyzed using an ethane oxidation mechanism involving seven elementary reaction steps. Calculated growth constants were close to experimental values at lower temperatures, up to about 1400 K, but at higher temperatures computed growth constants were considerably smaller than experiment. In attempts to explain these results additional branching reactions were added to the mechanism. However, these additional reactions did not appreciably change calculated growth constants.

  12. Carbon out-diffusion mechanism for direct graphene growth on a silicon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct growth of graphene on silicon (Si) through chemical vapor deposition has predominantly focused on surface-mediated processes due to the low carbon (C) solubility in Si. However, a considerable quantity of C atoms was incorporated in Si and formed Si1−xCx alloy with a reduced lattice dimension even in the initial stage of direct graphene growth. Subsequent high temperature annealing promoted active C out-diffusion, resulting in the formation of a graphitic layer on the Si surface. Furthermore, the significantly low thermal conductivity of the Si1−xCx alloy shows that the incorporated C atoms affect the properties of a semiconductor adjacent to the graphene. These findings provide a key guideline for controlling desirable properties of graphene and designing hybrid semiconductor/graphene architectures for various applications

  13. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  14. STUDY ON FATIGUE SHORT CRACK GROWTH LAW AND FATIGUE LIFE FOR MEDIUM CARBON STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation from notch root and the short-crack growth laws of two medium carbon alloying structural steels-35CrMo and 42CrMo are investigated under the different stress ratios R=0.1, 0.3) and three-point bending condition. The relationships between the maximum stress range at the notch root Δσmax and the number of cycles before fatigue crack initiation Ni are determined. The threshold stresses of fatigue crack initiation (Δσmax)th are got, and the smallcrack growth laws are obtained for these steels. An effective and convenient method is proposed for predicting the fatigue life of the notch specimens.

  15. CVD-grown horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis routes and growth mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attractive electrical and physical properties, which make them very promising for use in various applications. For some applications however, in particular those involving electronics, SWCNTs need to be synthesized with a high degree of control with respect to yield, length, alignment, diameter, and chirality. With this in mind, a great deal of effort is being directed to the precision control of vertically and horizontally aligned nanotubes. In this review the focus is on the latter, horizontally aligned tubes grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The reader is provided with an in-depth review of the established vapor deposition orientation techniques. Detailed discussions on the characterization routes, growth parameters, and growth mechanisms are also provided. PMID:22619167

  16. Growth of small diameter multi-walled carbon nanotubes by arc discharge process

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Chaudhary, K.; J., Ali; P. Yupapin, P.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are grown by arc discharge method in a controlled methane environment. The arc discharge is produced between two graphite electrodes at the ambient pressures of 100 torr, 300 torr, and 500 torr. Arc plasma parameters such as temperature and density are estimated to investigate the influences of the ambient pressure and the contributions of the ambient pressure to the growth and the structure of the nanotubes. The plasma temperature and density are observed to increase with the increase in the methane ambient pressure. The samples of MWCNT synthesized at different ambient pressures are analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. An increase in the growth of MWCNT and a decrease in the inner tube diameter are observed with the increase in the methane ambient pressure.

  17. Concentration gradient induced morphology evolution of silica nanostructure growth on photoresist-derived carbon micropatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Tielin; Xi, Shuang; Lai, Wuxing; Liu, Shiyuan; Li, Xiaoping; Tang, Zirong

    2012-09-01

    The evolution of silica nanostructure morphology induced by local Si vapor source concentration gradient has been investigated by a smart design of experiments. Silica nanostructure or their assemblies with different morphologies are obtained on photoresist-derived three-dimensional carbon microelectrode array. At a temperature of 1,000°C, rope-, feather-, and octopus-like nanowire assemblies can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. While at 950°C, stringlike assemblies, bamboo-like nanostructures with large joints, and hollow structures with smaller sizes can be obtained along with the Si vapor source concentration gradient flow. Both vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-quasiliquid-solid growth mechanisms have been applied to explain the diverse morphologies involving branching, connecting, and batch growth behaviors. The present approach offers a potential method for precise design and controlled synthesis of nanostructures with different features.

  18. Growth of Pd-Filled Carbon Nanotubes on the Tip of Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Sakamoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized Pd-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs oriented perpendicular to Si substrates using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD for the application of scanning probe microscopy (SPM tip. Prior to the CVD growth, Al thin film (10 nm was coated on the substrate as a buffer layer followed by depositing a 5∼40 nm-thick Pd film as a catalyst. The diameter and areal density of CNTs grown depend largely on the initial Pd thickness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM images clearly show that Pd is successfully encapsulated into the CNTs, probably leading to higher conductivity. Using optimum growth conditions, Pd-filled CNTs are successfully grown on the apex of the conventional SPM cantilever.

  19. Homogeneous water nucleation and droplet growth in methane and carbon dioxide mixtures at 235 K and 10 bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holten, V; van Dongen, M E H

    2010-05-28

    Homogeneous nucleation rates and droplet growth rates of water in pure methane and mixtures of methane and carbon dioxide were measured in an expansion wave tube at 235 K and 10 bar. The nucleation rate in pure methane is three orders of magnitude higher than literature nucleation rates of water in low-pressure helium or argon. Addition of carbon dioxide to the carrier gas mixture increases the rates even more. Specifically, rates in a mixture of methane and 3% carbon dioxide are a factor of 10 higher than the rates in pure methane. With 25% carbon dioxide, the rates are four orders of magnitude higher than the rates in pure methane. An application of the nucleation theorem shows that the critical cluster consists of 22 water molecules and 5 methane molecules, for nucleation in pure methane. Growth rates of water droplets were measured in methane and in methane-carbon dioxide mixtures at 243 K and 11.5 bar. At equal temperature, pressure and water vapor fraction, the growth rate of the squared droplet radius is about 20% lower in the mixture with 25% carbon dioxide than in pure methane. The lower growth rate is caused by a smaller diffusion coefficient of water in the mixture with carbon dioxide; the difference of the diffusion coefficients is qualitatively reproduced by the empirical Fuller correlation combined with Blanc's law. PMID:20515097

  20. Solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires promoted by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An array of well aligned and uniform CNTs is successfully fabricated by PECVD. • SiONW growth utilizes Si substrate as the source, ruling out the usage of silane. • With CNT array on the substrate, SiONW growth is improved significantly. • CNTs help dispersion of the catalysts and diffusion of the Si atoms. - Abstract: We report a method to promote solid source growth of Si oxide nanowires (SiONWs) by using an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It starts with the fabrication of CNT array by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on Si wafers, followed by growth of SiONWs. Herein, CNTs serve as a scaffold, which helps the dispersion of catalysts for SiONWs and also provides space for hydrogen which boosts the diffusion of Si atoms and hence formation of SiONWs. As the result, a three dimensional (3D) hybrid network of densely packed SiONWs and CNTs can be produced rapidly

  1. Growth and sporulation of Trichoderma polysporum on organic substrates by addition of carbon and nitrogen sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the present study nine different organic substrates viz., rice grains, sorghum grains, wheat grains, millet grains, wheat straw, rice husk, cow dung, sawdust and poultry manure were used for mass multiplication of Trichoderma polysporum. Grains, especially sorghum grains were found to be the best substrate for T. polysporum. Wheat straw and rice husk were less suitable, whereas, cow dung, sawdust and poultry manure were not suitable for growth of the fungus. Sucrose at the rate of 30,000 ppm and ammonium nitrate at the rate of 3,000 ppm were found to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources for growth and sporulation of T. polysporum. Amendment of the selected C and N sources to wheat straw, rice husk and millet grains resulted in significantly higher growth and conidia production by T. polysporum as compared to un-amended substrates. Sorghum and rice grains showed suppression in growth and sporulation of T. polysporum when amended with C and N sources. During studies on shelf life, populations of T. polysporum attained the peck at 60-135 days intervals on different substrates and declined gradually thereafter. However, even after 330 days, the populations were greater than the population at 0-day. At 345-360 days interval, populations were less than the initial populations at 0- days. Shelf life on C+N amended wheat straw and rice husk were more as compared to un-amended substrates. (author)

  2. Reliable Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays by Chemical Vapor Deposition and In-situ Measurement of Fundamental Growth Kinetics in Oxygen-free Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    IN, JUNG BIN

    2011-01-01

    Vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays are both an important technological system, and a fascinating system for studying basic principles of nanomaterial synthesis. However, despite continuing efforts for the past decade, important questions about this process remain largely unexplained. Recently, nanotube research investigations have been conducted, aiming at revealing the underlying growth mechanisms, rather than merely studying the feasibility on new growth methods. Nonetheless,...

  3. Modifications in membrane fatty acid composition of Salmonella typhimurium in response to growth conditions and their effect on heat resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; López, Mercedes; Arenas, Ricardo; Bernardo, Ana

    2008-04-30

    The effects of growth temperature (in the range 10-45 degrees C) and acidification up to pH 4.5 of the culture medium (Brain Heart Infusion, BHI) with different organic acids (acetic, citric and lactic) and hydrochloric acid on membrane fatty acid composition and heat resistance of Salmonella typhimurium CECT 443 were studied. The heat resistance was maximal in cells grown at 45 degrees C (cells grown in non-acidified BHI showed a D58-value of 0.90 min) and decreased with decreasing growth temperature up to 10 degrees C (D58-value of 0.09 min). The growth of cells in acidified media caused an increase in their heat resistance. In general, acid adapted cells showed D-values of between 1.5 and 2 times higher than the corresponding for non-acid adapted control cells. This cross-protection response, which has important implications in food processing, was not dependent on the pH value and the acid used to acidify the growth medium. A membrane adaptation corresponding to an increase in the unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (UFA/SFA) and membrane fluidity was observed at low growth temperature. Moreover, the acidification of the growth medium caused a decrease in UFA/SFA ratio and in the C18:1 relative concentration, and an increase in cyclopropane fatty acids (CFA) content mainly due to the increase in cyc19 relative concentration. Thus, acid adapted cells showed CFA levels 1.5 times higher than non-acid adapted control cells. A significant proportion of unsaturated fatty acids were converted to their cyclopropane derivatives during acid adaptation. These changes in membrane fatty acid composition result in cells with decreased membrane fluidity. A clear relation between membrane fatty acid composition and heat resistance was observed. In general, D-values were maximum for cells with low UFA/SFA ratio, and, consequently, with low membrane fluidity. Moreover, CFA formation played a major role in protecting acid adapted cells from heat inactivation. However

  4. Effects of Surface Modification of Nanodiamond Particles for Nucleation Enhancement during Its Film Growth by Microwave Plasma Jet Chemical Vapour Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Ruey Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The seedings of the substrate with a suspension of nanodiamond particles (NDPs were widely used as nucleation seeds to enhance the growth of nanostructured diamond films. The formation of agglomerates in the suspension of NDPs, however, may have adverse impact on the initial growth period. Therefore, this paper was aimed at the surface modification of the NDPs to enhance the diamond nucleation for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films which could be used in photovoltaic applications. Hydrogen plasma, thermal, and surfactant treatment techniques were employed to improve the dispersion characteristics of detonation nanodiamond particles in aqueous media. The seeding of silicon substrate was then carried out with an optimized spin-coating method. The results of both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated that plasma treated diamond nanoparticles possessed polar surface functional groups and attained high dispersion in methanol. The nanocrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma jet chemical vapour deposition exhibited extremely fine grain and high smooth surfaces (~6.4 nm rms on the whole film. These results indeed open up a prospect of nanocrystalline diamond films in solar cell applications.

