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Sample records for carbonate crystals precipitated

  1. Controls of Crystal Morphology, Size and Structure in Spontaneous Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Ya-Nan, ZHU Xiao-Li, KONG Xiang-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Nano- to micron-meter CaCO3 particles with different shape and crystal structures were prepared by adjusting the experimental conditions, including use of crystal growth inhibitors, concentrations of CaCl2 and Na2CO3, and dispersing methods. CaCO3 particles were characterized using electronic microscope, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. The results indicated that the nature and concentration of the crystal growth inhibitors had important effects on the morphology and crystal st...

  2. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  3. Study of calcium carbonate and sulfate co-precipitation

    KAUST Repository

    Zarga, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Co-precipitation of mineral based salts in scaling is still not well understood and/or thermodynamically well defined in the water industry. This study focuses on investigating calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and sulfate mixed precipitation in scaling which is commonly observed in industrial water treatment processes including seawater desalination either by thermal-based or membrane-based processes. Co-precipitation kinetics were studied carefully by monitoring several parameters simultaneously measured, including: pH, calcium and alkalinity concentrations as well as quartz microbalance responses. The CaCO3 germination in mixed precipitation was found to be different than that of simple precipitation. Indeed, the co-precipitation of CaCO3 germination time was not anymore related to supersaturation as in a simple homogenous precipitation, but was significantly reduced when the gypsum crystals appeared first. On the other hand, the calcium sulfate crystals appear to reduce the energetic barrier of CaCO3 nucleation and lead to its precipitation by activating heterogeneous germination. However, the presence of CaCO3 crystals does not seem to have any significant effect on gypsum precipitation. IR spectroscopy and the Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) were used to identify the nature of scales structures. Gypsum was found to be the dominant precipitate while calcite and especially vaterite were found at lower proportions. These analyses showed also that gypsum crystals promote calcite crystallization to the detriment of other forms. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Alternative polymer precipitants for protein crystallization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skálová, Tereza; Dušková, Jarmila; Hašek, Jindřich; Kolenko, Petr; Štěpánková, Andrea; Dohnálek, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 4 (2010), s. 737-742. ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500500701; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer precipitants * protein crystallization * X-ray crystallography Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2010

  5. Intergranular precipitation in aluminium-copper oriented bi-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this research thesis, the author addresses the fabrication of aluminium-copper oriented bi-crystals by discussing the specific problems raised by this fabrication, and by describing the aspect after a thermal treatment chosen to reach a defined objective: the visibility of precipitates in all grain boundaries, and a secondary role of kinetic parameters. The second part addresses the density of intergranular precipitates by reporting and commenting the results of precipitate numbering in symmetric and asymmetric boundaries performed by using optic microscopy. The third part addresses the dimensions and shapes of intergranular precipitates. The author there reports the study of the average dimensions of precipitates with respect to boundary nature. Some additional remarks are made regarding their shape and crystallographic nature. Numerical results are obtained from measurements performed on photographs of carbon replicates taken by using an electronic microscope. The author then reports the study of the width of the area of low precipitation density at the edge of boundaries. A copper assessment in the intergranular band is performed which shows the type of relationship which seems to exist between previously studied phenomena. Finally, the author reports the study of the relationship between boundary atomic structure and intergranular precipitation. A grain boundary model has been developed and allows a definition of intergranular germination sites to be obtained

  6. Were kinetics of Archean calcium carbonate precipitation related to oxygen concentration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, D. Y.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Archean carbonates commonly contain decimetre- to metre-thick beds consisting entirely of fibrous calcite and neomorphosed fibrous aragonite that precipitated in situ on the sea floor. The fact that such thick accumulations of precipitated carbonate are rare in younger marine carbonates suggests an important change in the modes of calcium carbonate precipitation through time. Kinetics of carbonate precipitation depend on the concentration of inhibitors to precipitation that reduce crystallization rates and crystal nuclei formation, leading to kinetic maintenance of supersaturated solutions. Inhibitors also affect carbonate textures by limiting micrite precipitation and promoting growth of older carbonate crystals on the sea floor. Fe2+, a strong calcite-precipitation inhibitor, is thought to have been present at relatively high concentrations in Archean seawater because oxygen concentrations were low. The rise in oxygen concentration at 2.2-1.9 Ga led to the removal of Fe2+ from seawater and resulted in a shift from Archean facies, which commonly include precipitated beds, to Proterozoic facies, which contain more micritic sediment and only rare precipitated beds.

  7. Ice crystal precipitation at Dome C site (East Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santachiara, G.; Belosi, F.; Prodi, F.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, falling ice crystals were collected on glass slides covered with a thin layer of 2% formvar in chloroform at the Dome Concordia site (Dome C), Antarctica. Samplings were performed in the framework of the 27th Italian Antarctica expedition of the Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica in the period 21 February-6 August 2012. Events of clear-sky precipitations and precipitations from clouds were considered and the replicas obtained were examined under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Several shapes of ice crystals were identified, including "diamond dust" (plates, pyramids, hollow and solid columns), and crystal aggregates varying in complexity. Single events often contained both small (10 μm to 50 μm) and large (hundreds of microns) crystals, suggesting that crystals can form simultaneously near the ground (height of a few hundred metres) and at higher layers (height of thousands of metres). Images of sampled crystal replicas showed that single bullets are not produced separately, but by the disintegration of combinations of bullets. Rimed ice crystals were absent in the Dome C samples, i.e. the only mode of crystal growth was water vapour diffusion. On considering the aerosol in the sampled crystals, we reached the conclusion that inertial impaction, interception and Brownian motion were insufficient to explain the scavenged aerosol. We therefore presume that phoretic forces play a role in scavenging during the crystal growth process.

  8. INDUSTRIAL CRYSTALLIZATION AND PRECIPITATION FROM SOLUTIONS: STATE OF THE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Giulietti

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization and precipitation from solutions are responsible for 70% of all solid materials produced by the chemical industry. Competing with distillation as a separation and purification technique, their use is widespread. They operate at low temperatures with low energy consumption and yield with high purifications in one single step. Operational conditions largely determine product quality in terms of purity, filterability, flowability and reactivity. Producing a material with the desired quality often requires a sound knowledge of the elementary steps involved in the process: creation of supersaturation, nucleation, crystal growth, aggregation and other secondary processes. Mathematical models coupling these elementary processes to all particles in a crystallizer have been developed to design and optimize crystallizer operation. For precipitation, the spatial distribution of reactants and particles in the reactor is important; thus the tools of computational fluid dynamics are becoming increasingly important. For crystallization of organic chemicals, where incorporation of impurities and crystal shape are critical, molecular modeling has recently appeared as a useful tool. These theoretical developments must be coupled to experimental data specific to each material. Theories and experimental techniques of industrial crystallization and precipitation from solutions are reviewed, and recent developments are highlighted.

  9. Mass Transfer and Kinetics Study of Heterogeneous Semi-Batch Precipitation of Magnesium Carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, B.; Qu, H. Y.; Niemi, H.;

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation kinetics and mass transfer of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) hydrates from a reaction of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)(2)) and CO2 were analyzed. The effect of CO2 flow rate and mixing intensity on precipitation was investigated under ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. Raman...... spectroscopy was used to determine the composition of the solids during semi-batch crystallization. The obtained spectra revealed the dissolution of Mg(OH)(2) and the formation of MgCO3. The precipitation rate increased with higher gas flow rate. The rotation speed of the stirrer had a significant effect on...... the dissolution of Mg(OH)(2). In the researched system, the main driver of the precipitation kinetics was the mass transfer of CO2. Nesquehonite (MgCO3 center dot 3H(2)O), as needle-like crystals, was precipitated as the main product. Raman spectroscopy can serve as a potential tool to monitor the...

  10. Effects of DPPC/Cholesterol liposomes on the properties of freshly precipitated calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześ, A

    2013-01-01

    DPPC/Cholesterol liposomes of average diameter below 100nm were used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation. Adsorption of calcium ions on the vesicles was determined via zeta potential measurement. It was found that with increasing calcium ions concentration the electrokinetic potential of the vesicles varied toward more positive values. The changes became smaller with the cholesterol content increase. Accumulation of calcium ions close to the vesicles membranes lead to attraction of CO(3)(2-) ions and enhances nucleation and growth of small calcium carbonate crystals that aggregates within lipid vesicles forming porous balls aggregates. However, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) does not change the CaCO(3) crystal forms and calcite is the only form obtained during precipitation. Moreover, the influence of the phospholipid on the calcium carbonate precipitation is enhanced by the induction of cholesterol to the lipid membranes. PMID:22796770

  11. Control of calcium carbonate precipitation in anaerobic reactors.

    OpenAIRE

    Langerak, van, B.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of waste waters with a high calcium content may lead to excessive precipitation of calcium carbonate. So far, no proper methods were available to predict or reduce the extent of precipitation in an anaerobic treatment system. Moreover, it also was not clear to what extent precipitation in an anaerobic reactor can be tolerated because adequate knowledge on the structure and quality of methanogenic sludges with high calcium carbonate content was lacking. In this thesis, the ...

  12. Control of calcium carbonate precipitation in anaerobic reactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, van E.P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of waste waters with a high calcium content may lead to excessive precipitation of calcium carbonate. So far, no proper methods were available to predict or reduce the extent of precipitation in an anaerobic treatment system. Moreover, it also was not clear to what extent precipi

  13. Synthesis of BiFeO3 by carbonate precipitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Kothai; Rajeev Ranjan

    2012-04-01

    Magnetoelectric multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) was synthesized by a simple carbonate precipitation technique of metal nitrate solutions. X-ray powder diffraction and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the precipitate consists of an intimate mixture of crystalline bismuth carbonate and an amorphous hydroxide of iron. The precipitate yielded BiFeO3 at an optimal calcination temperature of ∼560°C. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed 1:1 ratio between Bi and Fe in the oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies confirmed that Fe to be in +3 oxidation states both in the precipitated powder and BiFeO3. The synthesized BFO exhibits a very weak ferromagnetic correlation at room temperature and the degree of which increases slightly on cooling down to 10 K suggesting alteration in the long range spatial modulation of the spins arrangement as compared to the bulk BiFeO3.

  14. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  15. Membranes of Polyvinylidene Fluoride and PVDF Nanocomposites with Carbon Nanotubes via Immersion Precipitation

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    Gaurav Mago

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Microporous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF and PVDF nanocomposite membranes were prepared via an isothermal immersion precipitation method using two different antisolvents (ethanol and water. The structure and morphology of the resulting membranes were investigated by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The effects of the type of the antisolvent and the presence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs on membrane morphology and the crystal structure developed within the membranes were studied. The crystallization of the PVDF upon immersion precipitation occurred predominantly in the α-phase when water is used as the antisolvent or in the absence of the carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, β-phase crystallization of the PVDF was promoted upon the use of ethanol as the antisolvent in conjunction with the incorporation of the MWNTs. The morphology and the total crystallinity of the PVDF membranes were also affected by the incorporation of the MWNTs and the antisolvent used, suggesting that the microstructure and the ultimate properties of the PVDF membranes can be engineered upon the judicious selection of crystallization conditions and the use of carbon nanotubes.

  16. The skeletal organic matrix from Mediterranean coral Balanophyllia europaea influences calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Goffredo

    Full Text Available Scleractinian coral skeletons are made mainly of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite. The mineral deposition occurs in a biological confined environment, but it is still a theme of discussion to what extent the calcification occurs under biological or environmental control. Hence, the shape, size and organization of skeletal crystals from the cellular level through the colony architecture, were attributed to factors as diverse as mineral supersaturation levels and organic mediation of crystal growth. The skeleton contains an intra-skeletal organic matrix (OM of which only the water soluble component was chemically and physically characterized. In this work that OM from the skeleton of the Balanophyllia europaea, a solitary scleractinian coral endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is studied in vitro with the aim of understanding its role in the mineralization of calcium carbonate. Mineralization of calcium carbonate was conducted by overgrowth experiments on coral skeleton and in calcium chloride solutions containing different ratios of water soluble and/or insoluble OM and of magnesium ions. The precipitates were characterized by diffractometric, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The results showed that both soluble and insoluble OM components influence calcium carbonate precipitation and that the effect is enhanced by their co-presence. The role of magnesium ions is also affected by the presence of the OM components. Thus, in vitro, OM influences calcium carbonate crystal morphology, aggregation and polymorphism as a function of its composition and of the content of magnesium ions in the precipitation media. This research, although does not resolve the controversy between environmental or biological control on the deposition of calcium carbonate in corals, sheds a light on the role of OM, which appears mediated by the presence of magnesium ions.

  17. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions in presence of ethylene glycol and dodecane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsi, Panagiota D.; Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros G.

    2015-04-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in aqueous supersaturated solutions has been intensively studied over the past decades, because of its significance for a number of processes of industrial and environmental interest. In the oil and gas production industry the deposition of calcium carbonate affects adversely the productivity of the wells. Calcium carbonate scale deposits formation causes serious problems in water desalination, CO2 sequestration in subsoil wells, in geothermal systems and in heat exchangers because of the low thermal coefficient of the salt. Amelioration of the operational conditions is possible only when the mechanisms underlying nucleation and crystal growth of calcium carbonate in the aqueous fluids is clarified. Given the fact that in oil production processes water miscible and immiscible hydrocarbons are present the changes of the dielectric constant of the fluid phase has serious impact in the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation, which remains largely unknown. The problem becomes even more complicated if polymorphism exhibited by calcium carbonate is also taken into consideration. In the present work, the stability of aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to all calcium carbonate polymorphs and the subsequent kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation were measured. The measurements included aqueous solutions and solutions in the presence of water miscible (ethylene glycol, MEG) and water immiscible organics (n-dodecane). All measurements were done at conditions of sustained supersaturation using the glass/ Ag/AgCl combination electrode as a probe of the precipitation and pH as the master variable for the addition of titrant solutions with appropriate concentration needed to maintenance the solution supersaturation. Initially, the metastable zone width was determined from measurements of the effect of the solution supersaturation on the induction time preceding the onset of precipitation at free-drift conditions. The

  18. A mineralogical characterization of biogenic calcium carbonates precipitated by heterotrophic bacteria isolated from cryophilic polar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronholm, J; Schumann, D; Sapers, H M; Izawa, M; Applin, D; Berg, B; Mann, P; Vali, H; Flemming, R L; Cloutis, E A; Whyte, L G

    2014-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3(s) ) can be driven by microbial activity. Here, a systematic approach is used to identify the morphological and mineralogical characteristics of CaCO3(s) precipitated during the heterotrophic growth of micro-organisms isolated from polar environments. Focus was placed on establishing mineralogical features that are common in bioliths formed during heterotrophic activity, while in parallel identifying features that are specific to bioliths precipitated by certain microbial phylotypes. Twenty microbial isolates that precipitated macroscopic CaCO3(s) when grown on B4 media supplemented with calcium acetate or calcium citrate were identified. A multimethod approach, including scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD), was used to characterize CaCO3(s) precipitates. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that complete CaCO3(s) crystal encrustation of Arthrobacter sp. cells was common, while encrustation of Rhodococcus sp. cells did not occur. Several euhedral and anhedral mineral formations including disphenoid-like epitaxial plates, rhomboid-like aggregates with epitaxial rhombs, and spherulite aggregates were observed. While phylotype could not be linked to specific mineral formations, isolates tended to precipitate either euhedral or anhedral minerals, but not both. Three anhydrous CaCO3(s) polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite) were identified by μ-XRD, and calcite and aragonite were also identified based on TEM lattice-fringe d value measurements. The presence of certain polymorphs was not indicative of biogenic origin, although several mineralogical features such as crystal-encrusted bacterial cells, or casts of bacterial cells embedded in mesocrystals are an indication of biogenic origin. In addition, some features such as the formation of vaterite and bacterial entombment appear to be linked to certain phylotypes. Identifying

  19. Surface precipitates formed on annealed LSAT (001) single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kazuki; Okada, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2014-11-01

    LSAT (La0.3Sr0.7)(Al0.65Ta0.35)O3, which has a complex perovskite structure of (A'A'')(B'B'')O3, is expected as an attracting substrates for GaN and high temperature superconductivity oxides solid thin films from a viewpoint of the suitable lattice matching. To grow high quality thin film, it is very important to prepare step-terrace structure on substrates used for thin film growth. For this purpose, a technique of annealing substrates with mirror surface is often used. However, surface precipitates, called surface mounts, are reported to appear after annealing LSAT substrates [1]. In this study, we investigated the surface precipitates formed on annealed LSAT surfaces by TEM/STEM. Further, we directly confirmed the terminated atomic layers at the annealed LSAT surfaces in the area without surface precipitates.Commercially available LSAT single crystal substrates with (001) surfaces (SHINKOSHA CO.,LTD) were used for TEM/STEM observation. After annealing at 1300°C for 30 min in air, the (001) surface structures were observed from [110] direction using cross sectional thin foils. The thin foils were prepared by joining two annealed LSAT (001) surfaces with glue, grinding, polishing and finally Ar ion milling. TEM/STEM observation was conducted by JEOL ARM-200F (a double Cs-corrector type for TEM/STEM) operated at 200kV.Surface mounds were confirmed to appear on LSAT crystal surface after annealing at the annealing condition used in this study. A typical example is shown in Fig. 1. shows TEM bright field image taken from the surface area of LSAT (001) after annealing. The observation direction of the image is [110], which is parallel to the annealed surface. Cross sectional images of surface mounts with 300nm was clearly seen as indicated by the arrows in the image. The height of the mounts is around 20nm, and it is noted that the interfaces between the mounts and LSAT surfaces are hollowed into LSAT crystal with the depth about 10nm. Nano diffractometric and EDS

  20. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of γ' precipitates in single crystals of AM1 superalloy

    OpenAIRE

    Bellet, D; Bastie, P.; Royer, A.; Lajzerowicz, J.; Legrand, J.; Bonnet, R.

    1992-01-01

    The morphology of γ' precipitates of AM1 single crystal superalloys has been studied by small neutron scattering (SANS), and electron microscopy. Due to the single crystal nature of the samples, the SANS patterns are anisotropic and exhibit a fourfold symmetry corresponding both to the shape and to the spatial arrangement of the precipitates in a (001) plane. Measurements for other sample orientations have allowed us to improve the analysis of the shape of the precipitates. After creep deform...

  1. Authigenic carbonate precipitation in Lake Acigöl, a hypersaline lake in southwestern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Menekse, Meryem; Gül Karagüler, Nevin; Seref Sönmez, M.; Meister, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Lake Acigöl (Bitter Lake) is a hypersaline lake in southwestern Turkey at an elevation of 836 m above sea level showing authigenic precipitation of several different carbonate mineral phases. It is a perennial lake and closed drainage basin where a semiarid continental climate dominates. Due to the extreme water chemistry (salinity 8-200 mg/l; SO4 112-15232 mg/l; Cl 290-35320 mg/l; Mg, 82-3425 mg/l; Ca 102-745 mg/l) unique microorganisms flourish in the lake. We studied microbial diversity from enrichment cultures and performed precipitation experiments using similar water chemistry and adding bacterial enrichment cultures from lake sediments in order to elucidate whether the mineral assemblages found in the lake can be reproduced. Experiments using moderately halophilic bacteria obtained from the lake sediments demonstrate the formation of various calcium-/magnesium-carbonates: hydromagnesite, dypingite, huntite, monohydrocalcite and aragonite. The relative amounts of different mineral phases, particularly monohydrocalcite, hydromagnesite and dypingite, could be controlled by varying the sulphate concentration in the media from 0 to 56 mM. The similar mineral assemblages identified in the sediments of Lake Acigöl and in the experiments point to similar thermodynamic conditions and kinetics of crystal growth. In particular, the similar spherical morphology points to a rapid crystal growth under strong kinetic inhibition, possibly by organic polymers that are commonly produced by microbial communities. Our results demonstrate that the authigenic carbonate paragenesis of hypersaline lakes as Lake Acigöl can be reproduced in halophilic bacterial cultures. The exact thermodynamic conditions and precipitation kinetics under seasonally changing water chemistry or in batch experiment, however, still have to be constrained in order to establish a microbial model for carbonate precipitation in such environments.

  2. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  3. Microscopic modelling of simultaneous two-phase precipitation: application to carbide precipitation in low-carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamically-based precipitation model, employing the classical nucleation and growth theories, has been adapted to deal with simultaneous precipitation of metastable and stable phases. This model gives an estimation of the precipitation kinetics (time evolution of radius and density of precipitates for both phases, as well as the evolution of solute fraction) in a wide range of temperature. Results were successfully compared with an experimental isothermal precipitation diagram (Time-Temperature-Transformation, TTT) from the literature for the precipitation of ε carbide and Fe3C in low-carbon steels

  4. Novel precipitation technique for uranium recovery from carbonate leach solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recovery of uranium from carbonate ore leach solution was studied using novel precipitation method. The uranium from leach liquor was recovered as magnesium diuranate with NaOH in presence of trace amount of Mg2+. Effects of various parameters such as addition of H2SO4, MgO, MgSO4 as well as NaOH were investigated for maximum uranium recovery. Overall uranium recovery of the process was 97 % with improved particle size (∼57 µm). Based on the experimental findings, a process flow-sheet was developed for uranium recovery from carbonate ore leach solution with a uranium concentration of <1 g/L. (author)

  5. Authigenic carbonate precipitation at the end-Guadalupian (Middle Permian) in China: Implications for the carbon cycle in ancient anoxic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Masafumi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Isozaki, Yukio; Shibuya, Takazo; Yao, Jianxin; Ji, Zhansheng; Shozugawa, Katsumi; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate precipitation is a major process in the global carbon cycle. It was recently proposed that authigenic carbonate (carbonate precipitated in situ at the sediment-water interface and/or within the sediment) played a major role in the carbon cycle throughout Earth's history. The carbon isotopic composition of authigenic carbonates in ancient oceans have been assumed to be significantly lower than that of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater, as is observed in the modern oceans. However, the δ13Ccarb values of authigenic carbonates in the past has not been analyzed in detail. Here, we report authigenic carbonates in the uppermost Guadalupian (Middle Permian) rocks at Chaotian, Sichuan, South China. Monocrystalline calcite crystals black mudstone/chert sequence that was deposited on a relatively deep anoxic slope/basin along the continental margin. Textures of the crystals indicate in situ precipitation on the seafloor and/or within the sediments. The calcite precipitation corresponds stratigraphically with denitrification and sulfate reduction in the anoxic deep-water mass, as indicated by previously reported nitrogen and sulfur isotope records, respectively. Relatively high δ13Ccarb values of the authigenic carbonates (largely -1 ‰) compared with those of organic matter in the rocks (ca. -26 ‰) suggest that the main carbon source of the carbonates was DIC in the water column. The calcite crystals precipitated in an open system with respect to carbonate, possibly near the sediment-water interface rather than deep within the sediments. The δ13Ccarb values of the carbonates were close to the δ13CDIC value of seawater due to mixing of 13C-depleted remineralized organic carbon (that was released into the water column by the water-mass anaerobic respiration) with the large DIC pool in the oceans. Our results imply that δ13Ccarb values of authigenic carbonates in the anoxic oceans might have been systematically different from the values in the oxic

  6. Distinguishing between carbonate and non-carbonate precipitates from the carbonation of calcium-containing organic acid leachates

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; Chiang, Yi Wai; Elsen, Jan; Van Gerven, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Two organic acids were trialled for the extraction of calcium from steelmaking blast furnace slag for the purpose of precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production: succinic and acetic acids. While the leaching performance of succinic acid was superior, carbonation of its leachate did not result in the production of PCC, but rather the precipitation of calcium succinate, and only after the use of pH buffering agents (sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate). In contrast, carbonation of the acetic ac...

  7. Precipitation of calcium carbonate from a calcium acetate and ammonium carbamate batch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prah, J.; Maček, J.; Dražič, G.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we report a novel approach for preparing precipitated calcium carbonate using solutions of ammonium carbamate and calcium acetate as the sources of calcium and carbon dioxide, respectively. Two different concentrations of the starting solutions at three different temperatures (15, 25 and 50 °C) were used for the reaction. The influence of temperature and concentration on the polymorphism and the resulting morphology of calcium carbonate are discussed. The most important parameter for controlling a particular crystal structure and precipitate morphology were the concentrations of the initial solutions. When initial solutions with lower concentrations were used, the crystal form of the precipitate changed with time. Regardless the different polymorphism at different temperatures, after one day only the calcite form was detected in all samples, regardless of at which temperature the samples were prepared. At higher concentrations, pure vaterite or a mixture of vaterite and calcite were present at the beginning of the experiment. After one day, pure vaterite was found in the samples that were prepared at 15 and 25 °C. If calcium carbonate precipitated at 50 °C, the XRD results showed a mixture of calcite and vaterite regardless of the time at which the sample was taken. The morphology of calcium carbonate particles prepared at various conditions changed from calcite cubes to spherical particles of vaterite and aragonite needles. When a low starting concentration was used, the morphology at the initial stage was strongly affected by the temperature at which the experiments were conducted. However, after one day only, cubes were present in all cases at low initial concentrations. In contrast, at high concentrations spherical particles precipitated at all three temperatures at the beginning of the reaction. Spherical particles were made up from smaller particles. Over time, the size of the particles was diminishing due to their disintegration into

  8. Efifciency of Concrete Crack-healing based on Biological Carbonate Precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Mian; QIAN Chunxiang; LI Ruiyang; RONG Hui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the capacity for crack-repair in concrete by developing a new way. The self-healing agent based on biological carbonate precipitation was developed. Crack-healing capacity of the cement paste specimens with this biochemical agent was researched. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the precipitation in cracks. The healing efficiency was evaluated by measuring the water permeability after crack healing as well.The experimental results show that the applied biochemical agent can successfully improve the self-healing capacity of the cement paste specimens as larger cracks can be healed. The cracks with a width of 0.48 mm in the specimens with the biochemical agent are nearly fully healed by the precipitation after 80d repair. SEM and XRD analysis results demonstrate that the white precipitation in cracks is calcium carbonate, which displays spherical crystal morphology. Meanwhile, the water permeability test result shows that the biochemical agent can significantly decrease the water permeability of the cement paste specimens, the water permeability of specimens with the biochemical agent respectively decreases by 84%and 96%after 7 d and 28 d immersion in water, however the control specimens only respectively decrease by 41%and 60%, which indicates that the bacteria-based concrete appears to be a promising approach to increase concrete durability.

  9. Waste oil shale ash as a novel source of calcium for precipitated calcium carbonate: Carbonation mechanism, modeling, and product characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A method for converting oil shale waste ash into precipitated CaCO3 is elucidated. → We discuss the mechanism of hazardous alkaline ash leachates carbonation. → We report a model describing precipitation of CaCO3 from multi-ionic ash leachates. → Model enables simulation of reactive species concentration profiles. → Product contained ∼96% CaCO3 with 4-10 μm size calcite or/and vaterite particles. - Abstract: In this paper, a method for converting lime-containing oil shale waste ash into precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), a valuable commodity is elucidated. The mechanism of ash leachates carbonation was experimentally investigated in a stirred semi-batch barboter-type reactor by varying the CO2 partial pressure, gas flow rate, and agitation intensity. A consistent set of model equations and physical-chemical parameters is proposed to describe the CaCO3 precipitation process from oil shale ash leachates of complex composition. The model enables the simulation of reactive species (Ca2+, CaCO3, SO42-, CaSO4, OH-, CO2, HCO3-, H+, CO32-) concentration profiles in the liquid, gas, and solid phases as well as prediction of the PCC formation rate. The presence of CaSO4 in the product may also be evaluated and used to assess the purity of the PCC product. A detailed characterization of the PCC precipitates crystallized from oil shale ash leachates is also provided. High brightness PCC (containing up to ∼96% CaCO3) with mean particle sizes ranging from 4 to 10 μm and controllable morphology (such as rhombohedral calcite or coexisting calcite and spherical vaterite phases) was obtained under the conditions studied.

  10. Multiyear precipitation reduction strongly decreases carbon uptake over northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Dan; Dong, Wenjie; Liu, Shuguang; Zhou, Guangsheng; Yu, Guirui; Zhao, Tianbao; Feng, Jinming; Ma, Zhuguo; Chen, Jiquan; Chen, Yang; Chen, Shiping; Han, Shijie; Huang, Jianping; Li, Linghao; Liu, Huizhi; Liu, Shaoming; Ma, Mingguo; Wang, Yanfeng; Xia, Jiangzhou; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Xinquang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Drought has been a concern in global and regional water, carbon, and energy cycles. From 1999 to 2011, northern China experienced a multiyear precipitation reduction that significantly decreased water availability as indicated by the Palmer Drought Severity Index and soil moisture measurements. In this study, a light use efficiency model (EC-LUE) and an ecosystem physiological model (IBIS) were used to characterize the impacts of long-term drought on terrestrial carbon fluxes in northern China. EC-LUE and IBIS models showed the reduction of averaged GPP of 0.09 and 0.05 Pg C yr-1 during 1999-2011 compared with 1982-1998. Based on the IBIS model, simulated ecosystem respiration experienced an insignificant decrease from 1999 to 2011. The multiyear precipitation reduction changed the regional carbon uptake of 0.011 Pg C yr-1 from 1982 to 1998 to a net source of 0.018 Pg C yr-1 from 1999 to 2011. Moreover, a pronounced decrease in maize yield in almost all provinces in the study region was found from 1999 to 2011 versus the average of yield from1978 to 2011. The largest maize yield reduction occurred in Beijing (2499 kg ha-1 yr-1), Jilin (2180 kg ha-1 yr-1), Tianjing (1923 kg ha-1 yr-1), and Heilongjiang (1791 kg ha-1 yr-1), and the maize yield anomaly was significantly correlated with the annual precipitation over the entire study area. Our results revealed that recent climate change, especially drought-induced water stress, is the dominant cause of the reduction in the terrestrial carbon sink over northern China.

  11. Basalt catalyzed carbonate precipitation reactions using carbon dioxide at low temperatures and low pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik-Huff, C.; Finkelstein, D. B.; Mabee, S. B.

    2011-12-01

    Increased attention is being paid to basalts as host formations for the geologic sequestration of anthropogenically produced CO2. Here, we present preliminary results of batch experiments conducted on basalts from the Hartford Basin, the Deerfield and the Holyoke Basalt, to better constrain the optimum conditions to maximize carbon sequestration through the precipitation of carbonate. The purpose of this work is to explore options for CO2 sequestration in a locality where there is a lack of large geologic reservoirs appropriate for storage. In these experiments, 10 grams of 400 micron Deerfield and Holyoke basalt was reacted with deionized water for three hours both at and below supercritical conditions. These experiments showed carbonate precipitation of 15% was consistent at low pressures of CO2 (800 psi) both at high (100 Celsius) and low (20 Celsius) temperatures. These ranges of carbonate precipitation were greatest (15%) when CO2 was at low pressures. Experiments conducted at supercritical conditions precipitated a maximum of 4.7% carbonate. This information is valuable when considering alternative sequestration mechanisms that could be operated adjacent to power generation facilities or more industrial pure sources of CO2. The possibility of low pressure/temperature sequestration reactors to be operated in areas where transport to regional or national sequestration facilities may be cost prohibitive is a parallel course of action that should also be considered. Additionally, it is important to consider how a small ex-situ carbon sequestration project can help increase public acceptance of carbon capture and sequestration.

  12. Diffusion-reaction compromise the polymorphs of precipitated calcium carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Wang; Wenlai Huang; Yongsheng Han

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion is seldom considered by chemists and materialists in the preparation of materials while it plays an important role in the field of chemical engineering.If we look at crystallization at the atomic level,crystal growth in a solution starts from the diffusion of ions to the growing surface followed by the incorporation of ions into its lattice.Diffusion can be a rate determining step for the growth of crystals.In this paper,we take the crystallization of calcium carbonate as an example to illustrate the microscopic processes of diffusion and reaction and their compromising influence on the morphology of the crystals produced.The diffusion effect is studied in a specially designed three-cell reactor.Experiments show that a decrease of diffusion leads to retardation of supersaturation and the formation of a continuous concentration gradient in the reaction cell,thus promoting the formation of cubic calcite particles.The reaction rate is regulated by temperature.Increase of reaction rate favors the formation of needle-like aragonite particles.When diffusion and reaction play joint roles in the reaction system,their compromise dominates the formation of products,leading to a mixture of cubic and needle-like particles with a controllable ratio.Since diffusion and reaction are universal factors in the preparation of materials,the finding of this paper could be helpful in the controlled synthesis of other materials.

  13. Characterization of precipitates in a niobium-zirconium-carbon alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobstein, T. L.; Titran, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A niobium alloy with 1 percent zirconium and 0.063 percent carbon by weight was investigated in the as-rolled and annealed conditions, and after high-temperature (1350 and 1400 K) exposure with and without an applied stress. In the as-rolled and annealed conditions, large metastable carbides were observed in addition to a regular distribution of small particles. During the high-temperature exposure, the majority of the large carbides were dissolved and a more stable carbide phase formed. This finely dispersed phase had a composition determined to be approximately 70 percent ZrC and approximately 30 percent NbC and showed some evidence of an orientation relationship with the matrix. The precipitates appeared to coarsen slightly after approximately 5000 hr exposure in the presence of an applied stress resulted in a decrease in the size and in the interparticle spacing of the stable precipitates. However, the composition of the precipitate phase and its ability to pin dislocations were not affected by the temperature or stress conditions.

  14. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21

    Objectives of this project was to understand asphaltene precipitation in General and carbon dioxide induced precipitation in particular. To this effect, thermodynamic and kinetic experiments with the Rangely crude oil were conducted and thermodynamic and reservoir models were developed.

  15. Carbon Nanoparticles in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Eren San; Mustafa Okutan; O(g)uz K(o)ysal; Yusuf Yer-li

    2008-01-01

    Fullerene G60,C70,single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets are doped to nematic liquid crystal(LC)host in the same percentage.Planar samples of these mixtures are prepared and our measurements constitute an optimization basis for possible applications.Fullerene balls are found to be the best compatible material for optical aims and reorientation of LC molecules,while the carbon nanotubes experience some reorientation possibility in LC media and graphene layers are good barriers to preserve reorientation.

  16. Biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation: application in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A. J.; Eldring, J.; Lauchnor, E.; Hiebert, R.; Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Esposito, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated mitigation strategies for sealing high permeability regions, like fractures, in the subsurface. This technology has the potential to, for example, improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide (CO2) by sealing fractures in cap rocks or to mitigate leakage pathways to prevent contamination of overlying aquifers from hydraulic fracturing fluids. Sealing technologies using low-viscosity fluids are advantageous since they potentially reduce the necessary injection pressures and increase the radius of influence around injection wells. In this technology, aqueous solutions and suspensions are used to promote microbially-induced mineral precipitation which can be applied in subsurface environments. To this end, a strategy was developed to twice seal a hydraulically fractured, 74 cm (2.4') diameter Boyles Sandstone core, collected in North-Central Alabama, with biofilm-induced calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitates under ambient pressures. Sporosarcina pasteurii biofilms were established and calcium and urea containing reagents were injected to promote saturation conditions favorable for CaCO3 precipitation followed by growth reagents to resuscitate the biofilm's ureolytic activity. Then, in order to evaluate this process at relevant deep subsurface pressures, a novel high pressure test vessel was developed to house the 74 cm diameter core under pressures as high as 96 bar (1,400 psi). After determining that no impact to the fracture permeability occurred due to increasing overburden pressure, the fractured core was sealed under subsurface relevant pressures relating to 457 meters (1,500 feet) below ground surface (44 bar (650 psi) overburden pressure). After fracture sealing under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions, the sandstone core withstood three times higher well bore pressure than during the initial fracturing event, which occurred prior to biofilm-induced CaCO3 mineralization. These studies suggest

  17. Crystallization behaviour of hydroxide cobalt carbonates by aging: Environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Angeles; Jimenez, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Cobalt is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in water, sediments and air that is essential for living species, since it is a component of B12 vitamin and it is also a strategic and critical element used in a number of commercial, industrial and military applications. However, relatively high accumulations of cobalt in environment can be toxic for human and animal health. Cobalt usually occurs as Co2+ and Co3+ in aqueous solutions, where Co2+ is the most soluble and hence its mobility in water is higher. The study of the precipitation of cobalt carbonates is of great interest due to the abundance of carbonate minerals in contact with surface water and groundwater which can be polluted with Co2+. Previous works have demonstrated that the formation of Co-bearing calcium carbonates and Co-rich low crystallinity phases takes place at ambient conditions. With the aim of investigating the crystallization behavior of Co- bearing carbonates at ambient temperature, macroscopic batch-type experiments have been carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of CoCl2 (0.05M) and Na2CO3 (0.05M) during increasing reaction times (5 minutes and 1, 5, 24, 48, 96, 168, 720 and 1440 hours). The main goals of this work were (i) to analyse the physicochemical evolution of the system and (ii) to study the evolution of the crystallinity of the solid phases during aging. After a given reaction period, pH, alkalinity and dissolved Co2+ in the aqueous solutions were analysed. The evolution of the morphology and chemical composition of the solids with aging time was examined by SEM and TEM. The precipitates were also analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the crystallinity degree was followed by the intensity and the full width at high medium (FWHM) of the main peaks. The results show that a low crystallinity phase was obtained at the very beginning of aging. This phase evolves progressively to form hydroxide carbonate cobalt (Co2CO3(OH)2) which crystallize with the spatial

  18. PEDOGENIC CARBONATE δ13C AND ENVIRONMENTAL PRECIPITATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Catoni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopic analysis is a useful tool for investigating paleoenvironments, as the pedogenic carbonate δ13C is related to δ13CSOM and to the proportions of C3/C4 plants. In this work we interpreted the paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate precipitation in soils formed under different climates and during different geological ages. Samples were taken from a Bk (PR1, Holocene and from two Bkm horizons (PR2 and PR3, Pleistocene. When the mean δ13C plant values and the most plausible paleotemperatures were used in the evaluation, PR1 showed a lower percentage of C4 plants (48% than Pleistocene soils (~53%, in agreement with paleoclimate changes. When instead the δ13C values of current plants were used for PR1, C4 plants ranged from 59 (12°C to 66% (18°C, suggesting two possible interpretations: either plant species changed during the Holocene, or the plant mean values normally used in the literature are not suitable for Pleistocene reconstructions

  19. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  20. Reinforcement of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube in Nitrile Rubber: In Comparison with Carbon Black, Conductive Carbon Black, and Precipitated Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Atip Boonbumrung; Pongdhorn Sae-oui; Chakrit Sirisinha

    2016-01-01

    The properties of nitrile rubber (NBR) reinforced by multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), conductive carbon black (CCB), carbon black (CB), and precipitated silica (PSi) were investigated via viscoelastic behavior, bound rubber content, electrical properties, cross-link density, and mechanical properties. The filler content was varied from 0 to 15 phr. MWCNT shows the greatest magnitude of reinforcement considered in terms of tensile strength, modulus, hardness, and abrasion resistance follow...

  1. Effect of silk sericin on morphology and structure of calcium carbonate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui-Bo; Han, Hua-Feng; Ding, Shao; Li, Ze-Hao; Kong, Xiang-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, silk sericin was employed to regulate the mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). CaCO3 composite particles were prepared by the precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with calcium chloride solution in the presence of silk sericin. The as-prepared samples were collected at different reaction time to study the crystallization process of CaCO3 by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that silk sericin significantly affected the morphology and crystallographic polymorph of CaCO3. With increasing the reaction time, the crystal phase of CaCO3 transferred from calcite dominated to vaterite dominated mixtures, while the morphology of CaCO3 changed from disk-like calcite crystal to spherical vaterite crystal. These studies showed the potential of silk sericin used as a template molecule to control the growth of inorganic crystal.

  2. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from calcium silicates and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the pulp and paper industry by calcium carbonation are presented. The current precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production uses mined, crushed calcium carbonate as raw materials. If calcium silicates were used instead, carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of carbonates would be eliminated. In Finland, there could, thus, be a potential for eliminating 200 kt of carbon dioxide emissions per year, considering only the PCC used in the pulp and paper industry. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility to produce PCC from calcium silicates and the potential to replace calcium carbonate as the raw material was made. Calcium carbonate can be manufactured from calcium silicates by various methods, but only a few have been experimentally verified. The possibility and feasibility of these methods as a replacement for the current PCC production process was studied by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using HSC software and process modelling using Aspen Plus[reg]. The results from the process modelling showed that a process that uses acetic acid for extraction of the calcium ions is a high potential option for sequestering carbon dioxide by mineral carbonation. The main obstacle seems to be the limited availability and relatively high price of wollastonite, which is a mineral with high calcium silicate content. An alternative is to use the more common, but also more complex, basalt rock instead

  3. Carbonate precipitation by the thermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus: a model of carbon flow for an ancient microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ostrom

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted using the archaeon bacteria Archaeoglobus fulgidus to determine chemical and isotopic fractionation of organic and inorganic carbon into mineral phases. Carbonate precipitation was induced in two different experiments using A. fulgidus to determine the relative abundance of organically derived carbon incorporated into carbonate minerals as well as to define any distinct phases or patterns that could be attributed to the precipitation process. One experiment used a medium containing 13C-depleted organic carbon and 13C-enriched inorganic carbon, and the other used a 14C-labeled organic carbon source. Results indicated that 0.9–24.8% organic carbon was incorporated into carbonates precipitated by A. fulgidus and that this process was mediated primarily by pH and CO2 emission from cells. Data showed that the carbon in the CO2 produced from this microorganism is incorporated into carbonates and that the rate at which precipitation occurs and the dynamics of the carbonate precipitation process are strongly mediated by the specific steps involved in the biochemical process for lactate oxidation by A. fulgidus.

  4. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from steelmaking slag for fixation of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ca extraction efficiency. ► Grain size and solid to liquid ratio. ► Production of PCC. - Abstract: Producing precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from steelmaking slag is a technology that contributes to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from iron and steel industries. While the carbon dioxide emissions from the sector are large, it could benefit from this option by utilizing its own by-products, i.e. steelmaking slags for fixation of CO2. Since the calcium content of the steelmaking slag is high, a calcium carbonate precipitate can be produced with the method which we have recently developed, and, if fulfilling the requirements (e.g. purity and crystal shape), it can be utilized as PCC. Therefore, the objective of this study is to further evaluate the feasibility of this method. Calcium was extracted selectively from the slag with aqueous solution of ammonium salt (NH4NO3, CH3COONH4 or NH4Cl) in an extraction reactor. After removal of the residual slag, the calcium-rich solution reacted with CO2 in a carbonation reactor producing PCC. Based on the experimental results, the slag’s grain size has a clear effect on the calcium extraction efficiency; the smaller the steel converter slag’s grain size, the larger the surface area, and the better the mass transfer rate which in turn results in a higher extraction efficiency. Grinding to smaller sizes is therefore one strategy towards improved efficiencies and chemical conversion rates. Solid to liquid ratio is another important parameter for improving extraction efficiency. The smallest solid to liquid ratio 5 g/l resulted in the maximum calcium extraction efficiency (73%) while the highest solid to liquid ratio 100 g/l resulted in the lowest extraction efficiency (6%). Consequently this option will be operationally expensive because of larger reactor volumes. The PCC produced from the calcium rich solution is comparable to the PCC produced with conventional methods

  5. Mechanism of calcium phosphates precipitation in liquid crystals; Mecanisme de precipitation de phosphates de calcium dans des cristaux liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prelot, B.; Zemb, T

    2004-04-01

    The possibility of using as a precursor an easily wet meso-porous powder would be a breakthrough in the preparation of nuclear waste storage ceramics. A concentrated solution containing ions to be stored would wet a dry powder and then, subjected to mild compression, lead to a micro-crystalline matrix of calcium phosphate at acceptable temperatures. Since no porous calcium phosphate different from calcined bone (patented) is described as porous precursor, we have compared the different synthesis routes towards meso-porous ceramics. First, we considered homogeneous precipitation of slats in water: using initially off-stoichiometry in reaction, micron-sized hydroxyapatite particles are produced with a specific surface up to 100 m{sup 2}/g. Then, we consider the classical route of precipitation of an hybrid material in the miscibility gap of a phase diagram, when an hexagonal liquid crystal is used a matrix for precipitation. The surfactant family consists in single chain surfactants containing phosphates as head-group to poison the growing surface of calcium phosphate nano-domains. Since the reaction is still too brutal, we considered using a cat-anionic precursor material of controllable surface charge. For certain concentrations and molar ratios, a new structure not yet described in surfactant precipitation literature is observed: since the periodicity is lower than twice the chain length, a disordered constant curvature monolayer (instead of the classical cylinder of twice chain length diameter) of surfactant is implied. Finally, we have investigated synthesis routes implying slow dissolution of pre-formed calcium phosphate in an already existing hexagonal matrix. For all these routes of synthesis, micro-structural determinations using SAXS, WARS and BET are performed, with a special attention to comparison of the precipitation material, the matrix obtained with all elements present, and also the material obtained after calcinations. (authors)

  6. Femtosecond Laser Induced Ba2TiSi2O8 Crystal Precipitation in Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Bo,DAI Ye,MA Hong-Liang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ba2TiSi2O8 crystal was space-selectively precipitated in a 33.3BaO-16.7TiO2-50.0SiO2 glass sample by using a high repetition femtosecond laser with 800nm, 150fs and 250kHz. After the femtosecond laser irradiated for a period of time, the luminescence of the focused point could chang from 800nm red light to 400nm blue one due to second-order optical nonlinearity of the precipitated crystal. Raman spectra show Ba2TiSi2O8 crystal is formed. During the femtosecond laser irradiation, heat accumulation effect occurs in the irradiated region by continuously absorbing pulse energy, and the glass would be heated to its crystallization temperature, therefore Ba2TiSi2O8 may grow or precipitate in the crystallized region. Furthermore, the Raman spectra at different positions of the irradiated region demonstrate that Ba2TiSi2O8 crystal grows more effectively in the center compared with that in the outers. This result is agreeable with the femtosecond laserª²induced temperature distribution because the temperature increases more quickly in the focused region.

  7. Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J; Okita, Thomas W; Franceschi, Vincent R

    2003-10-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation. PMID:14555781

  8. Co-precipitation of dissolved organic matter by calcium carbonate in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Reddy, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences calcium carbonate mineral formation in surface and ground water. To better understand DOM mediation of carbonate precipitation and DOM co-precipitation and/or incorporation with carbonate minerals, we characterized the content and speciation of DOM in carbonate minerals and in the lake water of Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA. A 400-gram block of precipitated calcium carbonate from the Pyramid Lake shore was dissolved in 8 liters of 10% acetic acid. Particulate matter not dissolved by acetic acid was removed by centrifugation. DOM from the carbonate rock was fractionated into nine portions using evaporation, dialysis, resin adsorption, and selective precipitations to remove acetic acid and inorganic constituents. The calcium carbonate rock contained 0.23% DOM by weight. This DOM was enriched in polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids in comparison with the present lake water. DOM in lake water was composed of aliphatic, alicyclic polycarboxylic acids. These compound classes were found in previous studies to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation. DOM fractions from the carbonate rock were 14C-age dated at about 3,100 to 3,500 years before present. The mechanism of DOM co-precipitation and/or physical incorporation in the calcium carbonate is believed to be due to formation of insoluble calcium complexes with polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids that have moderately large stability constants at the alkaline pH of the lake. DOM co-precipitation with calcium carbonate and incorporation in precipitated carbonate minerals removes proteinaceous DOM, but nearly equivalent concentrations of neutral and acidic forms of organic nitrogen in DOM remain in solution. Calcium carbonate precipitation during lime softening pretreatment of drinking water may have practical applications for removal of proteinaceous disinfection by-product precursors.

  9. Identifying appropriate conditions for producing spindle-like causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate for paper filler applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Causticizing precipitated calcium carbonate (CPCC as a by-product of the green liquor causticizing process can be used as paper filler to save resources and reduce costs. In this study, CPCC was prepared with green liquor and quicklime, which were obtained from an alkali recovery line of a paper mill. The factors influencing crystal morphology of CPCC, such as slaking temperature, slaking time, and causticizing time were investigated. The morphology of CPCC was observed and analyzed for optimizing reaction conditions. The following were compared: properties of CPCC obtained in this study, conventional CPCC (white mud from a paper mill, and commercial PCC as fillers. The results showed that slaking time and causticizing time were important for morphology control. Spindle-like and rod-like CPCC obtained in this study had better drainability and retention, higher paper bulk, opacity, and physical strength compared to conventional CPCC, and had nearly the same performances as commercial PCC.

  10. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of γ' precipitates in single crystals of AM1 superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellet, D.; Bastie, P.; Royer, A.; Lajzerowicz, J.; Legrand, J. F.; Bonnet, R.

    1992-06-01

    The morphology of γ' precipitates of AM1 single crystal superalloys has been studied by small neutron scattering (SANS), and electron microscopy. Due to the single crystal nature of the samples, the SANS patterns are anisotropic and exhibit a fourfold symmetry corresponding both to the shape and to the spatial arrangement of the precipitates in a (001) plane. Measurements for other sample orientations have allowed us to improve the analysis of the shape of the precipitates. After creep deformation along the axis, a twofold symmetry corresponding to the “rafting” of the γ' precipitates is observed in the (010) plane. The main effect of heat treatments at 1 050 °C, commonly used for industrial applications, is the coarsening of the precipitates. From the displacement of the correlation peaks towards smaller angles, we deduce an average centre-to-centre spacing between the precipitates which increases with the annealing time from 0.3 μm to 0.6 μm according to the Lifshitz, Slyosov, Wagner behaviour. The results are compared to electron microscopy measurements, performed on the same samples.

  11. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here

  12. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ting-Chou [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Korczyńska, Justyna [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Smith, David K. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Brzozowski, Andrzej Marek, E-mail: marek@ysbl.york.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-01

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here.

  13. Selective Precipitation and Concentrating of Perovskite Crystals from Titanium-Bearing Slag Melt in Supergravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jintao; Zhong, Yiwei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2016-08-01

    Selective precipitation and concentrating of perovskite crystals from titanium-bearing slag melt in the supergravity field was investigated in this study. Since perovskite was the first precipitated phase from the slag melt during the cooling process, and a greater precipitation quantity and larger crystal sizes of perovskite were obtained at 1593 K to 1563 K (1320 °C to 1290 °C), concentrating of perovskite crystals from the slag melt was carried out at this temperature range in the supergravity field, at which the perovskite transforms into solid particles while the other minerals remain in the liquid melt. The layered structures appeared significantly in the sample obtained by supergravity treatment, and all the perovskite crystals moved along the supergravity direction and concentrated as the perovskite-rich phase in the bottom area, whereas the molten slag concentrated in the upper area along the opposite direction, in which it was impossible to find any perovskite crystals. With the gravity coefficient of G = 750, the mass fraction of TiO2 in the perovskite-rich phase was up to 34.65 wt pct, whereas that of the slag phase was decreased to 12.23 wt pct, and the recovery ratio of Ti in the perovskite-rich phase was up to 75.28 pct. On this basis, an amplification experimental centrifugal apparatus was exploited and the continuous experiment with larger scale was further carried out, the results confirming that selective precipitation and concentrating of perovskite crystals from the titanium-bearing slag melt by supergravity was a feasible method.

  14. Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Bacillus and Sporosarcina Strains Isolated from Concrete and Analysis of the Bacterial Community of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Eom, Hyo Jung; Park, Chulwoo; Jung, Jaejoon; Shin, Bora; Kim, Wook; Chung, Namhyun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (CCP) is a long-standing but re-emerging environmental engineering process for production of self-healing concrete, bioremediation, and long-term storage of CO2. CCP-capable bacteria, two Bacillus strains (JH3 and JH7) and one Sporosarcina strain (HYO08), were isolated from two samples of concrete and characterized phylogenetically. Calcium carbonate crystals precipitated by the three strains were morphologically distinct according to field emission scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping confirmed biomineralization via extracellular calcium carbonate production. The three strains differed in their physiological characteristics: growth at alkali pH and high NaCl concentrations, and urease activity. Sporosarcina sp. HYO08 and Bacillus sp. JH7 were more alkali- and halotolerant, respectively. Analysis of the community from the same concrete samples using barcoded pyrosequencing revealed that the relative abundance of Bacillus and Sporosarcina species was low, which indicated low culturability of other dominant bacteria. This study suggests that calcium carbonate crystals with different properties can be produced by various CCP-capable strains, and other novel isolates await discovery. PMID:26699752

  15. The effect of pigeon yolk sac fluid on the growth behavior of calcium carbonate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Cheng, Haixia; Shen, Xinyu; Tong, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Previous experiments have proved that thermodynamically unstable calcium carbonate vaterite can exist for long periods in the yolk sac of a pigeon embryo. The aim of this article was to demonstrate the effect of in vitro mineralization of yolk sac fluid on calcium carbonate by direct precipitation. Experiments were conducted using pigeon yolk sac fluid and using lecithin extracted from pigeon yolk sac fluid as a control to investigate the regulating effects of the organic components in the embryo on the formation of the calcium carbonate precipitate. Multiple characterization methods were employed to study the various morphological patterns, sizes, crystal growth, and crystal phase transformations of the calcium carbonate precipitates as regulated by the yolk sac fluid extracted at different stages of incubation. The experimental results demonstrate that as the incubation proceeds towards the later stages, the composition and environmental features of the yolk sac fluid become more favorable for the formation of relatively unstable calcium carbonate phases with high energies of the vaterite state. The experiments conducted with extracted lecithin as the template for crystal growth yielded similar results. A large amount of organic molecules with polar functional groups carried by the yolk sac fluid have strong effects and can both initially induce the crystallization and regulate the aggregation of calcium carbonate. Furthermore, this regulation process is found to be closely related to the lecithin contained in yolk sac fluid. These observations confirm the changes in yolk sac fluid composition during incubation have significant effects on the production of vaterite, which implicates the calcium transport during embryo growth. PMID:25681477

  16. Purification of uranium from fission products by ammonium uranyl carbonate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of the oxalate filtrate generated in plutonium reconversion laboratory involves recovery of plutonium by uranous oxalate carrier precipitation and uranium by ammonium diuranate precipitation. The ammonium di-uranate precipitate generally carries most of the fission products which are high energy gamma emitters. Purification of uranium from the fission products has been investigated employing ammonium carbonate which dissolves the slurry and re-precipitates uranium as ammonium uranyl carbonate. Fission product decontamination factor has been evaluated, which indicate the possibility of 99.6% recovery and purification of uranium from fission products. This method simplifies the purification process with less man-rem exposure and high quality end product. (author)

  17. Carbonate Precipitation through Microbial Activities in Natural Environment, and Their Potential in Biotechnology: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingting; Dittrich, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate represents a large portion of carbon reservoir and is used commercially for a variety of applications. Microbial carbonate precipitation, a by-product of microbial activities, plays an important metal coprecipitation and cementation role in natural systems. This natural process occurring in various geological settings can be mimicked and used for a number of biotechnologies, such as metal remediation, carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and construction restoration. In this study, different metabolic activities leading to calcium carbonate precipitation, their native environment, and potential applications and challenges are reviewed. PMID:26835451

  18. Carbonate precipitation through microbial activities in natural environment, and their potential in biotechnology: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eZhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate represents a large portion of carbon reservoir and is used commercially for a variety of applications. Microbial carbonate precipitation (MCP, a by-product of microbial activities, plays an important metal coprecipitation and cementation role in natural systems. This natural process occurring in various geological settings can be mimicked and used for a number of biotechnology such as metal remediation, carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery and construction restoration. In this study, different metabolic activities leading to calcium carbonate precipitation, their native environment, and potential applications and challenges are reviewed.

  19. Study of precipitated phases in Mn2+ singly doped KBr crystals by optical spectroscopy and EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aggregation states of Mn2+ in KBr:Mn2+ doped crystals are investigated using optical techniques. Excitation and luminescence spectra as well as lifetimes are obtained as a function of temperature of different crystals. It is demonstrated that at least three different Mn2+ precipitates are formed inside the KBr. Two of them contain MnBr64- units with slightly distorted octahedral symmetries, while the third one involves two non-equivalent tetrahedral MnBr42- units. These centers exhibit a broad green luminescence band. (orig.)

  20. Kinetics of crystal growth on seeded precipitation of sodium aluminate solutions with new device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金清; 张平民; 甘国耀; 尹周澜; 陈启元

    2004-01-01

    A new device was designed, which can effectively avoid the undesired nucleation and agglomeration of fine particles on the experimental results during the seaded precipitation of sodium aluminate solution, and moreover, the experimental conditions are nearly kept constant during the experiment. With the new device, it is proven that a good result can be obtained on the kinetics study of the crystal growth in seeded precipitation of sodium aluminate solution. Experiments were carried out with the concentration of Na2 O (Nk)170 g/L, the mole ratio of Na2 O to Al2 O3 (αk) all between 1.52 to 2.01, at 65, 70, 75 ℃, respectively. And the kinetics equation of crystal growth of gibbsite was deduced.

  1. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lata Govada; Hannah S. Leese; Emmanuel Saridakis; Sean Kassen; Benny Chain; Sahir Khurshid; Robert Menzel; Sheng Hu; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted m...

  2. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.D.

    2001-01-12

    The objective of this project was to identify conditions at which carbon dioxide induced precipitation occurred in crude oils. Establishing compositions of the relevant liquid and solid phases was planned. Other goals of the project were to determine if precipitation occurred in cores and to implement thermodynamic and compositional models to examine the phenomenon. Exploring kinetics of precipitation was also one of the project goals. Crude oil from the Rangely Field (eastern Colorado) was used as a prototype.

  3. High precipitation rate in a Middle Triassic carbonate platform: Implications on the relationship between seawater saturation state and carbonate production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Marco; Preto, Nereo; Marangon, Alessandro; Gattolin, Giovanni; Meda, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional geological modeling of the Middle Triassic Latemar carbonate platform is coupled with facies modal analysis to estimate its carbonate precipitation rate (G). The 3D model, strongly constrained by field data, encompasses a specific stratigraphic interval of the platform, bounded by two isochronous surfaces. Modal analysis of thin sections allows estimating the proportion of syndepositional vs postdepositional carbonate in the facies associations of the platform. This, together with the 3D facies distribution in the model that takes into account lateral and vertical facies variability, permits to calculate the volumes of syndepositional carbonate preserved at Latemar between the two considered isochrones. Given the peculiar characteristics of the platform, that does not show evidences of strong dissolution processes or large carbonate mass loss through export in the nearby basins, results can be used to estimate the average precipitation rate of the platform in the considered time interval. This estimate allows discussion in relation to models of ocean water saturation state (Ω) with respect to carbonates in the geological past, and comparison to the calculated precipitation rates of modern tropical coral reef ecosystems at global and reef scale. A high G value is found at Latemar and represents the first empirical confirmation that, in the Triassic, extremes in Ω may have triggered high carbonate precipitation in shallow water settings; moreover, comparison to modern reefs points to a possible common relationship that may link seawater Ω and precipitation rate in carbonate platform ecosystems through geological time.

  4. GFP facilitates native purification of recombinant perlucin derivatives and delays the precipitation of calcium carbonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Weber

    Full Text Available Insolubility is one of the possible functions of proteins involved in biomineralization, which often limits their native purification. This becomes a major problem especially when recombinant expression systems are required to obtain larger amounts. For example, the mollusc shell provides a rich source of unconventional proteins, which can interfere in manifold ways with different mineral phases and interfaces. Therefore, the relevance of such proteins for biotechnological processes is still in its infancy. Here we report a simple and reproducible purification procedure for a GFP-tagged lectin involved in biomineralization, originally isolated from mother-of-pearl in abalone shells. An optimization of E. coli host cell culture conditions was the key to obtain reasonable yields and high degrees of purity by using simple one-step affinity chromatography. We identified a dual functional role for the GFP domain when it became part of a mineralizing system in vitro. First, the GFP domain improved the solubility of an otherwise insoluble protein, in this case recombinant perlucin derivatives. Second, GFP inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation in a concentration dependent manner. This was demonstrated here using a simple bulk assay over a time period of 400 seconds. At concentrations of 2 µg/ml and higher, the inhibitory effect was observed predominantly for HCO(3 (- as the first ionic interaction partner, but not necessarily for Ca(2+. The interference of GFP-tagged perlucin derivatives with the precipitation of calcium carbonate generated different types of GFP-fluorescent composite calcite crystals. GFP-tagging offers therefore a genetically tunable tool to gently modify mechanical and optical properties of synthetic biocomposite minerals.

  5. Deposition of the platinum crystals on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique and the affecting factors for depositing platinum on the carbon nanotubes were investigated. The results show that the deposited platinum crystals in the atmosphere of hydrogen or nitrogen have a small size and a homogeneous distribution on the surface of the carbon nanotubes. The pretreatment would decrease the platinum particles on the carbon nanotubes significantly.

  6. Carbon partitioning during quenching and partitioning heat treatment accompanied by carbide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon partitioning from martensite into austenite in the quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process has been suggested to be controlled by the constrained carbon equilibrium (CCE) criterion. It defines an approach for predicting the carbon concentration in austenite under the condition that competing reactions such as carbide formation and bainite transformation are suppressed. Carbide precipitation in martensite is, however, often observed during the partitioning step, even in low-carbon steels as well as in high-carbon steels, even when containing a high amount of Si. Therefore, carbon partitioning from martensite into austenite is studied here, considering carbide precipitation in martensite. Carbon partitioning was investigated by means of a field-emission electron probe micro analysis (FE-EPMA) and atom probe tomography (APT), using 1.07 wt.% and 0.59 wt.% carbon steels with various martensite volume fractions. Carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite was clearly observed in all specimens, even though a considerable amount of carbide precipitated inside the martensite. The austenite carbon concentration after the partitioning step was not influenced by either the martensite volume fraction or the bulk carbon content. A modified model for predicting the austenite carbon concentration after the partitioning step was proposed to explain the experimental results by assuming carbon equilibria between austenite, ferrite and cementite under a constrained condition

  7. Environmental vs microbial control on ca-carbonate precipitation in fluvial tufa (NW Calabria-Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, E.; Perri, E.; Tucker, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    -shaped lobes and on the upper downstream face of the dams. Vacuolar tufas, which are observable on the upstream surface of the dams, compose the inner part of the dams and the core of the tongue-shaped bodies. Lamination of stromatolitic tufa is almost even and regular with only gentle doming. Laminae, which are 1-2 mm in thickness, originate by the alternation of two main types of microstructure: dendrolitic and detrital layers. Dendrolites, up to 1-1.5 mm thick contain mineralised upward-branching filaments a few micron in diameter, forming bush-likes fans. Filaments coalesce upward to form a solid carbonate layer. Filaments coalesce upwards to form a solid carbonate layer. They are formed by an envelope of micritic crystals of calcite around the sheath of individual cyanobacterial filaments. Detrital layers consist of a minor amount of mineralised cyanobacterial filaments, which appear mainly in transverse section. Carbonate minerals form thin radiating fibrous crystals around the filaments. Micron sized platy crystals of clay minerals and allochthonous dolomitic grains are abundant in such layers. Laminae of stromatolitic tufa also are characterized by the presence of empty tubes, subspherical/lenticular in section, probably originated by insect encrusted larvae. Vacuolar tufas consist of calcified plant remains that contain abundant large voids. Plant leaves, often with a preferred orientation, are the main component, with stems, twigs and mosses. Sub-millimetric carbonate crusts, which form around the plant material, consist of micro-spar fan-shaped calcite crystals 50-100 μm thick. Remains of cyanobacteria filaments, fungal hyphae and diatoms are absent within these calcite crusts, probably since no was biofilm on their external synsedimentary surface. Calcium carbonate tufa precipitation in the Parmenta stream is probably strongly controlled by the calcite supersaturation of the water, since the saturation index is about 0,7. Calcite in vacuolar tufas lacking evidence

  8. Environmental vs microbial control on ca-carbonate precipitation in fluvial tufa (NW Calabria-Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, E.; Perri, E.; Tucker, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    -shaped lobes and on the upper downstream face of the dams. Vacuolar tufas, which are observable on the upstream surface of the dams, compose the inner part of the dams and the core of the tongue-shaped bodies. Lamination of stromatolitic tufa is almost even and regular with only gentle doming. Laminae, which are 1-2 mm in thickness, originate by the alternation of two main types of microstructure: dendrolitic and detrital layers. Dendrolites, up to 1-1.5 mm thick contain mineralised upward-branching filaments a few micron in diameter, forming bush-likes fans. Filaments coalesce upward to form a solid carbonate layer. Filaments coalesce upwards to form a solid carbonate layer. They are formed by an envelope of micritic crystals of calcite around the sheath of individual cyanobacterial filaments. Detrital layers consist of a minor amount of mineralised cyanobacterial filaments, which appear mainly in transverse section. Carbonate minerals form thin radiating fibrous crystals around the filaments. Micron sized platy crystals of clay minerals and allochthonous dolomitic grains are abundant in such layers. Laminae of stromatolitic tufa also are characterized by the presence of empty tubes, subspherical/lenticular in section, probably originated by insect encrusted larvae. Vacuolar tufas consist of calcified plant remains that contain abundant large voids. Plant leaves, often with a preferred orientation, are the main component, with stems, twigs and mosses. Sub-millimetric carbonate crusts, which form around the plant material, consist of micro-spar fan-shaped calcite crystals 50-100 μm thick. Remains of cyanobacteria filaments, fungal hyphae and diatoms are absent within these calcite crusts, probably since no was biofilm on their external synsedimentary surface. Calcium carbonate tufa precipitation in the Parmenta stream is probably strongly controlled by the calcite supersaturation of the water, since the saturation index is about 0,7. Calcite in vacuolar tufas lacking evidence

  9. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor Joanna; Williams Kenneth H; Zhang Guoxiang; Hubbard Susan S; Spycher Nicolas; Ajo-Franklin Jonathan B; Wu Yuxin; Fujita Yoshiko; Smith Robert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predi...

  10. Carbonate Precipitation through Microbial Activities in Natural Environment, and Their Potential in Biotechnology: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Tingting; Dittrich, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate represents a large portion of carbon reservoir and is used commercially for a variety of applications. Microbial carbonate precipitation, a by-product of microbial activities, plays an important metal coprecipitation and cementation role in natural systems. This natural process occurring in various geological settings can be mimicked and used for a number of biotechnologies, such as metal remediation, carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and construction restoration....

  11. Microbially Accelerated Carbonate Mineral Precipitation as a Strategy for in Situ Carbon Sequestration and Rehabilitation of Asbestos Mine Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Jenine; Wilson, Siobhan A; Southam, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    A microbially accelerated process for the precipitation of carbonate minerals was implemented in a sample of serpentinite mine tailings collected from the abandoned Woodsreef Asbestos Mine in New South Wales, Australia as a strategy to sequester atmospheric CO2 while also stabilizing the tailings. Tailings were leached using sulfuric acid in reaction columns and subsequently inoculated with an alkalinity-generating cyanobacteria-dominated microbial consortium that was enriched from pit waters at the Woodsreef Mine. Leaching conditions that dissolved 14% of the magnesium from the serpentinite tailings while maintaining circumneutral pH (1800 ppm, pH 6.3) were employed in the experiment. The mineralogy, water chemistry, and microbial colonization of the columns were characterized following the experiment. Micro-X-ray diffraction was used to identify carbonate precipitates as dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O] and hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O] with minor nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that carbonate mineral precipitates form directly on the filamentous cyanobacteria. These findings demonstrate the ability of these organisms to generate localized supersaturating microenvironments of high concentrations of adsorbed magnesium and photosynthetically generated carbonate ions while also acting as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation. This study is the first step toward implementing in situ carbon sequestration in serpentinite mine tailings via microbial carbonate precipitation reactions. PMID:26720600

  12. Soil Organic Carbon and Labile Carbon Along a Precipitation Gradient and Their Responses to Some Environmental Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-Ping; ZHOU Guang-Sheng; GAO Su-Hua; GUO Jian-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from a field survey in 2001 along the Northeast China transect (NECT), a precipitation gradient,and a short-term simulation experiment under ambient CO2 of 350 μmol mol-1 and doubled CO2 of 700 μmol mol-1 with different soil moisture contents of 30%-45%, 45%-60%, and 60%-80% soil water holding capacity, the distribution of soil organic carbon and labile carbon along the NECT, their relationships with precipitation and their responses to CO2 enrichment and soil moisture changes were analyzed. The results indicated that the soil labile carbon along the gradient was significantly related to soil organic carbon (r = 0.993, P < 0.001). The soil labile carbon decreased more rapidly with depth than organic carbon. The soil organic and labile carbon along the gradient decreased with decrease in longitude in both the topsoils and subsoils, and the coefficient of variation for the labile carbon was greater than that for the organic carbon. Both the soil organic carbon and labile carbon had significant linear relationships with precipitation,with the correlation coefficient of soil organic carbon being lower (0.677 at P <0.001) than that of soil labile carbon (0.712 at P < 0.001). In the simulation experiment with doubled and ambient CO2 and different moisture contents, the coefficient of variation for soil organic carbon was only 1.3%, while for soil labile carbon it was 29.7%. With doubled CO2 concentration (700μmol mol-1), soil labile carbon decreased significantly at 45% to 60% of soil moisture content. These indicated that soil labile carbon was relatively more sensitive to environmental changes than soil organic carbon.

  13. Can Mg isotopes be used to trace cyanobacteria-mediated magnesium carbonate precipitation in alkaline lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, L. S.; Mavromatis, V.; Bundeleva, I.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Bénézeth, P.; Pearce, C.; Gérard, E.; Balor, S.; Oelkers, E. H.

    2011-07-01

    The fractionation of Mg isotopes was determined during the cyanobacterial mediated precipitation of hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation in both natural environments and in the laboratory. Natural samples were obtained from Lake Salda (SE Turkey), one of the few modern environments on the Earth's surface where hydrous Mg-carbonates are the dominant precipitating minerals. This precipitation was associated with cyanobacterial stromatolites which were abundant in this aquatic ecosystem. Mg isotope analyses were performed on samples of incoming streams, groundwaters, lake waters, stromatolites, and hydromagnesite-rich sediments. Laboratory Mg carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted in the presence of purified Synechococcus sp cyanobacteria that were isolated from the lake water and stromatolites. The hydrous magnesium carbonates nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O) and dypingite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)25(H2O)) were precipitated in these batch reactor experiments from aqueous solutions containing either synthetic NaHCO3/MgCl2 mixtures or natural Lake Salda water, in the presence and absence of live photosynthesizing Synechococcus sp. Bulk precipitation rates were not to affected by the presence of bacteria when air was bubbled through the system. In the stirred non-bubbled reactors, conditions similar to natural settings, bacterial photosynthesis provoked nesquehonite precipitation, whilst no precipitation occurred in bacteria-free systems in the absence of air bubbling, despite the fluids achieving a similar or higher degree of supersaturation. The extent of Mg isotope fractionation (Δ26Mgsolid-solution) between the mineral and solution in the abiotic experiments was found to be identical, within uncertainty, to that measured in cyanobacteria-bearing experiments, and ranges from -1.4 to -0.7 ‰. This similarity refutes the use of Mg isotopes to validate microbial mediated precipitation of hydrous Mg carbonates.

  14. Matrix effects in nilotinib formulations with pH-responsive polymer produced by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Stefano; Brisander, Magnus; Haglöf, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    Factors determining the pH-controlled dissolution kinetics of nilotinib formulations with the pH-titrable polymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate, obtained by carbon dioxide-mediated precipitation, were mechanistically examined in acid and neutral environment. The matrix effect, modulating...... on passage from acid to neutral pH, thereby preventing re-precipitation and re-crystallization of incorporated nilotinib. These findings provide a mechanistic foundation of formulation development of nilotinib and other protein kinase inhibitors, which are now witnessing an intense therapeutic and...... amorphization in the polymer matrix were mediated by hydrogen bonding between the drug and the phthalate groups on the polymer. Simultaneous Raman and UV-imaging studies of the effect of drug load on the swelling and dissolution of the polymer matrix revealed that high nilotinib load prevented matrix swelling...

  15. Kinetic study of nucleation and crystal growth during oxalic precipitation in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of an extensive use in chemical industry, most of precipitation processes are based on global and empirical knowledge. However, in the recent years, fundamental and phenomenological theories have been developed and they can be used to better understand the mechanisms of precipitation of plutonium IV oxalate, which is a significant stage of the irradiated fuel reprocessing. For this reason, appropriate methods were developed to study nucleation and crystal growth kinetics in a nuclear environment under a wide range of operating conditions. Each phenomena was studied individually in order to reduce the free parameters of the System. This study bears on the oxalates of plutonium and elements which simulate plutonium behaviour during the precipitation, neodymium III and uranium IV. A compact apparatus of a specific construction was used for nucleation measurements in accordance with the Nielsen's method. The state of the mixing was characterised at the reactor scale (macro-mixing) and at molecular scale (micro-mixing). The experimental results for the studied oxalates are in good agreement with the Volmer and Weber's theory. We propose primary nucleation kinetic laws over a wide range of operating conditions (temperature, non-stoichiometric conditions, acidity...). An original method, using a high seed charge, was developed for the determination of crystal growth kinetics, in a batch crystallizer. The crystal growth rate is first order with respect to the supersaturation and the kinetic constant follows an Arrhenius type relation with activation energies of 14, 29 and 36 kJ.mol-1 for respectively neodymium III, uranium IV and plutonium IV oxalates. The overall growth process is surface integration controlled, with a screw dislocation mechanism.

  16. Crystallization kinetics of ZnS precipitation; an experimental study using the mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) method

    OpenAIRE

    Tarazi, Mousa Al-; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Azzam, Mohammed O.J.; Yahya, Salah Abu; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2004-01-01

    The precipitation kinetics of zinc sulfide were studied using a lab scale mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) precipitation reactor. The vessel was operated at different feed concentrations, molar ratios, stirrer speeds, pH-values, feed injection positions and residence times. Primary nucleation and volume average crystal growth rates as well as agglomeration kernel were determined. Relationships were found between the rates of the different crystallization steps on the one hand an...

  17. Disordered nano-wrinkle substrates for inducing crystallization over a wide range of concentration of protein and precipitant

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Anindita Sengupta

    2015-01-01

    There are large number of proteins, the existence of which are known but not their crystal structure, because of difficulty in finding the exact condition for their crystallization. Heterogeneous nucleation on disordered porous substrates with small yet large distribution of pores is considered a panacea for this problem, but a universal nucleant, suitable for crystallizing large variety of proteins does not really exist. To this end, we report here a nano-wrinkled substrate which displays remarkable ability and control over protein crystallization. Experiments with different proteins show that on these substrates, crystals nucleate even at very low protein concentration in buffer. Small number of very large crystals appear for precipitant concentrations varied over orders of magnitude ~0.003-0.3M; for some proteins, crystals appear even without addition of any precipitant, not seen with any other heterogeneous substrates. In essence, these substrates significantly diminish the influence of the above two para...

  18. Nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates in HSLC and HSLA steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the composition, quantity and particle size distribution of nano-scaled precipitates with size less than 20 nm in high strength low carbon (HSLC) steel and their effects on mechanical properties of HSLC steel by means of mass balance calculation of nano-scaled precipitates measured by chemical phase analysis plus SAXS method, high-resolution TEM analysis and thermodynamics calculation, as well as temper rapid cooling treatment of ZJ330. It is found that there existed a large quantity of nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 18 nm in low carbon steel produced by CSP and they are mainly Fe-O-C and Fe-Ti-O-C precipitates formed below temperature A1. These precipitates have ob- vious precipitation strengthening effect on HSLC steel and this may be regarded as one of the main reasons why HSLC steel has higher strength. There also existed a lot of iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 36 nm in HSLA steels.

  19. Nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates in HSLC and HSLA steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jie; WU HuaJie; LIU YangChun; KANG YongLin

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the composition, quantity and particle size distribution of nano-scaled precipitates with size less than 20 nm in high strength Iow carbon (HSLC) steel and their effects on mechanical properties of HSLC steel by means of mass balance calculation of nano-scaled precipitates measured by chemical phase analysis plus SAXS method, high-resolution TEM analysis and thermodynamics calculation, as well as temper rapid cooling treatment of ZJ330. It is found that there existed a large quantity of nano-scaled iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 18 nm in Iow carbon steel produced by CSP and they are mainly Fe-O-C and Fe-Ti-O-C precipitates formed below temperature A1. These precipitates have obvious precipitation strengthening effect on HSLC steel and this may be regarded as one of the main reasons why HSLC steel has higher strength. There also existed a lot of iron-carbon precipitates with size less than 36 nm in HSLA steels.

  20. Precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate under diffusion controlled mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsigabu Gebrehiwet; James R. Henriksen; Luanjing Guo; Don T. Fox; Hai Huang; Lee Tu; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith; George Redden

    2014-07-01

    Multi-component mineral precipitation in porous, subsurface environments is challenging to simulate or engineer when in situ reactant mixing is controlled by diffusion. In contrast to well-mixed systems, the conditions that favor mineral precipitation in porous media are distributed along chemical gradients, which evolve spatially due to concurrent mineral precipitation and modification of solute transport in the media. The resulting physical and chemical characteristics of a mixing/precipitation zone are a consequence of coupling between transport and chemical processes, and the distinctive properties of individual chemical systems. We examined the spatial distribution of precipitates formed in “double diffusion” columns for two chemical systems, calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. Polyacrylamide hydrogel was used as a low permeability, high porosity medium to maximize diffusive mixing and minimize pressure- and density-driven flow between reactant solutions. In the calcium phosphate system, multiple, visually dense and narrow bands of precipitates were observed that were reminiscent of previously reported Liesegang patterns. In the calcium carbonate system, wider precipitation zones characterized by more sparse distributions of precipitates and a more open channel structure were observed. In both cases, formation of precipitates inhibited, but did not necessarily eliminate, continued transport and mixing of the reactants. A reactive transport model with fully implicit coupling between diffusion, chemical speciation and precipitation kinetics, but where explicit details of nucleation processes were neglected, was able to qualitatively simulate properties of the precipitation zones. The results help to illustrate how changes in the physical properties of a precipitation zone depend on coupling between diffusion-controlled reactant mixing and chemistry-specific details of precipitation kinetics.

  1. Preliminary Study On The Precipitation Of Ammonium Carbonate (AUC) From Uranylfluoride (UO2F2) Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary studies on the precipitation process of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC)-(NH4)4UO2(CO3)3 from the UO2F2-HF solution system by using precipitation agent of ammonium carbonate (AC)-(NH4)2CO3 and on preparation ability of UO2 powder via AUC route are shown in this report. Our analysis results suggested that a product, identified as ammonium uranyl fluoride (AUF), was found along with the AUC precipitate. In order to prevent the formation of the undesirable AUF precipitate, the AUC precipitation process was carried out in the stable pH media ∼ 9, uranium concentration of 100 g/L and molar ratio of C to U ≥ 7.5. (author)

  2. The transient response of global-mean precipitation to increasing carbon dioxide levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transient response of global-mean precipitation to an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels of 1% yr-1 is investigated in 13 fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) and compared to a period of stabilization. During the period of stabilization, when carbon dioxide levels are held constant at twice their unperturbed level and the climate left to warm, precipitation increases at a rate of ∼ 2.4% per unit of global-mean surface-air-temperature change in the AOGCMs. However, when carbon dioxide levels are increasing, precipitation increases at a smaller rate of ∼ 1.5% per unit of global-mean surface-air-temperature change. This difference can be understood by decomposing the precipitation response into an increase from the response to the global surface-temperature increase (and the climate feedbacks it induces), and a fast atmospheric response to the carbon dioxide radiative forcing that acts to decrease precipitation. According to the multi-model mean, stabilizing atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide would lead to a greater rate of precipitation change per unit of global surface-temperature change.

  3. Reinforcement of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube in Nitrile Rubber: In Comparison with Carbon Black, Conductive Carbon Black, and Precipitated Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atip Boonbumrung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of nitrile rubber (NBR reinforced by multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT, conductive carbon black (CCB, carbon black (CB, and precipitated silica (PSi were investigated via viscoelastic behavior, bound rubber content, electrical properties, cross-link density, and mechanical properties. The filler content was varied from 0 to 15 phr. MWCNT shows the greatest magnitude of reinforcement considered in terms of tensile strength, modulus, hardness, and abrasion resistance followed by CCB, CB, and PSi. The MWCNT filled system also exhibits extremely high levels of filler network and trapped rubber even at relatively low loading (5 phr leading to high electrical properties and poor dynamic mechanical properties. Although CCB possesses the highest specific surface area, it gives lower level of filler network than MWCNT and also gives the highest elongation at break among all fillers. Both CB and PSi show comparable degree of reinforcement which is considerably lower than CCB and MWCNT.

  4. Enhancement of carbon nanotube photoluminescence by photonic crystal nanocavities

    OpenAIRE

    Watahiki, R.; Shimada, T; Zhao, P; Chiashi, S.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y; Maruyama, S.; Kato, Y. K.

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystal nanocavities are used to enhance photoluminescence from single-walled carbon nanotubes. Micelle-encapsulated nanotubes are deposited on nanocavities within Si photonic crystal slabs and confocal microscopy is used to characterize the devices. Photoluminescence spectra and images reveal nanotube emission coupled to nanocavity modes. The cavity modes can be tuned throughout the emission wavelengths of carbon nanotubes, demonstrating the ability to enhance photoluminescence from...

  5. Enhancement of carbon nanotube photoluminescence by photonic crystal nanocavities

    OpenAIRE

    Watahiki, R.; Shimada, T; Zhao, P; Chiashi, S.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y; Maruyama, S.; Kato, Y. K.

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystal nanocavities are used to enhance photoluminescence from single-walled carbon nanotubes. Micelle-encapsulated nanotubes are deposited on nanocavities within Si photonic crystal slabs and confocal microscopy is used to characterize the devices.Photoluminescencespectra and images reveal nanotube emission coupled to nanocavity modes. The cavity modes can be tuned throughout the emission wavelengths of carbon nanotubes, demonstrating the ability to enhance photoluminescence from a...

  6. Effect of rapid thermal annealing on oxide precipitation behavior in silicon crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide precipitation behavior after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in Ar, N2 or O2 ambient was investigated. Lightly boron-, nitrogen- or carbon-doped p-CZ silicon wafers with a diameter of 200 mm ([Oi]=11.5-13.9x1017 atoms/cm3 (old ASTM)) were prepared as samples. RTA temperature and cooling rate were changed between 1280 and 1200 deg. C, and between 70 and 5 deg. C/s, respectively. From the result of in Ar ambient, it was found that (1) M-like depth profile of precipitate density was observed in the lightly boron-doped wafer, (2) width of precipitate denuded zone (DZ) was decreased in the nitrogen-doped wafer compared with the lightly boron-doped wafer and (3) DZ width in the carbon-doped wafer was comparable to lightly boron-doped wafer. From the calculated result of the depth profile of vacancy (V) and silicon interstitial (I) concentrations, CV and CI, it was clarified that the relationships of thermal equilibrium concentration and the diffusion constant of point defects are to be CV*>CI* and DVI, respectively, to appear the M-like profile in lightly boron-doped wafer. From the result of the decrease of the DZ width, it was deduced that the diffusion constant of vacancy decreased in the nitrogen-doped wafer. From the result of in lightly boron-doped wafer in N2 or O2 ambient, it was found that (1) the precipitate density was higher compared with that in Ar ambient and (2) the precipitate was not observed in O2 ambient. These results due to the injection of the vacancy or the interstitial silicon during RTA in N2 or O2, respectively

  7. An unusual twin structure in transformed precipitates in Y-PSZ single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosaic-like monoclinic ZrO2 particles form in TEM thin foils in 3.4-mol %-Y2O3-partially-stabilized ZrO2 (Y-PSZ) single crystals aged for 150 h at 1600 c. These particles transformed martensitically during TEM foil preparation; the parent phase existed as internally twinned tetragonal ZrO2 precipitates which had formed during aging. These monoclinic particles contain (100)m and (110)m transformation twins, and the twin variants have uniform thickness. The origin of this transformation microstructure, the lattice correspondences, and the applicability of the invariant plane strain model of martensitic transformations are discussed

  8. Microstructural characterization and thermodynamic analysis of precipitates in ultra-low-carbon bake hardened steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We provide the optimum amounts of Nb in ultra-low-carbon steel. • The density of fine precipitates and yield strength are closely connected. • The bake hardenability was mostly affected by a fine NbC precipitates. • The observed MnS–Cu2S precipitate manifests a core–shell structure. -- Abstract: The effects of niobium (Nb) addition on the morphologies, size distributions, crystallography, and thermodynamics of precipitates in ultra-low-carbon bake hardened steels (ULC-BH) were investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The calculated nucleation rate of NbC precipitates indicate that the observed fine precipitates and saturation of yield strength with Nb 90 ppm steel are closely connected to thermodynamic factors. A TEM analysis was also carried out for other fine precipitates in two nitride modes: hexagonal AlN and fcc TiN. The Cu2S–MnS complex precipitate was found to manifest a core–shell structure; the core part formed Cu2S and the shell part formed MnS. MnS and Cu2S have an orientation relationship between (001)MnS//(001)Cu2S and [001]MnS//[001]Cu2S

  9. Microstructural characterization and thermodynamic analysis of precipitates in ultra-low-carbon bake hardened steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taeg-Woo [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Il. [Sheet Products and Process Research Group, POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, 699, Gumho-dong, Gwangyang, Jeonnam 545-090 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Moon-Hi [POSCO Center, 892 Daechi-4dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-777 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won-Yong [Gangwon Regional Division, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young-Gyu [Foundry Technology Center, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 404-170 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sung-Hwan, E-mail: shlim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • We provide the optimum amounts of Nb in ultra-low-carbon steel. • The density of fine precipitates and yield strength are closely connected. • The bake hardenability was mostly affected by a fine NbC precipitates. • The observed MnS–Cu{sub 2}S precipitate manifests a core–shell structure. -- Abstract: The effects of niobium (Nb) addition on the morphologies, size distributions, crystallography, and thermodynamics of precipitates in ultra-low-carbon bake hardened steels (ULC-BH) were investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The calculated nucleation rate of NbC precipitates indicate that the observed fine precipitates and saturation of yield strength with Nb 90 ppm steel are closely connected to thermodynamic factors. A TEM analysis was also carried out for other fine precipitates in two nitride modes: hexagonal AlN and fcc TiN. The Cu{sub 2}S–MnS complex precipitate was found to manifest a core–shell structure; the core part formed Cu{sub 2}S and the shell part formed MnS. MnS and Cu{sub 2}S have an orientation relationship between (001){sub MnS}//(001){sub Cu{sub 2S}} and [001]{sub MnS}//[001]{sub Cu{sub 2S}}.

  10. Synthesis and crystal kinetics of cerium oxide nanocrystallites prepared by co-precipitation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, C.J., E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetics Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shi-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y.J. [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Hon, M.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Cerium oxide nanocrystallites were synthesized at a relatively low temperature using cerium nitrate as starting materials in a water solution by a co-precipitation process. Effect of calcination temperature on the crystallite growth of cerium oxide nano-powders was investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The crystallization temperature of the cerium oxide powders was estimated to be about 273 K by XRD analysis. When calcined from 473 to 1273 K, the crystallization of the face-centered cubic phase was observed by XRD. The crystallite size of the cerium oxide increased from 10.0 to 43.8 nm with calcining temperature increasing from 673 to 1273 K. The activation energy for growth of cerium oxide nanoparticles was found to be 16.0 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  11. Synthesis and crystal kinetics of cerium oxide nanocrystallites prepared by co-precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium oxide nanocrystallites were synthesized at a relatively low temperature using cerium nitrate as starting materials in a water solution by a co-precipitation process. Effect of calcination temperature on the crystallite growth of cerium oxide nano-powders was investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The crystallization temperature of the cerium oxide powders was estimated to be about 273 K by XRD analysis. When calcined from 473 to 1273 K, the crystallization of the face-centered cubic phase was observed by XRD. The crystallite size of the cerium oxide increased from 10.0 to 43.8 nm with calcining temperature increasing from 673 to 1273 K. The activation energy for growth of cerium oxide nanoparticles was found to be 16.0 kJ mol-1.

  12. The effect of protein-precipitant interfaces and applied shear on the nucleation and growth of lysozyme crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Nuno M; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Blundell, Tom L; Mackley, Malcolm R

    2009-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of protein-precipitant interfaces and externally applied shear on the nucleation and growth kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals. The early stages of microbatch crystallization of lysozyme were explored using both optical and confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging. Initially, an antisolvent (precipitant) was added to a protein drop and the optical development of the protein-precipitant interface was followed with time. In the presence of the water-soluble polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) a sharp interface was observed to form immediately within the drop, giving an initial clear separation between the lighter protein solution and the heavier precipitant. This interface subsequently became unstable and quickly developed within a few seconds into several unstable 'fingers' that represented regions of high concentration-gradient interfaces. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the subsequent nucleation of protein crystals occurred preferentially in the region of these interfaces. Additional experiments using an optical shearing system demonstrated that oscillatory shear significantly decreased nucleation rates whilst extending the growth period of the lysozyme crystals. The experimental observations relating to both nucleation and growth have relevance in developing efficient and reliable protocols for general crystallization procedures and the controlled crystallization of single large high-quality protein crystals for use in X-ray crystallography. PMID:19923710

  13. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaiduk, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumul......By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed...... the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation......-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued....

  14. Carbonate precipitation in artificial soils as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnover of C in soils is the dominant flux in the global C cycle and is responsible for transporting 20 times the quantity of anthropogenic emissions each year. This paper investigates the potential for soils to be modified with Ca-rich materials (e.g. demolition waste or basic slag) to capture some of the transferred C as geologically stable CaCO3. To test this principal, artificial soil known to contain Ca-rich minerals (Ca silicates and portlandite) was analysed from two sites across NE England, UK. The results demonstrate an average C content of 30 ± 15.3 Kg C m-2 stored as CaCO3, which is three times the expected organic C content and that it has accumulated at a rate of 25 ± 12.8 t C ha-1 a-1 since 1996. Isotopic analysis of the carbonates gave values between -6.4 per mille and -27.5 per mille for δ13C and -3.92 per mille and -20.89 per mille for δ18O, respectively (against V-PDB), which suggests that a combination of carbonate formation mechanisms are operating including the hydroxylation of gaseous CO2 in solution, and the sequestration of degraded organic C with minor remobilisation/precipitation of lithogenic carbonates. This study implies that construction/development sites may be designed with a C capture function to sequester atmospheric C into the soil matrix with a maximum global potential of 290 Mt C a-1.

  15. Preliminary assessment of a method utilizing carbon dioxide and steelmaking slags to produce precipitated calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► An NH4-salt-based method utilizes CO2 and steelmaking slags to produce pure CaCO3. ► It was determined if its economic potential warrants moving forward. ► Despite small solvent losses, the method was found to have economical potential. ► The method has significant CO2 emissions reduction potential. ► Scaling up the reactor will allow for a more detailed design for the process. -- Abstract: One of the options that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions for climate change mitigation is the so-called CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation, or CO2 mineral sequestration. Steel manufacturing could benefit from this option by utilizing its own by-products, i.e. steelmaking slags to combine with CO2. We have recently studied a method, where aqueous solution of ammonium salt (e.g. ammonium acetate, ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride) is used to extract calcium selectively from the steel converter slag, followed by precipitation of pure calcium carbonate by bubbling CO2 through the produced solution. The ammonium salt solution is recovered and re-used. The purpose of this research was to determine if the economic potential of the method warrants moving forward to large-scale application. Despite the small solvent losses, the method was found to have economical potential. In addition, it has significant CO2 emission reduction potential as well. Scaling up the reactor from the small laboratory scale will allow more detailed design for the process to be made followed by a full economical evaluation including all of the important operational and capital investment costs.

  16. Formate oxidation-driven calcium carbonate precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Arvaniti, Eleni Charalampous; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Ramos, Jose Angel; Rahier, Hubert; Boon, Nico

    2014-08-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such asammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented here to overcome these disadvantages. To induce calcium carbonate precipitation, M. parvus was incubated at different calcium formate concentrations and starting culture densities. Up to 91.4% ± 1.6% of the initial calcium was precipitated in the methane-amended cultures compared to 35.1% ± 11.9% when methane was not added. Because the bacteria could only utilize methane for growth, higher culture densities and subsequently calcium removals were exhibited in the cultures when methane was added. A higher calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when higher culture densities were used but not necessarily when more calcium formate was added. This was mainly due to salt inhibition of the bacterial activity at a high calcium formate concentration. A maximum 0.67 ± 0.03 g of CaCO3 g of Ca(CHOOH)2(-1) calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when a culture of 10(9) cells ml(-1) and 5 g of calcium formate liter(-)1 were used. Compared to the current strategy employing biogenic urea degradation as the basis for MICP, our approach presents significant improvements in the environmental sustainability of the application in the construction industry. PMID:24837386

  17. Robust direct effect of carbon dioxide on tropical circulation and regional precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bony, Sandrine; Bellon, Gilles; Klocke, Daniel; Sherwood, Steven; Fermepin, Solange; Denvil, Sébastien

    2013-06-01

    Predicting the response of tropical rainfall to climate change remains a challenge. Rising concentrations of carbon dioxide are expected to affect the hydrological cycle through increases in global mean temperature and the water vapour content of the atmosphere. However, regional precipitation changes also closely depend on the atmospheric circulation, which is expected to weaken in a warmer world. Here, we assess the effect of a rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on tropical circulation and precipitation by analysing results from a suite of simulations from multiple state-of-the-art climate models, and an operational numerical weather prediction model. In a scenario in which humans continue to use fossil fuels unabated, about half the tropical circulation change projected by the end of the twenty-first century, and consequently a large fraction of the regional precipitation change, is independent of global surface warming. Instead, these robust circulation and precipitation changes are a consequence of the weaker net radiative cooling of the atmosphere associated with higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, which affects the strength of atmospheric vertical motions. This implies that geo-engineering schemes aimed at reducing global warming without removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere would fail to fully mitigate precipitation changes in the tropics. Strategies that may help constrain rainfall projections are suggested.

  18. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  19. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiduk, P. I., E-mail: gaiduk@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Belarusian State University, prosp. Nezavisimosti 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Lundsgaard Hansen, J., E-mail: johnlh@phys.au.dk; Nylandsted Larsen, A., E-mail: anl@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bregolin, F. L., E-mail: f.lipp-bregolin@hzdr.de; Skorupa, W., E-mail: W.Skorupa@hzdr.de [Department of Semiconductor Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-09

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  20. Can Mg isotopes be used to trace cyanobacteria-mediated magnesium carbonate precipitation in alkaline lakes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Shirokova

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The fractionation of Mg isotopes was determined during the cyanobacterial mediated precipitation of hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation in both natural environments and in the laboratory. Natural samples were obtained from Lake Salda (SE Turkey, one of the few modern environments on the Earth's surface where hydrous Mg-carbonates are the dominant precipitating minerals. This precipitation was associated with cyanobacterial stromatolites which were abundant in this aquatic ecosystem. Mg isotope analyses were performed on samples of incoming streams, groundwaters, lake waters, stromatolites, and hydromagnesite-rich sediments. Laboratory Mg carbonate precipitation experiments were conducted in the presence of purified Synechococcus sp cyanobacteria that were isolated from the lake water and stromatolites. The hydrous magnesium carbonates nesquehonite (MgCO3·3H2O and dypingite (Mg5(CO34(OH25(H2O were precipitated in these batch reactor experiments from aqueous solutions containing either synthetic NaHCO3/MgCl2 mixtures or natural Lake Salda water, in the presence and absence of live photosynthesizing Synechococcus sp. Bulk precipitation rates were not to affected by the presence of bacteria when air was bubbled through the system. In the stirred non-bubbled reactors, conditions similar to natural settings, bacterial photosynthesis provoked nesquehonite precipitation, whilst no precipitation occurred in bacteria-free systems in the absence of air bubbling, despite the fluids achieving a similar or higher degree of supersaturation. The extent of Mg isotope fractionation (Δ26Mgsolid-solution between the mineral and solution in the abiotic experiments was found to be identical, within uncertainty, to that measured in cyanobacteria-bearing experiments, and ranges from −1.4 to −0.7 ‰. This similarity refutes

  1. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Supersaturated Lysozyme Solutions and Associated Precipitate Formation/Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (wlv) NaCl at pH= 4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  2. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-02-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions.

  3. The effect of protein–precipitant interfaces and applied shear on the nucleation and growth of lysozyme crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleation of lysozyme in microbatch experiments was linked to the formation of protein–precipitant interfaces. The use of oscillatory shear allowed decreasing the nucleation rate and extending the growth period for lysozyme crystals, presumably through the control of the number of interfaces and removal of impurities or defects. This paper is concerned with the effect of protein–precipitant interfaces and externally applied shear on the nucleation and growth kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals. The early stages of microbatch crystallization of lysozyme were explored using both optical and confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging. Initially, an antisolvent (precipitant) was added to a protein drop and the optical development of the protein–precipitant interface was followed with time. In the presence of the water-soluble polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) a sharp interface was observed to form immediately within the drop, giving an initial clear separation between the lighter protein solution and the heavier precipitant. This interface subsequently became unstable and quickly developed within a few seconds into several unstable ‘fingers’ that represented regions of high concentration-gradient interfaces. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the subsequent nucleation of protein crystals occurred preferentially in the region of these interfaces. Additional experiments using an optical shearing system demonstrated that oscillatory shear significantly decreased nucleation rates whilst extending the growth period of the lysozyme crystals. The experimental observations relating to both nucleation and growth have relevance in developing efficient and reliable protocols for general crystallization procedures and the controlled crystallization of single large high-quality protein crystals for use in X-ray crystallography

  4. Sucrose/bovine serum albumin mediated biomimetic crystallization of calcium carbonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng-Li Yao; Wang-Hua Xu; Ai-Min Ding; Jin-Mao Zhu

    2009-01-01

    To understand the role of the sucrose/bovine serum albumin system in the biomineralization process, we have tested the influence of different concentration of the sucrose/bovine serum albumin (BSA) on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation. The CaCO3 crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrograph (FT-IR) and powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The possible formation mechanism of CaCO3 in the sucrose/bovine serum albumin system was discussed.

  5. Precipitation pulses and carbon fluxes in semiarid and arid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxman, Travis E; Snyder, Keirith A; Tissue, David; Leffler, A Joshua; Ogle, Kiona; Pockman, William T; Sandquist, Darren R; Potts, Daniel L; Schwinning, Susan

    2004-10-01

    In the arid and semiarid regions of North America, discrete precipitation pulses are important triggers for biological activity. The timing and magnitude of these pulses may differentially affect the activity of plants and microbes, combining to influence the C balance of desert ecosystems. Here, we evaluate how a "pulse" of water influences physiological activity in plants, soils and ecosystems, and how characteristics, such as precipitation pulse size and frequency are important controllers of biological and physical processes in arid land ecosystems. We show that pulse size regulates C balance by determining the temporal duration of activity for different components of the biota. Microbial respiration responds to very small events, but the relationship between pulse size and duration of activity likely saturates at moderate event sizes. Photosynthetic activity of vascular plants generally increases following relatively larger pulses or a series of small pulses. In this case, the duration of physiological activity is an increasing function of pulse size up to events that are infrequent in these hydroclimatological regions. This differential responsiveness of photosynthesis and respiration results in arid ecosystems acting as immediate C sources to the atmosphere following rainfall, with subsequent periods of C accumulation should pulse size be sufficient to initiate vascular plant activity. Using the average pulse size distributions in the North American deserts, a simple modeling exercise shows that net ecosystem exchange of CO2 is sensitive to changes in the event size distribution representative of wet and dry years. An important regulator of the pulse response is initial soil and canopy conditions and the physical structuring of bare soil and beneath canopy patches on the landscape. Initial condition influences responses to pulses of varying magnitude, while bare soil/beneath canopy patches interact to introduce nonlinearity in the relationship between pulse

  6. Ion beam induced crystallization of amorphous Si from NiSi2 precipitates: An in situ study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By first growing NiSi2 precipitates in a-Si and then irradiating with a 150 keV Si beam, the authors have studied ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization (IBIEC) of Si initiated at a-Si/NiSi2 precipitate interfaces. The growth shape and its temperature dependence are studied in-beam via in situ transmission electron microscopy. Interface roughening is evidenced. Preliminary results for the Co-Si system are also reported

  7. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Carbon Dioxide Flooding by Managing Asphaltene Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2002-02-21

    This project was undertaken to understand fundamental aspects of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced asphaltene precipitation. Oil and asphaltene samples from the Rangely field in Colorado were used for most of the project. The project consisted of pure component and high-pressure, thermodynamic experiments, thermodynamic modeling, kinetic experiments and modeling, targeted corefloods and compositional modeling.

  8. PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS IN CASEIN PRECIPITATED BY PRESSURIZED CARBON DIOXIDE (C02 CASEIN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite much research on the casein micelles, the colloidal calcium-phosphate complexes of skim milk, the molecular interactions involved in the casein micelles remain elusive. We investigate casein precipitated by pressurized carbon dioxide (CO2 casein) to elucidate the mechanism of the formation o...

  9. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) as countermeasure to mist formation in amine based carbon capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.; Anderlohr, C.; Rogiers, P.; Brachert, L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Schaber, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study is to our knowledge the first to evaluate the potential of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) to prevent aerosol formation issues inside amine based carbon capture installations. A WESP is a suitable option since this study proves that it is very efficient for the removal of the mist

  10. Toxicity effects on metal sequestration by microbially-induced carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugwar, Ahmed J; Harbottle, Michael J

    2016-08-15

    Biological precipitation of metallic contaminants has been explored as a remedial technology for contaminated groundwater systems. However, metal toxicity and availability limit the activity and remedial potential of bacteria. We report the ability of a bacterium, Sporosarcina pasteurii, to remove metals in aerobic aqueous systems through carbonate formation. Its ability to survive and grow in increasingly concentrated aqueous solutions of zinc, cadmium, lead and copper is explored, with and without a metal precipitation mechanism. In the presence of metal ions alone, bacterial growth was inhibited at a range of concentrations depending on the metal. Microbial activity in a urea-amended medium caused carbonate ion generation and pH elevation, providing conditions suitable for calcium carbonate bioprecipitation, and consequent removal of metal ions. Elevation of pH and calcium precipitation are shown to be strongly linked to removal of zinc and cadmium, but only partially linked to removal of lead and copper. The dependence of these effects on interactions between the respective metal and precipitated calcium carbonate are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the bacterium operates at higher metal concentrations in the presence of the urea-amended medium, suggesting that the metal removal mechanism offers a defence against metal toxicity. PMID:27136729

  11. Study of the kinetics of recrystallization and precipitation in low carbon content steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of precipitation and recrystallization in low carbon steels was studied, from the point of view of the interaction between both phenomena, in a series of experiments involving interrupted annealing. Two kinds of steel with very different nitrogen content were used, and an aluminum nitrate dissolution treatment at a temperature of 1220oC was carried out during three hours, after which the steel was air cooled, when AIN precipitation was not attained. An aluminum nitrate precipitation treatment was also carried out at 800oC for eight hours, after which, the air was cooled. A treatment of interrupted conventional annealing was performed, measuring the recrystallized fraction based on measurements of hardness. The activation energy for the recrystallization was determined in each case, with the AIN precipitation producing a delay in the recrystallization, shown by the greater activation energies for the corresponding recrystallization in those samples where the nitrogen was free at the start of the annealing treatment (522 kJ/mol against 469 kJ/mol). The steels that contained all the precipitated nitrogen had lower activation energies, which suggests that the aluminum nitride precipitation during recrystallization produces a delay, probably due to the decreased mobility of the grain edges from the effect of the precipitates (CW)

  12. Formation and stability of Fe-rich precipitates in dilute Zr(Fe) single-crystal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and stability of Fe-rich precipitates in two α-Zr(Fe) single-crystal alloys with nominal compositions (I, 50 ppma Fe, and II, 650 ppma Fe) have been investigated (the maximum solid solubility of Fe in α-Zr is 180 ppma - 800 C). Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to examine the characteristics of Fe-rich precipitates. SEM and TEM micrographs show that in as-grown alloy II, Zr2Fe precipitates are located at 'stringers'. Precipitates were not observed in as-grown alloy I. During annealing, below the solvus, Fe diffuses to the surfaces to form Zr3Fe precipitates in both alloys. The precipitates on the surfaces of alloy I tend to be star-like (0001) or pyramidal (1010), and their distribution is heterogeneous. Dissolution of Zr3Fe surface precipitates of alloy I (annealing above the solvus) leaves precipitate-like features on the surfaces. Zr2Fe precipitates in as-grown alloy II can be dissolved only by β-phase annealing. (Author) 8 figs., 18 refs

  13. Carbon-13 NMR studies of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution, proton decoupled 13C nmr are observed for a series of neat nematic liquid crystals, the p-alkoxyazoxybenzenes, and a smectic-A liquid crystal, diethylazoxydibenzoate in a magnetic field of 23 kG. The (uniaxial) order parameters S = less than P2(costheta) greater than are found to be about 0.4 and 0.9 for the nematic and smectic-A phase respectively at the clearing points. The order parameter increases with decreasing temperature in the nematic phase but is constant, or nearly so, with temperature in the smectic-A phase. In the nematic series studied, the ordering exhibits an even-odd alternation along the series and qualitative agreement with a recent theory due to Marcelja is found. In both phases, the spectra show that the molecule rotates rapidly about its long axis. Tentative conclusions about molecular conformational motion and 14N spin relaxation are presented for both nematic and smectic-A phases. In the smectic-A phase, the sample is rotated about an axis perpendicular to H0 and the resulting spectra are dicusssed. The theory of observed chemical shifts in liquid crystals is discussed and equations are derived which relate the nmr spectra of liquid-crystals to the order parameters. A model for the smectic-C phase due to Luz and Meiboom and Doane is described and lineshapes are determined on the basis of this model for special cases. The dependence of the order parameters on the molecular potential which give rise to the various degrees of order in the different liquid crystalline phases is examined. To a good approximation the functional dependence of the order parameters on the molecular potential is shown to be a simple one in the limit of small tilt angle in the smectic-C phase

  14. Precipitation diagram and optimization of crystallization conditions at low ionic strength for deglycosylated dye-decolorizing peroxidase from a basidiomycete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precipitation phase diagrams can be rapidly constructed using dispensing-robot technology. These diagrams provide information that assists in optimization of crystal growth. The growth of suitably sized protein crystals is essential for protein structure determination by X-ray crystallography. In general, crystals are grown using a trial-and-error method. However, these methods have been modified with the advent of microlitre dispensing-robot technology and of protocols that rapidly screen for crystal nucleation conditions. The use of one such automatic dispenser for mixing protein drops (1.3–2.0 µl in volume) of known concentration and pH with precipitating solutions (ejecting 2.0 µl droplets) containing salt is described here. The results of the experiments are relevant to a crystallization approach based on a two-step procedure: screening for the crystal nucleation step employing robotics followed by optimization of the crystallization conditions using incomplete factorial experimental design. Large crystals have successfully been obtained using quantities as small as 3.52 mg protein

  15. Morphological changes of gamma prime precipitates in nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the morphology of the gamma prime precipitate were examined during tensile creep at temperatures between 927 and 1038 C in 001-oriented single crystals of a Ni-Al-Mo-Ta superalloy. In this alloy, which has a large negative misfit of -0.80%, the gamma prime particles link together during creep to form platelets, or rafts, which are aligned with their broad faces perpendicular to the applied tensile axis. The dimensions of the gamma and gamma prime phases were measured as directional coarsening developed in an attempt to trace the changing morphology under various stress levels. In addition, the effects of initial microstructure, as well as slight compositional variations, were related to raft development and creep properties. The results showed that directional coarsening of gamma prime began during primary creep, and under certain conditions, continued to develop after the onset of steady-state creep. The length of the rafts increased linearly with time up to a plateau region. The thickness of the rafts, however, remained equal to the initial gamma prime size at least up through the onset of tertiary creep this is a clear indication of the stability of the finely-spaced gamma-gamma prime lamellar structure. It was found that the single crystals with the finest gamma prime size exhibited the longest creep lives, because the resultant rafted structure had a larger number of gamma-gamma prime interfaces per unit volume of material

  16. Influence of calcium carbonate and carbon nanotubes on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene at high supercooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawe, Jürgen E. K.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer fillers have been classified as active or inactive regarding their nucleation performance. Whereas an active filler significantly accelerates the crystallization process, an inactive filler has a significantly reduced influence on the crystallization kinetics. The majority of the studies of the filler influence on the crystallization process are performed at relatively low supercooling or at low cooling rates. In this paper, we use the Fast Scanning DSC to study the crystallization process of differently filled polypropylene (PP) in the temperature range between 120 °C and 0 °C. The inactive filler calcium carbonate reduces the crystallization rate of the α-phase at low supercooling (above 80 °C). Between 45 °C and 80 °C, calcium carbonate significantly accelerates the α-phase crystallization of PP. The mesophase crystallization is not affected by this filler. As an example of active filler, carbon nanotubes are used. Even with small filler content the α-phase crystallization of PP is significantly accelerated. Also in this case the mesophase crystallization is not significantly affected.

  17. Precipitation kinetics of Mg-carbonates, influence of organic ligands and consequences for CO2 mineral sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forming magnesium carbonate minerals through carbonation of magnesium silicates has been proposed as a safe and durable way to store carbon dioxide, with a possibly high potential to offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. To date however, chemical reactions involved in this process are facing strong kinetic limitations, which originate in the low reactivity of both Mg-silicates and Mg-carbonates. Numerous studies have focused on the dissolution of Mg-silicates, under the questionable hypothesis that this step limits the whole process. This thesis work focuses instead on the mechanisms and rates of formation of magnesium carbonates, which are the final products of carbonation reactions. The first part of the work is dedicated to studying the influence on magnesite precipitation kinetics of three organic ligands known to accelerate Mg-silicates dissolution rates: oxalate, citrate and EDTA. With help of mixed-flow reactor experiments performed between 100 and 150 C, we show that these ligands significantly reduce magnesite growth rates, through two combined mechanisms: (1) complexation of Mg2+ cations in aqueous solution, which was rigorously estimated from a thermodynamic database established through a critical review of the literature, and (2) adsorption of ligands to a limited number of surface sites, leading to a decrease of the precipitation rate constant. The observed growth inhibition is maximal with citrate. We then used hydrothermal atomic force microscopy to probe the origin of the documented growth inhibition. Our observations show that citrate and oxalate interact with the crystal growth process on magnesite surface, modifying the shape of growth hillocks as well as the step generation frequency through spiral growth. We also show that the ligands adsorb preferentially on different kink-sites, which is probably related to their different structures and chemical properties. We propose that the stronger magnesite growth inhibition caused by citrate is related

  18. The sensitivity of carbon exchanges in Great Plains grasslands to precipitation variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, M. D.; Brunsell, N. A.; Vargas, R.; Collins, S. L.; Flanagan, L. B.; Hanan, N. P.; Litvak, M. E.; Suyker, A. E.

    2016-02-01

    In the Great Plains, grassland carbon dynamics differ across broad gradients of precipitation and temperature, yet finer-scale variation in these variables may also affect grassland processes. Despite the importance of grasslands, there is little information on how fine-scale relationships compare between them regionally. We compared grassland C exchanges, energy partitioning and precipitation variability in eight sites in the eastern and western Great Plains using eddy covariance and meteorological data. During our study, both eastern and western grasslands varied between an average net carbon sink and a net source. Eastern grasslands had a moderate vapor pressure deficit (VPD = 0.95 kPa) and high growing season gross primary productivity (GPP = 1010 ± 218 g C m-2 yr-1). Western grasslands had a growing season with higher VPD (1.43 kPa) and lower GPP (360 ± 127 g C m-2 yr-1). Western grasslands were sensitive to precipitation at daily timescales, whereas eastern grasslands were sensitive at monthly and seasonal timescales. Our results support the expectation that C exchanges in these grasslands differ as a result of varying precipitation regimes. Because eastern grasslands are less influenced by short-term variability in rainfall than western grasslands, the effects of precipitation change are likely to be more predictable in eastern grasslands because the timescales of variability that must be resolved are relatively longer. We postulate increasing regional heterogeneity in grassland C exchanges in the Great Plains in coming decades.

  19. Enrichment of yttrium from rare earth concentrate by ammonium carbonate leaching and peroxide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rare earth elements (REE) solubility with ammonium carbonate vary progressively from element to element, the heavy rare earth elements (HRE) being more soluble than the light rare earth elements (LRE). Their solubility is function of the carbonate concentration and the kind of carbonate as sodium, potassium and ammonium. In this work, it is explored this ability of the carbonate for the dissolution of the REE and an easy separation of yttrium was achieved using the precipitation of the peroxide from complex yttrium carbonate. For this work is used a REE concentrate containing (%) Y2O3 2.4, Dy2O3 0.6, Gd2O3 2.7, CeO2 2.5, Nd2O3 33.2, La2O3 40.3, Sm2O3 4.1 and Pr6O11 7.5. The mentioned concentrate was produced industrially from the chemical treatment of monazite sand by NUCLEMON in Sao Paulo. The yttrium concentrate was treated with 200 g L-1 ammonium carbonate during 10 and 30 min at room temperature. The experiments indicated that a single leaching operation was sufficient to get a rich yttrium solution with about 60.3% Y2O3. In a second step, this yttrium solution was treated with an excess of hydrogen peroxide (130 volumes), cerium, praseodymium and neodymium peroxides being completely precipitated and separated from yttrium. Yttrium was recovered from the carbonate solution as the oxalate and finally as oxide. The final product is an 81% Y2O3. This separation envisages an industrial application. The work discussed the solubility of the REE using ammonium carbonate and the subsequent precipitation of the correspondent peroxides

  20. Thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotube crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Li-Jun; Liu Ji; Liu Zheng; Qiu Cai-Yu; Zhou Hai-Qing; Sun Lian-Feng

    2011-01-01

    In this work,the thermal properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) crystal are studied. The thermal conductivity of the SWCNT crystal is found to have a linear dependence on temperature in the temperature range from 1.9 K to 100.0 K. In addition,a peak (658 W/mK) is found at a temperature of about 100.0 K. The thermal conductivity decreases gradually to a value of 480 W/mK and keeps almost a constant in the temperature range from 100.0 K to 300.0 K. Meanwhile,the specific heat shows an obvious linear relationship with temperature in the temperature range from 1.9 K to 300.0 K. We discuss the possible mechanisms for these unique thermal properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube crystal.

  1. Factors affecting the precipitation of pure calcium carbonate during the direct aqueous carbonation of flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineral carbonation of FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum was carried out through CO2 sorption into ammonia solution containing FGD gypsum. High-purity calcium carbonate was precipitated from DCC (dissolved calcium carbonate) solution which was extracted during the induction period. The factors affecting the preparation of pure calcium carbonate were examined under the following conditions: CO2 flow rate (1–3 L/min), ammonia content (4–12%), and S/L (solid-to-liquid) ratio (5–300 g/L). X-Ray diffraction study revealed that the PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate) was round-shaped vaterite. The induction time for PCC decreased as the CO2 flow rate increased. The maximum formation efficiency for pure PCC was seen to increase linearly with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure PCC was the highest (90%) for S/L ratio of 5 g/L but it decreased as S/L ratio increased. On the other hand, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of DCC. It is believed that the pure PCC would add an economic value to the FGD gypsum carbonation for industrial CO2 sequestration. - Highlights: • Pure and white CaCO3 was synthesized using induction period during direct carbonation of FGD gypsum. • Its formation efficiency was increased with ammonia content but decreased with solid-to-liquid ratio. • This method is expected to extend to other industrial CO2 sequestration for the enhanced economic value of precipitated CaCO3

  2. Study of mutual precipitation of holmium and nickel ions with sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction in the (Ho3++Ni2+)-Na2CO3-H2O at 25 deg C and relation (R) CO32-; (Ho3++Ni2+)=0.5-25 is studied by the method of residual concentrations. Only holmium carbonate hydrate precipitates at R=0.5 according to data on chemical analysis. In interval R=0.5-2 the composition of a solid phase corresponds to the Ho2(CO3)3xNiCO3x6H2O formula. Thermal analysis of this compound has shown that up to 260 deg C it dehydrates and then decomposes with Ho2NiO4 formation. In interval R=2-4 Na(Ho(CO3)3)xNiCO3x2H2O, which transforms to the solution as a holmium carbonate complex when increasing value R, precipitates, and nickel carbonate remains quantitatively in precipitate. The paper results can be used for holmium and nickel separation by means of carbonates

  3. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup

  4. Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling of Ureolytically-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuxin Wu; Jonathan B. Ajo-Franklin; Nicolas Spycher; Susan S. Hubbard; Guoxiang Zhang; Kenneth H. Williams; Joanna Taylor; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

    2011-09-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  5. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxin; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Spycher, Nicolas; Hubbard, Susan S; Zhang, Guoxiang; Williams, Kenneth H; Taylor, Joanna; Fujita, Yoshiko; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  6. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Joanna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT, and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes

  7. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Silva-Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments.

  8. Formation of carbon crystals from polymers using electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymers consist mainly of carbon and other atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine and etc. Because of the gas evolution during irradiation, polymer is converted into the carbon-rich materials un deer electron as well as ion irradiation. Ions have more heavy mass than electron, so it could be easy to generate the defects through the collision between ion and polymer. But electrons are not nearly affected the formation of defects due to their light mass. Thus the crystals could be formed from the electron irradiated polymer. PMMA and PE, which are degraded and cross-linked upon electron beam irradiation respectively, are irradiated by electrons of low energy and high fluence in the vacuum. In order to investigate the properties of irradiated polymers changed by electron irradiation, Raman spectrometer, nanoidentor, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are used. It reveals that the characteristic Raman bands of starting material are lost upon electron beam irradiation and the one-phonon bands near 1350 cm-1 (D line) and 1580 cm-1 (G line) of amorphous carbon appeared. Also the content of the sp2- and sp3 -bonded carbon which are related with electronic and mechanical properties in an amorphous carbon respectively, increases with fluence. And the surface hardness in the irradiated polymers increases as fluence increases in spite of the fact that PMMA has degrading property under irradiation especially. In the TEM observation, their diffraction patterns and high resolution lattice image show the formation of carbon crystals from polymer

  9. Interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation processes allow a photonic crystal to replace an ionic crystal along lattice planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesegang, Moritz; Milke, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    structural and chemical reorganization mechanisms behind silica pseudomorphism. Fundamental knowledge about the highly selective replacement process is absent so far, impeding an adequate interpretation of the observations. The replacement of calcitic shells by amorphous silica spheres (~300 nm in size) is a unique example for the transformation of an ionic to a photonic crystal accompanied by a large size contrast of ions and spheres, respectively, but preserving lattice planes. The observed replication of polysynthetic twinning and cleavage planes of calcite by opal-A spheres indicates that silicification occurs via dissolution of shell material and immediate precipitation of amorphous silica. This follows the interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism model (Putnis and Putnis, 2007), but requires some modification to allow for open space necessary to form spheres in the 100s-nm size range with a core-shell structure. While sphere growth by a gravitational ordering process is implausible, we assume that the ordered array of monodisperse spheres forms via layer-by-layer deposition. References: Putnis A. and Putnis C.V. (2007), J. Solid State Chem., 180, 1783-1786

  10. The influence of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putro, Triswantoro; Endarko

    2016-04-01

    The influences of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation in water have been successfully investigated. The study used three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T whilst the electron discharge was generated from television flyback transformer type BW00607 and stainless steel SUS 304 as an electrode. The water sample with an initial condition of 230 mg/L placed in the reactor with flow rate 375 mL/minutes, result showed that the electron discharge can be reduced contain of calcium carbonate the water sample around 17.39% within 2 hours. Meanwhile for the same long period of treatment and flow rate, around 56.69% from initial condition of 520 mg/L of calcium carbonate in the water sample can be achieved by three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T. When the combination of three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T and the electron discharge used for treatment, the result showed that the combination of electron discharge and magnetic field methods can be used to precipitate calcium carbonate in the water sample 300 mg/L around 76.66% for 2 hours of treatment. The study then investigated the influence of the polar position of the magnetic field on calcium carbonate precipitation. Two positions of magnetic field were tested namely the system with alternated polar magnetics and the system without inversion of the polar magnetics. The influence of the polar position showed that the percentage reduction in levels of calcium carbonate in the water sample (360 mg/L) is significant different. Result showed that the system without inversion of the polar magnetics is generally lower than the system with alternated polar magnetics, with reduction level at 30.55 and 57.69%, respectively.