  5. Growth inhibitory response and ultrastructural modification of oral-associated candidal reference strains (ATCC) by Piper betle L. extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohd-Al-Faisal Nordin; Wan Himratul-Aznita Wan Harun; Fathilah Abdul Razak; Md Yusoff Musa

    2014-01-01

    Candida species have been associated with the emergence of strains resistant to selected antifungal agents. Plant products have been used traditionally as alternative medicine to ease mucosal fungal infections. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper betle extract on the growth profile and the ultrastructure of commonly isolated oral candidal cells. The major component of P. betle was identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (LC-MS/MS). Seven ATCC control strains of Candida species were cultured in yeast peptone dextrose broth under four different growth environments:(i) in the absence of P. betle extract;and in the presence of P. betle extract at respective concentrations of (ii) 1 mg?mL21;(iii) 3 mg?mL21;and (iv) 6 mg?mL21. The growth inhibitory responses of the candidal cells were determined based on changes in the specific growth rates (m). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe any ultrastructural alterations in the candida colonies. LC-MS/MS was performed to validate the presence of bioactive compounds in the extract. Following treatment, it was observed that the m-values of the treated cells were significantly different than those of the untreated cells (P,0.05), indicating the fungistatic properties of the P. betle extract. The candidal population was also reduced from an average of 13.443106 to 1.783106 viable cell counts (CFU)?mL21. SEM examination exhibited physical damage and considerable morphological alterations of the treated cells. The compound profile from LC-MS/MS indicated the presence of hydroxybenzoic acid, chavibetol and hydroxychavicol in P. betle extract. The effects of P. betle on candida cells could potentiate its antifungal activity.

  6. Evaluation and Modification of Commercial Dry Powder Inhalers for the Aerosolization of a Submicrometer Excipient Enhanced Growth (EEG) Formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Longest, P. Worth; Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and modify commercial dry powder inhalers (DPIs) for the aerosolization of a submicrometer excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation. The optimized device and formulation combination was then tested in a realistic in vitro mouth-throat - tracheobronchial (MT-TB) model. An optimized EEG submicrometer powder formulation, consisting of albuterol sulfate (drug), mannitol (hygroscopic excipient), L-leucine (dispersion enhancer) and poloxamer 188 (surfactant)...

  7. Modification of the Technical Properties of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 by Supplementing the Growth Medium with Unsaturated Fatty Acids ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Sybesma, W. F. H.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of supplementing growth medium with unsaturated fatty acids on the technical properties of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533, such as heat and acid tolerance, and inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. Our results showed that the membrane composition and morphology of L. johnsonii NCC 533 were significantly changed by supplementing a minimal Lactobacillus medium with oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. The ratio of saturated to unsaturated plus cyclic fatty acids in the bacterial membrane decreased by almost 2-fold when minimal medium was supplemented with unsaturated fatty acids (10 μg/ml). The subsequent acid and heat tolerance of L. johnsonii decreased by 6- and 20-fold when the strain was grown in the presence of linoleic and linolenic acids, respectively, compared with growth in oleic acid (all at 10 μg/ml). Following acid exposure, significantly higher (P < 0.05) oleic acid content was detected in the membrane when growth medium was supplemented with linoleic or linolenic acid, indicating that saturation of the membrane fatty acids occurred during acid stress. Cell integrity was determined in real time during stressed conditions using a fluorescent viability kit in combination with flow cytometric analysis. Following heat shock (at 62.5°C for 5 min), L. johnsonii was unable to form colonies; however, 60% of the bacteria showed no cell integrity loss, which could indicate that the elevated heat inactivated vital processes within the cell, rendering it incapable of replication. Furthermore, L. johnsonii grown in fatty acid-enriched minimal medium had different adhesion properties and caused a 2-fold decrease in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1-lux invasion of HT-29 epithelial cells compared with bacteria grown in minimal medium alone. This could be related to changes in the hydrophobicity and fluidity of the membrane. Our study shows that technical

  8. Degradation-by-design: Surface modification with functional substrates that enhance the enzymatic degradation of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshbabu, Adukamparai Rajukrishnan; Kurapati, Rajendra; Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bartolini, Isacco; Meneghetti, Moreno; Kostarelos, Kostas; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Biodegradation of carbon-based nanomaterials has been pursued intensively in the last few years, as one of the most crucial issues for the design of safe, clinically relevant conjugates for biomedical applications. In this paper it is demonstrated that specific functional molecules can enhance the catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) for the degradation of carbon nanotubes. Two different azido coumarins and one cathecol derivative are linked to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These molecules are good reducing substrates and strong redox mediators to enhance the catalytic activity of HRP. XO, known to metabolize various molecules mainly in the mammalian liver, including human, was instead used to test the biodegradability of MWCNTs modified with an azido purine. The products of the biodegradation process are characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that coumarin and catechol moieties have enhanced the biodegradation of MWCNTs compared to oxidized nanotubes, likely due to the capacity of these substrates to better interact with and activate HRP. Although azido purine-MWCNTs are degraded less effectively by XO than oxidized nanotubes, the data uncover the importance of XO in the biodegradation of carbon-nanomaterials leading to their better surface engineering for biomedical applications. PMID:26342557

  9. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    in the mid-IR range (800 to 7000 cm(-1)) also showed no significant changes in either the real or the imaginary parts of the refractive indices for brown carbon aerosol particles when compared to ammonium sulfate. Therefore, changes in the optical properties of ammonium sulfate in the mid-IR spectral range due to reaction with methylglyoxal appear to be insignificant. In addition to these measurements, we have characterized additional physicochemical properties of the brown carbon aerosol particles including hygroscopic growth using a tandem-differential mobility analyzer. Compared to ammonium sulfate, brown carbon aerosol particles are found to have lower deliquescence relative humidity (DRH), efflorescence relative humidity (ERH), and hygroscopic growth at the same relative humidities. Overall, our study provides new details of the optical and physicochemical properties of a class of secondary organic aerosol which may have important implications for atmospheric chemistry and climate. PMID:27253434

  10. Vitamin B12: one carbon metabolism, fetal growth and programming for chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, E C; Katre, P; Yajnik, C S

    2014-01-01

    This review brings together human and animal studies and reviews that examine the possible role of maternal vitamin B12 (B12) on fetal growth and its programming for susceptibility to chronic disease. A selective literature review was undertaken to identify studies and reviews that investigate these issues, particularly in the context of a vegetarian diet that may be low in B12 and protein and high in carbohydrate. Evidence is accumulating that maternal B12 status influences fetal growth and development. Low maternal vitamin B12 status and protein intake are associated with increased risk of neural tube defect, low lean mass and excess adiposity, increased insulin resistance, impaired neurodevelopment and altered risk of cancer in the offspring. Vitamin B12 is a key nutrient associated with one carbon metabolic pathways related to substrate metabolism, synthesis and stability of nucleic acids and methylation of DNA which regulates gene expression. Understanding of factors regulating maternal-fetal one carbon metabolism and its role in fetal programming of non communicable diseases could help design effective interventions, starting with maternal nutrition before conception. PMID:24219896

  11. Growth of CuPd nanoalloys encapsulated in carbon-shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H. Y.; Wang, H. P., E-mail: wanghp@mail.ncku.edu.tw [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Environmental Engineering (China)

    2013-05-15

    Preparation of nanostructured copper-palladium (CuPd) alloys is getting more attention because specific catalytic properties can be tuned by controlling their composition, size, and shape. Thus, a better understanding especially in the formation mechanism of the CuPd nanoalloys is of great importance in designing the catalysts. Growth of CuPd nanoalloys encapsulated in carbon-shell (CuPd-C) was, therefore, studied by in situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering during temperature-programed carbonization (TPC) of the Cu{sup 2+}- and Pd{sup 2+}-{beta}-cyclodextrin complexes. A rapid reduction of Cu{sup 2+} and Pd{sup 2+} with nucleation is found at the temperatures of <423 K, followed by coalescence at 453-573 K. The well-dispersed CuPd nanoalloys having the sizes of 7.6-7.9 nm in diameter are encapsulated in carbon-shell of 1.4-1.8 nm in thickness. The refined extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra indicate that the bond distances of the first-shell Cu-Pd are 2.61-2.64 A with the coordination numbers of 5.1-5.6. A homogeneous CuPd alloy at the Cu/Pd atomic ratio of 1 is observed. Note that at the high Cu/Pd ratio, Cu is enriched on the CuPd nanoalloy surfaces, attributable to the relatively low surface free energy of Cu.

  12. Growth-related Metabolism of the Carbon Storage Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmaier, Nadine; Schunder, Eva; Kutzner, Erika; Tlapák, Hana; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Herrmann, Vroni; Stämmler, Maren; Lasch, Peter; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heuner, Klaus

    2016-03-18

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease, has a biphasic life cycle with a switch from a replicative to a transmissive phenotype. During the replicative phase, the bacteria grow within host cells in Legionella-containing vacuoles. During the transmissive phenotype and the postexponential (PE) growth phase, the pathogens express virulence factors, become flagellated, and leave the Legionella-containing vacuoles. Using (13)C labeling experiments, we now show that, under in vitro conditions, serine is mainly metabolized during the replicative phase for the biosynthesis of some amino acids and for energy generation. During the PE phase, these carbon fluxes are reduced, and glucose also serves as an additional carbon substrate to feed the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybuyrate (PHB), an essential carbon source for transmissive L. pneumophila. Whole-cell FTIR analysis and comparative isotopologue profiling further reveal that a putative 3-ketothiolase (Lpp1788) and a PHB polymerase (Lpp0650), but not enzymes of the crotonyl-CoA pathway (Lpp0931-0933) are involved in PHB metabolism during the PE phase. However, the data also reflect that additional bypassing reactions for PHB synthesis exist in agreement with in vivo competition assays using Acanthamoeba castellannii or human macrophage-like U937 cells as host cells. The data suggest that substrate usage and PHB metabolism are coordinated during the life cycle of the pathogen. PMID:26792862

  13. Electrochemical study on screen-printed carbon electrodes with modification by iron nanoparticles in Fe(CN)(6) (4-/3-) redox system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shyh-Hwang; Fang, Hung-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Chang; Lin, Hong-Ming; Chang, C Allen

    2005-10-01

    The remarkable enhancement of electron transfer on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) with modification by iron nanoparticles (Fe(nano)), coupled with Fe(CN)(6) (4-/3-) redox species, was characterized with an increase of electroactive area (A (ea)) at electrode surface together with a decrease of heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k degrees ) in the system. Hence, Fe(nano)-Fe(CN)(6) (3-) SPCEs with deposition of glucose oxidase (GOD) demonstrated a higher sensitivity to various glucose concentrations than Fe(CN)(6) (3-)/GOD-deposited SPCEs. In addition, an inhibited diffusion current from cyclic voltammograms was also observed with an increase in redox concentration and complicated the estimation of A (ea). Further analysis by the electrochemical impedance method, it was shown that this effect might be resulted from the electrode surface blocking by the products of activated complex decomposition. PMID:16136306

  14. Dietary intake, growth and development of children with ADHD in a randomized clinical trial of Ritalin and Melatonin co-administration: Through circadian cycle modification or appetite enhancement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Ali Mostafavi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is postulated that ritalin may adversely affect sleep, appetite, weight and growth of some children with ADHD. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate melatonin supplementation effects on dietary intake, growth and development of children with ADHD treated with ritalin through circadian cycle modification and appetite mechanisms.Method: After obtaining consent from parents, 50 children aged 7-12 with combined form of AD/HD were randomly divided into two groups based on gender blocks: one received melatonin (3 or 6 mg based on weight combined with ritalin (1mg/kg and the other took placebo combined with ritalin (1mg/kg in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Three-day food record, and standard weight and height of children were evaluated prior to the treatment and 8 weeks after the treatment. Children’s appetite and sleep were evaluated in weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8. Hypotheses were then analyzed using SPSS17.Results: Paired sample t-test showed significant changes in sleep latency (23.15±15.25 vs. 17.96±11.66; p=0.047 and total sleep disturbance score (48.84±13.42 vs. 41.30±9.67; p=0.000 before and after melatonin administration, respectively. However, appetite and food intake did not change significantly during the study. Sleep duration and appetite were significantly correlated in melatonin group (Pearson r=0.971, p=0.029. Mean height (138.28±16.24 vs. 141.35±16.78; P=0.000 and weight (36.73±17.82 vs. 38.97±17.93; P=0.005 were significantly increased in melatonin treated children before and after the trial.Conclusion: Administration of melatonin along with ritalin improves height and weight growth of children. These effects may be attributed to circadian cycle modification, increasing sleep duration and the consequent more growth hormone release during sleep.