  11. Transport and precipitation of carbon and sulphur in the Reykjanes geothermal system, Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla Rivas, E. Kevin, 1981

    2011-01-01

    Sulphur and carbon analyses of drill cuttings, mineral saturation state calculations and reaction path modelling were used to assess the effects of boiling and phase separation, cooling, magmatic gas input and extent of fluid-rock reaction in order to get insight into the source, transport and precipitation of sulphur, carbon and associated metals in the Reykjanes geothermal system. Reservoir temperatures range from 275 to 310°C and the estimated pH from ~4.5 to ~5.0 with uncertainties up to ...

  12. Effect of a cyanobacterial community on calcium carbonate precipitation in Puente del Inca (Mendoza, Argentina)

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, S.G.; Italiano, M.C.; de Silva, H J

    2002-01-01

    The involvement of cyanobacteria in the precipitation process forming calcium carbonate was studied in samples collected at a geothermal spring located in an area close to Puente del Inca (Mendoza, Argentina). In the summer season profuse cyanobacterial growth is observed at Puente del Inca in areas exposed to sunlight and over which thermal water flows. Differences in cellular structure allowed the recognition of strains of Oscillatoria, Spirulina, Plectonema, and Nostoc, Oscillatoria and...

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF CHEMICALS USE FOR HIGHLY FILLED MECHANICAL GRADE PAPERS WITH PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE

    OpenAIRE

    Yizhou Sang,; Michael McQuaid; Peter Englezos

    2011-01-01

    Response surface methodology was used with four factors to screen for the best starch and optimize the use of chemicals in order to maximize precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) filler retention in a peroxide-bleached TMP suspension. Three commercial starches were used in conjunction with colloidal silica and flocculant. The PCC loading level and the interactions between PCC level, starch, flocculant, and silica were investigated, and empirical models were constructed. The empirical process m...

  14. Investigation of Black Carbon Effects on Precipitation and Surface Hydrology over the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, H. L. R.; Liou, K. N.; Gu, Y.; Fovell, R. G.; Li, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The current Exceptional Drought (US Drought Monitor) over the western United States warrants an in-depth investigation of possible causes of decreased precipitation and surface hydrology. Black carbon (BC), being the most radiatively-absorptive of any aerosol species, has the potential to semi-directly influence atmospheric physics and dynamics. Aloft, BC can exacerbate the aridity in some areas while increasing precipitation in other locations. On the surface, BC can also alter surface hydrology parameters such as surface runoff and snow water equivalent. In this study, we examine the role of BC and its possible effect on spatial precipitation redistribution and surface hydrology west of and over the Rocky Mountains from an online and coupled meteorological and chemical perspective. In particular, we utilize the Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model at the horizontal resolution of 30 km, employing the Fu-Liou-Gu plane-parallel radiation scheme and a three-dimensional radiation parameterization over mountainous areas to account for BC feedback with clouds, radiation, local circulation, and precipitation. Preliminary results of a January 2005 low pressure system show the inclusion of BC increases (decreases) precipitation on the windward (leeward) side of the Transverse and Peninsular Ranges, and the Sierra Nevada. Results also show BC contributes to an increase in surface runoff on the windward side of the Transverse and Peninsular Ranges, the Sierra Nevada, and Rocky Mountains, but a decrease in snow water equivalent over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains.

  15. Nano-sized precipitation and properties of a low carbon niobium micro-alloyed bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work focuses on microstructure evolution and precipitation strengthening during tempering at region of 550–680 °C to elucidate the structure–property relationship in the steel. The effect of tempering on the development of a 700 MPa grade high strength hot rolled cost-effective bainitic steel was studied for infrastructure applications. Granular bainite with dispersed martenisit–austenite (M–A) constituents in the bainitic ferrite matrix was obtained after hot rolling and air cooling to room temperature. The decomposition of M–A constituents to cementite carbides and the precipitation of nano-sized NbC carbides in bainitic matrix on tempering were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nano-sized precipitates of NbC precipitated during tempering were in average diameter of ~4.1–6.1 nm. There were ~86–173 MPa increases in yield strength after tempering at region of 550–680 °C. It is noticeable that those nano-sized NbC precipitates provide an effective way to significantly increase the strength of the low carbon bainitic steel. High yield strength of 716 MPa with high ductility (uniform elongation of 9.3% and total elongation of 22.4%), low yield to tensile ratio of 0.9 and good low temperature toughness of 47 J (half thickness) at –40 °C was obtained after tempering at 680 °C for 30 min

  16. Nano-sized precipitation and properties of a low carbon niobium micro-alloyed bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4L8 (Canada); Ma, X.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4L8 (Canada); Shang, C.J., E-mail: cjshang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, X.M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Subramanian, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2015-08-12

    The present work focuses on microstructure evolution and precipitation strengthening during tempering at region of 550–680 °C to elucidate the structure–property relationship in the steel. The effect of tempering on the development of a 700 MPa grade high strength hot rolled cost-effective bainitic steel was studied for infrastructure applications. Granular bainite with dispersed martenisit–austenite (M–A) constituents in the bainitic ferrite matrix was obtained after hot rolling and air cooling to room temperature. The decomposition of M–A constituents to cementite carbides and the precipitation of nano-sized NbC carbides in bainitic matrix on tempering were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nano-sized precipitates of NbC precipitated during tempering were in average diameter of ~4.1–6.1 nm. There were ~86–173 MPa increases in yield strength after tempering at region of 550–680 °C. It is noticeable that those nano-sized NbC precipitates provide an effective way to significantly increase the strength of the low carbon bainitic steel. High yield strength of 716 MPa with high ductility (uniform elongation of 9.3% and total elongation of 22.4%), low yield to tensile ratio of 0.9 and good low temperature toughness of 47 J (half thickness) at –40 °C was obtained after tempering at 680 °C for 30 min.

  17. Bioactive coatings on Portland cement substrates: Surface precipitation of apatite-like crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, Daniel [Biomedical Engineering Department, Ohio State University, 1080 Carmack Road, 270 Bevis Hall, Columbus (OH) - 43210 (United States); Higuita, Natalia [Biomedical Engineering Department, Ohio State University, 1080 Carmack Road, 270 Bevis Hall, Columbus (OH) - 43210 (United States); Grupo de Investigacion en Ingenieria Biomedica CES-EIA (GIBEC), Carrera 43 A No. 52 Sur - 99, Sabaneta (Colombia); Garcia, Felipe [Grupo de Investigacion en Ingenieria Biomedica CES-EIA (GIBEC), Carrera 43 A No. 52 Sur - 99, Sabaneta (Colombia); Ferrell, Nicholas [Biomedical Engineering Department, Ohio State University, 1080 Carmack Road, 270 Bevis Hall, Columbus (OH) - 43210 (United States); Hansford, Derek J. [Biomedical Engineering Department, Ohio State University, 1080 Carmack Road, 270 Bevis Hall, Columbus (OH) - 43210 (United States)], E-mail: hansford.4@osu.edu

    2008-04-01

    We report a method for depositing bioactive coatings onto cement materials for bone tissue engineering applications. White Portland cement substrates were hydrated under a 20% CO{sub 2} atmosphere, allowing the formation of CaCO{sub 3}. The substrates were incubated in a calcium phosphate solution for 1, 3, and 6 days (CPI, CPII, and CPIII respectively) at 37 deg. C to induce the formation of carbonated apatite. Cement controls were prepared and hydrated with and without CO{sub 2} atmosphere (C+ and C- respectively). The presence of apatite-like crystals was verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The substrate cytocompatibility was evaluated via SEM after 24 hour cell cultures. SEM revealed the presence Ca(OH){sub 2} on C-, and CaCO{sub 3} on C+. Apatite-like crystals were detected only on CPIII, confirmed by phosphorus EDS peaks only for CPIII. Cells attached and proliferated similarly well on all the substrates except C-. These results prove the feasibility of obtaining biocompatible and bioactive coatings on Portland cement for bone tissue engineering applications.

  18. Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pearce, Christopher R.; Shirokova, Liudmila S.; Bundeleva, Irina A.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Benezeth, Pascale; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrous magnesium carbonates, nesquehonite (MgCO 3·3H 2O) and dypingite (Mg 5(CO 3) 4(OH) 2·5(H 2O)), were precipitated at 25 °C in batch reactors from aqueous solutions containing 0.05 M NaHCO 3 and 0.025 M MgCl 2 and in the presence and absence of live photosynthesizing Gloeocapsa sp. cyanobacteria. Experiments were performed under a variety of conditions; the reactive fluid/bacteria/mineral suspensions were continuously stirred, and/or air bubbled in most experiments, and exposed to various durations of light exposure. Bulk precipitation rates are not affected by the presence of bacteria although the solution pH and the degree of fluid supersaturation with respect to magnesium carbonates increase due to photosynthesis. Lighter Mg isotopes are preferentially incorporated into the precipitated solids in all experiments. Mg isotope fractionation between the mineral and fluid in the abiotic experiments is identical, within uncertainty, to that measured in cyanobacteria-bearing experiments; measured δ 26Mg ranges from -1.54‰ to -1.16‰ in all experiments. Mg isotope fractionation is also found to be independent of reactive solution pH and Mg, CO 32-, and biomass concentrations. Taken together, these observations suggest that Gloeocapsa sp. cyanobacterium does not appreciably affect magnesium isotope fractionation between aqueous fluid and hydrous magnesium carbonates.

  19. Crystallization and precipitation of phosphate from swine wastewater by magnesium metal corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiming; Liu, Jiahui; Jiang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a unique approach for magnesium dosage in struvite precipitation by Mg metal corrosion. The experimental results showed that using an air bubbling column filled with Mg metal and graphite pellets for the magnesium dosage was the optimal operation mode, which could significantly accelerate the corrosion of the Mg metal pellets due to the presence of graphite granules. The reaction mechanism experiments revealed that the solution pH could be used as the indicator for struvite crystallization by the process. Increases in the Mg metal dosage, mass ratio of graphite and magnesium metal (G:M) and airflow rate could rapidly increase the solution pH. When all three conditions were at 10 g L-1, 1:1 and 1 L min-1, respectively, the phosphate recovery efficiency reached 97.5%. To achieve a high level of automation for the phosphate recovery process, a continuous-flow reactor immersed with the graphite-magnesium air bubbling column was designed to harvest the phosphate from actual swine wastewater. Under conditions of intermittently supplementing small amounts of Mg metal pellets, approximately 95% of the phosphate could be stably recovered as struvite of 95.8% (±0.5) purity. An economic analysis indicated that the process proposed was technically simple and economically feasible.

  20. Separation of 1,3-propanediol from glycerol-based fermentations of Klebsiella pneumoniae by alcohol precipitation and dilution crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Sujun; ZHANG Daijia; SUN Yaqin; XIU Zhilong

    2007-01-01

    The separation of 1,3-propanediol from the glycerol-based fermentation broth of Klebsiella pneumoniae plays an important role during the microbial production of 1,3-propanediol.In this paper,the separation of 1,3-propanediol from fermentative broth by a combination of ultrafiltration and alcohol dilution crystallization was investigated.The broth was first filtered by ultrafiltration,and 99%of cells,89.4% of proteins and 69% of nucleic acids were removed.The obtained broth was further condensed by vacuum distillation,and then alcohol was added.The macromolecular impurities,such as nucleic acids,polysaccharides and proteins,were precipitated,and inorganic and organic salts were crystallized.The optimal volume ratio of alcohol added to the condensed fermentation broth was determined to tivity decreased by 97.4%,89.7% and 95.8%,respectively,compared with the fermentative broth.The influences of pH and water content in condensed broth on alcohol precipitation and dilution crystallization were also investigated.The experimental results indicated that alcohol precipitation and dilution crystallization was feasible and effective for the separation of 1,3-propanediol from actual fermentation broth.

  1. CVD synthesis of carbon-based metallic photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zakhidov, A A; Baughman, R H; Iqbal, Z

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensionally periodic nanostructures on the scale of hundreds of nanometers, known as photonic crystals, are attracting increasing interest because of a number of exciting predicted properties. In particular, interesting behavior should be obtainable for carbon- based structures having a dimensional scale larger than fullerenes and nanotubes, but smaller than graphitic microfibers. We show here how templating of porous opals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allows us to obtain novel types of graphitic nanostructures. We describe the synthesis of new cubic forms of carbon having extended covalent connectivity in three dimensions, which provide high electrical conductivity and unit cell dimensions comparable to optical wavelengths. Such materials are metallic photonic crystals that show intense Bragg diffraction. (14 refs).

  2. In situ investigation on the precipitation of topologically close-packed phase in Ni-base single crystal superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations reveal the homogeneous nucleation of topologically close-packed (TCP) phase in Ni-base single crystal superalloy at elevated temperatures, which tends to grow toward primary γ/γ′ interface for element supply. Ru addition can decrease both the nucleation and growth rate, hence to suppress TCP precipitation effectively. Higher exposure temperature reduces the nucleation rate but increases the growth rate, finally accelerates the TCP precipitation. - Highlights: • In situ TEM was first applied to study the precipitation behavior of TCP phase. • The TCP phase nucleates homogeneously in γ matrix without preferential sites. • The TCP phase tends to grow toward primary γ/γ′ interface for element supply. • Ru addition can decrease both the nucleation and growth rate of TCP precipitation. • Higher temperature reduces nucleation rate but increases growth rate of TCP phase. - Abstract: In situ transmission electron microscopy was first applied to study the precipitation behavior of topologically close-packed (TCP) phase at elevated temperature in Ru-free and Ru-containing Ni-base single crystal superalloys. Ru addition can decrease both the nucleation and growth rate, hence to suppress TCP precipitation effectively. Higher exposure temperature reduces the nucleation rate but increases the growth rate, finally accelerates the precipitation. The TCP phases nucleate homogeneously in γ matrix without preferential sites, but tend to grow toward primary γ/γ′ interface for element supply. An orientation relationship is kept during nucleation and growth of μ phase in γ matrix, which is [1 1 0]μ // [0 0 1]γ and (0 0 1)μ // (−1 1 0)γ

  3. Sensitivity of Temperate Desert Steppe Carbon Exchange to Seasonal Droughts and Precipitation Variations in Inner Mongolia, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Fulin; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2013-01-01

    Arid grassland ecosystems have significant interannual variation in carbon exchange; however, it is unclear how environmental factors influence carbon exchange in different hydrological years. In this study, the eddy covariance technique was used to investigate the seasonal and interannual variability of CO2 flux over a temperate desert steppe in Inner Mongolia, China from 2008 to 2010. The amounts and times of precipitation varied significantly throughout the study period. The precipitation ...

  4. Bioleaching of incineration fly ash by Aspergillus niger – precipitation of metallic salt crystals and morphological alteration of the fungus

    OpenAIRE

    Tong-Jiang Xu; Thulasya Ramanathan; Yen-Peng Ting

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the bioleaching of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by Aspergillus niger, and its effect on the fungal morphology, the fate of the ash particles, and the precipitation of metallic salt crystals during bioleaching. The fungal morphology was significantly affected during one-step and two-step bioleaching; scanning electron microscopy revealed that bioleaching caused distortion of the fungal hyphae (with up to 10 μm hyphae diameter) and a swollen pellet structure. I...

  5. Effects of transformation temperature on VC interphase precipitation and resultant hardness in low-carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of transformation temperature on VC interphase precipitation in low-carbon steels were investigated mainly by using an Fe–0.1C–1.5Mn–0.4V–0.05Si (mass%) alloy isothermally transformed at different temperatures. The crystallographic relationship between ferrite and austenite as well as the precipitates and resultant hardness were characterized by combining electron backscatter diffraction, three-dimensional atom probe and nanoindentation measurements in the same ferrite grains. It was found that the number density of sheet-like interphase precipitation at non-K–S (Kurdjumov–Sachs) interfaces is significantly increased by decreasing the transformation temperature from 993 K to 923 K, while no great change can be obtained by further lowering the temperature to 873 K. The nanohardness of ferrite grains shows the same trend as that of VC number density. The effects of transformation temperature on VC interphase precipitation are discussed in terms of the driving force for VC nucleation. On the other hand, the temperature dependence of macroscopic hardness does not agree with that for nanohardness due to the fact that fraction of ferrite holding near the K–S orientation relationship with austenite changes substantially with transformation temperature

  6. Effect of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu; Seref Sonmez, M.; Kurt, M. Ali

    2016-04-01

    Influence of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate mineralogy were investigated by series of experiments carried out under various environmental conditions (Mg/Ca ratio, temperature and salinity). Halophilic bacterial cultures used for biomineralization experiments were isolated from hypersaline Lake Acıgöl (Denizli, SW Turkey), displaying extreme water chemistry with an average pH around 8.6 (Balci eta l.,2015). Enriched bacterial culture used in the experiments consisted of Halomonas saccharevitans strain AJ275, Halomonas alimentaria strain L7B; Idiomarina sp. TBZ29, 98% Idiomarina seosensis strain CL-SP19. Biomineralization experiments were set up using above enriched culture with Mg/Ca ratios of 0.05, 1, 4 and 15 and salinity of 8% and 15% experiments at 30oC and 10oC. Additionally, long-term biomineralization experiments were set up to last for a year, for Mg/Ca=4 and Mg/Ca=15 experiments at 30oC. For each experimental condition abiotic experiments were also conducted. Solution chemistry throughout incubation was monitored for Na, K, Mg, Ca, bicarbonate, carbonate, ammonium and phosphate for a month. At the end of the experiments, precipitates were collected and morphology and mineralogy of the biominerals were investigated and results were evaluated using the software DIFFRAC.SUITE EVA. Overall the preliminary results showed chemical precipitation of calcite, halite, hydromagnesite and sylvite. Results obtained from biological experiments indicate that, low Mg/Ca ratios (0.05 and 1) favor chlorapatite precipitation, whereas higher Mg/Ca ratios favor struvite precipitation. Biomineralization of dolomite, huntite and magnesite is favorable at high Mg/Ca ratios (4 and 15), in the presence of halophilic bacteria. Moreover, results indicate that supersaturation with respect to Mg (Mg/Ca=15) combined with NaCl (15%) inhibits biomineralization and forms chemical precipitates. 15% salinity is shown to favor chemical precipitation of mineral phases more than

  7. A Layout for the Carbon Capture with Aqueous Ammonia without Salt Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonalumi, Davide; Valenti, Gianluca; Lillia, Stefano;

    2016-01-01

    Post-combustion carbon capture technologies seem to be necessary to realize the CO2 mitigation policies internationally shared for the next future, despite none of them appears to be ready for full-scale applications. This work considers the aqueous ammonia based process for a coal-fired Ultra...... Super Critical power plant. Two layouts are simulated with Aspen Plus employing the recently recalibrated Extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model. The first one operates at chilling conditions, which yield to salt precipitation, and is taken as reference because already analyzed in previous studies......, a lower SPECCA of 2.58 MJ/kgco2. The latter layout is a better choice also from the perspective of the plant operation since it does not present the salt precipitation....

  8. The sensitivity of ecosystem carbon exchange to seasonal precipitation and woody plant encroachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, D L; Huxman, T E; Scott, R L; Williams, D G; Goodrich, D C

    2006-12-01

    Ongoing, widespread increases in woody plant abundance in historical grasslands and savannas (woody encroachment) likely will interact with future precipitation variability to influence seasonal patterns of carbon cycling in water-limited regions. To characterize the effects of woody encroachment on the sensitivity of ecosystem carbon exchange to seasonal rainfall in a semi-arid riparian setting we used flux-duration analysis to compare 2003-growing season NEE data from a riparian grassland and shrubland. Though less seasonally variable than the grassland, shrubland NEE was more responsive to monsoon rains than anticipated. During the 2004-growing season we measured leaf gas exchange and collected leaf tissue for delta(13)C and nitrogen content analysis periodically among three size classes of the dominant woody-plant, Prosopis velutina and the dominant understory species, Sporobolus wrightii, a C(4) bunchgrass, present at the shrubland. We observed size-class and plant functional type independent patterns of seasonal plant performance consistent with greater-than-anticipated sensitivity of NEE in the shrubland. This research highlights the complex interaction between growing-season precipitation, plant-available alluvial groundwater and woody plant abundance governing ecosystem carbon balance in this semi-arid watershed. PMID:16955288

  9. Dynamics of mineral crystallization from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Wilhelm, Heribert; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-03-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. The mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet-orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatized at ~4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometres and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80-90 vol%) occur with constant volume proportions and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by synchrotron radiation at Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Such information is discussed in relation to the physico-chemical aspects of nucleation and growth, shedding light on the mode of mineral crystallization from a fluid phase trapped at supercritical conditions.

  10. Study of α-phase precipitation on crystallization of Fe88B12 amorphous alloy by NMR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR method is used to study processes, occurring at heating of Fe88B12 amorphous alloy to determine the possibility of preparation of supersaturated boron solid solution in α-iron. Samples in the form of 15-25 mcm thickness tape were prepared by means of spinning. Crystallization of amorphous matrix begins over 593 K and passes two stages. α-Fe precipitates during the first stage. Crystallization second stage starts over 723 K and results in essential structural variations. At this stage the residual amorphous matrix is crystallized with formation of metastable tetragonal boride Fe3B. Thus, one may conclude, that boron eurichment of amorphous matrix at heating results in change of orthorhombic Fe3B type short-range order for tetragonal F3B. At 730 K residual amorphous phase approaches stoichiometric boride-Fe3B-composition

  11. Massive barite deposits and carbonate mineralization in the Derugin Basin, Sea of Okhotsk: precipitation processes at cold seep sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Jens; Bollwerk, Sandra M.; Derkachev, Alexander; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Suess, Erwin

    2002-10-01

    An area of massive barite precipitations was studied at a tectonic horst in 1500 m water depth in the Derugin Basin, Sea of Okhotsk. Seafloor observations and dredge samples showed irregular, block- to column-shaped barite build-ups up to 10 m high which were scattered over the seafloor along an observation track 3.5 km long. High methane concentrations in the water column show that methane expulsion and probably carbonate precipitation is a recently active process. Small fields of chemoautotrophic clams ( Calyptogena sp., Acharax sp.) at the seafloor provide additional evidence for active fluid venting. The white to yellow barites show a very porous and often layered internal fabric, and are typically covered by dark-brown Mn-rich sediment; electron microprobe spectroscopy measurements of barite sub-samples show a Ba substitution of up to 10.5 mol% of Sr. Rare idiomorphic pyrite crystals (˜1%) in the barite fabric imply the presence of H 2S. This was confirmed by clusters of living chemoautotrophic tube worms (1 mm in diameter) found in pores and channels within the barite. Microscopic examination showed that micritic aragonite and Mg-calcite aggregates or crusts are common authigenic precipitations within the barite fabric. Equivalent micritic carbonates and barite carbonate cemented worm tubes were recovered from sediment cores taken in the vicinity of the barite build-up area. Negative δ 13C values of these carbonates (>-43.5‰ PDB) indicate methane as major carbon source; δ 18O values between 4.04 and 5.88‰ PDB correspond to formation temperatures, which are certainly below 5°C. One core also contained shells of Calyptogena sp. at different core depths with 14C-ages ranging from 20 680 to >49 080 yr. Pore water analyses revealed that fluids also contain high amounts of Ba; they also show decreasing SO 42- concentrations and a parallel increase of H 2S with depth. Additionally, S and O isotope data of barite sulfate (δ 34S: 21.0-38.6‰ CDT; δ 18O

  12. Experimental modelling of Calcium carbonate precipitation in the presence of phototrophic anaerobic bacteria Rhodovulum sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundeleva, Irina; Shirokova, Liudmila; Benezeth, Pascale; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Kompantseva, Elena

    2010-05-01

    Carbonate biomineralization is considered as one of the main natural processes controlling CO2 levels in the atmosphere both in the past and at present time. Haloalcaliphilic Rhodovulum sp. A-20s isolated from soda lake in southern Siberia and halophilic neutrophilic Rhodovulum sp. S-1765 isolated from hypersaline water body in Crimea steppe represent a large group of phototrophic bacteria likely to be involved in CaCO3 formation in soda and saline lakes. These bacteria use organic substrates for non-oxygenic photosynthesis and thus may mediate CaCO3 precipitation without CO2 consumption in highly-saline, highly-alkaline, NaHCO3-rich solutions. In order to provide the link between surface properties of bacteria and their ability to precipitate Ca carbonate, we used a combination of electrophoretic mobility measurements, surface titration and Ca ion adsorption using dead (autoclaved), inactivated (NaN3 - treated) and live cells at 25 °C as a unction of pH (3-11) and NaCl concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 M). Zeta potential of both bacteria is identical for active, NaN3-inactivated and dead cells at high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl). The pH of isoelectric point is below 3 and zeta-potential decreases or remain negative up to pH 11. However, at lower ionic strength (0.1 M and 0.01 M NaCl) for live cells the potential increases towards positive values in the alkaline solutions (pH of 9 to 10). Similar to previous results on cyanobacteria (Martinez et al., 2009) there is a net increase in zeta-potential towards more positive values at pH = 10.4 for active cells. In order to better understand this phenomenon, experiments with different concentration of Ca2+ and HCO3- ions as well as experiments with live cultures in the darkness have been carried out. The presence in solution of Ca2+ (0.01 and 0.001 M) and the absence of light in experiment do not change significantly the potential of the cells. However, the presence in solution of HCO3- strongly reduces the zeta

  13. Ellipsometric investigations of photonic crystals based on carbon nanofibers

    CERN Document Server

    Rehammar, R; Arwin, H; Kinaret, J M; Campbell, E E B

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF) are used as components of planar photonic crystals (PC). Square and rectangular lattices as well as random patterns of vertically aligned CNF were fabricated and their properties studied using ellipsometry. Conventional methods of ellipsometric analysis used in thin film ellipsometry are not applicable to these samples due to their nanostructured nature. We show that detailed information such as symmetry directions and the band structure of these novel materials can be extracted from considerations of the polarization state in the specular beam.

  14. The influence of xanthan on the crystallization of calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodeng; Xu, Guiying

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) was crystallized in xanthan (XC) aqueous solutions. The CaCO 3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) methods. The concentrations of XC, Ca 2+ and CO 32- ions and the ratios [Ca 2+]/[CO 32-] and [Mg 2+]/[Ca 2+] show evident influence on the aggregation and growth of CaCO 3 particles. The presence of Mg 2+ ions influences not only the morphology, but also the polymorph of CaCO 3.

  15. Stress–strain behavior of ferrite and bainite with nano-precipitation in low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We systematically investigate stress–strain behavior of ferrite and bainite with nano-sized vanadium carbides in low carbon steels; the ferrite samples were obtained through austenite/ferrite transformation accompanied with interphase precipitation and the bainite samples were via austenite/bainite transformation with subsequent aging. The stress–strain curves of both samples share several common features, i.e. high yield stress, relatively low work hardening and sufficient tensile elongation. Strengthening contributions from solute atoms, grain boundaries, dislocations and precipitates are calculated based on the structural parameters, and the calculation result is compared with the experimentally-obtained yield stress. The contributions from solute atoms and grain boundaries are simply additive, whereas those from dislocations and precipitates should be treated by taking the square root of the sum of the squares of two values. Nano-sized carbides may act as sites for dislocation multiplication in the early stage of deformation, while they may enhance dislocation annihilation in the later stage of deformation. Such enhanced dynamic recovery might be the reason for a relatively large elongation in both ferrite and bainite samples

  16. Performance of separation processes for precipitated calcium carbonate produced with an innovative method from steelmaking slag and carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eTeir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experiments were performed to determine the filterability of calcium carbonate produced with an alternative calcium carbonate production concept. The concept uses steelmaking slag as raw material and has potential to fix CO2 emissions and utilize steelmaking slag, simultaneously. As calcium carbonate is precipitated in a solution containing ammonium chloride, calcium chloride and ammonia, the product needs to be washed and hence filtered. In this work different separation processes, including washing, filtering and drying, were tested on two calcium carbonate slurries produced from steel converter slag and CO2 by a laboratory-scale pilot facility, with the aim of obtaining a solid product with a low chloride content using a minimum amount of washing water. The order of maximum filtration rates achievable of the calcium carbonate slurries was determined by experimental work. The tests included pressure filtration and vacuum filtration and the test series contained altogether 21 different filtration cycles with varying combinations of filtering, washing, and drying steps. The filtered cakes were analyzed by their residual moisture content, chloride content and conductivity, and the filtrates by their residual solids content, chloride content and conductivity. Pressure filtration gave a high capacity (400-460 kg/m2h and a low cake residual moisture content (12-14 wt-%. Vacuum filtration gave slightly higher filtration rates (500-610 kg/m2h at the lowest residual chloride contents of the cakes, but the cake residual moisture also stayed higher (25-26 wt-%. As the vacuum filtration tests used a filter cloth with higher permeability than that of the pressure filtration tests, a slightly higher filtration rate was expected. However, both filtration technologies seem suitable for filtering and washing calcium carbonate prepared with the studied method as a residual chloride content as low as 10 ppm of the filtered solids can be achieved

  17. Bioleaching of incineration fly ash by Aspergillus niger – precipitation of metallic salt crystals and morphological alteration of the fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Jiang Xu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the bioleaching of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by Aspergillus niger, and its effect on the fungal morphology, the fate of the ash particles, and the precipitation of metallic salt crystals during bioleaching. The fungal morphology was significantly affected during one-step and two-step bioleaching; scanning electron microscopy revealed that bioleaching caused distortion of the fungal hyphae (with up to 10 μm hyphae diameter and a swollen pellet structure. In the absence of the fly ash, the fungi showed a linear structure (with 2–4 μm hyphae diameter. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction confirmed the precipitation of calcium oxalate hydrate crystals at the surface of hyphae in both one-step and two-step bioleaching. Calcium oxalate precipitation affects bioleaching via the weakening of the fly ash, thus facilitating the release of other tightly bound metals in the matrix.

  18. Biocontainment of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on flat concrete surfaces by microbial carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwadha, George D O; Li, Jin

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a biosealant obtained from microbial carbonate precipitation (MCP) was evaluated as an alternative to an epoxy-coating system. A bacterium Sporosarcina pasteurii strain ATCC 11859, which metabolizes urea and precipitates calcite in a calcium-rich environment, was used in this study to generate the biosealant on a PCB-contaminated concrete surface. Concrete cylinders measuring 3 in (76.2 mm) by 6 in (152.4 mm) were made in accordance with ASTM C33 and C192 and used for this purpose. The PCB, urea, Ca(2+), and bacterial cell concentrations were set at 10 ppm, 666 mM, 250 mM, and about 2.1 × 10(8) cells mL(-1), respectively. The results indicate that the biosealed surfaces reduced water permeability by 1-5 orders of magnitude, and had a high resistance to carbonation. Since the MCP biosealant is thermally stable under temperatures of up to 840 °C, the high temperatures that normally exist in the surrounding equipment, which may contain PCB-based fluids, have no effect on the biosealed surfaces. Consequently, there is greater potential to obtain a stronger, coherent, and durable surface by MCP. No measurable amount of PCBs was detected in the permeating water, indicating that the leaching water, if any, will have a minimum impact on the surrounding environment. PMID:21696884

  19. Preparation of Uranium Dioxide by Electrochemical Reduction in Ammonium Carbonate Solutions and Subsequent Precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in a small scale electrolysis cell on cathodic reduction of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) show the possibility of an efficient way to obtain uranium (IV) in carbonate solutions. From this solution uranium (IV) hydrous oxide precipitates by merely raising the temperature. To obtain larger quantities of material needed for technological testing, a scale-up of the process was attempted. An electrolysis cell of hard PVC (polyvinylchloride) was constructed with a mercury pool cathode of approximately 2.5 dm2 and platinum anodes. The catholyte was separated from the anolyte by cationexchange membranes. The catholyte was circulated between two 50-1 reservoirs and streamed toward the vigorously stirred mercury cathode. The working potential of mercury was controlled against an Ag/AgCl/KC1 (sat.) reference electrode, the potential being held constant at -1.5 V. The current efficiency is approximately 90%; the power consumed for the reduction process is about 0.8 kWh/kg of uranium dioxide. After the electrolysis was completed the precipitation was initiated only by heating the deeply green clear solution up to 70 deg. C in a separate all-glass vessel of 60-1 volume. From 50, 1 of the catholyte solution 1 kg of a centrifuged product (containing about 20% of water) was obtained. The coulometric analysis of the oxygen-uranium ratio always gave results in the range of 2.04 to 2.09. By the procedure described uranium (IV) hydrous oxide is selectively precipitated, and the oxygen-uranium ratio in the precipitate was found to be independent of the degree of completion of the reduction. The product was identified as the alpha phase of uranium dioxide by the X-ray powder diffraction. Experiments in sintering and characterization of uranium dioxide thus obtained for the ceramic nuclear fuel requirements are under way. (author)

  20. Sublimation properties in carbon containing tungsten-rhenium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on sublimation parameters of W-Re single crystals with Re contents varying from 0.1 to 4.2 at % and different quantity of C, are obtained by the Langmuir method at superhigh vacuum. It is shown that the rates of sublimation in specimens with lesser carbon content (4.6X10-2 % at) increase with Re concentration growth (from 2.6 to 3.8% at) and sublimation parameters in specimens with greater carbon content (1.2x10-1 - 1.5x10-1% at) decrease in comparison with W(C=1.5x10-2 % at). The anisotropy of rate and heat of sublimation is observed in equivalent crystallographic directions , one of them is perpendicular to the crystallization direction. Another one - parallel to it. The effects observed are explained by the increase of C solubility in Re and by its redistribution in W bcc - lattice with a temperature increase

  1. Sublimation properties in carbon containing tungsten-rhenium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekhtyar, I.Ya.; Kolesnik, V.N.; Patoka, V.I.; Ovsienko, D.E.; Silant' ev, V.I.; Sosnina, E.I. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki)

    Data on sublimation parameters of W-Re single crystals with Re contents varying from 0.1 to 4.2 at % and different quantity of C, are obtained by the Langmuir method at superhigh vacuum. It is shown that the rates of sublimation in specimens with lesser carbon content (4.6X10/sup -2/ % at) increase with Re concentration growth (from 2.6 to 3.8% at) and sublimation parameters in specimens with greater carbon content (1.2x10/sup -1/ - 1.5x10/sup -1/% at) decrease in comparison with W(C=1.5x10/sup -2/ % at). The anisotropy of rate and heat of sublimation is observed in equivalent crystallographic directions <100>, one of them is perpendicular to the crystallization direction. Another one - parallel to it. The effects observed are explained by the increase of C solubility in Re and by its redistribution in W bcc - lattice with a temperature increase.

  2. Antisolvent precipitation of novel xylitol-additive crystals to engineer tablets with improved pharmaceutical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaialy, Waseem; Maniruzzaman, Mohammad; Shojaee, Saeed; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2014-12-30

    The purpose of this work was to develop stable xylitol particles with modified physical properties, improved compactibility and enhanced pharmaceutical performance without altering polymorphic form of xylitol. Xylitol was crystallized using antisolvent crystallization technique in the presence of various hydrophilic polymer additives, i.e., polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at a range of concentrations. The crystallization process did not influence the stable polymorphic form or true density of xylitol. However, botryoidal-shaped crystallized xylitols demonstrated different particle morphologies and lower powder bulk and tap densities in comparison to subangular-shaped commercial xylitol. Xylitol crystallized without additive and xylitol crystallized in the presence of PVP or PVA demonstrated significant improvement in hardness of directly compressed tablets; however, such improvement was observed to lesser extent for xylitol crystallized in the presence of PEG. Crystallized xylitols produced enhanced dissolution profiles for indomethacin in comparison to original xylitol. The influence of additive concentration on tablet hardness was dependent on the type of additive, whereas an increased concentration of all additives provided an improvement in the dissolution behavior of indomethacin. Antisolvent crystallization using judiciously selected type and concentration of additive can be a potential approach to prepare xylitol powders with promising physicomechanical and pharmaceutical properties. PMID:25447824

  3. Liquid crystal nanocomposites produced by mixtures of hydrogen bonded achiral liquid crystals and functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katranchev, B.; Petrov, M.; Keskinova, E.; Naradikian, H.; Rafailov, P. M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Spassov, T.

    2014-12-01

    The liquid crystalline (LC) nature of alkyloxybenzoic acids is preserved after adding of any mesogenic or non-mesogenic compound through hydrogen bonding. However, this noncovalent interaction provokes a sizable effect on the physical properties as, e. g. melting point and mesomorphic states. In the present work we investigate nanocomposites, prepared by mixture of the eighth homologue of p-n-alkyloxybenzoic acids (8OBA) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with the purpose to modify the optical properties of the liquid crystal. We exercise optical control on the LC system by inserting SWCNT specially functionalized by carboxylic groups. Since the liquid crystalline state combines order and mobility at the molecular (nanoscale) level, molecular modification can lead to different macroscopical nanocomposite symmetry. The thermal properties of the functionalized nanocomposite are confirmed by DSC analyses. The mechanism of the interaction between surface-treated nanoparticles (functionalized nanotubes) and the liquid crystal 8OBA bent- dimer molecules is briefly discussed.

  4. Evolution of crystal sizes in the series of dissolution and precipitation events in open magma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakin, A. G.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2008-11-01

    We propose a model that describes the evolution of crystal sizes and crystal size distributions (CSD) of igneous phenocrysts in a sequence of dissolution and crystallization events. This model is based on the assumption that crystal dissolution is rate-limited by diffusion in melt while crystal growth is controlled by the slower kinetic of new nucleation and growth. As a result, the dissolution rate is inversely proportional to crystal size coming into effect through the curvature of the crystal's surface, but the growth rate does not depend on the crystal size. Closed-form analytical solution of equation for CSD is obtained. We apply results of modeling to quartz and zircon, two prime minerals in silicic igneous systems that are widely used in geochemical and isotopic investigations. The time-series of multiple solution-reprecipitation episodes generate concave-downward CSDs and this result fits well with experimental and natural observations on the abundant concave-down CSD in silicic igneous rocks. We suggest that maturation of crystal populations with sizes above several micrometers can not be caused by a size effect on the solubility of the crystals (Ostwald ripening), but is rather driven by thermal oscillations in experiments and in nature. The model predicts that mean crystal size increases with time proportionally to ˜ t0.20, which is very close to the published experimental results for quartz maturation with the exponent of 0.19-0.22. Our proposed model gives an opportunity to use natural CSDs for interpretation of pre-eruptive magma history, when solubilities and diffusion data are available for constituent elements of the dissolving mineral. In particular, we present time estimates for maturing zircon populations in large volume ignimbrites and estimate that it takes 100-1000 yrs to mature an initially exponential CSD to a lognormal CSD.

  5. Study of Crystallization Process during La and La2(CO3)3 Precipitation with Sodium Bicarbonate%碳酸氢钠沉淀镧及碳酸镧的结晶过程研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦小燕; 罗贤满; 杨宇俊; 辜子英; 李永绣

    2001-01-01

    Based on pH situ-determination data,together with the results of variation in precipitation volume and precipitation partical size,the properties of lanthanum carbonate precipitated with sodium bicarbonate were investigated.The results show that crystalliazation active zone of lanthanum carbonate is in low molar ratio zone,where the moalr ratio is between 0.541~2.828.However,the crystallization of lanthanum carbonate in high molar ratio zone is inactive.At the same tine,the influence of stirring on the crystallization of lanthanum carbonate was examined ,the crystallization mechanism was discussed and the corresponding reaction equations were proposed.%以pH值原位测定法为基础,结合沉淀体积变化、沉淀粒度及外观形貌分析结果,对NaHCO3沉淀镧的性能及碳酸镧的结晶过程进行了研究。结果表明:碳酸镧结晶活性区域位于低配比区0.541~2.828之间,而在高配比区其结晶是惰性的。同时还考察了搅拌对结晶过程的影响,讨论了NaHCO3沉淀镧时的沉淀反应和结晶化机理。并给出了相关的化学反应方程式。

  6. Atom probe tomography of secondary γ′ precipitation in a single crystal Ni-based superalloy after isothermal aging at 1100 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, X.P., E-mail: xptan1985@gmail.com [IM 2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS, Université Aix-Marseille, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Mangelinck, D.; Perrin-Pellegrino, C. [IM 2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS, Université Aix-Marseille, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Rougier, L. [LSMX, MXG, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Gandin, Ch.-A. [CEMEF, UMR 7635 CNRS, MINES ParisTech, 06904 Sophia Antipolis (France); Jacot, A. [LSMX, MXG, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ponsen, D.; Jaquet, V. [Snecma-SAFRAN Group, Service YQGC, 92702 Colombes (France)

    2014-10-25

    Highlights: • Bimodal size distribution of γ′ precipitates occurs after isothermal aging at 1100 °C. • Characterization of secondary γ′ by atom probe tomography. • It is proposed that the secondary γ′ occurs via a non-classical nucleation. • The coarsening of secondary γ′ precipitates well obeys the classical LSW theory. - Abstract: Secondary γ′ precipitation in a commercial single crystal Ni-based superalloy after the 1100 °C isothermal aging has been investigated by atom probe tomography. After the isothermal aging for 300 s, 1800 s and 3600 s, a bimodal size distribution of larger primary γ′ precipitates and numerous smaller secondary γ′ precipitates was obtained. It is proposed that the secondary γ′ precipitated via a non-classical nucleation mode. The coarsening of secondary γ′ precipitates well obeys the classical LSW theory.

  7. Mechanistic Study of Magnesium Carbonate Semibatch Reactive Crystallization with Magnesium Hydroxide and CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, B.; Qu, H. Y.; Niemi, H.;

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates semibatch precipitation of magnesium carbonate at ambient temperature and pressure using Mg(OH)(2) and CO2 as starting materials. A thermal analysis method was developed that reflects the dissolution rate of Mg(OH)(2) and the formation of magnesium carbonate. The method...... the liquid and solid phases. A stirring rate of 650 rpm was found to be the optimum speed as the flow rate of CO2 was 1 L/min. Precipitation rate increased with gas flow rate, which indicates that mass transfer of CO2 plays a critical role in this precipitation case. Magnesium carbonate trihydrate...

  8. Influence of precipitating agents on thermodynamic parameters of protein crystallization solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavros, Philemon; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Nounesis, George

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is the most powerful method for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins to (near-)atomic resolution, but protein crystallization is a poorly explained and often intractable phenomenon. Differential Scanning Calorimetry was used to measure the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) of temperature-driven unfolding of two globular proteins, lysozyme, and ribonuclease A, in various salt solutions. The mixtures were categorized into those that were conducive to crystallization of the protein and those that were not. It was found that even fairly low salt concentrations had very large effects on thermodynamic parameters. High concentrations of salts conducive to crystallization stabilized the native folded forms of proteins, whereas high concentrations of salts that did not crystallize them tended to destabilize them. Considering the ΔH and TΔS contributions to the ΔG of unfolding separately, high concentrations of crystallizing salts were found to enthalpically stabilize and entropically destabilize the protein, and vice-versa for the noncrystallizing salts. These observations suggest an explanation, in terms of protein stability and entropy of hydration, of why some salts are good crystallization agents for a given protein and others are not. This in turn provides theoretical insight into the process of protein crystallization, suggesting ways of predicting and controlling it. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 642-652, 2016. PMID:27114109

  9. Promising dissolution enhancement effect of soluplus on crystallized celecoxib obtained through antisolvent precipitation and high pressure homogenization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayouni, Alireza; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Afrasiabi Garekani, Hadi; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    Poor solubility and dissolution of hydrophobic drugs have become a major challenge in pharmaceutical development. Drug nanoparticles have been widely accepted to overcome this problem. The aim of this study was to manufacture celecoxib nanoparticles using antisolvent precipitation and high pressure homogenization techniques in the presence of varying concentrations of soluplus(®) as a hydrophilic stabilizer. Antisolvent crystallization followed by freeze drying (CRS-FD) and antisolvent crystallization followed by high pressure homogenization and freeze drying (HPH-FD) were used to obtain celecoxib nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles were analyzed in terms of particle size, saturation solubility, morphology (optical and scanning electron microscopy), solid state (DSC, XRPD and FT-IR) and dissolution behavior. The results showed that celecoxib nanoparticle can be obtained when soluplus was added to the crystallization medium. In addition, the results showed that the concentration of soluplus and the method used to prepare nanoparticles can control the size and dissolution of celecoxib. Samples obtained in the presence of 5% soluplus through HPH technique showed an excellent dissolution (90%) within 4min. It is interesting to note that celecoxib samples with high crystallinity showed better dissolution than those celecoxib samples with high amorphous content, although they had the same concentration of soluplus. DSC and XRPD proved that samples obtained via HPH technique are more crystalline than the samples obtained through only antisolvent crystallization technique. PMID:25124835

  10. A study on zeolite precipitation at alkaline conditions: effect of solution composition on mineralogy and crystallization rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for engineered barrier systems for the geologic confinement of radioactive wastes involve the extensive use of bentonite, a material known for its capability to retard radionuclide migration into the groundwater system due to its low permeability. Cement and concrete are used in conjunction with bentonite to serve as structural supports and to seal access routes. However, when concrete becomes saturated with groundwater, it produces alkaline fluids that may attack and degrade the bentonite over time. A key concern regarding bentonite alteration by alkaline fluids is the precipitation of secondary minerals, such as zeolites, which may produce changes in the transport properties of the bentonite and compromise the stability of the entire barrier system. More importantly, studies have shown that zeolites form at timescales that are of interest in determining the long-term integrity of the barrier system. It is thus important to understand zeolite precipitation at conditions operative during bentonite alteration. The objective of this study, therefore, is to determine the effects of fluid composition on the crystallization rate and zeolite mineralogy. Zeolites were synthesized in batches from solutions with varying ratios of Si and Al at pH 13.5 by combining appropriate amounts of NaOH, NaAlO2 and Na2SiO3.9H2O. The Si and Al concentrations in the starting solutions both ranged from 0.03 to 0.24 M and the solution Si/Al ratios ranged from 0.125 to 8. The solutions were transferred to polypropylene bottles and stored in an oven set at a constant temperature of 70 deg. C for 1, 4, 7, 14 and 30 days. At appropriate reaction times, samples were extracted from the oven and then centrifuged to separate the solids from the liquid. The supernatant was filtered using 0.2 μm filter and the solids were washed several times before drying in a freeze dryer. The solids were characterized by XRD and SEM-EDX to determine the

  11. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper. PMID:26572417

  12. Carbonate precipitation in brine – a potential trigger for tropospheric ozone depletion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs at high latitudes were discovered 20 years ago and are attributed to bromine explosions. However, an unresolved issue is the explanation of how the acid-catalyzed reaction cycle is triggered in atmospheric particles derived from alkaline sea water. By simulating the chemistry occuring in polar regions over recently formed sea ice, we can model successfully the transformation of inert sea-salt bromide to reactive bromine monoxide (BrO and the subsequent ODE when precipitation of calcium carbonate from freezing sea water is taken into account. In addition, we found the temperature dependence of the equilibrium BrCl+Br−↔Br2Cl− to be important.

  13. Precipitation strengthening and mechanical properties of ultra low carbon bainitic steel with Cu addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of ageing parameters on tensile properties and impact energy of ultra low carbon bainitic steel (ULCB) was established. The investigated HN3MCu1.5 steel belongs to a new group of structural steels, which are going to be applied for constructions working at low temperatures.. The chemical composition of the steel is given. The microstructure of the steel after ageing at temperature 640oC during to 100 hours was observed by optical and electron microscopy. Special attention was paid to study primary austenite grain size, which determines the average diameter of bainite-martensite packet size and thus the impact transition temperature according to empirical equations. Then the quantitative determination of the average diameter of precipitates and the interparticle spacing was studied to calculate the precipitation strengthening effect on yield strength. The empirical equation, which relates effect of ageing time to the yield strength was determined. It was established that the optimum mechanical properties of HN3MCu1.5 steel aged at 649oC are achieved for ageing time in the range of 1 - 10 hours. For the above ageing parameters the investigated steels had: YS = 700-661 MPa, TS = 814-741 MPa and impact energy KCV = 150-170 J determined on Charpy V specimens at temperature -80oC. (author)

  14. Wet precipitation of major ions, polonium-210, and organic carbon in a metropolitan city, Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, G.; Kim, G.

    2011-12-01

    An extensive survey of chemical constituents in precipitation including dissolved organic carbon, dissolved nitrogen, major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides was conducted in a representative urban environment of Seoul over one-year period from 2009 to 2010. The sources for these chemical species were apportioned by applying principal component analysis (PCA) in association with commonly acknowledged key tracers, such as Na, K, Ca, and V. The fossil fuel combustion (especially coal) was shown to be the dominant source for most constituents being investigated, with biomass burning being recognized as another significant source. With the aid of air mass backward trajectory analyses, we concluded that the primary fraction of the chemical species in our precipitation samples originated locally in Korea, albeit the frequent long-range transport from the eastern and northeastern China might contribute substantially. Overall, our study suggests the significant role of human activities in altering the atmospheric environment of Seoul and presumably most urban areas around the world, highlighting its profound environmental implications, such as health risks posed by excessive polonium-210, enhanced rainwater acidity from organic acids, and radiative forcing by organic aerosols.

  15. Seeding Experiment of Liquid Carbon Dioxide for Enhancing Winter-time Precipitation in Saga Prefecture,Northern Kyushu,Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimizu, K.; Nishiyama, K.; Tomine, K.; Maki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Morita, O.

    2012-12-01

    Many droughts (shortage of water) have broken out by extreme small amount rainfall in recent Japan. So far,in order to prevent these droughts,artificial rainfall methods with 'AgI' or 'dry ice' have been widely used in Japan. However,these methods have many problems,which a large amount of overcooling liquid in the cumulus cloud was not able to be converted into precipitation efficiently. So as to solve these problems,new artificial rainfall method using liquid carbon dioxide (LC) was proposed by Fukuta (1996). This new method consists of the generation of ice particles by homogeneous nucleation using LC and the subsequent more effective growth for ice particles without competition process. And, this method is called 'Low-Level Penetration Seeding of Homogeneous Ice Nucleant (LOLEPSHIN)' ; this induces a 'Roll-up Expansion of Twin Horizontal Ice-crystal Thermals (RETHIT)' and a subsequent 'Falling growth-Induced Lateral Air Spreading (FILAS)'. This LC method was applied to thin super-cooled cumulus clouds in Saga prefecture, Northern Kyushu, Japan on February 4,2006. The seeding airplane took off the Atugi Airport in Kanagawa Prefecture toward the Iki Island around 0830JST. Many cloud bands were cofirmed in the flight going to the experimental area and the cloud base temperature was approximately -9C (1200m). Scince some young developing thin cumuli were found over the Iki Island, LC seeding to these clouds was carried out two times from 0841JST until 0919JST penetrating the -9C (1200m) altitude. The first precipitation seeding ebded in failure. The second penetration seeding was done for 115 seconds around 0917JST. This penetration led to success of developing one artificial echo (Echo I) in the leeward side of the Iki Island. Eco I moved from NNW to SSW. The maximum area of Echo I were 48km2 (at 1033JST) and first comfirmed by the Kyushu University radar (KU radar) at 1006JST (46 min. after LC seeding) around Mt.Sefuri in Saga Prefecture. It can be inferred that

  16. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Constantz; Randy Seeker; Martin Devenney

    2010-06-30

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO{sub 2} to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM{trademark} was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which is a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.

  17. Controlling the number of walls in multi walled carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid compound via ball milling of precipitate catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosbi, Norlin [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Akil, Hazizan Md, E-mail: hazizan@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Cluster for Polymer Composite (CPC), Science and Engineering Research Centre, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that, to manipulate carbon nanotubes geometry and number of walls are by controlling the precipitate catalyst size. • Number of walls and geometry effects depend on the milling time of the precipitate catalyst. • Increasing milling of time will decrease the carbon nanotubes number of walls. • Increasing milling of time will increase the carbon nanotubes thermal conductivity. - Abstract: This paper reports the influence of milling time on the structure and properties of the precipitate catalyst of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/alumina hybrid compound, produced through the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. For this purpose, light green precipitate consisted of aluminium, nickel(II) nitrate hexahydrate and sodium hydroxide mixture was placed in a planetary mill equipped with alumina vials using alumina balls at 300 rpm rotation speed for various milling time (5–15 h) prior to calcinations and CVD process. The compound was characterized using various techniques. Based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis, increasing the milling time up to 15 h decreased the diameter of MWCNT from 32.3 to 13.1 nm. It was noticed that the milling time had a significant effect on MWCNT wall thickness, whereby increasing the milling time from 0 to 15 h reduced the number of walls from 29 to 12. It was also interesting to note that the carbon content increased from 23.29 wt.% to 36.37 wt.% with increasing milling time.

  18. Controlling the number of walls in multi walled carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid compound via ball milling of precipitate catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that, to manipulate carbon nanotubes geometry and number of walls are by controlling the precipitate catalyst size. • Number of walls and geometry effects depend on the milling time of the precipitate catalyst. • Increasing milling of time will decrease the carbon nanotubes number of walls. • Increasing milling of time will increase the carbon nanotubes thermal conductivity. - Abstract: This paper reports the influence of milling time on the structure and properties of the precipitate catalyst of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/alumina hybrid compound, produced through the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. For this purpose, light green precipitate consisted of aluminium, nickel(II) nitrate hexahydrate and sodium hydroxide mixture was placed in a planetary mill equipped with alumina vials using alumina balls at 300 rpm rotation speed for various milling time (5–15 h) prior to calcinations and CVD process. The compound was characterized using various techniques. Based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis, increasing the milling time up to 15 h decreased the diameter of MWCNT from 32.3 to 13.1 nm. It was noticed that the milling time had a significant effect on MWCNT wall thickness, whereby increasing the milling time from 0 to 15 h reduced the number of walls from 29 to 12. It was also interesting to note that the carbon content increased from 23.29 wt.% to 36.37 wt.% with increasing milling time

  19. Modeling effects of temperature and precipitation on carbon characteristics and GHGs emissions in Abies fabric forest of subalpine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xuyang; CHENG Genwei; XIAO Feipeng; FAN Jihui

    2008-01-01

    Abies fabric forest in the eastern slope of Gongga mountain is one type of subalpine dark coniferous forests of southwestern China.It is located on the southeastern edge of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau and is sensitive to climatic changes,A process-oriented biogeochemical model,Forest-DNDC,was applied to simulate the effects of climatic factors,temperature and precipitation changes on carbon characteristics,and greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions inA.fabric forest.Validation indicated that the Forest-DNDC could be used to predict carbon characteristics and GHGs emissions with reasonable accuracy.The model simulated carbon fluxes,soil carbon dynamics,soil CO2,N2O,and NO emissions with the changes of temperature and precipitation conditions.The results showed that with variation in the baseline temperature from-2℃ to+2℃,the gross primary production (GPP) and soil organic carbon (SOC)increased,and the net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) decreased because of higher respiration rate.With increasing baseline precipitation the GPP and NPP increased slightly,and the NEP and SOC showed decreasing trend.Soil CO2 emissions increased with the increase of temperature,and CO2 emissions changed little with increased baseline precipitation.With increased temperature and decreased baseline temperature,the total annual soil N2O emissions increased.With the variation of baseline temperature from -2℃ to +2℃,the total annual soil NO emissions increased.The total annual N2O and NO emissions showed increasing trends with the increase of precipitation.The biogeochemical simulation of the typical forest indicated that temperature changes strongly affected carbon fluxes,soil carbon dynamics,and soil GHGs emissions.The precipitation was not a principal factor affecting carbon fluxes,soil carbon dynamics,and soil CO2 emissions,but changes in precipitation could exert strong effect on soil N2O and NO emissions.

  20. Control of γ lamella precipitation in Ti–39 at.% Al single crystals by nanogroove-induced dislocation bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempted to control γ lamellae precipitation in Ti–39 at.% Al single crystals by nanogrooving process (NGP) intending to introduce periodic dislocation bands as preferential nucleation sites of γ-TiAl lamellae precipitates. In NGP, grooves were formed along the trace of (0 0 0 1) basal plane on the surfaces of single crystal of α2-phase supersaturated with Al-atoms by nano-scale plastic deformation using diamond knives with the edge angle of 60°. The widths of grooves ranged from 180 nm to 1860 nm for the load per knife-edge length in the range from 0.3 N/mm to 8.3 N/mm. Beneath the grooves, dislocation bands consisting of both basal dislocations and non-basal dislocations were formed. After aging at 1073 K for 1 × 104 s, pairs of γ lamellae were found to form only beneath the grooves to depths greater than 30 μm, meaning that the location of γ lamellae could be controlled by NGP. Increasing the aging temperature to 1173 K provided even greater control, with arrays of γ lamella bundles exhibiting a periodicity identical to that of the nanogrooves, and even near the surface no γ lamellae were formed in un-deformed regions. No concentration gradient was found within individual γ lamellae, which had a near-equilibrium Al concentration; thinner γ lamellae tended to have a slightly lower Al concentration. These results indicate that the precipitation of γ lamellae can be effectively controlled by introducing periodic dislocation bands using NGP, which opens new avenue for the manufacturing of near- or sub-wavelength grating structures with ultra-high aspect ratios through the selective dissolution of these γ lamellae

  1. Co-precipitation Synthesis and Thermal Stability of Zircon Encapsulated Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PENG Cheng, ZHANG Chu-Xin, L? Ming, LI Zhi-Hong, WU Jian-Qing

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Zircon encapsulated carbon black powders were synthesized by a co-precipitation method using TEOS and zirconium oxychloride as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electronic microscope (SEM, colorimeter and laser grain size analyzer were used to investigate the phase structure, morphology, thermal stability and size distribution of the prepared composite powders, respectively. The effect of experimental conditions including the pH of the precursor solution, the calcination temperature, the type and amount of mineralizers on their thermal stability was studied by orthogonal test. The optimal conditions were accordingly determined as follows: precursor solution pH=5, calcination temperature 1150¡æ and 5% LiF mineralizer. Under these conditions, zircon encapsulated carbon black with embedded structures can be obtained. The composite powder has high thermal stability and adequate size distribution, and thus it is a good candidate material for black ceramic pigment. When calcined at 1000¡æ in the frit glaze, the powder shows considerable tilting strength.

  2. Adsorption properties of carbonized polyacrylonitrile deposited on γ-alumina and silica gel by precipitation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precipitation polymerization method was used for the deposition of various contents of polyacrylonitrile on two oxide-type supports (γ-alumina and silica gel). The synthesized materials were characterized by thermal analysis performed in inert and oxidizing atmospheres. The mechanism of polyacrylonitrile decomposition was proposed. In order to gain effective adsorbents of volatile organic compounds the polyacrylonitrile/support composites were carbonized at elevated temperatures. The texture and morphology of the calcined materials were examined by low-temperature sorption of N2 and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. An influence of thermal treatment conditions and carbonaceous species loading on adsorption capacity of methyl-ethyl ketone vapour was also determined. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements revealed that the ladder-type polyacrylonitrile species formed above 250 oC and stable up to about 350-400 oC are the most effective sites for methyl-ethyl ketone sorption. The carbonaceous species dispersion was found to be an additional factor influencing the adsorption capacity of the carbonized polyacrylonitrile/support composites.