  15. In Situ TEM Observations on the Sulfur-Assisted Catalytic Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Li, Shisheng; Shi, Chao; Cong, Hong-Tao; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-04-17

    The effect of sulfur on the catalytic nucleation and growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from an iron catalyst was investigated in situ by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalyst precursor of ferrocene and growth promoter of sulfur were selectively loaded inside of the hollow core of multiwall CNTs with open ends, which served as a nanoreactor powered by applying a voltage inside of the chamber of a TEM. It was found that a SWCNT nucleated and grew perpendicularly from a region of the catalyst nanoparticle surface, instead of the normal tangential growth that occurs with no sulfur addition. Our in situ TEM observation combined with CVD growth studies suggests that sulfur functions to promote the nucleation and growth of SWCNTs by forming inhomogeneous local active sites and modifying the interface bonding between catalysts and precipitated graphitic layers, so that carbon caps can be lifted off from the catalyst particle. PMID:26269989

  16. Growth of uniform thin-walled carbon nanotubes with spin-coated Fe catalyst and the correlation between the pre-growth catalyst size and the nanotube diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and double-walled CNTs with a selectivity of 93 % were obtained by means of the novel homemade iron catalysts which were spin coated on silicon wafer. The average diameters of the iron particles prepared from the colloidal solutions containing 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 mmol/L of iron nitrate were 8.2, 5.1, 20.8, 32.2, and 34.7 nm, respectively, and growing thin-walled CNTs with the average diameters of 4.1, 2.2, 9.2, 11.1, and 18.1 nm, respectively. The diameters of the CNTs were correlated with the geometric sizes of the pre-growth catalyst particles. Thin-walled CNTs were found to have a catalyst mean diameter-to-CNT average diameter ratio of 2.31. Iron carbide was formed after the growth of CNTs, and it is believed that during the growth of CNTs, carbon source decomposed and deposited on the surface of catalyst, followed by the diffusion of surface carbon into the iron catalyst particles, resulting in carbon supersaturation state before the growth of CNTs.

  17. Modification of carbon-coated TiO2 by iron to increase adsorptivity and photoactivity for phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryba, B; Toyoda, M; Morawski, A W; Inagaki, M

    2005-07-01

    Carbon-coated TiO(2) modified by iron, were prepared from TiO(2) of anatase structure and PET modified by FeC(2)O(4). Catalysts were prepared by mixing powders of TiO(2) and modified PET and heating at different temperatures, from 400 to 800 degrees C under flow of Ar gas. High adsorption of phenol was observed on the catalyst heated at 400 degrees C, confirmed by FT-IR analysis. On this catalyst, fast rate of phenol decomposition was achieved by addition of small amount of H(2)O(2) to the reaction mixture. Phenol decomposition proceeded mainly through the direct oxidation of phenol species adsorbed on the catalyst surface due to the photo-Fenton reaction. Iron-modified carbon-coated TiO(2) catalysts heated at 500-800 degrees C showed almost no phenol adsorption or oxidation. PMID:15950040

  18. The Effect of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride Modification by Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles on Photocatalytic Degradation of 1,3-Dinitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ershad Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, well ordered, mesoporous carbon nitride (MCN sorbent with uniform mesoporous wall, high surface area and pore volume has been fabricated using the simple polymerization reaction between ethylene diamine and carbon tetrachloride in mesoporous silica media, and then modified by TiO2 nanoparticles (Ti-MCN. The structural order and textural properties of the nanoporous materials were studied by XRD, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption experiments. Photodegradation experiments for 1,3-dinitrobenzene were conducted in batch mode, the Ti-MCN catalysts were found to be more active compared to the free TiO2 nanoparticles for 1,3-dinitrobenzene degradation.

  19. Modification of g-C3N4 nanosheets by carbon quantum dots for highly efficient photocatalytic generation of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kui; Su, Feng-Yun; Zhang, Wei-De

    2016-07-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) were deposited onto graphite-like carbon nitride nanosheets (CNNS) to form CNNS/CQDs composites. The prepared CNNS/CQDs composites exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation than pure CNNS do. The CNNS/CQDs-7 sample displays the highest photocatalytic performance, with H2 production rate of 116.1 μmol h-1, which is three times of that over pure CNNS (37.8 μmol h-1). Photoluminescence spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical (PEC) analysis reveal that the CQDs are favorable for trapping electrons and promoting the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in CNNS. A possible photocatalytic mechanism of the enhanced photocatalytic performance for H2 generation over CNNS/CQDs will be proposed in this paper.

  20. Antifungal activity of clotrimazole against Candida albicans depends on carbon sources, growth phase and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lydia; Miramón, Pedro; Jablonowski, Nadja; Wisgott, Stephanie; Wilson, Duncan; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, a superficial infection caused predominantly by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, is frequently treated with clotrimazole. Some drug formulations contain lactate for improved solubility. Lactate may modify C. albicans physiology and drug sensitivity by serving as a carbon source for the fungus and/or affecting local pH. Here, we explored the effects of lactate, in combination with pH changes, on C. albicans proliferation, morphology and clotrimazole sensitivity. Moreover, we determined the influence of growth phase and morphology per se on drug sensitivity. We showed that utilization of lactate as a carbon source did not promote fast fungal proliferation or filamentation. Lactate had no influence on clotrimazole-mediated killing of C. albicans in standard fungal cultivation medium but had an additive effect on the fungicidal clotrimazole action under in vitro vagina-simulative conditions. Moreover, clotrimazole-mediated killing was growth-phase and morphology dependent. Post-exponential cells were resistant to the fungicidal action of clotrimazole, whilst logarithmic cells were sensitive, and hyphae showed the highest susceptibility. Finally, we showed that treatment of pre-formed C. albicans hyphae with sublethal concentrations of clotrimazole induced a reversion to yeast-phase growth. As C. albicans hyphae are considered the pathogenic morphology during mucosal infections, these data suggest that elevated fungicidal activity of clotrimazole against hyphae plus clotrimazole-induced hyphae-to-yeast reversion may help to dampen acute vaginal infections by reducing the relative proportion of hyphae and thus shifting to a non-invasive commensal-like population. In addition, lactate as an ingredient of clotrimazole formulations may potentiate clotrimazole killing of C. albicans in the vaginal microenvironment. PMID:25976001

  1. Cheap and easy modification of glassy carbon electrode for voltammetric determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Naseri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Different methods have been proposed to modify glassy carbon electrode in order to determine dopamine (DA, as one of the most important neurotransmitters in central nervous systems of mammalian. These methods are time comsuming and in some cases expensive. In this work, a very simple and cheap pretreatment method is developed for the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE to determine DA in the presence of Ascorbic acid (AA.   Methods: Cyclic voltammetry as an electrochemical activation procedure was used for activation of glassy carbon electrode in order to separate diffrential pulse peaks of DA and AA. The effect of different parameters such as pH for supporting electrolyte, range of potential and the number of cycles were investigated. Finally, differential pulse voltammetry was used to determine DA in the presence of AA. Results: On the activated electrode under optimum condition, anodic peak of AA shifted to negative potentials and peak current decreased, but the peak current of DA increased. The peak current was linearly proportional to the bulk concentration of DA in the range of 6.5×10-7- 1.8×10-5 mol l-1. The limit of detection was 6.2×10-7 mol l-1. Conclusion: A simple and cheap method was developed for the activation of glassy carbon electrode. It was possible to determine DA in the presence of AA on the treated electrode. The proposed method was used to determine DA in pharmacutical samples.      

  2. The histone methyltransferase SDG8 mediates the epigenetic modification of light and carbon responsive genes in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ying LI; Mukherjee, Indrani; Thum, Karen E; Tanurdzic, Milos; Katari, Manpreet S.; Obertello, Mariana; Edwards, Molly B; McCombie, W Richard; Martienssen, Robert A.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Histone methylation modifies the epigenetic state of target genes to regulate gene expression in the context of developmental and environmental changes. Previously, we used a positive genetic screen to identify an Arabidopsis mutant, cli186, which was impaired in carbon and light signaling. Here, we report a deletion of the Arabidopsis histone methyltransferase SDG8 in this mutant (renamed sdg8-5), which provides a unique opportunity to study the global function of a specific histo...

  3. Modification of epidermal growth factor-like repeats with O-fucose. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel GDP-fucose protein O-fucosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Shao, L; Shi, S; Harris, R J; Spellman, M W; Stanley, P; Haltiwanger, R S

    2001-10-26

    The O-fucose modification is found on epidermal growth factor-like repeats of a number of cell surface and secreted proteins. O-Fucose glycans play important roles in ligand-induced receptor signaling. For example, elongation of O-fucose on Notch by the beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase Fringe modulates the ability of Notch to respond to its ligands. The enzyme that adds O-fucose to epidermal growth factor-like repeats, GDP-fucose protein O-fucosyltransferase (O-FucT-1), was purified previously from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Here we report the isolation of a cDNA that encodes human O-FucT-1. A probe deduced from N-terminal sequence analysis of purified CHO O-FucT-1 was used to screen a human heart cDNA library and expressed sequence tag and genomic data bases. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 388 amino acids with a predicted N-terminal transmembrane sequence typical of a type II membrane orientation. Likewise, the mouse homolog obtained from an expressed sequence tag and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends of a mouse liver cDNA library encodes a type II transmembrane protein of 393 amino acids with 90.4% identity to human O-FucT-1. Homologs were also found in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans with 41.2 and 29.4% identity to human O-FucT-1, respectively. The human gene (POFUT1) is on chromosome 20 between PLAGL2 and KIF3B, near the centromere at 20p11. The mouse gene (Pofut1) maps near Plagl2 on a homologous region of mouse chromosome 2. POFUT1 gene transcripts were expressed in all tissues examined, consistent with the widespread localization of the modification. Expression of a soluble form of human O-FucT-1 in insect cells yielded a protein of the predicted molecular weight with O-FucT-1 kinetic and enzymatic properties similar to those of O-FucT-1 purified from CHO cells. The identification of the gene encoding protein O-fucosyltransferase I now makes possible mutational strategies to examine the functions of the

  4. Covalent modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with neutral red for the fabrication of an amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanoscale dimensions, graphitic surface chemistry and electronic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) make them an ideal candidate for chemical and biochemical sensing. In this paper we explore a covalent chemical strategy for functionalization of MWNTs with neutral red through carbodiimide coupling between the primary amine of neutral red and carboxyl groups of the carbon nanotubes. The construction of an amperometric sensor was achieved by abrasive immobilization of the functionalized MWNTs on a paraffin impregnated graphite electrode followed by a coating of a thin film of nafion. The neutral red functionalized MWNTs were characterized by spectroscopic and electroanalytical methods. From the voltammetric studies, MWNTs were found to exhibit a higher accessible surface area in electrochemical reactions. The modified electrode exhibited stable electrocatalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide reduction in a wide potential range. A significant decrease in overvoltage for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, as well as a dramatic increase in the peak currents in comparison with a bare graphite electrode were observed. Such an ability of neutral red functionalized carbon nanotubes to promote the hydrogen peroxide electron transfer reaction with a short response time (<4 s) and long-term stability, a low detection limit, an extended linear concentration range and a high sensitivity suggest great promise for dehydrogenase and oxidase based amperometric biosensors

  5. Tuning the electronic properties by width and length modifications of narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes for nanomedicine

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2012-10-01

    The distinctive characteristics of nanoparticles, resulting from properties that arise at the nano-scale, underlie their potential applications in the biomedical sector. However, the very same characteristics also result in widespread concerns about the potentially toxic effects of nanoparticles. Given the large number of nanoparticles that are being developed for possible biomedical use, there is a need to develop rapid screening methods based on in silico methods. This study illustrates the application of conceptual Density Functional Theory (DFT) to some carbon nanotubes (CNTs) optimized by means of static DFT calculations. The computational efforts are focused on the geometry of a family of packed narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs) formed by units from four to twelve carbons evaluating the strength of the C-C bonds by means of Mayer Bond Orders (MBO). Thus, width and length are geometrical features that might be used to tune the electronic properties of the CNTs. At infinite length, partial semi-conductor characteristics are expected. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.