  3. CO2 (carbon dioxide) fixation by applying new chemical absorption-precipitation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CO2 (carbon dioxide) is the most common greenhouse gas and most of it is emitted from human activities. The methods for CO2 emission reduction can be divided into physical, chemical, and biochemical methods. Among the physical and chemical methods, CCS (carbon capture and storage) is a well-known reducing technology. However, this method has many disadvantages including the required storage area. In general, CCS requires capture and storage processes. In this study, we propose a method for reusing the absorbed CO2 either in nature or in industry. The emitted CO2 was converted into CO32− using a conversion solution, and then made into a carbonate by combining the conversion solution with metal ions at normal temperature and pressure. The resulting carbonate was analyzed using FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffraction). We verified the formation of a solid consisting of calcite and vaterite. In addition, the conversion solution that was used could be reused in the same process of CCS technology. Our study demonstrates a successful method of reducing and reusing emitted CO2, thereby making CO2 a potential future resource. - Highlights: • This study focused on a new CO2 fixation process method. • In CCS technology, the desorption process requires high thermal energy consumption. • This new method does not require a desorption process because the CO2 is accomplished through CaCO3 crystallization. • A new absorption method is possible instead of the conventional absorption-desorption process. • This is not only a rapid reaction for fixing CO2, but also economically feasible

  4. Calcium Carbonate Crystal Growth in Porous Media, in the presence of Water Miscible and Non-Miscible Organic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaho, Sofia; Sygouni, Varvara; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of sparingly soluble salts (scaling) within porous media is a major problem encountered in many industrial and environmental applications. In the oil industry scaling causes severe operational malfunctions and, therefore, increasing the total operating and maintenance cost [1]. The most common types of sparingly soluble salts located in oil fields include carbonate and sulfate salts of calcium, strondium and barium[1,2]. Multiple phase flow and tubing surface properties are some of the factors affecting scale formation [3]. The main purpose of the present work was the investigation of the precipitation mechanisms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) through in situ mixing of two soluble salt solutions in a flow granular medium, in the presence of water miscible organic fluid (ethylene glycol) or non-miscible organic fluid (n-dodecane). All series of experiments were carried out in a two dimensional porous medium made of Plexiglas. For all solutions used in the experiments, the contact angles with the surface of the porous medium and the interfacial tensions were measured. During the experiments, the calcium carbonate crystal growth was continuously monitored and recorded through an optical microscope equipped with a digital programmed video camera. The snap-shots were taken within specific time intervals and their detailed procession gave information concerning the crystal growth rate and kinetics. The pH of the effluent was measured and fluids samples were collected for calcium analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). In all experiments effluent calcium concentration decreased as a function of time, suggesting that CaCO3 precipitation took place inside the porous medium. Crystals of the precipitated salt were identified using Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and the morphology of the crystals was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The induction time for precipitation of CaCO3 crystals in the presence of n-dodecane was significantly

  5. CONTROL OF CADMIUM CARBONATE PRECIPITATION INTERFERENCES DURING THE DIALYSIS OF CADMIUM IN HIGH BICARBONATE ALKALINITY AQUATIC-LIFE BIOASSAY WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The precipitation of cadmium carbonate during the dialysis of cadmium in a high bicarbonate alkalinity natural water, was linked to a significant source of error when determining dialyzate cadmium concentrations. The relative standard deviation was reduced by approximately four-f...

  6. Precipitation of UO2 in sodium carbonate solutions by electrolytic hydrogen and catalyzed by Ni-Raney - Bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes abstracts and short versions of a set of documents (studies, patents) dealing with the precipitation of uranium (notably in its oxide form, UO2) in solutions of sodium carbonate. The main objective is to identify the interest of a chemical reduction by electrolytic hydrogen. The author makes a distinction between the most relevant documents and those relatively relevant ones

  7. Carbonate precipitates and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggio, Caterina; Torre, Agata; Lando, Gabriele; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Trischitta, Francesca

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the chemical composition of the precipitates found in the intestine of Dicentrarchus labrax and the source of HCO(3)(-) secreted into the intestinal lumen. The chemical analysis was performed by employing the potentiometric double titration method and by means of an electron microscope coupled with a spectrometer and X-ray powder diffraction. The results obtained suggest the presence of very insoluble intestinal precipitates, presumably formed by a mixture of CaCO(3) and MgCO(3), with a higher quantity of the former with respect to the latter. HCO(3)(-) secretion rate was investigated with the aid of the pH stat method in isolated tissues mounted in Ussing chamber, where the transepithelial electrical parameters were also measured. When the serosal surface of the intestinal mucosa was bathed in HCO(3)(-)-Ringer bubbled with 1% CO(2) in O(2) while the serosal surface was bathed in HCO(3)(-) free Ringer solution bubbled with pure O(2), bicarbonate secretion proceeded at an almost stable rate of 0.9 ± 0.05 μeq cm(-2) h(-1) for about 3 h while I(sc) maintained a constant value of 38 ± 1.5 μA cm(-2). The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor ethoxyzolamide elicited a progressive reduction of HCO(3)(-) secretion that was about 75% of the initial value after 80 min. When serosal HCO(3)(-)-CO(2) saline was substituted with Hepes-O(2) saline base secretion progressively declined reaching a value of about 20% of the initial value. It was also strongly inhibited when Na(+) was substituted with the impermeant cation choline and when either DIDS or ouabain were added to the basolateral side. These results suggest that most of the bicarbonate secreted is of extracellular source and is probably transported across the basolateral membrane by both Na(+) independent mechanism and Na(+) dependent transporter, presumably a NaHCO(3) cotransport. PMID:21152925

  8. Precipitation legacy effects on dryland ecosystem carbon fluxes: direction, magnitude and biogeochemical carryovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W.; Jenerette, G. D.; Hui, D.; Scott, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation legacy effect, defined as the impact of historical precipitation (PPT) on extant ecosystem dynamics, has been recognized as an important driver in shaping the temporal variability of dryland aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and soil respiration. How the PPT legacy influences whole ecosystem-level carbon (C) fluxes has rarely been quantitatively assessed, particularly at longer temporal scales. We parameterized a process-based ecosystem model to a semiarid savanna ecosystem in the southwestern USA, calibrated and evaluated the model performance based on 7 years of eddy-covariance measurements, and conducted two sets of simulation experiments to assess interdecadal and interannual PPT legacy effects over a 30-year simulation period. The results showed that decreasing the previous period/year PPT (dry legacy) always increased subsequent net ecosystem production (NEP) whereas increasing the previous period/year PPT (wet legacy) decreased NEP. The simulated dry-legacy impacts mostly increased subsequent gross ecosystem production (GEP) and reduced ecosystem respiration (Re), but the wet legacy mostly reduced GEP and increased Re. Although the direction and magnitude of GEP and Re responses to the simulated dry and wet legacies were influenced by both the previous and current PPT conditions, the NEP responses were predominantly determined by the previous PPT characteristics including rainfall amount, seasonality and event size distribution. Larger PPT difference between periods/years resulted in larger legacy impacts, with dry legacies fostering more C sequestration and wet legacies more C release. The carryover of soil N between periods/years was mainly responsible for the GEP responses, while the carryovers of plant biomass, litter and soil organic matter were mainly responsible for the Re responses. These simulation results suggest that previous PPT conditions can exert substantial legacy impacts on current ecosystem C balance, which should

  9. Studies on the sublimation of tungsten single crystal (110) face and the influence of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporation of tungsten single crystals face (110) is studied in ultrahigh vacuum (better than 1x10-9 torr) by Langmuir method. Small admixtures of carbon are shown to markedly influence the process. Carbon hinders the evaporation and increases the sublimation energy by 25 kcal. The data obtained show that the reported parametres of tungsten evaporation refer to a carbon-containing material

  10. Synthesis and Characterisation of Struvite Family Crystals by An Aqueous Precipitation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutiyono S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Struvite (NH4MgPO4•6H2O is a mineral often found as a scale deposit in an industrial process and piping. The common occurrence of struvite formation is a wide variety of environments. pH solution and environmental temperature are important parameters that control precipitation and subsequent decomposition of struvite. The study aims to characterise the struvite precipitated out the solution through chemical and mineralogical analysis. In this work, struvite solution was prepared by mixing NH4OH , MgCl2 and H3PO4 with the different purity grade (A and B in the mol ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 in the stirred glass vessel tank with volume of 500 ml, and then stirred at 200 rpm for 70 minutes. Temperature of 3°C and an initial pH of 10 were selected. The precipitated deposit was dried at room temperature for 48 hours of being analyzed. Material characterization of the deposits was conducted using XRPD Rietveld method of qualitative and quantitative mineralogical phase analysis. XRF was employed for bulk chemical elemental analysis of the scale obtained. The sample A using analytical grade powder provided the major phases of struvite-(K and struvite. In constrast, the major phase of newberyite and minor phases of lepidocrocite (FeOOH and niter (KNO3 was observed by following changes in the lowest purity of powder (Sample B. Analysis of the experimental data suggests a solution mediated transformation process as a possible mechanism of struvite transformation.

  11. Nitric acid adduct formation during crystallization of barium and strontium nitrates and their co-precipitation from nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molar solubilities of Ba, Sr and Pb nitrates in nitric acid as a function of total nitrate concentration is presented and described by the mass action law, indicating on formation of the adducts with nitric acid. Precipitates of Ba(NO3)2 and Sr(NO3)2 crystallized from nitric acid were studied by ISP OES and IR spectroscopy. The data obtained confirmed formation of metastable adducts with nitric acid. IR and X-ray diffraction studies of the mixed salt systems indicated conversion of the mixed salts into (Ba,Sr)(NO3)2 solid solution of discrete structure in range of total nitrate ion concentration ∼6 mol/L. (author)

  12. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Thin Films from Liquid Crystal Polyelectrolyte Inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Daniel D; Blanch, Adam J; Shearer, Cameron J; Moore, Katherine E; Pfohl, Moritz; Shapter, Joseph G; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2015-11-25

    Single walled carbon nanotube thin films are fabricated by solution shearing from high concentration sodium nanotubide polyelectrolyte inks. The solutions are produced by simple stirring of the nanotubes with elemental sodium in dimethylacetamide, and the nanotubes are thus not subject to any sonication-induced damage. At such elevated concentrations (∼4 mg mL(-1)), the solutions exist in the liquid crystal phase and during deposition this order is transferred to the films, which are well aligned in the direction of shear with a 2D nematic order parameter of ∼0.7 determined by polarized absorption measurements. Compared to similarly formed films made from superacids, the polyelectrolyte films contain smaller bundles and a much narrower distribution of bundle diameters. After p-doping with an organic oxidizer, the films exhibit a very high DC electrical to optical conductivity ratio of σ(DC)/σ(OP) ∼ 35, corresponding to a calculated DC conductivity of over 7000 S cm(-1). When very thin (T550 ∼ 96%), smooth (RMS roughness, R(q) ∼ 2.2 nm), and highly aligned films made via this new route are used as the front electrodes of carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells, the power conversion efficiency is almost an order of magnitude greater than that obtained when using the much rougher (R(q) ∼ 20-30 nm) and less conductive (peak σ(DC)/σ(OP) ∼ 2.5) films formed by common vacuum filtration of the same starting material, and having the same transmittance. PMID:26511159

  13. The aging by precipitation of Nb (C,N) in extra low carbon content steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonitride precipitation has been studied in a high-niobium acicular - ferrite - type steel. Interphase precipitation occurred only in those samples in which high transformation temperatures led to distinctly polygonal-ferrite microestructures. In this latter case, precipitation occurred during a subsequent aging treatment, with a strong tendency for heterogeneous nucleation on dislocations. (Author)

  14. Sensitivity of temperate desert steppe carbon exchange to seasonal droughts and precipitation variations in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulin Yang

    Full Text Available Arid grassland ecosystems have significant interannual variation in carbon exchange; however, it is unclear how environmental factors influence carbon exchange in different hydrological years. In this study, the eddy covariance technique was used to investigate the seasonal and interannual variability of CO₂ flux over a temperate desert steppe in Inner Mongolia, China from 2008 to 2010. The amounts and times of precipitation varied significantly throughout the study period. The precipitation in 2009 (186.4 mm was close to the long-term average (183.9±47.6 mm, while the precipitation in 2008 (136.3 mm and 2010 (141.3 mm was approximately a quarter below the long-term average. The temperate desert steppe showed carbon neutrality for atmospheric CO₂ throughout the study period, with a net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE of -7.2, -22.9, and 26.0 g C m⁻² yr⁻¹ in 2008, 2009, and 2010, not significantly different from zero. The ecosystem gained more carbon in 2009 compared to other two relatively dry years, while there was significant difference in carbon uptake between 2008 and 2010, although both years recorded similar annual precipitation. The results suggest that summer precipitation is a key factor determining annual NEE. The apparent quantum yield and saturation value of NEE (NEE(sat and the temperature sensitivity coefficient of ecosystem respiration (R(eco exhibited significant variations. The values of NEE(sat were -2.6, -2.9, and -1.4 µmol CO₂ m⁻² s⁻¹ in 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively. Drought suppressed both the gross primary production (GPP and R(eco, and the drought sensitivity of GPP was greater than that of R(eco. The soil water content sensitivity of GPP was high during the dry year of 2008 with limited soil moisture availability. Our results suggest the carbon balance of this temperate desert steppe was not only sensitive to total annual precipitation, but also to its seasonal distribution.

  15. Sensitivity of temperate desert steppe carbon exchange to seasonal droughts and precipitation variations in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fulin; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2013-01-01

    Arid grassland ecosystems have significant interannual variation in carbon exchange; however, it is unclear how environmental factors influence carbon exchange in different hydrological years. In this study, the eddy covariance technique was used to investigate the seasonal and interannual variability of CO₂ flux over a temperate desert steppe in Inner Mongolia, China from 2008 to 2010. The amounts and times of precipitation varied significantly throughout the study period. The precipitation in 2009 (186.4 mm) was close to the long-term average (183.9±47.6 mm), while the precipitation in 2008 (136.3 mm) and 2010 (141.3 mm) was approximately a quarter below the long-term average. The temperate desert steppe showed carbon neutrality for atmospheric CO₂ throughout the study period, with a net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE) of -7.2, -22.9, and 26.0 g C m⁻² yr⁻¹ in 2008, 2009, and 2010, not significantly different from zero. The ecosystem gained more carbon in 2009 compared to other two relatively dry years, while there was significant difference in carbon uptake between 2008 and 2010, although both years recorded similar annual precipitation. The results suggest that summer precipitation is a key factor determining annual NEE. The apparent quantum yield and saturation value of NEE (NEE(sat)) and the temperature sensitivity coefficient of ecosystem respiration (R(eco)) exhibited significant variations. The values of NEE(sat) were -2.6, -2.9, and -1.4 µmol CO₂ m⁻² s⁻¹ in 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively. Drought suppressed both the gross primary production (GPP) and R(eco), and the drought sensitivity of GPP was greater than that of R(eco). The soil water content sensitivity of GPP was high during the dry year of 2008 with limited soil moisture availability. Our results suggest the carbon balance of this temperate desert steppe was not only sensitive to total annual precipitation, but also to its seasonal distribution. PMID:23393576

  16. Misorientation effect of grain boundary on the formation of discontinuous precipitation in second and third generation single crystal superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available [001] tilt artificial grain boundaries of Ni-based single crystal superalloys CMSX-4 and DD10 have been prepared by self-diffusion bonding. The microstructural stability of 0 ∼ 30∘ artificial grain boundaries have been investigated after heat treatment at 1100 ∘C for 0 ∼ 300 h. TCP phases and cellular colony developed on boundaries are related to misorientation angle of the bonded boundaries of DD10 and DD10 alloys as well as the bonded boundaries of CMSX-4 and DD10 alloys. The heterogeneous nucleation of TCP phase, enveloped by γ′ film, occurred along 15∘ and 20∘ boundaries. Discontinuous Precipitation (DP reaction occurred along high misorientation angle (20∘∼ 30∘ boundaries. However, no TCP phase formation existed along grain boundaries with different misorientation angles in CMSX-4/CMSX-4 bonded alloys as well as for a 0∘ boundary in DD10/DD10 and CMSX-4/DD10 bonded alloys. The current study clearly suggests that grain boundary precipitation and its morphology were influenced by the misorientation angle of grain boundary and the content of refractory elements in alloy.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Liquid Crystals: Nematic Droplets and Coarsening Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behabtu, Natnael; Senyuk, Bohdan; Smalyukh, Ivan; Pasquali, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    On a fundamental basis, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offer a new model molecule to explore the dynamics and phases of rigid rods and test theories. Their large aspect ratio (100 to 100,000) and persistence length (˜ 100 microns) allow exploring the physics of nematic phases with high Frank elastic constant. Moreover, understanding of CNT liquid crystals is key to their rational processing into ordered materials such as fibers. Here we report the formation of elongated nematic droplets of CNTs in chlorosulfonic acid. In nematic droplets, a continuous transition from a homogeneous to bipolar nematic director field is expected theoretically, as a function of droplet volume; yet, experimental determination of such transition has been elusive. We show that CNT nematic droplets display such transition. We study the coarsening dynamics of positive and negative nematic droplets and observe that two or more droplets merge by matching their nematic director. Merging scenarios that lead to defect formation are not observed. Negative tactoids (isotropic phase in liquid crystalline continuum) merge through attractive forces induced by the nematic director distortion with quadrupolar symmetry.

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF CHEMICALS USE FOR HIGHLY FILLED MECHANICAL GRADE PAPERS WITH PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhou Sang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology was used with four factors to screen for the best starch and optimize the use of chemicals in order to maximize precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC filler retention in a peroxide-bleached TMP suspension. Three commercial starches were used in conjunction with colloidal silica and flocculant. The PCC loading level and the interactions between PCC level, starch, flocculant, and silica were investigated, and empirical models were constructed. The empirical process models were then employed to predict the retention and drainage. It was found that medium-charged cationic starch (S858 gave the highest total and filler retention, whereas high-charged cationic starch (S880 resulted in the best drainage. The ash content of the handsheet can be pushed up to 40% using the retention system with medium (S858 and high (S880 charged cationic starch. The high-charged cationic starch (S880 gave stronger paper, probably because of its higher affinity with the fiber and fines.

  19. Influence of cooling paths on microstructural characteristics and precipitation behaviors in a low carbon V–Ti microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on ultra fast cooling, the microstructural characteristics, precipitation behaviors and mechanical properties of a low-carbon V–Ti microalloyed steel were investigated in details using optical microscope, electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the ferrite grains can be slightly refined, the sheet spacings of interphase precipitation can be also slightly reduced and the number fraction of ferrite grains with higher precipitation hardening can be significantly enhanced by increasing cooling rate (by comparisons of air cooling and furnace cooling), and a ferritic steel precipitation-strengthened by nanometer-sized carbides was developed to produce hot rolled high strength steel with the tensile strength of ∼810 MPa, elongation of ∼24% and yield ratio of ∼0.82. While for furnace cooling after ultra fast cooling, its tensile strength, elongation and yield ratio is only ∼750 MPa, ∼22% and ∼0.84, respectively. The interphase precipitation in V–Ti microalloyed steel was observed, and these nanometer-sized carbides were detected as (V, Ti)C using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy spectra. In addition, the precipitation hardening was estimated as ∼313 MPa and ∼293 MPa for air cooling and furnace cooling after ultra fast cooling, respectively

  20. Carbon/Liquid Crystal Polymer Prepreg for Cryogenic and High-Temp Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — KaZaK Composites proposes to develop a pultrusion process to produce carbon fiber / liquid crystal polymer (LCP) prepreg, a first for this category of materials and...

  1. Precipitation legacy effects on dryland ecosystem carbon fluxes: direction, magnitude and biogeochemical carryovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Shen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The precipitation legacy effect, defined as the impact of historical precipitation (PPT on extant ecosystem dynamics, has been recognized as an important driver in shaping the temporal variability of dryland aboveground primary production (ANPP and soil respiration. How the PPT legacy influences whole ecosystem-level carbon (C fluxes has rarely been quantitatively assessed, particularly at longer temporal scales. We parameterized a process-based ecosystem model to a semiarid savanna ecosystem in southwestern US, calibrated and evaluated the model performance based on 7 years of eddy covariance measurements, and conducted two sets of simulation experiments to assess interdecadal and interannual scale PPT legacy effects over a 30 year simulation period. The results showed that decreasing the previous period/year PPT (dry legacy always imposed positive impacts on net ecosystem production (NEP whereas increasing the previous period/year PPT (wet legacy had negative impacts on NEP. The simulated dry legacy impacts were mostly positive on gross ecosystem production (GEP and negative on ecosystem respiration (Re but the wet legacy impacts were mostly negative on GEP and positive on Re. Although the direction and magnitude of GEP and Re responses to the simulated dry and wet legacies were influenced by both the previous and current PPT conditions, the NEP responses were predominantly determined by the previous PPT characteristics including rainfall amount, seasonality and event size distribution. Larger PPT difference between periods/years resulted in larger legacy impacts, with dry legacies fostering more C sequestration and wet legacies more C release. By analyzing the resource pool (C, N, and H2O responses to the simulated dry and wet legacies, we found that the carryover of soil N between periods/years was mainly responsible for the GEP responses while the carryovers of plant biomass, litter and soil organic matter were mainly responsible for the Re

  2. Crystallization and melting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced nylon-6 composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phang, In Yee; Ma, Jianhua; Shen, Lu; Liu, Tianxi; Zhang, Wei-De

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization and melting behavior of neat nylon-6 (PA6) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/PA6 composites prepared by simple melt-compounding was comparatively studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results show two crystallization exotherms (TCC, 1 and TCC, 2) for PA6/MWNTs

  3. Natural arsenic attenuation via metal arsenate precipitation in soils contaminated with metallurgical wastes: III. Adsorption versus precipitation in clean As(V)/goethite/Pb(II)/carbonate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil contamination with As and potentially harmful metals is a widespread problem around the world especially from mining and metallurgical wastes, which release substantial amounts of these elements to the environment in potentially mobile species. Recently, it has been found that in various Mexican soils contaminated with these types of wastes, arsenate is not in the form of sorbed species on Fe oxides present in the soils, as generally reported in the literature, but in the form of very insoluble compounds such as Pb, Cu and Ca arsenates. Here a thermodynamic model is applied and validated with the results from wet chemical experiments to determine the fundamental geochemical conditions governing the mobility of As in the presence of Pb. For this purpose, a relatively simple but fundamental system of goethite (α-FeOOH)/As(V)/Pb(II)/carbonate was defined as a function of the As(V)/Fe(III) ratio, in a pH range of 5–10. The speciation model included the simultaneous inclusion of triple layer surface complexation and arsenate precipitation equilibria. The model predicts that from very low total As(V)/Fe(III) molar ratios (0.012 at pH 7) the precipitation mechanism significantly influences the attenuation of As(V), and rapidly becomes the dominant process over the adsorption mechanism. Model results identify the quantitative conditions of predominance for each mechanism and describe the transition conditions in which relatively large fractions of adsorbed, precipitated and dissolved As(V) species prevail. Experimental measurements at selected As(V)/Fe(III) ratios and pH confirmed the predictions and validated the coupled thermodynamic model utilized.

  4. Complete genome sequence of the Sporosarcina psychrophila DSM 6497, a psychrophilic Bacillus strain that mediates the calcium carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenkai; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-20

    Sporosarcina psychrophila DSM 6497 is a gram positive, spore-formation psychrophilic bacterial strain, widely distributed in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Here we report its complete sequence including one circular chromosome of 4674191bp with a GC content of 40.3%. Genes encoding urease are predicted in the genome, which provide insight information on the microbiologically mediated urea hydrolysis process. This urea hydrolysis can further lead to an increase of carbonate anion and alkalinity in the environment, which promotes the microbiologically induced carbonate precipitation with various applications, such as the bioremediation of calcium rich wastewater and bio-reservation of architectural patrimony. PMID:27015981

  5. Growth of Large-Area Single- and Bi-Layer Graphene by Controlled Carbon Precipitation on Polycrystalline Ni Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Reina, Alfonso; Thiele, Stefan; Jia, Xiaoting; Bhaviripudi, Sreekar; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Schaefer, Juergen A.; Kong, Jing

    2009-01-01

    We report graphene films composed mostly of one or two layers of graphene grown by controlled carbon precipitation on the surface of polycrystalline Ni thin films during atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Controlling both the methane concentration during CVD and the substrate cooling rate during graphene growth can significantly improve the thickness uniformity. As a result, one- or two- layer graphene regions occupy up to 87% of the film area. Single layer coverage accounts for 5%–...

  6. PRE-FLOCCULATION OF PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLER BY CATIONIC STARCH FOR HIGHLY FILLED MECHANICAL GRADE PAPER

    OpenAIRE

    Yizhou Sang,; Michael McQuaid; Peter Englezos

    2011-01-01

    Three commercial starches were evaluated in conjunction with colloidal silica and flocculant to retain precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) filler. A unique feature of this study was the fact that the filler was pre-flocculated by a portion of starch (2kg starch/t PCC) and the rest of the starch was added after the flocculant but before the silica. The pulp used was peroxide bleached thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP). A statistical design methodology was employed and empirical process models were ...

  7. Influence of microstructure on the crystallization of segmented copolymers constituted by glycolide and trimethylene carbonate units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puiggali

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hot and cold non-isothermal crystallization of copolymers having glycolide hard segments and glycolide-cotrimethylene carbonate soft segments was investigated by calorimetry, optical microscopy and synchrotron radiation experiments. The effect of composition and microstructural changes on thermal properties and morphology of crystallized samples was analyzed. Significant differences were found between the nucleation density of spherulites developed during cold crystallization. Crystallizations from the melt were characterized by a lamellar insertion mechanism and a broad distribution of crystal layer widths. By contrast, cold crystallized samples gave rise to practically constant long periods and narrower distributions. Soft segments with high glycolide content were more easily incorporated in the crystalline phase by decreasing the hard segment content of the sample. A significant decrease on the melting point was observed as well as a decrease of the amorphous layer thickness and an increase of the crystalline lamellar thickness when the sample was hot and cold crystallized, respectively.

  8. Effect of oxygen and carbon impurities on the performance of silicon single crystal solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BSF solar cells are fabricated using B-doped wafers cut from Czochralski Si(100) single crystals. The effect of unintentional impurities of Oxygen and Carbon atoms on the solar cell performance parameters have been studied. The presence of carbon atoms shows an improvement in all parameters particularly the short circuit current where as oxygen shows an adverse effect. (author). 13 refs, 1 fig

  9. Crystallization of calcium carbonate on radiation-grafted polyethylene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In biomineralization processes, nucleation and growth of inorganic crystals can be regulated by organic template molecules. This has inspired great interest in studying mimic biomineralization. In our study, growing CaCO3 crystals on PE films functionalized through radiation-induced grafting was attempted. PE films grafted with different functional groups of different distributions and densities were used as substrates for CaCO3 nucleation and crystal growth from Ca(HCO3)2 supersaturated solution under different environmental conditions (e.g. additives and temperature) to study the effects and mechanisms. The grafted PE films were analyzed by ATR-FTIR and AFM, and the evolution of CaCO3 crystal formation on the grafted PE film was characterized by SEM, FTIR, and XRD. The results indicated that heterogeneous nucleation of CaCO3 crystals was significantly facilitated by the functional groups grafted on the surface of PE films, that the morphology of CaCO3 crystals could be controlled by distribution and density of the grafted functional groups, and that polymorphism of CaCO3 crystal could be regulated by selection of grafting functional groups. We believe that studying the effects of chemical structures on inorganic crystallization is of great importance since radiation-induced grafting is an effective method to graft desirable functional groups onto different polymers by selected monomers, in the endeavor of developing advanced organic/inorganic composites with high performance, with a wide availability of polymers, monomers and inorganic solutions. (authors)

  10. Study on crystal transformation process of magnesium carbonate hydrate based on salt lake magnesium resource utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Juan; Chen, Zhen; WU, Yu-Long; YANG, Ming-De

    2013-01-01

    The crystal transformation process of magnesium carbonate hydrate by the reaction of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) with ammonium carbonate [(NH4)2CO3] was investigated. MgSO4 is one of the main magnesium resources of the Lop Nur salt lake in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of China. Magnesium carbonate hydrates with different chemical compositions were prepared. The transformation process of the 2 crystals, MgSO4 and (NH4)2CO3, was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, and the associated chang...

  11. Catalytic Oxidation of Propylene, Toluene, Carbon Monoxide, and Carbon Black over Au/CeO 2 Solids: Comparing the Impregnation and the Deposition-Precipitation Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Antoine Aboukaïs; Samer Aouad; Houda El-Ayadi; Mira Skaf; Madona Labaki; Renaud Cousin; Edmond Abi-Aad

    2013-01-01

    Au/CeO2 solids were prepared by two methods: deposition-precipitation (DP) and impregnation (Imp). The prepared solids were calcined under air at 400°C. Both types of catalysts have been tested in the total oxidation of propylene, toluene, carbon monoxide, and carbon black. Au/CeO2-DP solids were the most reactive owing to the high number of gold nanoparticles and Au+ species and the low concentration of Cl- ions present on its surface compared to those observed in Au/CeO2-Imp solids.

  12. Studies in sublimation of tungsten single crystal (110) face and the influence of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekhtyar, I.Ya.; Kolesnik, V.M.; Patoka, V.I.; Silant' ev, V.I.

    1975-12-01

    Evaporation of the tungsten single crystal (110) face was studied in ultrahigh vacuum (better than 1.10/sup -9/ Torr) using the Langmuir method. The influence of carbon impurities on the evaporation parameters was found out and carbon is shown to increase the sublimation energy by 25 kcal. The data obtained show that the parameters of tungsten evaporation available in literature should be related to carbon-containing materials.

  13. Single crystals of DPPH grown from diethyl ether and carbon disulfide solutions - Crystal structures, IR, EPR and magnetization studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zilic, Dijana; Pajic, Damir; Juric, Marijana; Molcanov, Kresimir; Rakvin, Boris; Planinic, Pavica; Zadro, Kreso

    2012-01-01

    Single crystals of the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) obtained from diethyl ether (ether) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were characterized by the X-ray diffraction, IR, EPR and SQUID magnetization techniques. The X-ray structural analysis and IR spectra showed that the DPPH form crystallized from ether (DPPH1) is solvent free, whereas that one obtained from CS2 (DPPH2) is a solvate of the composition 4DPPH.CS2. Principal values of the g-tensor were estimated by the X-band EPR ...

  14. Carbon and hydrogen isotope composition of plant biomarkers as proxies for precipitation changes across Heinrich Events in the subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T. E.; Freeman, K.; Brenner, M.; Diefendorf, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tulane is a relatively deep (~23 m) solution lake in south-central Florida. Its depth and location on a structural high, the Lake Wales Ridge, enabled continuous lacustrine sediment accumulation over the past >60,000 years. Pollen in the lake sediments indicate repeated major shifts in the vegetation community, with six peaks in Pinus (pine) abundance that coincide with the most intense cold phases of Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles and the Heinrich events that terminate them. Alternating with Pinus peaks are zones with high relative percentages of Quercus (oak), Ambrosia (ragweed), Lyonia (staggerbush) and Ceratiola (rosemary) pollen, genera that today occupy the most xeric sites on the Florida landscape. This suggests the pollen record indicates the Pinus phases, and therefore Heinrich Events, were wetter than the intervening Quercus phases. To test the connection between Heinrich Events and precipitation in Florida, we analyzed the carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope signatures of plant biomarkers extracted from the Lake Tulane sediment core as proxies of paleohydrology. The δ13C of plant biomarkers, such as n-alkanes and terpenoids, are determined, in part, by changes in water-use efficiency (WUE = Assimilation/Transpiration) in plant communities, which changes in response to shifts in mean annual precipitation. Plant δ13C values can, therefore, provide a rough indication of precipitation changes when other factors, such as plant community, are relatively stable throughout time. Paleohydrology is also recorded in the δD of plant leaf waxes, which are strongly controlled by precipitation δD. In this region, precipitation δD is negatively correlated with rainfall amount (i.e. the "amount" effect) and positively correlated with aridity. Thus, the δ13C and δD signatures of molecular plant biomarkers provide relative indicators of precipitation change, and when combined, provide a test of our hypothesis that vegetation changes in this region are driven

  15. The influence of solution stoichiometry on surface-controlled Ca isotope fractionation during Ca carbonate precipitation from Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Depaolo, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Precipitation of calcite and aragonite from aqueous solution causes kinetic stable Ca isotope fractionation under conditions where Ca2+ is greatly in excess of CO32-. Research on carbonate mineral growth from low Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio solutions is lacking. Mono Lake, California is a highly alkaline lake with a Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio of 9.6 x 10-4, over five orders of magnitude lower than typical terrestrial fresh and ocean water. Aragonitic tufa towers grow along the lakeshore due to the mixing of lake water and Ca-rich spring water, while fine aragonite particles precipitate directly from the lake water, accumulating on the lake bottom. Variations in the Ca2+:CO32- activity ratio affect calcite growth kinetics and could affect the partitioning of Ca isotopes during carbonate precipitation. However, the relationship between solution stoichiometry, microscopic mineral growth mechanisms and calcium isotope fractionation is poorly understood. We analyzed the Sr and Ca isotopic compositions of a suite of lake water, spring, tufa and lake bottom sediment samples from the Mono Basin. Using the Sr isotope signatures of endmember water sources (pure lake water and shoreline spring water), we determined the compositions of carbonate mineral growth solutions, associated isotope separations (Δ44/40Cas-f = δ44/40Casolid - δ44/40Cafluid) and precipitation rates. While lake bottom aragonite precipitates directly from lake water (Ca2+:CO32- ≈ 10-3), tufa grows from mixed solutions with Ca2+:CO32- activity ratios approaching 10, so carbonate precipitation in Mono Lake spans a four order of magnitude range in solution stoichiometry. At Mono Lake, Δ44/40Cas-f and calculated precipitation rates vary between -0.6±0.15‰ at 1.5×10-9 mol m-2 s-1 for aragonite precipitating from lake water and ~ -1.0±0.15‰ at up to 4×10-8 mol m-2 s-1 for tufa growing from mixed spring and lake water. These values are consistent with fractionation observed during CaCO3 precipitation at

  16. Endolithic microbial communities in carbonate precipitates from serpentinite-hosted hyperalkaline springs of the Voltri Massif (Ligurian Alps, Northern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéméneur, Marianne; Palvadeau, Alexandra; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Chavagnac, Valérie; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-09-01

    The Voltri Massif is an ophiolitic complex located in the Ligurian Alps close to the city of Genova (Northern Italy) where several springs discharge high pH (up to 11.7), low salinity waters produced by the active serpentinization of the ultramafic basement. Mixing of these hyperalkaline waters with the river waters along with the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide forms brownish carbonate precipitates covering the bedrock at the springs. Diverse archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in these carbonate precipitates using 454 pyrosequencing analyses of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Archaeal communities were dominated by members of potential methane-producing and/or methane-oxidizing Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (Euryarchaeota) together with ammonia-oxidizing Nitrososphaerales (Thaumarchaeota) similar to those found in other serpentinization-driven submarine and terrestrial ecosystems. Bacterial communities consisted of members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Verrucomicrobia phyla, altogether accounting for 92.2% of total retrieved bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Amongst Bacteria, potential chemolithotrophy was mainly associated with Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria classes, including nitrogen-fixing, methane-oxidizing or hydrogen-oxidizing representatives of the genera Azospirillum, Methylosinus, and Hydrogenophaga/'Serpentinomonas', respectively. Besides, potential chemoorganotrophy was attributed mainly to representatives of Actinobacteria and Planctomycetales phyla. The reported 16S rRNA gene data strongly suggested that hydrogen, methane, and nitrogen-based chemolithotrophy can sustain growth of the microbial communities inhabiting the carbonate precipitates in the hyperalkaline springs of the Voltri Massif, similarly to what was previously observed in other serpentinite-hosted ecosystems. PMID:25874424

  17. Evaluation of ERTS data for certain oceanographic uses. [precipitation of calcium carbonate in Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. According to Lake Michigan records, the pH levels have been steadily increasing as the lake becomes more eutrophic. Numerous upwellings during the summer of 1973, beginning with the late July event, appear to be triggering a chemical precipitation of calcium carbonate. The upwelling provides abundant carbon dioxide into the surface water and results in massive blooms of phytoplankton. As the CO2 is utilized by these microscopic plants the pH is increased (acidity decreases) and CaCO3 no longer is able to remain in solution. The precipitation takes place where the phytoplankton are living, near depths of 10 meters. Therefore, the whiting observed by ERTS-1 is only seen in the green band, as red cannot penetrate but a few meters. With these whitings, secci disc readings lower in July from 10-15 meters to 3-5 meters and green, milky water is observed by research vessels. It appears that whitings have been becoming more frequent since the middle 60's but until ERTS-1 the extent had never been realized. Calcium levels are too low, presently, for a similar precipitate in Lakes Huron or Superior. However, whitings have been seen by ERTS-1 in Lakes Erie and Ontario where the calcium ion and pH levels are more like those found in Lake Michigan.

  18. The peculiar electrical response of liquid crystal-carbon nanotube systems as seen by impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, A.; Vergaz, R.; Algorri, J. F.; Geday, M. A.; Otón, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Conductive nanoparticles, especially elongated ones such as carbon nanotubes, dramatically modify the electrical behavior of liquid crystal cells. These nanoparticles are known to reorient with liquid crystals in electric fields, causing significant variations of conductivity at minute concentrations of tens or hundreds ppm. The above notwithstanding, impedance spectroscopy of doped cells in the frequency range customarily employed by liquid crystal devices, 100 Hz-10 kHz, shows a relatively simple resistor/capacitor response where the components of the cell can be univocally assigned to single components of the electrical equivalent circuit. However, widening the frequency range up to 1 MHz or beyond reveals a complex behavior that cannot be explained with the same simple EEC. Moreover, the system impedance varies with the application of electric fields, their effect remaining after removing the field. Carbon nanotubes are reoriented together with liquid crystal reorientation when applying voltage, but barely reoriented back upon liquid crystal relaxation once the voltage is removed. Results demonstrate a remarkable variation in the impedance of the dielectric blend formed by liquid crystal and carbon nanotubes, the irreversible orientation of the carbon nanotubes and possible permanent contacts between electrodes.

  19. The peculiar electrical response of liquid crystal-carbon nanotube systems as seen by impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conductive nanoparticles, especially elongated ones such as carbon nanotubes, dramatically modify the electrical behavior of liquid crystal cells. These nanoparticles are known to reorient with liquid crystals in electric fields, causing significant variations of conductivity at minute concentrations of tens or hundreds ppm. The above notwithstanding, impedance spectroscopy of doped cells in the frequency range customarily employed by liquid crystal devices, 100 Hz–10 kHz, shows a relatively simple resistor/capacitor response where the components of the cell can be univocally assigned to single components of the electrical equivalent circuit. However, widening the frequency range up to 1 MHz or beyond reveals a complex behavior that cannot be explained with the same simple EEC. Moreover, the system impedance varies with the application of electric fields, their effect remaining after removing the field. Carbon nanotubes are reoriented together with liquid crystal reorientation when applying voltage, but barely reoriented back upon liquid crystal relaxation once the voltage is removed. Results demonstrate a remarkable variation in the impedance of the dielectric blend formed by liquid crystal and carbon nanotubes, the irreversible orientation of the carbon nanotubes and possible permanent contacts between electrodes. (paper)

  20. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  1. Dynamics of mineral crystallization at inclusion-garnet interface from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in-situ synchrotron x-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. These inclusions are frequently hosted by minerals stable at mantle depths, such as garnet, and show the same textural features as fluid inclusions. The mineral infillings of the solid multiphase inclusions are generally assumed to have crystallized by precipitation from the solute load of dense supercritical fluids equilibrating with the host rock. Notwithstanding the validity of this assumption, the mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatised at ~ 4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometers and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol.%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80- 90 vol.%) occur with constant volume ratios and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by means of Synchrotron Radiation at DLS-Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and their reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Epitaxy drives a first-stage nucleation of spinel under near-to-equilibrium conditions

  2. Effect of aluminium nitride precipitation on recrystallisation kinetic in low carbon batch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important feature of aluminium killed steels is the strong influence that aluminium nitride precipitates produce in both the mechanical properties and the final micro-structural characteristics of the steel. This influence is related to the different stages of the fabrication process. This paper de las with a study of the effects of aluminium nitrides on the kinetics of recrystallisation. Different heat treatments were carried out, in one case to dissolve AIN, and in the other in order to precipitate AIN. These steels were subjected to cold rolling, followed by a batch annealing process. The recrystallised fraction was measured, thus obtaining the kinetic curves. The activation energy for recrystallisation was computed in each case. The results showed that AIN precipitation during recrystallisation produces a delay in recrystallisation kinetics through a change in the activation energy value. (Author) 29 refs

  3. Epifluorescence microscopy: a sensitive tool for studying the morphology and oriented growth of europium precipitates in KI single-crystal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Borboa, A E; Unda-Angeles, R

    2015-06-01

    The morphology and oriented growth of europium precipitates in well-annealed Eu²⁺-doped KI single crystals are investigated by epifluorescence microscopy using the proper doping ions as fluorochromes. To make this, electronic spatial reconstructions of some fields of precipitates and of some individual precipitates were built from epifluorescence microscope images of different optical cross-sections of these objects. The building procedures are carefully explained. Previously, the KI:Eu²⁺ system was characterized by fluorescence spectrophotometry and the KI-host long-range translational order was tested by single-plate X-ray diffraction. Precipitates are shaped as plates, with their broad faces being parallel to host lattice planes of either {100}- or {110}-forms (the {100}- or {110}-plates, respectively) and as rods lying along host lattice -directions. The {100}-plates have rhomboidal broad faces with a side lying along a -direction, an internal angle of about 45°, as measured on the corresponding {100}-plane, and, consequently, another side (the {100}-side) lying along a direction on this plane. The {110}-plates have rectangular broad faces with a side lying along a -direction and with another side (the {110}-side) lying along a -direction on the corresponding {110}-plane. Spatial reconstructions of a typical precipitate field, a typical {100}-plate, a typical {110}-plate and a typical rod are described in detail. Precipitates were measured in their different dimensions and the measuring procedures are explained. The plate thicknesses and rod diameters are into a common narrow range of values (0.5-0.2 μm) which contains also the inferior limits of the obtained length ranges for the {100}- and {110}-sides (5.1-0.3 and 4.9-0.3 μm, respectively). It is discussed that that three different europium precipitation states are responsible for the studied precipitation and that plates grew from rods during annealing. PMID:25703500

  4. Long-term patterns in dissolved organic carbon in boreal lakes: the role of incident radiation, precipitation, air temperature, southern oscillation and acid deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Hudson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Both lake-specific (e.g. pH and regional (e.g. precipitation factors affect DOC concentration and pattern. Using annual DOC concentration in nine boreal lakes in the ice-free season, the potential influences of five regional factors, air temperature, precipitation, SO4 deposition, solar radiation (photosynthetically active radiation, or PAR and the southern oscillation index (SOI have been explored through multiple regression. Mean solar radiation, winter precipitation and summer precipitation explained 59% of the variation in the mean DOC concentration (F3,17= 8.29, p= 0.0013. Solar radiation and winter precipitation were correlated, negatively, while summer precipitation was correlated, positively, with DOC concentration. Because these relationships were based on only 21 years of data (1978 to 1998, the significance of the parameters in the regression model was evaluated with a randomisation test. This re-analysis indicated that summer precipitation did not contribute significantly to the regression model ( prand= 0.183. The final multiple regression explained 50% of the variation in DOC (F2,18 = 9.33, prand= 0.002 based on solar radiation and winter precipitation. These results suggest that solar radiation and winter precipitation have a significant role in determining long-term DOC concentration in boreal lakes. Keywords: dissolved-organic-carbon, lakes, climate, solar-radiation, precipitation, acid-precipitation, Precambrian-Shield-Ontario

  5. Radiation does response of calcium carbonate crystal in marine shells samples

    OpenAIRE

    Changkian, S.; Kaewtubtim, P.

    2002-01-01

    A study of the evolution of element, crystal structure and thermoluminescence signal versus gamma irradiation dose were carried out for calcite shells samples. The composition of element was studied by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. As identified by X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDS analysis, two polymorphs of calcium-carbonate were extracted: calcite and aragonite. The evolution of TL signal versus gamma irradiation dose using the TL reader (Harshaw 2000) was initially dependent on crystal str...

  6. Optomechanical and Crystallization Phenomena Visualized with 4D Electron Microscopy: Interfacial Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Flannigan, David J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    With ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), we report observation of the nanoscopic crystallization of amorphous silicon nitride, and the ultrashort optomechanical motion of the crystalline silicon nitride at the interface of an adhering carbon nanotube network. The in situ static crystallization of the silicon nitride occurs only in the presence of an adhering nanotube network, thus indicating their mediating role in reaching temperatures close to 1000 °C when exposed to a train of laser pulse...

  7. Adsorption of crystal violet with diatomite earth&carbon by a modification of hydrothermal carbonization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhuo; Li, Jun; Chen, Guanghui; Bian, Wei; Lu, Yun; Li, Wenjing; Zheng, Zhaoming; Cheng, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    The high colority and difficulty of decolorization are the most important tasks on printing and dyeing wastewater. This study investigates the ability of diatomite earth&carbon (DE&C) as an adsorbent to removal crystal violet (CV) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicate the importance of functional groups during the adsorption of CV. The obtained N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm values accord with well IUPAC type II. Our calculations determined a surface area of 73.15 m(2) g(-1) for DE&C and an average pore diameter of 10.56 nm. Equilibrium data of the adsorption process fitted very well to the Langmuir model (R(2) > 0.99). The results of kinetics study showed that the pseudo-second-order model fitted to the experimental data well. The thermodynamic parameters were also evaluated. ΔH° 0 and ΔG° dye. Furthermore the positive value of ΔS° reflected good affinity of the CV dye. PMID:27003089

  8. Effect of pH and phosphate on calcium carbonate polymorphs precipitated at near-freezing temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Nehrke, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pH and phosphate on the precipitation of calcium carbonate polymorphs from aqueous solution were investigated. Experiments were carried out at near-freezing temperature and two different pH conditions (pH 13.4 and 9.0). At each pH condition, solutions having different concentrations of CaCl2 and NaHCO3 were mixed to achieve Ca/CO3 ratios of 1:1 and 10:1 at different pumping rates with and without phosphate. Results showed that, at pH 13.4, only ikaite wa...

  9. Effects of cosolvent on formation and morphology of microspheres in precipitation polymerization of divinylbenzene in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Sheng Li; Jing Cui Liang; Xiao Li Zhu; Xiang Zheng Kong

    2011-01-01

    Precipitation polymerizations of divinylbenzene (DVB) in pure supercritical carbon dioxide, and parallel runs with presence of a cosolvent were carried out. The results showed that use of acetone as the cosolvent contributed greatly to the formation of the monodisperse microspheres. PDVB microspheres, with obviously higher uniformity than reported up to date, were achieved using 6-7 mL of acetone in a reactor of 50 mL with DVB concentration of 0.4 mol/L under 16 MPa, a much lower pressure than previously reported without use of cosolvent.

  10. Carbon Isotopes in Pinus elliotti from Big Pine Key, Florida: Indicators of Seasonal Precipitation, ENSO and Disturbance Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebenack, C.; Willoughby, H. E.; Anderson, W. T.; Cherubini, P.

    2013-12-01

    The South Florida coastal ecosystem is among the world's subtropical coastlines which are threatened by the potential effects of climate change. A well-developed localized paleohistory is essential in the understanding of the role climate variability/change has on both hydrological dynamics and disturbance event frequency and intensity; this understanding can then aid in the development of better predictive models. High resolution paleoclimate proxies, such as those developed from tree-ring archives, may be useful tools for extrapolating actual climate trends over time from the overlapping long-term and short-term climate cycles, such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In South Florida, both the AMO and ENSO strongly influence seasonal precipitation, and a more complete grasp of how these cycles have affected the region in the past could be applied to future freshwater management practices. Dendrochronology records for the terrestrial subtropics, including South Florida, are sparse because seasonality for this region is precipitation driven; this is in contrast to the drastic temperature changes experienced in the temperate latitudes. Subtropical seasonality may lead to the complete lack of visible rings or to the formation of ring structures that may or may not represent annual growth. Fortunately, it has recently been demonstrated that Pinus elliottii trees in South Florida produce distinct annual growth rings; however ring width was not found to significantly correlate with either the AMO or ENSO. Dendrochronology studies may be taken a step beyond the physical tree-ring proxies by using the carbon isotope ratios to infer information about physiological controls and environmental factors that affect the distribution of isotopes within the plant. It has been well established that the stable isotope composition of cellulose can be related to precipitation, drought, large-scale ocean/atmospheric oscillations

  11. Impacts of Woody Plant Encroachment and Cultivation on Soil Carbon and Soil Water Flux Across a Precipitation Gradient in Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. H.; Jobbágy, E. G.; Jackson, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    Land-use/cover changes affect flux and storages of water and carbon, which are becoming increasingly important in light of the projected climate change and water shortages around the world. Cultivation of food crops and woody-plant encroachment are two such changes that are prevalent in grassland ecosystems. We compared belowground water flux and carbon storage in adjacent stands of natural grasslands and woody- encroached or cultivated plots. Stands were located in 5 sites across a precipitation gradient in the Pampa grasslands of varying soil texture in Argentina. Soil cores were excavated to 9 meters or to groundwater level and analyzed for soil moisture and chloride to estimate groundwater recharge rates using the chloride mass balance and chloride displacement methods. Cores were also analyzed for soil organic and inorganic carbon. Comparison of soil chloride profiles under the land-use/cover change from the natural grasslands suggested reduced recharge and/or higher groundwater use under woody plants and enhanced recharge under cultivation compared to the grasslands. Chloride concentrations differed up to 3-fold between the grassland and the two land-use/cover changes. Soil organic carbon was similar or significantly higher under woody plants and lower under cultivation compared with grasslands. The changes in water yield are discussed in context of the estimated carbon sequestration measured at the sites. Valuation of such changes would help determine the optimum land-use/cover under global environmental changes.

  12. Results of the TTF-TCNQ and the calcium carbonate crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1992-01-01

    Experiment A0139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and TTF-TCNQ. Although temperature data was lost, the experimental program had been working since the valves in all containers had been opened. All four experiments produced crystals of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals will be presented. Comparisons will be made with our previous space solution growth experiments. The TTF-TCNQ crystals are no longer of the highest interest, so this activity has been terminated in favor of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate crystallizations.

  13. Effect of Precipitation Fluctuation on Soil Carbon Storage of a Tropical Peat Swamp Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton E. Satrio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: It is important to compare the effect of extremely different rainfall conditions on soil carbon storage of lowland tropical peat swamp forest. Therefore, under these natural rainfall gradient, the objectives of this study were to determine whether rainfall affects soil carbon storage of a tropical peat swamp forest and to determine what correlations between variables occurs which stimulate soil carbon storage changes of a tropical peat swamp forest. Approach: Soil sampling was conducted in two different plots (0.3 ha each plot to a depth of 15 cm under two extremely different mean rainfall at Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. The soil samples were analyzed for acidity, organic matter content, total carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus. The humic acid extraction was also done and soil carbon storage values were obtained by calculation. The calculation of carbon storage was by the bulk density method. Comparison between paired means of soil carbon storage under two different rainfall gradients were tested using paired t-test and correlation analysis was used to correlate variables (pH, soil organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, C/N ratio, C/P ratio, humic acid yield, unstable carbon and stable carbon. Results: The percentage of stable carbon count of unstable carbon was 42.93% under lower rainfall, while that of higher rainfall was 62.69 %. It suggests that this natural tropical peat swamp forest plays an important role as a sink rather than a source of carbon under higher rainfall but inversely under lower rainfall. It also suggests that soil organic matter tends to decompose and releases CO2 by oxidation under lower rainfall. Stable carbon positively correlated with humic acid yield for the two areas with different rainfall (pConclusion: Anaerobic environment is more prominent under higher rainfall and may facilitate high value of soil carbon storage in the soil profile of tropical peat swamp forest and

  14. Study of the effect of nano-sized precipitates on the mechanical properties of boron-added low-carbon steels by neutron scattering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, B S; Cho, Y R; Shin, E J; Kim, S I; Choi, S-H; Kim, H R; Kim, Y J

    2008-10-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron powder diffraction (ND) techniques were used to study quantitatively the effect of nano-sized precipitates and boron addition on the mechanical properties of low-carbon steels. SANS was used to evaluate nano-sized precipitates, smaller than about 600 A in diameter, and ND was used to determine the weight fraction of the cementite precipitates. Fine core-shell structured spherical precipitates with an average radius of ~50 A, such as MnS and/or CuS, surrounded by BN layers were observed in the boron-added (BA) low-carbon steels; fine spherical precipitates with an average radius of ~48 A were mainly observed in the boron-free (BF) low-carbon steels. In the BA steels, the number of boron precipitates, such as BN, Fe(3)(C,B) and MnS, surrounded by BN layers increased drastically at higher hot-rolling temperatures. The volume fraction of the fine precipitates of the BA steels was higher than that of the BF steels; this difference is related to the rapid growth of the BN layers on the MnS and CuS precipitates. Boron addition to low-carbon steels resulted in a reduction in strength and an improvement in elongation; this behaviour is related to the reduction of the solute carbon and the nitrogen contents in the ferrite matrix caused by the precipitation of BN, as well by the increase in the volume fraction of the cementites. PMID:19461851

  15. Effect of Precipitation Fluctuation on Soil Carbon Storage of a Tropical Peat Swamp Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Anton E. Satrio; Seca Gandaseca; Osumanu H. Ahmed; Nik M.A. Majid

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: It is important to compare the effect of extremely different rainfall conditions on soil carbon storage of lowland tropical peat swamp forest. Therefore, under these natural rainfall gradient, the objectives of this study were to determine whether rainfall affects soil carbon storage of a tropical peat swamp forest and to determine what correlations between variables occurs which stimulate soil carbon storage changes of a tropical peat swamp forest. Approach: Soil sampling ...

  16. Preparation and Crystallization of Carbon Nanotube/maleic Anhydride-grafted Polypropylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua CHEN; Jing HU; Lingping ZHOU; Wenhua LI; Zi YANG; Yanguo WANG

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/maleic acid anhydride (MAH)-grafted polypropylene (PP) composites were prepared by in situ grafting method. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the CNTs were linked to PP by MAH grafting. The microstructures and calorimetry analysis indicated that the crystallization behaviors of the filled and unfilled PP were quite different. The addition of CNTs dramatically reduced the spherulite size, increased crystallization rate and improved the thermal stability of PP. These results confirmed the expected nucleant effect of CNT on the crystallization of PP. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that the CNTs were dispersed homogeneously, indicating that the original CNT bundles were separated into individual tubes by the grafting.

  17. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M; Geday, Morten A

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  18. Crystallization and self-assembly of flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate regulated by pepsin Langmuir monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate were synthesized at air–water interface in the presence of pepsin Langmuir monolayers as the biomimetic template. The phase structure, morphology, and microstructure of the products obtained at various crystallization stages were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structural and morphological evolution processes of the products from monodispersed nanoparticles to nanoparticle aggregates and flowerlike superstructures were investigated. Results indicate that the flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate are assembled from amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles. The growth and assembly of calcium carbonate minerals are significantly regulated by the pepsin Langmuir monolayers. Namely, the pepsin Langmuir monolayers stabilize amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles and direct their transformation to amorphous aggregates via non-oriented aggregation. The present approach presents a feasible way to manipulate the growth of inorganic crystal, which, hopefully, is to help better reveal the role of proteins in mineralization process and understand the mechanism of biomineralization. -- Highlights: ► Pepsin Langmuir monolayer as biomimetic template. ► Flower-like calcite crystals experience a novel assembly and growth process. ► The morphologic evolution and phase transformation were observed. ► The trace of initial nucleation site of CaCO3 at the interface was observed. ► The template directs the crystallization and growth process.

  19. Crystallization and self-assembly of flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate regulated by pepsin Langmuir monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhonghui [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Du, Zuliang, E-mail: zld@henu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate were synthesized at air-water interface in the presence of pepsin Langmuir monolayers as the biomimetic template. The phase structure, morphology, and microstructure of the products obtained at various crystallization stages were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structural and morphological evolution processes of the products from monodispersed nanoparticles to nanoparticle aggregates and flowerlike superstructures were investigated. Results indicate that the flowerlike superstructures of calcium carbonate are assembled from amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles. The growth and assembly of calcium carbonate minerals are significantly regulated by the pepsin Langmuir monolayers. Namely, the pepsin Langmuir monolayers stabilize amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles and direct their transformation to amorphous aggregates via non-oriented aggregation. The present approach presents a feasible way to manipulate the growth of inorganic crystal, which, hopefully, is to help better reveal the role of proteins in mineralization process and understand the mechanism of biomineralization. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pepsin Langmuir monolayer as biomimetic template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flower-like calcite crystals experience a novel assembly and growth process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphologic evolution and phase transformation were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The trace of initial nucleation site of CaCO{sub 3} at the interface was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The template directs the crystallization and growth process.

  20. Small angle neutron scattering investigation of Mg2Si precipitates in a single crystal of an Al-Mg-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was recently performed to investigate, by means of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), the precipitation of Mg2Si phase in a polycrystalline sample of a high purity Al-Mg-Si alloy. This kind of alloys, of great industrial interest, are characterized by the well known precipitation sequence: αSS -G.P.-β'-β(Mg2Si) as pointed out since 1961. SANS is able to supply relevant information on the size distribution of precipitates induced by thermal treatment of the quench from solubilization temperature. In particular it was shown that the precipitate volume fraction obtained from the size distribution function deduced from SANS measurements was in agreement with the results of resistivity measurements which, as well known, precise quantitative information about the depletion of the solid solution during isothermal annealing. In this paper we study a single crystal by means of a SANS measurement performed with the same experimental facility (D17 at ILL-Grenoble), and try to exploit all information arising from the regular orientation of the precipitates by means of a two-dimensional pattern analysis accounting for the directional anisotropy of the scattering profile. 6 refs., 3 figs

  1. Controlling the number of walls in multi walled carbon nanotubes/alumina hybrid compound via ball milling of precipitate catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosbi, Norlin; Akil, Hazizan Md

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the influence of milling time on the structure and properties of the precipitate catalyst of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/alumina hybrid compound, produced through the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. For this purpose, light green precipitate consisted of aluminium, nickel(II) nitrate hexahydrate and sodium hydroxide mixture was placed in a planetary mill equipped with alumina vials using alumina balls at 300 rpm rotation speed for various milling time (5-15 h) prior to calcinations and CVD process. The compound was characterized using various techniques. Based on high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis, increasing the milling time up to 15 h decreased the diameter of MWCNT from 32.3 to 13.1 nm. It was noticed that the milling time had a significant effect on MWCNT wall thickness, whereby increasing the milling time from 0 to 15 h reduced the number of walls from 29 to 12. It was also interesting to note that the carbon content increased from 23.29 wt.% to 36.37 wt.% with increasing milling time.

  2. Crystal structure of Brinzolamide: a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huirong; Lou, Benyong

    2016-05-01

    In crystal structure of the title compound, C12H21N3O5S3 [systematic name: (R)-4-ethyl-amino-2-(3-meth-oxy-prop-yl)-3,4-di-hydro-2H-thieno[3,2-e][1,2]thia-zine-6-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide], there exist three kinds of hydrogen-bonding inter-actions. The sulfonamide group is involved in hydrogen bonding with the secondary amine and the meth-oxy O atom, resulting in the formation of layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by an N-H⋯O hydrogen bond involving a sulfonamide O atom as acceptor and the secondary amine H atom as donor, which gives rise to the formation of a unique bilayer structure. The absolute structure of the mol-ecule in the crystal was determined by resonant scattering [Flack parameter = 0.01 (4)]. PMID:27308020

  3. Crystal structure of Brinzolamide: a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huirong Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In crystal structure of the title compound, C12H21N3O5S3 [systematic name: (R-4-ethylamino-2-(3-methoxypropyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-thieno[3,2-e][1,2]thiazine-6-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide], there exist three kinds of hydrogen-bonding interactions. The sulfonamide group is involved in hydrogen bonding with the secondary amine and the methoxy O atom, resulting in the formation of layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by an N—H...O hydrogen bond involving a sulfonamide O atom as acceptor and the secondary amine H atom as donor, which gives rise to the formation of a unique bilayer structure. The absolute structure of the molecule in the crystal was determined by resonant scattering [Flack parameter = 0.01 (4].

  4. Low Carbon Low Alloy Submicro-Steel with Nano-Precipitates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SongHongwei; ShiBi; ZhangJunbao; WangXiufang

    2005-01-01

    A submicro-steel sheet was successfully fabricated by severe warm-wiling at 773 K through a single pass. The microstructure was characterized first and the thermal stability of the submicro-steel was investigated by annealing the steel at different temperatures.Results indicate that grains are nearly equiaxial with an average diameter of 300 nm for grains near to the surface and 600 nm for grains at the center of the sheet and the submicro-steel can be subjected to annealing at 773 K without obvious grain growth. The formation of the submicro-structure can be related to a severe plastic deformation-induced grain refinement mechanism. The unusually high thermal stability can be attributed to the pinning effect of numerous uniformly-distributed nano-precipitates in the steel. The average diameter of the larger precipitates is about 30 nm and the smaller less than 10 inn.