  6. Effects of charge distribution on water filling process in carbon nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG LingYi; LI QiKai; SHUAI ZhiGang

    2009-01-01

    Using umbrella sampling technique with molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the nanoflu-idic transport of water in carbon nanotube (CNT). The simulations showed that a positive charge modi-fication to the carbon nanotube can slow down the water column growth process, while the negative charge modification to the carbon nanotube will, on the other hand, quicken the water column growth process. The free energy curves were obtained through the statistical process of water column growth under different charge distributions, and the results indicated that these free energy curves can be employed to explain the dynamical process of water column growth in the nanosized channels.

  7. Effects of charge distribution on water filling process in carbon nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using umbrella sampling technique with molecular dynamics simulation,we investigated the nanoflu-idic transport of water in carbon nanotube(CNT).The simulations showed that a positive charge modi-fication to the carbon nanotube can slow down the water column growth process,while the negative charge modification to the carbon nanotube will,on the other hand,quicken the water column growth process.The free energy curves were obtained through the statistical process of water column growth under different charge distributions,and the results indicated that these free energy curves can be employed to explain the dynamical process of water column growth in the nanosized channels.

  8. Phytoplankton carbon biomass and specific growth rates determined with the labeled chlorophyll a technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labeled chlorophyll a technique, based on the incorporation of H14CO-3 into chlorophyll a (chl a) gives accurate determinations of both phytoplankton carbon biomass (Csub(p)) and specific growth rate (μ). Csub(P) and μ, derived from the labeled chl a method, exhibited a diel periodicity and the mean μ over 24 h compared well with the dilution rate for an oceanic microflagellate in NH+sub(4-) limited continuous culture. The specific activity of carbon in Csub(P) (Rsup(*)sub(CP)) and in chl a (Rsup(*)sub(chl) sub(a)) were equal after only 2 h and remained the same through 24 h. This supports the main assumption of the technique that within a useful time scale, the specific activities are equal. Values of Csub(P) and phytoplankton POC measured with a CHN analyser were the same for the microflagellate in continuous culture. Estimates of phytoplankton carbon derived from several indirect methods were either greater than (methods based on measurement of adenosine triphosphate and microscopic examination of cell counts and volumes) or less than (methods based on measurement of particulate organic carbon and chlorophyll a concentrations) values determined with the labeled chl a technique. Time course 14C incubations indicate that both Csub(P) and μ exhibit diel variability through 24 h in the fluorescence maximum layer and overlying water column in the Southern California Bight. Phytoplankton populations in the fluorescence maximum layer grew with generation times of 2 to 3 d, while generation times in the water column above averaged less than 1 d. (orig.)

  9. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  10. Growth process and mechanism of a multi-walled carbon nanotube nest deposited on a silicon nanoporous pillar array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Weifen, E-mail: gingerwfj@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Mathematics and Information Science, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, No. 36 Beihuan Road, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Jian Lv; Yang Xiaohui [Department of Mathematics and Information Science, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, No. 36 Beihuan Road, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Li Xinjian [Department of Physics and Laboratory of Material Physics, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2010-03-01

    A large scale nest array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NACNTs) was grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Through observing its macro/micromorphology and structure, ascertaining the catalyst component and its locations at different growth time by hiring field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, and selected area electron diffraction, the growth process was deduced. Its thermal properties were also investigated by using a thermogravimetric analyzer. Our experiments demonstrated that the CNTs growth by means of root-growth mechanism at the initial growth stage, then a continuous growth process with its tip open is suggested, finally, a schematic growth model of NACNT/Si-NPA was presented.

  11. Direct growth of carbon nanotubes on metal surfaces without an external catalyst and nanocomposite production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, Carole Emilie

    The research work presented in this thesis deals with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), an allotrope of carbon with a cylindrical structure consisting of a rolled up graphene sheet. CNTs are generally produced by the decomposition of a carbon source in the presence of a metal catalyst at elevated temperatures. CNTs have outstanding properties and have attracted immense attention in both industry and academia. However, the development of commercial applications of CNTs is slow due to limitations in the large scale production of CNTs and their high cost. Another limitation is the interface resistance generated by external catalyst nanoparticles used in traditional CNT growth methods. In order to eliminate the interface resistance and simultaneously provide CNT growth over large surfaces and varying geometries, a method called direct CNT growth is established to enable the extraction of the CNT structure directly from the metal surface. The novel process for the production of CNTs developed in the present thesis is applied to planar surfaces and spherical particles made of stainless steel (SS) 304. The method is based on the establishment of nanometer scale structures at the surface which act as catalyst nanoparticles while at the same time being integral parts of the material. It uses first a mild chemical etching of the surface, followed by a specific heat treatment performed using either standard chemical vapour deposition (standard-CVD) or fluidized bed CVD (FBCVD) techniques. Acetylene (C2H2) is used as the carbon source and SS 304 acts as both the catalyst and the substrate in the growth process. This direct CNT growth with this substrate dual function eliminates the need of external catalyst nanoparticles deposited onto the surface. The active sites necessary for CNT growth are tailored on the SS itself by means of the two-step treatment process. MWNTs of 20-70 nm in diameter are produced. The CNTs are characterized by Raman Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA

  12. Nano-Scale Interface Modification of the Co/Cu System: Metallic Surface Modifiers in the Growth of Smooth Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review is a collection of twelve original papers concerning growth and interface modification in the Co/Cu system. Most of this research has been carried out in the Laboratory of Surface and Thin Film Physics at the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The Laboratory was created by the author of this review in 1996 in strong collaboration with the Institute of Nuclear Physics Wilhelms-Universitaet in Muenster, Germany and the Institute of Applied Physics Ukrainian Academy of Science in Sumy, Ukraine. The big international team worked under the leadership of Dr Marta Marszalek, initially developing a multicomponent ultrahigh vacuum setup for thin film preparation and analysis, and next accompanying her in studies of the structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of Co/Cu multilayers. Systems that exhibit giant magnetoresistance effect have been receiving intensive attentions over recent years since they are possible candidates for applications in ultrahigh-density data storage and magnetoelectronic devices. The focus of this research is the growth of magnetic Co/Cu multilayers modified by using metallic surface modifiers called surfactants. The different approaches have been used. Surfactant metals were introduced once into growth process as a buffer layer or they were deposited sequentially at each interface of Co/Cu multilayers. The growth was performed by molecular beam epitaxy technique which allows to tailor carefully deposition conditions. The results showed that two approaches gave different results. Surfactant buffer layers resulted in loss of layered character of multilayers being a kind of an intermediate cluster-like phase combined with a layered area. Small amount of surfactants introduced at each interface lead to well-ordered structures with small roughness and smoother interfaces than in the case of pure Co/Cu multilayers. Despite of the differences, in both cases the improvement of magnetoresistance value was observed. The atomic scale study

  13. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.;

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type....... The growth mechanisms as well as the roles of different components in the catalyst were studied in situ using environmental transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of the understanding of carbon nanotube growth mechanisms, an MgO-supported FeCu catalyst was prepared by...... impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  14. Growth of Few-Layer Graphene on Sapphire Substrates by Directly Depositing Carbon Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Chao-Yang; TANG Jun; LIU Zhong-Liang; LI Li-Min; YAN Wen-Sheng; WEI Shi-Qiang; XU Peng-Shou

    2011-01-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber.The reflection high energy diffraction,Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample,which confirm the formation of graphene layers.The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2 nm and the layer number is about 2-3.The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated a-SiC surface.Graphene,a monolayer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms,is a quasi two-dimensional (2D) material.It has attracted great interest because of its distinctive band structure and physical properties.[1] Graphene can now be obtained by several different approaches including micromechanical[1] and chemical[2] exfoliation of graphite,epitaxial growth on hexagonal SiC substrates by Si sublimation in vacuum,[3] and CVD growth on metal substrates.[4] However,these preparation methods need special substrates,otherwise,in order to design microelectronic devices,the prepared graphene should be transferred to other appropriate substrates.Thus the growth of graphene on the suitable substrates is motivated.%Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. The reflection high energy diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample, which confirm the formation of graphene layers. The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2nm and the layer number is about 2-3. The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated α-SiC surface.

  15. Surface modification of nanocrystalline anatase with CTAB in the acidic condition and its effects on photocatalytic activity and preferential growth of TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanocrystalline anatase TiO2, which was synthesized by a sol-hydrothermal process in advance, has successfully modified with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in the acidic condition as well as in the basic condition. On the basis of the measurements of infrared spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the resulting TiO2, together with the phase-transfer experiments, it is suggested that the modification mechanism in the acidic condition is closely related to Br-. Interestingly, compared with un-modified TiO2, the modified TiO2 exhibits high photocatalytic activity for degrading Rhodamine B (RhB) solution, especially for that modified in the acid. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of modified TiO2 in the acid is attributed to the role that the Br- can easily capture photo-induced holes and then form active Br, consequently effectively inducing photocatalytic oxidation reactions, based on the surface photovoltage responses of the resulting TiO2. After that, a one-pot sol-hydrothermal route at the temperature as low as 80 deg. C is developed to directly synthesize CTAB-modified nanocrystalline TiO2 with a little preferred growth along direction, which can be easily dispersed in the organic system and possess good photocatalytic performance. This work provides a feasible strategy to further improve the photocatalytic performance of nanocrystalline anatase and to synthesize TiO2 nanocrystals with preferential growth.

  16. Cobalt- and iron-based nanoparticles hosted in SBA-15 mesoporous silica and activated carbon from biomass: Effect of modification procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoncheva, Tanya; Genova, Izabela; Paneva, Daniela; Dimitrov, Momtchil; Tsyntsarski, Boyko; Velinov, Nicolay; Ivanova, Radostina; Issa, Gloria; Kovacheva, Daniela; Budinova, Temenujka; Mitov, Ivan; Petrov, Narzislav

    2015-10-01

    Ordered mesoporous silica of SBA-15 type and activated carbon, prepared from waste biomass (peach stones), are used as host matrix of nanosized iron and cobalt particles. The effect of preparation procedure on the state of loaded nanoparticles is in the focus of investigation. The obtained materials are characterized by Boehm method, low temperature physisorption of nitrogen, XRD, UV-Vis, FTIR, Mossbauer spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The catalytic behaviour of the samples is tested in methanol decomposition. The dispersion, oxidative state and catalytic behaviour of loaded cobalt and iron nanoparticles are successfully tuned both by the nature of porous support and the metal precursor used during the samples preparation. Facile effect of active phase deposition from aqueous solution of nitrate precursors is assumed for activated carbon support. For the silica based materials the catalytic activity could be significantly improved when cobalt acetylacetonate is used during the modification. The complex effect of pore topology and surface functionality of different supports on the active phase formation is discussed.

  17. Crystallite growth kinetics of TiO{sub 2} surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO prepared by a coprecipitation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Horng-Huey [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Hsi, Chi-Shiung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National United University, 1 Lein-Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miao-Li 36003, Taiwan (China); Wang, Moo-Chin, E-mail: mcwang@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Zhao, Xiujian, E-mail: opluse@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} powder surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO was obtained. • Phase transformation from anatase to rutile was hindered by ZnO added. • Growth kinetic of anatase TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites in T-9Z powders was described as: D{sub A,9}{sup 2}=2.42×10{sup 5}×exp(-39.9×10{sup 3}/RT). • Growth kinetic of rutile TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites in T-9Z powders was described as: D{sub R,9}{sup 2}=8.49×10{sup 5}×exp(-47.6×10{sup 3}/RT) rutile TiO{sub 2}. -- Abstract: The nanocrystallite growth of TiO{sub 2} surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO prepared by a coprecipitation process has been studied. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and UV–VIS–NIR spectrophotometry have been utilized to characterize the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites surface modification with 9 mol% ZnO (denoted by T-9Z). The DTA result shows that the anatase TiO{sub 2} first formed at 533 K and the completion of anatase TiO{sub 2} crystallization occurred at 745 K for the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders. XRD results reveal that the anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} coexist when the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders were calcined at 523–973 K for 2 h. When the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders were calcined at 973 K for 2 h, rutile TiO{sub 2} was the major phase, and the minor phases were anatase TiO{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The phase was composed of the rutile TiO{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} for the T-9Z freeze-dried precursor powders after calcination at 1273 K for 2 h. The growth kinetics of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites in T-9Z powders were described as: D{sub A,9}{sup 2}=2.42×10{sup 5}×exp(-39.9×10{sup 3}/RT)and D{sub R,9}{sup 2}=8.49×10{sup 5}×exp(-47.6×10{sup 3}/RT) for anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites respectively. The analysis results of UV/VIS/NIR spectra reveal that the T-9Z freeze

  18. Response of vegetation to carbon dioxide. Growth, yield and plant water relationships in sweet potatoes in response to carbon dioxide enrichment 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    In the summer of 1985, under the joint program of US Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Division, and Tuskegee University, experiments were conducted to study growth, yield, photosynthesis and plant water relationships in sweet potato plants growth in an enriched CO{sub 2} environment. The main experiment utilized open top chambers to study the effects of CO{sub 2} and soil moisture on growth, yield and photosynthesis of field-grown plants. In addition, potted plants in open top chambers were utilized in a study of the effects of different CO{sub 2} concentrations on growth pattern, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and biomass increment at different stages of development. The interaction effects of enriched CO{sub 2} and water stress on biomass production, yield, xylem potential, and stomatal conductance were also investigated. The overall results of the various studies are described.

  19. The relationship between carbon dioxide emission and economic growth: Hierarchical structure methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviren, Seyma Akkaya; Deviren, Bayram

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission has an essential role in the current debate on sustainable development and environmental protection. CO2 emission is also directly linked with use of energy which plays a focal role both for production and consumption in the world economy. Therefore the relationship between the CO2 emission and economic growth has a significant implication for the environmental and economical policies. In this study, within the scope of sociophysics, the topology, taxonomy and relationships among the 33 countries, which have almost the high CO2 emission and economic growth values, are investigated by using the hierarchical structure methods, such as the minimal spanning tree (MST) and hierarchical tree (HT), over the period of 1970-2010. The average linkage cluster analysis (ALCA) is also used to examine the cluster structure more clearly in HTs. According to their proximity, economic ties and economic growth, different clusters of countries are identified from the structural topologies of these trees. We have found that the high income & OECD countries are closely connected to each other and are isolated from the upper middle and lower middle income countries from the MSTs, which are obtained both for the CO2 emission and economic growth. Moreover, the high income & OECD clusters are homogeneous with respect to the economic activities and economic ties of the countries. It is also mentioned that the Group of Seven (G7) countries (CAN, ENG, FRA, GER, ITA, JPN, USA) are connected to each other and these countries are located at the center of the MST for the results of CO2 emission. The same analysis may also successfully apply to the other environmental sources and different countries.

  20. Laser printing of nanoparticle toner enables digital control of micropatterned carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S; Stevens, Adam G; Hart, A John

    2013-05-01

    Commercialization of materials utilizing patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, such as hierarchical composite structures, dry adhesives, and contact probe arrays, will require catalyst patterning techniques that do not rely on cleanroom photolithography. We demonstrate the large scale patterning of CNT growth catalyst via adaptation of a laser-based electrostatic printing process that uses magnetic ink character recognition (MICR) toner. The MICR toner contains iron oxide nanoparticles that serve as the catalyst for CNT growth, which are printed onto a flexible polymer (polyimide) and then transferred to a rigid substrate (silicon or alumina) under heat and mechanical pressure. Then, the substrate is processed for CNT growth under an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) recipe. This process enables digital control of patterned CNT growth via the laser intensity, which controls the CNT density; and via the grayscale level, which controls the pixelation of the image into arrays of micropillars. Moreover, virtually any pattern can be designed using standard software (e.g., MS Word, AutoCAD, etc.) and printed on demand. Using a standard office printer, we realize isolated CNT microstructures as small as 140 μm and isolated catalyst ″pixels″ as small as 70 μm (one grayscale dot) and determine that individual toner microparticles result in features of approximately 5-10 μm . We demonstrate that grayscale CNT patterns can function as dry adhesives and that large-area catalyst patterns can be printed directly onto metal foils or transferred to ceramic plates. Laser printing therefore shows promise to enable high-speed micropatterning of nanoparticle-containing thin films under ambient conditions, possibly for a wide variety of nanostructures by engineering of toners containing nanoparticles of desired composition, size, and shape. PMID:23438258

  1. A facile, covalent modification of single-wall carbon nanotubes by thiophene for use in organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stylianakis, Minas M.; Mikroyannidis, John A. [Chemical Technology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500, Patras (Greece); Kymakis, Emmanuel [Electrical Engineering Department, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, School of Applied Technology, Estavromenos, PB 1939, Heraklion, GR-71004, Crete (Greece)

    2010-02-15

    Thiophene was nitrated to afford 2-nitrothiophene. The hydrogenation of the latter gave 2-aminothiophene that was used for amidation of single-wall carbon nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic acid groups (SWCNT-COOH). The modified carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-CONHTh) were fully characterized by FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR, UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL) emission, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray, and TGA. The properties of the modified nanotubes were compared with those of the pristine SWCNT, indicating that the thiophenes were covalently attached to the SWCNTs via amide linkages. The modified SWCNT showed enhanced solubility, and thus better dispersion in common organic solvents. Furthermore, the SWCNT-CONHTh was used as dopant in polymer-fullerene photovoltaic cells. The power conversion efficiency (1.78%) of the polymer-fullerene cell with the SWCNT-CONHTh was superior to both the pristine cell without nanotubes (1.00%) and the cell with the unmodified SWCNTs (1.41%). The device takes advantage of the electron accepting feature of fullerenes and the high electron transport capability of the SWCNTs. The enhancement of the photovoltaic response with the use of the SWCNTs modified by thiophene compared with the as-prepared SWCNTs is believed to be due to more efficient dispersion of the modified SWCNTs resulting in a more homogenous photoactive layer. (author)

  2. Saturating light and not increased carbon dioxide under ocean acidification drives photosynthesis and growth in Ulva rigida (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautenberger, Ralf; Fernández, Pamela A; Strittmatter, Martina; Heesch, Svenja; Cornwall, Christopher E; Hurd, Catriona L; Roleda, Michael Y

    2015-02-01

    Carbon physiology of a genetically identified Ulva rigida was investigated under different CO2(aq) and light levels. The study was designed to answer whether (1) light or exogenous inorganic carbon (Ci) pool is driving growth; and (2) elevated CO2(aq) concentration under ocean acidification (OA) will downregulate CAext-mediated [Formula: see text] dehydration and alter the stable carbon isotope (δ (13)C) signatures toward more CO2 use to support higher growth rate. At pHT 9.0 where CO2(aq) is net photosynthesis (NPS) by only 56-83%, leaving the carbon uptake mechanism for the remaining 17-44% of the NPS unaccounted. An in silico search for carbon-concentrating mechanism elements in expressed sequence tag libraries of Ulva found putative light-dependent [Formula: see text] transporters to which the remaining NPS can be attributed. The shift in δ (13)C signatures from -22‰ toward -10‰ under saturating light but not under elevated CO2(aq) suggest preference and substantial [Formula: see text] use to support photosynthesis and growth. U. rigida is Ci saturated, and growth was primarily controlled by light. Therefore, increased levels of CO2(aq) predicted for the future will not, in isolation, stimulate Ulva blooms. PMID:25750714

  3. Modification of Carrier Gas Stream to Improve 13C/12C Isotopic Accuracy in Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy-Based Measurements of Low-Concentration Dissolved Carbon Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, C. H.; Morkner, P.; Thomas, B.; Saad, N.

    2013-12-01

    Determining isotopic composition of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon in natural waters is of critical importance to a broad set of scientific objectives. The routine analysis of these sample types can be expensive and in the past has been limited predominantly to laboratories capable of high-precision isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis. More recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has provided an alternative instrumental means for characterizing these samples. One challenge with these types of is that the CRDS can show a non-linear response in d13C at low carbon concentrations (<0.5 mM). Here we present a new approach using a modification of a total organic carbon-cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TOC-CRDS) continuous flow system by adding a background stream of carbon dioxide of known isotopic composition to the CRDS analytical train. The isotopic carbon values generated by the CRDS are then corrected using a two-component isotopic mixing model. This modification is useful in reducing bias towards lighter carbon isotopic values when measuring samples with low carbon concentration, such as natural waters with either dissolved organic or inorganic carbon concentrations of less than 0.5 mM, and does not introduce substantial bias for higher concentration samples.

  4. Thermal stability and growth kinetics of the interfacial TiC layer in the Ti alloy/carbon steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal stability and growth kinetics of the titanium carbide interfacial layer, formed in the course of the diffusion bonding of low-alloy carbon steel (0.3 wt.% C) and Ti alloy, were investigated. Thermal stability of the titanium carbide interfacial layer was evaluated based on the thermodynamic analysis of the Fe–Ti–C ternary system. Thermodynamic analysis of the Fe–Ti–C system confirmed that the titanium carbide layer is stable in contact with the steel part of the diffusion couple. An experiment with inert markers at the interface confirms that growth kinetics of the TiC layer is governed by carbon diffusion from steel to titanium alloy through the titanium carbide phase. In the 800–950 °C temperature range, carbon diffusion in austenite was found to be a rate-determining step of the titanium carbide layer growth during the initial stage of the interaction (<40 min). For advanced stages, the thickness of the layer depends on two simultaneously occurring processes, namely flow of carbon atoms through the titanium carbide layer and that from the titanium carbide layer into the titanium alloy. The estimated values of the carbon diffusion coefficient and the activation energy of the process reflect the grain boundary mechanism of carbon diffusion through the interfacial layer

  5. Decomposing Industrial Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in Yunnan Province, China: Switching to Low-Carbon Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxiang Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a less-developed province that has been chosen to be part of a low-carbon pilot project, Yunnan faces the challenge of maintaining rapid economic growth while reducing CO2 emissions. Understanding the drivers behind CO2 emission changes can help decouple economic growth from CO2 emissions. However, previous studies on the drivers of CO2 emissions in less-developed regions that focus on both production and final demand have been seldom conducted. In this study, a structural decomposition analysis-logarithmic mean Divisia index (SDA-LMDI model was developed to find the drivers behind the CO2 emission changes during 1997–2012 in Yunnan, based on times series energy consumption and input-output data. The results demonstrated that the sharp rise in exports of high-carbon products from the metal processing and electricity sectors increased CO2 emissions, during 2002–2007. Although increased investments in the construction sector also increased CO2 emissions, during 2007–2012, the carbon intensity of Yunnan’s economy decreased substantially because the province vigorously developed hydropower and improved energy efficiency in energy-intensive sectors. Construction investments not only carbonized the GDP composition, but also formed a carbon-intensive production structure because of high-carbon supply chains. To further mitigate CO2 emissions in Yunnan, measures should promote the development and application of clean energy and the formation of consumption-based economic growth.