  5. Single crystals of DPPH grown from diethyl ether and carbon disulfide solutions - Crystal structures, IR, EPR and magnetization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žilić, Dijana; Pajić, Damir; Jurić, Marijana; Molčanov, Krešimir; Rakvin, Boris; Planinić, Pavica; Zadro, Krešo

    2010-11-01

    Single crystals of the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) obtained from diethyl ether (ether) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were characterized by the X-ray diffraction, IR, EPR and SQUID magnetization techniques. The X-ray structural analysis and IR spectra showed that the DPPH form crystallized from ether (DPPH1) is solvent free, whereas that one obtained from CS2 (DPPH2) is a solvate of the composition 4DPPH·CS2. Principal values of the g-tensor were estimated by the X-band EPR spectroscopy at room and low (10 K) temperatures. Magnetization studies revealed the presence of antiferromagnetically coupled dimers in both types of crystals. However, the way of dimerization as well as the strength of exchange couplings are different in the two DPPH samples, which is in accord with their crystal structures. The obtained results improved parameters accuracy and enabled better understanding of properties of DPPH as a standard sample in the EPR spectrometry.

  6. Enzyme-accelerated and structure-guided crystallization of calcium carbonate: role of the carbonic anhydrase in the homologous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Werner E G; Schlossmacher, Ute; Schröder, Heinz C; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Glasser, Gunnar; Korzhev, Michael; Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    The calcareous spicules from sponges, e.g. from Sycon raphanus, are composed of almost pure calcium carbonate. In order to elucidate the formation of those structural skeletal elements, the function of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), isolated from this species, during the in vitro calcium carbonate-based spicule formation, was investigated. It is shown that the recombinant sponge CA substantially accelerates calcium carbonate formation in the in vitro diffusion assay. A stoichiometric calculation revealed that the turnover rate of the sponge CA during the calcification process amounts to 25 CO2s(-1) × molecule CA(-1). During this enzymatically driven process, initially pat-like particles are formed that are subsequently transformed to rhomboid/rhombohedroid crystals with a dimension of ~50 μm. The CA-catalyzed particles are smaller than those which are formed in the absence of the enzyme. The Martens hardness of the particles formed is ~4 GPa, a value which had been determined for other biogenic calcites. This conclusion is corroborated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which revealed that the particles synthesized are composed predominantly of the elements calcium, oxygen and carbon. Surprising was the finding, obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, that the newly formed calcitic crystals associate with the calcareous spicules from S. raphanus in a highly ordered manner; the calcitic crystals almost perfectly arrange in an array orientation along the two opposing planes of the spicules, leaving the other two plane arrays uncovered. It is concluded that the CA is a key enzyme controlling the calcium carbonate biomineralization process, which directs the newly formed particles to existing calcareous spicular structures. It is expected that with the given tools new bioinspired materials can be fabricated. PMID:23978410

  7. Precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate: key processes bridging the bio- and geosciences (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    In this Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal lecture, I will focus on the biogeochemical cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) which is arguably one of the best example of a set processes that bridge the bio- and geosciences. The main reactions involved are calcification and dissolution that, respectively, manufacture and destroy calcium carbonate. Biology is intimately involved in these two processes which are key controls of the Earth's climate and leave remains that are of great use to human societies (as building materials) and geoscientists. I will illustrate the bridge between the bio- and geosciences by providing brief examples for each of the following four issues. (1) The marine cycle of CaCO3 and its relationship with climate. The release of CO2 by the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the uptake of CO2 by its dissolution are important controls of atmospheric CO2 and climate. The vertical distribution of Ψ, the ratio of CO2 released/used per CaCO3 precipitated/dissolved in the ocean will be shown to be consistent with the Högbom-Urey reactions. (2) The use of CaCO3 in paleooceanography. The remains of calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are wonderful archives of past environmental changes. Their isotopic composition and the concen-tration of trace elements are invaluable in the reconstruction of past climate. I will address the challenge of calibrating one of the proxies used to reconstruct past ocean pH. (3) The challenge of understanding calcification. Despite having been investigated for decades, many aspects of the physiological and molecular processes involved in calcification by marine organisms remain obscure. Recent breakthroughs, mostly on reef-building corals, will be briefly reviewed. (4) The response of calcification and dissolution to environmental change. The critical importance of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution as climate controls makes it vital to understand their response to global environmental changes such as ocean warming and

  8. Citrate effects on amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) structure, stability, and crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of citrate in the crystallization kinetics of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is essential to explain the formation mechanisms, stabilities, surface properties, and morphologies of CaCO3 biominerals. It also contributes to deeper insight into fluid-mineral inte...

  9. Effects of Strain-Induced Crystallization on Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of strain-induced crystallization (SIC) on the mechanical properties of elastomeric composites as functions of extension ratio (λ), multi walled carbon nanotube (CNT) content, and carbon black (CB) content are investigated. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis shows that the degree of crystallinity increases with the increase in the CB and CNT content. As λ increases, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the composites increases, and the latent heat of crystallization (LHc) of the composites is maximum at λ=1.5. It is found that the mechanical properties have a linear relation with LHc, depending on the CNT content. According to the TGA (thermogravimetric analysis), the weight loss of the composite matrix is 94.3% and the weight of the composites decreases with the filler content. The ratio of tensile modulus (Ecomp/ Ematrix) is higher than that of tensile strength (σcomp/ σmatrix) because of the CNT orientation inside the elastomeric composites

  10. Effect of carbon on the primary crystallization of low content U-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives the results concerning the effects of carbon on the primary crystallization of uranium-molybdenum alloys. In effect, low amounts of added carbon can lead to considerable refinement of the γ grain. After describing in the first part the work carried out on the laboratory and the industrial scales, the authors put forward the most likely hypotheses for explaining the results and observations made during this work. In the second part, the authors propose four methods for introducing carbon which can be applied to these alloys. (authors)

  11. Influence of surface treatment of carbon fibers on electrochemical crystallization of calcium phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Ke; HUANG Su-ping; ZHOU Ke-chao

    2005-01-01

    Electrodeposition technique was used to coat calcium phosphate on carbon fiber which can be used to reinforce hydroxyapatite. The differences between fibers treated with and without nitric acid in electrodeposition were evaluated. The X-ray diffractometry results show that CaHPO4·2H2O is obtained as the kind of calcium phosphate coating on carbon fiber. The scanning electron microscopy photographs and deposit kinetic curve indicate that the influences of the functional group attained by nitric acid treatment, the crystal morphology and crystallization of the coating layers on the fiber with and without treatment rate are obviously different. The functional group, especially the acidic group, can act as nucleation centers of electrochemical crystallization.

  12. Optical properties of dimeric liquid crystals doped with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well oriented distinct local single crystals were grown in smectic C liquid crystal (LC) (heptyloxybenzoic acid – 7OBA) using predefined orientation of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The SWCNT/SiOx/ITO/glass surface is found to cause a substantial enlargement of the smectic C distinct local single crystals and to reinforce both surface memory effect and surface anchoring. We synthesized and examined a set of nanocomposites, built of LC with hydrogen-bonded in dimers molecules (7OBA) and SWCNT. We found that the surface orientation strength and the interaction of the dimeric molecules with the carbon nanotubes play a decisive role for the type (symmetry), thermal stability and chirality of the LC states induced in the nanocomposites. As a result, a set of phase transitions and new phases (chiral smectic C, reentrant nematic, reentrant chiral nematic and a unique low-temperature chiral biaxial fluid smectic phase CG) not typical for pristine 7OBA were found.

  13. Radiological hazards of TENORM in precipitated calcium carbonate generated as waste at nitrophosphate fertilizer plant in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material) in phosphate rock (PR) is converted to TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material) as a result of chemical processing of the PR to make phosphate fertilizers. → Precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) is generated as process waste during nitrophosphate fertilizer production, which contains TENORM. → Activity concentration of the radionuclide in the TENORM was measured using gamma spectrometry and radiological hazard was derived from the measured activities. → Radiological pollution in the environment from TENORM in the PCC has been addressed. → Restricted application of the PCC dose not pose a significant radiological hazard. -- Abstract: The NORM (naturally occurring radioactive material) in phosphate rock is transferred as TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material) to phosphatic fertilizers and to the waste generated by the chemical processes. The waste generated at the NP (nitrophosphate) fertilizer plant at Multan in Pakistan is PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate). Thirty samples of the PCC were collected from the heaps of the waste near the fertilizer plant. Activity concentrations of radionuclides in the waste samples were measured by using the technique of gamma ray spectrometry consisting of coaxial type HPGe (high purity germanium) detector coupled with a PC (personal computer) based MCA (multichannel analyzer) through a spectroscopy amplifier. Activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in the waste samples were determined to be 273 ± 23 (173-398), 32 ± 4 (26-39) and 56 ± 5 (46-66) Bq kg-1 respectively. The activity concentration of 226Ra in the PCC waste was found to be higher than that in naturally occurring calcium carbonate (limestone and marble) and in worldwide soil. Radiological hazard was estimated from indoor and outdoor exposure to gamma rays from the PCC. Indoor annual effective dose was higher than 1 m Sv

  14. Total organic carbon and gas chromatography: Mass spectroscopic methods to determine total carbon and hydrocarbons in mercuric iodide single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total organic carbon was by measuring the CO2 produced by combustion in a sealed quartz vessel. The CO2 was quantified by nondispersive IR and by titration using commercial detectors. The total organic carbon was found to be around 10 to 100 μg/g in both starting materials and in single crystals. Gas chromatography--mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) measurements were made hexane extracts of mercuric iodide (HgI2) dissolved in potassium iodide solution. Hydrocarbons starting with C10 (DIENE) and up to C26 were found. In addition, phthalates, such as diethyl and dioctyl phthalate were also found. Some of the organic compounds, for example, such hydrocarbons as branched nC16, nC20, nC21, nC22, nC23, and nC24, were present in some HgI2 materials in quantities of the order of weight ppM, but were eliminated in the purification process and were not found in the single crystals. Other organic compounds such as the phthalates were not always eliminated and were identified in the single crystals. In general, the GC/MS could identify only hydrocarbons of C10 and higher could account for few percentages of the total organic carbon determined by oxidation. 10 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Total organic carbon and gas chromatography: Mass spectroscopic methods to determine total carbon and hydrocarbons in mercuric iodide single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, S.; Kaplan, I.; Schieber, M..; Ortale, C.; Skinner, N.; van den Berg, L.

    1987-01-01

    Total organic carbon was by measuring the CO/sub 2/ produced by combustion in a sealed quartz vessel. The CO/sub 2/ was quantified by nondispersive IR and by titration using commercial detectors. The total organic carbon was found to be around 10 to 100 ..mu..g/g in both starting materials and in single crystals. Gas chromatography--mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) measurements were made hexane extracts of mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) dissolved in potassium iodide solution. Hydrocarbons starting with C/sub 10/ (DIENE) and up to C/sub 26/ were found. In addition, phthalates, such as diethyl and dioctyl phthalate were also found. Some of the organic compounds, for example, such hydrocarbons as branched nC/sub 16/, nC/sub 20/, nC/sub 21/, nC/sub 22/, nC/sub 23/, and nC/sub 24/, were present in some HgI/sub 2/ materials in quantities of the order of weight ppM, but were eliminated in the purification process and were not found in the single crystals. Other organic compounds such as the phthalates were not always eliminated and were identified in the single crystals. In general, the GC/MS could identify only hydrocarbons of C/sub 10/ and higher could account for few percentages of the total organic carbon determined by oxidation. 10 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Thermally induced crystallization and phase evolution in powders derived from amorphous calcium phosphate precipitates with a Ca/P ratio of 1:1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyman, Zoltan; Epple, Matthias; Goncharenko, Anton; Rokhmistrov, Dmytro; Prymak, Oleg; Loza, Kateryna

    2016-09-01

    Calcium phosphate powders of calcium pyrophosphate α1-CPP (the metastable phase of the high-temperature polymorph α-CPP) and the polymorph β-CPP (stable in this range), of α1-CPP, β-CPP, α1-TCP (metastable polymorph of the high-temperature phase α-tricalcium phosphate) and β-tricalcium phosphate β-TCP were prepared by heating amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) precipitates with the nominal Ca/P ratio of 1:1 by nitrate synthesis. α1-CPP/β-CPP resulted from a crystallization at 530-640 °C and subsequent heating to 980 °C of unwashed and lyophilized ACP. α1-CPP/β-CPP/α1-TCP/β-TCP was formed by crystallization at 620-720 °C, followed by heating of six-time washed and lyophilized ACP precipitates from an ultra-short synthesis. The activation energy for the crystallization of ACP to α1-CPP was determined with 165 kJ mol-1. The reason for the occurrence of the TCP phases (Ca/P ratio=1.5) from ACP (Ca/P ratio=1) is discussed. The powders are prospective biomaterials for bone substitution because they combine effective bioactive phases with the metastable polymorphs α1-CPP and α1-TCP.

  17. Characterisation of γ' precipitates in a single crystal nickel base superalloy SC16 using SEM, TEM and SANS as complimentary measuring tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterisation of the microstructure in nickel base superalloys is important for understanding and predicting the behaviour of these complex alloys. Large particle sizes of γ' precipitates in modern alloys, their regular arrangement in periodic arrays in the γ matrix and the complexity of the microstructure evolving under deformation at high temperatures, pose serious challenge to the precise characterisation of the microstructure. This necessitates the use of complementary measuring tools e.g. X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), optical metallography etc. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a useful modern technique, used to characterise fine precipitates and inhomogenities (< 50 nm) in materials. So far, established methodology does not exist for using SANS to characterise large particles like γ' precipitates in superalloys. In this paper we develop a model to analyse SANS intensity profiles from large (∼ 400 nm) γ' precipitates and together with the help of complementary methods such as SEM and TEM, characterise them in a single crystal nickel base alloy SC16. (orig.)

  18. Cementation of sand grains based on carbonate precipitation induced by microorganism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Microbes can produce 2 3 CO32-in an environment conductive to precipitation,so the incompact sands will be consolidated.This technology is environmentally friendly not only because it gives strength to the sand body,but also it allows water to penetrate into the sand body,which is unlike silicate cement that will destroy the ecosystem of the earth.After comparing the activity of three kinds of bacteria,the most suitable one was chosen for the study.However,the activity of this bacterium was still not high enough for the purpose,so it was purified.A suitable program for the consolidation and cementation of sands was also found in the experiment.The compressive strength and the porosity of the cemented sand body were tested to characterize the cementation effectiveness.XRD analysis showed that a new phase of calcite was produced between sand grains.The content of calcite was detected by TG.The study showed that the precipitation program was quite important to obtain a sound cemented sand body in addition to the activity of the bacteria.

  19. The effect of precipitants on Ni-Al2O3 catalysts prepared by a co-precipitation method for internal reforming in molten carbonate fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, You-Shick; Yoon, Wang-Lai; Seo, Yong-Seog; Rhee, Young-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Ni-Al2O3 catalysts are prepared via the co-precipitation method using various precipitants: urea, Na2CO3, NaOH, K2CO3, KOH and NH4OH. The effects of the precipitants on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the Ni-Al2O3 catalysts are investigated. The Ni50-urea catalyst displays the largest specific surface area and the highest pore volume. This catalyst also exhibits the highest Ni dispersion and the largest Ni surface area. Ni50-urea catalyst prepared with urea as preci...

  20. Crystal structure of Brinzolamide: a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Huirong; Lou, Benyong

    2016-01-01

    In crystal structure of the title compound, C12H21N3O5S3 [systematic name: (R)-4-ethyl­amino-2-(3-meth­oxy­prop­yl)-3,4-di­hydro-2H-thieno[3,2-e][1,2]thia­zine-6-sulfonamide 1,1-dioxide], there exist three kinds of hydrogen-bonding inter­actions. The sulfonamide group is involved in hydrogen bonding with the secondary amine and the meth­oxy O atom, resulting in the formation of layers parallel to the bc plane. The layers are linked by an N—H⋯O hydrogen bond involving a sulfonamide O atom as a...

  1. Study on Methods to Strenthen and Toughen Sapphire Crystal by Carbon Doped Grown by Temperature Gradient Technique (TGT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Ke-Yan, XU Jun, TANG Hui-Li, LI Hong-Jun, ZOU Yu-Qi, YANG Qiu-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of carbon-doped sapphire crystals with different carbon concentrations were studied at room temperature. The present work showed that the fracture strength and fracture toughness of as grown crystals were significantly improved by carbon doping and the visible-infrared optical property did not adversely affect. When the concentration of doped carbon was 5×10-3, the fracture strength and fracture toughness were increased to 752 MPa and 2.81 MPa·m1/2 in average, respectively, and the transmition of visible-infrared was about 80%. Appropriate carbon dopant in the crystals played the roles of clearance ions and created blocking effect to the sapphires cracking, which improved fracture strength and fracture toughness of sapphires at room temperature. However the mechanical properties and optical properties declined when carbon dopant was excessive, due to carbon inclusions grown from composition segregation.

  2. Factors controlling the growth rate, carbon and oxygen isotope variation in modern calcite precipitation in a subtropical cave, Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Junbing; Wang, Aoyu; Shen, Licheng; Yin, Jianjun; Yuan, Daoxian; Zhao, Heping

    2016-04-01

    A prerequisite for using cave speleothems to reconstruct palaeoenvironmental conditions is an accurate understanding of specific factors controlling calcite growth, in particular the isotopic partitioning of oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) which are the most commonly used proxies. An in situ monitoring study from April 2008 to September 2009 at Xueyu Cave, Chongqing, SW China, provides insight into the controls on calcite growth rates, drip water composition, cave air parameters and δ18O and δ13C isotopic values of modern calcite precipitation. Both cave air PCO2 and drip water hydrochemical characteristics show obvious seasonality driven by seasonal changes in the external environment. Calcite growth rates also display clear intra-annual variation, with the lowest values occurring during wet season and peak values during the dry season. Seasonal variations of calcite growth rate are primarily controlled by variations of cave air PCO2 and drip water rate. Seasonal δ18O-VPDB and δ13C-VPDB in modern calcite precipitates vary, with more negative values in the wet season than in the dry season. Strong positive correlation of δ18O-VPDB vs. δ13C-VPDB is due to simultaneous enrichment of both isotopes in the calcite. This correlation indicates that kinetic fractionation occurs between parent drip water and depositing calcite, likely caused by the variations of cave air PCO2 and drip rate influenced by seasonal cave ventilation. Kinetic fractionation amplifies the equilibrium fractionation value of calcite δ18O (by ∼1.5‰) and δ13C (by ∼1.7‰), which quantitatively reflects surface conditions during the cave ventilation season. These results indicate that the cave monitoring of growth rate and δ18O and δ13C of modern calcite precipitation are necessary in order to use a speleothem to reconstruct palaeoenvironment.

  3. Bainite transformation of low carbon Mn-Si TRIP-assisted multiphase steels: influence of silicon content on cementite precipitation and austenite retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies dealing with TRIP-assisted multiphase steels have emphasized the crucial role of the bainite transformation of silicon-rich intercritical austenite in the achievement of a good combination of strength and ductility. The present work deals with the bainite transformation in two steels differing in their silicon content. It is shown that both carbon enrichment of residual austenite and cementite precipitation influences the kinetics of the bainite transformation. A minimum silicon content is found to be necessary in order to prevent cementite precipitation from austenite during the formation of bainitic ferrite in such a way as to allow stabilisation of austenite by carbon enrichment. (orig.)

  4. Contribution of advanced microscopy techniques to nano-precipitates characterization: case of AlN precipitation in low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) precipitation in a Fe-Al-N alloy was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Crystallographic and chemical properties of precipitates were investigated using electron diffraction, High Resolution TEM, EDX microanalysis, EELS spectroscopy and Energy-Filtered TEM. Observations were carried out on extraction replicas and thin foils. Principally, two varieties of AlN precipitates have been observed: fine cubic (NaCl-type) precipitates with a platelet-like morphology exhibiting a Bain orientation relationship with respect to the α-iron matrix in the case of 3 h annealing at 923 K, and coarse cuboidal-shape hexagonal (wurtzite) precipitates having a particular orientation relationship with respect to the ferrite in the case of 5 h annealing at 973 K. A cubic-hexagonal transformation of AlN nitrides activated by the heterogeneous germination on iron sulfide (FeS) was established. The two AlN varieties were clearly recognized by EELS spectroscopy and the quantification of both populations of precipitates from EFTEM images is discussed

  5. Electrochemical and surface characterisation of carbon-film-coated piezoelectric quartz crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical properties of carbon films, of thickness between 200 and 500 nm, sputter-coated on gold- and platinum-coated 6 MHz piezoelectric quartz crystal oscillators, as new electrode materials have been investigated. Comparative studies under the same experimental conditions were performed on bulk electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry was carried out in 0.1 M KCl electrolyte solution, and kinetic parameters of the model redox systems Fe(CN)63-/4- and [Ru(NH3)6]3+/2+ as well as the electroactive area of the electrodes were obtained. Atomic force microscopy was used in order to examine the surface morphology of the films, and the properties of the carbon films and the electrode-solution interface were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of the preparation and development of nanometer thick carbon film modified quartz crystals. Such modified crystals should open up new opportunities for the investigation of electrode processes at carbon electrodes and for the application of electrochemical sensing associated with the EQCM.

  6. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas. Phase I. Final Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO2 to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM(trademark) was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which is a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.

  7. Radiation does response of calcium carbonate crystal in marine shells samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changkian, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the evolution of element, crystal structure and thermoluminescence signal versus gamma irradiation dose were carried out for calcite shells samples. The composition of element was studied by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. As identified by X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDS analysis, two polymorphs of calcium-carbonate were extracted: calcite and aragonite. The evolution of TL signal versus gamma irradiation dose using the TL reader (Harshaw 2000 was initially dependent on crystal structure and fading effect of the thermoluminescence signal .

  8. Evolution of Microstructure and Precipitation State during Thermomechanical Processing of a Low Carbon Microalloyed Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Valles, P.; Gómez, Manuel; Medina, Sebastián F.; Pastor, A.; Vilanova, O.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing demand of sources of energy such as oil and natural gas induces at the steel industry a development on low carbon microalloyed steels for pipeline applications in order to achieve excellent mechanical properties of strength and toughness at a reduced cost. To obtain an adequate fine-grained final structure, the strict control of thermomechanical processing and accelerated cooling is crucial. Depending on the thermomechanical processing conditions and chemical composition, pipel...

  9. Origin of Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from our thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  10. A single crystal carbon self-sputtering simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon bombardment of graphite and diamond is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations using a many-body potential to describe the low energy interactions splined to a Moliere potential which describes the hard collisions. It is found that no ejection takes place from the perfect graphite {1000} face at bombardment energies of 100 eV and that at normal incidence the yield is below 1% up to 600 eV. At oblique incidence corresponding to the maximum yield angle, the yield can be in excess of ten times that at normal incidence and a much larger proportion of dimer and trimer molecules are ejected. The bulk terminated diamond surfaces are found to be less resistant to erosion than graphite with as much as 23% of material ejected at normal incidence being in the form of dimers. (orig.)

  11. Carbonation of municipal solid waste incineration electrostatic precipitator fly ashes in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boom, Aurore; Aubert, Jean-Emmanuel; Degrez, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Carbonation was applied to a Pb- and Zn-contaminated fraction of municipal solid waste incineration electrofilter fly ashes in order to reduce heavy metal leaching. Carbonation tests were performed in solution, by Na2CO3 addition or CO2 bubbling, and were compared with washing (with water only). The injection of CO2 during the washing did not modify the mineralogy, but the addition of Na2CO3 induced the reaction with anhydrite, forming calcite. Microprobe analyses showed that Pb and Zn contamination was rather diffuse and that the various treatments had no effect on Pb and Zn speciation in the residues. The leaching tests indicated that carbonation using Na2CO3 was successful because it gave a residue that could be considered as non-hazardous material. With CO2 bubbling, Pb and Zn leaching was strongly decreased compared with material washed with water alone, but the amount of chromium extracted became higher than the non-hazardous waste limits for landfilling. PMID:24718362

  12. Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) by denitrification as ground improvement method - Process control in sand column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vinh; van Paassen, Leon; Nakano, Akiko; Kanayama, Motohei; Heimovaara, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Calcite precipitation induced by microbes has been proven to be efficient in stabilizing granular soils, especially with urea hydrolysis, as it has been successfully demonstrated in a pilot application 2010. However, as a byproduct highly concentrated ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) solution is produced, which has to be removed and disposed and forms a significant disadvantage of the technique that makes an alternative process like denitrification preferred. The proof of principle of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) by denitrification has been demonstrated by Van Paassen et al (2010) who suggested that instead of producing waste as a byproduct, different pre-treated waste streams could be used as substrates for in situ growth of denitrifying bacteria and simultaneous cementation without producing waste to be removed. In this study sand column experiments are performed in which calcium carbonate was successfully precipitated by indigenous denitrifying micro-organisms, which were supplied weekly with a pulse of a substrate solution containing calcium acetate and calcium nitrate. Besides the production of calcite and the growth of bacteria in biofilms, the reduction of nitrate resulted in the production of (nitrogen) gas. It was observed that this gas partly fills up the pore space and consequently contributed to a reduction of the permeability of the treated sand. The presence of gas in the pore space affected the flow of the injected substrates and influenced to the distribution of calcium carbonate. The effect of the mean particle size (D50) on the flow and transport of solutes and gas in the porous media has been evaluated by treating several columns with varying grain size distribution and comparing the change in permeability after each incubation period and analyzing the distribution of the gas throughout the columns using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. The present results show that there is a considerable decrease of permeability - a

  13. Fluid circulation and carbonate vein precipitation in the footwall of an oceanic core complex, Ocean Drilling Program Site 175, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Tim; Bach, Wolfgang; Jöns, Niels; Jöns, Svenja; Monien, Patrick; Klügel, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Carbonate veins recovered from the mafic/ultramafic footwall of an oceanic detachment fault on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge record multiple episodes of fluid movement through the detachment and secondary faults. High-temperature (˜75-175°C) calcite veins with elevated REE contents and strong positive Eu-anomalies record the mixing of up-welling hydrothermal fluids with infiltrating seawater. Carbonate precipitation is most prominent in olivine-rich troctolite, which also display a much higher degree of greenschist and sub-greenschist alteration relative to gabbro and diabase. Low-temperature calcite and aragonite veins likely precipitated from oxidizing seawater that infiltrated the detachment fault and/or within secondary faults late or post footwall denudation. Oxygen and carbon isotopes lie on a mixing line between seawater and Logatchev-like hydrothermal fluids, but precipitation temperatures are cooler than would be expected for isenthalpic mixing, suggesting conductive cooling during upward flow. There is no depth dependence of vein precipitation temperature, indicating effective cooling of the footwall via seawater infiltration through fault zones. One sample contains textural evidence of low-temperature, seawater-signature veins being cut by high-temperature, hydrothermal-signature veins. This indicates temporal variability in the fluid mixing, possibly caused by deformation-induced porosity changes or dike intrusion. The strong correlation between carbonate precipitation and olivine-rich troctolites suggests that the presence of unaltered olivine is a key requirement for carbonate precipitation from seawater and hydrothermal fluids. Our results also suggest that calcite-talc alteration of troctolites may be a more efficient CO2 trap than serpentinized peridotite.

  14. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  15. Composition and timing of carbonate vein precipitation within the igneous basement of the Early Cretaceous Shatsky Rise, NW Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, J.; Li, S.; Hauff, F. F.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.; Yu, S.; Zhao, S.; Rausch, S.

    2013-12-01

    Shatsky Rise is an Early Cretaceous large igneous province located in the NW Pacific ca. 1500 km east of Japan and is the third-largest oceanic plateau on Earth (after Ontong Java and Kerguelen). Numerous calcium carbonate veins were recovered from the igneous basement of Shatsky Rise during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 324 (Sager et al., 2010). The chemical (Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca) and isotopic (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, δ18O, δ13C) compositions of these veins were determined to constrain the timing of vein formation and to provide valuable data for the reconstruction of past seawater composition. A dominant control of seawater chemistry on calcite composition is evident for most investigated vein samples with varying compositional contribution from the basaltic basement. The Sr/Ca ratio of the vein calcite is positively correlated with Mg/Ca and with δ18O, indicating warmer/colder precipitation temperatures with decreasing/increasing Sr/Ca (and Mg/Ca) ratios, respectively. Distinctly higher formation temperatures (as inferred from oxygen isotope ratios) indicative of hydrothermal vein formation are only observed at one site (Site U1350, drilled into the central part of Shatsky Rise). The highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios (least basement influence) of vein samples at each drill site range form 0.707264 to 0.707550 and are believed to best reflect contemporaneous Early Cretaceous seawater composition. In principle, age information can be deduced by correlating these ratios with the global seawater Sr isotope evolution. Since the Sr isotopic composition of seawater has fluctuated three times between the early and mid Cretaceous (McArthur et al., 2001) no unambiguous precipitation ages can be constrained by this method and vein precipitation could have occurred at any time between ˜80 and 140 Ma. However, based on combined chemical and isotopic data and correlations of vein composition with formation depth and inferred temperature, we argue for a rather early

  16. Lanthanide-activated Na5Gd9F32 nanocrystals precipitated from a borosilicate glass: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization and optical property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Na5Gd9F32 nanocrystals embedded glass ceramics were fabricated for the first time. • Such glass ceramics were achieved by phase-separation-controlled crystallization. • Elemental mapping evidenced the segregation of activators into the Na5Gd9F32 lattice. • Luminescent color could be tuned by controlling glass crystallization temperature. - Abstract: Lanthanide-activated cubic Na5Gd9F32 nanocrystals were precipitated from a borosilicate glass with a specifically designed composition. The precursor glass is already phase-separated after melt-quenching, which is beneficial to the realization of the controllable glass crystallization for affording desirable size, morphology and activator partition. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscopy evidenced that the segregation of lanthanide ions into the Na5Gd9F32 lattice was in situ formed without the requirement of long-range ionic diffusion. Impressively, such fabricated glass ceramic co-doped with Yb3+/Er3+ ions exhibited intense upconversion luminescence, which was about 500 times higher than that of the precursor glass, and its luminescent color could be easily tuned from red to green by controlling glass crystallization temperature. It is anticipated that such phase-separation synthesis strategy with precise control over nanostructure of glass ceramics offer a great opportunity to design other highly transparent nanocomposites with a wide range of tunable optical properties

  17. Synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanosized powders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The thermal behavior of 3Y-TZP precursor powders had been investigated. → The crystallization behavior of 3Y-TZP nanopowders had been investigated. → The activation energy for crystallization of tetragonal ZrO2 was obtained. → The growth morphology parameter n is approximated as 2.0. → The crystallites show a plate-like morphology. - Abstract: The synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanopowders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process at 348 K and pH = 7 were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The activation energy of tetragonal ZrO2 crystallization from 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders using a non-isothermal method, namely, 169.2 ± 21.9 kJ mol-1, was obtained. The growth morphology parameter n was approximated as 2.0, which indicated that it had a plate-like morphology. The XRD, Raman spectra, and SAED patterns showed that the phase of the tetragonal ZrO2 was maintained at 1273 K. The crystallite size of 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders calcined at 1273 K for 5 min was 21.3 nm.

  18. Synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanosized powders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Yu-Wei [Graduate Institute of Applied Science, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ko-Ho, E-mail: yangkoho@cc.kuas.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Science, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Department of Mold and Die Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kuo-Ming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Dental Materials Research Center, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Sung-Wei [Metal Industries Research and Development Centre, 1001 Kaohsiung Highway, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Wang, Moo-Chin, E-mail: mcwang@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetics Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shihchuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80728, Taiwan (China)

    2011-06-16

    Highlights: > The thermal behavior of 3Y-TZP precursor powders had been investigated. > The crystallization behavior of 3Y-TZP nanopowders had been investigated. > The activation energy for crystallization of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} was obtained. > The growth morphology parameter n is approximated as 2.0. > The crystallites show a plate-like morphology. - Abstract: The synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanopowders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process at 348 K and pH = 7 were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The activation energy of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} crystallization from 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders using a non-isothermal method, namely, 169.2 {+-} 21.9 kJ mol{sup -1}, was obtained. The growth morphology parameter n was approximated as 2.0, which indicated that it had a plate-like morphology. The XRD, Raman spectra, and SAED patterns showed that the phase of the tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} was maintained at 1273 K. The crystallite size of 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders calcined at 1273 K for 5 min was 21.3 nm.

  19. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 by one-step precipitation method with ammonium carbonate as precipitating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Ammonium carbonate is used as the precipitating agent of synthesizing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 for the first time. → All the metal ions precipitated in one time, no washing process is needed. → Effect of concentration and hydrothermal on the materials are concerned. → The obtained material shows regular quasi-spherical. → The synthesized materials behave excellent electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 materials are synthesized by one-step precipitation method. Ammonium carbonate is used as the precipitating agent to obtain a more precise feed ratio without recourse to traditional washing. After annealing at high temperature, the spherical particles become angular and show high levels of crystallinity. The synthesized samples are evaluated using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical testing. The samples synthesized with different metal ion concentrations yield different morphologies and rate performances. The sample synthesized with 0.2 mol L-1 gives the most uniform particle distribution and the best electrochemical performance. The specific discharge capacity values of the sample at 10 and 15 C are as high as 109.5 and 88.7 mAh g-1, respectively. After the high-rate cycling, its discharge capacity at 0.2 C can be reverted to 97.67% of its initial capacity.

  20. Synthesis of beta carbon nitride nanosized crystal through mechanochemical reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Long Wei; Liu Yu Xian; Sui Jin Ling; Wang Jing Min

    2003-01-01

    Nanosized beta carbon nitride (beta-C sub 3 N sub 4), of grain size several tens of nanometres, has been synthesized by mechanochemical reaction processing. The low-cost synthetic method developed facilitates the novel and effective synthesis of nanosized crystalline beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 (a = 6.36 A, c = 4.648 A) powders. The graphite powders were first milled to a nanoscale state, then the nanosized graphite powders were milled in an atmosphere of NH sub 3 gas. It was found that nanosized beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 was formed after high-energy ball milling under an NH sub 3 atmosphere. After thermal annealing, the shape of the beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 changes from flake-like to sphere-like. The nanosized beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 formed was characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A solid-gas reaction mechanism was proposed for the formation of nanosized beta-C sub 3 N sub 4 at room temperature induced by mechanochemical activation.

  1. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This topical report covers Phase 2b, which is the construction phase of pilot demonstration subsystems that make up the integrated plant. The subsystems included are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant is now capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The topical report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. At the end of Phase 2b, the CCMP pilot demonstration is fully ready for testing.

  2. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA. This topical report covers Subphase 2a which is the design phase of pilot demonstration subsystems. Materials of construction have been selected and proven in both lab scale and prototype testing to be acceptable for the reagent conditions of interest. The target application for the reactive carbonate material has been selected based upon small-scale feasibility studies and the design of a continuous fiber board production line has been completed. The electrochemical cell architecture and components have been selected based upon both lab scale and prototype testing. The appropriate quality control and diagnostic techniques have been developed and tested along with the required instrumentation and controls. Finally the demonstrate site infrastructure, NEPA categorical exclusion, and permitting is all ready for the construction and installation of the new units and upgrades.

  3. Inhibition of precipitation of carbonate apatite by trisodium citrate analysed in base of the formation of chemical complexes in growth solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Olszynski, Marcin; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    Effect of trisodium citrate on the precipitation of carbonate apatite is studied. The experimental series are performed in the solution of artificial urine. The investigations are related to infectious urinary stones formation as carbonate apatite is one of the main components of this kind of stones. To mimic a real infection in urinary tract the aqueous ammonia solution was added to the solution of artificial urine. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that trisodium citrate increases induction time with respect to carbonate apatite formation and decreases the efficiency of carbonate apatite precipitation. The inhibitory effect of trisodium citrate on the precipitation of carbonate apatite is explained in base of chemical speciation analysis. Such an analysis demonstrates that the inhibitory effect is mainly related with the fact that trisodium citrate binds Ca2+ ions and causes the formation of CaCit- and Ca10(PO4)6CO3 complexes. Trisodium citrate binds Ca2+ ions in the range of pH from 6 to 9.5 for which carbonate apatite is favored to be formed.

  4. Metagenome-based diversity analyses suggest a significant contribution of non-cyanobacterial lineages to carbonate precipitation in modern microbialites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificacion eLopez-Garcia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are thought to play a key role in carbonate formation due to their metabolic activity, but other organisms carrying out oxygenic photosynthesis (photosynthetic eukaryotes or other metabolisms (e.g. anoxygenic photosynthesis, sulfate reduction, may also contribute to carbonate formation. To obtain more quantitative information than that provided by more classical PCR-dependent methods, we studied the microbial diversity of microbialites from the Alchichica crater lake (Mexico by mining for 16S/18S rRNA genes in metagenomes obtained by direct sequencing of environmental DNA. We studied samples collected at the Western (AL-W and Northern (AL-N shores of the lake and, at the latter site, along a depth gradient (1, 5, 10 and 15 m depth. The associated microbial communities were mainly composed of bacteria, most of which seemed heterotrophic, whereas archaea were negligible. Eukaryotes composed a relatively minor fraction dominated by photosynthetic lineages, diatoms in AL-W, influenced by Si-rich seepage waters, and green algae in AL-N samples. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria classes of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most abundant bacterial taxa, followed by Planctomycetes, Deltaproteobacteria (Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Chloroflexi. Community composition varied among sites and with depth. Although cyanobacteria were the most important bacterial group contributing to the carbonate precipitation potential, photosynthetic eukaryotes, anoxygenic photosynthesizers and sulfate reducers were also very abundant. Cyanobacteria affiliated to Pleurocapsales largely increased with depth. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM observations showed considerable areas of aragonite-encrusted Pleurocapsa-like cyanobacteria at microscale. Multivariate statistical analyses showed a strong positive correlation of Pleurocapsales and Chroococcales with aragonite formation at

  5. Influence of the precipitation parameters in the physical and chemical characteristics of the zirconium carbonate; Influencia de parametros de precipitacao nas caracteristicas fisicas e quimicas do carbonato de zirconio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, Vanderlei Sergio

    2000-07-01

    Among a great diversity of zirconium compounds, the zirconium carbonate stands out as being the initial material for the zirconia production and others zirconium compounds. The present work describes a study to obtain zirconium carbonates and observes the influences of the precipitation parameters in its physical and chemical characteristics, using three different routes. Route 1 - precipitation of zirconium carbonate starting from a basic zirconium sulphate. Route 2 - precipitation of zirconium carbonate, starting from a zirconium oxychloride solution and Route 3 - precipitation of zirconium carbonate, starting from a zirconium sulphate solution. In these routes it was evaluated the parameters such as: molar ratio carbonate/zirconium, precipitant agent and filtration time of the precipitate, as well as the evaluated the calcination temperature of the zirconia and dissolution parameters of the precipitates of zirconium such as: agitation time, dissolution temperature and mass rate acid/zirconium precipitate. For the sample characterization, several techniques were used, such as: X-ray spectrometry fluorescence, infrared radiation for determination of the carbon and sulfur element, thermal analysis, infrared spectrometry absorption, x-ray diffraction, gas adsorption (BET) for evaluation of specific surface area, sedimentation particle size distribution, scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that it was possible to obtain zirconium carbonate by all studied routes, but the route 1, demonstrated products wit superior characteristics in relation to the others, being indicated as the more appropriated for obtaining the zirconia and zirconium compounds. (author)

  6. Precipitation Behaviors of Nanometer-sized Carbides in a Niobium-Titanium Contained Low-Carbon Steel%含 Nb -Ti 低碳微合金钢纳米碳化物析出行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小琳; 王昭东

    2015-01-01

    采用热膨胀仪、显微硬度计和透射电镜研究了等温温度对 Nb -Ti 微合金钢组织性能及析出行为的影响规律.结果表明,在不同温度下等温淬火均得到铁素体与马氏体的双相组织,且随着等温温度的降低,铁素体的体积分数逐渐增大.实验钢中存在两种主要的析出形态,分别为相间析出和弥散析出,且随着等温温度的降低,析出形态逐渐从相间析出向弥散析出转变.通过 HRTEM确定相间析出碳化物具有 NaCl 型晶体结构,晶格常数为0.432 nm,且与铁素体基体满足 Baker -Nutting (B -N)关系.铁素体相的维氏硬度随着等温温度的降低而逐渐增大.%The microstructure,mechanical properties and precipitation behaviors in a low carbon Nb-Ti micro-alloyed steel were investigated using the dilatometer,Vickers-hardness tester and transmission electron microscope.The results showed that the microstructure of the experimental steel treated by an isothermal quenching process under different temperatures all mainly consisted of ferrite and martensite phases.The volume fraction of ferrite phase increased with the decrease of the isothermal temperature.Both of the interphase precipitation and supersaturated precipitation of carbides appeared in the samples treated by the isothermal quenching process.Along with the decrease of isothermal temperature,the precipitation form gradually changed from the interphase precipitation to supersaturated precipitation.Furthermore,the interphase-precipitated carbides had a NaCl-type crystal structure with a lattice parameter of 0.432 nm and obeyed the Baker -Nutting (B -N)orientation relationship with respect to the ferrite matrix which confirmed by HRTEM. The Vickers-hardness of the ferrite increased with the decrease of the isothermal temperature.

  7. Preliminary investigations on picoplankton-related precipitation of alkaline-earth metal carbonates in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Jaquet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a routine water-quality survey in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland, suspended matter was collected by filtration on 0.2 μm membranes in July and August 2012 at the depth of maximal chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration (2 mg m–3. Examination by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous dark and gelatinous patches occluding the pores of the membranes, containing high numbers of picoplanktonic cells and, in places, clusters of high-reflectance smooth microspheres (1-2 μm in diameter. Their chemical composition, determined by semi-quantitative, energy-dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDS showed magnesium (Mg, calcium (Ca, strontium (Sr and barium (Ba (alkaline earth metals to be the dominant cations. Among the anions, phosphorus (P and carbon (C were present, but only the latter is considered here (as carbonate. The microspheres were subdivided into four types represented in a Ca-Sr-Ba ternary space. All types are confined within a domain bound by Ca>45, Sr<10 and Ba<50 (in mole %. Type I, the most frequent, displays a broad variability in Ba/Ca, even within a given cluster. Types II and III are devoid of Ba, but may incorporate P. Type IV contains only Ca. The Type I composition resembles that of benstonite, a Group IIA carbonate that was recently found as intracellular granules in a cyanobacterium from alkaline lake Alchichica (Mexico.Lake Geneva microspheres are solid, featureless and embedded in a mucilage-looking substance in the vicinity of, but seemingly not inside, picoplanktonic cells morphologically similar to Chlorella and Synechococcus. In summer 2012, the macroscopic physico-chemical conditions in lake Geneva epilimnion were such as to allow precipitation of Ca but not of Sr and Ba carbonates. Favourable conditions did exist, though, in the micro-environment provided by the combination of active picoplankton and a mucilaginous envelope. Further studies are ongoing to investigate the

  8. The influence of polyaspartate additive on the growth and morphology of calcium carbonate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Laurie Anne

    The addition of low levels of polyaspartate to a supersaturated calcium carbonate (CaCOsb3) solution leads to unusual morphologies in the inorganic phase. Spherulitic vaterite aggregates with helical protrusions, and distorted calcite crystals that contain spiral pits, have been produced. The helical particles are coated with an inorganic membrane that appears to be responsible for the helical twist. The polymer also causes deposition of thin CaCOsb3 tablets and films on the glass substrate. Two distinct types of films are deposited; the first is a mosaic of calcite crystals, and the second is spherulitic vaterite. In situ observations of the crystallization reaction have determined that the thin-film morphology is a result of the phase separation of a hydrated CaCOsb3/polymer liquid-precursor, whereby accumulation of isotropic droplets creates a coating on the substrate, and subsequent dehydration and crystallization yields birefringent CaCOsb3 films. During the amorphous to crystalline transition, incremental growth steps lead to "transition bars" and sectored calcite tablets. This in vitro system was originally modeled after certain aspects of CaCOsb3 biomineralization, in which the soluble proteins extracted from biominerals tend to have high levels of aspartic acid residues. Based on the similarities between features exhibited by the products of this system and those in biominerals, an argument has been presented to suggest that this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process is involved in the morphogenesis of CaCOsb3 biominerals. These features include the following: thin CaCOsb3 tablets that grow laterally; tablets that express unstable crystallographic faces; non-faceted single crystals with curved surfaces; spatially-delineated single crystals; sectored calcite tablets; hollow-shell spheres; calcium carbonate cements; and magnesium-bearing calcites. This work has demonstrated that a means of morphological control can be accomplished through non

  9. The study of crystallization and interfacial morphology in polymer/carbon nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minus, Marilyn Lillith

    This study illustrates the ability of SWNT to nucleate and template polymer crystallization and orientation, and produce materials with improved properties and unique polymer morphologies. This research work focuses primarily on the physical interaction between single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and the flexible polymer system polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Polymer crystallization in the near vicinity of SWNT (interphase) has been studied to understand the capability of SWNT in influence polymer morphology in bulk films and fibers. Fibrillar crystallization was achieved by shearing PVA/SWNT dispersions and resulted in the formation of oriented PVA/SWNT fibers or ribbons, while PVA solutions produce unoriented fibers. PVA single crystals were grown in PVA solutions as well as PVA/SWNT dispersions over a period of several months at room temperature (25°C). PVA single crystal growth in PVA/SWNT dispersions is templated by SWNT, and these crystals show the presence of new morphologies for PVA. PVA single crystals of differing morphology were also grown at elevated temperatures, and show morphology dependant electron beam irradiation resistance. Gel-spinning was used to produce PVA, and PVA/SWNT fibers where, PVA crystallization in the bulk fiber was observed. With 1 wt% SWNT loading in PVA, the fiber tensile strength increased from 1.6 GPa for the control PVA to 2.6 GPa for PVA/SWNT. Analysis of this data suggests stress of up to ˜120 GPa on the SWNT. This is the highest reported stress on the SWNT to date and confirm excellent reinforcement and load transfer of SWNT in the PVA matrix. Raman spectroscopy data show high SWNT alignment in the fiber where the I0*/I90* ratio is measured to be 106. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to characterize polymer morphology near the polymer-SWNT interface for PVA/SWNT fibers. HR-TEM studies of Polymer/CNT composites show distinct morphological differences at the polymer-SWNT interface/interphase for

  10. Effects of Strain-Induced Crystallization on Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Black

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jong Hwan; Ryu, Sang Ryeoul; Lee, Dong Joo [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The effects of strain-induced crystallization (SIC) on the mechanical properties of elastomeric composites as functions of extension ratio ({lambda}), multi walled carbon nanotube (CNT) content, and carbon black (CB) content are investigated. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis shows that the degree of crystallinity increases with the increase in the CB and CNT content. As {lambda} increases, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the composites increases, and the latent heat of crystallization (LHc) of the composites is maximum at {lambda}=1.5. It is found that the mechanical properties have a linear relation with LHc, depending on the CNT content. According to the TGA (thermogravimetric analysis), the weight loss of the composite matrix is 94.3% and the weight of the composites decreases with the filler content. The ratio of tensile modulus (E{sub comp}/ E{sub matrix}) is higher than that of tensile strength ({sigma}{sub comp}/ {sigma}{sub matrix}) because of the CNT orientation inside the elastomeric composites.

  11. Evolution of pore-geometry and relative-permeability due to carbonate precipitation within natural rock sample: Insights from a coupled FVM-LBM method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, T.; Jiang, F.

    2013-12-01

    To predict long-term CO2 behavior within the reservoir in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects, we usually use reservoir simulation. A key parameter in the reservoir simulation is 'relative permeability'. However, since the relative permeability is significantly influenced by mineral precipitation (e.g., change of pore space), we should consider the time evolution of relative permeability in reservoir simulation. To investigate the influence of carbonate precipitation to the relative permeability during CO2 storage, we develop numerical calculation method. Pore spaces of Berea sandstone were extracted by high-resolution micro-CT scanned images. The fluid velocity field within the 3D pore spaces was then calculated using the two-phase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The calcite deposition within the pore space was calculated by using an advection-reaction formulation solved by finite volume method; we modeled the precipitated rock by transferring the fluid node to solid node according to the calcium concentration level. To increase the computation efficiency, we applied the graphics processor unit (GPU) parallel computing technique. The relative permeability of the rock sample is finally calculated separately by a highly optimized two-phase LB model. The calculated permeability variation due to the carbonate precipitation demonstrates that evolution of pore structure significantly influences the absolute permeability, while it only affects the relative permeability of non-wettable phase at low water saturation conditions.

  12. PRE-FLOCCULATION OF PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLER BY CATIONIC STARCH FOR HIGHLY FILLED MECHANICAL GRADE PAPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhou Sang,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Three commercial starches were evaluated in conjunction with colloidal silica and flocculant to retain precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC filler. A unique feature of this study was the fact that the filler was pre-flocculated by a portion of starch (2kg starch/t PCC and the rest of the starch was added after the flocculant but before the silica. The pulp used was peroxide bleached thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP. A statistical design methodology was employed and empirical process models were constructed based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA results. The models were then employed to predict the retention and drainage. It was found that the high-charged cationic starch gave the highest retention and best drainage performance. The high-charged cationic starch S880 also resulted in stronger paper, probably because of the larger and stronger flocs produced and its higher affinity with the fiber and fines. Finally, pre-flocculation was found to provide stronger paper compared with a conventional starch/retention aid addition sequence

  13. The local crystallization in nanoscale diamond-like carbon films during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local crystallization during annealing at 600 °C in nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films grown by pulsed vacuum-arc deposition method was observed using modern techniques of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The crystallites formed by annealing have a face-centred cubic crystal structure and grow in the direction [01¯1¯] as a normal to the film surface. The number and size of the crystallites depend on the initial values of the intrinsic stresses before annealing, which in turn depend on the conditions of film growth. The sizes of crystallites are 10 nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 3 GPa and 17 nm for films with initial compressive stresses of 12 GPa. Areas of local crystallization arising during annealing have a structure different from the graphite. Additionally, the investigation results of the structure of nanoscale diamond-like carbon coatings films using Raman spectroscopy method are presented, which are consistent with the transmission electron microscopy research results

  14. Spectrum of electron states and parameters of Si crystal with oxygen-silicon precipitates, irradiated by fast neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with properties of oxygen reach Si crystal irradiated with fast reactor neutrons. The spectra of electron states and electrical properties were studied by the method of modulation spectroscopy of light electrical reflection. From experimental data influence of irradiation and annealing on energetic position of quantum level (60 and 85 meV) and the width of surface quantum well (3 and 2 nm, according) were obtained

  15. The microstructural record of porphyroclasts and matrix of serpentinite mylonites – from brittle and crystal-plastic deformation to dissolution-precipitation creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bial

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We examine the microfabric development in high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphic serpentinite mylonites exposed in the Erro-Tobbio Unit (Voltri Massif, Italy using polarization microscopy and electron microscopy (SEM/EBSD, EMP. The mylonites are derived from mantle peridotites, were serpentinized at the ocean floor and underwent high pressure metamorphism during Alpine subduction. They contain diopside and olivine porphyroclasts embedded in a fine-grained matrix essentially consisting of antigorite. The porphyroclasts record brittle and crystal-plastic deformation of the original peridotites in the upper mantle at stresses of a few hundred MPa. After the peridotites became serpentinized, deformation occurred mainly by dissolution-precipitation creep resulting in a foliation with flattened olivine grains at phase boundaries with antigorite, crenulation cleavages and olivine and antigorite aggregates in strain shadows next to porphyroclasts. It is suggested that the fluid was provided by dehydration reactions of antigorite forming olivine and enstatite during subduction and prograde metamorphism. At sites of stress concentration around porphyroclasts antigorite reveals an associated SPO and CPO, characteristically varying grain sizes and sutured grain boundaries, indicating deformation by dislocation creep. Stresses were probably below a few tens of MPa in the serpentinites, which was not sufficiently high to allow for crystal-plastic deformation of olivine at conditions at which antigorite is stable. Accordingly, any intragranular deformation features of the newly precipitated olivine in strain shadows are absent. The porphyroclast microstructures are not associated with the microstructures of the mylonitic matrix, but are inherited from an independent earlier deformation. The porphyroclasts record a high-stress deformation in the upper mantle of the oceanic lithosphere probably related to rifting processes, whereas the antigorite matrix

  16. Crystal structure of di-chlorido-bis-(dimethyl N-cyano-dithio-imino-carbonate)cobalt(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Oliver, Allen G

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the mononuclear title complex, [{(H3CS)2C=NC  N}2CoCl2], consists of a Co(II) atom coordinated in a distorted tetra-hedral manner by two Cl(-) ligands and the terminal N atoms of two dimethyl N-cyano-dithio-imino-carbonate ligands. The two organic ligands are almost coplanar, with a dihedral angle of 5.99 (6)° between their least-squares planes. The crystal packing features pairs of inversion-related complexes that are held together through C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯S inter-actions and π-π stacking [centroid-to-centroid distance = 3.515 (su?) Å]. Additional C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯S inter-actions, as well as Cl⋯S contacts < 3.6 Å, consolidate the crystal packing. PMID:26870588

  17. Waveguiding properties in Yb:YAG crystals implanted with protons and carbon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, G V; Ramírez, D; Márquez, H; Flores-Romero, E; Rickards, J; Trejo-Luna, R

    2012-08-01

    We report the fabrication and analysis of optical waveguides in Yb:YAG crystals using either proton or carbon ion implantation. Planar waveguides were obtained by implanting the whole surface of the crystals. Channel waveguides were defined using an electroformed mask with apertures of 10, 15, and 20 micrometers in width. The waveguiding properties of the structures were analyzed, showing good light confinement based on the transversal mode distribution and optical transmission measurements. The spectroscopic properties of the Yb ions in the YAG host are preserved after the implantation process, which demonstrates the potential of this technique for tailoring microcomponents for integrated optics applications. In particular, the Yb:YAG waveguides have the potential to operate as miniature lasers. PMID:22859050

  18. The promotion of Ru on topologically close-packed phase precipitation in the high Cr-containing (∼9wt.%) nickel-base single crystal superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianzi [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang, Jianxin, E-mail: jianxin@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Feng, Qiang [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Material, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-11-05

    The partitioning behaviors of alloying elements Cr, Co, Al, Ta, etc. on the γ and γ′ phases of high Cr-containing (∼9wt.%) nickel-base single crystal superalloys have been investigated with and without the addition of 3wt.% Ru. The “reverse partitioning effect” occurs, which means that the addition of Ru causes the partition of Cr and Co into γ′ phase, while Al an Ta concentrate into γ matrix. However, Ru promotes the precipitation of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, since the diffusion coefficient between the TCP phase and the matrix interface increases with the diffusion behaviors of refractory elements. For the coarsening and slightly rafting of γ′ phases, the increase of elemental diffusion plays much more important role in its kinetic process than the decrease of lattice misfit. - Highlights: • The high Cr-containing (∼9wt.%) superalloys are chosen in this study. • The “reverse partitioning” behavior occurs with the addition of 3wt.% Ru. • Ru promotes the precipitation of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases. • Ru accelerates the diffusion process of alloying elements. • Increase of elemental diffusion plays important role in coarsening of γʹ phases.

  19. The promotion of Ru on topologically close-packed phase precipitation in the high Cr-containing (∼9wt.%) nickel-base single crystal superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partitioning behaviors of alloying elements Cr, Co, Al, Ta, etc. on the γ and γ′ phases of high Cr-containing (∼9wt.%) nickel-base single crystal superalloys have been investigated with and without the addition of 3wt.% Ru. The “reverse partitioning effect” occurs, which means that the addition of Ru causes the partition of Cr and Co into γ′ phase, while Al an Ta concentrate into γ matrix. However, Ru promotes the precipitation of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, since the diffusion coefficient between the TCP phase and the matrix interface increases with the diffusion behaviors of refractory elements. For the coarsening and slightly rafting of γ′ phases, the increase of elemental diffusion plays much more important role in its kinetic process than the decrease of lattice misfit. - Highlights: • The high Cr-containing (∼9wt.%) superalloys are chosen in this study. • The “reverse partitioning” behavior occurs with the addition of 3wt.% Ru. • Ru promotes the precipitation of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases. • Ru accelerates the diffusion process of alloying elements. • Increase of elemental diffusion plays important role in coarsening of γʹ phases

  20. Aboveground carbon in Quebec forests: stock quantification at the provincial scale and assessment of temperature, precipitation and edaphic properties effects on the potential stand-level stocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Louis; Houle, Daniel; Ouimet, Rock; Lambert, Marie-Claude; Logan, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems plays an important role in the net balance of greenhouse gases, acting as a carbon sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about the abiotic environmental factors (including climate) that control carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests and consequently, about their potential response to climate changes. From a set of more than 94,000 forest inventory plots and a large set of spatial data on forest attributes interpreted from aerial photographs, we constructed a fine-resolution map (∼375 m) of the current carbon stock in aboveground live biomass in the 435,000 km(2) of managed forests in Quebec, Canada. Our analysis resulted in an area-weighted average aboveground carbon stock for productive forestland of 37.6 Mg ha(-1), which is lower than commonly reported values for similar environment. Models capable of predicting the influence of mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, and soil physical environment on maximum stand-level aboveground carbon stock (MSAC) were developed. These models were then used to project the future MSAC in response to climate change. Our results indicate that the MSAC was significantly related to both mean annual temperature and precipitation, or to the interaction of these variables, and suggest that Quebec's managed forests MSAC may increase by 20% by 2041-2070 in response to climate change. Along with changes in climate, the natural disturbance regime and forest management practices will nevertheless largely drive future carbon stock at the landscape scale. Overall, our results allow accurate accounting of carbon stock in aboveground live tree biomass of Quebec's forests, and provide a better understanding of possible feedbacks between climate change and carbon storage in temperate and boreal forests. PMID:26966680

  1. In-vitro study on calcium carbonate crystal growth mediated by organic matrix extracted from fresh water pearls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of studying the mediation of organic matrix on the crystallization of calcium carbonate, water soluble matrix (WSM), acid soluble matrix (ASM) and acid insoluble matrix (AIM) were extracted from aragonite pearls and vaterite pearls respectively. Then, in-vitro calcium carbonate crystallization experiments under the control of these six organic matrices were carried out in the present study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the morphology of CaCO3 and Raman spectroscopy as a powerful technique was used to distinguish the crystal polymorph. Influences of the six kinds of organic matrices on the calcium carbonate crystal growth are proposed. ASM of vaterite pearls can induce vaterite to crystallize and WSM of aragonite pearls mediates to produce aragonite crystals. The single AIM membranes of the two pearls have no pronounced effect on the CaCO3 crystallization. Additionally, the crystal size obtained with the additive of WSM of the two kinds of pearls is smaller than that with the additive of ASM. Moreover, self-assembly phenomenon in the biomineralization process and the distorted morphology calcite are observed. Current results demonstrate important aspects of matrix protein-controlled crystallization, which is beneficial to the understanding of nacre biomineralization mechanism. Further study of the precise control of these matrix proteins on CaCO3 crystal growth is being processed. - Highlights: ► WSM, ASM and AIM are extracted from aragonite pearls and vaterite pearls. ► ASM of vaterite pearl induces vaterite. ► WSM of aragonite pearl mediates to produce aragonite. ► WSM can fine control crystal size smaller than that with the additive of ASM. ► Self-assembly and the distorted calcite existed in the mineralization process.

  2. Crystal structure of di-chlorido-bis-(dimethyl N-cyano-dithio-imino-carbonate)zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Mouhamadou Birame; Diop, Libasse; Oliver, Allen G

    2016-03-01

    The Zn(II) atom in the title complex, [ZnCl2(C4H6N2S2)2], is coordinated in a distorted tetra-hedral manner by two Cl atoms and two terminal N atoms of two dimethyl N-cyano-dithio-imino-carbonate ligands. In the crystal, the complex mol-ecules are connected through C-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds and Cl⋯S contacts, leading to a two-dimensional structure extending parallel to the ab plane. PMID:27006820

  3. Polarized absorption spectra of (2,2) carbon nanotubes aligned in channels of an AEL crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanping; Zhai, Jianpang; Li, Irene Ling; Ruan, Shuangchen; Tang, Zikang

    2015-11-01

    We report polarized absorption spectra for the (2,2) tubes arrayed in the one-dimensional channels of an AlPO4-11 (AEL) single crystal. Strong polarization dependence is observed indicating a preferential optical dipole along the axis of carbon nanotubes. By correlating with the absorption spectra and First-principles local density function (LDA) calculation, the absorption peak at 2.95 eV is uniquely assigned to semiconducting type (2,2) tubes, and peaks at 2.67 and 2.40 eV are corresponding to metallic type (2,2) tubes.