  6. Electrochemical regulation of microbial growth on disposable screen printed carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein we report an effective method to enhance microbial immobilization on screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) surface by electrochemical regulation of redox potential. This technique could deliver a prospective electrode for microbial biofuel cell and other applications. A phototrophic purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 was selected as a model organism to examine the proposed approach. Scanning the electrode between −0.7 to 0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at 70 mV/s for 50 cycles (∼24 min), placed in the growth medium with bacteria, significantly increased microbial adhesion when compared to SPCE without electrochemical stimulation. The electron-transfer effect between the adsorbed microorganism and electrode surface was further studied by AC impedance spectroscopy to confirm the accelerated microbial immobilization. Stable photosynthetic electron transport chain from immobilized bacteria through SPCE was achieved.

  7. Carbon nanotube growth on a pointed bulk electrode using femtosecond laser nonlinear lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hiroaki; Iba, Tomohiro; Hirata, Yoshinori

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles were synthesized on pointed bulk electrodes using femtosecond laser nonlinear lithography. A resist mask of 1.5 μm diameter was formed on a pointed bulk cathode by translating a laser focus three-dimensionally inside the spherical photoresist. Metal masks obtained by pattern transfers of the resists effectively suppressed CNT growth during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, resulting in synthesis of CNT bundles only at the electrode tip. Irradiation of field emission currents from the pointed cathode enables local melting and subsequent removal of anode materials. The damaged region size and the threshold voltage for this removal process were reduced by spatial limitations of emission sites using the metal mask.

  8. Tunable growth of silver nanobelts on monolithic activated carbon with size-dependent plasmonic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Ning, Yuesheng; Zhao, Binyuan; Yin, Fujun; Du, Cuiling; Wang, Fei; Lai, Yijian; Zheng, Junwei; Li, Shuan; Chen, Li

    2015-09-01

    Silver is one of the most important materials in plasmonics. Tuning the size of various silver nanostructures has been actively pursued in the last decade. However, silver nanobelt, a typical one-dimensional silver nanostructure, has not been systematically studied as to tuning its size for controllable plasmonic response. Here we show that silver nanobelts, with mean width ranging from 45 to 105 nm and thickness at ca. 13 nm, can grow abundantly on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) through a galvanic-cell reaction mechanism. The widths of silver nanobelts are positively correlated to the growth temperatures. The width/thickness ratio of the silver nanobelts can be adjusted so that their transversal plasmonic absorption peaks can nearly span the whole visible light band, which endows them with different colours. This work demonstrates the great versatility of a simple, green and conceptually novel approach in controlled synthesis of noble metal nanostructures.

  9. Fatigue crack initiation and crack growth studies for pipes made of carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB), a fail-safe design philosophy, is based on fatigue/fracture mechanics concepts and requires rigorous integrity assessment of piping component with postulated part through thickness flaw. It is required to be demonstrated that the unstable tearing will never occur before the crack penetrates through thickness and gives easily detectable leakage. This requires investigation on fatigue crack initiation followed by fatigue crack growth (FCG) of piping components with different postulated part through flaws for the qualification of LBB design criterion. In view of it, six numbers of tests were carried out on 8-inches Sch.100 straight pipes having circumferential part through wall notch and made of SA333Gr6 carbon steel and subjected to pure alternating bending moment using four point bend setup. The material is similar to that used in primary heat transport (PHT) piping of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR)

  10. Beneficial role of carbon nanotubes on mustard plant growth: an agricultural prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays an increasing application of nanotechnology in different fields has arisen an extensive debate about the effect of the engineered nanoparticles on environment. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles has come into limelight in the last few years. However, very few studies have been done so far on the beneficial aspects of nanoparticles on plants. In this article, we report the beneficial effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) having diameter of ∼30 nm on Brassica juncea (mustard) seeds. Measurements of germination rate, T50 (time taken for 50% germination), shoot and root growth have shown encouraging results using low concentration of oxidized MWCNT (OMWCNT) treated seeds as compared to non-oxidized as well as high concentration OMWCNT treated seeds. For toxicity study we measured the germination index and relative root elongation, while conductivity test and infra-red spectra were also performed to study the overall effect of oxidized and non-oxidized nanotubes on mustard seeds and seedlings.

  11. Syntheses and growth mechanisms of 3C-SiC nanostructures from carbon and silicon powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Xiong, X; Chen, H T; Wu, X L; Zhang, W C; Chu, Paul K

    2009-11-01

    Cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) nanostructures such as needle- and Y-shaped nanowhiskers, smooth and pagoda-shaped nanorods are synthesized on a large scale from activated carbon and silicon powders at 1250 degrees C under atmospheric pressure. The use of ball-milled silicon powders results in the formation of nanowires and nanowhiskers, whereas non-milled silicon powders lead to nanorods together with unreacted silicon powders. Residual oxygen in the growth chamber initiates the carburization reactions which can proceed without further oxygen consumption. The size and morphology of the as-synthesized 3C-SiC nanostructures are observed to be related to the size and morphology of the starting silicon particles. An oxygen-assisted gas-solid model is proposed to explain the observed nanostructures. PMID:19908579

  12. Amorphous carbon film growth on Si: Correlation between stress and generation of defects into the substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon films of several thicknesses were prepared by graphite sputtering on crystalline silicon substrate. The samples were depth profiled with positron annihilation spectroscopy for open-volume measurements and characterized for their residual internal stress. It was found that after film growth the substrate presents vacancy-like defects decorated by oxygen in a layer extending in the substrate by several tens of nanometers beyond the film/Si interface. The width of the defected layer and the decoration of vacancy-like defects are directly and inversely proportional to the measured intensity of the residual stress, respectively. These findings indicate the existence of a relaxation mechanism of the stress in the films that involves deeply the substrate. The decorated vacancy-like defects are suggested to be bounded to dislocations induced in the substrate by the stress relaxation

  13. Understanding the Causality between Carbon Dioxide Emission, Fossil Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Developed Countries: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Issues on climate change have been recognized as serious challenges for regional sustainable development both at a global and local level. Given the background that most of the artificial carbon emissions are resulted from the energy consumption sector and the energy is also the key element resource for economic development, this paper investigated the relationship between CO2 emission, fossil energy consumption, and economic growth in the period 1970–2008 of nine European countries, based on the approach of Granger Causality Test, followed by the risk analysis on impacts of CO2 reduction to local economic growth classified by the indicator of causality degree. The results show that there are various feedback causal relationships between carbon emission, energy consumption and economic growth, with both unidirectional and dual-directional Granger causality. The impact of reducing CO2 emission to economic growth varies between countries as well.

  14. Modification of glassy carbon electrode with a bilayer of multiwalled carbon nanotube/tiron-doped polypyrrole: Application to sensitive voltammetric determination of acyclovir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel voltammetric sensor based on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a thin film of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with an electropolymerized layer of tiron-doped polypyrrole was developed and the resulting electrode was applied for the determination of acyclovir (ACV). The surface morphology and property of the modified electrode were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The electrochemical performance of the modified electrode was investigated by means of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The effect of several experimental variables, such as pH of the supporting electrolyte, drop size of the cast MWCNTssuspension, number of electropolymerization cycles and accumulation time was optimized by monitoring the LSV response of the modified electrode toward ACV. The best response was observed at pH 7.0 after accumulation at open circuit for 160 s. Under the optimized conditions, a significant electrochemical improvement was observed toward the electrooxidation of ACV on the modified electrode surface relative to the bare GCE, resulting in a wide linear dynamic range (0.03–10.0 μM) and a low detection limit (10.0 nM) for ACV. Besides high sensitivity, the sensor represented high stability and good reproducibility for ACV analysis, and provided satisfactory results for the determination of this compound in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations. - Highlights: • A simple method was employed to construct a thin film modified electrode. • Tiron-doped polypyrrole was electropolymerized on MWCNT precast glassy carbon electrode. • Electrode surface characterization was performed by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. • The modified electrode showed nano-molar detection limit for acyclovir. • The modified electrode was applied for the detection of ACV in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations

  15. Modification of glassy carbon electrode with a bilayer of multiwalled carbon nanotube/tiron-doped polypyrrole: Application to sensitive voltammetric determination of acyclovir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahrokhian, Saeed, E-mail: shahrokhian@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-3516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azimzadeh, Mahnaz [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-3516 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Mohammad K. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    A novel voltammetric sensor based on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a thin film of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with an electropolymerized layer of tiron-doped polypyrrole was developed and the resulting electrode was applied for the determination of acyclovir (ACV). The surface morphology and property of the modified electrode were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The electrochemical performance of the modified electrode was investigated by means of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The effect of several experimental variables, such as pH of the supporting electrolyte, drop size of the cast MWCNTssuspension, number of electropolymerization cycles and accumulation time was optimized by monitoring the LSV response of the modified electrode toward ACV. The best response was observed at pH 7.0 after accumulation at open circuit for 160 s. Under the optimized conditions, a significant electrochemical improvement was observed toward the electrooxidation of ACV on the modified electrode surface relative to the bare GCE, resulting in a wide linear dynamic range (0.03–10.0 μM) and a low detection limit (10.0 nM) for ACV. Besides high sensitivity, the sensor represented high stability and good reproducibility for ACV analysis, and provided satisfactory results for the determination of this compound in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations. - Highlights: • A simple method was employed to construct a thin film modified electrode. • Tiron-doped polypyrrole was electropolymerized on MWCNT precast glassy carbon electrode. • Electrode surface characterization was performed by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. • The modified electrode showed nano-molar detection limit for acyclovir. • The modified electrode was applied for the detection of ACV in pharmaceutical and clinical preparations.

  16. Effects of Size and Surfaee Modification of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Mechanical Properties of Polyurethane-based Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fang; HUANGJin; ZHANG Hao; SU Zhongmin; ZHANG Qiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethanes/multi-walled carbon nanotube (PU/CNT) composites were prepared with a help of ultrasonically dispersing CNT in the traditional procedure of synthesizing polyurethane.In this case,the various loading levels,sizes and surface-modified groups were considered to regulate the mechanical performances of the PU/CNT nanocomposites.Moreover,the structure and mechanical properties of all the PU/CNT nanocomposites were investigated by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,dynamic mechanical analysis,scanning electron microscope,transmission electron microscope,and tensile testing.The experimental results showed that a moderate loading-level of 0.1 wt% and a diameter of 10-15 nm for CNT could produce the maximum tensile strength and elongation while it was worth noting that the surface carboxylation of CNT could further enhance the tensile strength and elongation of the PU/CNT nanocomposites.

  17. Chemical modification of hygroscopic magnesium carbonate into superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent suitable for removal of oil spill in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patowary, Manoj; Ananthakrishnan, Rajakumar; Pathak, Khanindra

    2014-11-01

    The wettability of hygroscopic magnesium carbonate has been modified to develop a superhydrophobic and oleophilic sorbent for oil spill clean-ups via a simple chemical process using palmitic acid. The prepared material was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Wettability test infers that the sorbent has a static water contact angle of 154 ± 1°, thereby indicating its superhydrophobic character. The sorbent was capable of scavenging oil for about three times its weight, as determined from oil sorption studies, carried out using the sorbent on model oil-water mixture. Interestingly, the chemically modified sorbent has high selectivity, buoyancy, and rate of uptake of oil. Further, the reusability studies confirm the repeatable usage of the sorbent and its efficacy in oil spill remediation.

  18. Preparation and modification of carbon nanotubes electrodes by cold plasmas processes toward the preparation of amperometric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luais, E. [CEISAM, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); IMN, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); PCI, Universite du Maine, CNRS, rue Aristote, 72085 Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Thobie-Gautier, C. [CEISAM, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Tailleur, A.; Djouadi, M.-A.; Granier, A.; Tessier, P.Y. [IMN, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Debarnot, D.; Poncin-Epaillard, F. [PCI, Universite du Maine, CNRS, rue Aristote, 72085 Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Boujtita, M., E-mail: mohammed.boujtita@univ-nantes.f [CEISAM, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2010-11-30

    An electrochemical transducer based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) was prepared as a platform for biosensor development. Prior to enzyme immobilization, the CNT were treated using a microwave plasma system (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) in order to functionalize the CNT surface with oxygenated and aminated groups. The morphological aspect of the electrode surface was examined by SEM and its chemical structure was also elucidated by XPS analysis. It was found out that microwave plasma system (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) not only functionalizes the CNT but also permits to avoid the collapse phenomena retaining thus the alignment structure of the electrode surface. The electrochemical properties of the resulting new material based on CNT were carried out by cyclic voltammetry and were found suitable to develop high sensitive enzyme (HRP) biosensors operating on direct electron transfer process.

  19. The influence of lateral beam profile modifications in scanned proton and carbon ion therapy: a Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Parodi, K; Kraemer, M; Sommerer, F; Naumann, J; Mairani, A; Brons, S

    2010-01-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery promises superior flexibility and accuracy for highly conformal tumour therapy in comparison to the usage of passive beam shaping systems. The attainable precision demands correct overlapping of the pencil-like beams which build up the entire dose distribution in the treatment field. In particular, improper dose application due to deviations of the lateral beam profiles from the nominal planning conditions must be prevented via appropriate beam monitoring in the beamline, prior to the entrance in the patient. To assess the necessary tolerance thresholds of the beam monitoring system at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany, this study has investigated several worst-case scenarios for a sensitive treatment plan, namely scanned proton and carbon ion delivery to a small target volume at a shallow depth. Deviations from the nominal lateral beam profiles were simulated, which may occur because of misaligned elements or changes of the beam optic in the beamline. Data have been an...

  20. Rare-earth metal halogenide encapsulation-induced modifications in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a detailed Raman spectroscopy investigation on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) filled with praseodymium chloride, terbium chloride and thulium chloride was performed. The salts were incorporated inside the SWCNTs by a capillary filling method using melts, and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy data proved the high filling degree of the nanotube channels. A thorough analysis of the radial breathing mode and G-band of the Raman spectra of the pristine and filled SWCNTs showed that the encapsulated salts cause acceptor doping of the host nanotubes, and the doping efficiency depends on the compound. The incorporated thulium chloride has the strongest doping effect on the SWCNTs, whereas praseodymium chloride has the weakest effect. It was found that the encapsulated salts modify more significantly the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes than semiconducting SWCNTs.

  1. Hydrophilic Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube for Building Photonic Crystals with Enhanced Color Visibility and Mechanical Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihu Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Low color visibility and poor mechanical strength of polystyrene (PS photonic crystal films have been the main shortcomings for the potential applications in paints or displays. This paper presents a simple method to fabricate PS/MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite photonic crystal films with enhanced color visibility and mechanical strength. First, MWCNTs was modified through radical addition reaction by aniline 2,5-double sulfonic acid diazonium salt to generate hydrophilic surface and good water dispersity. Then the MWCNTs dispersion was blended with PS emulsion to form homogeneous PS/MWCNTs emulsion mixtures and fabricate composite films through thermal-assisted method. The obtained films exhibit high color visibility under natural light and improved mechanical strength owing to the light-adsorption property and crosslinking effect of MWCNTs. The utilization of MWCNTs in improving the properties of photonic crystals is significant for various applications, such as in paints and displays.

  2. Hydrophilic Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube for Building Photonic Crystals with Enhanced Color Visibility and Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feihu; Tang, Bingtao; Xiu, Jinghai; Zhang, Shufen

    2016-01-01

    Low color visibility and poor mechanical strength of polystyrene (PS) photonic crystal films have been the main shortcomings for the potential applications in paints or displays. This paper presents a simple method to fabricate PS/MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes) composite photonic crystal films with enhanced color visibility and mechanical strength. First, MWCNTs was modified through radical addition reaction by aniline 2,5-double sulfonic acid diazonium salt to generate hydrophilic surface and good water dispersity. Then the MWCNTs dispersion was blended with PS emulsion to form homogeneous PS/MWCNTs emulsion mixtures and fabricate composite films through thermal-assisted method. The obtained films exhibit high color visibility under natural light and improved mechanical strength owing to the light-adsorption property and crosslinking effect of MWCNTs. The utilization of MWCNTs in improving the properties of photonic crystals is significant for various applications, such as in paints and displays. PMID:27136514

  3. Poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone) promotes axonal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Daniela Nogueira; Brites, Pedro; Fonseca, Carlos; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian central nervous system (CNS) neurons do not regenerate after injury due to the inhibitory environment formed by the glial scar, largely constituted by myelin debris. The use of biomaterials to bridge the lesion area and the creation of an environment favoring axonal regeneration is an appealing approach, currently under investigation. This work aimed at assessing the suitability of three candidate polymers - poly(ε-caprolactone), poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone) (P(TMC-CL)) (11∶89 mol%) and poly(trimethylene carbonate) - with the final goal of using these materials in the development of conduits to promote spinal cord regeneration. Poly(L-lysine) (PLL) coated polymeric films were tested for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. At similar PLL film area coverage conditions, neuronal polarization and axonal elongation was significantly higher on P(TMC-CL) films. Furthermore, cortical neurons cultured on P(TMC-CL) were able to extend neurites even when seeded onto myelin. This effect was found to be mediated by the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signaling pathway with impact on the collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4), suggesting that besides surface topography, nanomechanical properties were implicated in this process. The obtained results indicate P(TMC-CL) as a promising material for CNS regenerative applications as it promotes axonal growth, overcoming myelin inhibition. PMID:24586346

  4. Transcriptional profiling of biomass degradation-related genes during Trichoderma reesei growth on different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiuzhen; Luo, Yingfeng; Yu, Hongtao; Sun, Yuhui; Wu, Hong; Song, Shuhui; Hu, Songnian; Dong, Zhiyang

    2014-03-10

    To identify all the gene products involved in cellulosic biomass degradation, we employed RNA sequencing technology to perform a genome-wide comparison of gene expression during growth of Trichoderma reesei QM9414 on cellulose or glucose. Due to their important role in lignocellulose decomposition, we focused on CAZymes and other secreted proteins. In total, 122 CAZymes showed at least a two-fold change in mRNA abundance, and 97 of those were highly induced by cellulose. Compared to the well-characterized cellulases and hemicellulases, a majority of the other upregulated CAZymes showed lower transcriptional levels. In addition, 64 secreted proteins, including oxidoreductases, exhibited at least two-fold upregulation on cellulose medium. To better understand the potential roles of low-abundance CAZymes in cellulose breakdown, we compared the expression patterns of 25 glycoside hydrolase genes under different conditions via real-time PCR. Substantial differences for the 25 genes were observed for individual strains grown on different carbon sources, and between QM9414 and RUTC30 when grown on the same carbon source. Moreover, we identified 3 genes that are coregulated with known cellulases. Collectively, this study highlights a comprehensive transcriptional profile for biomass degradation-related proteins and provides a first step toward the identification of candidates to construct optimized enzyme cocktails. PMID:24445169

  5. Enhanced photoelectrocatalytic performance of titanium dioxide/carbon cloth based photoelectrodes by graphene modification under visible-light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Graphene modified well-define TiO2 sphere on carbon cloth has been fabricated. • RGO/TiO2/CC exhibits efficient visible light photoelectrocatalytic activity. • RGO/TiO2/CC electrode shows enhanced PEC activity for degradation of MB pollutant. • A synergetic effect of photocatalysis and electrocatalysis in the PEC process. -- Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide nanosheets modified TiO2 nanospheres on carbon cloth electrodes (RGO/TiO2/CC) have been fabricated and used for photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) degradation of organic pollutants under visible light irradiation. The fabricated RGO/TiO2/CC electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Compared with TiO2/CC electrode, the RGO modified TiO2/CC electrode evidently shows improved visible light-driven PEC activity for degradation of an often used model pollutant, methylene blue (MB). Moreover, the efficiency of MB degradation by PEC process (0.0133 min−1) is about 13-fold and 7-fold faster than that of electrochemical process (0.001 min−1) and photocatalytic process (0.0018 min−1), respectively. The improved catalytic activity for PEC degradation of MB pollutants could be attributed to the existence of RGO, which extends the absorption onset of TiO2 to longer wavelength direction and promotes the separation of electron–hole pairs generated under visible light irradiation. The promotion effect on the electron–hole separation is supported by photocurrent and electrochemical impedance measurements. In addition, a synergetic effect of photocatalysis and electrocatalysis is involved in the PEC process, by which the recombination of photogenerated electron–hole pairs is significantly suppressed

  6. A vertically discretised canopy description for ORCHIDEE (SVN r2290) and the modifications to the energy, water and carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudts, K.; Ryder, J.; McGrath, M. J.; Otto, J.; Chen, Y.; Valade, A.; Bellasen, V.; Berhongaray, G.; Bönisch, G.; Campioli, M.; Ghattas, J.; De Groote, T.; Haverd, V.; Kattge, J.; MacBean, N.; Maignan, F.; Merilä, P.; Penuelas, J.; Peylin, P.; Pinty, B.; Pretzsch, H.; Schulze, E. D.; Solyga, D.; Vuichard, N.; Yan, Y.; Luyssaert, S.

    2015-07-01

    Since 70 % of global forests are managed and forests impact the global carbon cycle and the energy exchange with the overlying atmosphere, forest management has the potential to mitigate climate change. Yet, none of the land-surface models used in Earth system models, and therefore none of today's predictions of future climate, accounts for the interactions between climate and forest management. We addressed this gap in modelling capability by developing and parametrising a version of the ORCHIDEE land-surface model to simulate the biogeochemical and biophysical effects of forest management. The most significant changes between the new branch called ORCHIDEE-CAN (SVN r2290) and the trunk version of ORCHIDEE (SVN r2243) are the allometric-based allocation of carbon to leaf, root, wood, fruit and reserve pools; the transmittance, absorbance and reflectance of radiation within the canopy; and the vertical discretisation of the energy budget calculations. In addition, conceptual changes were introduced towards a better process representation for the interaction of radiation with snow, the hydraulic architecture of plants, the representation of forest management and a numerical solution for the photosynthesis formalism of Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry. For consistency reasons, these changes were extensively linked throughout the code. Parametrisation was revisited after introducing 12 new parameter sets that represent specific tree species or genera rather than a group of often distantly related or even unrelated species, as is the case in widely used plant functional types. Performance of the new model was compared against the trunk and validated against independent spatially explicit data for basal area, tree height, canopy structure, gross primary production (GPP), albedo and evapotranspiration over Europe. For all tested variables, ORCHIDEE-CAN outperformed the trunk regarding its ability to reproduce large-scale spatial patterns as well as their inter

  7. A vertically discretised canopy description for ORCHIDEE (SVN r2290 and the modifications to the energy, water and carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Naudts