  4. Changes in crystal structure and properties of carbon materials under neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered is the neutron radiation effect on the graphite structural characteristics and on its physico-mechanical properties, as well. It is shown that in the result of the irradiation the lattice parameter increases depending on the decrease in the radiation temperature, and the increase in the dose accumulated. The sharp decrease of thermal conductivity is noted as a result of the irradiation. The irradiation changes electrophysical properties of graphite. The dependence of strength properties and creepage rate on fluence and temperature is analyzed. Shown is the complex dependence of parameters, determining creepage on external conditions, and on crystal structure and the strength of carbon materials as well

  5. Crystal structure searching by free energy surface trekking: application to carbon at 1 TPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an ab-initio crystal structure searching method, free energy surface trekking (FEST). This method consists of an ascent-run and a descent-run. First, the system is forced to climb up a free energy surface following by the inversion of the restoring forces acting on the simulation cell (ascent-run). Then, the system climbs down the surface toward neighboring local minima according to the release from the constraint of the inversion immediately after the system crosses the ridges of the surface (descent-run). We have applied the FEST simulations to carbon at terapascal pressures and obtained a BC8-like structure with a tetragonal I41 in addition to the earlier-predicted BC8, R8, and simple cubic structures. This structure is mechanically stable in the pressure range of at least 0.5-3.5 TPa, and has a potential to survive as a metastable structure in carbon at terapascal pressures.

  6. Crystal structure searching by free energy surface trekking: application to carbon at 1 TPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T.; Suzuki, N.; Shimizu, K.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed an ab-initio crystal structure searching method, free energy surface trekking (FEST). This method consists of an ascent-run and a descent-run. First, the system is forced to climb up a free energy surface following by the inversion of the restoring forces acting on the simulation cell (ascent-run). Then, the system climbs down the surface toward neighboring local minima according to the release from the constraint of the inversion immediately after the system crosses the ridges of the surface (descent-run). We have applied the FEST simulations to carbon at terapascal pressures and obtained a BC8-like structure with a tetragonal I41 in addition to the earlier-predicted BC8, R8, and simple cubic structures. This structure is mechanically stable in the pressure range of at least 0.5-3.5 TPa, and has a potential to survive as a metastable structure in carbon at terapascal pressures.

  7. n-diamond from catalysed carbon nanotubes: synthesis and crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase composition and morphology of black powder samples synthesized by pyrogenation of carbon nanotubes and colloidal Fe(OH)3 were investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy. A new kind allotrope of carbon, 'new diamond' (n-diamond), was obtained in the final black powder when the treatment temperature was higher than 1000 deg. C. As the treatment temperature reached 1400 deg. C, the peak intensity of the n-diamond achieved its maximal value and the estimated yield rate was about 20%. The average size of the n-diamond nanometric particles was around 20 nm. Using the least squares refinement method and XRD pattern simulation technology, the crystal structure of n-diamond was studied. (letter to the editor)

  8. A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION INTO THE USE OF ACID-TOLERANT PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLERS IN PAPERMAKING OF DEINKED PULP DERIVED FROM RECYCLED NEWSPAPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of acid-tolerant precipitated calcium carbonate fillers, including phosphoric acid/sodium hexametaphosphate modified precipitated CaCO3 filler, and sodium silicate/phosphoric acid/sodium hexametaphos-phate modified precipitated CaCO3 filler in papermaking of deinked pulp derived from recycled newspaper was explored. These two acid-tolerant fillers provided considerably more brightness improvement in papers in comparison the unmodified filler, presumably indicating alleviated pulp darkening achieved as a result of better acid-resistant properties. The addition of acid-tolerant fillers into the furnish slurries gave lower system pH as compared with unmodified filler. Among the three fillers used in this work, the effect on retention of modification of the filler with sodium silicate/phosphoric acid/sodium hexametaphosphate was probably the best, as evaluated from ash content measurements. For air permeability of the paper, the use of acid-tolerant fillers provided slightly more improvement in comparison to the unmodified filler. For tensile and burst strength of the paper, the use of sodium silicate/phosphoric acid/sodium hexameta-phosphate modified precipitated calcium carbonate filler gave better results as compared with the other two fillers. Additionally, the improving effect of acid-tolerant fillers on furnish static drainage was found to be slightly weaker than that of unmodified filler.

  9. MODIFICATION OF PRECIPITATED CALCIUM CARBONATE FILLER USING SODIUM SILICATE/ZINC CHLORIDE BASED MODIFIERS TO IMPROVE ACID-RESISTANCE AND USE OF THE MODIFIED FILLER IN PAPERMAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the acid-resistant property of papermaking grade precipitated calcium carbonate filler and to obtain modified filler in powder form, sodium silicate/zinc chloride based modifiers were used in filler modification, and the use of modified filler in papermaking of deinked pulp derived from recycled newspaper was also preliminarily investigated. Under the preliminarily optimized experimental conditions, when sodium silicate, zinc chloride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and phosphoric acid with dosages of 10 wt%, 3 wt%, 1 wt% and 0.2 wt%, respectively, were used as modifiers, and when the temperature, aging time, and PCC concentration during the filler modification process was 70 oC, 7 h and 9.1 wt%, respectively, the acid-resistant property of filler was significantly improved after modification, as evaluated using alum consumption and pH methods. The use of modified precipitated calcium carbonate filler prepared under the optimized conditions provided considerably more brightness and light scattering improvement in comparison to unmodified filler, and filler modification was found to have only negligible influence on tensile and burst strength of the paper, air permeability of the paper, and retention performance of the filler. Surface analysis of the modified filler using XPS and SEM confirmed the occurring of surface encapsulation and modification of precipitated calcium carbonate filler when the relevant modifiers were used in filler modification. The encapsulating effect of modifiers on filler was thought to be favorable to improvement in acid-resistant property, and optical properties of the filled paper.

  10. A co-precipitation preparation, crystal structure and photoluminescent properties of Er5%:Gd2O3 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inexpensive preparation method is being reported for obtaining erbium doped gadolinium oxide (Er5%:Gd2O3) nanoscale rods. The elongated nanoscale systems, as-formed through a co-precipitation process, are characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping, Ultra Violet-visible (UV-vis.) absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. In addition, the Williamson–Hall (W–H) plot is also performed to distinguish the effect of crystalline size-induced broadening and strain-induced broadening at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the XRD profile. The XRD patterns of as-formed and calcined products show that the phase confirmation. As revealed from the SEM micrographs, the morphology of the products show that the rod-like nanoparticles. The EDX micrographs show that the presence of elements in our samples. The band gap values in calcined samples are found to be in the range of 3.569 eV. Upon 230 nm excitation on calcined samples, three broad emission peaks are observed from PL studies. The possible mechanism for the formation of Er5%:Gd2O3 nanorods is briefly discussed

  11. Optomechanical and crystallization phenomena visualized with 4D electron microscopy: interfacial carbon nanotubes on silicon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, David J; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-05-12

    With ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), we report observation of the nanoscopic crystallization of amorphous silicon nitride, and the ultrashort optomechanical motion of the crystalline silicon nitride at the interface of an adhering carbon nanotube network. The in situ static crystallization of the silicon nitride occurs only in the presence of an adhering nanotube network, thus indicating their mediating role in reaching temperatures close to 1000 degrees C when exposed to a train of laser pulses. Under such condition, 4D visualization of the optomechanical motion of the specimen was followed by quantifying the change in diffraction contrast of crystalline silicon nitride, to which the nanotube network is bonded. The direction of the motion was established from a tilt series correlating the change in displacement with both the tilt angle and the response time. Correlation of nanoscopic motion with the picosecond atomic-scale dynamics suggests that electronic processes initiated in the nanotubes are responsible for the initial ultrafast optomechanical motion. The time scales accessible to UEM are 12 orders of magnitude shorter than those traditionally used to study the optomechanical motion of carbon nanotube networks, thus allowing for distinctions between the different electronic and thermal mechanisms to be made. PMID:20377202

  12. Crystal Structure Searching by Free Energy Surface Trekking: Application to Carbon above 1 TPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Naoshi; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2013-06-01

    Crystal structure determination of materials under extreme conditions has been one of grand challenges in high-pressure materials science. In computer simulations, the crystal structure searching is carried out by exploring Gibbs free energy surface (GFES) at given pressures and temperatures. Here, we propose a new crystal structure searching technique named as free energy surface trekking (FEST). FEST is based on a very simple idea and consists of an ascent-run and a descent-run. In the ascent-run, the system is forced to ascend GFES from a starting local minimum by following the inversion of the driving force acting on the simulation cell. Then, the system descends it toward a neighboring local minimum by flipping the inverted force at the ridge of GFES. The details of GFES around the starting local minimum are more correctly obtained by more investigating different trekking routes. We have applied FEST to carbon at 1.2 TPa and at 300 K, and successfully obtained the transition from the cubic diamond phase to the previously predicted BC8 phase. In this transition, 3 cell-angles concurrently increase from 90° to 101° in the ascent-run and become 109° through the descent-run, in which the activation energy is approximately 0.17 Ry/atom.

  13. A comparative investigation on strain induced crystallization for graphene and carbon nanotubes filled natural rubber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Fu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber containing graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs composites were prepared by ultrasonicallyassisted latex mixing. Natural rubber filled by both graphene and CNTs show significant enhanced tensile strength, while graphene exhibits a better reinforcing effect than CNTs. Strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber composites during stretching was determined by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction. With the addition of CNTs or graphene, the crystallization for natural rubber occurs at a lower strain compared to unfilled natural rubber, and the strain amplification effects were observed. The incorporation of graphene results in a faster strain-induced crystallization rate and a higher crystallinity compared to CNTs. The entanglement-bound rubber tube model was used to analyze the chain network structure and determine the network parameters of composites. The results show that the addition of graphene or CNTs has an influence on the molecular network structure and improves the contribution of entanglement to the conformational constraint, while graphene has a more marked effect than CNTs.

  14. Kinetics of structuring of submonolayer carbon coatings on silicon (100) crystals during microwave vacuum-plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafarov, R. K.; Shanygin, V. Ya.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of self-organization of nanodomains during the deposition of submonolayer carbon coatings on (100) silicon in the microwave plasma of low-pressure ethanol vapors is studied by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The laws of influence of the substrate temperature and the kinetic energy of carbon-containing ions on the mechanisms of formation and structuring of the forming silicon-carbon surface phases are established. It is shown that the deposited carbon-containing nanodomains can be used as nonlithographic mask coatings for the formation of spatial low-dimensional systems on single-crystal silicon upon selective highly anisotropic plasma-chemical etching.

  15. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurement of a Li4Ti5O12 composite electrode in a carbonate electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, Nobuyuki; Shono, Kumi; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashiro, Hajime; Katayama, Yasushi; Miura, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurement is conducted with a Li4Ti5O12 (lithium titanium oxide, LTO)-coated quartz crystal electrode in a carbonate electrolyte (ethylene carbonate + dimethyl carbonate; 50: 50 vol%) containing 1 M LiPF6. In-situ monitoring of the mass change during the charge and discharge of the LTO electrode can be achieved quantitatively because of the "zero-strain" property of LTO with Li+ insertion and the probably low reactivity between LTO and the electrolyte. The local changes of viscosity and density of the electrolyte contacting the LTO electrode are detected via the resonance resistance of the quartz crystal electrode, suggesting the local concentrations of Li+ and counter anion changed significantly during insertion and extraction of Li+ in the organic electrolyte.

  16. Growth and Characterization of Carbon Nanofibers on Fe/C-Fiber Textiles Coated by Deposition-Precipitation and Dip-Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to synthesize carbon nanofibers on C-fiber textiles, by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Fe catalyst. The substrate, which was a carbon textile consisting of non-woven carbon fibers and attached graphite particles, was oxidized by nitric acid, before the deposition process. Hydroxyl groups were created on the C-fiber textile, due to the oxidization step. Fe(III) hydroxide was subsequently deposited on the oxidized surface of the C-fiber textile. To deposit ferric particles, two different methods were tested: (i) deposition-precipitation, and (ii) dip-coating. For the experiments using both types of catalyst deposition, the weight ratio of Fe to C-fiber textile was also varied. Ferric particles were reduced to iron after deposition, by using H2/N2 gas, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown by flowing ethylene gas. Properties of carbon nanofibers created like this were analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectoscopy (XPS), Thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and Raman spectroscopy. In the case of the deposition-precipitation method, the results show that the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 30-55 nm, at which the weight ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles were 1:30 and 1:70, respectively. When Fe particles were deposited by the dip-coating method, the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 25-30 nm, for the ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles of 1:10 and 1:30, respectively. PMID:26716329

  17. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COPPER CARBONATE NANOPARTICLES

    OpenAIRE

    R.Hepzi Pramila Devamani; Sabeena, M.

    2014-01-01

    Copper carbonate nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method from copper sulphate and sodium carbonate. The formed nanoparticle is characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ultra-violet spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, confirmed the preferential growth of copper carbonate nanoparticles that width is 90.55nm. The SEM image shows the synthesized copper carbonate show well crystallized particles with ...

  18. Low temperature crystallization of diamond-like carbon films to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinchev, Savcho, E-mail: stinchev@ie.bas.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Valcheva, Evgenia [Physics Department, Sofia University, J. Bourchier 5, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrova, Elitza [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-09-01

    Plasma surface modification was used to fabricate graphene on the top of insulating diamond-like carbon films. It is shown that by a combination of pulsed argon plasma treatment and thermal annealing at 350{sup o}C it is possible to achieve crystallization of amorphous carbon to graphene. The observed Raman spectra are typical for defected graphene-splitted D- and G-peaks and a broad 2D-peak. Because interpretation of Raman spectra of such complicated system is not easy we have calculated Raman signals of graphene on an amorphous hydrogenated carbon film deposited on a Si substrate. Our simulation results show that multiple reflections and interference effects lead to enhancement of Raman signal of the system. The characteristic for graphene G and 2D bands reach maximal enhancement for thicknesses of the amorphous hydrogenated carbon film of about 75 nm and 230 nm. We estimate that the interference enhancement of the 2D graphene Raman signal is very weak in contrast to that of the G band signal simulated for the underlying diamond-like carbon films on silicon substrate only. Therefore experimentally measured Raman spectra of the whole graphene/a-C:H/Si system probably will consist of interference enhanced but still weak 2D graphene peak and stronger D and G peaks dominated by G and D Raman bands of the a-C:H. This conclusion is in line with observed experimental Raman spectra. Electrical field effect measurements of the samples show ambipolar dependence, typical for single-layer graphene.

  19. Temperature effect of curing on crystal phase in cement for the treatment with supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement is commercially used to immobilize low-level radioactive wastes for disposal and well known to be hardened by hydration. An experimental study has been carried out regarding the carbonation treatment involving the hydration of cement paste during the earlier stage before solidification. An ordinary Portland cement powder was mixed in the autoclave with deionized water in the cement/water ratio of unity, and then with carbon dioxide until the pressure reached to 15 MPa at 20, 40, 60 and 80 C. After 24 hours, the specimens were placed in a vacuum to remove the carbon dioxide. The carbonation distribution was investigated by the phenolphthalein method and the crystal phases were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The concentration of chromium in the leachate was measured by the MCC-1 leaching test. The specific surface area was measured with BET method, and the pore distribution and the average pore size were calculated with BJH method. The experimental results showed that all the Portlandite was converted into calcium carbonate in the treated specimens at all the temperatures and calcite and aragonite were detected for the specimens treated at 60 and 80 C. The concentration of chromium in the leachate of the treated specimens averaged as low as three-tenths of that in the untreated specimens. The pH in the leachate of the treated specimens was 8.5 at the lowest. The specific surface area, the cumulative pore volume and the average pore size of the treated specimen were smaller than those of the untreated specimen. (authors)

  20. Results of the TTF-TCNQ- and the calcium carbonate-crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1991-01-01

    Experiment AO139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit for five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and tetra thiafulvalene- tetra cyanoquino methane (TTF-TCNQ). The LDEF was in excellent condition after the long orbital stay, and although the temperature data was lost, the experiment program had been working since the valves in all containers were opened. All four experiments produced crystals; however, they were of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X-ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on the long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals are presented, and pictures of the calcium carbonate are shown. Comparisons are made with previous space solution growth experiments on the European Spacelab Mission and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

  1. Carbon and hydrogen isotope composition of plant biomarkers from lake sediments as proxies for precipitation changes across Heinrich Events in the subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T. E.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Brenner, M.; Freeman, K. H.; Curtis, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Tulane is a relatively deep (~23 m) solution lake in south-central Florida. Its depth and location on a structural high, the Lake Wales Ridge, enabled continuous lacustrine sediment accumulation over the past >60,000 years. Pollen in the lake sediments indicate repeated major shifts in the vegetation community, with six peaks in Pinus (pine) abundance that coincide with the most intense cold phases of Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles and the Heinrich events that terminate them. Alternating with Pinus peaks are zones with high relative percentages of Quercus (oak), Ambrosia (ragweed), Lyonia (staggerbush) and Ceratiola (rosemary) pollen, genera that today occupy the most xeric sites on the Florida landscape. This suggests the pollen record indicates the Pinus phases, and therefore Heinrich Events, were wetter than the intervening Quercus phases. To test the connection between Heinrich Events and precipitation in Florida, we analyzed the carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotope signatures of plant biomarkers extracted from the Lake Tulane sediment core as proxies of paleohydrology. The δ13C of plant biomarkers, such as n-alkanes and terpenoids, are determined, in part, by changes in water-use efficiency (WUE = Assimilation/Transpiration) in plant communities, which changes in response to shifts in mean annual precipitation. Plant δ13C values can, therefore, provide a rough indication of precipitation changes when other factors, such as plant community, are relatively stable throughout time. Paleohydrology is also recorded in the δD of plant leaf waxes, which are strongly controlled by precipitation δD. In this region, precipitation δD is negatively correlated with rainfall amount (i.e. the "amount" effect) and positively correlated with aridity. Thus, the δ13C and δD signatures of molecular plant biomarkers provide relative indicators of precipitation change, and when combined, provide a test of our hypothesis that vegetation changes in this region are driven

  2. Effect of hot rolling temperature on grain size and precipitation hardening in a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► TiC precipitation can induce the grain refinement after reheating quenching. ► TiC in steel rolled at 950 °C is more and finer. ► The grain size of steel rolled at 950 °C and followed reheating is much finer. ► The strength of steel rolled at 950 °C is much higher. - Abstract: The grain refinement and strength improvement resulted from hot rolling temperature in Ti microalloyed low carbon martensitic steel was investigated in this study. Two different started hot rolling temperatures (950 °C and 1100 °C) but with the same reheating quenching process were applied to the steel. The microstructures and second precipitated particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-rays diffraction and phase analysis method. It was found that hot rolling could induce the precipitation of TiC. Moreover, the amount of the TiC in steel rolled at 950 °C is higher and the size of the precipitates is much finer than that in steel rolled at 1100 °C. Both the large deformation without recrystallization and the precipitates in steel rolled at 950 °C are more effective on the grain refinement after the reheating process, in which the effective grain size (EGS) can be refined to 1.4 μm. In addition, the steel rolled at 950 °C exhibits a much higher strength than that rolled at 1100 °C due to the additional dislocation strengthening and more precipitation strengthening

  3. Photoluminescence microscopy on air-suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Shimada, T.; Ohta, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-03-01

    Because carbon nanotubes are room-temperature telecom-band emitters and can be grown on silicon substrates, they are ideal for coupling to silicon photonic cavities.[2,3 In particular, as-grown air-suspended carbon nanotubes show excellent optical properties, but cavity modes with large fields in the air are needed in order to achieve efficient coupling. Here we investigate individual air-suspended nanotubes coupled to photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. We utilize cavities that confine air-band modes which have large fields in the air. Dielectric mode cavities are also prepared for comparison. We fabricate the devices from silicon-on-insulator substrates by using electron beam lithography and dry etching to form the nanobeam structure. The buried oxide layer is removed by wet etching, and carbon nanotubes are grown onto the cavities by chemical vapor deposition. We perform photoluminescence imaging and excitation spectroscopy to find the positions of the nanotubes and identify their chiralities. For both types of devices, cavity modes with quality factors of ~3000 are observed within the nanotube emission peak. Work supported by SCOPE, KAKENHI, The Telecommunications Advancement Foundation, The Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, Japan and the Photon Frontier Network Program of MEXT, Japan.

  4. Influence of airflow rate and substrate nature on heterogeneous struvite precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidou, H; Ben Moussa, S; Ben Amor, M

    2009-01-01

    In wastewater treatment plants a hard scale consisting of struvite crystals can be formed, in pipes and recirculation pumps, during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of airflow rate and substrate nature on nucleation type, induction period and supersaturation coefficient during struvite precipitation. A crystallization reactor similar to that designed for calcium carbonate precipitation was used. The pH of synthetic wastewater solution was increased by air bubbling. Experimental results indicated that the airflow increased heterogeneous precipitation of struvite. The susceptibility to scale formation was more important on polyamide and polyvinyl chloride than on stainless steel. In all cases, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy showed that the precipitated solid phase was solely struvite. No difference in crystal morphology was observed. However, at similar experimental conditions, the particle size of struvite was higher for stainless-steel material than that for plastic materials. PMID:19213469

  5. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  6. Pore-scale simulation of calcium carbonate precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfludic pore network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved CO2 during geological CO2 storage may react with minerals in fractured rocks or confined aquifers and cause mineral precipitation. The overall rate of reaction can be affected by coupled processes among hydrodynamics, transport, and reactions at pore-scale. Pore-scale models of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution are applied to account for transient experimental results of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution under highly supersaturated conditions in a microfluidic pore network (i.e., micromodel). Pore-scale experiments in the micromodel are used as a basis for understanding coupled physics of systems perturbed by geological CO2 injection. In the micromodel, precipitation is induced by transverse mixing along the centerline in pore bodies. Overall, the pore-scale model qualitatively captured the governing physics of reactions such as precipitate morphology, precipitation rate, and maximum precipitation area in first few pore spaces. In particular, we found that proper estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient and the reactive surface area is necessary to adequately simulate precipitation and dissolution rates. As the model domain increases, the effect of flow patterns affected by precipitation on the overall reaction rate also increases. The model is also applied to account for the effect of different reaction rate laws on mineral precipitation and dissolution at pore-scale. Reaction rate laws tested include the linear rate law, nonlinear power law, and newly-developed rate law based on in-situ measurements at nano scale in the literature. Progress on novel methods for upscaling pore-scale models for reactive transport are discussed, and are being applied to mineral precipitation patterns observed in natural analogues. H.Y. and T. D. were supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of

  7. Influence of magnetic field on the morphology of the andrographolide crystal from supercritical carbon dioxide extraction crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kexun; Zhang, Xingyuan; Pan, Jian; Zhang, Wencheng; Yong, Ji; Yin, Wenhong

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, a supercritical fluid extraction-crystallization of andrographolide, a kind of Chinese traditional medicine, was investigated. We have studied the extraction-crystallization process with or without magnet in the extractor, respectively. It was found that the presence of magnetic field is an important factor influencing the quality of the products. SEM images showed that the crystal was slice-like in shape, and many slices reunited together in the absence of magnet. Further research showed that pressure had a certain effect on the morphology of the crystal.

  8. Precipitation reactions during the early stages of ageing in a Ni and Al alloyed martensitic medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Steels in hot-work applications are exposed to a complex combination of mechanical, thermal and creep loading conditions. Advanced hot-work tool steels combine precipitation of alloy carbides and intermetallic phases and exhibit a higher thermal stability than conventional tool steels. The properties of a 0.3 C / 2.5 Cr / 2.5 Mo / 2.5 Al / 5.0 Ni wt% martensitic steel are mainly determined by the combined precipitation of secondary hardening carbides and of NiAI B2-precipitates. This alloy shows a large and rapid hardening reaction upon aging as short as 60 seconds at an ageing temperature of 610oC. The aims of this investigation are APFIM analysis of composition and morphology of these fine precipitates after ageing times shorter than 60 seconds. In particular the chemical composition, the particle radii and the number density of precipitates were determined as function of ageing time. The results obtained at the initial stages of precipitation hardening are analysed by means of statistical calculations. (author)

  9. Detailed crystallization study of co-precipitated Y1.47 Gd1.53 Fe5 O12 and relevant magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization process of co-precipitated Y1.5Gd1.5Fe5O12 powder heated up to 1000 deg C at rate of 5 deg C min-1 was investigated. Above 810 deg C crystalline Y1.47Gd1.53Fe5O12 was obtained with a lattice parameter of 12.41 A and a theoretical density of 5.84 g cm-3. Dry pressed rings were sintered at 1270 and 1320 deg C, increasing the grain-size from 3.1 to 6.5 μm, the theoretical density by 87.6 to 95.3% and decreasing Hc from 2.9725 to 1.4005 Oe. Additionally, Hc increased when the frequency of the hysteresis graph varied from 60 Hz to 10 kHz, the curie temperature was 282.4 deg C and Ms equalled 9.25 emu g-1 (0.17 kG) agreeing well with the Bs-value of the hysteresis graph and literature values. (author)

  10. Two-step electrical percolation in nematic liquid crystals filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomylko, Serhiy; Yaroshchuk, Oleg; Lebovka, Nikolai

    2015-07-01

    Percolation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in liquid crystals (LCs) opens the way for a unique class of anisotropic hybrid materials with a complex dielectric constant widely controlled by CNT concentration. Percolation in such systems is commonly described as a one-step process starting at a very low loading of CNTs. In the present study the two-step percolation was observed in the samples of thickness 250 μ m obtained by pressing the suspension between two substrates. The first threshold concentration, Cnp1˜10-4 wt.%, was sensitive to temperature and phase state of LC, while the second one, Cnp2˜10-1 wt.%, remained practically unchanged in the temperature tests. The two-stage nature of percolation was explained on a base of mean-field theory assuming core-shell structure of CNTs.

  11. Modelling a nonlinear optical switching in a standard photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with carbon disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munera, Natalia; Acuna Herrera, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, a numerical analysis is developed for the propagation of ultrafast optical pulses through a standard photonic crystal fiber (PCF) consisting of two infiltrated holes using carbon disulfide (CS2). This material is a good choice since it has highly nonlinear properties, what makes it a good candidate for optical switching and broadband source at low power compared to traditional nonlinear fiber coupler. Based on supermodes theory, a set of generalized nonlinear equations is presented in order to study the propagation characteristics. It is shown in this letter that it is possible to get optical switching behavior at low power and how the dispersion, as well as, the two infiltrated holes separation influence this effect. Finally, we see that supercontinuum generation can be induced equally in both infiltrated holes despite no initial excitation at one hole.

  12. Role of precursor crystal structure on electrochemical performance of carbide-derived carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Benjamin; Norris, Zach; Taylor, Greg; Yu, Lei; Lofland, Samuel; Hettinger, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Binary carbides with hexagonal and cubic crystal structures have been synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering of vanadium and other transition metals in acetylene or methane gas mixed with argon. The binary carbides are converted to carbide-derived carbon (CDC) films using chlorine gas in a post-deposition process in an external vacuum reaction furnace. Residual chlorine has been removed using an annealing step in a hydrogen atmosphere. The CDC materials have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy. The performance of the CDC materials in electrochemical device applications has been measured with the hexagonal phase precursor demonstrating a significantly higher specific capacitance in comparison to that of the cubic phase. We report these results and pore-size distributions of these and similar materials.

  13. Solubility dynamic of methyl yellow and carbon black in microemulsions and lamellar liquid crystal of water, non ionic surfactants and cyclohexane system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, A.; Harfianto, R.; Dewi, W. Y.; Beri, D.; Putra, A.

    2016-02-01

    Solubility dynamics of methyl yellow and carbon black in microemulsions and liquid crystals of water, non-ionic surfactants and cyclohexane system, have been investigated. Actually, solubility dynamics of these dyes both in microemulsion (w/o microemulsions) and the lamellar liquid crystal (LLC) were strongly related to the chemical composition, nature and characteristics of microemulsions and the lamellar liquid crystals.

  14. Precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC - cellulose composite fillers: Effects of PCC particle structure on the production and properties of uncoated fine paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulapuro, H.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the precipitation of PCC – pulp composite fillers with varying crystal habits and their effects on the papermaking properties of printing and writing paper. Colloidal (c-PCC, rhombohedral (r-PCC, and scalenohedral types (s-PCC of composite PCCs were produced and compared with commercial reference PCCs. Scanning electron micros-copy showed the c-PCC to be a high-surface-area nano-structured PCC. The rhombohedral composite was formed in clusters like a spider-web structure. Under similar experimental conditions, composite PCC was formed as individual ellipsoidal crystals and some of the particles had malformed structure, in contrast to the structured reference s-PCC. The co-precipitation and the structure of PCC significantly influence the forming, consolidation, and properties of paper, as well as its perform-ance in printing.Composite c-PCC showed the highest retention during forming. At higher filler contents, dewatering was reduced significantly with handsheets containing s- and r-PCC composite fillers. Colloidal composite hand-sheets showed the lowest tensile index and internal bond strength, while the rhombohedral composite gave the highest z-directional bond strength. Compared with the traditional reference samples containing commercial PCCs, paper with s- and r-composites had significantly higher density but similar light scattering ability. Addition of fibrillar fines to fine paper increased print rub fastness significantly in both laser and inkjet printed samples.

  15. Influence of Sticky Rice and Anionic Polyacrylamide on the Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate in Chinese Organic Sanhetu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Peng, Changsheng; Dai, Min; Gu, Qingbao; Song, Shaoxian

    2015-09-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in soil controlled by natural organic material was considered a very important reason to enhance the property of ancient Chinese organic Sanhetu (COS), but how the organic material affected the crystallization of CaCO3 in COS is still unclear. In this paper, a natural organic material (sticky rice, SR) and a synthetic organic material (anionic polyacrylamide, APAM) were selected as additives to investigate their effect on the crystallization of CaCO3. The experimental results showed that the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of additives and reaction time, while only the size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of reactant. Although the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals varied greatly with the variation of additive concentration, reactant concentration and reaction time, the polymorph of CaCO3 crystals were always calcite, according to SEM/EDX, XRD and FTIR analyses. This study may help us to better understand the mechanism of the influence of organic materials on CaCO3 crystallization and properties of COS.

  16. Diamond crystallization in a CO2-rich alkaline carbonate melt with a nitrogen additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhryakov, Alexander F.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Nechaev, Denis V.

    2016-09-01

    Diamond crystallization was experimentally studied in a CO2-bearing alkaline carbonate melt with an increased content of nitrogen at pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperature of 1500 °C. The growth rate, morphology, internal structure of overgrown layers, and defect-impurity composition of newly formed diamond were investigated. The type of growth patterns on faces, internal structure, and nitrogen content were found to be controlled by both the crystallographic orientation of the growth surfaces and the structure of the original faces of diamond seed crystals. An overgrown layer has a uniform structure on the {100} plane faces of synthetic diamond and a fibrillar (fibrous) structure on the faceted surfaces of a natural diamond cube. The {111} faces have a polycentric vicinal relief with numerous twin intergrowths and micro twin lamellae. The stable form of diamond growth under experimental conditions is a curved-face hexoctahedron with small cube faces. The nitrogen impurity concentration in overgrown layers varies depending on the growth direction and surface type, from 100 to 1100 ppm.

  17. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  18. Effect of Magnesium as Substitute Material in Enzyme-Mediated Calcite Precipitation for Soil-Improvement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Heriansyah; Yasuhara, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Naoki; Neupane, Debendra; Lu, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation was evaluated as a soil-improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32− as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and treated with concentration-controlled solutions composed of urea, urease, calcium, and magnesium chloride. The mechanical properties of the treated soil specimens were examined through unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests. A precipitation ratio of the carbonate up to 90% of the maximum theoretical precipitation was achieved by adding a small amount of magnesium chloride. Adding magnesium chloride as a delaying agent was indeed found to reduce the reaction rate of the precipitation, which may increase the volume of the treated soil if used in real fields because of the slower precipitation rate and the resulting higher injectivity. A mineralogical analysis revealed that magnesium chloride decreases the crystal size of the precipitated materials and that another carbonate of aragonite is newly formed. Mechanical test results indicated that carbonate precipitates within the soils and brings about a significant improvement in strength. A maximum UCS of 0.6 MPa was obtained from the treated samples. PMID:27200343

  19. Microstructural record of cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation processes from shallow crustal carbonate strike-slip faults, Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Helene; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The concept of coseismic slip and aseismic creep deformation along faults is supported by the variability of natural fault rocks and their microstructures. Faults in carbonate rocks are characterized by very narrow principal slip zones (cm to mm wide) containing (ultra)cataclastic fault rocks that accommodate most of the fault displacement. Fluidization of ultracataclastic sub layers and thermal decomposition of calcite due to frictional heating have been proposed as possible indicators for seismic slip. Dissolution-precipitation (DP) processes are possible mechanism of aseismic sliding, resulting in spaced cleavage solution planes and associated veins, indicating diffusive mass transfer and precipitation in pervasive vein networks. We investigated exhumed, sinistral strike-slip faults in carbonates of the Northern Calcareous Alps. The study presents microstructural investigations of natural carbonate fault rocks that formed by cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation related deformation processes. Faults belong to the eastern segment of the Salzachtal-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system that was formed during eastward lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps in Oligocene to Lower Miocene. The investigated faults accommodated sinistral slip between several tens and few hundreds of meters. Microstructural analysis of fault rocks was done with scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Deformation experiments of natural fault rocks are planned to be conducted at the Sapienza University of Roma and should be available at the meeting. The investigated fault rocks give record of alternating cataclastic deformation and DP creep. DP fault rocks reveal various stages of evolution including early stylolites, pervasive pressure solution seams and cleavage, localized shear zones with syn-kinematic calcite fibre growth and mixed DP/cataclastic microstructures, involving pseudo sc- and scc'-fabrics. Pressure solution seams host fine grained kaolinit, chlorite

  20. The effect of tantalum and carbon on the structure/properties of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The microstructure, phase chemistry, and creep and hot tensile properties were studied as a function of tantalum and carbon levels in Mar-M247 type single crystal alloys. Microstructural studies showed that several types of carbides (MC, M23C6 and M5C) are present in the normal carbon (0.10 wt % C) alloys after heat treatment. In general, the composition of the MC carbides changes from titanium rich to tantalum rich as the tantalum level in the alloy increases. Small M23C6 carbides are present in all alloys. Tungsten rich M6C carbides are also observed in the alloy containing no tantalum. No carbides are present in the low carbon (0.01 wt % C) alloy series. The morphology of gamma prime is observed to be sensitive to heat treatment and tantalum level in the alloy. Cuboidal gamma prime is present in all the as cast structures. After heat treatment, the gamma prime precipitates tend to have a more spheroidal like morphology, and this tendency increases as the tantalum level decreases. On prolonged aging, the gamma prime reverts back to a cuboidal morphology or under stress at high temperatures, forms a rafted structure. The weight fraction and lattice parameter of the spheroidal gamma prime increases with increasing tantalum content. Changes in the phase chemistry of the gamma prime matrix and gamma prime have also been analyzed using phase extraction techniques. The partitioning ratio decreases for tungsten and aluminum and increases for tantalum as the tantalum content increases for both alloy series; no significant changes occur in the partitioning ratios of the other alloying elements. A reduction in secondary creep rate and an increase in rupture time result from increasing the tantalum content and decreasing the carbon level.

  1. Variations in soil carbon sequestration and their determinants along a precipitation gradient in seasonally dry tropical forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Julio; Merino, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    The effect of precipitation regime on the C cycle of tropical forests is poorly understood, despite the existence of models that suggest a drier climate may substantially alter the source-sink function of these ecosystems. Along a precipitation regime gradient containing 12 mature seasonally dry tropical forests growing under otherwise similar conditions (similar annual temperature, rainfall seasonality, and geological substrate), we analyzed the influence of variation in annual precipitation (1240 to 642 mm) and duration of seasonal drought on soil C. We investigated litterfall, decomposition in the forest floor, and C storage in the mineral soil, and analyzed the dependence of these processes and pools on precipitation. Litterfall decreased slightly - about 10% - from stands with 1240 mm yr(-1) to those with 642 mm yr(-1) , while the decomposition decreased by 56%. Reduced precipitation strongly affected C storage and basal respiration in the mineral soil. Higher soil C storage at the drier sites was also related to the higher chemical recalcitrance of litter (fine roots and forest floor) and the presence of charcoal across sites, suggesting an important indirect influence of climate on C sequestration. Basal respiration was controlled by the amount of recalcitrant organic matter in the mineral soil. We conclude that in these forest ecosystems, the long-term consequences of decreased precipitation would be an increase in organic layer and mineral soil C storage, mainly due to lower decomposition and higher chemical recalcitrance of organic matter, resulting from changes in litter composition and, likely also, wildfire patterns. This could turn these seasonally dry tropical forests into significant soil C sinks under the predicted longer drought periods if primary productivity is maintained. PMID:26913708

  2. Peptide Induced Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate on Wrinkle Patterned Substrate: Implications for Chitin Formation in Molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Weiss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We here present the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate under the influence of synthetic peptides on topographically patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS substrates, which have a controlled density of defects between the wrinkles. Experiments with two lysine-rich peptides derived from the extracellular conserved domain E22 of the mollusc chitin synthase Ar-CS1, AKKKKKAS (AS8 and EEKKKKKES (ES9 on these substrates showed their influence on the calcium carbonate morphology. A transition from polycrystalline composites to single crystalline phases was achieved with the peptide AS8 by changing the pH of the buffer solution. We analyzed three different pH values as previous experiments showed that E22 interacts with aragonite biominerals more strongly at pH 7.75 than at pH 9.0. At any given pH, crystals appeared in characteristic morphologies only on wrinkled substrates, and did not occur on the flat, wrinkle-free PDMS substrate. These results suggest that these wrinkled substrates could be useful for controlling the morphologies of other mineral/peptide and mineral/protein composites. In nature, these templates are formed enzymatically by glycosyltransferases containing pH-sensitive epitopes, similar to the peptides investigated here. Our in vitro test systems may be useful to gain understanding of the formation of distinct 3D morphologies in mollusc shells in response to local pH shifts during the mineralization of organic templates.

  3. Polypropylene/Graphene and Polypropylene/Carbon Fiber Conductive Composites: Mechanical, Crystallization and Electromagnetic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Lin Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the properties of composites that different carbon materials with different measurements can reinforce. Using a melt compounding method, this study combines polypropylene (PP and graphene nano-sheets (GNs or carbon fiber (CF to make PP/GNs and PP/CF conductive composites, respectively. The DSC results and optical microscopic observation show that both GNs and CF enable PP to crystalize at a high temperature. The tensile modulus of PP/GNs and PP/CF conductive composites remarkably increases as a result of the increasing content of conductive fillers. The tensile strength of the PP/GNs conductive composites is inversely proportional to the loading level of GNs. Containing 20 wt% of GNs, the PP/GNs conductive composites have an optimal conductivity of 0.36 S/m and an optimal EMI SE of 13 dB. PP/CF conductive composites have an optimal conductivity of 10−6 S/m when composed of no less than 3 wt% of CF, and an optimal EMI SE of 25 dB when composed of 20 wt% of CF.

  4. Estimation of the upper limit of carbon concentration in boron carbide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalikhin, S. V.; Ponomarev, V. I.

    2010-08-01

    The existence of a boron carbide phase with ˜25 at % carbon was proven experimentally. To evaluate the maximum possible concentration of C atoms in boron carbide (B12 - x C x )(BC2) crystals, we performed quantum-chemical calculations of (B12 - x C x )(BH2)6(CH3)6 model compounds ( x = 0-4; the goal of calculations was to determine the upper limiting number of C atoms in the B12 - x C x icosahedron) by the density functional theory method (B3LYP, 6-31G** basis set, full geometry optimization). A comparison of the experimental and calculated data showed that the calculations of the model compounds reproduced the experimental dependences of the structural parameters of the icosahedron (mean bond length and volume) on the number of C atoms in it. The icosahedra were found to be stable at x ≤ 3. According to the results of the quantum-chemical calculations, the maximum carbon concentration in boron carbide was 33 at %, which corresponded to the composition B10C5 and the structural formula (B9C3)(BC2).

  5. Tracking solvent and protein movement during CO2 release in carbonic anhydrase II crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Song, HyoJin; Avvaru, Balendu Sankara; Gruner, Sol M; Park, SangYoun; McKenna, Robert

    2016-05-10

    Carbonic anhydrases are mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration/dehydration of CO2/HCO3 (-) Previously, the X-ray crystal structures of CO2-bound holo (zinc-bound) and apo (zinc-free) human carbonic anhydrase IIs (hCA IIs) were captured at high resolution. Here, we present sequential timeframe structures of holo- [T = 0 s (CO2-bound), 50 s, 3 min, 10 min, 25 min, and 1 h] and apo-hCA IIs [T = 0 s, 50 s, 3 min, and 10 min] during the "slow" release of CO2 Two active site waters, WDW (deep water) and WDW' (this study), replace the vacated space created on CO2 release, and another water, WI (intermediate water), is seen to translocate to the proton wire position W1. In addition, on the rim of the active site pocket, a water W2' (this study), in close proximity to residue His64 and W2, gradually exits the active site, whereas His64 concurrently rotates from pointing away ("out") to pointing toward ("in") active site rotameric conformation. This study provides for the first time, to our knowledge, structural "snapshots" of hCA II intermediate states during the formation of the His64-mediated proton wire that is induced as CO2 is released. Comparison of the holo- and apo-hCA II structures shows that the solvent network rearrangements require the presence of the zinc ion. PMID:27114542

  6. The Moessbauer Spectroscopy Studies of Cementite Precipitations during Continuous Heating from As-Quenched State of High Carbon Cr-Mn-Mo Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work complements the knowledge concerning the kinetics of cementite precipitation during tempering. Investigations were performed on 120MnCrMoV8-6-4-2 steel. The samples of investigated steel were austenitized at the temperature of 900oC and quenched in oil. Then four of five samples were tempered. Tempering consisted of heating the samples up to chosen temperatures at the heating rate of 0.05oC/s and fast cooling after reaching desired temperature. This work presents the results of investigations performed carried out using the Moessbauer spectroscopy technique and their interpretation concerning cementite nucleation and growth during tempering. The values of hyperfine magnetic field on 57Fe atomic nuclei, determined for the third component of the Moessbauer spectrum as regards to its intensity, indicate that these are the components coming from ferromagnetic carbides. Big differences in hyperfine magnetic fields coming from Fe atoms existing in the structure of carbides, measured on samples heated up to the temperatures of 80oC and 210oC, in comparison with values for 57Fe atoms precipitated from carbides during heating up to the temperature of 350oC and 470oC, allow to state that these are the carbides of different crystal structure. The influence of hardened steel heating temperature on cementite precipitation was determined. The Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied not only for magnetic hyperfine field studies, but also to analyze the values of quadrupole splitting and isomeric shift, which resulted in significant conclusions concerning the changes in cementite precipitations morphology, chemical composition and the level of stresses being present in this research. (authors)

  7. pH coupled co-precipitation of alkaline-earth carbonates and silica - complex materials from simple chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Eiblmeier, Josef

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with the mineralization of alkaline-earth carbonates (mainly barium carbonate) from dilute silica solutions at high pH. It has for long been known that the concerted interaction between these purely inorganic components leads to amazing architectures with intricately curved and helical shapes, which were termed silica-carbonate biomorphs. Recently a general concept was proposed by García-Ruiz and co-workers that explains the spontaneous formation of these biomimetic agg...

  8. Crystal orbital study on the double walls made of nanotubes encapsulated inside zigzag carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure stabilities and electronic properties are investigated by using ab initio self-consistent-field crystal orbital method based on density functional theory for the one-dimensional (1D) double-wall nanotubes made of n-gon SiO2 nanotubes encapsulated inside zigzag carbon nanotubes. It is found that formation of the combined systems is energetically favorable when the distance between the two constituents is around the Van der Waals scope. The obtained band structures show that all the combined systems are semiconductors with nonzero energy gaps. The frontier energy bands (the highest occupied band and the lowest unoccupied band) of double-wall nanotubes are mainly derived from the corresponding carbon nanotubes. The mobilities of charge carriers are calculated to be within the range of 102–104 cm2 V−1 s−1 for the hybrid double-wall nanotubes. Young’s moduli are also calculated for the combined systems. For the comparison, geometrical and electronic properties of n-gon SiO2 nanotubes are also calculated and discussed. - Graphical abstract: Structures and band structures of the optimum 1D Double walls nanotubes. The optimized structures are 3-gon SiO2@(15,0), 5-gon SiO2@(17,0), 6-gon SiO2@(18,0) and 7-gon SiO2@(19,0). - Highlights: • The structure and electronic properties of the 1D n-gon SiO2@(m,0)s are studied using SCF-CO method. • The encapsulation of 1D n-gon SiO2 tubes inside zigzag carbon nanotubes can be energetically favorable. • The 1D n-gon SiO2@(m,0)s are all semiconductors. • The mobility of charge carriers and Young’s moduli are calculated

  9. Study on the crystal morphology and melting behavior of isothermally crystallized composites of short carbon fiber and poly(trimethylene terephthalate)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingtao RUN; Hongzan SONG; Yanping HAO

    2009-01-01

    The spherulites of the short carbon fibcr(SCF)/ poly (trimethylcne terephthalate) (PTT) composites forrned in limited space at designed temperatures, and their melting behaviors were studied by the polarized optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results suggest that SCF content, isothermal crystallization temperatures, and the film thicknesses influence the crystal morphology of the composites. The dimension of the spherulites is decreased with increasing SCF content, but whether banded or nonbandcd spherulites will form in the composites is not depondcnt on SCF content However, the crystal morphology of the composites depends strongly on the temperature. When the isothermal crystallization temperatures increase from 180℃ to 230℃, the crystal morphology of SCF/PTT composites continuously changes in the following order: nonbanded → banded → nonbanded spherulites. Disconti-nuous circle lines form in the film when the film thickness increases from 30 to 60 μm. Basing on the SEM observation, it is found that these circle lines are cracks formed due to the constriction difference of the different parts of the sphemlites. These cracks are formed when the film is cooled from the isothermal crystallization temperature to the room tempera-ture at a slow cooling rate; while they will disappear gradually at different temperatures in the heating process. The crack will appear/disappear first around the center of the spherulite when the film was cooled/heated. The nontwisted or slightly twisted lamellas will reorganize to form highly twisted lamellas inducing apparent banded texture of the sphemlites.

  10. A comparative study of precipitation effects in Ti only and Ti-V Ultra Low Carbon (ULC) strip steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two ULC steel grades were investigated, one based on combined vanadium and titanium additions and the other based on titanium only additions. It has been established that TiC formation during interphase precipitation retards grain growth of the {111} texture grains during continuous annealing and hence positively affects the r value of the Ti only steel. The formation of newly formed TiC precipitates on dislocations during continuous annealing has been found to result in an increase of the yield strength in both steel grades, as the annealing temperature is increased. It is also confirmed that VC particles formed during the coiling process dissolve during the continuous annealing cycles. Suitable continuous annealing cycles can be adopted to produce high formable steels with a bake hardening potential using the beneficial effects of combined Ti-V additions

  11. Trace element geochemistry of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex, India: Evidence for fractional crystallization and silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotiranjan S Ray; P N Shukla

    2004-12-01

    Carbonatites are believed to have crystallized either from mantle-derived primary carbonate magmas or from secondary melts derived from carbonated silicate magmas through liquid immiscibility or from residual melts of fractional crystallization of silicate magmas. Although the observed coexistence of carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks in most complexes, their coeval emplacement in many, and overlapping initial 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios are supportive of their cogenesis; there have been few efforts to devise a quantitative method to identify the magmatic processes. In the present study we have made an attempt to accomplish this by modeling the trace element contents of carbonatites and coeval alkaline silicate rocks of Amba Dongar complex, India. Trace element data suggest that the carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks of this complex are products of fractional crystallization of two separate parental melts. Using the available silicate melt-carbonate melt partition coefficients for various trace elements, and the observed data from carbonatites, we have tried to simulate trace element distribution pattern for the parental silicate melt. The results of the modeling not only support the hypothesis of silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility for the evolution of Amba Dongar but also establish a procedure to test the above hypothesis in such complexes.

  12. Nanophotonics of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: Two-dimensional photonic crystals and optical dipole antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and related nanostructures represent a novel class of condensed matters with intriguing properties due to their unique atomic structures and nanoscale morphologies. It is of particular interest to examine the interaction behavior and mechanism between the free electron gas within carbon nanotubes and the external electromagnetic wave, which may greatly facilitate the understanding of the physics of nanophotonics at the fundamental level. This dissertation is committed to investigate the optical responses of arrays of vertically aligned CNTs in different configurations, based on their fabrication by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and other techniques involved therein. The mechanisms of the photonic results are categorized into inter-CNT and intra-CNT contributions through data analysis on periodic and random CNT arrays, which then give rise to practical applications in photonic crystals and optical antennas. The growth and fabrication procedure of vertically aligned CNTs with optimized morphology and well-defined arrangement is first elaborated in this dissertation, owing to the tremendous difficulties encountered and efforts paid during the sample fabrication and optimization process, and the dominant effect of sample quality on the final results at the optical characterization stage. To fabricate periodic CNT arrays, a microsphere self-assembly technique is first adopted for catalyst patterning and a parametric study is carried out systematically for CNT growth by PECVD method. For random CNT arrays, the growth conditions are also modified so that small diameter CNTs can be grown and an IC industry-compatible procedure can be developed for practical application purposes. The inter-scatterer optical responses are studied by using hexagonal lattices of vertically aligned CNTs with various lattice constants and CNT morphologies. The diffraction patterns of theses CNT arrays are recorded and compared to theoretical

  13. Single-crystal γ-MnS nanowires conformally coated with carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Resto, Oscar; Carpena-Nuñez, Jennifer; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M; Fonseca, Luis F; Weiner, Brad R; Morell, Gerardo

    2014-01-22

    We report for the first time the fabrication of single-crystal metastable manganese sulfide nanowires (γ-MnS NWs) conformally coated with graphitic carbon via chemical vapor deposition technique using a single-step route. Advanced spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques were applied to elucidate the composition and structure of these NWs at the nanoscale, including Raman, XRD, SEM, HRTEM, EELS, EDS, and SAED. No evidence of α-MnS and β-MnS allotropes was found. The γ-MnS/C NWs have hexagonal cross-section and high aspect ratio (∼1000) on a large scale. The mechanical properties of individual γ-MnS/C NWs were examined via in situ uniaxial compression tests in a TEM-AFM. The results show that γ-MnS/C NWs are brittle with a Young's modulus of 65 GPa. The growth mechanism proposed suggests that the bottom-up fabrication of γ-MnS/C NWs is governed by vapor-liquid-solid mechanism catalyzed by bimetallic Au-Ni nanoparticles. The electrochemical performance of γ-MnS/C NWs as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries indicates that they outperform the cycling stability of stable micro-sized α-MnS, with an initial capacity of 1036 mAh g(-1) and a reversible capacity exceeding 503 mAh g(-1) after 25 cycles. This research advances the integration of carbon materials and metal sulfide nanostructures, bringing forth new avenues for potential miniaturization strategies to fabricate 1D core/shell heterostructures with intriguing bifunctional properties that can be used as building blocks in nanodevices. PMID:24392737

  14. Total organic carbon and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy methods to determine total carbon and hydrocarbons in mercuric iodide single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S.; Kaplan, I.; Schieber, M.; Ortale, C.; Skinner, N.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Total organic carbon was determined by measuring the CO2 produced by combustion in a sealed quartz vessel. The CO2 was quantified by nondispersive IR and by titration using commercial detectors. The total organic carbon was found to be around 10-100 μg/g in both starting materials and in single crystals. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) measurements were made on hexane extracts of mercuric iodide (HgI2) dissolved in potassium iodide solution. Hydrocarbons starting with C10 (DIENE) and up to C26 were found. In addition, phthalates, such as diethyl and dioctyl phthalate were also found. Some of the organic compounds, for example, such hydrocarbons as branched nC16, nC20, nC21, nC22, nC23, and nC24, were present in some HgI2 materials in quantities of the order of weight ppm, but were eliminated in the purification process and were not found in the single crystals. Other organic compounds such as the phthalates were not always eliminated and were identified in the single crystals. In general, the GC/MS could identify only hydrocarbons of C10 and higher which account for only a few percent of the total organic carbon determined by oxidation.

  15. Dielectric and electro-optic measurements of nematic liquid crystals doped with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Matthew; Georgiev, Georgi; Atherton, Timothy; Cebe, Peggy

    We studied the effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the dielectric and electro-optic properties of nematic 5CB liquid crystals (LCs). Samples containing 0.01%, 0.10% and 1.00% CNTs by weight were prepared. Anti- parallel rubbed cells with a nominal thickness of 10 μm were prepared using indium tin oxide coated glass cells and a polyimide alignment layer. The capacitance and dissipation factor were measured using an Agilent 4284A precision LCR meter. From these measurements, the complex dielectric permittivity was determined as a function of frequency. Analysis of the low frequency regime (f <1000 Hz) indicates that 5CB samples containing CNTs have a higher conductance than neat samples. The Fréedericksz transition critical voltage was noted by a sharp increase in capacitance after an initial plateau. Numerical simulations of CNT-facilitated switching show that polarization induced on the nanotubes from capacitive effects can significantly reduce the critical voltage in DC electric fields, in agreement with experimental results. Measurements of the critical voltage over a range of frequencies will also be presented. Research was supported by the National Science Foundation, DMR1206010.

  16. Fast-Response Liquid Crystal Lens Doped with Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a relatively fast-response liquid crystal (LC lens was proposed, which was fabricated by a simple method. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were utilized in fabricating the LC lens. As MWCNTs were doped into the LCs, the dielectric anisotropy of the mixture changed, which was the key factor in solving the technical barrier of slow response time. In experiments, the effects of doping with MWCNTs were demonstrated. The concentration of doped MWCNTs was discussed in detail, and the best concentration and doping method were analyzed. The relationship between the concentration and response time was also obtained. This LC lens had a sub-millisecond response time, which was a relatively fast response time in comparison to conventional LC lenses of pristine LCs. Thus, this proposed method could be considered as a new method to realize fast-response LC lens.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12913

  17. The impact of carbon on single crystal nickel-base superalloys: Carbide behavior and alloy performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Andrew Jay

    Advanced single crystal nickel-base superalloys are prone to the formation of casting grain defects, which hinders their practical implementation in large gas turbine components. Additions of carbon (C) have recently been identified as a means of reducing grain defects, but the full impact of C on single crystal superalloy behavior is not entirely understood. A study was conducted to determine the effects of C and other minor elemental additions on the behavior of CMSX-4, a commercially relevant 2nd generation single crystal superalloy. Baseline CMSX-4 and three alloy modifications (CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C, CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C and 68 ppm boron (B), and CMSX-4 + 0.05 wt. % C and 23 ppm nitrogen (N)) were heat treated before being tested in high temperature creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF). Select samples were subjected to long term thermal exposure (1000 °C/1000 hrs) to assess microstructural stability. The C modifications resulted in significant differences in microstructure and alloy performance as compared to the baseline. These variations were generally attributed to the behavior of carbide phases in the alloy modifications. The C modification and the C+B modification, which both exhibited script carbide networks, were 25% more effective than the C+N modification (small blocky carbides) and 10% more effective than the baseline at preventing grain defects in cast bars. All C-modified alloys exhibited reduced as-cast gamma/gamma' eutectic and increased casting porosity as compared to baseline CMSX-4. The higher levels of porosity (volume fractions 0.002 - 0.005 greater than the baseline) were attributed to carbides blocking molten fluid flow during the final stages of solidification. Although the minor additions resulted in reduced solidus temperature by up to 16 °C, all alloys were successfully heat treated without incipient melting by modifying commercial heat treatment schedules. In the B-containing alloy, heat treatment resulted in the transformation of

  18. Anisotropy of sublimation from equivalent crystal faces of carbon-containing tungsten monocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekhtyar, I.Ya.; Kolesnik, V.N.; Ovsienko, D.E.; Patoka, V.I.; Silant' ev, V.I.; Sosnina, E.I. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Metallofiziki)

    1981-08-01

    Anisotropy of sublimation parameters was found in equivalent faces (100) or (1O0) of W single crystals oriented perpendicular or parallel to the growth direction. The anisotropy value depends on C concentration in W single crystals.

  19. Anisotropy of sublimation from equivalent crystal faces of carbon-containing tungsten monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropy of sublimation parameters was found in equivalent faces (100) or (1O0) of W single crystals oriented perpendicular or parallel to the growth direction. The anisotropy value depends on C concentration in W single crystals

  20. Hydrophilic Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube for Building Photonic Crystals with Enhanced Color Visibility and Mechanical Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihu Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Low color visibility and poor mechanical strength of polystyrene (PS photonic crystal films have been the main shortcomings for the potential applications in paints or displays. This paper presents a simple method to fabricate PS/MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite photonic crystal films with enhanced color visibility and mechanical strength. First, MWCNTs was modified through radical addition reaction by aniline 2,5-double sulfonic acid diazonium salt to generate hydrophilic surface and good water dispersity. Then the MWCNTs dispersion was blended with PS emulsion to form homogeneous PS/MWCNTs emulsion mixtures and fabricate composite films through thermal-assisted method. The obtained films exhibit high color visibility under natural light and improved mechanical strength owing to the light-adsorption property and crosslinking effect of MWCNTs. The utilization of MWCNTs in improving the properties of photonic crystals is significant for various applications, such as in paints and displays.

  1. Hydrophilic Modification of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube for Building Photonic Crystals with Enhanced Color Visibility and Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feihu; Tang, Bingtao; Xiu, Jinghai; Zhang, Shufen

    2016-01-01

    Low color visibility and poor mechanical strength of polystyrene (PS) photonic crystal films have been the main shortcomings for the potential applications in paints or displays. This paper presents a simple method to fabricate PS/MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes) composite photonic crystal films with enhanced color visibility and mechanical strength. First, MWCNTs was modified through radical addition reaction by aniline 2,5-double sulfonic acid diazonium salt to generate hydrophilic surface and good water dispersity. Then the MWCNTs dispersion was blended with PS emulsion to form homogeneous PS/MWCNTs emulsion mixtures and fabricate composite films through thermal-assisted method. The obtained films exhibit high color visibility under natural light and improved mechanical strength owing to the light-adsorption property and crosslinking effect of MWCNTs. The utilization of MWCNTs in improving the properties of photonic crystals is significant for various applications, such as in paints and displays. PMID:27136514

  2. Activated Fraction Of Black Carbon By Cloud Droplets And Ice Crystals At The High Alpine Site Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozic, J.; Mertes, S. [IFT Leipzig (Georgia); Verheggen, B.; Petzold, A. [DLR, Oberpfaffenhofen (Georgia); Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) were made in winter and summer 2004 at the high Alpine site Jungfraujoch in order to study the activation of BC into cloud droplets and ice crystals. Main results showed that the activated fraction represents 61% in summer and that for a large temperature range between -25 C and 5 C, the activated BC fraction increases with increasing temperature and increasing liquid water content. (author)

  3. Theoretical constraints on the effects of pH, salinity, and temperature on clumped isotope signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon species and precipitating carbonate minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, PS; Tripati, AK; Schauble, EA

    2014-01-01

    The use of carbonate 'clumped isotope' thermometry as a geochemical technique to determine temperature of formation of a carbonate mineral is predicated on the assumption that the mineral has attained an internal thermodynamic equilibrium. If true, then the clumped isotope signature is dependent solely upon the temperature of formation of the mineral without the need to know the isotopic or elemental composition of coeval fluids. However, anomalous signatures can arise under disequilibrium co...

  4. Cryogenic carbonate precipitation in caves: Jaskyňa Studného Vetra Cave (Low Tatras, Slovakia) case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orvošová, M.; Žák, Karel

    Wroclaw : Sosnowiec, 2007 - ( Socha, P.; Stefaniak, K.; Tyc, A.). s. 104-105 ISBN 978-83-87431-84-6. [Karst and Cryokarst, Speleological School /25./ and GLACKIPR Symposium /8./. 19.03.2007-26.03.2007, Sosnowiec] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : cryogenic carbonate * cave * Low Tatra Mts. Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  5. Co-mineralization of alkaline-earth carbonates and silica

    OpenAIRE

    Kellermeier, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the manifold interactions that occur when alkaline-earth metal carbonates are crystallized in the presence of dissolved silica as an additive. The described work subdivides into two main lines of research. On the one hand, an understanding of the potential roles of silica during crystallization was sought on a fundamental level. That is, the mineral - in this case calcium carbonate - was directly precipitated from silica-containing solutions and the effect on gro...

  6. Quantitative auger electron spectroscopy of the interface carbon layer formation on the vacuum cleavage surfaces of layered semiconductor In4Se3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the qualitative Auger electron spectroscopy of the interface carbon layer formation on the high vacuum cleavage surfaces of layered semiconductor In4Se3 crystals are presented. The kinetics of interfacial carbon layer formation on the cleavage surfaces of crystals and the elemental and phase composition of the interface dependent on the exposition time in high vacuum and on the dose of electron irradiation have been studied by the quantitative Auger electron and mass-spectroscopy methods

  7. A facile and low-cost length sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by precipitation and applications for thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Hui; Chen, Haitian; Khripin, Constantine Y.; Liu, Bilu; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their combinations. Polyelectrolytes such as polymethacrylate (PMAA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are found to be especially effective on cholate and deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs. By adding PMAA to these nanotube dispersions in a stepwise fashion, we have achieved nanotube precipitation in a length-dependent order: first nanotubes with an average length of 650 nm, and then successively of 450 nm, 350 nm, and 250 nm. A similar effect of nanotube length sorting has also been observed for PSS. To demonstrate the utility of the length fractionation, the 650 nm-long nanotube fraction was subjected to an aqueous two-phase separation to obtain semiconducting enriched nanotubes. Thin-film transistors fabricated with the resulting semiconducting SWCNTs showed a carrier mobility up to 18 cm2 (V s)-1 and an on/off ratio up to 107. Our result sheds new light on the phase behavior of aqueous nanotube dispersions under high concentrations of polymers and salts, and offers a facile, low-cost, and scalable method to produce length sorted semiconducting nanotubes for macroelectronics applications.Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with long lengths are highly desirable for many applications such as thin-film transistors and circuits. Previously reported length sorting techniques usually require sophisticated instrumentation and are hard to scale up. In this paper, we report for the first time a general phenomenon of a length-dependent precipitation of surfactant-dispersed carbon nanotubes by polymers, salts, and their

  8. The effects of warming-shifted plant phenology on ecosystem carbon exchange are regulated by precipitation in a semi-arid grassland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyang Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The longer growing season under climate warming has served as a crucial mechanism for the enhancement of terrestrial carbon (C sink over the past decades. A better understanding of this mechanism is critical for projection of changes in C cycling of terrestrial ecosystems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 4-year field experiment with day and night warming was conducted to examine the responses of plant phenology and their influences on plant coverage and ecosystem C cycling in a temperate steppe in northern China. Greater phenological responses were observed under night than day warming. Both day and night warming prolonged the growing season by advancing phenology of early-blooming species but without changing that of late-blooming species. However, no warming response of vegetation coverage was found for any of the eight species. The variances in species-level coverage and ecosystem C fluxes under different treatments were positively dependent upon the accumulated precipitation within phenological duration but not the length of phenological duration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These plants' phenology is more sensitive to night than day warming, and the warming effects on ecosystem C exchange via shifting plant phenology could be mediated by precipitation patterns in semi-arid grasslands.

  9. Strontium hydroxyapatite and strontium carbonate as templates for the precipitation of calcium-phosphates in the absence and presence of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternitzke, Vanessa; Janousch, Markus; Heeb, Michèle B.; Hering, Janet G.; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation of calcium-phosphates on calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAP) in the presence and absence of fluoride is important in the formation of bone and teeth, protection against tooth decay, dental and skeletal fluorosis and defluoridation of drinking water. Strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr10(PO4)6(OH)2 or SrHAP) and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) were used as calcium-free seed templates in precipitation experiments conducted with varying initial calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) or calcium-to-phosphate-to-fluoride (Ca/P/F) ratios. Suspensions of SrHAP or SrCO3 seed templates (which were calcium-limited for both templates and phosphate-limited in the case of SrCO3) were reacted at pH 7.3 (25 °C) over 3 days. The resulting solids were examined with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Calcium apatite was the predominant phase identified by all techniques independent of the added Ca/P ratios and of the presence of fluoride. It was not possible to make an unambiguous distinction between HAP and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2, FAP). The apatite was calcium-deficient and probably contained some strontium.

  10. Hemocytes participate in calcium carbonate crystal formation, transportation and shell regeneration in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Yangjia; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-04-01

    In this study, light microscope, scanning and transmission electron microscope, hematoxylin-eosin and fluorescent staining, and mass spectrometry methods were employed to observe the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystal formation, hemocyte release and transportation, and hemocyte distribution at the shell regeneration area and to analyse the proteome of hemocytes in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The results indicated that intracellular CaCO3 crystals were observed in circulating hemocytes in P. fucata, implying that there was a suitable microenvironment for crystal formation in the hemocytes. This conclusion was further supported by the proteome analysis, in which various biomineralization-related proteins were detected. The crystal-bearing hemocytes, mainly granulocytes, may be released to extrapallial fluid (EPF) by the secretory cavities distributed on the outer surface of the mantle centre. These granulocytes in the EPF and between the regenerated shells were abundant and free. In the regenerated prismatic layer, the granulocytes were fused into each column and fragmented with the duration of shell maturation, suggesting the direct involvement of hemocytes in shell regeneration. Overall, this study provided evidence that hemocytes participated in CaCO3 crystal formation, transportation and shell regeneration in the pearl oyster. These results are helpful to further understand the exact mechanism of hemocyte-mediated biomineralization in shelled molluscs. PMID:26923245

  11. Genetic variation in seedling water-use efficiency of Patagonian Cypress populations from contrasting precipitation regimes assessed through carbon isotope discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastorino, M. J.; Aparicio, A. G.; Marchelli, P.; Gallo, L. A.

    2012-11-01

    Water-use efficiency (WUE) is a physiological parameter that plays a significant role in the evolutionary dynamics of many forest tree species. It can be estimated indirectly through carbon isotope discrimination (A). In general, plants of more arid origins have lower values of A. In order to study the degree of genetic control of this parameter and the genetic variation in A of Patagonian Cypress seedlings, three Argentinean natural populations chosen to represent two contrasting precipitation regimes were sampled in a common garden trial. The dry situation was represented by two neighboring marginal forest patches from the steppe, while the humid condition was represented by a population with 1,200 mm higher mean annual precipitation. Height (H) and A were measured in 246 five-year-old seedlings from 41 open-pollinated families. The factor family had a significant effect on both variables; however heritability for A was found not to be significant in two out of the three populations. This could be explained by low sample size in one of them and by a real evolutionary effect in the other. An inverse association between H and A was verified, which is interpreted as evidence of an adaptation process at the intra-population level. The studied populations were not shown to discriminate carbon isotopes differently; hence evidence of adaptation to current environmental conditions could not be obtained. On the other hand, the arid populations proved to be quite different in terms of genetic variation, which seems to be the consequence of genetic drift and isolation. (Author) 49 refs.

  12. Interactions of carbon nanotubes in a nematic liquid crystal. I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galerne, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Elongated and rodlike objects such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are studied when immersed in a nematic liquid crystal. Their interaction energy in a uniform nematic field depends on their orientation relative to the director n , and its minimum determines if they stabilize parallel or perpendicular to n . Using free energy calculations, we deduce the orientation at equilibrium that they choose in a uniform director field n or when they are in contact with a splay-bend disclination line. Naturally, the CNT orientations also depend on the anchoring conditions at their surface. Essentially, three types of anchorings are considered, planar, homeotropic, and Janus anchorings in the cases of weak and strong anchoring strengths. In the presence of a splay-bend disclination line, they are attracted toward it and ultimately, they get out of the colloidal dispersion to stick on it. Their orientation relative to the line is found to be parallel or perpendicular to it, again depending on the anchoring conditions. When a sufficient number of particles are deposited on a disclination line, we finally obtain a micro- or nanonecklace in the shape of a thin thread or of a bottle brush, according to the CNTs being oriented parallel or perpendicular to the disclination line, respectively. The system exhibits a rich versatility even if up to now the weak anchorings appear to be difficult to control. As discussed in the associated experimental paper, these necklaces could be a step toward interesting applications for realizing nanowires self-connected in three dimensions to predesignated electrodes. This method could provide a way to increase the number of transistors that may be connected together on a small volume.

  13. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  14. Interpretation of the vacancy-ordering controlled growth morphology of Hg5In2Te8 precipitates in Hg3In2Te6 single crystals by TEM observation and crystallographic calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The growth morphology and detailed crystallography of Hg5In2Te8 precipitates in Hg3In2Te6 matrix to has been interpreted by means of transmission electron microscopy and invariant element deformation model. Three crystallographic equivalent variants of Hg5In2Te8 precipitates in Hg3In2Te6 matrix were found to have different growth directions and habit planes. Such growth morphology is fully attributed to the lattice shrinkage induced by vacancy ordering under high temperature in Hg5In2Te8. Through near coincident site lattice and invariant strain calculation, the morphology and crystallographic features of the precipitate has been successfully interpreted. - Highlights: • The growth morphology of Hg5In2Te8 precipitates in Hg3In2Te6 was observed by TEM. • Near-CSL calculation show 0.7577% lattice shrinkage of Hg5In2Te8 at high temperature. • All the involved factors have inverse relationship with the move speed of interface. • The calculated crystallography features of Hg5In2Te8 agree well with the TEM results. - Abstract: Generally, the crystal growth morphology in liquid or vapor was controlled by chemical potential, while that in solid solute was restricted by 3D strain matching between matrix and secondary phase. It is already known that the growth and evolution of the morphology of secondary phase during the solid phase transformation are highly determined by the variation of interface energy induced by lattice mismatch. In this work, the growth morphology and crystallography of Hg5In2Te8 precipitates in Hg3In2Te6 matrix were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the growth of Hg5In2Te8 precipitates displayed an unusual growth morphology which contain three crystallographically equivalent variants with different growth directions in Hg3In2Te6 matrix, suggesting a slight lattice constant variation of Hg5In2Te8 precipitate during the phase transformation at high temperature, which is

  15. Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes using a simple vacuum filtration process. Vacuum filtration of nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solution formed nematic domains on the filter membrane surface and exhibited local ordering. A 2D fast Fourier transform was used to calculate the order parameters from scanning electron microscopy images. The order parameter was observed to be sensitive to the filtration time demonstrating different regions of transformation namely nucleation of nematic domains, nanotube accumulation and large domain growth.Transmittance versus sheet resistance measurements of such films resulted in optical to dc conductivity of σ opt/σ dc = 9.01 indicative of purely semiconducting nanotube liquid crystal network.Thin films of nanotube liquid crystals with order parameters ranging from S = 0.1–0.5 were patterned into conducting channels of transistor devices which showed high I on/I off ratios from 10–19 800 and electron mobility values μ e = 0.3–78.8 cm2 (V-s)−1, hole mobility values μ h = 0.4–287 cm2 (V-s)−1. High I on/I off ratios were observed at low order parameters and film mass. A Schottky barrier transistor model is consistent with the observed transistor characteristics. Electron and hole mobilities were seen to increase with order parameters and carbon nanotube mass fractions. A fundamental tradeoff between decreasing on/off ratio and increasing mobility with increasing nanotube film mass and order parameter is therefore concluded. Increase in order parameters of nanotubes liquid crystals improved the electronic transport properties as witnessed by the increase in σ dc/σ opt values on macroscopic films and high mobilities in microscopic transistors. Liquid crystal networks of semiconducting nanotubes as demonstrated here are simple to fabricate, transparent, scalable and could find wide ranging device applications. (papers)

  16. Para-amino benzoic acid–mediated synthesis of vaterite phase of calcium carbonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Ramesh; S A Inchara; K Pallavi

    2015-05-01

    Calcium carbonate polymorphs were precipitated at room temperature and 80°C by varying the precipitation pH, carbonate source, effect of solvent in presence and absence of structure directing agent such as para-aminobenzoic acid. Calcite phase of calcium carbonate was obtained when sodium hydrogen carbonate and/or sodium carbonate (used as precipitating agents) were added to calcium chloride solution at different pHs in water and/or methanol as solvent in separate experiments. Vaterite phase of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has been synthesized by mixing calcium chloride and sodium carbonate in presence of para-aminobenzoic acid when water–methanol binary mixture was used as solvent. Vaterite phase of calcium carbonate crystallizes in P63/mmc, while that of calcite phase in R-3mc, respectively. Calcite phase of calcium carbonate exhibits rhombohedral morphology, while vaterite phase has spherical morphology.

  17. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States); Gilliam, Ryan [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States); Seeker, Randy [Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, CA (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This final report details all development, analysis, design and testing of the project. Also included in the final report are an updated Techno-Economic Analysis and CO2 Lifecycle Analysis. The subsystems included in the pilot demonstration plant are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant was proven to be capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing it into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The final report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. The report also discusses the results of the fully integrated operation of the facility. Fiber cement boards have been produced in this facility exclusively using reactive calcium carbonate from captured CO2 from flue gas. These boards meet all US and China appropriate acceptance standards. Use demonstrations for these boards are now underway.

  18. Experience with a carbon injection system at a spray dryer/electrostatic precipitator equipped waste-to-energy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honeycheck, T.S.; Gesell, G. [American Ref-Fuel Co., Houston, TX (United States); Armellino, K.E. [American Ref-Fuel Co., Uniondale, NY (United States); Kozlowski, J. [American Ref-Fuel Co. of Essex County, Newark, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-01

    American Ref-Fuel Company of Essex County obtained an air permit to construct the Essex County Resource Recovery Facility (ECRRF), a municipal solid waste resource recovery facility, in December 1985 from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). Permit condition A.9.a. states that the emission rate of mercury from each unit shall not exceed 0.053 pounds per hour, based on the average value of three runs using EPA Method 101A. Testing for mercury was required to be performed on a quarterly basis during the facility`s first year of operation. This emission requirement was met by the spray dryer adsorber (SDA)/electrostatic precipitator (ESP) equipped facility. Subsequently, the NJDEP chartered a task force to investigate the setting of a new statewide mercury emission standard for municipal solid waste (MSW) combustors. The task force in July of 1993 recommended a more stringent two phase emission standard requiring all facilities to achieve 65 {mu}g/dscm at 7% oxygen dry volume or 80 % reduction by January, 1996, and to achieve 28 {mu}g/dscm at 7% oxygen dry volume or 80% reduction by January 1, 2000. These recommendations and a requirement for installing a mercury control system were codified into a regulation in November 22, 1994. In order to comply with the new regulation the facility proceeded with a retrofit mercury control system.

  19. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Evaporation and their Relations with Precipitation, Net Radiation, and Net Carbon Accumulation for the Gediz Basin Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1999-01-01

    A model combining the rate of carbon assimilation with water and energy balance equations has been run using satellite and ancillary data for a period of 60 months (January 1986 to December 1990). Calculations for the Gediz basin area give mean annual evaporation as 395 mm, which is composed of 45% transpiration, 42% soil evaporation and 13% interception. The coefficient of interannual variation of evaporation is found to be 6%, while that for precipitation and net radiation are, respectively, 16% and 2%, illustrating that net radiation has an important effect in modulating interannual variation of evaporation. The mean annual water use efficiency (i.e., the ratio of net carbon accumulation and total evaporation) is ca. 1 g/sq m/mm, and has a coefficient of interannual variation of 5%. A comparison of the mean water use efficiency with field observations suggests that evaporation over the area is utilized well for biomass production. The reference crop evaporation for irrigated areas has annual mean and coefficient of variation as, respectively, 1176 mm and 3%. The total evaporation during three summer months of peak evaporation (June-August) is estimated to be about 575 mm for irrigated crops like maize and cotton. Seasonal variations of the fluxes are presented.

  20. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COPPER CARBONATE NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Hepzi Pramila Devamani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Copper carbonate nanoparticles were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method from copper sulphate and sodium carbonate. The formed nanoparticle is characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ultra-violet spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, confirmed the preferential growth of copper carbonate nanoparticles that width is 90.55nm. The SEM image shows the synthesized copper carbonate show well crystallized particles with spherical morphology. The FTIR spectrum is used to study the stretching and bending frequencies of molecular functional groups in the sample. From UV spectrum, the band gap of copper carbonate nanoparticles is found to be 3.4eV.

  1. Crystallization of a chemical conversion layer that forms on AZ91D magnesium alloy in carbonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → An amorphous precursor layer formed on Mg-Al-Zn alloy in carbonic acid. → The amorphous layer has high Al3+ concentration. → Leaching Al3+ out of precursor layer was the first step of crystallization. → Al3+ leaching only occurred in a strongly alkaline solution. → The formula of crystalline conversion coating is Mg4.38Zn0.22Al2(OH)13.192CO3.mH2O. - Abstract: This investigation studied the crystallization of a chemical conversion layer that formed on AZ91D Mg alloy in carbonic acid. The layer was an amorphous precursor to a crystalline Mg-Al layered double hydrotalcite, which improved the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The precursor must be treated with a strongly alkaline solution, causing the leaching out of amphoteric Al3+. The leaching step evidently caused crystallization from an amorphous precursor layer to a crystalline coating. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated that Al3+, which was originally randomly coordinated with surrounding OH- in the precursor, coordinated octahedrally with OH- groups in the crystalline conversion coating.

  2. Mesoporous MEL, BEA, and FAU zeolite crystals obtained by in situ formation of carbon template over metal nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Ali, Zahra Nasrudin; Mentzel, Uffe Vie;

    2016-01-01

    nanoparticles supported on silica, a carbon–silica composite is obtained and exploited as a combined carbon template/silica source for the zeolite synthesis. The mesoporous zeolite materials were all prepared by hydrothermal crystallization in alkaline media followed by removal of the carbon template by...

  3. Role of pH controlled DNA secondary structures in the reversible dispersion/precipitation and separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Basudeb; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-03-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers (dA20, d[(C3TA2)3C3] or dT20) are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water at pH 7 through non-covalent wrapping on the nanotube surface. At lower pH, an alteration of the DNA secondary structure leads to precipitation of the SWNTs from the dispersion. The structural change of dA20 takes place from the single-stranded to the A-motif form at pH 3.5 while in case of d[(C3TA2)3C3] the change occurs from the single-stranded to the i-motif form at pH 5. Due to this structural change, the DNA is no longer able to bind the nanotube and hence the SWNT precipitates from its well-dispersed state. However, this could be reversed on restoring the pH to 7, where the DNA again relaxes in the single-stranded form. In this way the dispersion and precipitation process could be repeated over and over again. Variable temperature UV-Vis-NIR and CD spectroscopy studies showed that the DNA-SWNT complexes were thermally stable even at ~90 °C at pH 7. Broadband NIR laser (1064 nm) irradiation also demonstrated the stability of the DNA-SWNT complex against local heating introduced through excitation of the carbon nanotubes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed the formation of a stable DNA-SWNT complex at pH 7 and also the generation of DNA secondary structures (A/i-motif) upon acidification. The interactions of ss-DNA with SWNTs cause debundling of the nanotubes from its assembly. Selective affinity of the semiconducting SWNTs towards DNA than the metallic ones enables separation of the two as evident from spectroscopic as well as electrical conductivity studies.Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers (dA20, d[(C3TA2)3C3] or dT20) are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water at pH 7 through non-covalent wrapping on the nanotube surface. At lower pH, an alteration of the DNA secondary structure leads to precipitation of the SWNTs from the dispersion. The structural change of dA20 takes place

  4. ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY, CRYSTALLIZATION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYPROPYLENE/MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE/CALCIUM CARBONATE COMPOSITES PREPARED BY MELT MIXING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-da Bao; Zhao-xia Guo; Jian Yu

    2009-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/calcium carbonate (CaCO3) composites are prepared by melt mixing using two types of CaCO3 of different sizes. The electrical resistivities of the composites with the two types of CaCO3 are all lower than those of the corresponding PP/MWCNT composites at various MWCNT loadings (1 wt%-5 wt%). The morphology of the composites is investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The crystallization behavior of PP in the composites is characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The storage modulus, as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), increases significantly by the presence of CaCO3.

  5. Effect of carbon and aging treatment on precipitation of ordered α2 in Ti-5.6Al-4.8Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.35Si-0.7Nd alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of carbon and heat treatment on microstructural stability of a near-α titanium alloy Ti-5.6Al-4.8Sn-2Zr-1Mo-0.35Si-0.7Nd during high-temperature exposure was investigated. Aging leads to the precipitation of α2 phase from α after both β- and (α + β)-solution treatment. The α2 precipitates are uniformly distributed throughout the α matrix for alloys aged at 700 deg. C and 750 deg. C, but the precipitation is heterogeneous, preferring dislocations or other substructures during aging at 800 deg. C. Carbon has little effect on α2 precipitation for fully lamellar microstructure because there is no partitioning of alloying elements. For bimodal microstructure with ∼15% primary α (αp), however, increasing carbon addition reduces α2 particle size and increases interparticle spacing in αp after exposure at 700-800 deg. C for 168 h, reducing and delaying α2-related embrittlement. This effect is attributed to carbon decreasing the Al concentration of the αp and increasing the partitioning of Al and Mo to the transformed β

  6. One-dimensional SnF2 single crystals in the inner channels of single-wall carbon nanotubes: I. Preparation and basic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One-dimensional (1D) SnF2 single crystals have been obtained by crystallization from melt in the inner channels of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). SWCNTs with an inner diameter of 1.02-1.4 nm, synthesized by electric-arc discharge and chemically purified, were used for incorporation. The synthesized 1D SnF2 single crystal-SWCNT composites are basically characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive analysis, electron microscopy, and chemical analysis. The characteristic motifs of tin cation distribution in the SWCNT inner channel confirm the formation of SnF2 single crystals.

  7. Growth of single-crystal α-MnO2 nanorods on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-crystal α-MnO2 nanorods were grown on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in H2SO4 aqueous solution. The morphology and microstructure of the composites were examined by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffractometry and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that α-MnO2 single-crystal nanorods with a mean diameter of 15 nm were densely grown on the surface of MWNTs. Those MWNTs/MnO2 composites were used as an electrode material for supercapacitors, and it was found that the supercapacitor performance using MWNTs/MnO2 composites was improved largely compared to that using pure MWNTs and α-MnO2 nanorod mechanically mixed with MWNTs

  8. Interactions of carbon nanotubes in a nematic liquid crystal. II. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Hakam; Galerne, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) colloids with different anchoring conditions are dispersed in pentyl-cyanobiphenyl (5CB), a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) that exhibits a room-temperature nematic phase. The experiments make use of CNTs treated for strong planar, homeotropic, or Janus anchorings. Observations with a polarizing microscope show that the CNTs placed in a uniform nematic field stabilize parallel or perpendicular to n depending on their anchoring conditions. In the presence of a splay-bend disclination line, they are first attracted toward it and ultimately, they get trapped on it. Their orientation relative to the line is then found to be parallel or perpendicular to it, again depending on the anchoring conditions. When a sufficient number of particles are deposited on a disclination line, they form a micro- or nanonecklace in the shape of a thin thread or of a bottle brush, with the CNTs being oriented parallel or perpendicular to the disclination line according to the anchoring treatment. The system exhibits a rich versatility, even if until now the weak anchorings appear to be difficult to control. In a next step, the necklaces may be glued by means of pyrrole electropolymerization. In this manner, we realize a true materialization of the disclination lines, and we obtain nanowires capable of conducting the electricity in the place of the initial disclinations that just worked as templates. The advantage of the method is that it finally provides nanowires that are automatically connected to predesignated three-dimensional (3D) electrodes. Such a 3D nanowiring could have important applications, as it could allow one to develop electronic circuits in the third dimension. They could thus help with increasing the transistor density per surface unit, although downsizing of integrated circuits will soon be limited to atomic sizes or so. In other words, the predicted limitation to Moore's law could be avoided. For the moment, the nanowires that we obtain

  9. ROE Precipitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This polygon dataset represents the rate of change in precipitation across the United States in terms of percent change per century. The map shows National Oceanic...

  10. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering; Tensile Strength and Strain-Induced Crystallization in Carbon Black Filled Natural Rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tensile strength of rubber depends on a combination of contributions, in particular on the finite extensibility of chain segments between network points and on strain-induced crystallization. In order to achieve high tensile strength at high strain at break, we optimized the composition and processing parameters to gain high molecular flexibility by the cure conditions, to acquire high flexibility of sulfur bridges by the accelerator, and to increase the modulus level without losing rubber molecule flexibility by carbon black. As a result, our formula performed a tensile strength of 42.5 MPa at 25 C under ISO-37, as officially measured by the Society of Rubber Industry, Japan, in 2004.

  11. Recovery of N and P from human urine by freezing, struvite precipitation and adsorption to zeolite and active carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganrot, Zsófia; Dave, Göran; Nilsson, Eva

    2007-11-01

    The majority of the nutrients in domestic waste originate from human urine. This study deals with methods for recovery of N and P from urine. Results from a freezing-thawing method (FTM) together with struvite recovery and nitrogen adsorption on zeolite and active carbon (AC) are presented. Various amounts of MgO, zeolite and AC were added to samples of 100ml urine. After 3 days the supernatants were analysed for pH, total-N, total-P and acute toxicity for Daphnia magna. One set of samples was frozen and then thawed and the supernatants collected were tested as before. The FTM method concentrated 60% of the nutrients in 40% of the initial volume and significantly improved the N reduction and D. magna survival. The P recovery was 95-100%, mainly as struvite. No significant effect of AC was found. Zeolite improved the P recovery and in some combinations of MgO also the N recovery. PMID:17321132

  12. Probing local pH-based precipitation processes in self-assembled silica-carbonate hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Julian; Hecht, Mandy; Rurack, Knut; Eiblmeier, Josef; Kunz, Werner; Cölfen, Helmut; Kellermeier, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Crystallisation of barium carbonate in the presence of silica can lead to the spontaneous assembly of highly complex superstructures, consisting of uniform and largely co-oriented BaCO3 nanocrystals that are interspersed by a matrix of amorphous silica. The formation of these biomimetic architectures (so-called silica biomorphs) is thought to be driven by a dynamic interplay between the components, in which subtle changes of conditions trigger ordered mineralisation at the nanoscale. In particular, it has been proposed that local pH gradients at growing fronts play a crucial role in the process of morphogenesis. In the present work, we have used a special pH-sensitive fluorescent dye to directly trace these presumed local fluctuations by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our data demonstrate the existence of an active region near the growth front, where the pH is locally decreased with respect to the alkaline bulk solution on a length scale of few microns. This observation provides fundamental and, for the first time, direct experimental support for the current picture of the mechanism underlying the formation of these peculiar materials. On the other hand, the absence of any temporal oscillations in the local pH - another key feature of the envisaged mechanism - challenges the notion of autocatalytic phenomena in such systems and raises new questions about the actual role of silica as an additive in the crystallisation process. PMID:26439927

  13. Ultralow mode-volume photonic crystal nanobeam cavities for high-efficiency coupling to individual carbon nanotube emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Ohta, R.; Ishii, A.; Liu, X.; Shimada, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-11-01

    The unique emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive for achieving increased functionality in integrated photonics. In addition to being room-temperature telecom-band emitters that can be directly grown on silicon, they are ideal for coupling to nanoscale photonic structures. Here we report on high-efficiency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters.

  14. Unexpected carbon-oxygen bond cleavage of THF promoted by guanidinate titanium complex/lithium diisopropylamide: Synthesis and crystal structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; WANG Mei; YAO Yingming; SHEN Qi

    2005-01-01

    An unexpected carbon-oxygen bond cleavage of THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran) promoted by guanidinate titanium complex was described. Guanidinate lithium [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]Li (Cy = cyclohexyl) formed in situ reacted with TiCl4(THF)2 in a 2:1 molar ratio to produce the guanidinate titanium chloride [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2TiCl2 (1) in good yield. The reaction of [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2TiCl2 with lithium diisopropylamide in THF afforded an unexpected [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2Ti(OBun)2 (2), which was formed by the cleavage of carbon-oxygen bond of THF. Complexes 1 and 2 were fully characterized by elemental analysis, NMR and IR spectroscopies, and X-ray crystal structure determination for complex 2.

  15. Probing local pH-based precipitation processes in self-assembled silica-carbonate hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Julian; Hecht, Mandy; Rurack, Knut; Eiblmeier, Josef; Kunz, Werner; Cölfen, Helmut; Kellermeier, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Crystallisation of barium carbonate in the presence of silica can lead to the spontaneous assembly of highly complex superstructures, consisting of uniform and largely co-oriented BaCO3 nanocrystals that are interspersed by a matrix of amorphous silica. The formation of these biomimetic architectures (so-called silica biomorphs) is thought to be driven by a dynamic interplay between the components, in which subtle changes of conditions trigger ordered mineralisation at the nanoscale. In particular, it has been proposed that local pH gradients at growing fronts play a crucial role in the process of morphogenesis. In the present work, we have used a special pH-sensitive fluorescent dye to directly trace these presumed local fluctuations by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our data demonstrate the existence of an active region near the growth front, where the pH is locally decreased with respect to the alkaline bulk solution on a length scale of few microns. This observation provides fundamental and, for the first time, direct experimental support for the current picture of the mechanism underlying the formation of these peculiar materials. On the other hand, the absence of any temporal oscillations in the local pH - another key feature of the envisaged mechanism - challenges the notion of autocatalytic phenomena in such systems and raises new questions about the actual role of silica as an additive in the crystallisation process.Crystallisation of barium carbonate in the presence of silica can lead to the spontaneous assembly of highly complex superstructures, consisting of uniform and largely co-oriented BaCO3 nanocrystals that are interspersed by a matrix of amorphous silica. The formation of these biomimetic architectures (so-called silica biomorphs) is thought to be driven by a dynamic interplay between the components, in which subtle changes of conditions trigger ordered mineralisation at the nanoscale. In particular, it has been proposed that local

  16. The effect of crystallization pressure on macromolecular structure, phase evolution, and fracture resistance of nano-calcium carbonate-reinforced high density polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe here phase evolution and structural changes that are induced when high density polyethylene (HDPE) containing dispersion of nano-calcium carbonate is isothermally crystallized in the pressure range of 0.1-100 MPa. To delineate and separate the effects of applied crystallization pressure from nanoparticle effects, a relative comparison is made between neat HDPE and HDPE containing nano-calcium carbonate under similar experimental conditions. X-ray diffraction studies point toward the evolution of monoclinic phase at high crystallization pressure together with the commonly observed orthorhombic phase of HDPE. Furthermore, the nucleation of monoclinic phase is promoted by nanoparticles even at low crystallization pressure. The equilibrium melting point is insignificantly influenced on the addition of nanoparticle, such that the crystallization pressure has no obvious effect. The strong thermodynamic interaction between nano-calcium carbonate and HDPE is supported by the shift in glass transition temperature and changes in the modification of absorption bands of HDPE in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum. Furthermore, the reinforcement of HDPE with nano-calcium carbonate increases impact strength and alters the micromechanism from crazing-tearing in polyethylene to fibrillated fracture in polymer nanocomposite, such that the fibrillation increases with crystallization pressure.

  17. High hydrogen loading of thin palladium wires through alkaline earth carbonates' precipitation on the cathodic surface - evidence of a new phase in the Pd-H system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new protocol for the electrolytic loading of hydrogen (H) in thin palladium (Pd) wires has been developed. In order to increase the cathodic overvoltage, which is known to be the main parameter capable to enhance the electrolytic H loading of Pd, the catalytic action of the Pd surface versus H-H recombination has been strongly reduced by precipitation of a thin layer of alkaline-earth carbonates on the cathode. A set of electrolytes has been employed, containing small amounts of hydrochloric or sulfuric acid and strontium or calcium ions. The H loading has been continuously evaluated through ac measurements of the Pd wire resistance. Uncommonly low resistivity values, leading to an estimate of exceptionally high H loading, have been observed. Evidence of the existence of a new phase in the very high H content region of the Pd-H system has been inferred on the basis of the determination of the temperature coefficient of the electrical resistivity. Mainly for this purpose a thin layer of Hg was galvanically deposed on the cathodic surface, in order to prevent any H deloading during the measurements. The results have been fully reproduced in other 2 well equipped and experienced Laboratories (Italy, USA)

  18. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose ori gins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated: that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  19. Effects of Tx-100-SDS on crystal growth of calcium carbonate in reverse microemulsion solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yu; DU BiYing; LI LinGang; YANG Jun; ZHANG YuanMing

    2007-01-01

    Syntheses of CaCO3 crystals in reverse microemulsion solutions containing 1-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)-4-hydroxypolyethoxybenzene (Tx-100), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and their equimolar mixture were carried out at room temperature respectively. The crystal phase of CaCO3 is changed from calcite at low concentrations to vaterite at high concentrations of SDS and Tx-100. From rods at low concentration to olivary spheres at high concentration, SDS can influence the morphology of CaCO3 significantly, while almost no such effect for Tx-100. Hollow spheres, olivary spheres and even two fused olivary spheres of CaCO3 were produced at different concentrations of Tx-100-SDS, and the variation of crystal phase is opposite to that in the presence of SDS or Tx-100 alone. The effects of interaction of SDS with Tx-100 on morphology and crystal phase of CaCO3 were discussed. It was estimated to put forward that the formation of hollow CaCO3 crystals was caused by the collaborating actions of SDS template and TX-100 inhibition.

  20. Crystallization of modified hydroxyapatite on titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Izmailov, R. R.; Ghyngazov, S. A.; Zaits, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Carbonated-hydroxyapatite (CHA) and Si-hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) precipitation have been synthesized from the model bioliquid solutions (synovial fluid and SBF). It is found that all the samples synthesized from the model solutions are single-phase and represent hydroxyapatite. The crystallization of the modified hydroxyapatite on alloys of different composition, roughness and subjected to different treatment techniques was investigated. Irradiation of the titanium substrates with the deposited biomimetic coating can facilitate further growth of the crystal and regeneration of the surface.

  1. A Study of the Optical Properties of Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arienti, Marco [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Yang, Xiaoyuan [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kopacz, Adrian M [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Geier, Manfred [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The report focu ses on the modification of the optical properties of ice crystals due to atmospheric black car bon (BC) contamination : the objective is to advance the predictive capabilities of climate models through an improved understanding of the radiative properties of compound particles . The shape of the ice crystal (as commonly found in cirrus clouds and cont rails) , the volume fraction of the BC inclusion , and its location inside the crystal are the three factors examined in this study. In the multiscale description of this problem, where a small absorbing inclusion modifies the optical properties of a much la rger non - absorbing particle, state - of - the - art discretization techniques are combined to provide the best compromise of flexibility and accuracy over a broad range of sizes .

  2. Control of calcium carbonate crystallization by using anionic polymethylsiloxanes as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfonated (SO3H-PMS) and carboxylated (CO2H-PMS) polymethylsiloxanes were synthesized and their effects as anionic template modifier on the CaCO3 crystal morphologies were evaluated. In vitro crystallization assays of CaCO3 were performed at room temperature by using gas diffusion method at different concentration, pH and time. SEM images of CaCO3 showed well-defined short calcite piles (ca. 5 μm) and elongated calcite (ca. 20 μm) when SO3H-PMS was used. When CO2H-PMS was used, the morphology of CaCO3 crystals was single-truncated at pH 7–9 and aggregated-modified calcite at pH 10–11. However, at pH 12 the least stable donut-shaped vaterite crystals were formed. EDS and XRD confirmed the presence of Si from anionic PMS templates on the CaCO3 surfaces and its polymorphism, respectively. Results showed that the selective morphologies of CaCO3 reflect the electrostatic interaction of anionic groups of functionalized PMS with Ca2+ adsorbed on CaCO3 crystals. Rounded and truncated-modified fluorescent CaCO3 was also produced by the inclusion of functionalized PMS into the lattice of CaCO3 matrix. We demonstrated that the anionic PMS offer a good modifier for polymer-controlled crystallization and a convenient approach for understanding the biomineralization field. - Graphical abstract: Optical photographs of rounded and truncated-modified fluorescent CaCO3 produced by the inclusion of sulfonated (SO3H-PMS) polymethylsiloxanes into the lattice of CaCO3 matrix. Insert represents the simulation of modified and fluorescent CaCO3 crystals using Software JCrystal, (2008). Highlights: ► We prepared two anionic polymethylsiloxanes (PMS) as templates. ► Their modifier capacity on the CaCO3 crystal morphologies was demonstrated. ► At pH 12, the least stable donut-shaped vaterite, was formed. ► EDS confirmed the presence of Si from anionic PMS templates on the CaCO3 surfaces. ► Fluorescent CaCO3 was produced by the inclusion of PMS into the CaCO3 matrix.

  3. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  4. Crystal structure of diamondlike carbon films prepared by ionized deposition from methane gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamondlike carbon films have been prepared by ionized deposition from methane gas. The film structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis techniques. It was found that the structure of the carbon films could be classified into three types: (i) amorphous, (ii) graphite, and (iii) cubic. These types depended mainly on the deposition conditions. Usually crystalline carbon films were diamond mixed with graphite showing an average grain size of several hundred angstroms. Very hard films were composed of diamond crystallites distributed in amorphous matrix

  5. Mathematical model for Nb(C,N) precipitation kinetics in austenite controlled both by chemical and interfacial energy; Kaimen energy wo koryoshita {gamma} sochu deno Nb tanchikkabutsu no sekishutsu kyodo no teishikika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, R.; Suehiro, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    A wide range of material characteristics can be obtained from steel materials by adjusting added elements and giving heat treatment. This is attributable to the fact that phase transformation, precipitation and re-crystallization of metallic structures can be combined and varied differently. Utilization of the precipitation phenomena may include strengthening of precipitation by using precipitates, structural control such as re-crystallization control by using precipitates, and making C, N and S harmless by forming them as precipitates. Individual precipitate grain sizes and effects of particle growth were incorporated into local equilibrium calculation using the model of Akamatsu et al for an attempt of structuring a model to estimate precipitation behavior from the beginning to the end by performing the calculation on each particle. Good reproduction was achieved on difference in precipitation behaviors of Nb (C, N) between a very low carbon component system and an HSLA component system having equal over-saturation degree as proved by experiments performed by Akamatsu et al. It has become possible to calculate precipitation behaviors of the precipitates all the way from the nucleation and growth process to the Ostwald growth process. It was also possible to evaluate grain size distribution of the precipitates, and present a characteristic grain size distribution provided by difference in driving force. Versatility and expandability of the model were increased by using the Thermo-Calc. 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in a flowing system: Influence of Cu2+ additives on induction time and crystalline phase transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmany, Y.; Putranto, W. A.; Bayuseno, A. P.; Muryanto, S.

    2016-04-01

    Scaling of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is commonly found in piping systems in oil, gas, desalination and other chemical processes. The scale may create technical problems, leading to the reduction of heat transfer, increase of energy consumption and unscheduled equipment shutdown. This paper presents crystallization scaling experiments and evaluation of the effect of Cu2+ additives on the induction time and calcium carbonate transformation. The crystals precursors were prepared using equimolar of CaCl2 and Na2CO3 resulted in concentrations of 3000 ppm Ca2+ in the solution. The Cu2+ in amounts of 0, 1 and 10 ppm was separately added in the solution. The flow rates (20, 35, and 60 mL/min) and elevated temperatures (27, 35 and 45°C) were selected in the study. The induction time for crystallization of CaCO3 was observed by measuring the solution conductivity over time, while the phase transformation of calcium carbonate was examined by XRD method and SEM/EDX. It was found that the conductivity remained steady for a certain period reflecting to the induction time of crystal formation, and then decreased sharply afterwards,. The induction time was increased from 34 and 48 minutes in the presence of Cu additives (1 and 10 ppm), depending on the flow rates and temperature observed. In all the experiments, the Cu2+ addition leads to the reduction of mass of crystals. Apparently, the presence of Cu2+ could inhibit the CaCO3 crystallization. In the absence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals obtained were a mixture of vaterite and calcite. In the presence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals formed were aragonite and calcite. Here, the presence of Cu2+ additives might have controlled the crystal transformation of CaCO3.

  7. Precipitation Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  8. Carbon exchange variability over Amazon Basin using coupledhydrometeorological-mixed layer PBL-carbon dioxide assimilation modeling system forced by satellite-derived surface radiation and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    A hydrometeorological model is modified to include a simple slab model of the mixed layer for the estimation of CO2 fluxes in Amazonia. Three carbon assimilation models are examined for use in the FSU hydromet model, of which the NCAR LSM module is chosen because respiration rates are provided and CO2, latent and sensible heat fluxes are coupled through stomatal resistance. Initial calculations of NEP show a necessity for modeling canopy-boundary layer interactions to reproduce observed morning effluxes at forest tower sites at Manaus and Jaru. CO2 concentrations in five layers in and above the canopy are modeled with associated fluxes. Sensible heat fluxes are consistently overestimated until canopy heat capacity is taken into account. Estimations of canopy heat storage are found using observed differences between net incoming radiation and latent and sensible heat fluxes, or observed total residual energy. Calibration of fluxes at three tower sites is conducted using modeled total residual energy at the forest sites and modified photosynthesis parameters at the pasture site. The forcing parameters of downwelling solar radiation (K ↓) and temperature are found to exert the most influence over modeled CO2 fluxes at the tower sites. Model application over the basin shows that while vegetation type is the primary factor controlling CO2 fluxes area-wide, K ↓ is the primary forcing variable that produces spatial and temporal variability of CO2 fluxes. Modeled CO2 fluxes show mean monthly uptake values in the range of 1-3 mumol m-2 s-1 and diurnal progressions of large coherent areas of CO2 effluxes over the forest, progressing from SE to NW in December, and from NE to SW in June. Inspection of area-wide modeled fluxes near tower sites shows that the use of ECMWF winds and temperatures creates a spurious nocturnal stability that produces much larger morning efflux magnitudes than observations suggest. Comparison of CO2 fluxes at nearly 20,000 forest points within

  9. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon

  10. Growth of crystals of several boron-carbon compositions by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevill, D. N.; Rissmann, T. J.; Brewe, D.; Wood, C.

    1986-01-01

    Boron-carbon compounds have been deposited by the flow of carbon tetrachloride and boron trichloride, in the presence of a large excess of hydrogen, over a graphite surface maintained at 1000-1300 C. Deposits were formed on either an RF-heated disc or a tube or insert heated by a resistance furnace. Crystalline materials ranging in composition from B2C to B17C have been obtained.

  11. Space-Selective Precipitation of Ba2TiSi2O8 Crystals in Sm3+-Doped BaO-TiO2-SiO2 Glass by Femtosecond Laser Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Bin; DAI Ye; MA Hong-Liang; LIN Geng; QIU Jian-Rong

    2008-01-01

    The ferroelectric crystal Ba2TiSi2O8 with high second-order optical nonlinearity is precipitated in Sm3+-doped BaO-TiO2-SiO2 glass by a focused 800 nm,250 kHz and 150 fs femtosecond laser irradiation.No apparent blue and red emissions are observed at the beginning,while strong blue emission due to second harmonic generation and red emission due to the f-f transitions of Sm3+ are observed near the focal point of the laser beam after irradiation for 25 s. Micro-Raman spectra confirm that Ba2TiSi2O8 crystalline dots and lines are formed after laser irradiation.The mechanism of the phenomenon is discussed.

  12. Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically activated mixtures of barium carbonate and goethite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Temuujin; M Aoyama; M Senna; T Masuko; C Ando; H Kishi; A Minjigmaa

    2006-10-01

    -type hexagonal ferrite precursor was prepared by a soft mechanochemical treatment of BaCO3 and -FeOOH mixtures. The effect of milling on its structure and thermal behaviour was examined by XRD, SEM and FTIR. Well crystallized -type hexagonal ferrite was formed from just 1 h milled precursors at 800°C. The beneficial effect of milling was explained in terms of increased homogeneity with simultaneous hetero bridging bond formation between powder constituents.

  13. Production of biodiesel fuel from canola oil with dimethyl carbonate using an active sodium methoxide catalyst prepared by crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Takami; Mak, Goon Lum; Wada, Shohei; Nakazato, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Uemura, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel method for the production of biodiesel under mild conditions using fine particles of sodium methoxide formed in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is proposed. Biodiesel is generally produced from vegetable oils by the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. However, this reaction produces glycerol as a byproduct, and raw materials are not effectively utilized. Transesterification with DMC has recently been studied because glycerol is not formed in the process. Although solid-state sodium methoxide has been reported to be inactive for this reaction, the catalytic activity dramatically increased with the preparation of fine catalyst powders by crystallization. The transesterification of canola oil with DMC was studied using this catalyst for the preparation of biodiesel. A conversion greater than 96% was obtained at 65°C for 2h with a 3:1M ratio of DMC and oil and 2.0 wt% catalyst. PMID:24813567

  14. Method of precipitating uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium dissolved as uranyl tricarbonate ion in an aqueous alkaline solution is precipitated out as uranium peroxide. The precipitation is carried out by acidifying a portion of the aqueous alkaline solution with excess sulfuric acid to convert the uranyl tricarbonate ion to the uranyl ion and carbon dioxide. This is followed by the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the acidified solution to convert the uranyl ion to uranium peroxide precipitate, producing additional acid. Concurrently, a different portion of the aqueous alkaline uranyl tricarbonate solution is added to the precipitating solution to elevate the pH to an acidic range which is optimum for effective reaction to uranium peroxide and for its precipitation

  15. Struvite precipitation as a technology to be integrated in a manure anaerobic digestion treatment plant - removal efficiency, crystal characterization and agricultural assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Cerrillo Moreno, Miriam; Palatsi Civit, Jordi; Comas Angelet, Jordi; Bonmatí Blasi, August

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDThe formation of struvite (MgNH4PO4 6H(2)O) from digested slurry is an opportunity to recover nutrients as a slow-release fertilizer. A series of batch and continuous experiments were conducted to assay the influence of operational parameters, total solids and organic matter content on the quality and size of struvite crystals formed. Finally, the agronomic bioavailability of struvite was assessed in a greenhouse experiment.; RESULTSIn terms of process conditions an optimum pH of 9 ...

  16. Remarkable crystallization morphologies of poly(4-vinylpyridine on single-walled carbon nanotubes in CO2-expanded liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(4-vinylpyridine (P4VP is a widely studied polymer for applications in catalysis, humidity sensitive and antimicrobial materials due to its pyridine group exhibiting coordinative reactivity with transition metals. In this work, the non-covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with P4VP in CO2-expanded liquids (CXLs is reported. It is found that P4VP stabilized SWCNTs show good dispersion in both organic solvent and aqueous solution (pH = 2. The ability to manipulate the dispersion state of CNTs in water with P4VP will likely benefit many biological applications, such as drug delivery and optical sensors. Furthermore, the structure and morphology of P4VP/SWCNTs composite are examined, with the focus on molecular weight of P4VP (MW-P4VP, the pressure of CXLs and the concentration of P4VP. It is amazing that the P4VP15470 wrapping patterns undergo a notable morphological evolution from dotlike crystals to bottle brush-like, then to compact kebab-like, and then to widely-spaced dotted kebab patterns by facile pressure tuning in the higher polymer concentration series. In other words, the CXLs method enables superior control of the P4VP crystallization patterns on SWCNTs. Meanwhile, the CXL-assisted P4VP crystal growth mechanism on SWCNT is investigated, and the dominating growth mechanism is attributed to ‘size dependent soft epitaxy’ in P4VP15470/SWCNTs composites. We believe these studies would r

  17. Influence of the surfactant nature on the calcium carbonate synthesis in water-in-oil emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra

    2009-02-01

    Calcium carbonate has been precipitated from water-in-oil emulsions consisting of n-hexane/nonionic surfactant (Brij 30) and its mixture with cationic (DTAB) or anionic surfactant (SDS) to which calcium chloride and sodium carbonate were added. It was found that the surfactant kind and its amount can regulate the size, form and morphology of the precipitated particles. In case of nonionic surfactant the water/surfactant ratio is the most important parameter that allows to obtain small and regular calcium carbonate crystals. Addition of the DTAB results in different morphology of particles having the same crystal form, whereas addition of SDS changes the kind of emulsion from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. Moreover, light transmittance and backscattering light measurements have been used as a method to study the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in emulsion systems.

  18. A Holocene record of endogenic iron and manganese precipitation, isotopic composition of endogenic carbonate, and vegetation history in a lake-fen complex in northwestern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Walter E.; Doner, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    percent in the LSL-B core and 15.5 percent in the LSF-10 core. Values of delta18O in mollusk (Pisidium) and ostracode shells increase by only about 20 per mil from the bottom to the top of the LSL-B core (about 12600-2200 calendar years). The remarkably constant oxygen-isotope composition throughout the Holocene suggests that environmental conditions affecting values of delta18O (temperature, salinity, composition of the water, composition of precipitation) did not change greatly. Values of delta13C in carbonate shells generally decreased by about 2 per mil from 9000 calendar years to 6000 calendar years, but they did not increase in organic carbon. This mid-Holocene increase in delta13C in shells but not in organic carbon is likely due to an increase in residence time. A late Pleistocene forest dominated by spruce was replaced in the early Holocene by a pine forest. The pine forest migrated east during the middle Holocene and was replaced by an open sagebrush-oak savanna. The western migration of forests into northwestern Minnesota is marked first by a hardwood forest and finally a pine forest.

  19. Experimental studies of the deformation of carbonated rocks by dissolution crystallization under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this research thesis reports the experimental investigation and the modelling of the deformation of poly-mineral rocks under the influence of mechanism of dissolution-crystallization under stress. This mechanism has a significant role in the compaction of sedimentary rocks, in the folding process of the earth's crust. The author notably reports the results of the experimental deformation of calcite in presence of water (calcite is present in marls in which the deposit of nuclear wastes in planned in France). The second part deals with the fact that healing is possible between two grains of similar mineralogy, and slows down or even stops deformation

  20. Encodable multiple-fluorescence CdTe@carbon nanoparticles from nanocrystal/colloidal crystal guest-host ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Wang, Cai-Feng; Mao, Li-Hua; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Zi-Yi; Chen, Su

    2013-04-01

    We report herein the controllable generation of encodable multi-fluorescence CdTe@carbon nanoparticles (CdTe@C NPs) via the pyrolysis of quantum dot/photonic crystal (QD/PC) guest-host ensembles. The precursors of CdTe/poly(styrene-co-glycidylmethacrylate) (PS-co-PGMA) QD/PC guest-host ensembles were initially formed via the assembly of epoxy groups of PCs and carboxyl groups on the surface of CdTe QDs, followed by a pyrolysis process to generate CdTe@C NPs. The as-prepared CdTe@C NPs not only integrate the optical properties for both the carbon and CdTe QD constituents, but also enable an impressive enhancement of the fluorescence lifetime for CdTe QDs. The multifarious fluorescent spectra coding for CdTe@C NPs was further generated through regulating the embedded sizes or concentrations of CdTe QDs and the excitation wavelength, and their applications in DNA detection and luminescent patterns were achieved.

  1. Crystal chemical correlations between the mid and near-infrared in carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Laurence; Rutt, Ken J.

    2016-06-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of carbonates have proved important in many disciplines including planetary exploration. Classically bands in the 4000-6000 cm- 1 (2.5-1.67 μm) region are assigned to [CO32-] internal mode combinations and overtones. However band assignments remain equivocal. This study examines three prominent bands ((ca 4505 cm- 1 (2.219 μm), 4900 cm- 1 (2.041 μm) and 5145 cm- 1 (1.944 μm)) from powdered calcite and aragonite group minerals. Results indicate that the bands originate from anharmonic coupling of degenerate internal mode(s) with external (lattice) modes. On this basis it is suggested that NIR data may provide an untapped source of detailed information on lattice mode frequencies and information on the type(s) of the environmental cation(s) in carbonate minerals.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of 1-ferrocenesulfonyl-2-1ong carbon chain alkyl benzimidazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junzhen ZHANG; Bingqin YANG; Yating YANG; Binglin ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Six new 1-ferrocenesulfonyl-2-benzimidazole derivatives were prepared by the reaction of ferrocene-sulfonyl chloride with benzimidazole derivatives in the presence of dichloromethane and n-tetrabutylammonia bromide. The yields of these six new ferrocenesulfonyl benzimidazole derivatives were about 80%. The structures characteristic were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, Elemental analysis and MS. The crystal structure of compound a2 was determined via X-ray single crystal diffraction and it belongs to monoclinic system with space group C2/c,and the unit cell parameters are a=2.8252(2)nm, b=0.97696(7)nm, c=1.64828(12)nm, a=90°, β=92.053(2)°,y = 90°, V= 4.5466(6) nm3, Z= 8, F(000) =2024, Mr=481.40, Dc=l.407g/cm3, μ=0.784mm-1,R1=0.0495, wR2=0.1517. The results show that the reactions of 2-alkylbenzimidazoles containing active hydrogen with ferrocenesulfonyl chloride gave 1-ferrocenesulfonyl-2-alkylbenzimidazoles in good yields.

  3. Carbon-based micro-ball and micro-crystal deposition using filamentary pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin plasma filaments are produced by the propagation of ionization waves from a spiked driven electrode in a quartz tube in an argon/methane gas mixture (2400 sccm/2 sccm) at atmospheric pressure. The position of the touch point of filaments on the substrate surface is controlled in our experiment by applying various suitable substrate configurations and geometries of the grounded electrode. The gas conditions at the touch point are varied from argon to ambient air. Based on microphotography and discharge current waveforms, the duration of the filament touching the substrate is estimated to be about one microsecond. Carbon-based materials are deposited during this time at the touch points on the substrate surface. Micro-balls are produced if the filament touch points are saved from ambient air by the argon flow. Under an air admixture, micro-crystals are formed. The dimension of both materials is approximately one micrometre (0.5–2 µm) and corresponds to about 1010–1012 carbon atoms. Neither the diffusion of neutral species nor drift of ions can be reason for the formation of such a big micro-material during this short period of filament–substrate interaction. It is possible that charged carbon-based materials are formed in the plasma channel and transported to the surface of the substrate. The mechanism of this transport and characterization of micro-materials, which are formed under different gas conditions in our experiment, will be studied in the future. (paper)

  4. A co-precipitation preparation, crystal structure and photoluminescent properties of Er5%:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boopathi, G., E-mail: psixboopathi@gmail.com; Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai - 600 005 (India); Raj, S. Gokul [Department of Physics, VEL TECH UNIVERSITY, Avadi, Chennai - 600 062 (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering Arni, Anna University Chennai, Arni - 632 317 (India)

    2015-06-24

    An inexpensive preparation method is being reported for obtaining erbium doped gadolinium oxide (Er5%:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoscale rods. The elongated nanoscale systems, as-formed through a co-precipitation process, are characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) mapping, Ultra Violet-visible (UV-vis.) absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. In addition, the Williamson–Hall (W–H) plot is also performed to distinguish the effect of crystalline size-induced broadening and strain-induced broadening at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the XRD profile. The XRD patterns of as-formed and calcined products show that the phase confirmation. As revealed from the SEM micrographs, the morphology of the products show that the rod-like nanoparticles. The EDX micrographs show that the presence of elements in our samples. The band gap values in calcined samples are found to be in the range of 3.569 eV. Upon 230 nm excitation on calcined samples, three broad emission peaks are observed from PL studies. The possible mechanism for the formation of Er5%:Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods is briefly discussed.

  5. Phosphate recovery through struvite precipitation by CO{sub 2} removal: Effect of magnesium, phosphate and ammonium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korchef, Atef, E-mail: atef.korchef@inrst.rnrt.tn [Centre of Waters Researches and Technologies, Technopark of Borj-Cedria, CERTE, BP 273, Soliman 8020 (Tunisia); Saidou, Hassidou; Amor, Mohamed Ben [Centre of Waters Researches and Technologies, Technopark of Borj-Cedria, CERTE, BP 273, Soliman 8020 (Tunisia)

    2011-02-15

    In the present study, the precipitation of struvite (MgNH{sub 4}PO{sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O) using the CO{sub 2} degasification technique is investigated. The precipitation of struvite was done from supersaturated solutions in which precipitation was induced by the increase of the solution supersaturation concomitant with the removal of dissolved carbon dioxide. The effect of magnesium, phosphate and ammonium concentrations on the kinetics and the efficiency of struvite precipitation was measured monitoring the respective concentrations in solution. In all cases struvite precipitated exclusively and the solid was characterized by powder XRD and FTIR. The morphology of the precipitated crystals was examined by scanning electronic microscopy and it was found that it exhibited the typical prismatic pattern of the struvite crystals with sizes in the range between 100 and 300 {mu}m. The increase of magnesium concentration in the supersaturated solutions, resulted for all phosphate concentration tested, in significantly higher phosphate removal efficiency. Moreover, it is interesting to note that in this case the adhesion of the suspended struvite crystals to the reactor walls was reduced suggesting changes in the particle characteristics. The increase of phosphate concentration in the supersaturated solutions, for the magnesium concentrations tested resulted to the reduction of struvite suppression which reached complete suppression of the precipitate formation. Excess of ammonium in solution was found favour struvite precipitation. Contrary to the results found with increasing the magnesium concentration in solution, higher ammonium concentrations resulted to higher adhesion of the precipitated crystallites to the reactor walls. The results of the present work showed that it is possible to recover phosphorus in the form of struvite from wastewater reducing water pollution and at the same time saving valuable resources.

  6. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  7. Computer simulation of channelling measurements in carbon-implanted NbC-single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo-program has been used to study the channelling process in NbC-single crystals implanted with C-ions at 8300C. The dechannelling yields measured in the -direction separately for the Nb- and the C-sublattice are compared to calculated results. In the calculation two defect models (statistically displaced C-atoms and stacking faults) were applied and the characteristic parameters for these models were varied in order to reproduce the behavior of the experimental spectra. The best agreement was obtained by assuming a defect structure consisting of stacking faults with a Burger's vector of a6 [112] and a stacking fault length of 7 nm. The analyzing ion beam energy was varied in the calculation and the expected energy independence of the dechannelling yield for stacking faults was found which lies in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. (orig.)

  8. Stress from NaCl crystallization by CO2 injection in aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    OSSELIN, Florian; Fabbri, Antonin; FEN CHONG, Teddy; DANGLA, Patrick; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Lassin, Arnault

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to identify the mechanical impact of water evaporation and salt crystallisation during supercritical carbon dioxide injection (drying-out process) in aquifer rocks. The precipitation of salt and the resulting crystallisation pressure are inferred from the chemical equilibrium of the carbon dioxide-rich gas phase, the in-pore brine and the crystal. The induced rock strain and equivalent tensile stress are then estimated within the framework of isotropic linear poroela...

  9. USING CALCIUM CARBONATE WHISKERS AS PAPERMAKING FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Whiskers, having large length/diameter ratio, are fiber-shaped single crystals. The technical possibility of using calcium carbonate whiskers as papermaking filler to replace conventional powder-like calcium carbonate was investigated. The results showed that it may be feasible to use calcium carbonate whisker as papermaking filler. Compared with conventional precipitated calcium carbonate, calcium carbonate whisker had higher retention efficiency. The use of calcium carbonate whisker also favorably affected the strength properties of paper sheets. A model was proposed to suggest the mechanism for paper strength improvement. The whiskers filled in paper sheets could increase the friction between fibers, thus increasing bonding strength. Moreover, the strength properties of paper were further improved because calcium carbonate whiskers were partly embedded in pulp fiber walls.

  10. Precipitation of fluticasone propionate microparticles using supercritical antisolvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Vatanara

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: The ability of supercritical fluids (SCFs, such as carbon dioxide, to dissolve and expand or extract organic solvents and as result lower their solvation power, makes it possible the use of SCFs for the precipitation of solids from organic solutions. The process could be the injection of a solution of the substrate in an organic solvent into a vessel which is swept by a supercritical fluid. The aim of this study was to ascertain the feasibility of supercritical processing to prepare different particulate forms of fluticasone propionate (FP, and to evaluate the influence of different liquid solvents and precipitation temperatures on the morphology, size and crystal habit of particles. Method: The solution of FP in organic solvents, was precipitated by supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2 at two pressure and temperature levels. Effects of process parameters on the physicochemical characteristics of harvested microparticles were evaluated. Results: Particle formation was observed only at the lower selected pressure, whilst at the higher pressure, no precipitation of particles was occurred due to dissolution of FP in supercritical antisolvent. The micrographs of the produced particles showed different morphologies for FP obtained from different conditions. The results of thermal analysis of the resulted particles showed that changes in the processing conditions didn't influence thermal behavior of the precipitated particles. Evaluation of the effect of temperature on the size distribution of particles showed that increase in the temperature from 40 oC to 50 oC, resulted in reduction of the mean particle size from about 30 µm to about 12 μm. ‍Conclusion: From the results of this study it may be concluded that, processing of FP by supercritical antisolvent could be an approach for production of diverse forms of the drug and drastic changes in the physical characteristics of microparticles could be achieved by changing the

  11. Comparative in vitro studies on disodium EDTA effect with and without Proteus mirabilis on the crystallization of carbonate apatite and struvite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Olszynski, Marcin; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    Effect of disodium EDTA (salt of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) on the crystallization of struvite and carbonate apatite was studied. To evaluate such an effect we performed an experiment of struvite and carbonate apatite growth from artificial urine. The crystallization process was induced by Proteus mirabilis to mimic the real urinary tract infection, which usually leads to urinary stone formation. The results demonstrate that disodium EDTA exhibits the effect against P. mirabilis retarding the activity of urease - an enzyme produced by these microorganisms. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that, with and without P. mirabilis, the addition of disodium EDTA increases the induction time and decreases the growth efficiency compared to the baseline (without disodium EDTA). These results are discussed from the standpoint of speciation of complexes formed in the solution of artificial urine in the presence of disodium EDTA. The size of struvite crystals was found to decrease in the presence of disodium EDTA. However, struvite crystals are larger in the presence of bacteria while the crystal morphology and habit remain unchanged.

  12. Preparation of Nano-hexagonal Plate Mg-Al Water Talc Crystal Through Co-precipitation%纳米六角片状镁铝水滑石晶体的共沉淀法制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈利花; 梁小平

    2012-01-01

    以共沉淀法制备镁铝水滑石,主要研究了原料物质的量浓度和反应温度等参数对纳米晶的影响.采用透射电镜(TEM)、X线衍射(XRD)仪等对纳米晶进行表征.结果表明采用共沉淀法可制备出纯相六角片状结构的纳米镁铝水滑石晶体.制备工艺条件为NaOH物质的量浓度大于0.625mol/L、反应温度90℃、Na2CO3物质的量浓度为0.09mol/L时镁铝水滑石产率可达到最大值95%.%The study is set on the preparation of magnesium aluminates water talc with co-precipitation method, focusing on the influence of raw material concentration and reaction temperature parameters on nanocrystalline. The methods of scanning electron microscope (TEM), X-ray Diffract(XRD) meter and other methods were used to characterize Nanocrystalline. The results show that pure phase structure of the nana magnesium hex flake aluminum water talc crystals can be prepared with the use of co-precipitation. The best preparation conditions are: NaOH concentration over 0. 625 mol/L, reaction temperature 90 ℃ , Na2CO3 concentration of 0.09 mol/L. The yield of magnesium aluminates water talc will reach a maximumof 95%.

  13. Interactive effects of belowground organic matter input, increased precipitation and clipping on soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a temperate steppe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Ma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter (SOM inputs, increased precipitation and clipping (reducing belowground photosynthates allocation are predicted to affect soil C and N cycling in temperate grassland ecosystems. However, the interactive effects between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil C and N mineralization in temperate steppes are still poorly understood. A field manipulation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of SOM inputs, increased precipitation, clipping and their interactions on soil C and N mineralization in a temperate steppe of northeastern China from 2010 to 2011. The results showed that SOM inputs significantly increased soil C mineralization rate (CMR and net N mineralization rate (NMR. Increased precipitation-induced enhancement of soil CMR essentially ceased after the first year, stimulation of soil NMR and NNR continued into the second year. However, clipping only marginally decreased soil CMR and NMR during the two years. There were significant synergistic interactions between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil CMR and NMR, as SOM inputs (or increased precipitation showed greater effects on soil CMR and NMR under clipped plots than under unclipped plots, which could be explained by the relative shifts in soil microbial community structure because of bacterial biomass increases, and by the relative decreases in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biomass due to the reduction of belowground photosynthates allocation. These results highlight the importance of plants in mediating the responses of soil C and N mineralization to potentially increased SOM and precipitation by controlling belowground photosynthates allocation in the temperate steppe. Thus, the findings have important implications for improving prediction of C and N sequestration potential and its feedbacks to climate change in temperate steppe ecosystems.

  14. Solubilization of functionalized (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 5CB nematic liquid crystals: simulation using Flory–Huggins theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work analyzes the solubility behavior between a 4'-n-pentyl-4-cyano-biphenyl (5CB) liquid crystal and a maleic anhydride (MA)-grafted surface-modified (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-MA) using the Flory–Huggins model. The statistical thermodynamics of the Flory–Huggins mean-field theory, and its extension to modeling of macromolecular or polymer solutions, is adopted for the first time to investigate solubility as it is related to blending of liquid crystals with carbon nanotubes. This theory incorporated with Monte Carlo calculation reveals that, at room temperature, this functionalized carbon nanotube with all regular commonly seen CNT lengths can spontaneously and fully dissolve in 5CB nematogen when the grafting ratio of the MA functional group reaches 30 at. wt%. We believe that this mesoscale simulation offers a reliable and useful analytical method for 'liquid crystal soluble' carbon nanotubes, since this novel composite material can form a homogeneous nanosolution, and realize its potential in the future

  15. Modeling Carbon Sequestration over the Large-Scale Amazon Basin, Aided by Satellite Observations. Part I: Wet- and Dry-Season Surface Radiation Budget Flux and Precipitation Variability Based on GOES Retrievals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiujing; Smith, Eric A.; Cooper, Harry J.; Grose, Andrew; Liu, Guosheng; Merritt, James D.; Waterloo, Maarten J.; de Araújo, Alessandro C.; Nobre, Antonio D.; Manzi, Antonio O.; Marengo, Jose; de Oliveira, Paulo J.; von Randow, Celso; Norman, John; Silva Dias, Pedro

    2004-06-01

    In this first part of a two-part investigation, large-scale Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) analyses over the Amazônia region have been carried out for March and October of 1999 to provide detailed information on surface radiation budget (SRB) and precipitation variability. SRB fluxes and rainfall are the two foremost cloud-modulated control variables that affect land surface processes, and they require specification at space time resolutions concomitant with the changing cloud field to represent adequately the complex coupling of energy, water, and carbon budgets. These processes ultimately determine the relative variations in carbon sequestration and carbon dioxide release within a forest ecosystem. SRB and precipitation retrieval algorithms using GOES imager measurements are used to retrieve surface downward radiation and surface rain rates at high space time resolutions for large-scale carbon budget modeling applications in conjunction with the Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazônia. To validate the retrieval algorithms, instantaneous estimates of SRB fluxes and rain rates over 8 km × 8 km areas were compared with 30-min-averaged surface measurements obtained from tower sites located near Ji-Paraná and Manaus in the states of Rondônia and Amazonas, respectively. Because of large aerosol concentrations originating from biomass burning during the dry season (i.e., September and October for purposes of this analysis), an aerosol index from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer is used in the solar radiation retrieval algorithm. The validation comparisons indicate that bias errors for incoming total solar, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and infrared flux retrievals are under 4%, 6%, and 3% of the mean values, respectively. Precision errors at the analyzed space time scales are on the order of 20%, 20%, and 5%. The visible and infrared satellite measurements used for precipitation retrieval do not directly

  16. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  17. Precipitation kinetics of a continuous precipitator, with application to the precipitation of ammonium polyuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model describing the kinetics of continuous precipitation was developed which accounts for crystal nucleation, crystal growth, primary coagulation, and secondary coagulation. Population density distributions, average particle sizes, dominant particle sizes, and suspension density fractions of the crystallites, primary agglomerates, and secondary agglomerates leaving the continuous precipitator can be determined. This kinetic model was applied to the continuous precipitation of ammonium polyuranate, which consists of: (1) elementary crystals, (2) clusters or primary coagulated particles, and (3) agglomerates or secondary coagulated particles. The crystallites are thin, submicron, hexagonal platelets. The clusters had an upper size limit of about 7 μ in diameter and contained numerous small voids (less than 0.3 μm) due to the packing of the crystallites. The agglomerates had an upper size limit of about 40 μm in diameter and contained large voids (approximately 1 μm). The particle size distribution and particle structure of the ammonium polyuranate precipitate can be controlled through proper regulation of the precipitation conditions. The ratio of clusters to agglomerates can be best controlled through the uranium concentration, and the cohesiveness or internal bonding strength of the particles can be controlled with the ammonium to uranium reacting feed mole ratio. These two conditions, in conjunction with the residence time, will determine the nucleation rates, growth rates, and size distributions of the particles leaving the continuous precipitator. With proper control of these physical particle characteristics, the use of pore formers, ball-milling, and powder blending can probably be eliminated from the nuclear fuel fabrication process, substantially reducing the cost

  18. Substoichiometric precipitation of fluoride with lanthanum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The substoichiometric precipitation of fluoride with lanthanum was studied by using 18F and 140La tracers. It was found that fluoride could be precipitated substoichiometrically with lanthanum and the reaction ratio between fluoride and lanthanum was 3:1. The pH range at which fluoride can be separated subsotichiometrically with lanthanum is between 2 and 8. Barium and indium interfere in the precipitation of fluoride, but sodium, copper and manganese do not. Fluorosilicate can also be precipitated subsotichiometrically by using lanthanum as a precipitant and the reaction ratio between fluorosilicate and lanthanum was 1:2. This separation was applied for the determination of oxygen in silicon crystals. The concentration of oxygen measured in some silicon crystals was between 5 and 27 ppm and was in good agreement with those by non-destructive method and infrared spectrophotometry. (author)

  19. Asynchronous evolution of the isotopic composition and amount of precipitation in north China during the Holocene revealed by a record of compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotopes of long-chain n-alkanes from an alpine lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhiguo; Jia, Guodong; Li, Yunxia; Chen, Jianhui; Xu, Qinghai; Chen, Fahu

    2016-07-01

    Both the timing of the maximum East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) intensity in monsoonal China and the environmental significance of the Chinese stalagmite oxygen isotopic record (δ18O) have been debated. Here, we present a ca. 120-year-resolution compound-specific carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of terrestrial long-chain n-alkanes extracted from a well-dated sediment core from an alpine lake in north China. Our δ13C data, together with previously reported pollen data from a parallel core, demonstrate a humid mid-Holocene from ca. 8-5 ka BP. Assuming that the climatic humidity of north China is an indicator of the EASM intensity, then the maximum EASM intensity occurred in the mid-Holocene. Our δD data reveal a similar long-term trend to the δ18O record from nearby Lianhua Cave, indicating that the synchronous δD and δ18O records faithfully record the δD and δ18O of precipitation, respectively. The most negative δD and δ18O values occur in the early-mid Holocene, from ca. 11-5 ka BP. This contrast in the timing of isotopic variations demonstrates a complex relationship between the isotopic composition of precipitation and precipitation amount, or EASM intensity. Further comparisons indicate a possible linkage between the precipitation amount in north China and the west-east thermal gradient in the equatorial Pacific. In addition, the temperature of the moisture source area may play an important role in determining the isotopic composition of precipitation in monsoonal China.

  20. Effect of minor carbon additions on the high-temperature creep behavior of a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different amounts of carbon were added to a single-crystal nickel-based superalloy. The microstructural evolution of these alloys before and after high-temperature creep tests was investigated by employing scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Upon increasing the carbon contents, the volume fraction and diameter of the carbides increased gradually: however, the creep lives of the alloys increased slightly at first and subsequently decreased. The formation of second-phase particles, such as the nano-sized M23C6, blocky and needle-shaped μ phase, was observed in the creep samples, which was closely related to the high-temperature creep behaviors. - Highlights: • Creep behaviors of alloys with different amounts of carbon were investigated. • The creep rupture lives increased and later decreased with more carbon. • Second-phase particles were responsible for the different creep behaviors

  1. The influence of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Hu, J.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year data set from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction χc). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle) to multi-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found the following: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 50-70 % to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 90 and 110 %, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10 %), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m-2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m-2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6 % in dry conditions and between 15 and 25 % in partially wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, even though precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced the magnitude of Rnet, LE increased from ≈ 10 to over 20 W m-2 due to increased evaporation. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above-canopy mean χc during wet conditions was

  2. Detailed crystallization study of co-precipitated Y{sub 1.47} Gd{sub 1.53} Fe{sub 5} O{sub 12} and relevant magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Rogerio Arving [Instituto de Criminalistica Carlos Eboli (ICCE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ogasawara, Tsuneharu; Ogasawara, Angelica Soares [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais]. E-mail: ogasawat@metalmat.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization process of co-precipitated Y{sub 1.5}Gd{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} powder heated up to 1000 deg C at rate of 5 deg C min{sup -1} was investigated. Above 810 deg C crystalline Y{sub 1.47}Gd{sub 1.53}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} was obtained with a lattice parameter of 12.41 A and a theoretical density of 5.84 g cm{sup -3}. Dry pressed rings were sintered at 1270 and 1320 deg C, increasing the grain-size from 3.1 to 6.5 {mu}m, the theoretical density by 87.6 to 95.3% and decreasing H{sub c} from 2.9725 to 1.4005 Oe. Additionally, Hc increased when the frequency of the hysteresis graph varied from 60 Hz to 10 kHz, the curie temperature was 282.4 deg C and Ms equalled 9.25 emu g{sup -1} (0.17 kG) agreeing well with the B{sub s}-value of the hysteresis graph and literature values. (author)

  3. Mineral Carbonation Employing Ultramafic Mine Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, G.; McCutcheon, J.; Power, I. M.; Harrison, A. L.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate minerals are an important, stable carbon sink being investigated as a strategy to sequester CO2 produced by human activity. A natural playa (Atlin, BC, CAN) that has demonstrated the ability to microbially-accelerate hydromagnesite formation was used as an experimental model. Growth of microbial mats from Atlin, in a 10 m long flow-through bioreactor catalysed hydromagnesite precipitation under 'natural' conditions. To enhance mineral carbonation, chrysotile from the Clinton Creek Asbestos Mine (YT, CAN) was used as a target substrate for sulphuric acid leaching, releasing as much as 94% of the magnesium into solution via chemical weathering. This magnesium-rich 'feedstock' was used to examine the ability of the microbialites to enhance carbonate mineral precipitation using only atmospheric CO2 as the carbon source. The phototrophic consortium catalysed the precipitation of platy hydromagnesite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·4H2O] accompanied by magnesite [MgCO3], aragonite [CaCO3], and minor dypingite [Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2·5H2O]. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy indicated that cell exteriors and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) served as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation. In many cases, entire cyanobacteria filaments were entombed in magnesium carbonate coatings, which appeared to contain a framework of EPS. Cell coatings were composed of small crystals, which intuitively resulted from rapid crystal nucleation. Excess nutrient addition generated eutrophic conditions in the bioreactor, resulting in the growth of a pellicle that sealed the bioreactor contents from the atmosphere. The resulting anaerobic conditions induced fermentation and subsequent acid generation, which in turn caused a drop in pH to circumneutral values and a reduction in carbonate precipitation. Monitoring of the water chemistry conditions indicated that a high pH (> 9.4), and relatively high concentrations of magnesium (> 3000 ppm), compared with the natural

  4. Molecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John D.

    1995-02-01

    This book describes the chemical and physical structure of molecular crystals, their optical and electronic properties, and the reactions between neighboring molecules in crystals. In the second edition, the author has taken into account research that has undergone extremely rapid development since the first edition was published in 1987. For instance, he gives extensive coverage to the applications of molecular materials in high-technology devices (e.g. optical communications, laser printers, photocopiers, liquid crystal displays, solar cells, and more). There is also an entirely new chapter on the recently discovered Buckminsterfullerene carbon molecule (C60) and organic non-linear optic materials.

  5. Holocene precipitation in the subtropical Pacific inferred from the carbon isotope composition of Melaleuca quinquenervia (The Broad-leaved Paper Bark tree) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibby, John; Barr, Cameron; Henderson, Andrew; Leng, Melanie; Marshall, Jon; McGregor, Glenn

    2013-04-01

    Holocene records of the amounts of subtropical precipitation are rare, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. Yet such information is vital for a comprehensive understanding of global climate system dynamics. We present a precipitation record inferred from the δ13C composition of Melaleuca quinquenervia leaves retrieved from the Holocene sediments of Swallow Lagoon, North Stradbroke Island, in the subtropics of Australia. The modern relationship between rainfall and δ13C was quantified using a collection of monthly leaf falls between 1992 and 2003 and climate data. We then used the calibration to reconstruct precipitation variability from 7500 to 600 cal. yr BP. Dry phases at Swallow Lagoon in the early to mid Holocene are correlated with cooling in the North Atlantic Ocean (i.e. "Bond" events). This relationship breaks down after ~3500 cal. yr BP. From 3500 cal. yr BP there is increased aridity (and variability) associated with the mid- to late Holocene establishment of modern El Niño Southern Oscillation conditions. Overall, these data show linkages between precipitation in the low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere and Northern Hemisphere cooling events, with a shift to internal forcing of subtropical climate via the Pacific Ocean in the late Holocene.

  6. The formation of carbonic and silicon dioxide structured films through the decomposition of molecules on the surface of ionic crystals under the action of IR femtosecond laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanets, V. O.; Laptev, V. B.; Pigul’skii, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A.; Chekalin, S. V.; Blank, V. D.; Denisov, V. N.; Kravchuk, K. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    This study relates to the formation of carbon and silicon dioxide films that occurs as a result of the decomposition of organic and silicon-containing molecules on the surface of ionic crystals under IR femtosecond laser radiation of moderate intensity (~1011 W cm‑2) without molecular decomposition in the gas phase. We found that transparent graphite oxide films formed in the case of CO2 molecule decomposition.

  7. Chemical precipitation for controlling nitrogen loss during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li-Mei; Li, Guo-Xue; Shen, Yun-Jun; Schuchardt, Frank; Lu Peng

    2010-05-01

    Aimed at controlling the nitrogen loss during composting, the mixture of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)( 2)) and phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) (molar ratio 1:2) were utilized as additives to avoid increasing total salinity. In trial TA, the additives were put into absorption bottles connecting with a gas outlet of fermentor (ex situ method); in trial TB, the additives were directly added to the composting materials (in situ method). During the 26 day composting period, the temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N), total phosphorus (TP), available phosphorus (AP) and germination index (GI) were measured. The experimental results show that the additives reduced the pH, while NH( 4)(+)-N and TN were obviously improved. NH(4)( +)-N was 11.9 g kg(-1) and 3 g kg(- 1) in amended compost trial (TB) and unamended compost trial (TA), respectively; TN increased from 26.5 g kg(-1) to 40.3 g kg(-1) in TB and increased from 26.5 g kg( -1) to 26.8 g kg(-1) in TA. Analysis of the TOC and carbon mass revealed that absorbents accelerated the degradation of organic matter. The germination index test showed the maturity of TB (102%) was better than TA (82%) in final compost. Furthermore, TP and AP were also obviously improved. X-ray diffraction analysis of precipitation showed that the precipitation in absorption bottle of TA was newberyite (MgHPO( 4) 3H(2)O), however, the crystal in the TB compost was struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4) 6H(2)O: magnesium ammonium phosphate). These results indicated that Mg(OH)(2) and H(3)PO( 4) could reduce the ammonia emission by struvite crystallization reaction. Optimal conditions for struvite precipitation should be determined for different systems. PMID:19808738

  8. Experimental verification of segregation of carbon and precipitation of carbides due to deep cryogenic treatment for tool steel by internal friction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaohong, E-mail: uniquelsh@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Min, Na; Li, Junwan; Wu, Xiaochun; Li, Chenhui; Tang, Leilei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2013-07-15

    This work presents an internal frictional behavior of cold work tool steel subjected to different heat treatment schedules to get insight related to segregation of carbon and refinement of carbide particles due to deep cryogenic treatment. The temperature dependence of internal friction was used to describe the variation of carbon concentration in solid solution of the martensite matrix in successive tempering steps. The results indicate that the carbon atoms segregated to nearby defects forming atomic clusters producing strong interactions, including interstitial carbon atoms themselves and between the interstitial carbon atoms with time-dependent strain field of dislocations because of lattice shrinking and thermodynamic instability of martensite during the deep cryogenic treatment. The clusters act as and grow into nuclei for the formation of fine carbide particle on subsequent tempering that was verified by analyses of TEM micrographs.

  9. Experimental verification of segregation of carbon and precipitation of carbides due to deep cryogenic treatment for tool steel by internal friction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an internal frictional behavior of cold work tool steel subjected to different heat treatment schedules to get insight related to segregation of carbon and refinement of carbide particles due to deep cryogenic treatment. The temperature dependence of internal friction was used to describe the variation of carbon concentration in solid solution of the martensite matrix in successive tempering steps. The results indicate that the carbon atoms segregated to nearby defects forming atomic clusters producing strong interactions, including interstitial carbon atoms themselves and between the interstitial carbon atoms with time-dependent strain field of dislocations because of lattice shrinking and thermodynamic instability of martensite during the deep cryogenic treatment. The clusters act as and grow into nuclei for the formation of fine carbide particle on subsequent tempering that was verified by analyses of TEM micrographs

  10. The co-effect of collagen and magnesium ions on calcium carbonate biomineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of calcium carbonate biomineralization in the solution containing collagen and magnesium ions was studied in this paper. The results were characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect rules were obtained by the cooperation of collagen and magnesium ions in different concentration. The experiment results showed that in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated at low Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio, while only aragonite with regular spherical morphology was precipitated at high Mg/Ca ion concentration ratio. It indicated that collagen has a promotional effect on magnesium ions in controlling the polymorph of calcium carbonate crystal. A much wider range of calcium carbonate morphologies was observed in the presence of both collagen and magnesium ions. The experiments suggested that collagen acts in combination with magnesium ions to inhibit calcite crystal growth, while favoring the formation of aragonite crystals

  11. Final report for grant number DE-FG02-06ER64244 to the University of Idaho (RW Smith)-coupling between flow and precipitation in heterogeneous subsurface environments and effects on contaminant fate and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Beig, Mikala S. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gebrehiwet, Tsigabu [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Corriveau, Catherine E. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Redden, George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fujita, Yoshiko [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2010-06-18

    Engineered remediation strategies for inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface typically involve the introduction of at least one reactant either by direct injection or by in situ generation. The localization of reactant sources means a wide range of saturation states and ion ratios will be created as reactants are mixed: These conditions together can result in a wide range of precipitation rates, as well as impact which mineral phase precipitates. This is potentially important for the capacity of the precipitates to take up of trace metal contaminants, for their long term stability. Aragonite, for example, is able to sequester a larger amount of Sr than calcite. However, aragonite is less stable under typical groundwater conditions, and so may release sequestered Sr over time as the aragonite transforms to a more stable phase. In addition, previous experimental studies have indicated that other system constituents may influence calcium carbonate precipitation and consequently the Sr uptake potential of a system. For example, dissolved organic carbon (at levels typical of groundwaters) can suppress crystal growth. As a result, the continuous nucleation of small crystals, rather than growth of existing crystals, may be the dominant mode of precipitation. This has the potential for greater uptake of Sr because the smaller crystal sizes associated with nucleated calcite may more readily accommodate the distortion resulting from substitution of the larger Sr ion for Ca ions than can larger crystals. However, these smaller crystals may also be less stable and over the long term release Sr as a result of Ostwald ripening. To better understand the formation and composition of relevant calcium carbonate mineral phases two related series of mineral precipitation experiments were conducted. The first series of experiments, conducted using a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) operated at steady state rates of precipitation was focused on understanding the

  12. An analysis of the shape of a luminescence band induced by free electron-to-carbon atom transitions in semi-insulating undoped GaAs crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Glinchuk, K D; Prokhorovich, A V; Strilchuk, O N

    2001-01-01

    The shape of a photoluminescence (band observed due to recombination of free electrons on carbon atoms) in semi-insulating undoped GaAs crystals is analyzed at different temperatures (T=4.8 to 77 K). It is shown that at low temperatures the shape essentially differs from the theoretical one while at high temperatures is very close to it for radiative transitions of free electrons to isolated shallow acceptors. The observed difference of the experimental and theoretical shapes of the photoluminescence band is connected with the broadening of carbon-induced acceptor levels, resulting from the influence of electric fields of randomly distributed ionized acceptors and donors on isolated carbon atoms. Coincidence of the shapes is connected with a considerable in the energy of free carriers

  13. Role of crystal structure on CO2 capture by limestone derived CaO subjected to carbonation/recarbonation/calcination cycles at Ca-looping conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CO2 capture of limestone subjected to carbonation/recarbonation/calcination cycles is affected by diffusion. • A reduction of crystallinity by ball milling favors diffusion and promotes recarbonation. • Thermal annealing enhances crystallinity and hinders recarbonation. • Milling promotes friability whereas annealing enhances the resistance of particles to fragmentation. • The solid crystal structure determines the efficiency of the novel Ca-looping concept. - Abstract: Large scale pilot plants are currently demonstrating the feasibility of the Calcium-looping (CaL) technology built on the multicyclic calcination/carbonation of natural limestone for post-combustion and pre-combustion CO2 capture. Yet, limestone derived CaO exhibits a drop of conversion when subjected to multiple carbonation/calcination cycles, which lessens the efficiency of the technology. In this paper we analyze a novel CaL concept recently proposed to mitigate this drawback based on the introduction of an intermediate stage wherein carbonation is intensified at high temperature and high CO2 partial pressure. It is shown that carbonation in this stage is mainly driven by solid-state diffusion, which is determined by the solid’s crystal structure. Accordingly, a reduction of crystallinity by ball milling, which favors diffusion, serves to promote recarbonation. Conversely, thermal annealing, which enhances crystallinity, hinders recarbonation. An initial fast phase has been identified in the recarbonation stage along which the rate of carbonation is also a function of the crystal structure indicating a relevant role of surface diffusion. This is consistent with a recently proposed mechanism for nucleation of CaCO3 on the CaO surface in islands with a critical size determined by surface diffusion. A further issue analyzed has been the effects of pretreatment and cycling on the mechanical strength of the material, whose fragility hampers the CaL process efficiency

  14. Crystal growth by precipitation under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier, A.; Lefaucheux, F.; Robert, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    The importance of understanding the mechanisms associated with defect generation during growth and the influence of gravity is stressed. An experiment is described. The advantages of adapting this experiment to the FES are then discussed. A brief survey of the ground based research under way is given.

  15. Biomineralization of metal carbonates by Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianwei; Csetenyi, Laszlo; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2014-12-16

    In this research, the urease-positive fungus Neurospora crassa was investigated for the biomineralization of calcium carbonate and its potential application in metal biorecovery and/or bioremediation. After 12 d incubation at 25 °C in urea and calcium-containing medium, extensive biomineralization of fungal filaments was observed. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of crystalline precipitates on the hyphae of N. crassa showed that the main elements present in the crystals were Ca, C, and O. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the precipitates showed they were composed solely of calcite (CaCO3) and over 90% Ca could be removed from the media by the fungal biomass and associated calcite precipitation. To further investigate biologically induced metal carbonate biomineralization, CdCl2 was contacted with supernatants of N. crassa obtained after growth in urea-containing medium. XRD showed that the Cd(2+) was precipitated as pure otavite (CdCO3) with a particle size range of 55 to 870 nm, and approximately 1.5% having nanoscale dimensions. These results provide direct experimental evidence for the precipitation of metal carbonates such as calcite and otavite based on biologically induced mineralization, and suggest that urease-positive fungi may play a potential role in the synthesis of novel biominerals and in metal bioremediation or biorecovery. PMID:25423300

  16. Morphological and chemical analysis of different precipitates on mineral trioxide aggregate immersed in different fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi; Okawa, Seigo

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the ultrastructures and chemical compositions of precipitates formed on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; White ProRoot MTA) immersed in distilled water (DW) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS), based on the attribution that MTA's bioactivity and sealing ability are influenced by its interaction with the external fluid environment. After 1 and 14 days of immersion, precipitates formed on MTA disks were analyzed using wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy electron probe microanalyzer with image observation function (SEM-EPMA; EPMA1601, Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan), and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. On DW specimens, cubic-like crystals containing Ca, O, and C (17, 66, and 17 at% respectively) were produced. State analysis of calcium k(β)spectrum also revealed calcium hydroxide. On PBS specimens, acicular-spherical and lath-like crystals with Ca/P molar ratios of 1.42 and 1.58 respectively were produced. In conclusion, the precipitates formed on DW specimens were identified as calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxide primarily, whereas the precipitates on PBS specimens were inferred to be amorphous calcium phosphate. PMID:20823620

  17. Effect of carbon on the primary crystallization of low content U-Mo alloys; Influence du carbone sur la cristallisation primaire des alliages U-Mo de faibles teneurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombie, M.; Decours, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement de Metallurgie, Services de Technologie, Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees

    1966-07-01

    This report gives the results concerning the effects of carbon on the primary crystallization of uranium-molybdenum alloys. In effect, low amounts of added carbon can lead to considerable refinement of the {gamma} grain. After describing in the first part the work carried out on the laboratory and the industrial scales, the authors put forward the most likely hypotheses for explaining the results and observations made during this work. In the second part, the authors propose four methods for introducing carbon which can be applied to these alloys. (authors) [French] Ce rapport rassemble les resultats de l'etude de l'influence du carbone sur la cristallisation primaire des alliages uranium-molybdene. En effet, l'addition de carbone en faible quantite produit un affinage important du grain {gamma}. Apres avoir decrit dans une premiere partie les travaux effectues au stade de laboratoire et au stade industriel, les auteurs proposent les hypotheses les plus probables permettant d'expliquer les resultats et les remarques notes au cours de cette etude. Dans une seconde partie, les auteurs proposent quatre methodes d'introduction de carbone utilisables pour ces alliages. (auteurs)

  18. Effect of carbon content on the microstructure and creep properties of a 3rd generation single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of carbon content on the microstructure and creep properties of a 3rd generation single crystal nickel-base superalloy has been investigated by the scanning electron microscope, X-ray computed tomography and electron probe microanalyzer. With the increase of the carbon content, MC carbides evolve from octahedral to well-developed dendrite, which promotes the formation of microporosity. Moreover, the volume fraction of porosity increases in the experimental alloys after solution heat treatment. As a result, the increase in the size of MC carbides and the porosity has a detrimental effect on the low temperature and high stress creep behavior of the alloys. The specimen crept at 850 °C and 586 MPa with the carbon content of 430 ppm shows the shortest rupture life due to the largest primary creep strain. However, the creep behavior of the alloy at 1120 °C and 140 MPa gets better as the carbon content increases from 88 to 430 ppm. TCP phase is observed near the fracture surfaces of the alloys, which explores as a potential cause for the creep rupture. However, the formation of TCP phase is effectively suppressed for decreasing segregation of the alloying elements, which results in the improvement of the creep life in the alloy with 430 ppm carbon at 1120 °C and 140 MPa

  19. Influence of Substrate Mineralogy on Bacterial Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate: Implications for Stone Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carb...

  20. Self-formation of highly aligned metallic, semiconducting and single chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes assemblies via a crystal template method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Hideki; Hasegawa, Kai; Yanagi, Kazuhiro, E-mail: yanagi-kazuhiro@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Oyane, Ayako [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Naitoh, Yasuhisa [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTs were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 10{sup 5}.

  1. Self-formation of highly aligned metallic, semiconducting and single chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes assemblies via a crystal template method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTs were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 105.

  2. Graphene and carbon black nano-composite polymer absorbers for a pyro-electric solar energy harvesting device based on LiNbO3 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel scheme for solar energy harvesting based on pyroelectric effect is proposed. • An optical system focusing solar radiation onto a LiNbO3 crystal is used. • Graphene and carbon black nano-composite polymer absorbers used as coating. • This configuration increases the amplitude of temperature variation experienced. • The whole solar spectrum is involved in the energy harvesting mechanism. - Abstract: A novel scheme for solar energy harvesting based on the pyro-electric effect has been demonstrated. The proposed harvester is based on an optical system focusing solar radiation onto a ferroelectric crystal (i.e. lithium niobate). The face exposed to the heating source is coated with a nanocomposite material (i.e. carbon black and graphene particles) that greatly improves the adsorption of solar radiation. The solar energy focused onto the crystal through a simple optical system allows one to induce a thermal gradient able to generate electric charges. Experiments have been carried out indoor as well as outdoor (in Pozzuoli, Naples, Italy, on December). Results show that two configurations appear to be preferable: (a) pyro-electric element with carbon black-based coating and a Fresnel lens (surface of about 100 cm2); (b) pyro-electric element with graphene-based coating and a Fresnel lens (surface of about 600 cm2). In both experimental arrangements the maximum temperature variation reached locally onto the lithium niobate substrate is relatively high with peaks greater than 250 °C. The maximum electrical power peak is of about 90 μW and about 50 μW for (a) and (b) respectively. The results of this first investigation are encouraging for further development of more efficient harvesting devices

  3. New methods to analyse fragmentation mechanisms of precipitated silicas

    OpenAIRE

    Dumas, Timothée; Bonnefoy, Olivier; Thomas, Gérard; Nebut, Sébastien; Guy, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Precipitated silica is traditionally used as reinforcing filler in rubber applications. In pneumatic manufacture, it offers several advantages compared to carbon black. Indeed, in tyres treads, precipitated silica can yield a lower rolling resistance and better wet grip at equal wear resistance than carbon black. The development of a new method to study the fragmentation mechanism of precipitated silica is investigated. Usually, the dispersion of granules is done in high viscous media (elasto...

  4. Constraints on the factors controlling 13C-18O bond abundances in biologically precipitated carbonates from measurements of marine calcifiers cultured at variable temperature, pH, and salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchas, T. E.; Eagle, R.; Eiler, J. M.; Ries, J. B.; Freitas, P. S.; Hiebenthal, C.; Wanamaker, A. D.; Tripati, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Marine mollusks and corals are widely used as archives of past climate change; oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O value) of their carbonate minerals is perhaps the most commonly used proxy to reconstruct paleoclimate from these marine calcifiers. However, oxygen isotope paleothermometry of mollusks and corals is complicated by non-equilibrium "vital effects" and variations in seawater pH changes, both of which influence the net fractionation of oxygen isotopes between carbonate and water. Carbonate "clumped isotope" thermometry is an emerging approach that potentially addresses these ambiguities. Here we report measurements of abundance of 13C-18O bonds (described by the measured parameter Δ47) in a variety of marine calcifiers cultured under controlled conditions. Previous studies on biologically precipitated samples such as foraminifera, coccoliths, and corals have shown that Δ47 values are related to calcification temperature with a relationship that is generally similar to inorganic carbonate. However, the influence of effects other than temperature has not been extensively studied and little work has been done to explore the potential for small non-equilibrium effects in cultured specimens that were grown under controlled conditions. In this study, we report δ18O and Δ47 measurements of mollusk specimens that were cultured at several temperatures ranging from 5 to 25°C, as well as different pH and salinity values. We also report data for other marine calcifiers including the temperate coral species Oculina arbuscula and the coralline red algae Neogoniolithon sp., that were cultured at a single temperature but variable pH.

  5. In situ and fast detection of single-walled carbon nanotubes by using DNA mediated aggregation method and quartz crystal microbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kuewhan; Park, Jinsung; Lee, Sangmyung; You, Juneseok; Park, Chanho; Lee, Jaeryung; Park, Woonghwi; Yun, Jinsu; Ahn, Sanghyun; Na, Sungsoo

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted great interest from scientific interest to industrial areas. Due to the toxicity effect of CNTs, assessment methods for CNTs are one of the noticeable issues. In this work, we report the in situ and fast detection of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The detection is based on DNA hybridization between the DNA on a quartz electrode and the DNA of aggregated SWCNTs. It is shown that our detection tool is capable of the in situ and fast detection of 5 min with the limit of detection (LOD) of 10 ng ml-1 in distilled water. Furthermore, our detection tool is able to detect SWCNTs in a real practical sample of tap water with the LOD of 100 ng ml-1. Our work sheds light on a direct monitoring tool that could detect and assess the toxicity of SWCNTs in a real environment.

  6. Magnesite dissolution and precipitation rates at hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesite (MgCO3) is the stable anhydrous member of a series of Mg-carbonates with different degrees of hydration. Despite its relative scarcity in the natural environments, it constitutes an important mineral phase for the permanent sequestration of CO2 as carbonate minerals. Experimental determination of magnesite precipitation and dissolution rates at conditions representative of the storage sites is therefore fundamental for the assessment of magnesite sequestration potential in basaltic and ultramafic rocks and the optimization of the techniques of CO2 storage. Magnesite precipitation rates have been measured using mixed-flow and batch reactors as a function of temperature (100 ≤ T ≤ 200 deg. C), solution composition and CO2 partial pressure (up to 30 bar). Rates were found to be independent of aqueous solution ionic strength at 0.1 M 32- activity at pH > 8. All rates obtained from mixed flow reactor experiments were found to be consistent with the model of Pokrovsky et al. (1999) where magnesite precipitation rates are proportional to the concentration of the >MgOH2+ surface species. The study of magnesite crystallization using hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) demonstrated the consistency of the rates derived from microscopic measurements with those obtained from bulk experiments and showed that these rates are also consistent with a spiral growth mechanism. According to AFM observations this mechanism controls magnesite growth over a wide range of temperatures and saturation states (15≤ Ω ≤200 for 80 ≤T 2 to accelerate the rate of the overall carbonation process, avoiding the inhibiting effect of carbonate ions on magnesite precipitation and increasing the rates of Mg-silicate dissolution via acidification of reacting solutions. Determination of magnesite dissolution rates by mixed flow reactor at 150 and 200 deg. C and at neutral to alkaline conditions allowed us to improve and extend to high temperatures the surface complexation model

  7. Influence of non-covalent modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the crystallization behaviour of binary blends of polypropylene and polyamide 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Nabaneeta; Panwar, Ajay S; Kumar, Gulshan; Samajdar, I; Bhattacharyya, Arup R

    2015-02-14

    Blends of polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared using different processing strategies in a twin-screw micro-compounder. The effect of MWNTs on the crystallization behaviour of the PP phase and the PA6 phase of the blend has been investigated through non-isothermal crystallization studies by differential scanning calorimetric analysis. Furthermore, the effect of the addition of the compatibilizer (PP-g-MA) and the modification of MWNTs (m-MWNTs) with a non-covalent organic modifier (Li-salt of 6 amino hexanoic acid, Li-AHA) has also been studied in context to the crystallization behaviour of the PP and PA6 phase in the blend. The crystallization studies have indicated a significant increase in bulk crystallization temperature of the PP phase in the blend in the presence of MWNTs. Moreover, the formation of 'trans-lamellar crystalline' structure consisting of PA6 'trans-crystalline lamellae' on MWNTs surface was facilitated in the case of blends prepared via 'protocol 2' as compared to the corresponding blends prepared via 'protocol 1'. Wide angle X-ray diffraction analysis has showed the existence of a β-polymorph of the PP phase due to incorporation of the PA6 phase in the blend. Addition of MWNTs in the blends has facilitated further β-crystalline structure formation of the PP phase. In the presence of m-MWNTs, a higher β-fraction was observed in the PP phase as compared to the blend with pristine MWNTs. Addition of PP-g-MA has suppressed the β-phase formation in the PP phase in the blend. X-ray bulk texture analysis revealed that incorporation of PA6 as well as pristine/modified MWNTs has influenced the extent of orientation of the PP chains towards specific crystalline planes in various blend compositions of PP and PA6. PMID:25574831

  8. Dependence on injection temperature and on aquifer's petrophysical properties of the local stress applying on the pore wall of a crystallized pore in the context of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselin, Florian; Fen-Chong, Teddy; Fabbri, Antonin; Lassin, Arnault; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Dangla, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    The development of CCS (carbon capture and storage) currently faces numerous problems and particularly the precipitation of salts induced by the drying of the porous medium during injection of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers. This precipitation has several consequences, and particularly the creation of a crystallization pressure which can have an important mechanical impact on the host rock. Literature on crystallization pressure is one century rich of experimental and theoretical works. However, applications have been performed in the field of civil engineering and building science only, and, despite they are of paramount importance in the context of CCS, studies about this phenomenon in deep reservoir conditions are currently lacking. In this paper, we retrieve the classic crystallization pressure equation within the framework of geochemistry and present its explicit form of dependence with temperature, pressure, and composition. Evaluation of the crystallization pressure has then been proceeded considering the injection conditions and a sketch of in-pore crystallization process. The evolution of the local stress transmitted to a crystallized pore wall is found to be strongly related to the petrophysical properties of the medium and to the injection temperature of the carbon dioxide under the assumption of constant salt concentration during the precipitation process. Values differ strongly with the considered mineral, depending particularly on the solubility, and can reach in some conditions 165 MPa, making crystallization pressure a major factor in the mechanical behavior of the aquifer.

  9. Reuse of MgCl2 as Crystal Controlling Agent in the Synthesis Process of Needle―like Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Jun, LIU Hua-Yan, CHEN Yin-Fei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available MgCl2 was used as crystal controlling agent for the synthesis of regular needle―like calcium carbonate with diameter of 2.5―5μm and aspect ratio of 10―20. Complexometric titrating method was employed to determine the contents of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in filtrated solution after carbonization and the fresh MgCl2 was added to balance the Mg2+ content as same as the raw solution. The morphology, particle size and polymorphs of calcium carbonate were characterized by SEM and XRD. The results show that the content of aragonite phase CaCO3 decreases with the recycle time increasing. When the content of aragonite phase CaCO3 is lower than 80%, the aspect ratio of need―like calcium carbonate decreases significantly companied with the production of calcite cubic CaCO3 particles, thus the filtrated MgCl2 solution is unsuitable to recycled anymore. The direct recycle filtrate can be used for only once while the reused time by the MgCl2 filtrate can reach 12 by optimizing the recycle process through the addition of Mg2+ and the justification of pH of the filtrate.

  10. The Crystallization of Monosodium Urate

    OpenAIRE

    Martillo, Miguel A.; Nazzal, Lama; Crittenden, Daria B.

    2014-01-01

    Gout is a common crystal-induced arthritis, in which monosodium urate (MSU) crystals precipitate within joints and soft tissues and elicit an inflammatory response. The causes of elevated serum urate and the inflammatory pathways activated by MSU crystals have been well studied, but less is known about the processes leading to crystal formation and growth. Uric acid, the final product of purine metabolism, is a weak acid that circulates as the deprotonated urate anion under physiologic condit...

  11. Struvite Precipitation and Biological Dissolutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Ezquerro, Ander

    2010-01-01

    Struvite is a salt that is formed out of  Mg2+,NH4+ and PO43- and it crystallizes in form of MgNH4PO4.6H2O. Struvite‟s (magnesium ammonium phosphate or MAP) precipitation has recently been regarded as an interesting technique to remove phosphate and ammonium from waste water. The high elimination rates and the possibility of recycling the struvite as a direct slow release fertilizer make this process feasible and appealing. However, the costs due to the raw chemicals needed are drawbacks that...

  12. Specific Surface versus Electrochemically Active Area of the Carbon/Polypyrrole Capacitor: Correlation of Ion Dynamics Studied by an Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance with BET Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosch, Heike L K S; Akintola, Oluseun; Plass, Winfried; Höppener, Stephanie; Schubert, Ulrich S; Ignaszak, Anna

    2016-05-10

    Carbon/polypyrrole (PPy) composites are promising electrode materials for energy storage applications such as lightweight capacitors. Although these materials are composed of relatively inexpensive components, there is a gap of knowledge regarding the correlation between surface, porosity, ion exchange dynamics, and the interplay of the double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. In this work we evaluate the specific surface area analyzed by the BET method and the area accessible for ions using electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance (EQCM) for SWCNT/PPy and carbon black Vulcan XC72-R/PPy composites. The study revealed that the polymer has significant influence on the pore size of the composites. Although the BET surface is low for the polypyrrole, the electrode mass change and thus the electrochemical area are large for the polymer-containing electrodes. This indicates that multiple redox active centers in the charged polymer chain are good ion scavengers. Also, for the composite electrodes, the effective charge storage occurs at the polypyrrole-carbon junctions, which are easy to design/multiply by a proper carbon-to-polymer weight ratio. The specific BET surface and electrochemically accessible surface area are both important parameters in calculation of the electrode capacitance. SWCNTs/PPy showed the highest capacitances normalized to the BET and electrochemical surface as compared to the polymer-carbon black. TEM imaging revealed very homogeneous distribution of the nanosized polymer particles onto the CNTs, which facilitates the synergistic effect of the double layer capacitance (CNTs) and pseudocapacitance (polymer). The trend in the electrode mass change in correlation with the capacitance suggest additional effects such as a solvent co-insertion into the polymer and the contribution of the charge associated with the redox activity of oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbon surface. PMID:27082127

  13. Precipitation of uranium concentrates by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study on the (UO4.xH2) uranyl peroxide precipitation from a uranium process strip solution is presented. The runs were performed in a batch reactor, in laboratory scale. The main objective was to assess the possibility of the peroxide route as an alternative to a conventional ammonium diuranate process. The chemical composition of process solution was obtained. The experiments were conducted according to a factorial design, aiming to evaluate the effects of initial pH, precipitation pH and H2O2/UO22+ ratio upon the process. The responses were measured in terms of the efficiency of U precipitation, the content of U in the precipitates and the distribution of impurities in the precipitates. The results indicated that the process works is satisfactory on the studied conditions and depending on conditions, it is possible to achieve levels of U precipitation efficiency greater than 99.9% in reaction times of 2 hours. The precipitates reach grades around 99% U3O8 after calcination (9000C) and impurities fall below the limit for penalties established by the ASTM and the Allied Chemical Standards. The precipitates are composed of large aggregates of crystals of 1-4 μm, are fast settling and filtering, and are free-flowing when dry. (Author)

  14. Effects of acidic deposition on the erosion of carbonate stone - experimental results from the U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Reimann, K.J.; Sciammarella, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the goals of NAPAP-sponsored research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone has been to quantify the incremental effects of wet and dry deposition of hydrogen ion, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides on stone erosion. Test briquettes and slabs of freshly quarried Indiana limestone and Vermont marble have been exposed to ambient environmental conditions in a long-term exposure program. Physical measurements of the recession of test stones exposed to ambient conditions at an angle of 30?? to horizontal at the five NAPAP materials exposure sites range from ~15 to ~30?? ??m yr-1 for marble, and from ~25 to ~45 ??m yr -1 for limestone, and are approximately double the recession estimates based on the observed calcium content of run-off solutions from test slabs. The difference between the physical and chemical recession measurements is attributed to the loss of mineral grains from the stone surfaces that are not measured in the run-off experiments. The erosion due to grain loss does not appear to be influenced by rainfall acidity, however, preliminary evidence suggests that grain loss may be influenced by dry deposition of sulfur dioxide between rainfall events. Chemical analyses of the run-off solutions and associated rainfall blanks suggest that ~30% of erosion by dissolution can be attributed to the wet deposition of hydrogen ion and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid between rain events. The remaining ~70% of erosion by dissolution is accounted for by the solubility of carbonate stone in rain that is in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide ('clean rain'). These results are for marble and limestone slabs exposed at an angle of 30?? from horizontal. The relative contribution of sulfur dioxide to chemical erosion is significantly enhanced for stone slabs having an inclination of 60?? or 85??. The dry deposition of alkaline particulate material has a mitigating effect at the two urban field exposure sites at Washington, DC

  15. Method of strontium carbonate preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for humidity decrease of strontium carbonate, obtained by its precipitation by sodium carbonate out of strontium salt solution with further precipitate separation, its washing by repulpation and drying, is proposed. The use of sodium carbonate solution with 0.8-1.5 g/l concentration during the precipitation repulpation permits to decrease the product humidity from 45-50% to 29-35%, to improve its quality, to reduce energy consumption for filtration and drying of precipitation

  16. Modelled Precipitation Over Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the annual total precipitation from 1985 to 1999 and monthly total precipitation from January 1985 to December 1999. The data is derived from...

  17. Interpretation of the vacancy-ordering controlled growth morphology of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} precipitates in Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} single crystals by TEM observation and crystallographic calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jie [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, 127 Youyi Road, Xi’an (China); School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Fu, Li, E-mail: fuli@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, 127 Youyi Road, Xi’an (China); Liu, Hongwei [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, S.P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Liu, Zongwen, E-mail: zongwen.liu@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The growth morphology and detailed crystallography of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} precipitates in Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} matrix to has been interpreted by means of transmission electron microscopy and invariant element deformation model. Three crystallographic equivalent variants of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} precipitates in Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} matrix were found to have different growth directions and habit planes. Such growth morphology is fully attributed to the lattice shrinkage induced by vacancy ordering under high temperature in Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8}. Through near coincident site lattice and invariant strain calculation, the morphology and crystallographic features of the precipitate has been successfully interpreted. - Highlights: • The growth morphology of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} precipitates in Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} was observed by TEM. • Near-CSL calculation show 0.7577% lattice shrinkage of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} at high temperature. • All the involved factors have inverse relationship with the move speed of interface. • The calculated crystallography features of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} agree well with the TEM results. - Abstract: Generally, the crystal growth morphology in liquid or vapor was controlled by chemical potential, while that in solid solute was restricted by 3D strain matching between matrix and secondary phase. It is already known that the growth and evolution of the morphology of secondary phase during the solid phase transformation are highly determined by the variation of interface energy induced by lattice mismatch. In this work, the growth morphology and crystallography of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} precipitates in Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} matrix were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the growth of Hg{sub 5}In{sub 2}Te{sub 8} precipitates displayed an unusual growth morphology which contain three crystallographically

  18. Use of black diamond-like carbon films as a contrast enhancement layer for liquid-crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; McClelland, S.; Tams, F., III; Halon, B.; Mesker, O.

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation of a highly durable single-layer pinhole-free abrasion-resistant chemically inert black diamondlike coating which is suitable for use as a contrast enhancement layer for liquid-crystal display devices. The diamondlike films prepared have an optical transmission of less than 2 percent over the visible spectrum, and a reflectance of about 20 percent. The coating is also electrically insulating and chemically compatible with liquid-crystal display materials. Data on the optical and mechanical properties of these films are presented.

  19. Melting, growth, and faceting of lead precipitates in aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gråbæk, L.; Bohr, J.; Andersen, H.H.;

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum single crystals cut in the <111> direction were implanted with 2 x 10(20) m-2 Pb+ ions at 75 or 150 keV. The implanted insoluble lead precipitated as epitaxially oriented crystallites in the aluminum matrix. The precipitates were studied by x-ray diffraction at Riso, DESY, and Brookhaven...

  20. PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2011-04-04

    The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

  1. Structure and composition of admixture precipitates of nickel in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and composition of precipitates of nickel atoms in monocrystalline silicon were investigated by electron-probe microanalysis. precipitates were found to consist of silicides of nickel involving some technological impurities and have needle, disk and ball forms, which can disintegrate under influence of external pressures. Because of distinct environmental conditions around precipitates of various forms their disintegration also differs from each other and it leads to corresponding alteration of crystals electrophysical parameter. (author)

  2. In situ absorption of molybdate and vanadate during precipitation of hydrotalcite from sodium aluminate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard D.; Parkinson, Gordon M.; Hart, Robert D.

    2005-02-01

    Reaction with seawater to produce the layered double hydroxide hydrotalcite is an important means for amelioration of Bayer process wastewater prior to its disposal into the marine environment. This reaction has been synthesised under controlled conditions to elucidate the principal mechanisms involved, particularly those related to absorption of transition metals that are removed from solution. Magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxides precipitated from reaction between magnesium chloride and synthetic sodium aluminate solution in the presence of transition metal oxyanions have been prepared and characterised using thermal, X-ray and microscopic techniques. The layered double hydroxide precipitated at pH >13 is found to consist of nano-sized hexagonal crystals of final magnesium-aluminium ratio of 2:1, while that precipitated at pHprecipitation is a pH dependent process. Transition metals are found to replace carbonate in the interlayer space but have little or no overall effect on crystal size or structure. Interlayer distance remains constant in the presence of transition metals, suggesting that these species are intercalated as simple monomeric or dimeric oxyanions, rather than larger polymeric forms.

  3. Crystal structure of lead uranyl carbonate mineral widenmannite: Precession electron-diffraction and synchrotron powder-diffraction study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, J.; Palatinus, L.; Rohlíček, J.; Houdková, L.; Klementová, Mariana; Goliáš, V.; Škácha, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 99, 2-3 (2014), s. 276-282. ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Widenmannite * uranyl bicarbonate * crystal structure * precession electron diffraction * synchrotron powder diffraction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2014

  4. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O' Brien, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily

  5. Growth of Organic Crystals by Ostwald Ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, W.; Podsiadly, C.; Naumann, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the growth of various organic crystals by chemical precipitation and Ostwald ripening. Six precipitation reactors were flown on STS-51A. Five of the reactors contained proprietary materials. The sixth contained urea dissolved in ethanol with toluene as the precipitating agent. The size distribution will be analyzed and compared with a similar model being developed.

  6. Antecedent moisture and seasonal precipitation influence the response of canopy-scale carbon and water exchange to rainfall pulses in a semi-arid grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, D L; Huxman, T E; Cable, J M; English, N B; Ignace, D D; Eilts, J A; Mason, M J; Weltzin, J F; Williams, D G

    2006-01-01

    The influences of prior monsoon-season drought (PMSD) and the seasonal timing of episodic rainfall ('pulses') on carbon and water exchange in water-limited ecosystems are poorly quantified. *In the present study, we estimated net ecosystem exchange of CO(2) (NEE) and evapotranspiration (ET) before, and for 15 d following, experimental irrigation in a semi-arid grassland during June and August 2003. Rainout shelters near Tucson, Arizona, USA, were positioned on contrasting soils (clay and sand) and planted with native (Heteropogon contortus) or non-native invasive (Eragrostis lehmanniana) C4 bunchgrasses. Plots received increased ('wet') or decreased ('dry') monsoon-season (July-September) rainfall during 2002 and 2003. Following a June 2003 39-mm pulse, species treatments had similar NEE and ET dynamics including 15-d integrated NEE (NEE(pulse)). Contrary to predictions, PMSD increased net C uptake during June in plots of both species. Greater flux rates after an August 2003 39-mm pulse reflected biotic activity associated with the North American Monsoon. Furthermore, August NEE(pulse) and ecosystem pulse-use efficiency (PUE(e) = NEE(pulse)/ET(pulse)) was greatest in Heteropogon plots. PMSD and rainfall seasonal timing may interact with bunchgrass invasions to alter NEE and ET dynamics with consequences for PUE(e) in water-limited ecosystems. PMID:16684243

  7. Digitonide precipitable sterols: a reevaluation with special attention to lanosterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of digitonin to precipitate lanosterol from prepared mixtures and biological sources was evaluated. Commercially available lanosterol was determined to be composed of about 60% lanosterol and 40% dihydrolanosterol. Both sterols were only partially precipitated by digitonin under all conditions examined. The presence of cholesterol increased the precipitation of lanosterol, but never to completion. About 40% of the lanosterols from saponified sheep's-wool fat was not precipitated by digitonin. Also 14C-labeled lanosterol recovered from rat brain following intracerebral injection of 2-[14C]mevalonate was only 70% precipitated by digitonin. Steric hinderance by the methyl groups at carbon -4 is suggesed to explain the poor precipitability of this sterol. In conclusion, lanosterol can not be considered to be a digitonide-precipitable sterol equivalent to cholesterol. Caution should be exercised in situations where digitonin-precipitable sterols are being prepared from sources containing significant concentrations of lanosterol (i.e., mass and/or radiolabel)

  8. Crystallization from Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  9. Thermodynamic Calculation of Carbide Precipitate in Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bo; YU Yong-mei; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of regular solution sublattice model, thermodynamic equilibrium of austenite/carbide in Fe-Nb-C ternary system was investigated. The equilibrium volume fraction, chemical driving force of carbide precipitates and molar fraction of niobium and carbon in solution at different temperatures were evaluated respectively. The volume fraction of precipitates increases, molar fraction of niobium dissolved in austenite decreases and molar fraction of carbon increases with decreasing the niobium content. The driving force increases with the decrease of temperature, and then comes to be stable at relatively low temperatures. The predicted ratio of carbon in precipitates is in good agreement with the measured one.

  10. Crystal structure of lead uranyl carbonate mineral widenmannite: precession electron-diffraction and synchrotron powder-diffraction study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, Jakub; Palatinus, Lukáš; Rohlíček, Jan; Houdková, L.; Klementová, Mariana; Goliáš, V.; Škácha, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 99, 2-3 (2014), s. 276-282. ISSN 0003-004X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : widenmannite * uranyl bicarbonate * crystal structure * precession electron diffraction * synchrotron powder diffraction Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2014

  11. Broadband Tunable, Polarization-Selective and Directional Emission of (6,5) Carbon Nanotubes Coupled to Plasmonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate broadband tunability of light emission from dense (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotube thin films via efficient coupling to periodic arrays of gold nanodisks that support surface lattice resonances (SLRs). We thus eliminate the need to select single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different chiralities to obtain narrow linewidth emission at specific near-infrared wavelengths. Emission from these hybrid films is spectrally narrow (20–40 meV) yet broadly tunable (∼1000–1500 nm) and highly directional (divergence simulations are applied to correlate the increased local electric fields around the nanodisks with the observed enhancement of directional emission. The ability to control the emission properties of a single type of near-infrared emitting SWNTs over a wide range of wavelengths will enable application of carbon nanotubes in multifunctional photonic devices. PMID:27105249

  12. Microbially Induced Precipitation of Strontianite Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Serku; Yumi Kim; Lee, Young Jae; Roh, Yul

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the microbially mediated precipitation of strontium by microorganisms, and to examine the mineralogical characteristics of the precipitates. Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) enriched from rhodoliths was used to precipitate strontium at room temperature under aerobic environment. The growth of Wu Do-1 gradually increased over 16 days (OD600 = 2.6) and then decreased until 22 days (OD600 = 2.0) during microbial incubation for strontium precipitation. Also, the pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.3 over 4 days of incubation due to microbial oxidation of organic acids, and then the pH increased up to 8.6 at 25 days of incubation due to NH3+ generation. The Sr2+ concentration in the biotic group sharply decreased from 2,953 mg/L to 5.7 mg/L over 29 days of incubation. XRD, SEM-/TEM-EDS analyses revealed that the precipitates formed by Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) were identified as 20-70 nm sized strontianite (SrCO3). Therefore, these results suggested that formation of sparingly soluble Sr precipitates mediated by Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) sequesters strontium and carbon dioxide into a more stable and less toxic form such as strontianite (SrCO3). These results also suggest that bioremediation of metal-contaminated water and biominealization of carbonate minerals may be feasible in the marine environment. PMID:26373143

  13. On precursor self-organization upon the microwave vacuum-plasma deposition of submonolayer carbon coatings on silicon (100) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning atomic-force and electron microscopies are used to study the self-organization kinetics of nanoscale domains upon the deposition of submonolayer carbon coatings on silicon (100) in the microwave plasma of low-pressure ethanol vapor. Model mechanisms of how silicon-carbon domains are formed are suggested. The mechanisms are based on Langmuir’s model of adsorption from the precursor state and modern concepts of modification of the equilibrium structure of the upper atomic layer in crystalline semiconductors under the influence of external action

  14. Effect of precipitation procedure and detection technique on particle size distribution of CaCO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, C.; Coto, B.; Peña, J. L.; Rodríguez, R.; Merino-Garcia, D.; Pastor, G.

    2010-09-01

    The deposition of inorganic salts ("scales") such as calcium carbonate is an important flow assurance problem during crude oil production. The knowledge of the features of the precipitated solids, mainly the particle size and morphology, is crucial to understand the nature of the solids and to avoid or reduce the effect of their deposition. For instance, the use of additives is one of the most usual procedures to mitigate this problem. Additives interact with scale-forming substances either by increasing the induction time, or by inhibiting crystal growth, changing the morphology of solids. In this work, CaCO 3 was precipitated by two different experimental methods: by mixing sodium carbonate and calcium chloride at 25 °C (method 1), and by changing the pH (method 2). Precipitated solids were analyzed by means of the following techniques: laser diffraction (LD), focused-beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), in order to select a method for the determination of particle size of solids similar to scales, in order to study these deposits at the beginning of their formation and to evaluate the effect of additives in the scales particle size. Results were compared to those of scale deposits extracted from crude oil pipelines. SEM and XRD characterization showed that both the precipitation methods lead to calcium carbonate as a mixture of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, with rhombohedral morphology for method 1 and spherical for method 2. The effects of temperature, kinetics and Mg 2+ presence in the morphology of CaCO 3 were evaluated. Thus, the solids obtained by static bottle test and real scales are mainly formed by long needle-shaped aragonite. The comparison of the several particle size characterization methods determinates that an LD is a fast and sensitive technique for spherical and non-spherical solids, and it is a convenient technique for the analysis of scales extracted from oil pipelines.