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 70% of global forests are managed and forests impact the global carbon cycle and the energy exchange with the overlying atmosphere, forest management has the potential to mitigate climate change. Yet, none of the land surface models used in Earth system models, and therefore none of today's predictions of future climate, account for the interactions between climate and forest management. We addressed this gap in modelling capability by developing and parametrizing a version of the land surface model ORCHIDEE to simulate the biogeochemical and biophysical effects of forest management. The most significant changes between the new branch called ORCHIDEE-CAN (SVN r2290 and the trunk version of ORCHIDEE (SVN r2243 are the allometric-based allocation of carbon to leaf, root, wood, fruit and reserve pools; the transmittance, absorbance and reflectance of radiation within the canopy; and the vertical discretisation of the energy budget calculations. In addition, conceptual changes towards a~better process representation occurred for the interaction of radiation with snow, the hydraulic architecture of plants, the representation of forest management and a~numerical solution for the photosynthesis formalism of Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry. For consistency reasons, these changes were extensively linked throughout the code. Parametrization was revisited after introducing twelve new parameter sets that represent specific tree species or genera rather than a group of unrelated species, as is the case in widely used plant functional types. Performance of the new model was compared against the trunk and validated against independent spatially explicit data for basal area, tree height, canopy strucure, GPP, albedo and evapotranspiration over Europe. For all tested variables ORCHIDEE-CAN outperformed the trunk regarding its ability to reproduce large-scale spatial patterns as well as their inter-annual variability over Europe. Depending on the data

  8. Costs of Defense and a Test of the Carbon-Nutrient Balance and Growth-Differentiation Balance Hypotheses for Two Co-Occurring Classes of Plant Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Massad, Tara Joy; Dyer, Lee A.; Vega C., Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of chemical ecology is to assess costs of plant defenses. Intraspecific trade-offs between growth and defense are traditionally viewed in the context of the carbon-nutrient balance hypothesis (CNBH) and the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH). Broadly, these hypotheses suggest that growth is limited by deficiencies in carbon or nitrogen while rates of photosynthesis remain unchanged, and the subsequent reduced growth results in the more abundant resource being in...

  9. The over-step coalescence of carbon atoms on copper surface in the CVD growth of graphene: density functional calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ways in which carbon atoms coalesce over the steps on copper (111 surface are ascertained by density functional theory (DFT calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD growth of graphene. Two strategies, (1 by putting carbon atoms on and under the steps separately and (2 by importing additional carbon atoms between the ones separated by the steps, have been attempted to investigate if an over-step coalescence of carbon atoms could take place. Based on analyses about the optimized configurations and adsorption energies of carbon atoms nearby the steps, as well as the energy evolution curve of the system throughout the geometry optimizations process, we determined the main way in which graphene grows over the steps continuously: the carbon atoms, adsorbed additionally on the locations between the already existing ones which are separated by the steps, link them (these carbon atoms separated by the steps together. The direct over-step coalescence of the carbon atoms separated by the steps is very difficult, although the energy barrier preventing their coalescence can be weakened by importing carbon atoms on and under the steps gradually. Our results imply potential applications in directing the fabrication of graphene with particular structure by controlling the surface topography of copper substrate.

  10. Coordination between growth, phenology and carbon storage in three coexisting deciduous tree species in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Vitasse, Yann; Hoch, Günter

    2016-07-01

    In deciduous trees growing in temperate forests, bud break and growth in spring must rely on intrinsic carbon (C) reserves. Yet it is unclear whether growth and C storage occur simultaneously, and whether starch C in branches is sufficient for refoliation. To test in situ the relationships between growth, phenology and C utilization, we monitored stem growth, leaf phenology and stem and branch nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) dynamics in three deciduous species: Carpinus betulus L., Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. To quantify the role of NSC in C investment into growth, a C balance approach was applied. Across the three species, >95% of branchlet starch was consumed during bud break, confirming the importance of C reserves for refoliation in spring. The C balance calculation showed that 90% of the C investment in foliage (7.0-10.5 kg tree(-1) and 5-17 times the C needed for annual stem growth) was explained by simultaneous branchlet starch degradation. Carbon reserves were recovered sooner than expected, after leaf expansion, in parallel with stem growth. Carpinus had earlier leaf phenology (by ∼25 days) but delayed cambial growth (by ∼15 days) than Fagus and Quercus, the result of a competitive strategy to flush early, while having lower NSC levels. PMID:27126226

  11. The Role of Faulting on the Growth of a Carbonate Platform: Evidence from 3D Seismic Analysis and Section Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Fathiyah Jamaludin, Siti; Pubellier, Manuel; Prasad Ghosh, Deva; Menier, David; Pierson, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Tectonics in addition to other environmental factors impacts the growth of carbonate platforms and plays an important role in shaping the internal architecture of the platforms. Detailed of faults and fractures development and healing in carbonate environment have not been explored sufficiently. Using 3D seismic and well data, we attempt to reconstruct the structural evolution of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia Province, offshore Malaysia. Luconia Province is located in the NW coast of Borneo and has become one of the largest carbonate factories in SE Asia. Seismic interpretations including seismic attribute analysis are applied to the carbonate platform to discern its sedimentology and structural details. Detailed seismic interpretations highlight the relationships of carbonate deposition with syn-depositional faulting. Branching conjugate faults are common in this carbonate platform and have become a template for reef growth, attesting lateral facies changes within the carbonate environments. Structural restoration was then appropriately performed on the interpreted seismic sections based on sequential restoration techniques, and provided images different from those of horizon flattening methods. This permits us to compensate faults' displacement, remove recent sediment layers and finally restore the older rock units prior to the fault motions. It allows prediction of platform evolution as a response to faulting before and after carbonate deposition and also enhances the pitfalls of interpretation. Once updated, the reconstructions allow unravelling of the un-seen geological features underneath the carbonate platform, such as paleo-structures and paleo-topography which in turn reflects the paleo-environment before deformations took place. Interestingly, sections balancing and restoration revealed the late-phase (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) rifting of South China Sea, otherwise difficult to visualize on seismic sections. Later it is shown that

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Different Ferromagnetic Alloys Affect the Growth and Development of Rice Seedlings by Changing the C:N Ratio and Plant Hormones Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Yi; Yu, Feifan; Lv, Ruitao; Ma, Chuanxin; Zhang, Zetian; Rui, Yukui; Liu, Liming; Cao, Weidong; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phytotoxicity of thin-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings. Three different CNTs, including hollow multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), Fe-filled carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNTs), and Fe-Co-filled carbon nanotubes (FeCo-CNTs), were evaluated. The CNTs significantly inhibited rice growth by decreasing the concentrations of endogenous plant hormones. The carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N ratio) significantly increased in rice r...

  13. Growth, dispersion, and electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, Antonios [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I. [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, PO Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Vijayaraghavan, Aravind [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes the complete processes from growth to electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes (N-SWCNTs). The N-SWCNTs were synthesized using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method. The dry-deposited N-SWCNT films were dispersed in N-methylpyrolidone followed by sonication and centrifugation steps to yield a stable dispersion of N-SWCNTs in solution. The length and diameter distribution as well as concentration of N-SWCNTs in solution were measured by atomic force microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The N-SWCNTs were then assembled into electronic devices using bottom-up dielectrophoresis and characterized as field-effect transistors. Finally, the potential for application of N-SWCNTs in sensors is discussed. The three stages of N-doped SWCNT processing: (a) growth and collection on filter, (b) dispersion in NMP, and (c) dielectrophoretic assembly into transistor device. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Growth of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure for one-step gas sensor fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yanwu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional "graphitic" platelets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate, can exhibit similar properties as graphene. Growth of CNWs reported to date was exclusively carried out at a low pressure. Here, we report on the synthesis of CNWs at atmosphere pressure using "direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition" by taking advantage of the high electric field generated in a pin-plate dc glow discharge. CNWs were grown on silicon, stainless steel, and copper substrates without deliberate introduction of catalysts. The as-grown CNW material was mainly mono- and few-layer graphene having patches of O-containing functional groups. However, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies confirmed that most of the oxygen groups could be removed by thermal annealing. A gas-sensing device based on such CNWs was fabricated on metal electrodes through direct growth. The sensor responded to relatively low concentrations of NO2 (g and NH3 (g, thus suggesting high-quality CNWs that are useful for room temperature gas sensors. PACS: Graphene (81.05.ue, Chemical vapor deposition (81.15.Gh, Gas sensors (07.07.Df, Atmospheric pressure (92.60.hv

  15. Effects of chronic carbon monoxide exposure on fetal growth and development in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venditti Carolina C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon monoxide (CO is produced endogenously, and can also be acquired from many exogenous sources: ie. cigarette smoking, automobile exhaust. Although toxic at high levels, low level production or exposure lends to normal physiologic functions: smooth muscle cell relaxation, control of vascular tone, platelet aggregation, anti- inflammatory and anti-apoptotic events. In pregnancy, it is unclear at what level maternal CO exposure becomes toxic to the fetus. In this study, we hypothesized that CO would be embryotoxic, and we sought to determine at what level of chronic CO exposure in pregnancy embryo/fetotoxic effects are observed. Methods Pregnant CD1 mice were exposed to continuous levels of CO (0 to 400 ppm from conception to gestation day 17. The effect on fetal/placental growth and development, and fetal/maternal CO concentrations were determined. Results Maternal and fetal CO blood concentrations ranged from 1.12- 15.6 percent carboxyhemoglobin (%COHb and 1.0- 28.6%COHb, respectively. No significant difference was observed in placental histological morphology or in placental mass with any CO exposure. At 400 ppm CO vs. control, decreased litter size and fetal mass (p Conclusions Exposure to levels at or below 300 ppm CO throughout pregnancy has little demonstrable effect on fetal growth and development in the mouse.

  16. Carbon Nanostructure: Its Evolution During its Impact Upon Soot Growth and Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The proposed work is a ground-based study to define and quantify soot nanostructural changes in response to growth conditions, thermal and oxidative treatments and to quantify their impact upon further oxidation and growth of highly ordered carbon materials. Experimental data relating soot oxidation rates to multiple oxidizing species concentrations will directly test for additive or synergistic soot oxidation rates. Such validation is central for assessing the applicability of individual soot oxidation rates and designing oxidative strategies for controlling soot loadings in and emissions from turbulent combustion processes. Through these experiments, new insights into soot nanostructure evolution during and its impact upon oxidation by O2 and OH will be realized. It is expected that the results of this effort will spawn new research directions in future microgravity and 1g environments. Issues raised by positive or even negative demonstration of the hypotheses of this proposal have direct bearing on modelling and controlling soot formation and its destruction in nearly every combustion process producing soot.

  17. Carbon-assisted growth and high visible-light optical reflectivity of amorphous silicon oxynitride nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Zirong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large amounts of amorphous silicon oxynitride nanowires have been synthesized on silicon wafer through carbon-assisted vapor-solid growth avoiding the contamination from metallic catalysts. These nanowires have the length of up to 100 μm, with a diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. Around 3-nm-sized nanostructures are observed to be homogeneously distributed within a nanowire cross-section matrix. The unique configuration might determine the growth of ternary amorphous structure and its special splitting behavior. Optical properties of the nanowires have also been investigated. The obtained nanowires were attractive for their exceptional whiteness, perceived brightness, and optical brilliance. These nanowires display greatly enhanced reflection over the whole visible wavelength, with more than 80% of light reflected on most of the wavelength ranging from 400 to 700 nm and the lowest reflectivity exceeding 70%, exhibiting performance superior to that of the reported white beetle. Intense visible photoluminescence is also observed over a broad spectrum ranging from 320 to 500 nm with two shoulders centered at around 444 and 468 nm, respectively.

  18. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@njtech.edu.cn; Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun, E-mail: zhuhj@njtech.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Li, Wei-qi [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Guang-hui [Department of Chemistry, Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong 515063 (China)

    2015-02-21

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  19. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs

  20. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Takashima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification.