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Sample records for carbonaceous chondrite acfer

  1. Iron Oxidation States of Matrix in Carbonaceous Chondrites Acfer 094 and MIL 07687

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, E.; King, A. J.; Schofield, P. F.; Abyaneh, M. K.; Kaulich, B.; Russell, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    STXM Fe-oxidation state study in Acfer 094 and MIL 07687 matrix revealed high Fe3+/ΣFe ratios likely to be a primordial signature. Terrestrial weathering cannot be ruled out but is unlikely to have a pervasive effect throughout entire meteorites.

  2. Origin of dark clasts in the Acfer 059/El Djouf 001 CR2 chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreb, M.; Keil, K.; Bischoff, A.; Speitel, B.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.

    1994-01-01

    The ten specimens of the paired Acfer 059/El Djouf 001 CR2 chondrite contain abundant lithic fragments which we refer to as dark clasts. Petrological and mineralogical studies reveal that they are not related to the CR2 host meteorite but are similar to dark clasts in other CR2 chondrites. Dark clasts consist of chondrule and mineral fragments, phyllosilicate fragments and clusters, magnetite, sulfides and accessory phases, embedded into a very fine-grained, phyllosilicate-rich matrix. Magnetite has morphologies known from CI chondrites: spherules, framboids and platelets. Average abundances of major elements in the dark clasts are mostly in the range of both CR and CV chondrites, but strong depletions in Na and S are apparent. Oxygen isotopic compositions of two dark clasts suggest relationships to type 3 carbonaceous chondrites and dark inclusions in Allende. The dark clasts are clearly different in texture and mineralogical compositions from the host matrix of Acfer 059/El Djouf 001. Therefore, these dark clasts are xenoliths and are quite unlike the Acfer 059/El Djouf 001 CR2 host meteorite. We suggest that dark clasts accreted at the same time with all other components during the formation of Acfer 059/El Djouf 001 whole rock.

  3. Fluid Inclusions in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Le L.; Schwandt, C.

    2001-01-01

    Fluid inclusions are present in carbonaceous chondrites. Of the chondrites studied (CI1, CM1 and 2, CV3) fluid inclusions were found only in CM2s and CI1s, and by extrapolation are most likely to be found there in the future. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Mossbauer Spectra of Weathered H5 Ordinary Chondrites from Reg EL Acfer, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, F.; Oates, G.; Bland, P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-07-01

    Approximately 380 meteorite specimens have been retrieved from the Acfer region of the Sahara desert, Algeria. To date, 26 of these have been classified H5 (Bischoff et al., 1990, 1991, 1992). Being the most common meteorite type and having a tightly constrained mineralogy (Mason, 1965), H5 chondrites are ideal candidates for investigating terrestrial weathering products in meteorites. Arid climate, uniform topography, and lack of a concentration/movement mechanism makes it likely that meteorites throughout Reg el Acfer were weathered by a common mechanism. Jull et al. (1991) showed a correlation in meteorites from Roosevelt County between terrestrial ^14C ages and a qualitative weathering scale. An aim of the present study is to provide a quantitative measure of weathering for the Acfer region that might allow an estimate of terrestrial age, as well as information on pairing. Meteorite Specimens: Approximately 1 g of sample was used, prepared by grinding under acetone to prevent oxidation during crushing, until a homogenized powder was produced. Mossbauer spectra were recorded at 298 degrees K with a microprocessor controlled Mossbauer spectrometer using a ^57Co/Rh source. Drive velocity was calibrated with the same source and a metallic iron foil. Results: The H5 chondrite Acfer 146 (Bischoff, forthcoming Meteoritical Bulletin) was found on 19/11/90 at coordinates 27 degrees 38'N, 4 degrees 05'E. This meteorite gave a spectrum dominated by quadrupole split absorption characteristics of Fe^2+ in a forsteritic olivine structure. A sample of the outer crust showed the additional presence of Fe^3+. XRD was insensitive to the unequivocal identification of the phases present in the two samples and given that the Mossbauer parameters of the hydrolyzed Fe^3+ species and ferric oxyhydroxides are very similar it is not possible at this stage to identify the oxidized phase. Clearly, however, the results demonstrate the sensitivity of Mossbauer spectroscopy to the products

  5. Extraterrestrial Nucleobases in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Z.; Botta, O.; Fogel, M.; Sephton, M.; Glavin, D.; Watson, J.; Dworkin, J.; Schwartz, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    Nucleobases in Carbonaceous Chondrites Z. Martins (1), O. Botta (2), M. L. Fogel (3), M. A. Sephton (4), D. P. Glavin (2), J. S. Watson (5), J. P. Dworkin (2), A. W. Schwartz (6) and P. Ehrenfreund (1,6). (1) Astrobiology Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden, The Netherlands, (2) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Greenbelt, MD, USA, (3) GL, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC, USA, (4) Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College, London, UK, (5) Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK, (6) Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. E-mail: z.martins@chem.leidenuniv.nl/Phone:+31715274440 Nucleobases are crucial compounds in terrestrial biochemistry, because they are key components of DNA and RNA. Carbonaceous meteorites have been analyzed for nucleobases by different research groups [1-5]. However, significant quantitative and qualitative differences were observed, leading to the controversial about the origin of these nucleobases. In order to establish the origin of these compounds in carbonaceous chondrites and to assess the plausibility of their exogenous delivery to the early Earth, we have performed formic acid extraction of samples of the Murchison meteorite [6], followed by an extensive purification procedure, analysis and quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorption detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our results were qualitatively consistent with previous results [3, 4], but showed significant quantitative differences. Compound specific carbon isotope values were obtained, using gas chromatography-combustion- isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A soil sample collected in the proximity of the Murchison meteorite fall site was subjected to the same extraction, purification and analysis procedure

  6. Carbonaceous Chondrite Clasts in HED Achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Weisberg, M. K.; Buchanan, P. C.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1996-01-01

    Since carbonaceous chondrite planetesimals are attractive candidates for the progenitors of HED asteroid(s), we have performed a survey of HED meteorites in order to locate and characterize the mineralogy, chemistry, and petrography of the oft-reported carbonaceous chondrite clasts by microprobe, SEM-EDX. and TEM techniques. We examined samples of all HEDs we could lay our gloved hands on, and found carbonaceous chondrite clasts in the howardites Kapoeta, Jodzie, EET 87513, Y 793497, LEW 85441, LEW 87015, and G'Day, the polymict eucrites LEW 97295 and LEW 95300, and the diogenite Ellemeet. We verified previous suggestions that the majority (about 80%) of these clasts are CM2 material, but we discovered that a significant proportion are CR2 (about 20%) and other rare types are present. We conclude that chondritic compounds of mixed CM2 and CR2 materials should be investigated in future geochemical modeling of the origin of the HED asteroid(s).

  7. Evidence of Microfossils in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Zhmur, S. I.; Gorlenko, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out on freshly broken, internal surfaces of the Murchison, Efremovka and Orgueil carbonaceous chondrites using Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) in Russia and the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) in the United States. These independent studies on different samples of the meteorites have resulted in the detection of numerous spherical and ellipsoidal bodies (some with spikes) similar to the forms of uncertain biogenicity that were designated "organized elements" by prior researchers. We have also encountered numerous complex biomorphic microstructures in these carbonaceous chondrites. Many of these complex bodies exhibit diverse characteristics reminiscent of microfossils of cyanobacteria such as we have investigated in ancient phosphorites and high carbon rocks (e.g. oil shales). Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis and 2D elemental maps shows enhanced carbon content in the bodies superimposed upon the elemental distributions characteristic of the chondritic matrix. The size, distribution, composition, and indications of cell walls, reproductive and life cycle developmental stages of these bodies are strongly suggestive of biology' These bodies appear to be mineralized and embedded within the meteorite matrix, and can not be attributed to recent surface contamination effects. Consequently, we have interpreted these in-situ microstructures to represent the lithified remains of prokaryotes and filamentous cyanobacteria. We also detected in Orgueil microstructures morphologically similar to fibrous kerite crystals. We present images of many biomorphic microstructures and possible microfossils found in the Murchison, Efremovka, and Orgueil chondrites and compare these forms with known microfossils from the Cambrian phosphate-rich rocks (phosphorites) of Khubsugul, Northern Mongolia.

  8. Carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman; Sweeney, Michael A.; Kropp, Michael A.; Lewis, John S.

    1993-01-01

    Organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites can be separated into three fractions. The first component, the fraction that is insoluble in chloroform and methanol, has a part which is of interstellar origin. The other two fractions (chloroform-soluble hydrocarbons and methanol-soluble polar organics) are hypothesized to have been synthesized on a planetoid body. We propose that the polar organics, i.e., amino acids, were synthesized close to its surface by the radiolysis of hydrocarbons and ammonium carbonate in a liquid water environment. Some hydrocarbons may have been synthesized by a Fischer-Tropsch mechanism in the interior of the body. Ferrous ion acted as a protection against back reactions. The simultaneous synthesis of iron-rich clays with the polar organics may be indicative of events related to the origin of life on Earth.

  9. Distinct Purine Distribution in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are known to contain a diverse suite of organic compounds, many of which are essential components of biochemistry. Amino acids, which are the monomers of proteins, have been extensively studied in such meteorites (e.g. Botta and Bada 2002; Pizzarello et aI., 2006). The origin of amino acids in meteorites has been firmly established as extraterrestrial based on their detection typically as racemic mixtures of amino acids, the presence of many non-protein amino acids, and non-terrestrial values for compound-specific deuterium, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic measurements. In contrast to amino acids, nucleobases in meteorites have been far less studied. Nucleobases are substituted one-ring (pyrimidine) or two-ring (purine) nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and serve as the information carriers of nucleic acids and in numerous coenzymes. All of the purines (adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine) and pyrimidines (uracil) previously reported in meteorites are biologically common and could be interpreted as the result of terrestrial contamination (e.g. van del' Velden and Schwartz, 1974.) Unlike other meteoritic organics, there have been no observations of stochastic molecular diversity of purines and pyrimidines in meteorites, which has been a criterion for establishing extraterrestrial origin. Maltins et al. (2008) performed compound-specific stable carbon isotope measurements for uracil and xanthine in the Murchison meteorite. They assigned a non-terrestrial origin for these nucleobases; however, the possibility that interfering indigenous molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) contributed to the 13C-enriched isotope values for these nucleobases cannot be completely ruled out. Thus, the origin of these meteoritic nucleobases has never been established unequivocally. Here we report on our investigation of extracts of II different carbonaceous chondrites covering various petrographic types (Cl, CM, and CR) and degrees of aqueous alteration

  10. Spectral reflectance properties of carbonaceous chondrites: 2. CM chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutis, E. A.; Hudon, P.; Hiroi, T.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mann, P.

    2011-11-01

    We have examined the spectral reflectance properties and available modal mineralogies of 39 CM carbonaceous chondrites to determine their range of spectral variability and to diagnose their spectral features. We have also reviewed the published literature on CM mineralogy and subclassification, surveyed the published spectral literature and added new measurements of CM chondrites and relevant end members and mineral mixtures, and measured 11 parameters and searched pair-wise for correlations between all quantities. CM spectra are characterized by overall slopes that can range from modestly blue-sloped to red-sloped, with brighter spectra being generally more red-sloped. Spectral slopes, as measured by the 2.4:0.56 μm and 2.4 μm:visible region peak reflectance ratios, range from 0.90 to 2.32, and 0.81 to 2.24, respectively, with values tandem, suggesting a single cause, specifically serpentine-group phyllosilicates. The generally high Fe content, high phyllosilicate abundance relative to mafic silicates, and dual Fe valence state in CM phyllosilicates, all suggest that the phyllosilicates will exhibit strong absorption bands in the 0.7 μm region (due to Fe 3+-Fe 2+ charge transfers), and the 0.9-1.2 μm region (due to Fe 2+ crystal field transitions), and generally dominate over mafic silicates. CM petrologic subtypes exhibit a positive correlation between degree of aqueous alteration and depth of the 0.7 μm absorption band. This is consistent with the decrease in fine-grained opaques that accompanies aqueous alteration. There is no consistent relationship between degree of aqueous alteration and evidence for a 0.65 μm region saponite-group phyllosilicate absorption band. Spectra of different subsamples of a single CM can show large variations in absolute reflectance and overall slope. This is probably due to petrologic variations that likely exist within a single CM chondrite, as duplicate spectra for a single subsample show much less spectral variability

  11. Presolar diamond, silicon carbide, and graphite in carbonaceous chondrites: implications for thermal processing in the solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Gary R.; Meshik, Alex P.; Smith, Julie B.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    2003-12-01

    We have determined abundances of presolar diamond, silicon carbide, graphite, and Xe-P1 (Q-Xe) in eight carbonaceous chondrites by measuring the abundances of noble gas tracers in acid residues. The meteorites studied were Murchison (CM2), Murray (CM2), Renazzo (CR2), ALHA77307 (CO3.0), Colony (CO3.0), Mokoia (CV3 ox), Axtell (CV3 ox), and Acfer 214 (CH). These data and data obtained previously by Huss and Lewis (1995) provide the first reasonably comprehensive database of presolar-grain abundances in carbonaceous chondrites. Evidence is presented for a currently unrecognized Ne-E(H) carrier in CI and CM2 chondrites. After accounting for parent-body metamorphism, abundances and characteristics of presolar components still show large variations across the classes of carbonaceous chondrites. These variations correlate with the bulk compositions of the host meteorites and imply that the same thermal processing that was responsible for generating the compositional differences between the various chondrite groups also modified the initial presolar-grain assemblages. The CI chondrites and CM2 matrix have the least fractionated bulk compositions relative to the sun and the highest abundances of most types of presolar material, particularly the most fragile types, and thus are probably most representative of the material inherited from the sun's parent molecular cloud. The other classes can be understood as the products of various degrees of heating of bulk molecular cloud material in the solar nebula, removing the volatile elements and destroying the most fragile presolar components, followed by chondrule formation, metal-silicate fractionation in some cases, further nebula processing in some cases, accretion, and parent body processing. If the bulk compositions and the characteristics of the presolar-grain assemblages in various chondrite classes reflect the same processes, as seems likely, then differential condensation from a nebula of solar composition is ruled out as

  12. Carbonaceous Chondrite Fragments in the Polymict Eucrite Yamato 791834

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, P. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Buchanan et al. and Zolensky et al. described carbonaceous chondrite fragments in a variety of howardites and concluded that the majority are CM2 and CR2 materials. Gounelle et al. also described similar, but very small, fragments in these meteorites. These clasts are important because they represent materials that were in orbital proximity to the HED parent body (4 Vesta) and they may be similar to the primitive materials that originally accreted to form this body. The present study describes two carbonaceous chondrite clasts in the Yamato 791834 (Y791834) polymict eucrite.

  13. Petrology of Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates in Antarctic CR Chondrites: Comparison With Other Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, M.; Fagan, T. J.; Yamaguchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Yasutake, M.

    2016-01-01

    Amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) are important refractory components of carbonaceous chondrites and have been interpreted to represent solar nebular condensates that experienced high-temperature annealing, but largely escaped melting. In addition, because AOAs in primitive chondrites are composed of fine-grained minerals (forsterite, anorthite, spinel) that are easily modified during post crystallization alteration, the mineralogy of AOAs can be used as a sensitive indicator of metamorphic or alteration processes. AOAs in CR chondrites are particularly important because they show little evidence for secondary alteration. In addition, some CR AOAs contain Mn-enriched forsterite (aka low-iron, Mn-enriched or LIME olivine), which is an indicator of nebular formation conditions. Here we report preliminary results of the mineralogy and petrology of AOAs in Antarctic CR chondrites, and compare them to those in other carbonaceous chondrites.

  14. Origin of Thorium/Uranium Variations in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Goreva, J. S.; Burnett, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Thorium-, U-, and Pb-isotopic analyses of a wide variety of planetary materials show that Th/U ratio (by weight) varies from 3.5 to 4.2. It is generally believed that chondritic meteorites contain refractory lithophile elements in a relative proportions close to solar, i.e., CI chondrites [1]. Surprisingly, a number of analyses of different types of carbonaceous chondrites show a large (at least a factor of 3) scatter in Th/U measurements [2]. The widest spread in Th/U is observed in the most...

  15. R Raman Spectroscopy and Petrology of Antarctic CR Chondrites: Comparison with Other Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, M.; Fagan, T. J.; Yamaguchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Yasutake, M.

    2015-01-01

    In Renazzo-like carbonaceous (CR) chondrites, abundant original Fe,Ni-metal is preserved in chrondules, but the matrix is characterized by fine-grained magnetite with phyllosilicate. This combination of reduced Fe in chrodrules with oxidized Fe and phyllosilicate in the matrix has been attributed to aqueous alteration of matrix at relatively low temperatures.

  16. Microscale Distribution of Hydrogen Isotopes in Two Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A. F.; Nittler, L. R.; Alexander, C. M. O'D

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes are highly variable among primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) [1, 2]. In particular, many primitive objects exhibit D (and N-15) enrichments, relative to terrestrial values, thought to represent partial preservation of presolar material fractionated in molecular clouds. However, the diversity of D/H ratios among IDPs and chondrites indicates a complex history of processing in the solar nebula and on meteorite parent bodies. Deconvolving this record requires identification and characterization of the carriers of D enrichments in different objects. Isotopic imaging has proven to be a powerful method to quantitatively explore the distribution of D/H ratios on a one to several m scale in IDPs [2-4] and the CR chondrite Renazzo [5, 6]. In this study, we have used ion imaging to explore the microscale D/H distribution of two carbonaceous chondrites, Tagish Lake (unique) and Al Rais (CR2). Previous D/H measurements (on a tens of microns scale) of Tagish Lake matrix fragments by Messenger [7] and Engrand et al. [8] have found different results, most likely related to the analytical techniques used. Previous work has also shown a large range of D/H ratios in CR chondrites, including very large variations on a scale of a few microns [5, 6, 9].

  17. Comparing Amino Acid Abundances and Distributions Across Carbonaceous Chondrite Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are grouped according to bulk properties such as chemical composition and mineralogy. These parameters can vary significantly among the different carbonaceous chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CR, CH, CB, CV and CK). We have determined the amino acid abundances of more than 30 primary amino acids in meteorites from each of the eight groups, revealing several interesting trends. There are noticeable differences in the structural diversity and overall abundances of amino acids between meteorites from the different chondrite groups. Because meteorites may have been an important source of amino acids to the prebiotic Earth and these organic compounds are essential for life as we know it, the observed variations of these molecules may have been important for the origins of life.

  18. Petrogenesis of opaque assemblages in the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSU; WeiBiao

    2007-01-01

    Numerous round to oblate opaque assemblages (OAs) are found in chondrules and matrix of the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite. They are mainly composed of Ni-rich metal,magnetite,Fe,Ni-sulfides,with minor amounts of phosphate,phosphoran-olivine,pyroxene and trace amounts of nano-sized platinum-group metal alloys. The mineralogy of Ningqiang OAs is very similar to that of OAs previously reported in Ca,Al-rich inclusions of CV chondrites. Being a rare mineral phase in nature,phosphoran-olivine is thought to form by nonequilibrium reactions between P-bearing molten metal and olivine crystals during rapid cooling. Its occurrence in Ningqiang OAs indicates that the precursor of OAs was locally produced during chondrule formation,rather than directly condensed from the solar nebula as previously thought. The petrographic and mineralogical characteristics of Ningqiang OAs reveal that OAs formed by low temperature alterations of pre-existing homogeneous alloys within chondrules on a planetary body.

  19. Organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites, planetary satellites, asteroids and comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed review is given of the organic compounds found in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, especially the Murchison meteorite, and detected spectroscopically in other solar-system objects. The chemical processes by which the organic compounds could have formed in the early solar system and the conditions required for these processes are discussed, taking into account the possible alteration of the compounds during the lifetime of the meteoroid. Also considered are the implications for prebiotic evolution and the origin of life. Diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  20. Isotopically uniform, 16O-depleted calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions in CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Petaev, Michail I.

    2012-04-01

    In situ oxygen-isotope measurements of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites Isheyevo (CH/CB-like), Acfer 214 paired with Acfer 182 (CH), QUE 94411 paired with QUE 94627 (CBb), and Hammadah al Hamra 237 (CBb) revealed the presence of a common population of igneous, isotopically uniform, 16O-depleted inclusions: Δ17O (average ± 2 standard deviations) = -7 ± 4‰, -6 ± 5‰, and -8 ± 3‰, respectively. All CAIs from CBs and a significant fraction of those from CHs and Isheyevo are 16O-depleted. Most of the 16O-depleted CAIs consist of Ti-poor Al-diopside, spinel, melilite, and forsterite and surrounded by a single- and double-layered rim of forsterite ± diopside. The 16O-depleted CAIs composed of hibonite, grossite, melilite, and spinel, and surrounded by the multilayered melilite + diopside ± forsterite rims are less common. Some of the 16O-depleted refractory igneous inclusions composed of Al-diopside, forsterite, and ±spinel have chondrule-like textures (skeletal or barred). They are mineralogically most similar to Al-diopside-rich chondrules found in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites and composed of Al-diopside, forsterite, Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene, ±glassy mesostasis, and ±spinel, suggesting there is a continuum between these objects. We suggest that (i) most of the isotopically uniform and 16O-depleted CAIs resulted from remelting of pre-existing, possibly 16O-rich refractory inclusions. The remelting may have occurred during formation of the magnesian, non-porphyritic (cryptocrystalline and skeletal) chondrules in CHs, CBs, and Isheyevo either by an unspecified, late, single-stage, highly-energetic event or in an impact-generated plume previously hypothesized for their origin; both mechanisms probably occurred in the solar nebula (i.e., in the presence of the nebula gas). The forsterite ± pyroxene rims around 16O-depleted CAIs may have resulted from evaporation-recondensation of silicon and magnesium

  1. Delivery of Dark Material to Vesta via Carbonaceous Chondritic Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; O'Brien, David P; Nathues, Andreas; Cloutis, Edward A; Durda, Daniel D; Bottke, William F; Bhatt, Megha U; Nesvorny, David; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer E C; Palmer, Elizabeth M; Sierks, Holger; Mann, Paul J; Becker, Kris J; Beck, Andrew W; Mittlefehldt, David; Li, Jian-Yang; Gaskell, Robert; Russell, Christopher T; Gaffey, Michael J; McSween, Harry Y; McCord, Thomas B; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Blewett, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft observations of asteroid (4) Vesta reveal a surface with the highest albedo and color variation of any asteroid we have observed so far. Terrains rich in low albedo dark material (DM) have been identified using Dawn Framing Camera (FC) 0.75 {\\mu}m filter images in several geologic settings: associated with impact craters (in the ejecta blanket material and/or on the crater walls and rims); as flow-like deposits or rays commonly associated with topographic highs; and as dark spots (likely secondary impacts) nearby impact craters. This DM could be a relic of ancient volcanic activity or exogenic in origin. We report that the majority of the spectra of DM are similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites mixed with materials indigenous to Vesta. Using high-resolution seven color images we compared DM color properties (albedo, band depth) with laboratory measurements of possible analog materials. Band depth and albedo of DM are identical to those of carbonaceous chondrite xenolith-rich howar...

  2. Distinct Distribution of Purines in CM and CR Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Smith, Karen E.; Martin, Mildred G.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of organic molecules and delivered pre biotic organic compounds, including purines and pyrimidines, to the early Earth (and other planetary bodies), seeding it with the ingredients likely required for the first genetic material. We have investigated the distribution of nucleobases in six different CM and CR type carbonaceous chondrites, including fivc Antarctic meteorites never before analyzed for nucleobases. We employed a traditional formic acid extraction protocol and a recently developed solid phase extraction method to isolate nucleobases. We analyzed these extracts by high performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV -MS/MS) targeting the five canonical RNAIDNA bases and hypoxanthine and xanthine. We detected parts-per-billion levels of nucleobases in both CM and CR meteorites. The relative abundances of the purines found in Antarctic CM and CR meteorites were clearly distinct from each other suggesting that these compounds are not terrestrial contaminants. One likely source of these purines is formation by HCN oligomerization (with other small molecules) during aqueous alteration inside the meteorite parent body. The detection of the purines adenine (A), guanine (0), hypoxanthine (HX), and xanthine (X) in carbonaceous meteorites indicates that these compounds should have been available on the early Earth prior to the origin of the first genetic material.

  3. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Organics and Alteration in Carbonaceous Chondrites: Goop and Crud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Organics and Alteration in Carbonaceous Chondrites: Goop and Crud" included the following reports:Organics on Fe-Silicate Grains: Potential Mimicry of Meteoritic Processes?; Molecular and Compound-Specific Isotopic Study of Monocarboxylic Acids in Murchison and Antarctic Meteorites; Nanoglobules, Macromolecular Materials, and Carbon Sulfides in Carbonaceous Chondrites; Evidence for Terrestrial Organic Contamination of the Tagish Lake Meteorite; Nitrogen Isotopic Imaging of Tagish Lake Carbon Globules; Microscale Distribution of Hydrogen Isotopes in Two Carbonaceous Chondrites; The Nature and Origin of Aromatic Organic Matter in the Tagish Lake Meteorite; Terrestrial Alteration of CM Chondritic Carbonate; Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites; Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions; Chondrule Glass Alteration in Type IIA Chondrules in the CR2 Chondrites EET 87770 and EET 92105: Insights into Elemental Exchange Between Chondrules and Matrices; Aqueous Alteration of Carbonaceous Chondrites: New Insights from Comparative Studies of Two Unbrecciated CM2 Chondrites, Y 791198 and ALH 81002 ;and A Unique Style of Alteration of Iron-Nickel Metal in WIS91600, an Unusual C2 Carbonaceous Chondrite.

  4. Young Pb-Isotopic Ages of Chondrules in CB Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelin, Yuri; Krot, Alexander N.

    2005-01-01

    CB (Bencubbin-type) carbonaceous chondrites differ in many ways from more familiar CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites and from ordinary chondrites. CB chondrites are very rich in Fe-Ni metal (50-70 vol%) and contain magnesian silicates mainly as angular to sub-rounded clasts (or chondrules) with barred olivine (BO) or cryptocrystalline (CC) textures. Both metal and silicates appear to have formed by condensation. The sizes of silicate clasts vary greatly between the two subgroups of CB chondrites: large (up to one cm) in CB(sub a) chondrites, and typically to much much less than 1 mm in CB(sub b) chondrites. The compositional and mineralogical differences between these subgroups and between the CB(sub s) and other types of chondrites suggest different environment and possibly different timing of chondrule formation. In order to constrain the timing of chondrule forming processes in CB(sub s) and understand genetic relationship between their subgroups, we have determined Pb-isotopic ages of silicate material from the CB(sub a) chondrite Gujba and CB(sub b) chondrite Hammadah al Hamra 237 (HH237 hereafter).

  5. Petrologic study of the Belgica 7904 carbonaceous chondrite - Hydrous alteration, oxygen isotopes, and relationship to CM and CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Y.; Prinz, M.

    1993-01-01

    The genetic relationships between the petrology, hydration reactions, and isotopic oxygen composition in the Belgica 7904 (B7904) carbonaceous chondrite, and the relationship between B7904 and the CM and CI chondrites were investigated by characterizing seven components separated from B7904. The seven specimens included two partially altered chondrules, two phylosilicate clasts, two olivine fragments, and one matrix sample. The results of the analyses and thermodynamic calculations suggest that CI chondrites may have been produced in a two-stage alteration process from materials similar to that of the B7904 matrix, by reactions with liquid water in their parent body. The common CM chondrites may have undergone aqueous alteration in the parent body, in addition to hydration in the nebula, resulting in two-stage alterations; the parent body may have been different from that of B7904.

  6. The Effects of Parent Body Processes on Amino Acids in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of parent body processes on the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric composition of amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites, the water extracts from nine different powdered Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites were analyzed for amino acids by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-FD/ToF-MS). Four aqueously altered type 1 carbonaceous chondrites including Orgueil (C11), Meteorite Hills (MET) 01070 (CM1), Scott Glacier (SCO) 06043 (CM1), and Grosvenor Mountains (GRO) 95577 (CR1) were analyzed using this technique for the first time. Analyses of these meteorites revealed low levels of two- to five-carbon acyclic amino alkanoic acids with concentrations ranging from -1 to 2,700 parts-per-billion (ppb). The type 1 carbonaceous chondrites have a distinct distribution of the five-carbon (C5) amino acids with much higher relative abundances of the gamma- and delta-amino acids compared to the type 2 and type 3 carbonaceous chondrites, which are dominated by a-amino acids. Much higher amino acid abundances were found in the CM2 chondrites Murchison, Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94102, and Lewis Cliffs (LEW) 90500, the CR2 Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and the CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. For example, a-aminoisobutyric acid ((alpha-AIB) and isovaline were approximately 100 to 1000 times more abundant in the type 2 and 3 chondrites compared to the more aqueously altered type 1 chondrites. Most of the chiral amino acids identified in these meteorites were racemic, indicating an extraterrestrial abiotic origin. However, non-racemic isovaline was observed in the aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites Murchison, Orgueil, SCO 06043, and GRO 95577 with L-isovaline excesses ranging from approximately 11 to 19%, whereas the most pristine, unaltered carbonaceous chondrites analyzed in this study had no detectable L-isovaline excesses. These results are consistent with the

  7. Petrologic Locations of Nanodiamonds in Carbonaceous Chondrite Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie, Laurence

    Nanodiamonds (NDs), with dimensions near two nanometers, are widespread accessory minerals in primitive meteorites. They have been studied extensively in concentrates made from acid-insoluble residues, but surprisingly little is known about their petrologic settings in the meteorites because they have not been studied in situ. Information about such settings is fundamental for determining how they formed and were incorporated into the meteorites. The primary goal of the planned research is to determine and compare the petrologic settings of NDs within matrix of different types of carbonaceous chondrites, with the long-term aim of providing new insights regarding the origin of NDs. This research will also provide new data on the structure and major and trace element compositions of individual NDs and regions within them. Transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) provide uniquely powerful information regarding chemical, bonding, and structural data on the scale needed to solve this problem, assuming the NDs can be located within the host matrix. We have developed methods of observing NDs in situ within the fine-grained matrix of primitive meteorites and will use various TEMs to accomplish that goal for several meteorites. High- resolution imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) will permit determination of both structural and chemical information about the NDs and their adjacent minerals. By the middle of the proposed grant period, two state-of-the-art, aberration-corrected TEMs will have been installed at ASU and will be used to locate heavy elements such as Xe, Te, and Pd within the NDs. These TEMs permit the imaging of individual atoms of heavy elements with annular dark-field (ADF) imaging, and these atoms can be identified using EELS. The result of these new types of measurements will provide information about whether such elements, which have been used to determine whether NDs formed in supernovae, occur within the interiors or on the surfaces of

  8. Bulk Chemical Composition of the Ningqiang Carbonaceous Chondrite:An Issue of Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guiqin; LIN Yangting

    2007-01-01

    The Ningqiang meteorite is a fall carbonaceous chondrite, containing various Ca-, Al-rich inclusions that usually escaped from secondary events such as high-temperature heating and lowtemperature alteration. However, it has not yet been classified into any known chemical group. In order to address this issue, 41 elements of the bulk Ningqiang meteorite were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma atom emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in this study. The Allende (CV3) carbonaceous chondrite and the Jilin (H5)ordinary chondrite were also measured as references, and our analyses are consistent with the previous results. Rare earth and other refractory lithophile elements are depleted in Ningqiang relative to both Allende and mean CK chondrites. In addition, the REE pattern of Ningqiang is nearly flat, while that of Allende shows slight enrichment of LREE relative to HREE. Siderophile elements of Ningqiang are close to those of mean CK chondrites, but lower than those of Allende. Our new analyses indicate that Ningqiang cannot be classified into any known group of carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with previous reports.

  9. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids Identified in Metal-Rich CH and CB Carbonaceous Chondrites from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Hein, Jason E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain numerous indigenous organic compounds and could have been an important source of prebiotic compounds required for the origin of life on Earth or elsewhere. Extraterrestrial amino acids have been reported in five of the eight groups of carbonaceous chondrites and are most abundant in CI, CM, and CR chondritesbut are also present in the more thermally altered CV and CO chondrites. We report the abundance, distribution, and enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of simple primary amino acids in six metal-rich CH and CB carbonaceous chondrites that have not previously been investigated for amino acids: Allan Hills (ALH) 85085 (CH3), Pecora Escarpment(PCA) 91467 (CH3), Patuxent Range (PAT) 91546 (CH3), MacAlpine Hills (MAC) 02675(CBb), Miller Range (MIL) 05082 (CB), and Miller Range (MIL) 07411 (CB). Amino acid abundances and carbon isotopic values were obtained by using both liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fluorescence, and gas chromatography isotope ratiomass spectrometry. The (delta D, delta C-13, delta N-15) ratios of multiple amino acids fall outside of the terrestrial range and support their extraterrestrial origin. Extracts of CH chondrites were found to be particularly rich in amino acids (1316 parts per million, ppm) while CB chondrite extracts had much lower abundances (0.22 ppm). The amino acid distributions of the CH and CB chondrites were distinct from the distributions observed in type 2 and 3 CM and CR chondrites and contained elevated levels of beta-, gamma-, and delta-amino acids compared to the corresponding alpha-amino acids, providing evidence that multiple amino acid formation mechanisms were important in CH and CB chondrites.

  10. Proto-Planetary Disk Chemistry Recorded by D-Rich Organic Radicals in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Meibom, Anders; Mostefaoui, Smail; Delpoux, Olivier; Binet, Laurent; Gourier, Didier; Derenne, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites has preserved its chemical composition and isotopic heterogeneity since the solar system formed ~4.567 billion years ago. We have identified the carrier moieties of isotopically anomalous hydrogen in IOM isolated from the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite. Data from high spatial resolution, quantitative isotopic NanoSIMS mapping of Orgueil IOM combined with data from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that orga...

  11. Localized Chemical Redistribution During Aqueous Alteration in CR2 Carbonaceous Chondrites EET 87770 and EET 92105

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Paul V.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are primitive meteorites that are valuable because they preserve evidence of processes that occurred in the solar nebula and on asteroidal parent bodies. Among the carbonaceous chondrite groups, the CR group appears to contain a particularly pristine record of early solar system processes. Distinguishing characteristics of CR2 chondrites include a high abundance of chondrules (50-60 vol.%) and Fe, Ni metal (5-8 vol. %). These meteorites preserve evidence for varying degrees of aqueous alteration, manifested by progressive replacement of chondrule mesostasis by phyllosilicates. Recent studies have suggested that even in weakly altered chondrites, mass transfer occurred between chondrules and fine-grained matrices, implying that aqueous alteration must have followed lithification of the final meteorite parent body. Although petrographic characteristics of alteration in CR chondrites have been documented, mechanisms of alteration are still only poorly understood. For example, the relative rates and scales of elemental mobility as well as the sources and sinks for key elements are currently not constrained. An improved knowledge of these issues will contribute to an increased understanding of aqueous alteration reactions on meteorite parent bodies. This study expands on research conducted on Type IIA chondrules and chondrule fragments from two CR2 chondrites, EET 87770 and EET 92105. These chondrites have been weakly altered; chondrule mesostases show incipient alteration primarily where they are in direct contact with fine-grained matrices.

  12. Aliphatic amines in Antarctic CR2, CM2, and CM1/2 carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, José C.; McLain, Hannah L.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2016-09-01

    Meteoritic water-soluble organic compounds provide a unique record of the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system and the chemistry preceding the origins of life on Earth. We have investigated the molecular distribution, compound-specific δ13C isotopic ratios and enantiomeric compositions of aliphatic monoamines present in the hot acid-water extracts of the carbonaceous chondrites LAP 02342 (CR2), GRA 95229 (CR2), LON 94101 (CM2), LEW 90500 (CM2), and ALH 83100 (CM1/2). Analyses of the concentration of monoamines in these meteorites revealed: (a) the CR2 chondrites studied here contain higher concentrations of monoamines relative to the analyzed CM2 chondrites; (b) the concentration of monoamines decreases with increasing carbon number; and (c) isopropylamine is the most abundant monoamine in these CR2 chondrites, while methylamine is the most abundant amine species in these CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. The δ13C values of monoamines in CR2 chondrite do not correlate with the number of carbon atoms; however, in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites, the 13C enrichment decreases with increasing monoamine carbon number. The δ13C values of methylamine in CR2 chondrites ranged from -1 to +10‰, while in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites the δ13C values of methylamine ranged from +41 to +59‰. We also observed racemic compositions of sec-butylamine, 3-methyl-2-butylamine, and sec-pentylamine in the studied carbonaceous chondrites. Additionally, we compared the abundance and δ13C isotopic composition of monoamines to those of their structurally related amino acids. We found that monoamines are less abundant than amino acids in CR2 chondrites, with the opposite being true in CM2 and CM1/2 chondrites. We used these collective data to evaluate different primordial synthetic pathways for monoamines in carbonaceous chondrites and to understand the potential common origins these molecules may share with meteoritic amino acids.

  13. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Patricia M; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J; Hutcheon, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric (53)Mn-(53)Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as Myr after calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and (53)Mn-(53)Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ∼1.8-2.5 Myr after CAIs. PMID:26100451

  14. Ion irradiation of carbonaceous chondrites as a simulation of space weathering on C-complex asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, C.; Brunetto, R.; Barucci, M. A.; Bachelet, C.; Baklouti, D.; Bourçois, J.; Dartois, E.; Duprat, J.; Duret, P.; Engrand, C.; Godard, M.; Ledu, D.; Mivumbi, O.; Fornasier, S.

    2015-10-01

    We are investigating the effects of space weathering on primitive asteroids using ion irradiation on their meteoritic analogs. To do so, we exposed several carbonaceous chondrites (CV Allende, COs Lancé and Frontier Mountain 95002, CM Mighei, CI Alais, and ungrouped Tagish Lake) to 40 keV He+ ions as a simulation of solar wind irradiation using fluences up to 6.1016 ions/cm2 (implantation platform IRMA at CSNSM Orsay). As a test for our new experimental setup, we also studied samples of olivine and diopside. We confirm the reddening and darkening trends on S-type objects, but carbonaceous chondrites present a continuum of behaviors after ion irradiation as a function of the initial albedo and carbon content: from red to blue and from dark to bright.

  15. Titanium-rich oxide-bearing plagioclase-olivine inclusions in the unusual Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite

    OpenAIRE

    Lin,Yangting /Kimura,Makoto

    1997-01-01

    Two plagioclase-olivine inclusions (POIs) from the unusual Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite were studied to understand their mineralogy and crystallization history. In addition to the major phases plagioclase, spinel, olivine and pyroxene, Ningqiang POIs are characterized by interstitial assemblages composed of Ca-rich and Ca-poor pyroxenes, Ti-rich oxides and the other phases. The Ti-rich oxides include an unidentified titanium mineral series referred to as phase T, Ca-rich and Mg, Fe-rich a...

  16. In Situ Mapping of the Organic Matter in Carbonaceous Chondrites and Mineral Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Ross, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrite organic matter represents a fossil record of reactions that occurred in a range of physically, spatially and temporally distinct environments, from the interstellar medium to asteroid parent bodies. While bulk chemical analysis has provided a detailed view of the nature and diversity of this organic matter, almost nothing is known about its spatial distribution and mineralogical relationships. Such information is nevertheless critical to deciphering its formation processes and evolutionary history.

  17. The Spatial Distribution of Organic Matter and Mineralogical Relationships in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2012-01-01

    Organic matter present within primitive carbonaceous meteorites represents the complex conglomeration of species formed in a variety of physically and temporally distinct environments including circumstellar space, the interstellar medium, the Solar Nebula & Jovian sub-nebulae and asteroids. In each case, multiple chemical pathways would have been available for the synthesis of organic molecules. Consequently these meteorites constitute a unique record of organic chemical evolution in the Universe and one of the biggest challenges in organic cosmochemistry has been in deciphering this record. While bulk chemical analysis has provided a detailed description of the range and diversity of organic species present in carbonaceous chondrites, there is virtually no hard experimental data as to how these species are spatially distributed and their relationship to the host mineral matrix, (with one exception). The distribution of organic phases is nevertheless critical to understanding parent body processes. The CM and CI chondrites all display evidence of low temperature (organics and synthesis of new organics coupled to aqueous mineral alteration. To address such issues we have applied the technique of microprobe two-step laser desorption / photoionization mass spectrometry (L2MS) to map in situ the spatial distribution of a broad range of organic species at the micron scale in the freshly exposed matrices of the Bells, Tagish Lake and Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrites.

  18. Checking Contamination during Storage of Carbonaceous Chondrites for Micro FTIR Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    We examined organic contamination by Fourier transform infrared micro spectroscopic (micro FTIR) measurements of carbonaceous chondrite samples. Carbonaceous chondrites, Tagish Lake (C2), Murchison (CM2) and Moss (CO3), and some mineral powder samples pressed on aluminum plates were measured by micro FTIR before and after storage in several containers with silicone rubber mat. During storage, samples did not touch directly anything except the holding aluminum plates. The carbonaceous chondrites containing hydrous minerals (Tagish Lake and Murchison) pressed on aluminum plates and measured by transmission-reflection micro FTIR measurements were found to be contaminated during storage after only one day, as revealed by an increase of approximately 2965 /cm and approximately 1260 /cm peaks. The Moss meteorite which contains no hydrous minerals, did not show an increase of these peaks, indicating no organic contamination. This difference is probably related to the differing mineralogy and physical properties (including porosity and permeability) of these chondrites. Hydrous minerals such as antigorite, muscovite, montmorillonite and silica gel showed organic contamination by the same infrared measurements, while anhydrous materials such as SiO2 and KBr showed no contamination. These results indicate importance of surface OH groups for the organic contamination. Organic contamination was found on silica gel samples pressed on aluminum plates when they were stored within containers including silicone rubber, silicone grease or adhesive tape. Long path gas cell FTIR measurements for silicone rubber indicated methylsiloxane oligomers were released from the silicone rubber. In-situ heating infrared measurements on the contaminated antigorite and Tagish Lake showed decrease of the 1262 /cm (Si-CH3) and 2963 /cm (CH3) peaks from room temperature to 200-300 C indicating desorption of volatile contaminants. These results indicate that careful preparation and storage are

  19. Structure of high-molecular carbonaceous compound in carbonaceous chondrites and formation of IR-spectroscopically similar compounds in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murae, T.

    1997-05-01

    Main components of carbonaceous matter in carbonaceous chondrites are high molecular organic matter. Examinations of the compounds using pyrolysis GC/MS and FT-IR indicated the structural resemblance of major part of the molecule for all of the compounds from different types of carbonaceous chondrites (8 Antarctic and 2 none-Antarctic meteorites). A carbonaceous matter derived from graphite on a shock experiment using a rail gun (1g projectile at 7 km/s) showed similar IR spectrum to those of the meteoritic high-molecular organic matter. C-60 fulleren also gave a similar compound (with minor differences in IR spectra) on a shock experiment under the same conditions. A shock experiment using coronene also examined.

  20. Powder X-Ray Diffraction of the Grain Components of Carbonaceous Chondrite Meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furton, D. G.; Hurt, Kendra; Bos, Abram

    Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are thought to bring to Earth samples of primordial interstellar material. Detailed chemical analysis of meteorites representative of this class (i.e., Allende, Murchison, and Orgueil) establish the primordial character of the material they include and, among other things, reveal that nanometer-sized diamond grains are present in the carbonaceous component of these meteorites at about the 1,000 ppm level (Lewis et al. 1987, Nature, 326, 160). The high abundance of nanodiamonds in these meteoritic samples contributes to the hypothesis that nanodiamonds are present in the interstellar medium at relatively high abundance, but direct observational support of this hypothesis is not so conclusive. (It may also be, according to Dai et al. (2002, Nature, 418, 157), that the nanodiamond grains were formed in situ). On the other hand, there is a growing body of observational evidence that indicates nanometer-sized silicon grains are present in the interstellar medium at relatively high abundance (e.g., Smith & Witt 2001, ApJ, 565, 304). But, silicon nanoparticles have yet to be discovered in a sample of carbonaceous chondrite meteorite. It is relevant in this context that the chemical process that has been used to extract nanodiamond grains from meteoritic samples involves dissolving in strong acid the silicate component of the meteorite. The process is ultimately destructive to any silicon grains that may be present and possibly even alters the nanodiamonds it is used to extract (Mutschke et al. 1995, ApJL, 454, L160). There does not appear to be a similar chemical process that could be used to extract silicon nanoparticles from meteoritic samples. We are in the process of establishing to what extent powder X-ray diffraction can be use as a non-destructive analytical tool to examine nanometer-sized grain components of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. We present powder X-ray diffraction patterns obtained from samples of the Murchison and

  1. Experimental simulation of organic matter alteration in carbonaceous chondrites under an in situ micro FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Saiki, K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain organic matter up to a few weight percents, most of which consists of kerogen- like macromolecular material. Chondritic organic matter preserves signatures of various evolutional steps from presolar materials, through aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism in the parent asteroid up to delivery to the Earth. The organic-mineral interactions during these processes are little known. We report here on the experimental simulation of organic matter alteration on carbonaceous chondrite parent body under micro FTIR spectroscopy with a heating stage. Leonardite humic acid (IHSS standard humic acid) and synthetic saponite or natural antigorite were used as the macromolecular organic matter and the matrix mineral. These powdered samples were dispersed by MilliQ water then dropped on a CaF2 plate and dried. They were heated in the heating stage from room temperature to 600 °C with a heating rate of 10 °C/min in air, Ar gas, and H2+CO2 gas mixture (mixing ratio 1:1). H2+CO2 gas mixture enables controls of not only oxygen fugacity but also water vapor fugacity, and aqueous processing on chondrite parent bodies can be partly simulated. IR spectra were collected at every 20 °C under the micro FTIR spectroscopy. Aliphatic C-H increased from room temperature to approximately 250 °C then decreased. Aromatic C-H increased from room temperature to around 400-450 °C then decreased. These aliphatic C-H decrease and aromatic C-H increase are faster in air than in Ar or H2+CO2. These CH changes of leonardite humic acid are slower with the presence of saponite. These results indicate that organic matter transformation might be prevented by the clay mineral (saponite). Some carbonaceous chondrite samples mixed with the organic material (leonardite humic acid) will also be investigated by the same way. These results will elucidate interactions of chondritic macromolecular organic matter with matrix minerals during parent body processes.

  2. Electrical conductivity of carbonaceous chondrites and electric heating of meteorite parent bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duba, AL

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic heating of rock-forming materials most probably was an important process in the early history of the solar system. Electrical conductivity experiments of representative materials such as carbonaceous chondrites are necessary to obtain data for use in electromagnetic heating models. With the assumption that carbon was present at grain boundaries in the material that comprised the meteorite parent bodies, the electrical heating of such bodies was calculated as a function of body size and solar distance using the T-Tauri model of Sonett and Herbert (1977). The results are discussed.

  3. The Chromium Isotopic Composition of the Ungrouped Carbonaceous Chondrite Tagish Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitat, M.; Birck, J.-L.; Luu, T. H.; Gounelle, M.

    2011-07-01

    Early solar materials bear a variety of isotopic anomalies that reflect compositional differences deriving from distinct stellar nucleosynthetic processes. As shown in previous studies, the stepwise dissolution with increasing acid strengths of bulk rock carbonaceous chondrites liberates Cr with both excesses and deficits in 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the terrestrial standard. The magnitude of the 54Cr variations within a meteorite decreases in the sequence CI1 > CR2 > CM2 > CV3 > CO3 > CK4 and correlates with the degree of metamorphism of each carbonaceous chondrite class. This study shows that the Tagish Lake meteorite presents the highest excesses in 54Cr ever measured in a bulk silicate phase. According to this study, the Tagish Lake meteorite is composed of the least re-equilibrated material known at this time. The magnitude of 54Cr variation decreases now in the following sequence: Tagish Lake (ungrouped CI2) > Orgueil (CI1) > Murchison (CM2) > Allende (CV2). Moreover, this study shows that excesses in 53Cr relative to Earth can be interpreted as representing the extent of aqueous alteration on meteorite parent bodies. Finally, the high 54Cr anomalies measured in this meteorite make Tagish Lake one of the major targets to decipher the host of these anomalies.

  4. The formation and alteration of the Renazzo-like carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Devin Lee

    This study investigates the pre-accretionary formation conditions of individual minerals within chondrules and whole-rock parent asteroid processes from the Renazzo-like carbonaceous (CR) chondrites. It presents a comprehensive work on the whole-rock O-isotope composition, sulfide-bearing opaque minerals, and type-II chondrules within the CR chondrites. Whole-rock O-isotope composition and minerals present in type-II chondrules are found to be related to the degree of parent asteroid aqueous alteration. Primary minerals within chondrules, formed prior to accretion of the CR chondrite parent asteroid, are used to constrain both the environment and the conditions present during chondrule formation. Chondrule formation, as recorded by chondrules in the CR chondrites, took place under dust- and ice-rich conditions relative to solar values. Type-II (FeO-rich) chondrules contain FeO-poor fragments compositionally similar to type-I (FeO-poor) chondrules; the formation of type-II chondrules may have occurred after the formation of type-I chondrules. The dust and ice abundances present during type-II chondrule formation were higher than those of type-I chondrules, although both populations probably exchanged with the same 16O-poor gas reservoir. Both the oxygen fugacity (fo 2) and sulfur fugacity (fs2) appear to have increased from type-I to type-II chondrule formation, and between individual type-II chondrules. The increase in fo2 and fs2 may be due to the dissipation of H2 in the early Solar System. Gas-solid oxidation/sulfidation of Fe,Ni metal is recorded in both type-I and type-II chondrules. This corrosion occurred either during chondrule cooling after formation, or during chondrule reheating events, and suggests that S was present in the gas phase. After chondrule formation the CR chondrite parent asteroid accreted 16O-poor ice and experienced variable degrees of aqueous alteration, possibly due to heterogeneity in accreted ice or ammonia abundances and/or differing

  5. The Effect of Aqueous Alteration in Antarctic Carbonaceous Chondrites from Comparative ICP-MS Bulk Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Azcarate, J.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Zolensky, M.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial ages of Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites (CC) indicate that these meteorites have been preserved in or on ice for, at least, tens of thousands of years. Due to the porous structure of these chondrites formed by the aggregation of silicate-rich chondrules, refractory inclusions, metal grains, and fine-grained matrix materials, the effect of pervasive terrestrial water is relevant. Our community defends that pristine CC matrices are representing samples of scarcely processed protoplanetary disk materials as they contain stellar grains, but they might also trace parent body processes. It is important to study the effects of terrestrial aqueous alteration in promoting bulk chemistry changes, and creating distinctive alteration minerals. Particularly because it is thought that aqueous alteration has particularly played a key role in some CC groups in modifying primordial bulk chemistry, and homogenizing the isotopic content of fine-grained matrix materials. Fortunately, the mineralogy produced by parent-body and terrestrial aqueous alteration processes is distinctive. With the goal to learn more about terrestrial alteration in Antarctica we are obtaining reflectance spectra of CCs, but also performing ICP-MS bulk chemistry of the different CC groups. A direct comparison with the mean bulk elemental composition of recovered falls might inform us on the effects of terrestrial alteration in finds. With such a goal, in the current work we have analyzed some members representative of CO and CM chondrite groups.

  6. Radar-enabled recovery of the Sutter's Mill meteorite, a carbonaceous chondrite regolith breccia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Fries, Marc D; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Zolensky, Michael; Krot, Alexander N; Sandford, Scott A; Sears, Derek; Beauford, Robert; Ebel, Denton S; Friedrich, Jon M; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Wimpenny, Josh; Yamakawa, Akane; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Hamajima, Yasunori; Caffee, Marc W; Welten, Kees C; Laubenstein, Matthias; Davis, Andrew M; Simon, Steven B; Heck, Philipp R; Young, Edward D; Kohl, Issaku E; Thiemens, Mark H; Nunn, Morgan H; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Cahill, Thomas A; Lawton, Jonathan A; Barnes, David; Steele, Andrew; Rochette, Pierre; Verosub, Kenneth L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Cooper, George; Glavin, Daniel P; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P; Elsila, Jamie E; Pizzarello, Sandra; Ogliore, Ryan; Schmitt-Kopplin, Phillipe; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Verchovsky, Alexander; Grady, Monica; Nagao, Keisuke; Okazaki, Ryuji; Takechi, Hiroyuki; Hiroi, Takahiro; Smith, Ken; Silber, Elizabeth A; Brown, Peter G; Albers, Jim; Klotz, Doug; Hankey, Mike; Matson, Robert; Fries, Jeffrey A; Walker, Richard J; Puchtel, Igor; Lee, Cin-Ty A; Erdman, Monica E; Eppich, Gary R; Roeske, Sarah; Gabelica, Zelimir; Lerche, Michael; Nuevo, Michel; Girten, Beverly; Worden, Simon P

    2012-12-21

    Doppler weather radar imaging enabled the rapid recovery of the Sutter's Mill meteorite after a rare 4-kiloton of TNT-equivalent asteroid impact over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada in northern California. The recovered meteorites survived a record high-speed entry of 28.6 kilometers per second from an orbit close to that of Jupiter-family comets (Tisserand's parameter = 2.8 ± 0.3). Sutter's Mill is a regolith breccia composed of CM (Mighei)-type carbonaceous chondrite and highly reduced xenolithic materials. It exhibits considerable diversity of mineralogy, petrography, and isotope and organic chemistry, resulting from a complex formation history of the parent body surface. That diversity is quickly masked by alteration once in the terrestrial environment but will need to be considered when samples returned by missions to C-class asteroids are interpreted. PMID:23258889

  7. Rapid Contamination During Storage of Carbonaceous Chondrites Prepared for Micro FTIR Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Nakashima, Satoru; Otsuka, Takahiro; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Zolensky, ichael E.

    2008-01-01

    The carbonaceous chondrites Tagish Lake and Murchison, which contain abundant hydrous minerals, when pressed on aluminum plates and analyzed by micro FTIR, were found to have been contaminated during brief (24 hours) storage. This contamination occurred when the samples were stored within containers which included silicone rubber, silicone grease or adhesive tape. Long-path gas cell FTIR measurements for silicone rubber revealed the presence of contaminant volatile molecules having 2970 cm(sup -1) (CH3) and 1265 cm(sup -1) (Si-CH3) peaks. These organic contaminants are found to be desorbed by in-situ heating infrared measurements from room temperature to 200-300 C. Careful preparation and storage are therefore needed for precious astronomical samples such as meteorites, IDPs and mission returned samples from comets, asteroids and Mars, if useful for FTIR measurements are to be made.

  8. Carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen isotopes in solvent-extractable organic matter from carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    CCl4 and CH3OH solvent extractions were performed on the Murray, Murchison, Orgueil and Renazzo carbonaceous chondrites. Delta-D values of +300-+500% are found in the case of the CH3OH-soluble organic matter. The combined C, H and N isotope data makes it unlikely that the CH3OH-soluble components are derivable from, or simply related to, the insoluble organic polymer found in the same meteorites. A relation between the event that formed hydrous minerals in CI1 and CM2 meteorites and the introduction of water- and methanol-soluble organic compounds is suggested. Organic matter soluble in CCl4 has no N, and delta-C-13 values are lower than for CH3OH-soluble phases. It is concluded that there either are large isotopic fractionations for carbon and hydrogen between different soluble organic phases, or the less polar components are partially of terrestrial origin.

  9. Molecular Composition of Carbonaceous Globules in the Bells (CM2) Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemett, S. J.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Robinson, G.-A.; Mckay, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    Some meteorites and IDPs contain micron-size carbonaceous globules that are associated with significant H and/or N isotopic anomalies. This has been interpreted as indicating that such globules may contain at least partial preserved organic species formed in the outer reaches of the proto-solar disk or the presolar cold molecular cloud. Owing to their small sizes, relatively little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present in situ measurements of aromatic molecular species in organic globules from the Bells (CM2) chondrite by microprobe two-step laser mass spectrometry. This meteorite was chosen for study because we have previously found this meteorite to contain high abundances of globules that often occur in clusters. The Bells (CM2) globules are also noteworthy for having particularly high enrichments in H-2. and N-15. In this study, we identified individual globules and clusters of globules using native UV fluorescence.

  10. Thermal history of type 3 chondrites from the Antarctic meteorite collection determined by Raman spectroscopy of their polyaromatic carbonaceous matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, Lydie; Quirico, Eric; Flandinet, Laurène; Montagnac, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    This paper is focused on the characterization of the thermal history of 151 CV, CO and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) from the NASA Antarctic meteorite collection, using an approach based on the structure of the included polyaromatic carbonaceous matter determined by Raman spectroscopy. 114 out of these 151 chondrites provided Raman spectra of carbonaceous matter and allowing to assign a petrologic type, which mostly reflects the peak temperature experienced by the rock on the parent body. A thorough review of literature shows however that it is not possible to deduce a peak temperature because accurate calibration is not available. Twenty-three new weakly metamorphosed chondrites have been identified: MIL 07671 (CV3.1); DOM 08006 (CO3.0); DOM 03238, MIL 05024, MIL 05104, MIL 07193 (CO3.1); TIL 82408, LAR 06279 (LL3.05-3.1); EET 90628 (L3.0); GRO 06054, QUE 97008 (L3.05), ALHA 77176, EET 90066, LAR 04380, MET 96515, MIL 05050 (L3.1); ALHA 78133, EET 87735, EET 90909, LEW 87208, PRE 95401 (L3.05-3.1); MCY 05218 (H3.05-3.1) and MET 00506 (H3.1). This study confirms that the width of the D band (FWHMD) and the ratio of the peak intensity of the D and G bands (ID/IG) are the most adapted tracers of the extent of thermal metamorphism in type 3 chondrites. It also unambiguously shows, thanks to the large number of samples, that the width of the G band (FWHMG) does not correlate with the maturity of polyaromatic carbonaceous matter. This parameter is nevertheless very valuable because it shows that Raman spectra of CV chondrites preserve memory of either the metamorphic conditions (possibly oxidation controlled by aqueous alteration) or the nature of the organic precursor. Oxidation memory is our preferred interpretation, however an extensive petrologic characterization of this CV series is required to get firm conclusions. Pre-graphitic carbonaceous matter is reported in seven chondrites and is even the only carbonaceous material detected in the chondrites

  11. In situ observation of D-rich carbonaceous globules embedded in NWA 801 CR2 chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Minako; Kobayashi, Sachio; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2013-12-01

    Eighty-five D-rich carbonaceous particles were identified in the matrix of the NWA 801 CR2 chondrite using isotope microscopy. The occurrence of 67 D-rich carbonaceous particles was characterized using secondary electron microscopy combined with X-ray elemental mapping. The close association of H and C, and D-enrichment suggests that the D-rich carbonaceous particles correspond to organic matter. The D-rich organic particles were scattered ubiquitously throughout the matrix at a concentration of approximately 660 ppm. The morphology of the D-rich carbonaceous particles is globular up to about 1 μm in diameter and is classified into four types: ring globules, round globules, irregular-shaped globules, and globule aggregates. The ring globules are ring-shaped organic matter containing silicate and/or oxide, with or without a void in the center. This is the first report of silicate and oxide grains surrounded by D-rich organic matter. The globule aggregates are composed of several D-rich organic globules mixed with silicates. Morphology of ring globules is very similar to core-mantle grain produced in the molecular cloud or in the outer solar nebula inferring by astronomy, suggesting that the organic globules have formed by UV photolysis in the ice mantle. Silicates or oxides attached to D-rich organic globules are the first observation among chondrites so far and may be unique nature of CR2 chondrites. The hydrogen isotopic compositions of the ring globules, round globules, irregular-shaped globules, and globule aggregates are δD = 3000-4800, 2900-8100, 2700-11,000, and 2500-11,000‰, respectively. Variations of D/H ratio of these organic globules seemed to be attributed to variations of D/H ratio of the organic radicals or differences of content of the D-rich organic radicals. There are no significant differences in the hydrogen isotopic compositions among the four types of D-rich carbonaceous matter. The D-enrichments suggest that these organic globules have

  12. Magnesium and 54Cr isotope compositions of carbonaceous chondrite chondrules – Insights into early disk processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Mia B.; Wielandt, Daniel; Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah M.M.E.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We report on the petrology, magnesium isotopes and mass-independent 54Cr/52Cr compositions (μ54Cr) of 42 chondrules from CV (Vigarano and NWA 3118) and CR (NWA 6043, NWA 801 and LAP 02342) chondrites. All sampled chondrules are classified as type IA or type IAB, have low 27Al/24Mg ratios (0.04–0.27) and display little or no evidence for secondary alteration processes. The CV and CR chondrules show variable 25Mg/24Mg and 26Mg/24Mg values corresponding to a range of mass-dependent fractionation of ~500 ppm (parts per million) per atomic mass unit. This mass-dependent Mg isotope fractionation is interpreted as reflecting Mg isotope heterogeneity of the chondrule precursors and not the result of secondary alteration or volatility-controlled processes during chondrule formation. The CV and CR chondrule populations studied here are characterized by systematic deficits in the mass-independent component of 26Mg (μ26Mg*) relative to the solar value defined by CI chondrites, which we interpret as reflecting formation from precursor material with a reduced initial abundance of 26Al compared to the canonical 26Al/27Al of ~5 × 10−5. Model initial 26Al/27Al values of CV and CR chondrules vary from (1.5 ± 4.0) × 10−6 to (2.2 ± 0.4) × 10−5. The CV chondrules display significant μ54Cr variability, defining a range of compositions that is comparable to that observed for inner Solar System primitive and differentiated meteorites. In contrast, CR chondrites are characterized by a narrower range of μ54Cr values restricted to compositions typically observed for bulk carbonaceous chondrites. Collectively, these observations suggest that the CV chondrules formed from precursors that originated in various regions of the protoplanetary disk and were then transported to the accretion region of the CV parent asteroid whereas CR chondrule predominantly formed from precursor with carbonaceous chondrite-like μ54Cr signatures. The observed μ54Cr variability in chondrules from

  13. Magnesium and 54Cr isotope compositions of carbonaceous chondrite chondrules - Insights into early disk processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Mia B.; Wielandt, Daniel; Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah M. M. E.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We report on the petrology, magnesium isotopes and mass-independent 54Cr/52Cr compositions (μ54Cr) of 42 chondrules from CV (Vigarano and NWA 3118) and CR (NWA 6043, NWA 801 and LAP 02342) chondrites. All sampled chondrules are classified as type IA or type IAB, have low 27Al/24Mg ratios (0.04-0.27) and display little or no evidence for secondary alteration processes. The CV and CR chondrules show variable 25Mg/24Mg and 26Mg/24Mg values corresponding to a range of mass-dependent fractionation of ∼500 ppm (parts per million) per atomic mass unit. This mass-dependent Mg isotope fractionation is interpreted as reflecting Mg isotope heterogeneity of the chondrule precursors and not the result of secondary alteration or volatility-controlled processes during chondrule formation. The CV and CR chondrule populations studied here are characterized by systematic deficits in the mass-independent component of 26Mg (μ26Mg∗) relative to the solar value defined by CI chondrites, which we interpret as reflecting formation from precursor material with a reduced initial abundance of 26Al compared to the canonical 26Al/27Al of ∼5 × 10-5. Model initial 26Al/27Al values of CV and CR chondrules vary from (1.5 ± 4.0) × 10-6 to (2.2 ± 0.4) × 10-5. The CV chondrules display significant μ54Cr variability, defining a range of compositions that is comparable to that observed for inner Solar System primitive and differentiated meteorites. In contrast, CR chondrites are characterized by a narrower range of μ54Cr values restricted to compositions typically observed for bulk carbonaceous chondrites. Collectively, these observations suggest that the CV chondrules formed from precursors that originated in various regions of the protoplanetary disk and were then transported to the accretion region of the CV parent asteroid whereas CR chondrule predominantly formed from precursor with carbonaceous chondrite-like μ54Cr signatures. The observed μ54Cr variability in chondrules from CV

  14. A plausible link between the asteroid 21 Lutetia and CH carbonaceous chondrites

    CERN Document Server

    Moyano-Cambero, Carles E; Llorca, Jordi; Fornasier, Sonia; Barucci, Maria A; Rimola, Albert

    2016-01-01

    A crucial topic in planetology research is establishing links between primitive meteorites and their parent asteroids. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a connection between asteroids similar to 21 Lutetia, encountered by the Rosetta mission in July 2010, and the CH3 carbonaceous chondrite Pecora Escarpment 91467 (PCA 91467). Several spectra of this meteorite were acquired in the ultraviolet to near-infrared (0.3 to 2.2 {\\mu}m) and in the mid-infrared to thermal infrared (2.5 to 30.0 {\\mu}m or 4000 to ~333 cm^-1), and they are compared here to spectra from the asteroid 21 Lutetia. There are several similarities in absorption bands and overall spectral behavior between this CH3 meteorite and 21 Lutetia. Considering also that the bulk density of Lutetia is similar to that of CH chondrites, we suggest that this asteroid could be similar, or related to, the parent body of these meteorites, if not the parent body itself. However, the apparent surface diversity of Lutetia pointed out in previous studi...

  15. Dipeptides and Diketopiperazines in the Yamato-791198 and Murchison Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Akira; Ogasawara, Ryo

    2002-04-01

    The Yamato-791198 and Murchison carbonaceous chondrites were analyzed for dipeptides and diketopiperazines as well as amino acids and hydantoins by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Glycylglycine (gly-gly) and cyclo(gly-gly) were detected at the concentrations of 11 and 18 pmol g^-1, respectively, in Yamato-791198, and 4 and 23 pmol g^-1, respectively, in Murchison. No other dipeptide and diketopiperazine were detected. Five hydantoins were detected at 8 to 65 pmol g^-1 in Yamato-791198 and seven in Murchison at 6 to 104 pmol g^-1. Total concentration of the glycine (gly) dimers is approximately four orders of magnitude less than the concentration of free gly in Yamato-791198, and three orders of magnitude less than that in Murchison. The absence of L- and LL-stereoisomers of dipeptides consisting of protein amino acids indicates that gly-gly and cyclo(gly-gly) detected are native to the chondrites and not from terrestrial contaminants. A possibility was discussed that the gly dimers might have been formed by condensation of gly monomers but not formed through N-carboxyanhydrides of gly.

  16. Rhenium-osmium systematics of calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, H.; Morgan, J.W.; Walker, R.J.; MacPherson, G.J.; Grossman, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    pose several difficulties. The narrow range of 187Os/188Os in group I, III, V, and VI bulk CAIs, and the agreement with 187Os/188Os of whole rock carbonaceous chondrites suggest that on a bulk inclusion scale, secondary alteration only modestly fractionated Re/Os in these CAIs. The average of 187Os/188Os for group I, III, V, and VI CAIs is indistinguishable from average CI chondrites, indicating a modern solar system value for 187Os/188Os of 0.12650, corresponding to a 187Re/188Os of 0.3964. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. Crystallography of Magnetite Plaquettes and their Significance as Asymmetric Catalysts for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  18. Extended chronologies of aqueous alteration in the CM2 carbonaceous chondrites: evidence from carbonates in Queen Alexandra Range 93005

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M.; Lindgren, P.; Sofe, M.; Alexander, C.; Wang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic CM2 carbonaceous chondrite QUE 93005 contains four compositionally distinct carbonates, namely breunnerite, calcite, dolomite and a Ca-poor dolomite. These carbonates can form monomineralic grains, or may be intergrown as bimineralic grains consisting of dolomite plus breunnerite and dolomite plus calcite, or polymineralic grains containing an intergrowth of breunnerite, Ca-poor dolomite and calcite. Carbonates in all grain types have inclusions of Fe,Ni sulphides and/or Mg-Fe p...

  19. Detection of serpentine in exogenic carbonaceous chondrite material on Vesta from Dawn FC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Cloutis, Edward A.; Schäfer, Michael; Reddy, Vishnu; Christensen, Ulrich; Sierks, Holger; Thangjam, Guneshwar Singh; Le Corre, Lucille; Mengel, Kurt; Vincent, Jean-Baptist; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Tom; Schmedemann, Nico; Kneissl, Thomas; Raymond, Carol; Gutierrez-Marques, Pablo; Hall, Ian; Büttner, Irene

    2014-09-01

    The Dawn mission’s Framing Camera (FC) observed Asteroid (4) Vesta in 2011 and 2012 using seven color filters and one clear filter from different orbits. In the present paper we analyze recalibrated HAMO color cubes (spatial resolution ∼60 m/pixel) with a focus on dark material (DM). We present a definition of highly concentrated DM based on spectral parameters, subsequently map the DM across the Vestan surface, geologically classify DM, study its spectral properties on global and local scales, and finally, compare the FC in-flight color data with laboratory spectra. We have discovered an absorption band centered at 0.72 μm in localities of DM that show the lowest albedo values by using FC data as well as spectral information from Dawn’s imaging spectrometer VIR. Such localities are contained within impact-exposed outcrops on inner crater walls and ejecta material. Comparisons between spectral FC in-flight data, and laboratory spectra of meteorites and mineral mixtures in the wavelength range 0.4-1.0 μm, revealed that the absorption band can be attributed to the mineral serpentine, which is typically present in CM chondrites. Dark material in its purest form is rare on Vesta’s surface and is distributed globally in a non-uniform manner. Our findings confirm the hypothesis of an exogenic origin of the DM by the infall of carbonaceous chondritic material, likely of CM type. It further confirms the hypothesis that most of the DM was deposited by the Veneneia impact.

  20. Metamorphosed CM and CI Carbonaceous Chondrites Could Be from the Breakup of the Same Earth-crossing Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Abell, Paul; Tonui, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Far from being the relatively unprocessed materials they were once believed to be, we now know that a significant number of carbonaceous chondrites were thermally metamorphosed on their parent asteroid(s). Numerous studies indicate that 7 "CM" and 2 "CI" chondrites have been naturally heated, variously, at from 400 to over 700 C on their parent asteroid(s). Petrographic textures reveal that this thermal metamorphism occurred after the dominant aqueous alteration phase, although some meteorites show evidence of a heating event between two aqueous alteration episodes, i.e. pro- and retrograde aqueous alteration. Aside from the issues of the identification of the transient heat source, timing of metamorphism, and the relation of these materials (if any) to conventional CM and CI chondrites, there is also a mystery related to their recovery. All of these meteorites have been recovered from the Antarctic; none are falls or finds from anyplace else. Indeed, the majority have been collected by the Japanese NIPR field parties in the Yamato Mountains. In fact, one estimate is that these meteorites account for approx. 64 wt% of the CM carbonaceous chondrites at the NIPR. The reasons for this are unclear and might be due in part to simple sampling bias. However we suggest that this recovery difference is related to the particular age of the Yamato Mountains meteorite recovery surfaces, and differences in meteoroid fluxes between the Yamato meteorites and recent falls and substantially older Antarctic meteorites. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Synchrotron Radiation XRD Analysis of Indialite in Y-82094 Ungrouped Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Sawa, N.; Kimura, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Komatsu, M.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Y-82094 is an ungrouped type 3.2 carbonaceous chondrite, with abundant chondrules making 78 vol.% of the rock. Among these chondrules, an unusual porphyritic Al-rich magnesian chondrule is reported that consists of a cordierite-like phase, Al-rich orthopyroxene, cristobalite, and spinel surrounded by an anorthitic mesostasis. The reported chemical formula of the cordierite-like phase is Na(0.19)Mg(1.95)Fe(0.02)Al(3.66)Si(5.19)O18, which is close to stoichiometric cordierite (Mg2Al3[AlSi5O18]). Although cordierite can be present in Al-rich chondrules, it has a high temperature polymorph (indialite) and it is therefore necessary to determine whether it is cordierite or indialite in order to better constrain its formation conditions. In this abstract we report on our synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) study of the cordierite-like phase in Y-82094.

  2. Application of Scanning-Imaging X-Ray Microscopy to Fluid Inclusion Candidates in Carbonates of Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakano, Tsukasa; Miyake, Akira; Akihisa, Takeuchi; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Kitayama, Akira; Matsuno, Junya; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to search for such fluid inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites, a nondestructive technique using x-ray micro-absorption tomography combined with FIB sampling was developed and applied to a carbonaceous chondrite. They found fluid inclusion candidates in calcite grains, which were formed by aqueous alteration. However, they could not determine whether they are really aqueous fluids or merely voids. Phase and absorption contrast images can be simultaneously obtained in 3D by using scanning-imaging x-ray microscopy (SIXM). In refractive index, n=1-sigma+i(beta), in the real part, 1-sigma is the refractive index with decrement, sigma, which is nearly proportional to the density, and the imaginary part, beta, is the extinction coefficient, which is related to the liner attenuation coefficient, mu. Many phases, including water and organic materials as well as minerals, can be identified by SIXM, and this technique has potential availability for Hayabusa-2 sample analysis too. In this study, we examined quantitative performance of d and m values and the spatial resolution in SIXM by using standard materials, and applied this technique to carbonaceous chondrite samples. We used POM ([CH2O]n), silicon, quartz, forsterite, corundum, magnetite and nickel as standard materials for examining the sigma and mu values. A fluid inclusion in terrestrial quartz and bi-valve shell (Atrina vexillum), which are composed of calcite and organic layers with different thickness, were also used for examining the spatial resolution. The Ivuna (CI) and Sutter's Mill (CM) meteorites were used as carbonaceous chondrite samples. Rod- or cube-shaped samples 20-30 micron in size were extracted by using FIB from cross-sectional surfaces of the standard materials or polished thin sections of the chondrites, which was previously observed with SEM. Then, the sample was attached to a thin W-needle and imaged by SIXM system at beamline BL47XU, SPring-8, Japan. The slice thickness was 109.3 nm

  3. Magnetite as Possible Template for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the Japanese Aerospace Ex-ploration Agency (JAXA) Hayabusa-2 mission is to visit and return to Earth samples of a C-type asteroid (162173) 1999 JU3 in order to understand the origin and nature of organic materials in the Solar System. Life on Earth shows preference towards the set of organics with particular spatial arrangements, this 'selectivity' is a crucial criterion for life. With only rare exceptions, life 'determines' to use the left- (L-) form over the right- (D-) form of amino acids, resulting in a L-enantiomeric excess (ee). Recent studies have shown that L-ee is found within the alpha-methyl amino acids in meteorites [1, 2], which are amino acids with rare terrestrial occurrence, and thus point towards a plausible abiotic origin for ee. One of the proposed origins of chiral asymmetry of amino acids in meteorites is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts [3]. The catalytic mineral grains acted as a surface at which nebular gases (CO, H2 and NH3) were allowed to condense and react through Fisher Tropsch type (FTT) syntheses to form the organics observed in meteorites [4]. Magnetite is shown to be an effective catalyst of the synthesis of amino acids that are commonly found in meteorites [5]. It has also taken the form as spiral magnetites (a.k.a. 'plaquettes'), which were found in various carbonaceous chondrites (CCs), including C2s Tagish Lake and Esseibi, CI Orgueil, and CR chondrites [e.g., 6, 7, 8]. In addition, L-ee for amino acids are common in the aqueously altered CCs, as opposed to the unaltered CCs [1]. It seems possible that the synthesis of amino acids with chiral preferences is correlated to the alteration process experienced by the asteroid parent body, and related to the configuration of spiral magnetite catalysts. Since C-type asteroids are considered to be enriched in organic matter, and the spectral data of 1999 JU3 indicates a certain de-gree of aqueous alteration [9], the Hayabusa-2 mission serves as

  4. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy of carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for water quantification and primary composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garenne, A.; Beck, P.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Brissaud, O.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.; Bonal, L.; Beck, C.; Howard, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured bidirectional reflectance spectra (0.5-4.0 μm) of 24 CMs, five CRs, one CI, one CV, and one C2 carbonaceous chondrites. These meteorites are known to have experienced an important variability in their relative degrees of aqueous alteration degree (Rubin et al. [2007]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2361-2382; Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2011]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 2735-2751; Alexander et al. [2013]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 123, 244-260). These measurements were performed on meteorite powders inside an environmental cell under a primary vacuum and heated at 60 °C in order to minimize adsorbed terrestrial water. This protocol allows controlling of atmospheric conditions (i.e. humidity) in order to avoid contamination by terrestrial water. We discuss various spectral metrics (e.g. reflectance, band depth, single-scattering albedo, …) in the light of recent bulk composition characterization (Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2015]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 149, 206-222; Alexander et al. [2012]. Science 337, 721; Beck et al. [2014]. Icarus 229, 263-277; Garenne et al. [2014]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 137, 93-112). This study reveals variability of reflectance among meteorite groups. The reflectance is not correlated with carbon or hydrogen abundance neither with measured grain size distribution. We suggest that it is rather controlled by the nature of accreted components, in particular the initial matrix/chondrule proportion. Band depth, integrated band depth, mean optical path length, normalized optical path length, effective single-particle absorption thickness were calculated on the so called 3-μm band for reflectance spectra and for single scattering albedo spectra. They were compared with hydrated phase proportions from previous study on the same meteorites by thermogravimetric analyses and infrared spectroscopy in transmission. We find

  5. Oxygen- and magnesium-isotope compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions from CR2 carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makide, Kentaro; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Bischoff, Addi

    2009-09-01

    We report both oxygen- and magnesium-isotope compositions measured in situ using a Cameca ims-1280 ion microprobe in 20 of 166 CAIs identified in 47 polished sections of 15 CR2 (Renazzo-type) carbonaceous chondrites. Two additional CAIs were measured for oxygen isotopes only. Most CR2 CAIs are mineralogically pristine; only few contain secondary phyllosilicates, sodalite, and carbonates - most likely products of aqueous alteration on the CR2 chondrite parent asteroid. Spinel, hibonite, grossite, anorthite, and melilite in 18 CAIs have 16O-rich (Δ 17O = -23.3 ± 1.9‰, 2 σ error) compositions and show no evidence for postcrystallization isotopic exchange commonly observed in CAIs from metamorphosed CV carbonaceous chondrites. The inferred initial 26Al/ 27Al ratios, ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0, in 15 of 16 16O-rich CAIs measured are consistent with the canonical value of (4.5-5) × 10 -5 and a short duration (oxygen- and magnesium-isotope compositions (˜11 and 23‰/amu, respectively), a deficit of 26Mg, and a relatively low ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 = (2.0 ± 1.7) × 10 -5. This could be the first FUN ( Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear effects) CAI found in CR2 chondrites. Because this inclusion is slightly 16O-depleted compared to most CR2 CAIs and has lower than the canonical ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0, it may have experienced multistage formation from precursors with nonsolar magnesium-isotope composition and recorded evolution of oxygen-isotope composition in the early solar nebula over 0.9+2.2-0.7 My. Eight of the 166 CR2 CAIs identified are associated with chondrule materials, indicating that they experienced late-stage, incomplete melting during chondrule formation. Three of these CAIs show large variations in oxygen-isotope compositions (Δ 17O ranges from -23.5‰ to -1.7‰), suggesting dilution by 16O-depleted chondrule material and possibly exchange with an 16O-poor (Δ 17O > -5‰) nebular gas. The low inferred ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 ratios of these CAIs (2 My after crystallization

  6. UV to far-IR reflectance spectra of carbonaceous chondrites. I. Implications for remote characterization of dark primitive asteroids targeted by sample-return missions

    CERN Document Server

    Trigo-Rodriguez, Josep M; Llorca, Jordi; Fornasier, Sonia; Barucci, Maria A; Belskaya, Irina; Martins, Zita; Rivkin, Andy S; Dotto, Elisabetta; Madiedo, José M; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2013-01-01

    We analyze here a wide sample of carbonaceous chondrites from historic falls (e.g. Allende, Cold Bokkeveld, Kainsaz, Leoville, Murchison, Murray and Orgueil), and from NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the role of aqueous alteration in promoting the reflectance spectra diversity evidenced in the most primitive chondrite groups. We particularly focus in the identification of spectral features and behavior that can be used to remotely identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids. The selected meteorite specimens are a sample large enough to exemplify how laboratory reflectance spectra of rare groups of carbonaceous chondrites exhibit distinctive features that can be used to remotely characterize the spectra of primitive asteroids. Our spectra cover the full electromagnetic spectrum from 0.2 to 25 microns by using two spectrometers. First one is a UV-NIR spectrometer that covers the 0.2 to 2 microns window, while the second one is an Attenuated Total Reflectance IR spectrometer covering the 2 to 25...

  7. Mineral associations and character of isotopically anomalous organic material in the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.; Busemann, Henner; Nittler, Larry R.; Hoppe, Peter; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Young, Andrea F.

    2010-10-01

    We report a coordinated analytical study of matrix material in the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite in which the same small (⩽20 μm) fragments were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). SIMS analysis reveals H and N isotopic anomalies (hotspots), ranging from hundreds to thousands of nanometers in size, which are present throughout the fragments. Although the differences in spatial resolution of the SIMS techniques we have used introduce some uncertainty into the exact location of the hotspots, in general, the H and N isotopic anomalies are spatially correlated with C enrichments, suggesting an organic carrier. TEM analysis, enabled by site-specific extraction using a focused-ion-beam scanning-electron microscope, shows that the hotspots contain an amorphous component, Fe-Ni sulfides, serpentine, and mixed-cation carbonates. TEM imaging reveals that the amorphous component occurs in solid and porous forms, EDS indicates that it contains abundant C, and EELS and XANES at the C K edge reveal that it is largely aromatic. This amorphous component is probably macromolecular C, likely the carrier of the isotopic anomalies, and similar to the material extracted from bulk samples as insoluble organic matter. However, given the large sizes of some of the hotspots, the disparity in spatial resolution among the various techniques employed in our study, and the phases with which they are associated, we cannot entirely rule out that some of the isotopic anomalies are carried by inorganic material, e.g., sheet silicates. The isotopic composition of the organic matter points to an initially primitive origin, quite possibly within cold interstellar clouds or the outer reaches of the solar protoplanetary disk. The association of organic material with secondary phases, e.g., serpentine

  8. Hydrothermal venting on carbonaceous chondritic elevations on 1 Ceres and 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Martin; Nathues, Andreas; Platz, Thomas; Thangjam, Guneshwar

    2016-04-01

    Framing Camera images of the Dawn spacecraft [1] led to the discovery of recent geologic activity on Ceres, including deposition of salts, formation of near surface haze [2], and impact associated spectral diversity. More detailed analyses revealed widespread flow features, partly composed of granular material, but also indicating sites of fluidized areas of the surface and sub-surface. The unexpected discovery of deposits of carbonaceous chondritic material on Vesta associated with indications of considerable amounts of volatiles at large impact structures hint at similar processes [3, 4]. Near large crater walls on both proto-/dwarf-planets, montes and domes appear to be associated with uplift and even release of water-driven material including salts and clays [5, 6]. We report morphologic and color band spectroscopic characteristics of selected key features on 1 Ceres and 4 Vesta which demonstrate this context. A first analysis indicates compositional differences of the proportion of the content of salts and phyllosilicates, e. g. on the different elevations of the primary and secondary spots in Occator and some flow features. The distribution and diversity of these color features is further characterized by a comparison with more widespread properties on the whole surface. During this investigation, not only the link between salt deposits and different types of materials at the centers of activity could be described, but we also offer an intriguing new interpretation of one of the most prominent surface features of Vesta: Lucaria Tholus. Several analogies with similar features and properties of Mars [7] further support the view of a related origin. References: [1] Sierks, H. et al., Space Sci. Rev., 163, 263-327, 2011. [2] Nathues, A. et al., Nature 528, 237-240, 2015. [3] Reddy, V. et al. Icarus, 221, 544-559, 2012. [4] Scully, J. E. C. et al., EPSC Abstracts 8, 2013-242-2, 2013. [5] Platz, T. et al. LPSC 2016 [6] Ruesch, O. et al. LPSC 2016 [7] Platz, T. et

  9. Ca-carbonate in the Orgueil (CI) carbonaceous chondrite: Mineralogy, microstructure and implications for parent body history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin R.; Nicholson, Kirsty

    2009-04-01

    The Orgueil CI carbonaceous chondrite is a breccia and some of its constituent clasts contain Ca-carbonate grains whose mineralogy is undetermined, but may yield new information on the history of its asteroidal or cometary parent body. Characterisation of one such clast shows that in addition to Ca-carbonate it contains magnetite, olivine and orthopyroxene grains that are supported within a finely crystalline saponite-serpentine-ferrihydrite groundmass. The Ca-carbonate grains are typically rounded, less than 10 μm in diameter, and backscatter Kikuchi patterns identify all those analysed as calcite. Electron backscatter diffraction orientation contrast maps show that most calcites have sub-μm sized e-twins, some of which are cut by corroded grain margins. These microstructures demonstrate that the clast experienced very mild shock during aqueous alteration and probably accompanying impact 'gardening' of the parent body regolith. The sample studied hosts several other millimeter sized clasts and a fine grained clastic matrix that are free of Ca-carbonate, olivine and orthopyroxene although can contain apatite, dolomite and pyrrhotite. Within one of these clasts is a network of phyllosilicate-magnetite veins that are inferred to have acted as fluid flow conduits during parent body aqueous alteration. Sulphur-rich reaction rims within the same clast are likely to have formed during post-fall remobilization and crystallization of pre-terrestrial sulphates. This study provides good evidence for alteration of the CI carbonaceous chondrites in a dynamic parent body regolith.

  10. The appearance of Carbonaceous Chondrites on (1) Ceres from observations by the Dawn Framing Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Tanja; Schäfer, Michael; Mengel, Kurt; Cloutis, Edward A.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Thangjam, Guneshwar; Hoffmann, Martin; Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Kallisch, Jan; Ripken, Joachim; Russel, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft reached dwarf planet Ceres in March 2015 and started data acquisition using three different instruments. These are the Framing Camera (FC; [1]), the Visible & Infrared Spectrometer (VIR; [2]), and the Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND; [3]). In our work we focus on the potential appearance of carbonaceous chondritic (CC) material on the cerean surface using Dawn FC color mosaics covering the VIS/NIR wavelength region. In preparation of the Dawn arrival at Ceres, a discrimination scheme for CC groups using FC color ratios was developed by [4] and is based on 121 CC laboratory spectra compiled from RELAB. As the cerean surface material mainly differs by its spectral slope over the whole FC wavelength range (0.44-0.97 μm), we classified the color mosaics by this parameter. We applied the CC discrimination scheme only to those regions on the cerean surface (more than 90 %) which exhibit spectral slopes ≥ -1 % reflectance per μm to exclude the strongly negative sloped regions of large young craters such as Occator, Haulani, and Oxo. These are not likely to be similar to pure CC material as can be seen by their brightness and their bluish spectral slope [5]. We found that the surface material of Ceres is, among the suite of CCs, most similar to Ivuna samples artificially heated to 200 and 300°C [6] and unusual CCs, which naturally experienced heating. The latter ones comprise Dhofar 225, Y-86789 and Y-82162, which have been determined to have undergone aqueous alteration and subsequent thermal metamorphism (e.g. [7,8]).Our comparison with VIR data shows, that the spectra of Ivuna heated to 200°C and 300°C match well the OH-absorption at 2.7 μm but do not show the smaller 3.05-3.1 μm absorption observed on Ceres [9,10,11]. Nevertheless, the remarkably flat UV drop-off detected on the cerean surface may, at least spectrally, correspond to highly aqueously altered and subsequently thermally metamorphosed CC material. Further alteration of

  11. Size distributions and aerodynamic equivalence of metal chondrules and silicate chondrules in Acfer 059

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, William R.; Leenhouts, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The CR2 chondrite Acfer 059 is unusual in that the original droplet shapes of metal chondrules are well preserved. We determined separate size distributions for metal chondrules and silicate chondrules; the two types are well sorted and have similar size distributions about their respective mean diameters of 0.74 mm and 1.44 mm. These mean values are aerodynamically equivalent for the contrasting densities, as shown by calculated terminal settling velocities in a model solar nebula. Aerodynamic equivalence and similarity of size distributions suggest that metal and silicate fractions experienced the same sorting process before they were accreted onto the parent body. These characteristics, together with depletion of iron in Acfer 059 and essentially all other chondrites relative to primitive CI compositions, strongly suggest that sorting in the solar nebula involved a radial aerodynamic component and that sorting and siderophile depletion in chondrites are closely related.

  12. Early solar system. Early accretion of water in the inner solar system from a carbonaceous chondrite-like source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafian, Adam R; Nielsen, Sune G; Marschall, Horst R; McCubbin, Francis M; Monteleone, Brian D

    2014-10-31

    Determining the origin of water and the timing of its accretion within the inner solar system is important for understanding the dynamics of planet formation. The timing of water accretion to the inner solar system also has implications for how and when life emerged on Earth. We report in situ measurements of the hydrogen isotopic composition of the mineral apatite in eucrite meteorites, whose parent body is the main-belt asteroid 4 Vesta. These measurements sample one of the oldest hydrogen reservoirs in the solar system and show that Vesta contains the same hydrogen isotopic composition as that of carbonaceous chondrites. Taking into account the old ages of eucrite meteorites and their similarity to Earth's isotopic ratios of hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen, we demonstrate that these volatiles could have been added early to Earth, rather than gained during a late accretion event.

  13. Isotopic composition of carbonaceous-chondrite kerogen Evidence for an interstellar origin of organic matter in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Stepwise combustion has revealed systematic patterns of isotopic heterogeneity for C, H and N in the insoluble organic fraction (m-kerogen) from the Orgueil and Murray carbonaceous chondrites. Those patterns are essentially identical for both meteorites, indicating a common source of m-kerogen. The data cannot be reconciled with a single mass-fractionation process acting upon a single precursor composition. This indicates either a multi-path history of mass-dependent processing or a significant nucleogenetic contribution, or both. If mass-fractionation were the dominant process, the magnitude of the observed isotopic variability strongly suggests that ion-molecule reactions at very low temperatures, probably in interstellar clouds, were responsible. In any case, an interstellar, rather than solar nebular, origin for at least some of the meteoritic organic matter is indicated. This has interesting implications for the origin of prebiotic molecules, temperatures in the early solar system, and the isotopic compositions of volatiles accreted by the terrestrial planets.

  14. Primitive Liquid Water of the Solar System in an Aqueous Altered Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Miyake, A.; Kitayama, A.; Matsuno, J.; Takeuchi, A.; Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakano, T.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive 3D observations of the aqueous altered CM chondrite Sutter's Mill using scanning imaging x-ray microscopy (SIXM) showed that some of calcite and enstatite grains contain two-phase inclusion, which is most probably composed of liquid water and bubbles. This water should be primitive water responsible for aqueous alteration in an asteroid in the early solar system.

  15. HRTEM and EFTEM Studies of Phyllosilicate-Organic Matter Associations in Matrix and Dark Inclusions in the EET92042 CR2 Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Neyda M.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2005-01-01

    Based on petrologic and isotopic observations, the CR chondrites represent one of the most primitive carbonaceous chondrite groups. The organic matter in CR chondrite matrices is considered to be among the most ancient carbonaceous matter known, potentially providing a link between organic matter in the interstellar medium and our solar system [1]. However, the organic chemistry of CR chondrites may be complicated by the fact that these meteorites have undergone moderate secondary alteration, which potentially overprints primordial features [2]. Although the general effects of this alteration have been documented [2], the details of the fine-grained mineralogy and alteration styles of CR matrices are not fully understood. Here we present TEM observations of matrix in EET 92042, a CR chondrite that contains particularly primitive insoluble organic matter [1]. Preliminary studies [3] determined that EET 92042 matrix is heterogeneous in terms of mineralogy, texture, and petrographic fabric on the micron scale. EET 92042 contains magnetite-rich regions, foliated matrix and dark inclusions (DIs). Some chondrules show fine-grained rims, similar to those described by [4].

  16. Ca-, Al-rich Inclusions in Three New Carbonaceous Chondrites from the Grove Mountains, Antarctica:New Evidence for a Similar Origin of the Objects in Various Groups of Chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Deqiu; LIN Yangting; MIAO Bingkui; SHENG Wenjie; WANG Daode

    2004-01-01

    Three new carbonaceous chondrites (GRV 020025, 021579 and 022459) collected from the Grove Mountains(GRV), Antarctica, have been classified as the CM2, CO3 and CV3 chondrites, respectively. A total of 27 Ca- and Al-rich inclusions have been found in the three meteorites, which are the earliest assemblages formed in the solar nebula. Most of the inclusions are intensively altered, with abundant phyllosilicates in the inclusions from GRV 020025 and FeO enrichment of spinel in those from GRV 022459. Except for one spinel-spherule in each of GRV 020025 and 021579, all the inclusions can be classified as Type A-like or spinel-pyroxene-rich inclusions, and they probably represent the continuum of solar nebular condensation. In addition, most of the inclusions in these meteorites share much similarity in both petrography and mineral chemistry, suggesting a similar origin of Ca-Al-rich inclusions in various chondrites.

  17. Oxygen isotopic composition of relict olivine grains in cosmic spherules: Links to chondrules from carbonaceous chondrites

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Nagashima, K.; Jones, R.H.

    evidence of evolved asteroids, similar to chondritic or achondritic parent bodies (e.g., Taylor et al., 2007; Genge et al., 2008; Gounelle et al., 2009; Badjukov et al., 2010; Cordier et al., 2011a, b, 2012; Suavet et al., 2010; Van Ginneken et al., 2012... is much less (Taylor et al., 2000; Yada et al., 2004; Prasad et al., 2013). They are expected to have sampled a wide variety of parent bodies, including those known to us through meteorite studies, and some that have not yet been sampled (Brownlee...

  18. Planetary Bioresources and Astroecology. 1. Planetary Microcosm Bioassays of Martian and Carbonaceous Chondrite Materials: Nutrients, Electrolyte Solutions, and Algal and Plant Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    2002-07-01

    The biological fertilities of planetary materials can be assessed using microcosms based on meteorites. This study applies microcosm tests to martian meteorites and analogues and to carbonaceous chondrites. The biological fertilities of these materials are rated based on the soluble electrolyte nutrients, the growth of mesophile and cold-tolerant algae, and plant tissue cultures. The results show that the meteorites, in particular the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite and DaG 476 martian shergottite, contain high levels of water-extractable Ca, Mg, and SO 4-S. The martian meteorites DaG 476 and EETA 79001 also contain higher levels of extractable essential nutrients NO 3-N (0.013-0.017 g kg -1) and PO 4-P (0.019-0.046 g kg -1) than the terrestrial analogues. The yields of most of the water-extractable electrolytes vary only by factors of 2-3 under a wide range of planetary conditions. However, the long-term extractable phosphate increases significantly under a CO 2 atmosphere. The biological yields of algae and plant tissue cultures correlate with extractable NO 3-N and PO 4-P, identifying these as the limiting nutrients. Mesophilic algae and Asparagus officinalis cultures are identified as useful bioassay agents. A fertility rating system based on microcosm tests is proposed. The results rate the fertilities in the order martian basalts > terrestrial basalt, agricultural soil > carbonaceous chondrites, lava ash > cumulate igneous rock. The results demonstrate the application of planetary microcosms in experimental astroecology to rate planetary materials as targets for astrobiology exploration and as potential space bioresources. For example, the extractable materials in Murchison suggest that concentrated internal solutions in carbonaceous asteroids (3.8 mol L -1 electrolytes and 10 g L -1 organics) can support and disperse microorganisms introduced by natural or directed panspermia in early solar systems. The results also suggest that carbonaceous asteroids

  19. Origin of organic matter in the early solar system. VII - The organic polymer in carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatsu, R.; Matsuoka, S.; Anders, E.; Scott, R. G.; Studier, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    Degradation techniques, including pyrolysis, depolymerization, and oxidation, were used to study the insoluble polymer from the Murchison C2 chondrite. Oxidation with Cr2O7(2-) or O2/UV led to the identification of 15 aromatic ring systems. Of 11 aliphatic acids identified, three dicarboxylic acids presumably came from hydroaromatic portions of the polymer, whereas eight monocarboxylic acids probably derive from bridging groups or ring substituents. Depolymerization with CF3COO4 yielded some of the same ring systems, as well as alkanes (C1 through C8) and alkenes (C2 through C8), alkyl (C1 through C5) benzenes and naphthalenes, and methyl- or dimethyl -indene, -indane, -phenol, -pyrrole, and -pyridine. All these compounds were detected below 200 C, and are therefore probably indigenous constituents. The properties of the meteoritic polymer were compared with the properties of a synthetic polymer produced by the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. It is suggested that the meteoritic polymer was also produced by surface catalysis.

  20. A Quantitative NMR Analysis of Phosphorus in Carbonaceous and Ordinary Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, M. A.; Smith, V. D.; Lauretta, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus is important in a number of biochemical molecules, from DNA to ATP. Early life may have depended on meteorites as a primary source of phosphorus as simple dissolution of crustal apatite may not produce the necessary concentration of phosphate. Phosphorus is found in several mineral phases in meteorites. Apatite and other Ca- and Mg phosphate minerals tend to be the dominant phosphorus reservoir in stony meteorites, whereas in more iron-rich or reduced meteorites, the phosphide minerals schreibersite, (Fe, Ni)3P, and perryite, (Ni, Fe)5(Si, P)2 are dominant. However, in CM chondrites that have experienced significant aqueous alteration, phosphorus has been detected in more exotic molecules. A series of phosphonic acids including methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butyl- phosphonic acids were observed by GC-MS in Murchison. Phosphorian sulfides are in Murchison and Murray. NMR spectrometry is capable of detecting multiple substances with one experiment, is non-destructive, and potentially quantitative, as discussed below. Despite these advantages, NMR spectrometry is infrequently applied to meteoritic studies due in large part to a lack of applicability to many compounds and the relatively high limit of detection requirements. Carbon-13 solid-state NMR has been applied to macromolecular carbon in Murchison. P-31 NMR has many advantages over aqueous carbon-13 NMR spectrometry. P-31 is the only isotope of phosphorus, and P-31 gives a signal approximately twice as strong as C-13. These two factors together with the relative abundances of carbon and phosphorus imply that phosphorus should give a signal approximately 20 as strong as carbon in a given sample. A discussion on the preparation of the quantitative standard and NMR studies are presented

  1. Extremely rapid cooling of a carbonaceous-chondrite chondrule containing very 16O-rich olivine and a 26Mg-excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Wasson, John T.

    2002-12-01

    We describe a phenocryst in a CO-chondrite type-II chondrule that we infer to have formed by melting an amoeboid olivine aggregate (AOA). This magnesian olivine phenocryst has an extremely 16O-rich composition Δ 17O (=δ 17O - 0.52 · δ 18O) = -23‰. It is present in one of the most pristine carbonaceous chondrites, the CO3.0 chondrite Yamato 81020. The bulk of the chondrule has a very different Δ 17O of -1‰, thus the Δ 17O range within this single chondrule is 22‰, the largest range encountered in a chondrule. We interpret the O isotopic and Fe-Mg distributions to indicate that a fine-grained AOA assemblage was incompletely melted during the flash melting that formed the chondrule. Some Fe-Mg exchange but negligible O-isotopic exchange occurred between its core and the remainder of the chondrule. A diffusional model to account for the observed Fe-Mg and O-isotopic exchange yields a cooling rate of 10 5 to 10 6 K hr -1. This estimate is much higher than the cooling rates of 10 1 to 10 3 K hr -1 inferred from furnace simulations of type-II chondrule textures (e.g. Lofgren, 1996); however, our cooling-rate applies to higher temperatures (near 1900 K) than are modeled by the crystal-growth based cooling rates. We observed a low 26Al/ 27Al initial ratio ((4.6 ± 3.0) · 10 -6) in the chondrule mesostasis, a value similar to those in ordinary chondrites (Kita et al., 2000). If the 26Al/ 27Al system is a good chronometer, then chondrule I formed about 2 Ma after the formation of refractory inclusions.

  2. Organic Analysis in Miller Range 090657 and Buckley Island 10933 CR2 Chondrites: Part 1 In-Situ Observation of Carbonaceous Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, T.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Messenger, S.; Clemett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble unstructured kerogen-like component as well as structured nano-globules of macromolecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Due to the differences in extractability of soluble and insoluble organic materials, the analysis methods for each differ and are often performed independently. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses, when performed concurrently, can provide a wider understanding on spatial distribution, and elemental, structural and isotopic composition of organic material in primitive meteorites. Furthermore, they can provide broader perspective on how extraterrestrial organic ma-terials potentially contributed to the synthesis of life's essential compounds such as amino acids, sugar acids, activated phosphates and nucleobases.

  3. Whole‐rock 26Al‐26Mg systematics of amoeboid olivine aggregates from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mia Bjørg Stolberg; Krot, Alexander N.; Larsen, Kirsten K.;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract– We report on mineralogy, petrography, and whole-rock 26Al-26Mg systematics of eight amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) from the oxidized CV chondrite Allende. The AOAs consist of forsteritic olivine, opaque nodules, and variable amounts of Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) of different types....... (2008). In contrast, whole-rock 26Al-26Mg isotope systematics of CAIs and AOAs from the reduced CV chondrite Efremovka define a single isochron with a slope of (5.25± 0.01) × 10−5 (Larsen et al. 2011). We infer that the excesses in 26Mg* present in Allende AOAs are due to their late-stage open...

  4. SNOW COVER OF THE CENTRAL ANTARCTICA (VOSTOK STATION AS AN IDEAL NATURAL TABLET FOR COSMIC DUST COLLECTION: PRELIMINARY RESULTS ON THE IDENTIFICATION OF MICROMETEORITES OF CARBONACEOUS CHONDRITE TYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Bulat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2010/11 season nearby the Vostok station the 56th Russian Antarctic Expedition has collected surface snow in a big amount from a 3 m deep pit using 15 220 L vol. containers (about 70 kg snow each. Snow melting and processing by ultra-centrifugation was performed in a clean (class 10 000 and 100 laboratory. Total dust concentrations were not exceeded 37.4 mkg per liter with particle dispersal mode around 2.5 mkm. To analyze the elemental composition of fine dust particles aimed to reveal Antarctic micrometeorites (AMM two electron microscopy devices equipped with different micro-beams were implemented. As a preliminary result, three particles (of 107 analyzed featured by Mg content clearly dominated over Al along with Si and Fe as major elements (a feature of carbonaceous chondrites were observed. By this the Vostok AMM CS11 collection was established. The occurrence of given particles was averaged 2.8% – the factual value obtained for the first time for chondritic type AMM at Vostok which should be considered as the lowest estimate for all other families of AMM. Given the reference profile of total dust content in East Antarctic snow during Holocene (18 mkg/kg the MM deposition in Antarctica was quantified for the first time – 14 tons per day for carbonaceous chondrites for the Vostok AMM CS11 collection and up to 245 tons per day for all MM types for the Concordia AMM DC02 collection. The results obtained allowed to prove that snow cover (ice sheet in total of Central East Antarctica is the best spot (most clean of other natural locations and always below 0 ºC for collecting native MM deposited on the Earth during the last million years and could be useful in deciphering the origin and evolution of solid matter in our Solar System and its effects on Earth-bound biogeochemical and geophysical processes including the life origin. The farther analyses of the Vostok AMMs are in a progress.

  5. Oxygen Isotopes in Early Solar System Materials: A Perspective Based on Microbeam Analyses of Chondrules from CV Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. H.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the biggest challenges to understanding the early history of the solar system include determining the distribution of oxygen isotopes amongst materials that existed in the solar nebula, and interpreting the processes that might have resulted in the observed isotopic distributions. Oxygen isotope ratios in any individual mineral grain from a chondritic meteorite may be the cumulative product of a variety of processes, including stellar nucleosynthetic events, gas/solid interactions in the molecular cloud, mixing of independent isotopic reservoirs in the nebula, mass-independent processing in the nebula, and mass-dependent fractionation effects in various environments. It is not possible to unravel this complex isotopic record unless the distribution of oxygen isotope ratios in chondritic materials is fully understood.

  6. An ion probe study of the sulphur isotopic composition of Fe-Ni sulphides in CM carbonaceous chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Bullock, E. S.; McKeegan, K. D.; Gounelle, M.; Grady, M. M.; Russell, S.S

    2004-01-01

    From the Introduction: The CM chondrites have endured variable degrees of aqueous alteration [1] which has changed their original mineralogy. A detailed study of the petrology and mineralogy of the sulphides in a suite of increasingly aqueously altered CMs, combined with sulphur isotope data measured in situ, can provide clues as to whether differences in the CM group are a result of different degrees of aqueous alteration, or whether they are the result of nebular heterogeneity.

  7. Elephant Moraine 96029, a very mildly aqueously altered and heated CM carbonaceous chondrite: Implications for the drivers of parent body processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin R.; Lindgren, Paula; King, Ashley J.; Greenwood, Richard C.; Franchi, Ian A.; Sparkes, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Elephant Moraine (EET) 96029 is a CM carbonaceous chondrite regolith breccia with evidence for unusually mild aqueous alteration, a later phase of heating and terrestrial weathering. The presence of phyllosilicates and carbonates within chondrules and the fine-grained matrix indicates that this meteorite was aqueously altered in its parent body. Features showing that water-mediated processing was arrested at a very early stage include a matrix with a low magnesium/iron ratio, chondrules whose mesostasis contains glass and/or quench crystallites, and a gehlenite-bearing calcium- and aluminium-rich inclusion. EET 96029 is also rich in Fe,Ni metal relative to other CM chondrites, and more was present prior to its partial replacement by goethite during Antarctic weathering. In combination, these properties indicate that EET 96029 is one of the least aqueously altered CMs yet described (CM2.7) and so provides new insights into the original composition of its parent body. Following aqueous alteration, and whilst still in the parent body regolith, the meteorite was heated to ∼400-600 °C by impacts or solar radiation. Heating led to the amorphisation and dehydroxylation of serpentine, replacement of tochilinite by magnetite, loss of sulphur from the matrix, and modification to the structure of organic matter that includes organic nanoglobules. Significant differences between samples in oxygen isotope compositions, and water/hydroxyl contents, suggests that the meteorite contains lithologies that have undergone different intensities of heating. EET 96029 may be more representative of the true nature of parent body regoliths than many other CM meteorites, and as such can help interpret results from the forthcoming missions to study and return samples from C-complex asteroids.

  8. Whole-rock Al-Mg systematics of amoeboid olivine aggregates from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M.B.; Krot, A.N.; Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn;

    2011-01-01

    We report on mineralogy, petrography, and whole-rock Al- Mg systematics of eight amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) from the oxidized CV chondrite Allende. The AOAs consist of forsteritic olivine, opaque nodules, and variable amounts of Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) of different types, and show......, and Si were introduced, whereas Ca was removed from AOAs and used to form the Ca,Fe-rich silicate rims around AOAs. The whole-rock Al- Mg systematics of the Allende AOAs plot above the isochron of the whole-rock Allende CAIs with a slope of (5.23±0.13)×10 reported by Jacobsen et al. (2008). In contrast......, whole-rock Al- Mg isotope systematics of CAIs and AOAs from the reduced CV chondrite Efremovka define a single isochron with a slope of (5.25±0.01)×10 (Larsen et al. 2011). We infer that the excesses in Mg present in Allende AOAs are due to their late-stage open-system metasomatic alteration. Thus...

  9. Petrology and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules in E3 chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Michael K.; Ebel, Denton S.; Connolly, Harold C.; Kita, Noriko T.; Ushikubo, Takayuki

    2011-11-01

    Chondrules in E3 chondrites differ from those in other chondrite groups. Many contain near-pure endmember enstatite (Fs metal, Cr-bearing troilite, and, in some cases Mg, Mn- and Ca-sulfides. Olivine and more FeO-rich pyroxene grains are present but much less common than in ordinary or carbonaceous chondrite chondrules. In some cases, the FeO-rich grains contain dusty inclusions of metal. The oxygen three-isotope ratios (δ 18O, δ 17O) of olivine and pyroxene in chondrules from E3 chondrites, which are measured using a multi-collection SIMS, show a wide range of values. Most enstatite data plots on the terrestrial fractionation (TF) line near whole rock values and some plot near the ordinary chondrite region on the 3-isotope diagram. Pyroxene with higher FeO contents (˜2-10 wt.% FeO) generally plots on the TF line similar to enstatite, suggesting it formed locally in the EC (enstatite chondrite) region and that oxidation/reduction conditions varied within the E3 chondrite chondrule-forming region. Olivine shows a wide range of correlated δ 18O and δ 17O values and data from two olivine-bearing chondrules form a slope ˜1 mixing line, which is approximately parallel to but distinct from the CCAM (carbonaceous chondrite anhydrous mixing) line. We refer to this as the ECM (enstatite chondrite mixing) line but it also may coincide with a line defined by chondrules from Acfer 094 referred to as the PCM (Primitive Chondrite Mineral) line ( Ushikubo et al., 2011). The range of O isotope compositions and mixing behavior in E3 chondrules is similar to that in O and C chondrite groups, indicating similar chondrule-forming processes, solid-gas mixing and possibly similar 16O-rich precursors solids. However, E3 chondrules formed in a distinct oxygen reservoir. Internal oxygen isotope heterogeneity was found among minerals from some of the chondrules in E3 chondrites suggesting incomplete melting of the chondrules, survival of minerals from previous generations of

  10. Identification of silicate and carbonaceous presolar grains by SIMS in the type-3 enstatite chondrite ALHA81189

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isotope ratio imaging technique using the HokuDai isotope microscope system has been applied to in situ survey for presolar grains in the type-3 enstatite chondrite ALHA81189. Rastered and static ion beam were used for primary beam. Lateral resolution of the isotope image was achieved to be 0.4 μm for static ion beam mode and to be 0.6 μm for rastered ion beam mode. As a result, the abundances of presolar grains are 150-200% larger under the static ion beam mode than under the rastered ion beam mode. Development of image processing introducing isotopography of 32S-, 24Mg16O- and 56Fe- succeeded to increase efficiency of presolar grain characterization. Using the static ion beam and introducing appropriate isotopography were very useful methods of in situ characterization of presolar grains in meteorites

  11. The case for vestiges of early solar system biota in carbonaceous chondrites: petroleum geochemical snapshots and possible future petroleum prospects on Mars expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta K.; Mossman, David J.; Ehrman, James M.

    2007-09-01

    This research documents the analysis and interpretation of selected Carbonaceous Chondrites (CC) including Murchison, Allende, NWA 3003, Dhofar 735, Orgueil, Tagish Lake and Vigarano using organic petrology, scanning electron microscopy, and petroleum geochemistry. The kerogen microstructures and bitumen within CCs closely resemble remnant 2.5 Ga terrestrial microbial-like structures and their biodegraded components and solid bitumen. In both instances, organoclasts are associated with framboidal iron sulfides or oxides and clay-like minerals. The organic-rich kerogens within three CCs (especially Murchison) might have served as petroleum source rocks for the early generation of hydrocarbons. The maturity varies between 0.7% (Orgueil) and 1.24% (Murchison), to 5.1 % Ro (Vigarano) with predicted maturation temperatures of 100° to 475°C. Geochemical analysis of selected CCs (Murchison, Orgueil, and Tagish Lake) reveal the organic richness and the presence of low molecular weight n-alkanes (C 10 to C 20), complex cyclo-and isoalkanes, nonhydrocarbons, elemental sulfur with abundant aromatic compounds, most of them similar to bacterial and algal derived petroleum products. Apart from the concept of panspermia, the data highlights that three CCs sustained a formation temperature (oil biomarkers. Therefore, the authors propose a model of a "universal unconventional petroleum system", which implies a prospect of oil and gas within the Martian environment and elsewhere within the Solar System.

  12. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D.; Sears, S. Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-01-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  13. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D; Sears, S Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-06-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  14. A combined FE-SEM/EDS and μ-IR analysis of Carbonaceous Chondrites, analogue of the next returned asteroid samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirri, Fabrizio; Palomba, Ernesto; Ferrari, Marco; Longobardo, Andrea; Rotundi, Alessandra

    2016-10-01

    A combined method for the analysis of extraterrestrial samples returned by spacecrafts foresees two different analytical techniques: Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscope with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS) and Infrared μ-spectroscopy (μ-IR). These are non-destructive analytical techniques that allow obtaining mineral and organic information of the samples: μ-IR spectroscopy is able to provide thermal maps of selected area, whereas FE-SEM/EDS microscopy provides information on sample morphology and chemical composition. The combined results provide a complete overview of the sample mineralogy.In the past, different types of analysis were performed in order to characterise returned asteroid and cometary samples, and meteorites [e.g. 1,2,3]. Waiting for the analyses of the samples to be returned from primitive asteroids targets by Hayabusa 2 and Osiris Rex missions [4,5], we applied the combined FE-SEM/EDS and μ-IR techniques to Carbonaceous Chondrites (CC) meteorites as possible analogues. In particular, we selected 3 samples: Murchinson (CM2 group), characterised by small chondrules and refractory inclusions [6]; Orgueil (CI1 group) characterised by the absence of chondrules and refractory inclusion and with a high degree of hydration [7]; NWA2086 (CV3 group) with considerable amount of large mm-size chondrules, many surrounded by igneous rims [8]. A preliminary analysis was performed on the samples using a Stereo Microscope (Leica M205c) equipped with a digital camera in order to select regions of the samples showing a significant mineralogical heterogeneity.[1] Rotundi, A. et al., Meteorit. & Planet. Scie.,49,4,550–575,2014[2] Matrajt, G. et al.,A&A,416,3,983-990,2004[3] Naraoka, H. et al.,Geochem. J.,46,1,61-72,2012[4] Chasley, R. et al.,Icarus,235,5-22,2014[5] Yoshikawa, M. et al., 47th LPSC Abs,2016[6] Cronin, J.R. and Chang, S.,The Chemistry of Life's Origins, 416,209-258,1993[7] Tomeoka K. and Buseck P.R., Geochimica et Cosmochimica

  15. CV and CM chondrite impact melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunning, Nicole G.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; McSween, Harry Y.; Tenner, Travis J.; Kita, Noriko T.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-09-01

    Volatile-rich and typically oxidized carbonaceous chondrites, such as CV and CM chondrites, potentially respond to impacts differently than do other chondritic materials. Understanding impact melting of carbonaceous chondrites has been hampered by the dearth of recognized impact melt samples. In this study we identify five carbonaceous chondrite impact melt clasts in three host meteorites: a CV3red chondrite, a CV3oxA chondrite, and a regolithic howardite. The impact melt clasts in these meteorites respectively formed from CV3red chondrite, CV3oxA chondrite, and CM chondrite protoliths. We identified these impact melt clasts and interpreted their precursors based on their texture, mineral chemistry, silicate bulk elemental composition, and in the case of the CM chondrite impact melt clast, in situ measurement of oxygen three-isotope signatures in olivine. These impact melts typically contain euhedral-subhedral olivine microphenocrysts, sometimes with relict cores, in glassy groundmasses. Based on petrography and Raman spectroscopy, four of the impact melt clasts exhibit evidence for volatile loss: these melt clasts either contain vesicles or are depleted in H2O relative to their precursors. Volatile loss (i.e., H2O) may have reduced the redox state of the CM chondrite impact melt clast. The clasts that formed from the more oxidized precursors (CV3oxA and CM chondrites) exhibit phase and bulk silicate elemental compositions consistent with higher intrinsic oxygen fugacities relative to the clast that formed from a more reduced precursor (CV3red chondrite). The mineral chemistries and assemblages of the CV and CM chondrite impact melt clasts identified here provide a template for recognizing carbonaceous chondrite impact melts on the surfaces of asteroids.

  16. Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Trace Elements in Focused Ion Beam Prepared Sections of Carbonaceous Chondrite Iron Sulfides (CM and CR) and Associated Metal (CR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singerling, S. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Brearley, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents data on trace element abundances in CM and CR sulfides and metals. We determined that Ge and Zn were observed to be depleted relative to CI chondrite while the more volatile Se was observed to be enriched.

  17. Chemical analysis of organic molecules in carbonaceous meteorites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrao Pinto Martins, Zita Carla

    2007-01-01

    Meteorites are extraterrestrial objects that survive the passage through the Earth’s atmosphere and impact the Earth's surface. They can be divided into several classes, the carbonaceous chondrites being one of them. Carbonaceous chondrites are the oldest and best preserved meteorites and contain a

  18. Origins of Al-rich chondrules: Clues from a compound Al-rich chondrule in the Dar al Gani 978 carbonaceous chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Itoh, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-04-01

    Aluminum-rich chondrules are one of the most interesting components of primitive chondrites, because they have characteristics that are similar to both Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and ferromagnesian chondrules. However, their precursor and formation history remain poorly constrained, especially with respect to their oxygen isotopic distributions. In this study, we report on the petrography, mineralogy, oxygen isotope ratios, and rare-earth-element compositions of a sapphirine-bearing Al-rich chondrule (SARC) in the ungrouped chondrite Dar al Gani (DaG) 978. The SARC has a complex core-mantle-rim texture; while both the core and the mantle are mainly composed of Al-rich enstatite and anorthite with minor amounts of mesostasis, these regions are distinguished by the presence of Fe-rich spinel and sapphirine in the core and their absence in the mantle. The rim of the SARC consists mainly of Fe-rich olivine, enstatite, and Fe-Ni metal. Spinel and some olivine grains in the SARC are 16O-rich, with Δ17O values down to -20‰ and -23‰, respectively. Enstatite, sapphirine, and most olivine grains have similar Δ17O values (∼ -7‰), which are lower than those of anorthite and the mesostasis (including augite therein) (Δ17O: ∼ -3‰). Mesostasis from both the core and mantle have Group II rare-earth-element (REE) patterns; however, the core mesostasis has higher REE concentrations than the mantle mesostasis. These observations provide a strong indication that the SARC formed by the melting and crystallization of a mixture of materials from Group II CAIs and ferromagnesian chondrules. Both spinel and olivine with 16O-rich features could be of relict origin. The 16O-poor isotopic compositions of most components in Al-rich chondrules can be explained by oxygen isotopic exchange between the melt and 16O-poor nebular gas (Δ17O: ∼ -7‰) during melting in chondrule-forming regions; whereas the anorthite and mesostasis could have experienced further oxygen isotopic

  19. Petrologic and oxygen isotopic study of ALH 85085-like chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, M.; Weisberg, M. K.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Ebihara, M.

    1994-07-01

    Four meteorites (PAT 91546, PCA 91328, PCA 91452, PCA 91467) petrologically similar to ALH 85085 chondrite have now been found. Previous studies of ALH 85085 showed it be a new kind of CR-related microchondrule-bearing chondrite, although one called it a sub-chondrite. The purpose of this study is to learn more about ALH 85085-like meteorites and their relationship to CR and CR-related (LEW 85332, Acfer 182, Bencubbin) chondrites. The methods used included petrology, INA bulk chemical analysis (PAT 91546, PCA 91467), and O isotopic analyses of the whole rocks and separated chondrules and dark inclusions (DIs) from PAT 91546. Since microchondrules and fragments are approximately 20 microns it was necessary to analyze composite samples for O; one was of approximately 100 chondrules, and another was of 5 DIs. Petrologically, the four meteorites are similar to ALH 85085, and there is no basis for determining if all of them, or any combinations, are paired. Mineralogically, olivine and pyroxene are highly magnesian FeNi metal generally has 3-10% Ni, and has a positive Ni-Co correlation similar to that in CR and CR-related chondrites. Refractory inclusions are similar in size to the chondrules and have the following assemblages: (1) hibonite-perovskite, (2) melilite-fassaite-forsterite, (3) grossite (Ca-dialuminate)-melilite-perovskite, (4) spinel-melilite, and (5) spinel-pyroxene aggregates. Chemically, INA analyses indicate that PAT 91546 and PCA 91467 are generally similar to ALH 85085. Oxygen isotopic analyses of the four whole-rock compositions fall along the CR mixing line as does ALH 85085; they are also close to LEW 85332, Acfer 182, and Bencubbin. This supports the concept that these are all CR-related chondrites. Even stronger support is found in the compositions of the chondrules and DIs in PAT 91546, which also plot on or near the CR line.

  20. C Chondrite Clasts in H Chondrite Regolith Breccias: Something Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Fries, M.; Utas, J.; Chan, Q. H.-S.; Kebukawa, Y.; Steele, A.; Bodnar, R. J.; Ito, M.; Nakashima, D.; Greenwood, R.; Rahman, Z.; Le, L.; Ross, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Zag (H3-6) and Monahans (1998) (H5) are regolith breccias that contain 4.5 GY old halite crystals which in turn contain abundant inclusions of aqueous fluids, solids and organics [1-4]. We have previously proposed that these halites originated on a hydro-volcanically-active C-class asteroid, probably Ceres [3-7]. We have begun a detailed analysis of the included solids and organics and are re-examining the related carbonaceous (C)) chondrite clast we previously reported in Zag [5-7]. These new investigations will potentially reveal the mineralogy of asteroid Ceres. We report here on potentially identical C chondrite clasts in the H chondrite regolith breccias Tsukuba (H5-6) and Carancas (H4-5). The clast in Tsukuba was known before [8], but the Carancas clast is newly recognized.

  1. Bacterial morphologies in carbonaceous meteorites and comet dust

    CERN Document Server

    Wickramasinghe, N Chandra; Gibson, Carl H; Wallis, Jamie; Al-Mufti, Shirwan; Miyake, Nori

    2010-01-01

    Three decades ago the first convincing evidence of microbial fossils in carbonaceous chondrites was discovered and reported by Hans Dieter Pflug and his collaborators. In addition to morphology, other data, notably laser mass spectroscopy, confirmed the identification of such structures as putative bacterial fossils. Balloon-borne cryosampling of the stratosphere enables recovery of fragile cometary dust aggregates with their structure and carbonaceous matter largely intact. Scanning electron microscope studies of texture and morphology of particles in the Cardiff collection, together with Energy Dispersive X-ray identifications, show two main types of putative bio-fossils - firstly organic-walled hollow spheres around 10 microns across, secondly siliceous diatom skeletons similar to those found in carbonaceous chondrites and terrestrial sedimentary rocks and termed "acritarchs". Since carbonaceous chondrites (particularly Type 1 chondrites) are thought to be extinct comets the data reviewed in this article p...

  2. Organic Chemistry of Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Chiral and carbon-isotopic analyses of isovaline have been carried out on numerous samples of the Murchison and one sample of the Murray carbonaceous chondrite. The isovaline was found to be heterogeneous with regard to enantiomeric excess (ee) both between samples and within a single Murchison sample. L-Excesses ranging from 0 to 15% were observed. The isovaline delta(sup 13) C was found to be about +18%. No evidence was obtained suggesting terrestrial contamination in the more abundant L-enantiomer. A correlation was observed between isovaline (also alpha - aminoisobutyric acid) concentration and PCP content of five CM chondrites. It is suggested that isovaline, along with other meteoritic a-methyl amino acids with ee, are of presolar origin. The possible formation of ee in extraterrestrial amino acids by exposure to circularly polarized light or by magnetochiral photochemistry is discussed. Key words: Murchison meteorite, Murray meteorite, amino acids, isovaline, chirality, carbon isotopes, PCP.

  3. Microbeam analysis of four chondritic interplanetary dust particles for major elements, carbon and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, G. E.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compositions determined using electron excited X-rays are reported for four interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. These analyses include measurements of carbon and oxygen abundances which are important elements in these primitive materials. Spot analyses show very heterogeneous compositions on a micrometer scale although average composition approaches that of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. While the spot analyses show intermediate compositions between cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrites, the heterogeneity more closely resembles that of comet Halley dust particles.

  4. Electrical conductivity of chondritic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duba, AL; Didwall, E. M.; Burke, G. J.; Sonett, C. P.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of samples of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous chondrites is 4 to 6 orders of magnitude greater than rock forming minerals such as olivine for temperatures up to 700 C. The remarkably high electrical conductivity of these meteorites is attributed to carbon at the grain boundaries. Much of this carbon is produced by pyrolyzation of hydrocarbons at temperatures in excess of 150 C. As the temperature increases, light hydrocarbons are driven off and a carbon-rich residue or char migrates to the grain boundaries enhancing electrical conductivity. Assuming that carbon was present at the grain boundaries in the material which comprised the meteorite parent bodies, the electrical heating of such bodies was calculated as a function of body size and solar distance during a hypothetical T-Tauri phase of the sun. Input conductivity data for the meteorite parent body were the present carbonaceous chondrite values for temperatures up to 840 C and the electrical conductivity values for olivine above 840 C.

  5. On the aerodynamic redistribution of chondrite components in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Fromang, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Despite being all roughly of solar composition, primitive meteorites (chondrites) present a diversity in their chemical, isotopic and petrographic properties, and in particular a first-order dichotomy between carbonaceous and non-carbonaceous chondrites. We investigate here analytically the dynamics of their components (chondrules, refractory inclusions, metal/sulfide and matrix grains) in protoplanetary disks prior to their incorporation in chondrite parent bodies. We find the dynamics of the solids, subject to gas drag, to be essentially controlled by the "gas-solid decoupling parameter" $S\\equiv \\textrm{St}/\\alpha$, the ratio of the dimensionless stopping time to the turbulence parameter. The decoupling of the solid particles relative to the gas is significant when $S$ exceeds unity. $S$ is expected to increase with time and heliocentric distance. On the basis of (i) abundance of refractory inclusions (ii) proportion of matrix (iii) lithophile element abundances and (iv) oxygen isotopic composition of chon...

  6. CI chondrite-like clasts in the Nilpena polymict ureilite - Implications for aqueous alteration processes in CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brearley, Adrian J.; Prinz, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Petrographic studies of Nilpena polymict ureilite have revealed the presence of small quantities of carbonaceous chondrite matrix clasts. Detailed electron microprobe and TEM studies show that the chemistry and fine-scale mineralogy of one of these clasts is consistent with CI carbonaceous chondrite matrix. Compared to Orgeuil, the phyllosilicate, sulfide, and oxide mineralogy suggests that the Nilpena clasts may represent a less altered type of CI matrix. It is suggested that increased oxidation and aqueous alteration of Nilpena-type materials could result in the formation of the type of mineral assemblage observed in Orgueil. Increased alteration produces progressive more Mg-rich phyllosilicates and more Fe(3+)-rich iron oxides, such as ferrihydrite. As a function of increased alteration, Ca is also progressively leached from the matrix material to form carbonate veins. The depletion of Ca in CI chondrite matrices suggests the Ivuna and Alais may be intermediate in their degree of alteration to Nilpena and Orgueil.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy of an interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    The majority of hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have compositions that resemble CI and CM chondrites, however, their mineralogies are most similar to the fine grained material in certain altered type-3 carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. During the transmission electron microscope studies of hydrated IDPs, a unique particle was discovered whose mineralogy is very similar to that reported from CI chondrites. W7013F5 is the first IDP whose mineralogy and chemistry approximates that of CI chondrites. The similarity in mineralogy and mineral chemistry suggests that W7013F5 was altered under conditions similar to those that existed on the CI parent bodies.

  8. HRTEM and EFTEM Observations of Matrix in the Oxidized CV3 Chondrite ALH 84028: Implications for the Origins of Matrix Olivines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Neyda M.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2003-01-01

    The determination of the nature, distribution, and origin of organic material in carbonaceous chondrites is fundamental to understanding early solar nebular conditions and the origin of life. Using a variety of extraction techniques, followed by detailed chemical analysis, an extensive suite of organic compounds has been identified in carbonaceous chondrites. These data have provided key information on the diversity and isotopic composition of the organic component in chondrites. However, one disadvantage of extraction techniques is that all information regarding the spatial distribution of the organics on a fine scale is lost. This is especially important for the insoluble macromolecular carbon, which constitutes approximately 70% of the carbon in carbonaceous chondrites such as Murchison. The distribution and mineralogical associations may provide important constraints on the possible origins of the carbonaceous material. Our previous studies of the CV3 chondrites Allende and Vigarano have demonstrated that energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), combined with high resolution TEM (HRTEM) are powerful tools for the in situ characterization of insoluble organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites. In this study, we have used SEM and TEM techniques to characterize the matrix mineralogy of the CV3 chondrite ALH 84028 and examine the distribution and mineralogical associations of carbon. We are especially interested in establishing whether the occurrence of poorly graphitized carbon (PGC), observed in Allende matrix olivines, is common to all oxidized CV3 chondrites or is a unique feature of Allende.

  9. The Aqueous Alteration of CR Chondrites: Experiments and Geochemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perronnet, M.; Berger, G.; Zolensky, M. E.; Toplis, M. J.; Kolb, V. M.; Bajagic, M.

    2007-01-01

    CR carbonaceous chondrites are of major interest since they contain some of the most primitive organic matter known. However, aqueous alteration has more or less overprinted their original features in a way that needs to be assessed. This study was initiated by comparing the mineralogy and modal abundances of the most altered CR1 chondrite, GRO 95577, to a less altered CR2. Calculated element distributions imply that GRO 95577 may result from aqueous alteration of Renazzo by an isochemical process on their parent asteroid, whose mineralogical composition was estimated ( Unaltered CR shown included table).

  10. Comparative 187Re-187Os systematics of chondrites: Implications regarding early solar system processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R.J.; Horan, M.F.; Morgan, J.W.; Becker, H.; Grossman, J.N.; Rubin, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of 47 carbonaceous, enstatite, and ordinary chondrites are examined for Re-Os isotopic systematics. There are significant differences in the 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios of carbonaceous chondrites compared with ordinary and enstatite chondrites. The average 187Re/188Os for carbonaceous chondrites is 0.392 ?? 0.015 (excluding the CK chondrite, Karoonda), compared with 0.422 ?? 0.025 and 0.421 ?? 0.013 for ordinary and enstatite chondrites (1?? standard deviations). These ratios, recast into elemental Re/Os ratios, are as follows: 0.0814 ?? 0.0031, 0.0876 ?? 0.0052 and 0.0874 ?? 0.0027 respectively. Correspondingly, the 187Os/188Os ratios of carbonaceous chondrites average 0.1262 ?? 0.0006 (excluding Karoonda), and ordinary and enstatite chondrites average 0.1283 ?? 0.0017 and 0.1281 ?? 0.0004, respectively (1?? standard deviations). The new results indicate that the Re/Os ratios of meteorites within each group are, in general, quite uniform. The minimal overlap between the isotopic compositions of ordinary and enstatite chondrites vs. carbonaceous chondrites indicates long-term differences in Re/Os for these materials, most likely reflecting chemical fractionation early in solar system history. A majority of the chondrites do not plot within analytical uncertainties of a 4.56-Ga reference isochron. Most of the deviations from the isochron are consistent with minor, relatively recent redistribution of Re and/or Os on a scale of millimeters to centimeters. Some instances of the redistribution may be attributed to terrestrial weathering; others are most likely the result of aqueous alteration or shock events on the parent body within the past 2 Ga. The 187Os/188Os ratio of Earth's primitive upper mantle has been estimated to be 0.1296 ?? 8. If this composition was set via addition of a late veneer of planetesimals after core formation, the composition suggests the veneer was dominated by materials that had Re/Os ratios most similar to ordinary and

  11. Evidence for Impact Shock Melting in CM and CI Chondrite Regolith Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Le, Loan

    2014-01-01

    C class asteroids frequently exhibit reflectance spectra consistent with thermally metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrites, or a mixture of phyllosilicate-rich material along with regions where they are absent. One particularly important example appears to be near-Earth asteroid 1999 JU3, the target of the Hayabusa II sample return mission [1], although not all spectra indicate this. In fact most spectra of 1999 JU3 are featureless, suggesting a heterogeneous regolith. Here we explore an alternative cause of dehydration of regolith of C class asteroids - impact shock melting. Impact shock melting has been proposed to explain some mineralogical characteristics of CB chondrites, but has not been considered a major process for hydrous carbonaceous chondrites. What evidence is there for significant shock melting in the very abundant CMs, or less abundant but still important CI chondrites?

  12. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  13. Heavily irradiated grains and neon isotope anomalies in carbonaceous chondrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audouze, J.; Bibring, J.P.; Dran, J.C.; Maurette, M.; Walker, R.M.

    1976-06-15

    High-voltage microscope observations of micron-sized grains extracted from a /sup 22/Ne-rich fraction of the Orgueil meteorite give strong experimental evidence for their heavy irradiation. It is further suggested that the excess of /sup 22/Ne measured in the same mineral separate can be explained by low-energy (<10 MeV) production by (p, a) reaction on /sup 25/Mg. A discussion of the astrophysical sites potentially responsible for the peculiar irradiation history of the meteoritic grains is presented. (AIP)

  14. Oxygen isotope systematics of chondrules in the Allende CV3 chondrite: High precision ion microprobe studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; Ushikubo, T.; Nakashima, D.; Kita, N.T.

    in local dust-rich protoplanetary disk, from which the CV3 parent asteroid formed. A compilation of 225 olivine and low-Ca pyroxene isotopic data from 36 chondrules analyzed in the present study lie between carbonaceous chondrite anhydrous mineral (CCAM...

  15. Structure, composition, and location of organic matter in the enstatite chondrite Sahara 97096 (EH3)

    CERN Document Server

    Piani, Laurette; Beyssac, Olivier; Binet, Laurent; Bourot-Denise, Michèle; Derenne, Sylvie; Guillou, Corentin Le; Marrocchi, Yves; Mostefaoui, Smail; Rouzaud, Jean-Noel; Thomen, Aurelien

    2015-01-01

    The insoluble organic matter (IOM) of an unequilibrated enstatite chondrite Sahara (SAH) 97096 has been investigated using a battery of analytical techniques. As the enstatite chondrites are thought to have formed in a reduced environment at higher temperatures than carbonaceous chondrites, they constitute an interesting comparative material to test the heterogeneities of the IOM in the solar system and to constrain the processes that could affect IOM during solar system evolution. The SAH 97096 IOM is found in situ: as submicrometer grains in the network of fine-grained matrix occurring mostly around chondrules and as inclusions in metallic nodules, where the carbonaceous matter appears to be more graphitized. IOM in these two settings has very similar $\\delta^{15}N$ and $\\delta^{13}C$; this supports the idea that graphitized inclusions in metal could be formed by metal catalytic graphitization of matrix IOM. A detailed comparison between the IOM extracted from a fresh part and a terrestrially weathered part...

  16. Terminology of carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, G.N.; Nagornyi, V.G.; Ostrovskii, V.S.

    1986-07-01

    The need is discussed to standardize definition of carbonaceous material. Terms related to carbonaceous materials and their products are selected and analyzed. Diagramatic representation is given of relationships between carbonaceous materials. Carbon has two forms of structure, cubic and hexagonal, characterized by sp/sup 3/-hybrid groups of atoms forming spatial system of tetrahedral bonds. Hexagonal form of carbon is represented by natural materials such as graphite, shungite, anthracite and a number of artificial materials obtained during thermal treatment of organic substances at temperatures above carbonization temperature. 4 references.

  17. Halogens in CM Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, J. M.; Caron, B.; Jambon, A.; Michel, A.; Villemant, B.

    2013-09-01

    We set up an extraction line of halogens (fluorine, chlorine) by pyrohydrolysis with 50 mg of rock. We analyzed 7 CM2 chondrites found in Antarctica and found that the Cl content of meteorites with an intact fusion crust is higher than those without.

  18. A Raman Study of Carbonates and Organic Contents in Five CM Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Farley, C.; Cheung, J. C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonates comprise the second most abundant class of carbon-bearing phases in carbonaceous chondrites after organic matter (approximately 2 wt.%), followed by other C-bearing phases such as diamond, silicon carbide, and graphite. Therefore, understanding the abundances of carbonates and the associated organic matter provide critical insight into the genesis of major carbonaceous components in chondritic materials. Carbonates in CM chondrites mostly occur as calcite (of varying composition) and dolomite. Properly performed, Raman spectroscopy provides a non-destructive technique for characterizing meteorite mineralogy and organic chemistry. It is sensitive to many carbonaceous phases, allows the differentiation of organic from inorganic materials, and the interpretation of their spatial distribution. Here, with the use of Raman spectroscopy, we determine the structure of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) in the matrix and carbonate phases in five CM chondrites: Jbilet Winselwan, Murchison, Nogoya, Santa Cruz, and Wisconsin Range (WIS) 91600, and interpret the relative timing of carbonate precipitation and the extent of the associated alteration events.

  19. The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of MIL 090001: A CR2 Chondrite with Abundant Refractory Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; McKeegan, K. D.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2012-01-01

    MIL 090001 is a large (>6 kg) carbonaceous chondrite that was classified as a member of the CV reduced subgroup (CVred) that was recovered during the 2009-2010 ANSMET field season [1]. Based on the abundance of refractory inclusions and the extent of aqueous alteration, Keller [2] suggested a CV2 classification. Here we report additional mineralogical and petrographic data for MIL 090001, its whole-rock oxygen isotopic composition and ion microprobe analyses of individual phases. The whole rock oxygen isotopic analyses show that MIL 090001 should be classified as a CR chondrite.

  20. Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites from Algeria and Australia as a Climatic Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, P. A.; Berry, F. J.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: Recently it has been recognized that ordinary chondrite meteorites resident in desert regions may preserve information about the climate at the time of their arrival on Earth in the degree to which they are weathered [1], providing that a stable surface has existed at the accumulation site. We present here a comparison of ^57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy data for additional meteorites for which terrestrial ages exist, recovered from Reg el Acfer, Algeria and the Nullarbor Region, Australia. Results and Discussion: The data presented in Fig. 1 compare abundance of ferric iron oxide/oxyhydroxide species against terrestrial age [2, 3] for ordinary chondrites from Australia (a) and Algeria (b). Even with an increased dataset for Australian meteorites (compared to that already presented [1]) the initial hypothesis remains intact i.e. meteorite weathering over time is sensitive to changes in climate. Peaks in oxidation at around 2,000, 7,000 and 23,000 years correspond to periods of speleothem formation [4] and high lake level status [5]. Similarly, a period of low oxidation between 12,000-20,000 years is mirrored in low lake level status [5] and aridity in the Nullarbor [6]. The mechanism by which meteorites may record palaeoclimatic information is given in [1]. A correlation that strengthens our case is that where data from both H and L(LL) chondrites are available (i.e. around 7,000-8,000 years) the two plots are similar, indicating a broadscale environmental effect. In contrast, the distribution for meteorites from the Acfer region appears to be more random, with no correlation between H and L(LL) data. The difference may be related to the stability of the respective accumulation surfaces. The surface of the Nullarbor appears to have been stable over the last 30,000 years [7]. The Algerian and Libyan Sahara, however, has experienced several episodes of active fluvial processes over the last 10,000 years [8] which may have profoundly effected the meteorites

  1. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 3 C and N Isotopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Elsila, J. E.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Cao, T.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble nanoglobules of macro-molecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Large H, C and N isotopic anomalies suggest some organic components formed in low-T interstellar or outer Solar System environments. The highest isotope anomalies occur in m-scale inclusions in the most primitive materials, such as cometary dust and the least altered carbonaceous chondrites. Often, the hosts of these isotopically anomalous 'hotspots' are discrete organic nanoglobules that probably formed in the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk or cold molecular cloud. Molecular and isotopic studies of meteoritic organic matter are aimed at identifying the chemical properties and formation processes of interstellar organic materials and the subsequent chemical evolutionary pathways in various Solar System environments. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses with in situ and bulk studies provides powerful constraints on the origin and evolution of organic matter in the Solar System. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques as well as microscale in situ observations we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in primitive astromaterial samples. Here, we present results of bulk C and N isotopic measurements and coordinated in situ C and N isotopic imaging and mineralogical and textural studies of carbonaceous materials in a Cr2 carbonaceous chondrite. In accompanying abstracts we discuss the morphology and distribution of carbonaceous components and soluble organic species of this meteorite.

  2. The deuterium/hydrogen distribution in chondritic organic matter attests to early ionizing irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe; Nuns, Nicolas; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a large array of organic compounds dominated by insoluble organic matter (IOM). A striking feature of this IOM is the systematic enrichment in deuterium compared with the solar hydrogen reservoir. This enrichment has been taken as a sign of low-temperature ion-molecule or gas-grain reactions. However, the extent to which Solar System processes, especially ionizing radiation, can affect D/H ratios is largely unknown. Here, we report the effects of electron irradiation on the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic precursors containing different functional groups. From an initial terrestrial composition, overall D-enrichments and differential intramolecular fractionations comparable with those measured in the Orgueil meteorite were induced. Therefore, ionizing radiation can quantitatively explain the deuteration of organics in some carbonaceous chondrites. For these meteorites, the precursors of the IOM may have had the same isotopic composition as the main water reservoirs of the inner Solar System. PMID:26461170

  3. Distilling solid carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainscow, J.W.H.

    1928-11-19

    Carbonaceous materials such as coal or oil shale are distilled by being passed in a continuous stream through a retort heated externally and at temperatures increasing from the inlet to the outlet end, the distillates being taken off through openings in the retort wall.

  4. Evolution of Indarch (EH4 Chondrite) at 1 GPa and High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, S.; Malavergne, V.; Righter, K.

    2008-01-01

    The chondritic meteorites are materials that are as old as the solar system itself characterized by variations in bulk chemical and oxidation state, and have long been considered possible building blocks that accreted to form the terrestrial inner planets. Enstatite chondrites contain nearly FeO free enstatite, silicon-rich kamacite and various sulfides indicating formation under highly reducing conditions. These materials could have participated in the formation of the Earth. However, "fingerprinting" of meteoritic materials has shown that no known meteoritic class corresponds to a hypothetical bulk Earth composition in every aspect. To derive constraints on early accretion and differentiation processes and possibly resolve the debate on the formation of the Earth, it is required to study experimentally a variety of chondritic materials and investigate their melting relations and elemental partitioning behavior at variable pressure (P), temperature (T) and oxygen fugacities (fO2). Variations in fO2 can indeed change chemical features and phase equilibria dramatically. The P-T phase diagrams of peridotites and carbonaceous chondrites have been extensively studied experimentally up to pressures and temperatures corresponding to the transition zone and lower mantle. Even though partial melting experiments have been conducted at ambient pressure on the enstatite chondrite Indarch, enstatite meteorites have never been experimentally investigated at high PT. The following investigation focuses on the effect of the fO2 on the phase relations of Indarch, an EH4 chondrite.

  5. Chondrule Glass Alteration in Type IIA Chondrules in the CR2 Chondrites EET 87770 and EET 92105: Insights into Elemental Exchange Between Chondrules and Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Paul V.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2004-01-01

    CR2 carbonaceous chondrites are a primitive group of meteorites that preserve evidence of a variety of processes that occurred in the solar nebula as well as on asteroidal parent bodies. CR2 chondrites are distinct from other carbonaceous chondrites by (among other properties) their relatively high abundance of chondrules (50-60 vol. %) and Fe,Ni metal (5-8 vol. %) [1]. Like the CM2 chondrites, the CRs have been affected by aqueous alteration and according to [2] show a range of degrees of alteration. In weakly- altered CR chondrites, fine-grained matrices and chondrule rims have been partially altered and chondrule mesostases show evidence of incipient aqueous alteration. In these meteorites, glassy mesostasis is still common. However, some CR chondrites, (e.g. Renazzo and Al Rais) show evidence of much more extensive alteration with complete replacement of chondrule mesostasis [2] by chlorite and serpentine. Although the general characteristics of alteration of the CR chondrites have been described, the details of alteration reactions in these meteorites remain unclear. In addition, the setting for aqueous alteration is poorly understood: both asteroidal and preaccretionary alteration scenarios have been proposed [2].

  6. The Effects of Thermal Metamorphism on the Amino Acid Content of the CI-Like Chondrite Y-86029

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Grunsfeld, S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites con-tain a diverse suite of amino acids that varies in abundance and structural diversity depending on the degree of aqueous alteration and thermal histo-ry that the parent body experienced [1 - 3]. We recently determined the amino acid contents of several fragments of the Sutter's Mill CM2 chon-drite [4]. In contrast with most other CM2 chon-drites, the Sutter's Mill meteorites showed minimal evidence for the presence of indigenous amino acids. A notable difference between the Sutter's Mill meteorites and other CM2 chondrites are that the Sutter's Mill stones were heated to tempera-tures of 150 - 400 C [4], whereas most other CM2 chondrites do not show evidence for thermal met-amorphism [5]. Because empirical studies have shown that amino acids rapidly degrade in aqueous solutions above 150 C and the presence of miner-als accelerates this degradation [6], a plausible explanation for the lack of amino acids observed in the Sutter's Mill meteorites is that they were destroyed during metamorphic alteration. Fewer CI chondrites have been analyzed for amino acids because only a small number of these meteorites have been recovered. Nevertheless, indigenous amino acids have been reported in the CI chondrites Ivuna and Orgueil [7]. Here we report on the amino acid analysis of the CI-like chondrite, Yamato 86029 (Y-86029; sample size of 110 mg). Just as the Sutter's Mill meteorites were thermally metamporphosed CM2 chondrites, Y-86029 has experienced thermal metamorphism at higher temperatures than Orgueil and Ivuna (normal CI chondrites) experienced, possibly up to 600 C [8].

  7. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE ABUNDANCES OF SILICATE AND OXIDE STARDUST FROM SUPERNOVAE IN THE ACFER 094 METEORITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Peter; Leitner, Jan; Kodolányi, János, E-mail: peter.hoppe@mpic.de [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-20

    We studied about 5000 μm{sup 2} of fine-grained matrix material in the Acfer 094 meteorite by high-resolution (nominal 50 nm) NanoSIMS ion imaging for the presence of O-rich presolar (stardust) grains. This approach permits identifying presolar grains down to <100 nm in size, compared to >150 nm in lower-resolution (nominal 100 nm) ion imaging surveys. The number density of identified presolar grains is a about a factor of two to three higher than what was found by lower-resolution ion imaging studies. The abundances of grains of O isotope Group 3 and 4 are higher than previously found. None of the presolar grains shows the strong enrichments in {sup 16}O expected from model predictions for the majority of supernova (SN) grains. Other potential O-rich SN grains, the Group 4 and some of the Group 3 grains, make up 33% by number and 19% by mass. This is clearly higher than the ∼10% (by number) inferred before and the 5% (by mass) estimated by a model for stellar dust in the interstellar medium. Our work shows that O-rich SN grains might be more abundant among the population of presolar grains in primitive solar system materials than currently thought, even without the {sup 16}O-rich grains as predominantly expected from SN models.

  8. Evidence for Oxygen-Isotope Exchange in Chondrules and Refractory Inclusions During Fluid-Rock Interaction on the CV Chondrite Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, A. N.; Nagashima, K.

    2016-08-01

    Plagioclase in chondrules, CAIs and AOAs from the carbonaceous chondrite Kaba (CV3.1) experienced oxygen-isotope exchange with a metasomatic fluid responsible for the formation of magnetite, fayalite and Ca,Fe-rich silicates on the CV parent body.

  9. Isotopic anomalies of noble gases in meteorites and their origins. III - LL-chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaerts, L.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    Nine LL-chondrites were studied by selective etching to characterize the noble gas components in three mineral fractions: HF-HCl-solubles, chromite and carbon. The Ne-20/Ar-36 ratio is considered, noting that chondrites of different petrologic types cannot all be derived from the same volatile rich ancestor, but must have formed over a range of temperatures, with correspondingly different volatile contents. Variations in the carbonaceous chondrite fission (CCFXe) component in LL3, LL5, and LL6 chondrites are discussed, noting that if CCFXe comes from a supernova, then its distribution in LL-chondrites requires three presolar carrier minerals of the right solubility properties, containing three different xenon components. However, if CCFXe comes from fission of a volatile superheavy element, then its decrease from LL3 to LL6 can be attributed to less complete condensation from the solar nebula. Finally, the three types of primordial xenon components which occur in different minerals of the same meteorite are described.

  10. Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrules from the metal-rich chondrites Isheyevo (CH/CB b), MAC 02675 (CB b) and QUE 94627 (CB b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Yoshitake, Miwa; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2010-04-01

    It has been recently suggested that (1) CH chondrites and the CB b/CH-like chondrite Isheyevo contain two populations of chondrules formed by different processes: (i) magnesian non-porphyritic (cryptocrystalline and barred) chondrules, which are similar to those in the CB chondrites and formed in an impact-generated plume of melt and gas resulted from large-scale asteroidal collision, and (ii) porphyritic chondrules formed by melting of solid precursors in the solar nebula. (2) Porphyritic chondrules in Isheyevo and CH chondrites are different from porphyritic chondrules in other carbonaceous chondrites ( Krot et al., 2005, 2008a,b). In order to test these hypotheses, we measured in situ oxygen isotopic compositions of porphyritic (magnesian, Type I and ferroan, Type II) and non-porphyritic (magnesian and ferroan cryptocrystalline) chondrules from Isheyevo and CB b chondrites MAC 02675 and QUE 94627, paired with QUE 94611, using a Cameca ims-1280 ion microprobe. On a three-isotope oxygen diagram ( δ17O vs. δ18O), compositions of chondrules measured follow approximately slope-1 line. Data for 19 magnesian cryptocrystalline chondrules from Isheyevo, 24 magnesian cryptocrystalline chondrules and 6 magnesian cryptocrystalline silicate inclusions inside chemically-zoned Fe,Ni-metal condensates from CB b chondrites have nearly identical compositions: Δ17O = -2.2 ± 0.9‰, -2.3 ± 0.6‰ and -2.2 ± 1.0‰ (2 σ), respectively. These observations and isotopically light magnesium compositions of cryptocrystalline magnesian chondrules in CB b chondrites ( Gounelle et al., 2007) are consistent with their single-stage origin, possibly as gas-melt condensates in an impact-generated plume. In contrast, Δ17O values for 11 Type I and 9 Type II chondrules from Isheyevo range from -5‰ to +4‰ and from -17‰ to +3‰, respectively. In contrast to typical chondrules from carbonaceous chondrites, seven out of 11 Type I chondrules from Isheyevo plot above the terrestrial

  11. A refractory inclusion in the Kaba CV3 chondrite - Some implications for the origin of spinel-rich objects in chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegley, B.; Post, J. E.

    1985-11-01

    The first detailed petrographic and mineralogical study of a Ca, Al-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Kaba CV3 chondrite is reported. This 'fine-grained' CAI contains abundant small, rounded, rimmed, spinel-rich objects which have important features in common with the spinel-rich objects in other carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. These nodules are interpreted as fractionated distillation residues of primitive dust. However, the available data do not unambiguously rule out a condensation origin for at least some of these objects. Finally, the preservation of distinct diopside-hedenbergite rims on the spinel-rich bodies and the small grain size of many minerals in the CAI matrix material both suggest that the CAI accreted cool and had a relatively cool thermal history in the Kaba parent body.

  12. In situ oxygen isotope compositions in olivines of different types of cosmic spherules: An assessment of relationships to chondritic particles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Jones, R.H.; Nagashima, K.

    et al., 2015a). The micrometeorites that have entered Earth’s atmosphere at high zenith angle and low velocity are interesting because their petrologic and isotopic characteristics are largely preserved thereby providing constraints on the parent... et al., 2012). Oxygen isotope studies complemented by mineralogical compositions are vital to unravel the complexity involved in distinguishing the known components of micrometeorites and their parent bodies. For carbonaceous chondrites...

  13. Micron-scale D/H heterogeneity in chondrite matrices: a signature of the pristine solar system water?

    CERN Document Server

    Piani, Laurette; Remusat, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Organic matter and hydrous silicates are intimately mixed in the matrix of chondrites and in-situ determination of their individual D/H ratios is therefore challenging. Nevertheless, the D/H ratio of each pure component in this mixture should yield a comprehensible signature of the origin and evolution of water and organic matter in our solar system. We measured hydrogen isotope ratios of organic and hydrous silicates in the matrices of two carbonaceous chondrites (Orgueil CI1 and Renazzo CR2) and one unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (Semarkona, LL3.0). A novel protocol was adopted, involving NanoSIMS imaging of H isotopes of monoatomatic ($H^-$) and molecular ($OH^-$) secondary ions collected at the same location. This allowed the most enriched component with respect to D to be identified in the mixture. Using this protocol, we found that in carbonaceous chondrites the isotopically homogeneous hydrous silicates are mixed with D-rich organic matter. The opposite was observed in Semarkona. Hydrous silicates i...

  14. The Confirmation of a New Type of Chondrites and Their Cosmochemical Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯渭

    1996-01-01

    The data available show that some Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites are similar to Cl meteorites.Tehy contain a lot of phyllosilicate aggregates and the oxygen isotopic composition of the whole-rock samples is approximate to that of C1 chondrites,so they are named after quasi-C1(Q-C1)chondrites Unlike Cl metcorites,the Q-Cl chondites possess chondrule structrue,and the compositions of hih temperature condensates(chondrule fragments,mineral grains or aggregates)show that the oxygen fugacity varied within a wide range in the surroundings where they were formed,similar to the variation range from E.H.L,LL to C group chondrites.It is inferred that the Q-C1 chondrites could be formed at the edges far from the equator in the whole asteroid region of the solar nebular disk.where the nebula was lower in density and the condensates were lower in accretion velocity,so that the hydration of chon drules and matrix occurred during the late stage of nebular condensation.The discovery of the Q-Cl chondrites and the fact that the earth and other terrestrial planets contain water indicate that at the edges far from the equator in the terrestrial reigion of the solar nebular disk,a large amount of water was incorporated into the lattice of minerals in the condensates as a result of hydration during nebular condensation,and then found its way into the interior parts of the Earth and other terrestrial planets due to accretion.

  15. Microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-08-01

    Microfossils of large filamentous trichomic prokaryotes have been detected during in-situ investigations of carbonaceous meteorites. This research has been carried out using the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) to examine freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorites. The images obtained reveal that many of these remains are embedded in the meteorite rock matrix. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies establish that the filamentous microstructures have elemental compositions consistent with the meteorite matrix, but are often encased within carbon-rich electron transparent sheath-like structures infilled with magnesium sulfate. This is consistent with the taphonomic modes of fossilization of cyanobacteria and sulphur bacteria, since the life habits and processes of these microorganisms frequently result in distinctive chemical biosignatures associated with the properties of their cell-walls, trichomes, and the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the sheath. In this paper the evidence for biogenicity presented includes detailed morphological and morphometric data consistent with known characteristics of uniseriate and multiseriate cyanobacteria. Evidence for indigeneity includes the embedded nature of the fossils and elemental compositions inconsistent with modern bio-contaminants.

  16. Carbonaceous Survivability on Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to gain knowledge about the potential contributions of comets and cosmic dust to the origin of life on Earth, we need to explore the survivability of their potential organic compounds on impact and the formation of secondary products that may have arisen from the chaotic events sustained by the carriers as they fell to Earth. We have performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, kerogens, PAH crystals, and Murchison and Nogoya meteorites) into Al plate targets at velocities - 6 km/s. Estimated peak shock pressures probably did not exceed 120 GPa and peak shock temperatures were probably less than 4000 K for times of nano- to microsecs. Nominal crater dia. are less than one mm. The most significant results of these experiments are the preservation of the higher mass PAHs (e. g., pyrene relative to napthalene) and the formation of additional alkylated PAHs. We have also examined the residues of polystyrene projectiles impacted by a microparticle accelerator into targets at velocities up to 15 km/s. This talk will discuss the results of these experiments and their implications with respect to the survival of carbonaceous deliverables to early Earth. The prospects of survivability of organic molecules on "intact" capture of cosmic dust in space via soft: and hard cosmic dust collectors will also be discussed.

  17. Microfossils in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Microfossils of large filamentous trichomic prokaryotes have been detected during in-situ investigations of carbonaceous meteorites. This research has been carried out using the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) to examine freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorites. The images obtained reveal that many of these remains are embedded in the meteorite rock matrix. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies establish that the filamentous microstructures have elemental compositions consistent with the meteorite matrix, but are often encased within carbon-rich electron transparent sheath-like structures infilled with magnesium sulfate. This is consistent with the taphonomic modes of fossilization of cyanobacteria and sulphur bacteria, since the life habits and processes of these microorganisms frequently result in distinctive chemical biosignatures associated with the properties of their cell-walls, trichomes, and the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the sheath. In this paper the evidence for biogenicity presented includes detailed morphological and morphometric data consistent with known characteristics of uniseriate and multiseriate cyanobacteria. Evidence for indigeneity includes the embedded nature of the fossils and elemental compositions inconsistent with modern biocontaminants.

  18. Distillation of carbonaceous material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainscow, J.W.H.

    1936-10-03

    To recover hydrocarbon products by distillation of carbonaceous material in a plurality of horizontal zones maintained at different temperatures, a retort has a plurality of superimposed (3) retort chambers, the uppermost being in communication at one end with a hopper and at the other end through coupled junction not shown with one end of the next lower chamber, whose opposite end communicates with lowermost chamber, the other end of which has a sealed discharge passage, tank, and conveyor not shown. Each retort chamber has stirring and conveying means consisting of helical blades (2) attached to radial arms on shaft mounted in water cooled bearings and driven through suitably mounted sprocket wheels and chains not shown. Each retort chamber has a gas dome, with pyrometer tube, and off-take connected to a common main opening into a dust eliminator which in turn connects with a plurality of vertical condensation towers of known construction, maintained at different temperatures by means of steam from a superheater not shown situated in one retort chamber. The retort heating gases pass from the furnace via zig-zag, (three) baffles under and around each retort chamber to a flue not shown.

  19. The micro-distribution of carbonaceous matter in the Murchison meteorite as investigated by Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Chahrazade El; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Sagon, Gérard; Baron, Marie-Hélène

    2005-07-01

    The carbonaceous Murchison chondrite is one of the most studied meteorites. It is considered to be an astrobiology standard for detection of extraterrestrial organic matter. Considerable work has been done to resolve the elemental composition of this meteorite. Raman spectroscopy is a very suitable technique for non-destructive rapid in situ analyses to establish the spatial distribution of carbonaceous matter. This report demonstrates that Raman cartography at a resolution of 1 μm 2 can be performed. Two-dimensional distribution of graphitised carbon, amorphous carbonaceous matter and minerals were obtained on 100 μm 2 maps. Maps of the surface of native stones and of a powdered sample are compared. Graphitic and amorphous carbonaceous domains are found to be highly overlapping in all tested areas at the surface of the meteorite and in its interior as well. Pyroxene, olivine and iron oxide grains are embedded into this mixed carbonaceous material. The results show that every mineral grain with a size of less than a few μm 2 is encased in a thin carbonaceous matrix, which accounts for only 2.5 wt.%. This interstitial matter sticks together isolated mineral crystallites or concretions, including only very few individualized graphitised grains. Grinding separates the mineral particles but most of them retain their carbonaceous coating. This Raman study complements recent findings deduced from other spatial analyses performed by microprobe laser-desorption laser-ionisation mass spectrometry (μL 2MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM).

  20. Organic matter and metamorphic history of CO chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, Lydie; Bourot-Denise, Michèle; Quirico, Eric; Montagnac, Gilles; Lewin, Eric

    2007-03-01

    The metamorphic grades of a series of eight CO3 chondrites (ALHA77307, Colony, Kainsaz, Felix, Lancé, Ornans, Warrenton and Isna) have been quantified. The method used was based on the structural grade of the organic matter trapped in the matrix, which is irreversibly transformed by thermal metamorphism. The maturation of the organic matter is independent with respect to the mineralogical context and aqueous alteration. This metamorphic tracer is thus valid whatever the chemical class of chondrites. Moreover, it is sensitive to the peak metamorphic temperature. The structural grade of the organic matter was used along with other metamorphic tracers such as petrography of opaque minerals, Fa and Fs silicate composition in type I chondrules, presolar grains and noble gas (P3 component) abundance. The deduced metamorphic hierarchy and the attributed petrographic types are the following: ALHA77307 (3.03) Chopin C., and Rouzaud J. N. (2002) Raman spectrum of carbonaceous material in metasediments: a new geothermometer. J. Metamorph. Geol., 20, 859-871]. A value of 330 °C was obtained for Allende (CV chondrite), Warrenton and Isna, consistent with temperatures estimated from Fe diffusion [Weinbruch S., Armstrong J., and Palme H. (1994). Constraints on the thermal history of the Allende parent body as derive from olivine-spinel thermometry and Fe/Mg interdiffusion in olivine. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta58(2), 1019-1030.], from the Ni content in sulfide-metal assemblages [Zanda B., Bourot-Denise M., and Hewins R. (1995) Condensate sulfide and its metamorphic transformations in primitive chondrites. Meteorit. Planet. Sci.30, A605.] and from the d002 interlayer spacing in poorly graphitized carbon [Rietmeijer, F., and MacKinnon, I. (1985) Poorly graphitized carbon as a new cosmothermometer for primitive extraterrestrial materials. Nature, 315, 733-736]. The trapped noble gas and C content appear to be sensitive but not precise metamorphic tracers, indicating that the "Ornans

  1. The origin and evolution of chondrites recorded in the elemental and isotopic compositions of their macromolecular organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. M. O.'D.; Fogel, M.; Yabuta, H.; Cody, G. D.

    2007-09-01

    Extraterrestrial organic matter in meteorites potentially retains a unique record of synthesis and chemical/thermal modification by parent body, nebular and even presolar processes. In a survey of the elemental and isotopic compositions of insoluble organic matter (IOM) from 75 carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites, we find dramatic variations within and between chondrite classes. There is no evidence that these variations correlate with the time and/or location of chondrite formation, or with any primary petrologic or bulk compositional features that are associated with nebular processes (e.g., chondrule and volatile trace element abundances). Nor is there evidence for the formation of the IOM by Fischer-Tropsch-Type synthesis in the nebula or in the parent bodies. The elemental variations are consistent with thermal maturation and/or oxidation of a common precursor. For reasons that are unclear, there are large variations in isotopic composition within and between chondrite classes that do not correlate in a simple way with elemental composition or petrologic type. Nevertheless, because of the pattern of elemental variations with petrologic type and the lack of any correlation with the primary features of the chondrite classes, at present the most likely explanation is that all IOM compositional variations are the result of parent body processing of a common precursor. If correct, the range of isotopic compositions within and between chondrite classes implies that the IOM is composed of several isotopically distinct components whose relative stability varied with parent body conditions. The most primitive IOM is found in the CR chondrites and Bells (CM2). Isotopically, the IOM from these meteorites resembles the IOM in interplanetary dust particles. Chemically, their IOM resembles the CHON particles of comet Halley. Despite the large isotopic anomalies in the IOM from these meteorites, it is uncertain whether the IOM formed in the interstellar medium or

  2. Everyone Wins: A Mars-Impact Origin for Carbonaceous Phobos and Deimos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Welzenbach, L.; Steele, A.

    2016-01-01

    Discussions of Phobos' and Deimos' origin(s) tend to feature an orthogonally opposed pair of observations: dynamical studies which favor coalescence of the moons from an orbital debris ring arising from a large impact on Mars; and reflectance spectroscopy of the moons that indicate a carbonaceous composition that is not consistent with Martian surface materials. One way to reconcile this discrepancy is to consider the option of a Mars-impact origin for Phobos and Deimos, followed by surficial decoration of carbon-rich materials by interplanetary dust particles (IDP). The moons experience a high IDP flux because of their location in Mars' gravity well. Calculations show that accreted carbon is sufficient to produce a surface with reflectance spectra resembling carbonaceous chondrites.

  3. Oxygen isotopic constraints on the origin of Mg-rich olivines from chondritic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libourel, Guy; Chaussidon, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Chondrules are the major high temperature components of chondritic meteorites which accreted a few millions years after the oldest solids of the solar system, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, were condensed from the nebula gas. Chondrules formed during brief heating events by incomplete melting of solid dust precursors in the protoplanetary disk. Petrographic, compositional and isotopic arguments allowed the identification of metal-bearing Mg-rich olivine aggregates among the precursors of magnesian type I chondrules. Two very different settings can be considered for the formation of these Mg-rich olivines: either a nebular setting corresponding mostly to condensation-evaporation processes in the nebular gas or a planetary setting corresponding mostly to differentiation processes in a planetesimal. An ion microprobe survey of Mg-rich olivines of a set of type I chondrules and isolated olivines from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites and carbonaceous chondrites revealed the existence of several modes in the distribution of the ∆17O values and the presence of a large range of mass fractionation (several ‰) within each mode. The chemistry and the oxygen isotopic compositions indicate that Mg-rich olivines are unlikely to be of nebular origin (i.e., solar nebula condensates) but are more likely debris of broken differentiated planetesimals (each of them being characterized by a given ∆17O). Mg-rich olivines could have crystallized from magma ocean-like environments on partially molten planetesimals undergoing metal-silicate differentiation processes. Considering the very old age of chondrules, Mg-rich olivine grains or aggregates might be considered as millimeter-sized fragments from disrupted first-generation differentiated planetesimals. Finally, the finding of only a small number of discrete ∆17O modes for Mg-rich olivines grains or aggregates in a given chondrite suggests that these shattered fragments have not been efficiently mixed in the disk and

  4. Terrestrial microbes in martian and chondritic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airieau, S.; Picenco, Y.; Andersen, G.

    2007-08-01

    Introduction: The best extraterrestrial analogs for microbiology are meteorites. The chemistry and mineralogy of Asteroid Belt and martian (SNC) meteorites are used as tracers of processes that took place in the early solar system. Meteoritic falls, in particular those of carbonaceous chondrites, are regarded as pristine samples of planetesimal evolution as these rocks are primitive and mostly unprocessed since the formation of the solar system 4.56 billion years ago. Yet, questions about terrestrial contamination and its effects on the meteoritic isotopic, chemical and mineral characteristics often arise. Meteorites are hosts to biological activity as soon as they are in contact with the terrestrial biosphere, like all rocks. A wide biodiversity was found in 21 chondrites and 8 martian stones, and was investigated with cell culture, microscopy techniques, PCR, and LAL photoluminetry. Some preliminary results are presented here. The sample suite included carbonaceous chondrites of types CR, CV, CK, CO, CI, and CM, from ANSMET and Falls. Past studies documented the alteration of meteorites by weathering and biological activity [1]-[4]. Unpublished observations during aqueous extraction for oxygen isotopic analysis [5], noted the formation of biofilms in water in a matter of days. In order to address the potential modification of meteoritic isotopic and chemical signatures, the culture of microbial contaminating species was initiated in 2005, and after a prolonged incubation, some of the species obtained from cell culture were analyzed in 2006. The results are preliminary, and a systematic catalog of microbial contaminants is developing very slowly due to lack of funding. Methods: The primary method was cell culture and PCR. Chondrites. Chondritic meteorite fragments were obtained by breaking stones of approximately one gram in sterile mortars. The core of the rocks, presumably less contaminated than the surface, was used for the present microbial study, and the

  5. Using the Fe/Mn Ratio of FeO-Rich Olivine In WILD 2, Chondrite Matrix, and Type IIA Chondrules to Disentangle Their Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David R.; Le, L.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The Stardust Mission returned a large abundance of impactors from Comet 81P/Wild2 in the 5-30 m range. The preliminary examination of just a limited number of these particles showed that the collection captured abundant crystalline grains with a diverse mineralogy [1,2]. Many of these grains resemble those found in chondrite matrix and even contain fragments of chondrules and CAIs [1-3]. In particular, the olivine found in Wild 2 exhibits a wide compositional range (Fa0-97) with minor element abundances similar to the matrix olivine found in many carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs). Despite the wide distribution of Fa content, the olivine found in the matrices of CCs, UOCs, and Wild 2 can be roughly lumped into two types based solely on fayalite content. In fact, in some cases, a distinct bi-modal distribution is observed.

  6. Petrology and mineralogy of CK chondrites: Implications for the metamorphism of the CK chondrite parent body

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki, Noguchi

    1993-01-01

    The petrology and mineralogy of four CK chondrites, Karoonda (CK4), Maralinga (CK4), Yamato(Y)-693(CK4), and Elephant Moraine (EET) 87507 (CK5) were investigated in detail to estimate the origin of their quite heterogeneous plagioclases and the metamorphic history of CK chondrite parent body. EPMA analyses and SEM observations revealed that plagioclases in chondrules, CAIs, and matrices in CK chondrites have different compositional variations and that plagioclases in matrices display distinct...

  7. Carbonaceous Material in Extraterrestrial Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Comets, asteroids and their fragments (i.e. meteorite, micrometeorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs)) are known to contain carbonaceous material. IDPs have ~10% of carbon by mass [1-3], while both micrometeorites and IDPs contain organic molecules. However, it is not certain whether these molecules are indigenous or terrestrial contamination [4-7]. On the other hand, ultra-carbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites (UCAMMs) contain 50-80% of carbonaceous material, which is one of the highest organic matter contents detected in an extraterrestrial body [8]. Comets also have several extraterrestrial organic molecules [9, 10], including the simplest amino acid glycine [11]. In addition, the impact-shock of a typical comet ice mixture produces several amino acids from simple precursors [12]. Carbonaceous meteorites contain up to 5wt% of organic carbon [13], which is either locked in an insoluble kerogen-like polymer, or in a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds [14-16]. Bulk analysis of the meteoritic soluble organic fraction has revealed a high molecular diversity of tens of thousands of different molecular compositions [17]. The analysis of the carbonaceous content of comets, asteroids and their fragments provides a window into the resources delivered to the early Earth.[1] Brownlee (1985) Ann. Rev. Earth and Plan. Sci. 13, 147. [2] Schramm et al. (1989) Meteoritics 24, 99. [3] Messenger (2002) MAPS 37, 1491. [4] Clemett et al. (1993) Science 262, 721. [5] Brinton et al. (1998) OLEB 28, 413. [6] Flynn (2003) GCA 67, 4791. [7] Matrajt et al. (2004) MAPS 39, 1849. [8] Duprat et al. (2010) Science 328, 742-745. [9] Bockelée-Morvan et al. (2004) in: Comets II. pp. 391-423. [10] Mumma and Charnley (2011) ARAA 49, 471. [11] Elsila et al. (2009) MAPS 44, 1323. [12] Martins et al. (2013) Nature Geoscience 6, 1045. [13] Alexander et al. (2013) GCA 123, 244. [14] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [15] Cody and

  8. Diversity in C-Xanes Spectra Obtained from Carbonaceous Solid Inclusions from Monahans Halite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Y.; Zolensky, M. E.; Fries, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Rahman, Z.; Cody, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    Monahans meteorite (H5) contains fluid inclusion- bearing halite (NaCl) crystals [1]. Microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy showed that the fluid in the inclusions is an aqueous brine and they were trapped near 25degC [1]. Their continued presence in the halite grains requires that their incorporation into the H chondrite asteroid was post metamorphism [2]. Abundant solid inclusions are also present in the halites. The solid inclusions include abundant and widely variable organics [2]. Analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction and TEM reveal that these grains include macromolecular carbon similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, magnetite, sulfides, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and possibly the zeolite phillipsite [3]. Here we report organic analyses of these carbonaceous residues in Monahans halite using C-, N-, and O- X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). Samples and Methods: Approximately 100 nm-thick sections were extracted with a focused ion beam (FIB) at JSC from solid inclusions from Monahans halite. The sections were analyzed using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) on beamline 5.3.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for XANES spectroscopy. Results and Discussion: C-XANES spectra of the solid inclusions show micrometer-scale heterogeneity, indicating that the macromolecular carbon in the inclusions have complex chemical variations. C-XANES features include 284.7 eV assigned to aromatic C=C, 288.4-288.8 eV assigned to carboxyl, and 290.6 eV assigned to carbonate. The carbonyl features obtained by CXANES might have been caused by the FIB used in sample preparation. No specific N-XANES features are observed. The CXANES spectra obtained from several areas in the FIB sections include type 1&2 chondritic IOM like, type 3 chondritic IOM like, and none of the above

  9. Isotopic evidence for primordial molecular cloud material in metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Kooten, Elishevah M M E; Wielandt, Daniel; Schiller, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    product of (26)Al. This correlation is interpreted as reflecting progressive thermal processing of in-falling (26)Al-rich molecular cloud material in the inner Solar System. The thermally unprocessed molecular cloud matter reflecting the nucleosynthetic makeup of the molecular cloud before the last...

  10. Origin of spinel-rich chondrules and inclusions in carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornacki, A. S.; Fegley, B.

    1984-02-01

    The evaluation of three models of the origin of spinel-rich chondrules and inclusions presented here includes new calculations of the major-element refractory mineral condensation sequence from a gas of solar composition over a wide pressure interval. Condensation calculations show that spinel-rich chondrules did not crystallize from metastable liquid condensates, and that spinel-rich inclusions are not aggregates of refractory nebular condensates. It is proposed that spinel-rich objects are fractionated distillation residues of small aggregates of primitive dust that lost Ca, Si-rich partial melts by evaporation, ablation, or splashing during collisions. This model also explains why spinel-rich chondrules and inclusions (1) are usually smaller than melilite-rich chondrules and inclusions; (2) often have highly fractionated trace-element compositions; and (3) usually do not contain Pt-metal nuggets even when they are more enriched in the Pt-group metals than nugget-bearing melilite-rich objects.

  11. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of chondrites and silicate planetary reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Merdian, Alexandra; Holmden, Chris; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Haßler, Kathrin; Wille, Martin; Reitter, Elmar

    2016-06-01

    The depletion of chromium in Earth's mantle (∼2700 ppm) in comparison to chondrites (∼4400 ppm) indicates significant incorporation of chromium into the core during our planet's metal-silicate differentiation, assuming that there was no significant escape of the moderately volatile element chromium during the accretionary phase of Earth. Stable Cr isotope compositions - expressed as the ‰-difference in 53Cr/52Cr from the terrestrial reference material SRM979 (δ53/52CrSRM979 values) - of planetary silicate reservoirs might thus yield information about the conditions of planetary metal segregation processes when compared to chondrites. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of 7 carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, 5 HED achondrites and 2 martian meteorites determined by a double spike MC-ICP-MS method are within uncertainties indistinguishable from each other and from the previously determined δ53/52CrSRM979 value of -0.124 ± 0.101‰ for the igneous silicate Earth. Extensive quality tests support the accuracy of the stable Cr isotope determinations of various meteorites and terrestrial silicates reported here. The uniformity in stable Cr isotope compositions of samples from planetary silicate mantles and undifferentiated meteorites indicates that metal-silicate differentiation of Earth, Mars and the HED parent body did not cause measurable stable Cr isotope fractionation between these two reservoirs. Our results also imply that the accretionary disc, at least in the inner solar system, was homogeneous in its stable Cr isotopic composition and that potential volatility loss of chromium during accretion of the terrestrial planets was not accompanied by measurable stable isotopic fractionation. Small but reproducible variations in δ53/52CrSRM979 values of terrestrial magmatic rocks point to natural stable Cr isotope variations within Earth's silicate reservoirs. Further and more detailed studies are required to investigate whether silicate

  12. Noble gases in E-chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, J.; Anders, E.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of noble gas data for 12 E-chondrites with literature data shows K-Ar ages greater than 4 AE for 14 out of 18 meteorites, while U, Th-He ages are often shorter. Cosmic ray exposure ages are found to differ systematically between types E4 and E6, with the respective, below-16 Myr and above-30 Myr values implying that the E-chondrite parent body predominantly contains a single petrologic type on the 1 km scale of individual impacts in contrast to the mixed parent bodies of the ordinary chondrites. Amounts of planetary gas in E4-E6 chondrites fall in the range for ordinary chondrites of types 4-6, but fail to correlate with petrologic type or volatile trace element contents, in contrast to the ordinary chondrites. Analyses of mineral separates show that the planetary gases are concentrated in an HFand HCl-insoluble mineral, similar to phase Q. The subsolar gases are located in an HCl- and HNO3-resistant phase.

  13. Hydrocarbon components in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissin, Y. V.

    2003-05-01

    Currently, the presence of free n-alkanes and isoprenoid alkanes in carbonaceous meteorites is usually explained either by microbial contamination during the period between the meteorite fall and collection or by contamination from the environment of analytical laboratories and museums. The goal of this research was to repeat analysis of hydrocarbon components in meteorites and to investigate possible meteorite contamination routes discussed in the literature. Experimental analysis of free organic constituents in five carbonaceous meteorites by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and gas chromatographic (GC) methods confirmed the presence of extractable aliphatic components, n-alkanes in the C 15H 32-C 27H 56 range and isoprenoid alkanes (phytane, pristane, and norpristane), in some of these meteorites. The contents of these compounds vary depending on the source. Insoluble organic components of two meteorites (meteorite kerogens) were isolated, and their composition was analyzed by IR and cracking/GC methods. Comparison with the data on several terrestrial contamination sources proposed in the literature shows that the presence of free saturated hydrocarbons in meteorites and the composition of the meteorite kerogen could not be explained either by microbial contamination or by contamination from the laboratory environment. The types of the hydrocarbons in meteorites resemble those typical of ancient terrestrial deposits of organic-rich sediments, except for the absence of lighter hydrocarbons, which apparently slowly evaporated in space, and multi-ring naphthenic compounds of the biologic origin, steranes, terpanes, etc. The prevailing current explanation for the presence of free linear saturated hydrocarbons in carbonaceous meteorites, apart from contamination, is the abiotic route from hydrogen and carbon monoxide. However, the data on the structure of meteorite kerogens require a search for different routes that initially produce complex polymeric structures containing

  14. The classification and complex thermal history of the enstatite chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have carried out instrumental neutron activation analysis of 11 enstatite chondrites and electron microprobe analyses of 17 enstatite chondrites, most of which were previously little described. We report here the third known EH5 chondrite (LEW 88180) and an unusual EL6 chondrite (LEW 87119), new data on four EL3 chondrites (ALH 85119, EET 90299, PCA 91020, and MAC 88136, which is paired with MAC 88180 and MAC 88184), the second EL5 chondrite (TIL 91714), and an unusual metal-rich and sulfide-poor EL3 chondrite (LEW 87223). The often discussed differences in mineral composition displayed by the EH and EL chondrites are not as marked after the inclusion of the new samples in the database, and the two classes apparently experienced a similar range of equilibrium temperatures. However, texturally the EL chondrites appear to have experienced much higher levels of metamorphic alteration than EH chondrites of similar equilibration temperatures. Most of the petrologic type criteria are not applicable to enstatite chondrites and, unlike the ordinary chondrites, texture and mineralogy reflect different aspects of the meteorite history. We therefore propose that the existing petrologic type scheme not be used for enstatite chondrites. We suggest that while 'textural type' reflects peak metamorphic temperatures, the 'mineralogical type' reflects equilibration during postmetamorphic (probably regolith) processes. Unlike the ordinary chondrites and EH chondrites, EL chondrites experienced an extensive low-temperature metamorphic episode. There are now a large number of enstatite meteorite breccias and impact melts, and apparently surface processes were important in determining the present nature of the enstatite chondrites.

  15. New Volatile-Rich Clasts from Brecciated Chondrites and Achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzek, M.; Ebert, S.; Bischoff, A.

    2016-08-01

    New volatile-rich clasts from brecciated chondrites and achondrites have been analyzed. Some share similarities with CM and some with CI chondrites, but mineralogical and chemical differences still exist.

  16. REE and Hf distribution among mineral phases in the CV-CK clan: A way to explain present-day Hf isotopic variations in chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Céline; Debaille, Vinciane; Lanari, Pierre; Goderis, Steven; Vandendael, Isabelle; Vanhaecke, Frank; Vidal, Olivier; Claeys, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Chondrites are among the most primitive objects in the Solar System and constitute the main building blocks of telluric planets. Among the radiochronometers currently used for dating geological events, Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf are both composed of refractory, lithophile element. They are thought to behave similarly as the parent elements (Sm and Lu) are generally less incompatible than the daughter elements (Nd and Hf) during geological processes. As such, their respective average isotopic compositions for the solar system should be well defined by the average of chondrites, called Chondritic Uniform Reservoir (CHUR). However, while the Sm-Nd isotopic system shows an actual spread of less than 4% in the average chondritic record, the Lu-Hf system shows a larger variation range of 28% [Bouvier A., Vervoort J. D. and Patchett P. J. (2008) The Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd isotopic composition of CHUR: Constraints from unequilibrated chondrites and implications for the bulk composition of terrestrial planets. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.273, 48-57]. To better understand the contrast between Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf systems, the REE and Hf distribution among mineral phases during metamorphism of Karoonda (CK) and Vigarano-type (CV) carbonaceous chondrites has been examined. Mineral modes were determined from elemental mapping on a set of five CK chondrites (from types 3-6) and one CV3 chondrite. Trace-element patterns are obtained for the first time in all the chondrite-forming minerals of a given class (CK chondrites) as well as one CV3 sample. This study reveals that REE are distributed among both phosphates and silicates. Only 30-50% of Sm and Nd are stored in phosphates (at least in chondrites types 3-5); as such, they are not mobilized during early stages of metamorphism. The remaining fraction of Sm and Nd is distributed among the same mineral phases; these elements are therefore not decoupled during metamorphism. Of the whole-rock total of Lu, the fraction held in phosphate decreases significantly

  17. The matrices of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites - Implications for the origin and history of chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, G. R.; Keil, K.; Taylor, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    The matrices of 16 unequilibrated chondrites were examined by optical microscopy, an electron microprobe, and a scanning electron microscope. The fine-grained, opaque, silicate matrix of type 3 unequilibrated chondrites was compositionally, mineralogically, and texturally different from the chondrules and their fragments; it may be the low temperature condensate proposed by Larimer and Anders (1967, 1970). Each meteorite has been metamorphosed by a combination of processes including thermal metamorphism and the passage of shock waves; the appearance of each chondrite results from the temperature and pressure conditions which formed it, and subsequent metamorphic alterations.

  18. GEMS-like material in the matrix of the Paris meteorite and the early stages of alteration of CM chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, H.; Cuvillier, P.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Paris meteorite is a weakly altered CM chondrite that has been discovered recently (Hewins et al., 2014). Its matrix offers the opportunity to search for well-preserved pristine pre-accretional material, as well as to study the earliest stages of aqueous alteration in the CM parent body. The study of the matrix of Paris has been conducted by analytical transmission electron microscopy on focused ion beam sections extracted from matrix areas showing different degrees of aqueous alteration. The least altered matrix sample consists of amorphous silicate grains, a few hundreds of nm in size, separated from one another by an abundant porosity. The amorphous silicates enclose numerous Fe-sulfide nanograins and their average composition is close to the chondritic composition. They share many similarities with GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains present in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles and with primitive type 3.0 carbonaceous chondrites. This first discovery of GEMS-like texture in a CM chondrite suggests that GEMS grains could have been the building blocks of the CM matrices. In more aqueously altered samples, pronounced microstructural heterogeneities were detected at the micrometer scale. The matrix consists mostly of a mixture of amorphous material and Fe-rich, spongy to fine-fibrous, poorly crystalline phyllosilicates. The porosity fraction is significantly reduced and the mixed amorphous-fibrous material frequently forms a continuous groundmass. The close association between these two material types suggests a replacement mechanism due to aqueous alteration. Chemical compositions correlate strongly with the microstructure. The amorphous material has a composition close to the chondritic value while the fine-fibrous phyllosilicate material is Fe-enriched. This Fe enrichment is found to be continuous from weakly to more heavily altered areas, in which the fibrous morphology is coarser and better crystalline. Cronstedtite with

  19. Physical Property Comparison of Ordinary Chondrite Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Daniel; Bryson, Kathryn L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the physical properties of meteorites are essential in helping to determine the physical characteristics of the parent asteroids. Studying of physical properties can provide fundamental information to understand meteoroid behavior in the atmosphere and determine methods to deflect potentially hazardous asteroids. Initial focus of our study is on ordinary chondrites, since they are over 70% of the meteorites.To date we have measured the density (bulk and grain), porosity, thermal emissivity, and acoustic velocity of 7 ordinary chondrites (Tamdakht, Chelyabinsk, and multiple Antarctic meteorites). Each meteorite is first scanned using a 3D laser scanner to determine bulk density. For the other tests 1.5cm cubes are studied. Grain density is determined using gas pycnometer using nitrogen gas. Acoustic velocity, longitudinal and shear wave, are measured using an Olympus 45-MG in single element mode. Thermal emissivity is measured from 20°C up to atmospheric entry temperatures, and is based on average measurements over the wavelength range of 8 to 14μm.Tamdakht's bulk density is that of an average H Chondrite (3-4 g/cm3), while it has a low longitudinal velocity of 3540 m/s compared to the normal rage for H chondrites at 3529-6660 m/s. The velocity is consistent across all three axes in the sample. One possibility is an internal fracture, where part of has been seen on the surface of one of the test cubes. Chelyabinsk and the studied Antarctic meteorites have lower bulk and higher grain densities yielding above average porosities. Tamdakht is on the high end of the emissivity range for H chondrites and Chelyabinsk is on the high end for LL chondrites. Emissivity ranges from 0.985-0.995 at 20°C for the ordinary chondrites studied. Heated samples emissivity decreases slightly, 0.045, from initial 20°C measurement. Between 40-200°C, the emissivity stays fairly constant after decrease from room temperature. BTN 00304 has the highest average over the

  20. Searching for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in a Contaminated Meteorite: Amino Acid Analyses of the Canakkale L6 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ornek, C. Y.; Esenoglu, H. H.; Unsalan, O.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids can serve as important markers of cosmochemistry, as their abundances and isomeric and isotopic compositions have been found to vary predictably with changes in parent body chemistry and alteration processes. Amino acids are also of astrobiological interest because they are essential for life on Earth. Analyses of a range of meteorites, including all groups of carbonaceous chondrites, along with H, R, and LL chondrites, ureilites, and a martian shergottite, have revealed that amino acids of plausible extraterrestrial origin can be formed in and persist after a wide range of parent body conditions. However, amino acid analyses of L6 chondrites to date have not provided evidence for indigenous amino acids. In the present study, we performed amino acid analysis on larger samples of a different L6 chondite, Canakkale, to determine whether or not trace levels of indigenous amino acids could be found. The Canakkale meteor was an observed fall in late July, 1964, near Canakkale, Turkey. The meteorite samples (1.36 and 1.09 g) analyzed in this study were allocated by C. Y. Ornek, along with a soil sample (1.5 g) collected near the Canakkale recovery site.

  1. A New Modal Analysis Method to put Constraints on the Aqueous Alteration of CR Chondrites and Estimate the Unaltered CR Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perronnet, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Gounelle, M.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2007-01-01

    carbonaceous chondrites are of the major interest since they contain one of the most primitive organic matters. However, aqueous alteration has more or less overprinted their original features in a way that needed to be assessed. That was done in the present study by comparing the mineralogy of the most altered CR1 chondrite, GRO 95577, to a less altered CR2, Renazzo. Their modal analyses were achieved thanks to a new method, based on X-ray elemental maps acquired on electron microprobe, and on IDL image treatment. It allowed the collection of new data on the composition of Renazzo and confirmed the classification of GRO 95577 as a CR1. New alteration products for CRs, vermiculite and clinochlore, were observed. The homogeneity of the Fe-poor clays in the CR1 and the distinctive matrix composition in the two chondrites suggest a wide-range of aqueous alteration on CRs. The preservation of the outlines of the chondrules in GRO 95577 and the elemental transfers of Al, Fe and Ca throughout the chondrule and of Fe and S from the matrix to the chondrule favor the idea of an asteroidal location of the aqueous alteration. From their mineralogical descriptions and modal abundances, the element repartitions in Renazzo and GRO 95577 were computed. It indicates a possible relationship between these two chondrites via an isochemical alteration process. Knowing the chemical reactions that occurred during the alteration, it was thus possible to decipher the mineralogical modal abundances in the unaltered CR body.

  2. Highly 15N-Enriched Chondritic Clasts in the Isheyevo Meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, L; Huss, G R; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Ishii, H A; Bradley, J P; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-01-14

    The metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites (CB and CH) have the highest whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment ({delta}{sup 15}N up to +1500{per_thousand}), similar to {delta}{sup 15}N values reported in micron-sized regions (hotspots) of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) of possibly cometary origin and fine-grained matrices of unmetamorphosed chondrites. These {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are commonly attributed to low-temperature ion-molecule reactions in the protosolar molecular cloud or in the outer part of the protoplanetary disk. The nature of the whole-rock {sup 15}N enrichment of the metal-rich chondrites is not understood. We report a discovery of a unique type of primitive chondritic clasts in the CH/CB-like meteorite Isheyevo, which provides important constraints on the origin of {sup 15}N anomaly in metal-rich chondrites and nitrogen-isotope fractionation in the Solar System. These clasts contain tiny chondrules and refractory inclusions (5-15 {micro}m in size), and abundant ferromagnesian chondrule fragments (1-50 {micro}m in size) embedded in the partly hydrated, fine-grained matrix material composed of olivines, pyroxenes, poorly-organized aromatic organics, phyllosilicates and other hydrous phases. The mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of chondrules and refractory inclusions in the clasts are similar to those in the Isheyevo host, suggesting formation at similar heliocentric distances. In contrast to the previously known extraterrestrial samples, the fine-grained material in the clasts is highly and rather uniformly enriched in {sup 15}N, with bulk {delta}{sup 15}N values ranging between +1000 and +1300{per_thousand}; the {delta}{sup 15}N values in rare hotspots range from +1400 to +4000{per_thousand}. Since fine-grained matrices in the lithic clasts are the only component containing thermally unprocessed (during CAI and chondrule formation or during impact melting) materials that accreted into the metal rich chondrite parent body(ies), the {sup 15}N

  3. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals. III. Modelling the heat conductivity of porous chondrite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Stephan; Gail, Hans-Peter; Trieloff, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Context. The construction of models for the internal constitution and temporal evolution of large planetesimals, which are the parent bodies of chondrites, requires as accurate as possible information on the heat conductivity of the complex mixture of minerals and iron metal found in chondrites. The few empirical data points on the heat conductivity of chondritic material are severely disturbed by impact-induced microcracks modifying the thermal conductivity. Aims: We attempt to evaluate the heat conductivity of chondritic material with theoretical methods. Methods: We derived the average heat conductivity of a multi-component mineral mixture and granular medium from the heat conductivities of its mixture components. We numerically generated random mixtures of solids with chondritic composition and packings of spheres. We solved the heat conduction equation in high spatial resolution for a test cube filled with such matter. We derived the heat conductivity of the mixture from the calculated heat flux through the cube. Results: For H and L chondrites, our results are in accord with empirical thermal conductivity at zero porosity. However, the porosity dependence of heat conductivity of granular material built from chondrules and matrix is at odds with measurements for chondrites, while our calculations are consistent with data for compacted sandstone. The discrepancy is traced back to subsequent shock modification of the currently available meteoritic material resulting from impacts on the parent body over the last 4.5 Ga. This causes a structure of void space made of fractures/cracks, which lowers the thermal conductivity of the medium and acts as a barrier to heat transfer. This structure is different from the structure that probably exists in the pristine material where voids are represented by pores rather than fractures. The results obtained for the heat conductivity of the pristine material are used for calculating models for the evolution of the H chondrite

  4. Trace element geochemistry of CR chondrite metal

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Alard, Olivier; Kearsley, Anton T; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    We report trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of metal grains from 9 different CR chondrites, distinguishing grains from chondrule interior ("interior grains"), chondrule surficial shells ("margin grains") and the matrix ("isolated grains"). Save for a few anomalous grains, Ni-normalized trace element patterns are similar for all three petrographical settings, with largely unfractionated refractory siderophile elements and depleted volatile Au, Cu, Ag, S. All types of grains are interpreted to derive from a common precursor approximated by the least melted, fine-grained objects in CR chondrites. This also excludes recondensation of metal vapor as the origin of the bulk of margin grains. The metal precursors presumably formed by incomplete condensation, with evidence for high-temperature isolation of refractory platinum-group-element (PGE)-rich condensates before mixing with lower temperature PGE-depleted condensates. The rounded shape of the Ni-rich, interior ...

  5. Chronology of enstatite chondrites and ureilites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the chronological studies on enstatite chondrites and ureilites, both of which are special groups of meteorites with unknown origins. Two unequilibrated enstatite chondrites, Qingzhen and Yamato 6901 (E3), showed the highly disturbed Rb-Sr system, while their silicate fractions yielded the 2.1 Ga isochron. The thermally metamorphosed enstatite chondrite Khairpur (E6) showed the older Rb-Sr age of 4.50 Ga. The parent body of E3 chondrites experienced late thermal event at low temperature, which broke down alkali-bearing sulfides in E3. The observed Rb-Sr data are consistent with the mobilization of Rb from alkali-sulfide to silicate phases. Ureilites show highly depleted trace elements abundance which makes it difficult to determine the age of the formation. The U-Pb and Sm-Nd age determination of low-Ca ureilite Goalpara showed that the Pb and Nd isotopes are heavily contaminated with terrestrial components. The acid residues of high-Ca ureilite MET-78008 were free of contamination and defined the old U-Pb age of 4.563±0.006 Ga. The early formation of ureilites supports their formation through the collisional destruction of the parent body. Including the ureilite date, many evolved meteorites formed within the first 10 million years of the solar system history. Future studies on meteorite chronology with the purpose of understanding the early history of the solar system should focus on the fine time resolution through the precise U-Pb age determination or the relative age determination using the extinct nuclides with half lives less than 10 million years. (author)

  6. Thermal history modeling of the H chondrite parent body

    CERN Document Server

    Henke, Stephan; Trieloff, Mario; Schwarz, Winfried H; Kleine, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    The cooling histories of individual meteorites can be empirically reconstructed by using ages from different radioisotopic chronometers with distinct closure temperatures. For a group of meteorites derived from a single parent body such data permit the reconstruction of the cooling history and properties of that body. Particularly suited are H chondrites because precise radiometric ages over a wide range of closure temperatures are available. A thermal evolution model for the H chondrite parent body is constructed by using all H chondrites for which at least three different radiometric ages are available. Several key parameters determining the thermal evolution of the H chondrite parent body and the unknown burial depths of the H chondrites are varied until an optimal fit is obtained. The fit is performed by an 'evolution algorithm'. Empirical data for eight samples are used for which radiometric ages are available for at least three different closure temperatures. A set of parameters for the H chondrite pare...

  7. 187Re-187Os systematics, highly siderophile element, S-Se-Te abundances in the components of unequilibrated L chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlag, Yogita; Becker, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The 187Re-187Os systematics, abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE: Re, platinum group elements and Au), Te, Se and S as well as major and minor elements were determined in separated components of two unequilibrated L chondrites QUE 97008 (L3.05) and Ceniceros (L3.7). The 187Re-187Os systematics are disturbed in the components of both meteorites, most likely due to open system behavior of Re during terrestrial weathering of QUE 97008 and alteration on the L chondrite parent body as indicated by an internal errorchron generated for components of Ceniceros. The HSE abundance patterns suggest that the bulk rock abundances were mainly controlled by two different end members. Non-magnetic fractions display lower Re/Os and HSE/Ir than CI chondrites. Chondrules, metal-troilite spherules and fine magnetic fractions, are depleted in refractory HSE and show higher Rh/Ir, Pd/Ir and Au/Ir than in CI chondrites. The different HSE compositions indicate the presence of unequilibrated alloys and loss of refractory HSE-rich carrier phases from the precursors of some L chondrite components. Gold is decoupled from other HSE in magnetic fractions and shows chalcophile affinities with a grain size dependent variation similar to S and Se, presumably inherited from preaccretionary processes. Tellurium is depleted in all components compared to other analysed siderophile elements, and its abundance was most likely controlled by fractional condensation and different geochemical affinities. The volatility dependent depletion of Te requires different physical and chemical conditions than typical for the canonical condensation sequence as represented by carbonaceous chondrites. Tellurium also shows variable geochemical behavior, siderophile in Ceniceros, predominantly chalcophile in QUE 97008. These differences may have been inherited from element partitioning during chondrule formation. Selenium and S on the other hand are almost unfractionated from each other and only show

  8. The Cerro LOS Calvos and La Banderia chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Randall; Lewis, Charles F.; Clark, James C.; Moore, Carleton B.

    1991-06-01

    The Cerro los Calvos meteorite is a single stone of 68.5 g found in the Nuevo Mercurio strewn field of Zacatecas, (Mexico). It is an unusual H4 chondrite. Its olivine (Fa12.5) and orthopyroxene (Fs 11.7, Wo 0.8) are reduced relative to typical H chondrites. The La Banderia meteorite of 54.3 g from the same vicinity is an LL5 chondrite of shock classification e.

  9. Chemistry and oxygen isotopic composition of cluster chondrite clasts and their components in LL3 chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Knut; Pack, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Cluster chondrites are characterized by close-fit textures of deformed and indented chondrules, taken as evidence for hot chondrule accretion (Metzler). We investigated seven cluster chondrite clasts from six brecciated LL3 chondrites and measured their bulk oxygen isotopic and chemical composition, including REE, Zr, and Hf. The same parameters were measured in situ on 93 chondrules and 4 interchondrule matrix areas. The CI-normalized REE patterns of the clasts are flat, showing LL-chondritic concentrations. The mean chemical compositions of chondrules in clasts and other LL chondrites are indistinguishable and we conclude that cluster chondrite chondrules are representative of the normal LL chondrule population. Type II chondrules are depleted in MgO, Al2O3 and refractory lithophiles (REE, Zr, Hf) by factors between 0.65 and 0.79 compared to type I chondrules. The chondrule REE patterns are basically flat with slight LREE fractionations. Many chondrules exhibit negative Eu anomalies while matrix shows a complementary pattern. Chondrules scatter along a correlation line with a slope of 0.63 in the oxygen 3-isotope diagram, interpreted as the result of O-isotope exchange between chondrule melts and 18O-rich nebular components. In one clast, a distinct anticorrelation between chondrule size and δ18O is found, which may indicate a more intense oxygen isotope exchange by smaller chondrules. In some clasts the δ18O values of type I chondrules are correlated with concentrations of SiO2 and MnO and anticorrelated with MgO, possibly due to the admixture of a SiO2- and MnO-rich component to chondrule melts during oxygen isotope exchange. Two chondrules with negative anomalies in Sm, Eu, and Yb were found and may relate their precursors to refractory material known from group III CAIs. Furthermore, three chondrules with strong LREE > HREE and Zr/Hf fractionations were detected, whose formation history remains to be explained.

  10. A Collisional Origin to Earth's Non-chondritic Composition?

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsor, Amy; Leinhardt, Zoë M.; Carter, Philip J.; Elliott, Tim; Walter, Michael J.; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a non-chondritic composition for Bulk Earth. If Earth formed from the accretion of chondritic material, its non-chondritic composition, in particular the super-chondritic 142Nd/144Nd and low Mg/Fe ratios, might be explained by the collisional erosion of differentiated planetesimals during its formation. In this work we use an N-body code, that includes a state-of-the-art collision model, to follow the formation of protoplanets, similar to proto-Earth, from d...

  11. Petrology and Cosmochemistry of a Suite of R Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrano, Z. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites are among the most primitive surviving materials from the early solar system. They are divided into groups based on chemical types defined by mineralogy, bulk composition, and oxygen isotope compositions. Chondrites range in petrographic grade from type 1 to type 7. Type 3 chondrites are the most primitive and are little changed from the nebular solids accreted to form asteroids. They are composed of chondrules, fine-grained matrix, metal and sulfide, plus or minus Ca-Al-rich inclusions. With increasing aqueous alteration at low temperatures, members of some chondrite classes transformed from type 3 towards type 1. With increasing thermal metamorphism and low fluid content, members of other classes changed from type 3 towards type 7. Rumuruti (R) chondrites are a rare group (0.1% of falls) similar to ordinary chondrites in some properties but different in others. They are characterized by low chondrule/matrix modal abundance ratios, high oxidation state, small mean chondrule size, abundant sulfides and low metal contents. R chondrites vary in petrologic type from 3 to 6. They are important objects to study because some of them have undergone metamorphism at high temperatures in the presence of aqueous fluids. In contrast, CM and CI chondrites were heated to low temperatures in the presence of aqueous fluids leading to alteration; they contain low-T hydrous phases (phyllosilicates) and little or no remaining metal. Ordinary chondrites were heated to high temperatures in a low-fluid environment resulting in anhydrous metamorphic rocks. R6 chondrites are highly metamorphosed and some contain the high-T hydrous phases mica and amphibole. R chondrites are thus unique and give us an opportunity to examine whether there are compositional effects caused by high-T, highfluid metamorphism of nebular materials.

  12. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals III. Modelling the heat conductivity of porous chondrite material

    CERN Document Server

    Henke, Stephan; Trieloff, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The construction of models for the internal constitution and the temporal evolution of large planetesimals, the parent bodies of chondrites, requires information on the heat conductivity of the complex mixture of minerals and iron metal found in chondrites. It is attempted to evaluate the heat conductivity of a multi-component mineral mixture and granular medium from the heat conductivities of its mixture components. Random mixtures of solids with chondritic composition and packings of spheres are numerically generated. The heat conduction equation is solved in high spatial resolution for a test cube filled with such matter. From the heat flux through the cube the heat conductivity of the mixture is derived. The model results for porous material are consistent with data for compacted sandstone, but are at odds with measurements for H and L chondrites. The discrepancy is traced back to shock modification of the currently available meteoritic material by impacts on the parent body over the last 4.5 Ga. This cau...

  13. Re-Os isotope geochemistry of three Chinese chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI XiaChen; QIN Xie; SHI RenDeng; HONG JiAn

    2007-01-01

    Three Chinese ordinary chondrites, including Jilin (H5), Boxian (LL3.8) and Lujiang (LL6), have been studied for their Re and Os abundances and Os isotopic composition in whole-chondrite samples, separated magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions, and nodules.The results indicate that the Re and Os abundances of the whole-chondrite samples are in the ranges of corresponding H- and LL-Groups, respectively.The Re and Os abundances of magnetic fraction from Boxian and Lujiang are within the range of high-Os IIAB and IIIAB irons, whereas those of nonmagnetic fractions of Boxian and Lujiang are lower than the whole-chondrite values.The Re and Os abundances of nodules in Jilin are in the range of the LL-Group.187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios of the three whole chondrites are in the range of ordinary chondrites which locate around the isochron of IIAB+IIIAB irons.187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios of the magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions from Boxian have a larger difference.The nonmagnetic fraction of Lujiang may contain a recent addition of Re, which causes deviation of the 187Re/188Os ratio from the irons isochron.The Re and Os abundances of nodules in Jilin are lower than those of the whole-chondrite, but their 187Os/188Os ratios are higher than that of the whole chondrite.

  14. Chromium on Eros: Further Evidence of Ordinary Chondrite Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, C. N.; Nittler, L. R.; Brown, M. R. M.; McCoy, T. J.; Lim, L. F.

    2005-01-01

    The surface major element composition of the near-earth asteroid 433-Eros has been determined by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRS) on the NEAR-Shoemaker spacecraft [1]. The abundances of Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe match those of ordinary chondrites [1]. However, the observation that Eros appears to have a sulfur abundance at least a factor of two lower than ordinary chondrites, suggests either sulfur loss from the surface of Eros by impact and/or radiation processes (space weathering) or that its surface is comprised of a somewhat more differentiated type of material than an ordinary chondrite [1]. A definitive match for an ordinary chondrite parent body has very rarely been made, despite the conundrum that ordinary chondrites are the most prevalent type of meteorite found on Earth. Furthermore, Eros is classified as an S(IV) type asteroid [2] and being an S, it is the second most prevalent type of asteroid in the asteroid belt [3].

  15. High-temperature water-rock interactions and hydrothermal environments in the chondrite-like core of Enceladus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Postberg, Frank; Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Mori, Megumi; Hong, Peng K; Yoshizaki, Motoko; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti

    2015-10-27

    It has been suggested that Saturn's moon Enceladus possesses a subsurface ocean. The recent discovery of silica nanoparticles derived from Enceladus shows the presence of ongoing hydrothermal reactions in the interior. Here, we report results from detailed laboratory experiments to constrain the reaction conditions. To sustain the formation of silica nanoparticles, the composition of Enceladus' core needs to be similar to that of carbonaceous chondrites. We show that the presence of hydrothermal reactions would be consistent with NH3- and CO2-rich plume compositions. We suggest that high reaction temperatures (>50 °C) are required to form silica nanoparticles whether Enceladus' ocean is chemically open or closed to the icy crust. Such high temperatures imply either that Enceladus formed shortly after the formation of the solar system or that the current activity was triggered by a recent heating event. Under the required conditions, hydrogen production would proceed efficiently, which could provide chemical energy for chemoautotrophic life.

  16. Thermal recalcitrance of the organic D-rich component of ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remusat, L.; Piani, L.; Bernard, S.

    2016-02-01

    Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites (CCs and OCs) contain insoluble organic matter (IOM) with large D-excess compared to other objects in the solar system. The higher the temperature experienced by CCs, the lower the D/H ratio of their IOM. It seems to be the opposite for OCs. Here, we report NanoSIMS H- (and N-) isotopic imaging of IOM of three OCs that experienced thermal metamorphism in the sequence Semarkona, Bishunpur and GRO 95502. In addition, we performed flash heating experiments on the IOM of GRO 95502 at 600 °C and characterized the residues using NanoSIMS, Raman and XANES spectroscopy. The present study shows that, in contrast to IOM of CI, CM and CR, IOM of OCs exhibits very few D-rich (or 15N-rich) hotspots. Furthermore, although the evolution of the molecular structure of OC and CC IOM is similar upon heating, their D/H ratios do not follow the same trend: the D/H of OC IOM drastically increases while the D/H of CC IOM decreases. In contrast to CC IOM, the D-rich component of which does not survive at high temperatures, the present results highlight the thermal recalcitrance of the D-rich component of OC IOM. This suggests that CCs and OCs did not accrete the same organic material, thereby challenging the hypothesis of a common precursor on chondritic parent bodies. The present results support the hypothesis that OC IOM contains an organic component that could originate from the interstellar medium.

  17. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 2 Amino Acid Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Cao, T.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Berger, E. L.; Messenger, S.; Clemett, S. J.; Aponte, J. C.; Elsila, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble, unstructured kerogen-like components, as well as structured nano-globules of macromolecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Due to the differences in extractability of soluble and insoluble organic materials, the analysis methods for each differ and are often performed independently. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses, when performed concurrently, can provide a wider understanding of spatial distribution, and elemental, structural and isotopic composition of organic material in primitive meteorites. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques in combination with in situ microscale observation, we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in the primitive CR2 chondrite Miller Range (MIL) 090657. In accompanying abstracts (Cao et al. and Messenger et al.) we discuss insoluble organic material in the samples. By performing the consortium studies, we aim to improve our understanding of the relationship between the meteorite minerals and the soluble and insoluble organic phases and to delineate which species formed within the meteorite and those that formed in nebular or presolar environments. In this abstract, we present the results of amino acid analyses of MIL 090657 by ultra performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Amino acids are of interest because they are essential to life on Earth, and because they are present in sufficient structural, enantiomeric and isotopic diversity to allow insights into early solar system chemical processes. Furthermore, these are among the most isotopically anomalous species, yet at least some fraction are thought to have formed by aqueously-mediated processes during parent body alteration.

  18. Application of an alkylammonium method for characterization of phyllosilicates in CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Yang, S. V.

    1994-01-01

    Many meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) with primitive compositions contain significant amounts of phyllosilicates, which are generally interpreted as evidence of protoplanetary aqueous alteration at an early period in the solar system. These meteorites are chondrites of the carbonaceous and ordinary varieties. Characterization of phyllosilicates in these materials is important because of the important physico-chemical information they hold, e.g., from well characterized phyllosilicates, thermodynamic stability relations and hence the conditions of formation of phyllosilicates in the parent body of the meteorite can be predicted. Although we are at a rudimentary level of understanding of the minerals resulting from the aqueous alteration in the early solar nebula, we know that the most common phyllosilicates present in chondritic extraterrestrial materials are serpentines, smectites, chlorites, and micas. The characterization of fine grained minerals in meteorites and IDP's rely heavily on electron beam instruments, especially transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Typically, phyllosilicates are identified by a combination of high resolution imaging of basal spacings, electron diffraction analysis, and chemical analysis. Smectites can be difficult to differentiate from micas because the smectites loose their interlayer water and the interlayers collapse to the same basal spacing as mica in the high vacuum of the TEM. In high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) images, smectite basal spacings vary from 1 nm up to 1.5 nm, while micas show 1 or 2 nm basal spacings. Not only is it difficult to differentiate smectites from micas, but there is no way of identifying different classes of smectites in meteorites and IDP's. To differentiate smectites from micas and also to recognize the charge differences among smectites, an alkylammonium method can be employed because the basal spacings of alkylammonium saturated smectites expand as a function of alkylamine chain

  19. The isotope composition of selenium in chondrites constrains the depletion mechanism of volatile elements in solar system materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollstaedt, Hauke; Mezger, Klaus; Leya, Ingo

    2016-09-01

    Solar nebula processes led to a depletion of volatile elements in different chondrite groups when compared to the bulk chemical composition of the solar system deduced from the Sun's photosphere. For moderately-volatile elements, this depletion primarily correlates with the element condensation temperature and is possibly caused by incomplete condensation from a hot solar nebula, evaporative loss from the precursor dust, and/or inherited from the interstellar medium. Element concentrations and interelement ratios of volatile elements do not provide a clear picture about responsible mechanisms. Here, the abundance and stable isotope composition of the moderately- to highly-volatile element Se are investigated in carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites to constrain the mechanism responsible for the depletion of volatile elements in planetary bodies of the inner solar system and to define a δ 82 / 78 Se value for the bulk solar system. The δ 82 / 78 Se of the studied chondrite falls are identical within their measurement uncertainties with a mean of - 0.20 ± 0.26 ‰ (2 s.d., n = 14, relative to NIST SRM 3149) despite Se abundance depletions of up to a factor of 2.5 with respect to the CI group. The absence of resolvable Se isotope fractionation rules out a kinetic Rayleigh-type incomplete condensation of Se from the hot solar nebula or partial kinetic evaporative loss on the precursor material and/or the parent bodies. The Se depletion, if acquired during partial condensation or evaporative loss, therefore must have occurred under near equilibrium conditions to prevent measurable isotope fractionation. Alternatively, the depletion and cooling of the nebula could have occurred simultaneously due to the continuous removal of gas and fine particles by the solar wind accompanied by the quantitative condensation of elements from the pre-depleted gas. In this scenario the condensation of elements does not require equilibrium conditions to avoid isotope

  20. Discovery of ancient silicate stardust in a meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ann N; Zinner, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    We have discovered nine presolar silicate grains from the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Their anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions indicate formation in the atmospheres of evolved stars. Two grains are identified as pyroxene, two as olivine, one as a glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS), and one as an Al-rich silicate. One grain is enriched in 26Mg, which is attributed to the radioactive decay of 26Al and provides information about mixing processes in the parent star. This discovery opens new means for studying stellar processes and conditions in various solar system environments.

  1. Oxygen Isotope Evidence for the Relationship between CM and CO Chondrites: Could they Both Coexist on a Single Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, R. C.; Howard, K. T.; Franchi, I. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Buchanan, P. C.; Gibson, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Water played a critical role in the early evolution of asteroids and planets, as well as being an essential ingredient for life on Earth. However, despite its importance, the source of water in the inner solar system remains controversial. Delivery of water to Earth via comets is inconsistent with their relatively elevated D/H ratios, whereas carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) have more terrestrial-like D/H ratios [1]. Of the eight groups into which the CCs are divided, only three (CI, CM, CR) show evidence of extensive aqueous alteration. Of these, the CMs form the single most important group, representing 34% of all CC falls and a similar percentage of finds (Met. Bull. Database). CM material also dominates the population of CC clasts in extraterrestrial samples [2, 3]. The Antarctic micrometeorites population is also dominated by CM and CI-like material and similar particles may have transported water and volatiles to the early Earth [4]. CCs, and CMs in particular, offer the best opportunity for investigating the evolution of water reservoirs in the early solar system. An important aspect of this problem involves identifying the anhydrous silicate component which co-accreted with ice in the CM parent body. A genetic relationship between the essentially anhydrous CO group and the CMs was proposed on the basis of oxygen isotope evidence [5]. However, previous CM whole-rock oxygen isotope data scattered about a line of approximately 0.5 that did not intersect the field of CO chondrites [5]. Here we discuss new oxygen isotope data which provides additional constraints on the relationship between CO and CM chondrites.

  2. Investigation of magnesium isotope fractionation during basalt differentiation: Implications for a chondritic composition of the terrestrial mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F.-Z.; Wadhwa, M.; Helz, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether magnesium isotopes are fractionated during basalt differentiation, we have performed high-precision Mg isotopic analyses by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) on a set of well-characterized samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, USA. Samples from the Kilauea Iki lava lake, produced by closed-system crystal-melt fractionation, range from olivine-rich cumulates to highly differentiated basalts with MgO content ranging from 2.37 to 26.87??wt.%. Our results demonstrate that although these basalts have diverse chemical compositions, mineralogies, crystallization temperatures and degrees of differentiation, their Mg isotopic compositions display no measurable variation within the limits of our external precision (average ??26Mg = - 0.36 ?? 0.10 and ??25Mg = - 0.20 ?? 0.07; uncertainties are 2SD). This indicates that Mg isotopic fractionation during crystal-melt fractionation at temperatures of ??? 1055????C is undetectable at the level of precision of the current investigation. Calculations based on our data suggest that at near-magmatic temperatures the maximum fractionation in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio between olivine and melt is 0.07???. Two additional oceanic basalts, two continental basalts (BCR-1 and BCR-2), and two primitive carbonaceous chondrites (Allende and Murchison) analyzed in this study have Mg isotopic compositions similar to the Kilauea Iki lava lake samples. In contrast to a recent report [U. Wiechert, A.N. Halliday, Non-chondritic magnesium and the origins of the inner terrestrial planets, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 256 (2007) 360-371], the results presented here suggest that the Bulk Silicate Earth has a chondritic Mg isotopic composition. ?? 2007.

  3. Renewed Search for FUN (Fractionated and Unidentified Nuclear Effects) in Primitive Chondrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollstrup, D L; Wimpenny, J B; Yin, Q -; Ebel, D S; Jacobsen, B; Hutcheon, I D

    2011-04-07

    Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) found in primitive chondrites record processes and conditions of the earliest solar system as they are the oldest known solid objects formed in the solar system [1,2]. CAIs with fractionation and unidentified nuclear anomalies (FUN CAIs; [3]) are very rare and thusfar found exclusively in CV carbonaceous chondrites (e.g., Allende and Vigarano)[4]. FUN CAIs are characterized by large nucleosynthetic anomalies in several elements (Ca, Ti, Si, Sr, Ba, Nd, and Sm), large mass-dependant isotope fractionation (Mg, Si, and O), and very little initial {sup 26}Al [4,5 and reference therein]. Formation of FUN CAIs by thermal processing of presolar dust aggregates prior to the injection of {sup 26}Al into the protoplanetary disk has been proposed. More recently [5] proposed that FUN CAIs formed from a protosolar molecular cloud after injection of {sup 26}Al but before {sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al were completely homogenized. Therefore discovering more FUN CAIs to perform U-Pb and other short-lived chronometric dating will provide key constraints on the age of the solar system, the isotopic composition of the protosolar molecular cloud, the earliest stages of the thermal processing in the solar system and the timing of {sup 26}Al and other short-lived radionuclide injection into the nascent solar system. Most known FUN CAIs were discovered and studied > 30 yr ago, and their isotope ratios determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Most of these FUN CAIs were almost or entirely consumed during their respective analyses. [5] recently identified a new FUN CAI (NWA 779 KS-1) based on O and Mg isotope ratios determined by SIMS and MCICPMS, respectively. We have initiated a systematic search for FUN CAIs in primitive chondrites, taking advantage of the large mass-dependant Mg isotope effects known for FUN inclusions with little or no inferred {sup 26}Al. Our strategy is to use newly developed sample cells capable of holding very large

  4. Coordinated Isotopic and Mineral Characterization of Highly Fractionated 18O-Rich Silicates in the Queen Alexandra Range 99177 CR3 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Rahman, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain a mixture of solar system condensates, pre-solar grains, and primitive organic matter. Each of these materials record conditions and processes in different regions of the solar nebula, on the meteorite parent body, and beyond the solar system. Oxygen isotopic studies of meteorite components can trace interactions of distinct oxygen isotopic reservoirs in the early solar system and secondary alteration processes. The O isotopic compositions of the earliest solar system condensates fall along a carbonaceous chondrite anhydrous mineral (CCAM) line of slope approximately 1 in a plot of delta 17O against delta 18O. This trend is attributed to mixing of material from 16O-poor and 16O-rich reservoirs. Secondary processing can induce mass-dependent fractionation of the O isotopes, shifting these compositions along a line of slope approximately 0.52. Substantial mass-dependent fractionation of O isotopes has been observed in secondary minerals in CAIs, calcite, and FUN inclusions. These fractionations were caused by significant thermal or aqueous alteration. We recently reported the identification of four silicate grains with extremely fractionated O isotopic ratios (delta 18O equals 37 - 55 per mille) in the minimally altered CR3 chondrite QUE 99177. TEM analysis of one grain indicates it is a nebular condensate that did not experience substantial alteration. The history of these grains is thus distinct from those of the aforementioned fractionated materials. To constrain the origin of the silicate grains, we conducted further Mg and Fe isotopic studies and TEM analyses of two grains.

  5. Can Halogen Enrichment in Reduced Enstatite Chondrites Provide Clues to Volatile Accretion in the Early Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, P. L.; Burgess, R.; Busemann, H.; Ruzié, L.; Joachim, B.; Ballentine, C.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how the Earth obtained and ultimately retained its volatiles is important for our overall understanding of large scale planetary evolution. Numerous models exist for the heterogeneous accretion of volatiles to early Earth, but accounting for all elements through accretion of typical planetary building blocks (e.g., CI chondrites) is difficult. Proto-planetary collisions resulting in the accretion of volatile-poor material under reducing conditions followed by accretion of volatile-rich material under oxidizing conditions has been suggested in such models [e.g., 1]. The heavy halogens (Cl, Br and I), a group of moderately volatile elements, are excellent tracers of planetary processing due to their low abundance and incompatible nature. Therefore characterizing halogen abundance and distribution in materials that accreted to form the planets, e.g., primitive meteorites, is crucial. One group of primitive meteorites, the enstatite chondrites (EC's), are amongst the most reduced materials in the solar system as evidenced by their unique mineral assemblage. Yet despite forming under ultra-reducing conditions, they are enriched in the moderately volatile elements, such as the halogens. The ECs are of particular interest owing to their oxygen isotopic composition which plots along the terrestrial fractionation line, linking them isotopically to the Earth-Moon system. These samples can thus potentially provide clues on the accretion of moderately volatile element rich material under reducing conditions, such as it may have existed during the early stages of Earth's accretion. Chlorine, Br and I concentrations in ECs were determined through step-heating small neutron-irradiated samples (0.3 to 3.3 mg) and measured by mass spectrometry using the noble gas proxy isotopes 38ArCl/Cl, 80KrBr/Br and 128XeI/I. The EH chondrites are consistently enriched in the heavy halogens (up to 330 ppm Cl, 2290 ppb Br and 180 ppb I), compared to other ordinary and carbonaceous

  6. Multiple and Fast: The Accretion of Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Vernazza, P; Binzel, R P; Hiroi, T; DeMeo, F E; Birlan, M; Hewins, R; Ricci, L; Barge, P; Lockhart, M

    2014-01-01

    Although petrologic, chemical and isotopic studies of ordinary chondrites and meteorites in general have largely helped establish a chronology of the earliest events of planetesimal formation and their evolution, there are several questions that cannot be resolved via laboratory measurements and/or experiments only. Here we propose rationale for several new constraints on the formation and evolution of ordinary chondrite parent bodies (and by extension most planetesimals) from newly available spectral measurements and mineralogical analysis of main belt S-type asteroids (83 objects) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites (53 samples). Based on the latter, we suggest spectral data may be used to distinguish whether an ordinary chondrite was formed near the surface or in the interior of its parent body. If these constraints are correct, the suggested implications include that: i) large groups of compositionally similar asteroids are a natural outcome of planetesimal formation and, consequently, meteor...

  7. Characterization of Luminescent Minerals in CM2 Chondrite (Jbilet Winselwan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, Y. K.; Ohgo, S. O.; Nishido, H. N.

    2014-09-01

    We have characterized luminescent minerals of forsterite, diopside and spinel in the CM2 chondrite (Jbilet Winselwan) using SEM-CL and to discuss the formation of the luminescent minerals under aqueous conditions.

  8. Evaluating the Evidence for Magnetic Dynamocs in Chondritic Parent Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, R. R.; Weiss, B. P.; Krot, A. N.; Kehayias, P.; Glenn, D. R.; Fintor, K.; Pál-Molnár, E.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present paleomagnetic data suggesting that the LL chondrite parent body lacked a magnetic dynamos. We then further test the dynamo hypothesis for the CV parent body by mapping magnetization in Kaba.

  9. A Common Parent for IIE Iron Meteorite and H Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplyakova, S. N.; Humayun, M.; Lorenz, C. A.; Ivanova, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    We report new siderophile element abundances for the metal in the IIE irons — Watson, Tobychan, Elga, Verkhne Dnieprovsk, and Miles — to examine the possible genetic relations between IIE metal and H chondritic precursors.

  10. Ruthenium Isotopic Composition of Terrestrial Materials, Iron Meteorites and Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, H.; Walker, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Ru isotopic compositions of magmatic iron meteorites and chondrites overlap with terrestrial Ru at the 0.3 to 0.9 (epsilon) level. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  12. I-Xe Dating: The Time Line of Chondrule Formation and Metamorphism in LL Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Meshik, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    Refractory inclusions, considered to be the oldest solids formed in the solar nebula. (4567.2 0.6 Ma) [1], are common in many carbonaceous and in some ordinary and enstatite chondrites. High-precision Pb- Pb ages for CAI s and chondrules (from different meteorites) suggested that chondrule formation appeared to have started about 2 Ma later than that of CAIs [1]. However, recent 26Al/26Mg data suggest simultaneous formation of CAI s and chondrules in Allende [2]. The I-Xe ages of CAI s in Allende are about 2 Ma younger than the I-Xe ages of Allende chondrules [3] but, like all chronometers, the I-Xe system records closure time of its particular host phase. In the case of Allende CAI s, the major iodine-bearing phase is sodalite, a secondary phase presumably formed by aqueous alteration, so I-Xe reflects the post-formational processes in these objects. In chondrules the iodine host phases vary and can reflect formation and/or alteration but, to put chondrule ages on a quantative basis, some problems should first be addressed.

  13. Noble gases, C,N, and Si isotopes in interstellar SiC form the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tang; Anders, Edward; Zinner, Ernst

    1988-01-01

    Isotopic measurements of presolar interstellar silicon carbide are presented. Silicon carbide was recently identified in a primitive meteorite Murray. There exists strong evidence that the silicon carbide predates the formation of the solar system and originated in the atmospheres of certain stars. Thus, this material provides a link with its stellar sources and gives the opportunity to study processes taking place in distant stars.

  14. Chiral biomarkers and microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-09-01

    Homochirality of the biomolecules (D-sugars of DNA and RNA and L-amino acids of proteins) is a fundamental property of all life on Earth. Abiotic mechanisms yield racemic mixtures (D/L=1) of chiral molecules and after the death of an organism, the enantiopure chiral biomolecules slowly racemize. Several independent investigators have now established that the amino acids present in CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites have a moderate to strong excess of the L-enantiomer. Stable isotope data have established that these amino acids are both indigenous and extraterrestrial. Carbonaceous meteorites also contain many other strong chemical biomarkers including purines and pyrimidines (nitrogen heterocycles of nucleic acids); pristine and phytane (components of the chlorophyll pigment) and morphological biomarkers (microfossils of filamentous cyanobacteria). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis reveals that nitrogen is below the detectability level in most of the meteorite filaments as well as in Cambrian Trilobites and filaments of 2.7 Gya Archaean cyanobacteria from Karelia. The deficiency of nitrogen in the filaments and the total absence of sugars, of twelve of the life-critical protein amino acids, and two of the nucleobases of DNA and RNA provide clear and convincing evidence that these filaments are not modern biological contaminants. This paper reviews the chiral, chemical biomarkers morphological biomarkers and microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites. This paper reviews chiral and morphological biomarkers and discusses the missing nitrogen, sugars, protein amino acids, and nucleobases as "bio-discriminators" that exclude modern biological contaminants as a possible explanation for the permineralized cyanobacterial filaments found in the meteorites.

  15. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites 12: The metamorphic history of CV chondrites and their components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimon, R. Kyle; Symes, Steven J. K.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1995-01-01

    The induced thermoluminescence (TL) properties of 16 CV and CV-related chondrites, four CK chondrites and Renazzo (CR2) have been measured in order to investigate their metamorphic history. The petrographic, mineralogical and bulk compositional differences among the CV chondrites indicate that the TL sensitivity of the approximately 130 C TL peak is reflecting the abundance of ordered feldspar, especially in chondrule mesostasis, which in turn reflects parent-body metamorphism. The TL properties of 18 samples of homogenized Allende powder heated at a variety of times and temperatures, and cathodoluminescence mosaics of Axtell and Coolidge, showed results consistent with this conclusion. Five refractory inclusions from Allende, and separates from those inclusions, were also examined and yielded trends reflecting variations in mineralogy indicative of high peak temperatures (either metamorphic or igneous) and fairly rapid cooling. The CK chondrites are unique among metamorphosed chondrites in showing no detectable induced TL, which is consistent with literature data that suggests very unusual feldspar in these meteorites. Using TL sensitivity and several mineral systems and allowing for the differences in the oxidized and reduced subgroups, the CV and CV-related meteorites can be divided into petrologic types analogous to those of the ordinary and CO type 3 chondrites. Axtell, Kaba, Leoville, Bali, Arch and ALHA81003 are type 3.0-3.1, while ALH84018, Efremovka, Grosnaja, Allende and Vigarano are type 3.2-3.3 and Coolidge and Loongana 001 are type 3.8. Mokoia is probably a breccia with regions ranging in petrologic type from 3.0 to 3.2. Renazzo often plots at the end of the reduced and oxidized CV chondrite trends, even when those trends diverge, suggesting that in many respects it resembles the unmetamorphosed precursors of the CV chondrites. The low-petrographic types and low-TL peak temperatures of all samples, including the CV3.8 chondrites, indicates metamorphism

  16. Microfossils in CI and CO Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Jerman, Gregory; Costen, James

    2003-01-01

    Secondary and backscatter electron images and x-ray spectral data of selected CI (Alais, Orgueil, and Tagish Lake) and CO3 (Rainbow and Dar a1 Gani 749) carbonaceous meteorites have recently been obtained using Field Emission and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopes These studies indicate the presence of a large assemblage of biomarkers and complex lithified and carbonized remains of bodies that we interpret as indigenous microfossils. We discuss the meteorites, provide images of many of the biogenic forms found embedded in the freshly fractured meteorite surfaces.

  17. Pyrolysis of Carbonaceous Foundry Sand Additives: Seacoal and Gilsonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacoal and gilsonite are used by the foundry industry as carbonaceous additives in green molding sands. In this study, pyrolysis was used to simulate the heating conditions that the carbonaceous additives would experience during metal casting. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to tent...

  18. Keto-acids in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, G.; Chang, P. M.; Dugas, A.; Byrd, A.; Chang, P. M.; Washington, N.

    2005-01-01

    The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorites with respect to organic chemistry and are generally used as references for organic compounds in extraterrestrial material. Among the classes of organic compounds found in these meteorites are amino acids, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, purines, and pyrimidines. Such compounds, important in contemporary biochemistry, are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets and may have played a role in early life and/or the origin of life. Absent among (today's) critically important biological compounds reported in carbonaceous meteorites are keto acids, i.e., pyruvic acid, acetoacetic acid, and higher homologs. These compounds are key intermediates in such critical processes as glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. In this study several individual meteoritic keto acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (see figure below). All compounds were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), isopropyl ester (ISP), and tert-butyldimethylsilyl (tBDMS) derivatives. In general, the compounds follow the abiotic synthesis pattern of other known meteorite classes of organic compounds [1,2]: a general decrease in abundance with increasing carbon number within a class of compounds and many, if not all, possible isomers present at a given carbon number. The majority of the shown compounds was positively identified by comparison of their mass spectra to commercially available standards or synthesized standards.

  19. Multi-wavelength characterization of carbonaceous aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massabò, Dario; Caponi, Lorenzo; Chiara Bove, Maria; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Prati, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol is a major component of the urban PM. It mainly consists of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) although a minor fraction of carbonate carbon could be also present. Elemental carbon is mainly found in the finer PM fractions (PM2.5 and PM1) and it is strongly light absorbing. When determined by optical methods, it is usually called black carbon (BC). The two quantities, EC and BC, even if both related to the refractory components of carbonaceous aerosols, do not exactly define the same PM component (Bond and Bergstrom, 2006; and references therein). Moreover, another fraction of light-absorbing carbon exists which is not black and it is generally called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). We introduce a simple, fully automatic, multi-wavelength and non-destructive optical system, actually a Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analyzer, MWAA, to measure off-line the light absorption in Particulate Matter (PM) collected on filters and hence to derive the black and brown carbon content in the PM This gives the opportunity to measure in the same sample the concentration of total PM by gravimetric analysis, black and brown carbon, metals by, for instance, X Ray Fluorescence, and finally ions by Ion Chromatography. Up to 16 samples can be analyzed in sequence and in an automatic and controlled way within a few hours. The filter absorbance measured by MWAA was successfully validated both against a MAAP, Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (Petzold and Schönlinner, 2004), and the polar photometer of the University of Milan. The measurement of sample absorbance at three wavelengths gives the possibility to apportion different sources of carbonaceous PM, for instance fossil fuels and wood combustion. This can be done following the so called "aethalometer method" (Sandradewi et al., 2008;) but with some significant upgrades that will be discussed together the results of field campaigns in rural and urban sites. Andreae, M.O, and Gelencsér, A

  20. Chloromethane release from carbonaceous meteorite affords new insight into Mars lander findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Frank; Harper, David B; Greule, Markus; Ott, Ulrich; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinz F; Hamilton, John T G

    2014-11-13

    Controversy continues as to whether chloromethane (CH3Cl) detected during pyrolysis of Martian soils by the Viking and Curiosity Mars landers is indicative of organic matter indigenous to Mars. Here we demonstrate CH3Cl release (up to 8 μg/g) during low temperature (150-400°C) pyrolysis of the carbonaceous chondrite Murchison with chloride or perchlorate as chlorine source and confirm unequivocally by stable isotope analysis the extraterrestrial origin of the methyl group (δ(2)H +800 to +1100‰, δ(13)C -19.2 to +10‰,). In the terrestrial environment CH3Cl released during pyrolysis of organic matter derives from the methoxyl pool. The methoxyl pool in Murchison is consistent both in magnitude (0.044%) and isotope signature (δ(2)H +1054 ± 626‰, δ(13)C +43.2 ± 38.8‰,) with that of the CH3Cl released on pyrolysis. Thus CH3Cl emissions recorded by Mars lander experiments may be attributed to methoxyl groups in undegraded organic matter in meteoritic debris reaching the Martian surface being converted to CH3Cl with perchlorate or chloride in Martian soil. However we cannot discount emissions arising additionally from organic matter of indigenous origin. The stable isotope signatures of CH3Cl detected on Mars could potentially be utilized to determine its origin by distinguishing between terrestrial contamination, meteoritic infall and indigenous Martian sources.

  1. Enantiomeric excesses of chiral amines in ammonia-rich carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra; Yarnes, Christopher T.

    2016-06-01

    Chiral homogeneity is essential to the structure and function of terrestrial biopolymers but the origin of this "homochirality" is poorly understood and remains one of the many unknowns surrounding the origins of life. Several amino acids extracted from Carbonaceous Chondrite meteorites display L-enantiomeric excesses (ee) and their findings have encouraged suggestions that an input of non-racemic meteoritic compounds to early Earth might have led to terrestrial homochirality. Motivated by occasional indications of possible ee in other classes of soluble meteoritic compounds, we have undertaken a systematic study of the chiral distribution of amines in Renazzo-type (CR) meteorites, where they are the second most abundant organic molecular species and ammonia is by far the most abundant single molecule. We report here the first time finding of L-ee for two chiral amines in several pristine CR meteorites from Antarctica and outline a proposal by which the compounds possibly formed from the same ketone precursors as some of the chiral amino acids. This would occur during a warm hydrous stage of the asteroidal parent body, via a reductive amination process in the presence of a large abundance of ammonia, where the precursors' adsorption upon mineral phases possessing asymmetry offered the opportunity for chiral induction. Because the precursor ketones are achiral, the proposal underscores the likelihood of diverse asymmetric influences and processes in cosmochemistry.

  2. The amino acid and hydrocarbon contents of the Paris meteorite, the most primitive CM chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita; Modica, Paola; Zanda, Brigitte; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2015-04-01

    The Paris meteorite is reported to be the least aqueously altered CM chondrite [1,2], and to have experienced only weak thermal metamorphism [2-5]. The IR spectra of some of Paris' fragments suggest a primitive origin for the organic matter in this meteorite, similar to the spectra from solid-state materials in molecular clouds [6]. Most of the micron-sized organic particles present in the Paris matrix exhibit 0 amino acids and the synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids. When plotted with several CM chondrites, Paris has the lowest relative abundance of β-alanine/glycine (0.15) for a CM chondrite, which fits with the relative abundance of β-alanine/glycine increasing with increasing aqueous alteration [10,11]. In addition, our results show that the isovaline detected in this meteorite is racemic (D/L= 0.99 ± 0.08; L-enantiomer excess (%) = 0.35 ± 0.5; corrected D/L = 1.03; corrected L-enantiomer excess (%) = -1.4 ± 2.6). Although aqueous alteration does not create by itself an isovaline asymmetry, it may amplify a small enantiomeric excess. Therefore, our data may support the hypothesis that aqueous alteration is responsible for the high L-enantiomer excess of isovaline observed in the most aqueously altered carbonaceous meteorites [12,13]. Paris has n-alkanes ranging from C16 to C25 and 3- to 5-ring non-alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The lack of alkylated PAHs in Paris seems to be related to the low degree of aqueous alteration on its parent body [9,14]. The extra-terrestrial aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon content of Paris may have an interstellar origin or contribution from interstellar precursors. In summary, the soluble organic content of the primitive CM chondrite Paris possibly relates to late phases of condensed phase chemistry in molecular clouds. References: [1] Blanchard et al. (2011) Abstract #5322. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 46:A21. [2] Caillet Komorowski et al. (2011) Abstract #5289. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 46

  3. Global cloud condensation nuclei influenced by carbonaceous combustion aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pöschl, U.; Rap, A.; Forster, P. M.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon in carbonaceous combustion aerosol warms the climate by absorbing solar radiation, meaning reductions in black carbon emissions are often perceived as an attractive global warming mitigation option. However, carbonaceous combustion aerosol can also act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) so they also cool the climate by increasing cloud albedo. The net radiative effect of carbonaceous combustion aerosol is uncertain because their contribution to CCN has not been evaluated on the global scale. By combining extensive observations of CCN concentrations with the GLOMAP global aerosol model, we find that the model is biased low (normalised mean bias = -77 %) unless carbonaceous combustion aerosol act as CCN. We show that carbonaceous combustion aerosol accounts for more than half (52-64 %) of global CCN with the range due to uncertainty in the emitted size distribution of carbonaceous combustion particles. The model predicts that wildfire and pollution (fossil fuel and biofuel) carbonaceous combustion aerosol causes a global mean cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect of -0.34 W m-2, with stronger cooling if we assume smaller particle emission size. We calculate that carbonaceous combustion aerosol from pollution sources cause a global mean aerosol indirect effect of -0.23 W m-2. The small size of carbonaceous combustion particles from fossil fuel sources means that whilst pollution sources account for only one-third of the emitted mass they cause two-thirds of the cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect that is due to carbonaceous combustion aerosol. This cooling effect must be accounted for, along with other cloud effects not studied here, to ensure that black carbon emissions controls that reduce the high number concentrations of fossil fuel particles have the desired net effect on climate.

  4. Global cloud condensation nuclei influenced by carbonaceous combustion aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon in carbonaceous combustion aerosol warms the climate by absorbing solar radiation, meaning reductions in black carbon emissions are often perceived as an attractive global warming mitigation option. However, carbonaceous combustion aerosol can also act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN so they also cool the climate by increasing cloud albedo. The net radiative effect of carbonaceous combustion aerosol is uncertain because their contribution to CCN has not been evaluated on the global scale. By combining extensive observations of CCN concentrations with the GLOMAP global aerosol model, we find that the model is biased low (normalised mean bias = −77 % unless carbonaceous combustion aerosol act as CCN. We show that carbonaceous combustion aerosol accounts for more than half (52–64 % of global CCN with the range due to uncertainty in the emitted size distribution of carbonaceous combustion particles. The model predicts that wildfire and pollution (fossil fuel and biofuel carbonaceous combustion aerosol causes a global mean cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect of −0.34 W m−2, with stronger cooling if we assume smaller particle emission size. We calculate that carbonaceous combustion aerosol from pollution sources cause a global mean aerosol indirect effect of −0.23 W m−2. The small size of carbonaceous combustion particles from fossil fuel sources means that whilst pollution sources account for only one-third of the emitted mass they cause two-thirds of the cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect that is due to carbonaceous combustion aerosol. This cooling effect must be accounted for, along with other cloud effects not studied here, to ensure that black carbon emissions controls that reduce the high number concentrations of fossil fuel particles have the desired net effect on climate.

  5. Microfossils of Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopes have been used at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center to investigate freshly fractured interior surfaces of a large number of different types of meteorites. Large, complex, microfossils with clearly recognizable biological affinities have been found embedded in several carbonaceous meteorites. Similar forms were notably absent in all stony and nickel-iron meteorites investigated. The forms encountered are consistent in size and morphology with morphotypes of known genera of Cyanobacteria and microorganisms that are typically encountered in associated benthic prokaryotic mats. Even though many coccoidal and isodiametric filamentous cyanobacteria have a strong morphological convergence with some other spherical and filamentous bacteria and algae, many genera of heteropolar cyanobacteria have distinctive apical and basal regions and cellular differentiation that makes it possible to unambiguously recognize the forms based entirely upon cellular dimensions, filament size and distinctive morphological characteristics. For almost two centuries, these morphological characteristics have historically provided the basis for the systematics and taxonomy of cyanobacteria. This paper presents ESEM and FESEM images of embedded filaments and thick mats found in-situ in the Murchison CM2 and Orgueil cn carbonaceous meteorites. Comparative images are also provided for known genera and species of cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the meteorite filaments typically exhibit dramatic chemical differentiation with distinctive difference between the possible microfossil and the meteorite matrix in the immediate proximity. Chemical differentiation is also observed within these microstructures with many of the permineralized filaments enveloped within electron transparent carbonaceous sheaths. Elemental distributions of

  6. Chondritic xenon in the Earth's mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Antonio; Avice, Guillaume; Burnard, Peter G; Füri, Evelyn; Marty, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Noble gas isotopes are powerful tracers of the origins of planetary volatiles, and the accretion and evolution of the Earth. The compositions of magmatic gases provide insights into the evolution of the Earth's mantle and atmosphere. Despite recent analytical progress in the study of planetary materials and mantle-derived gases, the possible dual origin of the planetary gases in the mantle and the atmosphere remains unconstrained. Evidence relating to the relationship between the volatiles within our planet and the potential cosmochemical end-members is scarce. Here we show, using high-precision analysis of magmatic gas from the Eifel volcanic area (in Germany), that the light xenon isotopes identify a chondritic primordial component that differs from the precursor of atmospheric xenon. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatiles in the Earth's mantle, and indicates that the volatiles in the atmosphere and mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the origin of Eifel magmatism being a deep mantle plume. The corresponding mantle source has been isolated from the convective mantle since about 4.45 billion years ago, in agreement with models that predict the early isolation of mantle domains. Xenon isotope systematics support a clear distinction between mid-ocean-ridge and continental or oceanic plume sources, with chemical heterogeneities dating back to the Earth's accretion. The deep reservoir now sampled by the Eifel gas had a lower volatile/refractory (iodine/plutonium) composition than the shallower mantle sampled by mid-ocean-ridge volcanism, highlighting the increasing contribution of volatile-rich material during the first tens of millions of years of terrestrial accretion. PMID:27111512

  7. Microchondrules in three unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigolski, John N.; Weisberg, Michael K.; Connolly, Harold C.; Ebel, Denton S.

    2016-02-01

    We report on a suite of microchondrules from three unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs). Microchondrules, a subset of chondrules that are ubiquitous components of UOCs, commonly occur in fine-grained chondrule rims, although may also occur within matrix. Microchondrules have a variety of textures: cryptocrystalline, microporphyritic, radial, glassy. In some cases, their textures, and in many cases, their compositions, are similar to their larger host chondrules. Bulk compositions for both chondrule populations frequently overlap. The primary material that composes many of the microchondrules has compositions that are pyroxene-normative and is similar to low-Ca-pyroxene phenocrysts from host chondrules; primary material rarely resembles olivine or plagioclase. Some microchondrules are composed of FeO-rich material that has compositions similar to the bulk submicron fine-grained rim material. These microchondrules, however, are not a common compositional type and probably represent secondary FeO-enrichment. Microchondrules may also be porous, suggestive of degasing to form vesicles. Our work shows that the occurrence of microchondrules in chondrule rims is an important constraint that needs to be considered when evaluating chondrule-forming mechanisms. We propose that microchondrules represent melted portions of the chondrule surfaces and/or the melt products of coagulated dust in the immediate vicinity of the larger chondrules. We suggest that, through recycling events, the outer surfaces of chondrules were heated enough to allow microchondrules to bud off as protuberances and become entrained in the surrounding dusty environment as chondrules were accreting fine-grained rims. Microchondrules are thus byproducts of cyclic processing of chondrules in localized environments. Their occurrence in fine-grained rims represents a snapshot of the chondrule-forming environment. We evaluate mechanisms for microchondrule formation and hypothesize a potential link between

  8. Photolytic process for gasification of carbonaceous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process and apparatus are disclosed for converting carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by subjecting the carbon dioxide to radiation in the presence of carbonaceous material such as coal to form carbon monoxide. The preferred form of radiation is solar energy, and the process is preferably carried out in an atmosphere essentially free of oxygen. The invention also includes subjecting carbon monoxide to radiation to form purified carbon and useful heat energy. The two procedures can be combined into a single process for converting solar or other energy into useful thermal energy with the production of useful products. The reactor apparatus is specifically designed to carry out the radiation-induced conversions. Coal can be desulfurized and its caking characteristics altered by solar radiation in the presence of suitable gases. 3 figures

  9. Methods of ultimate carbonaceous BOD determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamer, J.K.; McKenzie, S.W.; Cherry, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were conducted to provide an accurate and practical technique for determining the concentration of ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and the rate at which this demand is exerted. The three methods evaluated were carbon derived, nitrification adjusted, and nitrification inhibited. The studies indicate that comparable concentrations and reaction rates can be determined from either non-nitrified samples using no chemical nitrifying inhibitor, or from partially nitrified samples using the chemical inhibitors, 1-allyl-2 thiourea or nitrapyrin, and that the combined use of time-series analysis and Lee's graphical method provide a reliable and accurate technique for determining ultimate biochemical oxygen demand concentration and reaction rate in 5 to 7 days.

  10. Ordinary Chondrite Formation from two Components: Implied Connection to Planet Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2004-01-01

    Major element fractionation among chondrites has been discussed for decades as ratios relative to Si or Mg. Expressing ratios relative to Fe leads to a new relationship admitting the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components: one is a relatively undifferentiated, primitive component, oxidized like the CI or C1 chondrites; the other is a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the reduced enstatite chondrites. Such a picture ...

  11. Global cloud condensation nuclei influenced by carbonaceous combustion aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon in carbonaceous combustion aerosol warms the climate by absorbing solar radiation, meaning reductions in black carbon emissions are often perceived as an attractive global warming mitigation option. However, carbonaceous combustion aerosol can also act as cloud condensation nuclei (particles upon which cloud drops form so they also cool the climate by increasing cloud albedo. The net radiative effect of carbonaceous combustion aerosol is uncertain because their contribution to cloud drops has not been evaluated on the global scale. By combining extensive observations of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and a global aerosol model, we show that carbonaceous combustion aerosol accounts for more than half of global cloud condensation nuclei. The evaluated model predicts that wildfire and pollution (fossil fuel and biofuel carbonaceous combustion aerosol causes a global mean aerosol indirect effect of −0.34 W m−2 due to changes in cloud albedo, with pollution sources alone causing a global mean aerosol indirect effect of −0.23 W m−2. The small size of carbonaceous combustion particles from pollution sources means that whilst they account for only one-third of the emitted mass from these sources they cause two-thirds of the cloud albedo indirect effect that is due to carbonaceous combustion aerosol. This cooling effect must be accounted for to ensure that black carbon emissions controls that reduce the high number concentrations of small pollution particles have the desired net effect on climate.

  12. Rapid Classification of Ordinary Chondrites Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Welzenbach, L.

    2014-01-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrites is typically done through measurements of the composition of olivine and pyroxenes. Historically, this measurement has usually been performed via electron microprobe, oil immersion or other methods which can be costly through lost sample material during thin section preparation. Raman microscopy can perform the same measurements but considerably faster and with much less sample preparation allowing for faster classification. Raman spectroscopy can facilitate more rapid classification of large amounts of chondrites such as those retrieved from North Africa and potentially Antarctica, are present in large collections, or are submitted to a curation facility by the public. With development, this approach may provide a completely automated classification method of all chondrite types.

  13. Morro do Rocio - an unequilibrated H5 chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, K.; Wlotzka, F.

    1985-09-01

    The results of an intensive study of apparently anomalous features of the Morro do Rocio (MDR) chondrite are reported. The examination was undertaken because of the detection of what appeared to be tridymite spherules. Chemical, petrological and mineralogical analyses were performed. The analyses indicated that the features thought to anomalous were in reality artifacts taken out of context. Some olivines and pyroxenes with Fe/Mg ratios which deviated from an equilibrated structure were observed, along with free SiO2 close to the olivine. K-feldspar was found to have separated from the albitic-diopsidic residual glass (or melt). The scale of the observed anomalies was finer than the scale usually used in examining chondrites, implying that chondrites will normally display some anomalies if examined on a fine enough scale.

  14. Forming Chondrites in a Solar Nebula with Magnetically Induced Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Turner, Neal J.; Masiero, Joseph R.

    2016-10-01

    Chondritic meteorites provide valuable opportunities to investigate origins of the solar system. We explore impact jetting as a mechanism to form chondrules and subsequent pebble accretion as a mechanism to accrete them onto parent bodies of chondrites, and investigate how these two processes can account for the currently available meteoritic data. We find that when the solar nebula is 1024 g in mass were unlikely to contain chondrules, while less massive primordial asteroids likely had a chondrule-rich surface layer. The scenario developed from impact jetting and pebble accretion can therefore provide new insights into origins of the solar system.

  15. Nitrogen and light noble gases in Parsa enstatite chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, S. V. S.

    1993-01-01

    Solar gases have been recently reported in Parsa, an EH3 chondrite. In an effort to check whether solar gases are uniformly distributed throughout Parsa or they are located in specific phases, we analyzed two additional samples of bulk Parsa and one aubritic nodule for N and noble gases. Nitrogen studies are intended for the understanding of the nitrogen components distribution in E-chondrites. The N-systematics of the nodule are entirely different from the bulk samples. The higher N contents in this nodule, as well as its complex delta(sup 15)N structure, as compared to the normal aubrites, is suggestive that the nodule is not a genuine aubrite.

  16. Petrology of Two Itokawa Particles: Comparison with Equilibrated LL Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, M.; Mikouchi, T.; Arai, T.; Fagan, T. J.; Zolensky, M.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K.; Karouji, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A strong link between Itokawa particles and LL chondrites was confirmed by preliminary examinations of Hayabusa particles [e.g., 1, 2]. Both poorly equilibrated and highly equilibrated particles have been found among the grains returned from Itokawa [1], and it is suggested that they correspond to LL4 and LL5-6, respectively. Here we report the petrography of two Itokawa particles and TEM study of one, and compare them to Antarctic LL chondrites with variable petrologic types (LL4-LL7) in order to understand the metamorphic history of asteroid Itokawa.

  17. Correlations and zoning patterns of phosphorus and chromium in olivine from H chondrites and the LL chondrite Semarkona

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanta, M. C.; Beckett, J. R.; Stolper, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Phosphorus zoning is observed in olivines in high-FeO (type IIA) chondrules in H chondrites over the entire range of petrologic grades: H3.1-H6. Features in P concentrations such as oscillatory and sector zoning, and high P cores are present in olivines that are otherwise unzoned in the divalent cations. Aluminum concentrations are low and not significantly associated with P zoning in chondrule olivines. In highly unequilibrated H chondrites, phosphorus zoning is generally positively correlated with Cr. Atomic Cr:P in olivine is roughly 1:1 (3:1 for one zone in one olivine in RC 075), consistent with Cr3+ charge-balancing P5+ substituting for Si4+. Normal igneous zonation involving the dominant chrome species Cr2+ was observed only in the LL3.0 chondrite Semarkona. In more equilibrated chondrites (H3.5-H3.8), Cr spatially correlated with P is occasionally observed but it is diffuse relative to the P zones. In H4-H6 chondrites, P-correlated Cr is absent. One signature of higher metamorphic grades (≥H3.8) is the presence of near matrix olivines that are devoid of P oscillatory zoning. The restriction to relatively high metamorphic grade and to grains near the chondrule-matrix interface suggests that this is a response to metasomatic processes. We also observed P-enriched halos near the chondrule-matrix interface in H3.3-H3.8 chondrites, likely reflecting the loss of P and Ca from mesostasis and precipitation of Ca phosphate near the chondrule surface. These halos are absent in equilibrated chondrites due to coarsening of the phosphate and in unequilibrated chondrites due to low degrees of metasomatism. Olivines in type IA chondrules show none of the P-zoning ubiquitous in type IIA chondrules or terrestrial igneous olivines, likely reflecting sequestration of P in reduced form within metallic alloys and sulfides during melting of type IA chondrules.

  18. TESTING OF CARBONACEOUS ADSORBENTS FOR REMOVAL OF POLLUTANTS FROM WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAISA NASTAS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Testing of carbonaceous adsorbents for removal of pollutants from water. Relevant direction for improving of quality of potable water is application of active carbons at various stages of water treatments. This work includes complex research dealing with testing of a broad spectrum of carbonaceous adsorbents for removal of hydrogen sulfide and nitrite ions from water. The role of the surface functional groups of carbonaceous adsorbents, their acid-basic properties, and the influence of the type of impregnated heteroatom (N, O, or metals (Fe, Cu, Ni, on removal of hydrogen sulfide species and nitrite ions have been researched. The efficiency of the catalyst obtained from peach stones by impregnation with Cu2+ ions of oxidized active carbon was established, being recommended for practical purposes to remove the hydrogen sulfide species from the sulfurous ground waters. Comparative analysis of carbonaceous adsorbents reveals the importance of surface chemistry for oxidation of nitrite ions.

  19. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  20. Carbonaceous aerosols in Norwegian urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Yttri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Little is known regarding levels and source strength of carbonaceous aerosols in Scandinavia. In the present study, ambient aerosol (PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations of elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, water-insoluble organic carbon (WINSOC, and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC are reported for a curbside site, an urban background site, and a suburban site in Norway in order to investigate their spatial and seasonal variations. Aerosol filter samples were collected using tandem filter sampling to correct for the positive sampling artefact introduced by volatile and semivolatile OC. Analyses were performed using the thermal optical transmission (TOT instrument from Sunset Lab Inc., which corrects for charring during analysis. Finally, we estimated the relative contribution of OC from wood burning based on the samples content of levoglucosan.

    Levels of EC varied by more than one order of magnitude between sites, likely due to the higher impact of vehicular traffic at the curbside and the urban background sites. In winter, the level of particulate organic carbon (OCp at the suburban site was equal to (for PM10 or even higher (for PM2.5 than the levels observed at the curbside and the urban background sites. This finding was attributed to the impact of residential wood burning at the suburban site in winter, which was confirmed by a high mean concentration of levoglucosan (407 ng m−3. This finding indicates that exposure to primary combustion derived OCp could be equally high in residential areas as in a city center. It is demonstrated that OCp from wood burning (OCwood accounted for almost all OCp at the suburban site in winter, allowing a new estimate of the ratio TCp/levoglucosan for both PM10 and PM2.5. Particulate carbonaceous material (PCM

  1. Recommendations for Estimating Carbonaceous Aerosol Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liousse, C.; Cachier, H.; Bond, T.; Penner, J.; Carmichael, G.; Reddy, M.; Gadi, R.; Michel, C.

    2002-12-01

    Increasing interest for carbonaceous aerosol studies is due to the recognized effect of such particles on regional and global radiative balance and climate. Recent calculations (Jacobson et al.,2002) have shown for example that reduction of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) particle emissions by fossil fuel combustions especially diesel combustions, may slow the global warming more efficiently that any reductions of carbon dioxide. Also, modeling studies of aerosol radiative forcing have pointed out its high sensitivity to the choice of BC source inventory, as BC is the main absorbing component of the aerosol phase. However, such studies rely on very different existing BC inventories (Penner et al., 1993, Cooke and Wilson, 1996, Liousse et al., 1996, Cooke et al., 1999, LavouZ˜ et al., 2000) while other developments for the global (Bond, Shulz or Chin works) and regional scales (Streets, Reddy, Michel, Liousse works) are currently underway. Actually, the budgets which are presented in the various inventories differ significantly. Yearly global BC emissions from Bond is roughly half of those given by Cooke et al., 1999. Let us note also that there is an important lack of knowledge for organic particulates. We created a working group on this topic and the first meeting took place in Toulouse last June. The aim is also to keep close connection with other initiatives and to conduct intercomparisons with the different inventories with a double focus, the global scale and zooms over some areas of particular interest for combustion aerosols (Asia and Africa). Our role is above all to obtain consistent inventories relying firstly in the definition of carbonaceous aerosol, secondly in the methods chosen for carbon measurements. Thus we will be able to propose clear recommendations for existing emission factor values for fossil fuel (especially for diesel and coal) and biomass burning (especially for domestic fires, savanna and forest fires) or future experiments

  2. An interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1992-01-01

    W7013F5 is a chondritic, hydrated interplanetary dust particle whose composition and mineralogy is nearly identical to that found in the CI chondrites. Transmission electron microscope observations show that the phyllosilicates in W7013F5 consist largely of a coherent undergrowth of Mg-Fe serpentine and Fe-bearing saponite on the unitcell scale. This distinctive intergrowth of phyllosilicates has only been observed previously in the CI chondrites. Other secondary minerals in W7013F5 include Mg-Fe carbonates, magnetite, and pentlandite. The mineral assemblage in W7013F5 is generally not as oxidized as that in the CI chondrites. The presence of kamacite in W7013F5 indicates that the particle is extraterrestrial, and a thin amorphous rim surrounding the particle provides evidence that it is not a piece of a meteorite that fragmented during transit through the atmosphere. The apparent lack of hydrated IDPs with CI mineralogy and chemistry may indicate that CI-type dust-producing asteroids are uncommon in the asteroid belt.

  3. Chondrules and Opaque Phases in Unequilibrated R Chondrites: A Comprehensive Assessment of Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. E.; Lauretta, D. S.; Connolly, H. C., Jr.; Berger, E. L.; Domanik, K.

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrated Rumuruti (R) chondrites record an oxygen fugacity between 0 and 3.5 log units below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer, and a sulfur fugacity (fS2) 2 log units above the iron-troilite buffer. They are more than an order of magnitude more oxidized than the ordinary chondrites [1], and orders of magnitude more sulfidized than solar values. Although the R chondrites have the highest (delta)O-17 value of any meteorites, analyses of unequilibrated R chondrites indicate chondrule formation in an oxygen isotope reservoir similar to that of the ordinary chondrite chondrules. We present the relationship of the R chondrite parent body to pre-accretionary volatiles O and S based on our analyses of unequilibrated R chondrite material in two thin sections from the meteorite Mount Prestrud (PRE) 95404.

  4. Accretional Impact Melt From the L-Chondrite Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, A.; Weirich, J. R.; Swindle, T. D.; Rumble, D.; Kring, D. A.

    2009-05-01

    MIL 05029, a unique achondritic Antarctic meteorite with L-chondritic affinity, has a medium-grained, well equilibrated texture of large poikilitic low-Ca pyroxenes that overgrew smaller, euhedral olivines. Plagioclase filled interstitial spaces and has an abundance that is twice that typical for L-chondrites, while Fe-Ni metal and troilite are strongly depleted in that respect. No relic clasts or shock features were found in the thin section analyzed. However, based on its chemical affinity to L-chondrites, MIL 05029 was classified as an impact melt. This is confirmed by its olivine and low-Ca pyroxene compositions, the Co content in Fe-Ni metal, and its oxygen isotopic composition that lies very close to that of L-chondrites. An igneous origin of MIL 05029 cannot be ruled out but would have to be reconciled with thermochronometric constraints for the formation of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. These studies infer delayed accretion of the parent asteroids of the ordinary chondrites and, thus, insufficient heating from short-lived radiogenic isotopes to produce endogenic magmatism. Metallographic cooling rates of ˜2-22 °C/Ma in the temperature range between ˜700-400°C were determined on five zoned metal particles of MIL 05029. Thermal modeling showed that such cooling rates relate to metamorphic conditions at depths of 5-12 km on the L-chondrite parent body. For an impact to deposit material at this depth, scaling relationships for an impact event on the 100-200 km diameter parent asteroid require a 15 to 60 km diameter simple crater that produced a basal melt pool, in which MIL 05029 crystallized. Further constraints for the formation conditions of MIL 05029 were derived from three whole-rock samples that gave well-defined Ar-Ar plateau ages of 4.53±0.02 Ga. This age indicates the time at which MIL 05029 cooled below ˜180°C, the Ar-closure temperature of plagioclase. Considering its slow metallographic cooling, the impact event that formed MIL 05029

  5. Detection of carbonaceous material in Naga Bhasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines have maintained their popularity in all regions of the developing world and are being adopted increasingly by people worldwide. Indian traditional system of medicine Ayurveda make use of unique metallic-herbal preparations (called Bhasma which involves different processing steps including repeated steps of calcination of metal in the presence of natural precursor (herbal juices, decoctions, and powders, etc. It has been recently established that Bhasma contains nano/sub-micron size particles and different nutrient elements. However, the role and the end product of the raw materials, especially the herbal parts, used during the synthesis of the drug (Bhasma is one of the important but unanswered problems in such medicinal preparations. Present work on Naga Bhasma is an attempt to understand the role of natural precursors in detail. Our results on infrared, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy along with thermal measurements identify the presence of carbonaceous material (hydrogenated amorphous carbon in the drug along with other compounds. In addition, this work also suggests the science and mechanism behind such complex preparations which could help in standardization of such medicines.

  6. Multiple and fast: The accretion of ordinary chondrite parent bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although petrologic, chemical, and isotopic studies of ordinary chondrites and meteorites in general have largely helped establish a chronology of the earliest events of planetesimal formation and their evolution, there are several questions that cannot be resolved via laboratory measurements and/or experiments alone. Here, we propose the rationale for several new constraints on the formation and evolution of ordinary chondrite parent bodies (and, by extension, most planetesimals) from newly available spectral measurements and mineralogical analysis of main-belt S-type asteroids (83 objects) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites (53 samples). Based on the latter, we suggest that spectral data may be used to distinguish whether an ordinary chondrite was formed near the surface or in the interior of its parent body. If these constraints are correct, the suggested implications include that: (1) large groups of compositionally similar asteroids are a natural outcome of planetesimal formation and, consequently, meteorites within a given class can originate from multiple parent bodies; (2) the surfaces of large (up to ∼200 km) S-type main-belt asteroids mostly expose the interiors of the primordial bodies, a likely consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system; (3) the duration of accretion of the H chondrite parent bodies was likely short (instantaneous or in less than ∼105 yr, but certainly not as long as 1 Myr); (4) LL-like bodies formed closer to the Sun than H-like bodies, a possible consequence of the radial mixing and size sorting of chondrules in the protoplanetary disk prior to accretion.

  7. Multiple and fast: The accretion of ordinary chondrite parent bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernazza, P.; Barge, P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. [Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux, et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC), Sorbonne Universités, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR CNRS 7590, IRD UMR 206, 61 rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris (France); Binzel, R. P.; DeMeo, F. E.; Lockhart, M. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hiroi, T. [Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Birlan, M. [IMCCE, Observatoire de Paris, 77 Av. Denfert Rochereau, F-75014 Paris Cedex (France); Ricci, L. [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    Although petrologic, chemical, and isotopic studies of ordinary chondrites and meteorites in general have largely helped establish a chronology of the earliest events of planetesimal formation and their evolution, there are several questions that cannot be resolved via laboratory measurements and/or experiments alone. Here, we propose the rationale for several new constraints on the formation and evolution of ordinary chondrite parent bodies (and, by extension, most planetesimals) from newly available spectral measurements and mineralogical analysis of main-belt S-type asteroids (83 objects) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites (53 samples). Based on the latter, we suggest that spectral data may be used to distinguish whether an ordinary chondrite was formed near the surface or in the interior of its parent body. If these constraints are correct, the suggested implications include that: (1) large groups of compositionally similar asteroids are a natural outcome of planetesimal formation and, consequently, meteorites within a given class can originate from multiple parent bodies; (2) the surfaces of large (up to ∼200 km) S-type main-belt asteroids mostly expose the interiors of the primordial bodies, a likely consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system; (3) the duration of accretion of the H chondrite parent bodies was likely short (instantaneous or in less than ∼10{sup 5} yr, but certainly not as long as 1 Myr); (4) LL-like bodies formed closer to the Sun than H-like bodies, a possible consequence of the radial mixing and size sorting of chondrules in the protoplanetary disk prior to accretion.

  8. Surviving High-temperature Components in CI Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M.; Frank, D.

    2014-01-01

    The CI1 chondrites, while having the most solar-like compo-sition of any astromaterial available for laboratory analysis, have also been considerably altered by asteroidal processes including aqueous alteration. It is of fundamental importance to determine their pre-alteration mineralogy, so that the state of matter in the early Solar System can be better determined. In the course of a re-examination of the compositional range of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in CI chondrites Orgueil, Ivuna and Alais [1] we found the first reported complete CAI, as already reported [2], with at-tached rock consisting mainly of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene. The range of residual olivine major element compositions we have determined in the CIs (Fig. 1) may now be directly com-pared with those of other astromaterials, including Wild 2 grains. The abundance of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in CIs is higher than is generally appreciated, and in fact much higher than for some CMs [1]. We also noted numerous rounded objects varying in shape from spheres to oblate spheroids, and ranging up to 100µm in size (Fig. 2), which have been previously noted [3] but have not been well documented or appreciated. We characterized the mineralogy by transmission electron microscopy and found that they consist mainly of rather fine-grained, flaky single phase to intergrown serpentine and saponite. These two materials in fact dominate the bulk of the host CI1 chondrites. With the exception of sparse spinels, the rounded phyllosilicate objects are remarka-bly free of other minerals, suggesting that the precursor from which the phyllosilicates were derived was a homogeneous mate-rial. We suggest that these round phyllosilicates aggregates in CI1 chondrites were cryptocrystalline to glassy microchondrules. If so then CI chondrites cannot be considered chondrule-free. Small though they are, the abundance of these putative microchondrules is the same as that of chondrules in the Tagish Lake meteorite.

  9. The carbonaceous concrete based on sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today there are many requirements for strength, ecology and economy of produced concretes. The authors of the paper study attenuation of electromagnetic radiation of carbonaceous powders in the concrete composition. Carbon black was selected as a carbon powder for addition in concrete composition. Carbon black is a nanomaterial with disoriented structure of particles (average size is about 50 nm. The composition of the carbon black contains at least 90 wt.% amorphous carbon, more than 5 wt. % chemisorbed oxygen and about 4 wt.% of impurities. Materials with the addition of carbon black have electrical conductivity due to the high content of carbon. These materials are able to absorb electromagnetic radiation. For cement composition with addition of carbon black (more than 30 wt. % and water transmission coefficient of electromagnetic radiation is about –10 dB, for cement composition with 20 wt. % of carbon black the reflection coefficient is –8 dB in the frequency range 8–12 GHz. The concretes with a saturated aqueous solution of calcium chloride and 10% of carbon black possess minimal reflection coefficient (–14... –8 dB. Electromagnetic radiation shielding of concrete with the addition of sawdust was investigated. The concrete with sawdust (40 wt. % impregnated with an aqueous solution with carbon black has the reflection coefficient less than –8 dB and transmission coefficient –40 dB in the frequency range 8–12 GHz. These concretes can be used for creation of a shielded room with the technical equipment for information processing to prevent data leakage through the compromising emanations and crosstalk.

  10. Carbonaceous Components in the Comet Halley Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary grains containing large amounts of carbon and/or organic matter (CHON) were discovered by in situ measurements of comet Halley dust composition during VEGA and GIOTTO flyby missions. In this paper, we report the classification of these cometary, grains by means of cluster analysis, discuss the resulting compositional groups, and compare them with substances observed or hypothesized in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and the interstellar medium. Grains dominated by carbon and/or organic matter (CHON grains) represent approx. 22% of the total population of measured cometary dust particles. They, usually contain a minor abundance of rock-forming elements as well. Grains having organic material are relatively more abundant in the vicinity of the nucleus than in the outer regions of the coma, which suggests decomposition of the organics in the coma environment. The majority of comet Halley organic particles are multicomponent mixtures of carbon phases and organic compounds. Possibly, the cometary CHON grains may be related to kerogen material of an interstellar origin in carbonaceous meteorites. Pure carbon grains, hydrocarbons and polymers of cyanopolyynes, and multi-carbon monoxides are present in cometary dust as compositionally simple and distinctive components among a variety of others. There is no clear evidence of significant presence of pure formaldehyde or HCN polymers in Halley dust particles. The diversity of types of cometary organic compounds is consistent with the inter-stellar dust model of comets and probably reflects differences in composition of precursor dust. Preservation of this heterogeneity among submicron particles suggest the gentle formation of cometary, nucleus by aggregation of interstellar dust in the protosolar nebula without complete mixing or chemical homogenization at the submicron level.

  11. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, S.; Jin, J. S.; Hwang, G. S.; Jang, K. S.; Han, W. S.; OH, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been recently paid attention more in environmental research due to their negative effects on air quality, public health, and climate change. The aerosols contain approximately >20-50% carbonaceous components such as organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) (or elemental carbon [EC]) derived from organic compounds, biomass burning, and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The physical, chemical, and biological properties of atmospheric aerosols are strongly dependent on the carbonaceous components. In particular, the BC could significantly affect the regional air quality in the northeastern Asia, because China is one of the foremost BC emission country in the world. Previous studies have mainly focused on the quantification and source identification for carbonaceous aerosols. However, understanding of physical and chemical properties for the carbonaceous aerosols related to environmental contamination and toxicity was still incomplete due to analytical difficulties. This study is addressed to evaluate the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to air pollution through the surface, mass spectroscopic, and electron microscopic analyses, and determination of chemical composition and structure using the air particulate matter (PM2.5 and >PM2.5) samples.

  12. Origin and chronology of chondritic components: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, A. N.; Amelin, Y.; Bland, P.; Ciesla, F. J.; Connelly, J.; Davis, A. M.; Huss, G. R.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Makide, K.; Nagashima, K.; Nyquist, L. E.; Russell, S. S.; Scott, E. R. D.; Thrane, K.; Yurimoto, H.; Yin, Q.-Z.

    2009-09-01

    Mineralogical observations, chemical and oxygen-isotope compositions, absolute 207Pb- 206Pb ages and short-lived isotope systematics ( 7Be- 7Li, 10Be- 10B, 26Al- 26Mg, 36Cl- 36S, 41Ca- 41K, 53Mn- 53Cr, 60Fe- 60Ni, 182Hf- 182W) of refractory inclusions [Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs)], chondrules and matrices from primitive (unmetamorphosed) chondrites are reviewed in an attempt to test (i) the x-wind model vs. the shock-wave model of the origin of chondritic components and (ii) irradiation vs. stellar origin of short-lived radionuclides. The data reviewed are consistent with an external, stellar origin for most short-lived radionuclides ( 7Be, 10Be, and 36Cl are important exceptions) and a shock-wave model for chondrule formation, and provide a sound basis for early Solar System chronology. They are inconsistent with the x-wind model for the origin of chondritic components and a local, irradiation origin of 26Al, 41Ca, and 53Mn. 10Be is heterogeneously distributed among CAIs, indicating its formation by local irradiation and precluding its use for the early solar system chronology. 41Ca- 41K, and 60Fe- 60Ni systematics are important for understanding the astrophysical setting of Solar System formation and origin of short-lived radionuclides, but so far have limited implications for the chronology of chondritic components. The chronological significance of oxygen-isotope compositions of chondritic components is limited. The following general picture of formation of chondritic components is inferred. CAIs and AOAs were the first solids formed in the solar nebula ˜4567-4568 Myr ago, possibly within a period of events in nebular region(s) with high ambient temperature (at or above condensation temperature of forsterite), either throughout the inner protoplanetary disk (1-4 AU) or in a localized region near the proto-Sun ( -10‰) and have ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 similar to those in chondrules (events in regions with low ambient temperature

  13. Glanggang and Selakopi - Two new paired Indonesian chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, K.; Peretsman, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The Indonesian meteorites Selakopi, and H-5 chondrite, and Glanggang, a breccia with H-6 fragments in an H-5 chondritic matrix, were recovered on the same day from sites only 50 km apart. The textures and compositions of Selakopi and the H-5 portion of Glanggang are very similar, indicating that they are closely related. The bulk chemistry of the H-6 portion of Glanggang is also very similar to that of the samples mentioned. It has therefore been concluded that Selakopi and the Glanggang breccia fragments were derived from the same source area and were probably ejected at the same time. Minor differences in bulk composition and texture among the three samples may be attributed to local variations on the parent body. However, for reasons stipulated in the conclusion, it is recommended that separate names be maintained for these meteorites until further, more definitive investigations have been made.

  14. New Titanium Monosulfide Mineral Phase in Yamato 691 Enstatite Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K; Clemett, S. J.; Rubin, A. E.; Choi, B.-G.; Zhang, S.; Rahman, Z.; Oikawa, K.; Keller, L. P.

    2011-01-01

    Yamato 691, an EH3 enstatite chondrite, was among the first meteorites discovered by chance in Antarctica by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) team in 1969. This discovery led to follow-up searches for meteorites in Antarctica [1]. These international searches have been very successful recovering over 40,000 total specimens (and still counting), including martian and lunar meteorites. Titanium is partly chalcophile in enstatite-rich meteorites. Previous occurrences of Ti-bearing sulfides include troilite, daubrelite and ferroan alabandite in enstatite chondrites and aubrites [2], and heideite with 28.5 wt% Ti in the Bustee aubrite [3]. Here we report a new mineral from Yamato 691, ideally stoichiometric TiS, titanium monosulfide, a simple two-element mineral phase, yet with a very unique crystal structure that, to our knowledge, has not been observed previously in nature.

  15. The Tuxtuac, Mexico, meteorite, an LL5 chondrite fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, A. L.; Michel-Levy, M. Christophe; Danon, J.; Easton, A. J.

    1988-12-01

    The Tuxtuac meteorite fell in Zacatecas state, Mexico, on October 16, 1975, at 1820 hours. Two partly crusted masses, weighing 1924 g and 2340 g, were recovered. The stone is an ordinary chondrite, LL5, with olivine Fa30 and 19.22 wt pct total iron. The silicates contain numerous voids and a froth-like mesostasis is present within some chondrules. Metal phases present are kamacite (5.7-6.4 pct Ni, 6-7 pct Co) and high nickel metal (taenite 37-41 pct Ni, 1.7 + or - 0.3 pct Co; tetrataenite 47-52 pct Ni, 0.8-1.4 pct Co). The stone is unusual for an LL-group chondrite in that it exhibits neither large-scale brecciation features nor dark veins.

  16. Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in the Wethersfield (1982) chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. C.; Reeves, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    The Wethersfield (1982) chondrite was assayed for a suite of cosmogenic radionuclides shortly after fall. Data are reported for Be-7, Na-22, All-26, Sc-46, V-48, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-60. A comparison is made with predicted results based on a scaling to the Deep River Neutron Monitor. Noble gases were also assayed in a subsample. The cosmic-ray-exposure age is estimated to be 45 Myr.

  17. Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere: A historical perspective to the Fifth International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Novakov, T.

    1996-08-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol species together with sulfates, other water-soluble inorganic compounds, and mineral particles play an important role in a variety of environmental effects. Carbonaceous particles contribute to the extinction of visible light by both scattering and absorption, thus influencing visibility degradation and radiative transfer through the atmosphere. These particles may serve as sites for condensation of water vapor and organic compounds. Components of carbonaceous material may contribute to atmospheric chemical processes because of their chemical and catalytic properties. Many of the original results in this field of research were first presented at the International Conferences on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere held in Berkeley (1978 and 1987) and in Linz and Vienna, Austria (1983 and 1991, respectively). At the fifth conference, August 23-26, 1994, at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 85 papers were presented. This volume contains papers accepted for publication after peer review. In this introduction we attempt to provide an overview of research on carbonaceous particles from the 1950s to mid-1970s, which provided the backdrop for the first conference. We follow this by outlining research accomplishments and evolution of emphasis (as evidenced by the material presented at these conferences) and by summarizing the present state of this field of research.

  18. Laboratory Studies Of Circumstellar Carbonaceous Grain Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2014-06-01

    The study of the formation processes of dust is essential to understand the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar (IS) chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation processes of carbonaceous dust. We report the progress that was recently achieved in this domain using NASA Ames’ COSmIC facility (Contreras & Salama 2013, ApJS, 208, 6). PAHs are important chemical building blocks of IS dust. They are detected in IDPs and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs are an important, ubiquitous component of the ISM. The formation of PAHs from smaller molecules has not been extensively studied. Therefore, we have performed laboratory experiments to study the dynamic processes of carbon grain formation, starting from the smallest hydrocarbon molecules into the formation of larger PAH and further into nanograins. Studies of IS dust analogs formed from a variety of PAH and hydrocarbon precursors as well as species that include the atoms O, N, and S, have recently been performed in our laboratory using the COSmIC facility to provide conditions that simulate IS and circumstellar environments. The species formed in the COSmiC chamber through a pulsed discharge nozzle plasma source are detected and characterized with a cavity ringdown spectrometer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. Analysis of solid soot particles was also conducted using scanning electron microscopy at the UCSC/NASA Ames’ MACS facility. The SEM analysis of the deposition of soot from methane and acetylene precursors seeded in argon plasmas provide examples on the types of nanoparticles and micrograins that are produced in these gas mixtures under our experimental conditions. From these measurements, we derive information on

  19. Magmatic sulfides in the porphyritic chondrules of EH enstatite chondrites

    CERN Document Server

    Piani, Laurette; Libourel, Guy; Tissandier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within 17 porphyritic chondrules of the Sahara 97096 EH3 enstatite chondrite have been studied by backscattered electron microscopy and electron microprobe in order to investigate the role of gas-melt interactions in the chondrule sulfide formation. Troilite (FeS) is systematically present and is the most abundant sulfide within the EH3 chondrite chondrules. It is found either poikilitically enclosed in low-Ca pyroxenes or scattered within the glassy mesostasis. Oldhamite (CaS) and niningerite [(Mg,Fe,Mn)S] are present in about 60% of the chondrules studied. While oldhamite is preferentially present in the mesostasis, niningerite associated with silica is generally observed in contact with troilite and low-Ca pyroxene. The chondrule mesostases contain high abundances of alkali and volatile elements as well as silica. Our data suggest that most of the sulfides found in EH3 chondrite chondrules are magmatic minerals that formed after the dissolution of S from a volatile-r...

  20. Timescales and settings for alteration of chondritic meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, A N; Hutcheon, I D; Brearley, A J; Pravdivtseva, O V; Petaev, M I; Hohenberg, C M

    2005-11-16

    Most groups of chondritic meteorites experienced diverse styles of secondary alteration to various degrees that resulted in formation of hydrous and anhydrous minerals (e.g., phyllosilicates, magnetite, carbonates, ferrous olivine, hedenbergite, wollastonite, grossular, andradite, nepheline, sodalite, Fe,Ni-carbides, pentlandite, pyrrhotite, Ni-rich metal). Mineralogical, petrographic, and isotopic observations suggest that the alteration occurred in the presence of aqueous solutions under variable conditions (temperature, water/rock ratio, redox conditions, and fluid compositions) in an asteroidal setting, and, in many cases, was multistage. Although some alteration predated agglomeration of the final chondrite asteroidal bodies (i.e. was pre-accretionary), it seems highly unlikely that the alteration occurred in the solar nebula, nor in planetesimals of earlier generations. Short-lived isotope chronologies ({sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg, {sup 53}Mn-{sup 53}Cr, {sup 129}I-{sup 129}Xe) of the secondary minerals indicate that the alteration started within 1-2 Ma after formation of the Ca,Al-rich inclusions and lasted up to 15 Ma. These observations suggest that chondrite parent bodies must have accreted within the first 1-2 Ma after collapse of the protosolar molecular cloud and provide strong evidence for an early onset of aqueous activity on these bodies.

  1. FORMING CHONDRITES IN A SOLAR NEBULA WITH MAGNETICALLY INDUCED TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Turner, Neal J.; Masiero, Joseph [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wakita, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Yuji; Oshino, Shoichi, E-mail: yasuhiro@caltech.edu [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-03-20

    Chondritic meteorites provide valuable opportunities to investigate the origins of the solar system. We explore impact jetting as a mechanism of chondrule formation and subsequent pebble accretion as a mechanism of accreting chondrules onto parent bodies of chondrites, and investigate how these two processes can account for the currently available meteoritic data. We find that when the solar nebula is ≤5 times more massive than the minimum-mass solar nebula at a ≃ 2–3 au and parent bodies of chondrites are ≤10{sup 24} g (≤500 km in radius) in the solar nebula, impact jetting and subsequent pebble accretion can reproduce a number of properties of the meteoritic data. The properties include the present asteroid belt mass, the formation timescale of chondrules, and the magnetic field strength of the nebula derived from chondrules in Semarkona. Since this scenario requires a first generation of planetesimals that trigger impact jetting and serve as parent bodies to accrete chondrules, the upper limit of parent bodies’ masses leads to the following implications: primordial asteroids that were originally ≥10{sup 24} g in mass were unlikely to contain chondrules, while less massive primordial asteroids likely had a chondrule-rich surface layer. The scenario developed from impact jetting and pebble accretion can therefore provide new insights into the origins of the solar system.

  2. Origin of unusual impact melt rocks, Yamato-790964 and 790143 (LL-chondrites)

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi,Akira/Scott,Edward R.D./Keil,Klaus

    1998-01-01

    We have studied Yamato (Y)-790964 and-790143,which are unusual paired impact-melted LL chondrites. Some petrologic aspects of these impact melt rocks are similar to those of the impact melted L-chondrite, Ramsdorf; these meteorites experienced nearly total melting, yet partly preserve chondritic textures. Olivine and chromite grains in Y-790964 and olivine in Y-790143 are the only relicts of the precursor materials; they were solid clasts during impact melting. All other portions (i.e., chond...

  3. Investigation of the chemical composition of mineral fractions of the Tsarev chondrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenova, L.F.; Fisenko, A.V.; Kashkarova, V.G.; Melnikova, L.N.; Bezrogova, E.V.; Pomytkina, V.A.; Lavrukhina, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    A selective-dissolution method was used to study the chemical composition of mineral fractions of the Tsarev chondrite. Redistributions of Na, K, and P were found in mineral fractions of L-chondrites which have experienced different degrees of impact metamorphism. It is shown that the normative composition of inclusions in olivine in the Tsarev chondrite is characterized by a high content of diopside and anorthite components. 24 references.

  4. The behavior of carbonaceous matter in Tagish Lake Meteorite at high P-T: implications for the survivability of organics during petrological processes and origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagno, V.; DU, W.

    2015-12-01

    Recent models of planets formation have faced the possibility that (volatile-rich) carbonaceous chondrites are the possible carrier of water and complex carbon molecules. The Tagish Lake (TL) meteorite is a classified C2 ungroup chondrite whose bulk and organic chemistry compositions have received a considerable attention owing to the short-time exposure before being collected. TL is likely representative of D-type asteroids known to contain complex organic compounds, and was described including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons considered to be building blocks of life (Gilmour 2001; Pizzarello et al. 2001). Recent studies on the spatial distribution and mineralogical association of organics in TL meteorites show a certain affinity of organic compounds for S-bearing phases such as Fe-Ni sulfide coexisting with abundant carbonate (Ca-Mg-Fe-Mn solid solution), magnetite and serpentine (Zega et al. 2010). In particular, carbonate is believed to form from the organic matter during hydrothermal alteration with implications for the carbon (C) isotopic signature. Therefore, the knowledge of how carbonaceous matter survived during the history of a meteorite at extreme pressures-temperatures is of fundamental importance to solve the mystery of the origin of life. In order to investigate the behavior of carbonaceous matter and to constrain the stability and structural evolution of organics and in Tagish Lake meteorite during petrological processes (melting, solid state reaction etc.), we carried heating experiments at 5 GPa and temperature between 800-1400 °C using multi anvil apparatus at GRC, Ehime University. The recovered samples were polished for textural and chemical characterization of the mineral phases using FE-SEM and electron microprobe, respectively. Ultra-thin sections, 80-100 nm thick, were prepared from the recovered samples using focused ion beam. These sections were then transferred to TEM grids for in situ X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES

  5. In situ remediation of contaminated sediments using carbonaceous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakowska, M.I.; Kupryianchyk, D.; Harmsen, J.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials (CM), such as activated carbons or biochars, have been shown to significantly reduce porewater concentrations and risks by binding hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) present in aquatic sediments. In the present study, the authors review the current state-of-the-art use of CM

  6. [Investigation of Carbonaceous Airborne Particles by Scanning Proton Microprobe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Liang-man; Liu, Jiang-feng; Lei, Qian-tao; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Gui-lin; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    Carbonaceous particles are an important component of the atmospheric aerosol particles and important for global climate change, air quality and human health. The PM₁₀ single particles from two environmental monitor locations and seven pollution emission sources were analyzed using scanning proton microprobe (SPM) techniques. The concentration of carbon in individual particles was quantitatively determined by proton non-Rutherford elastic backscattering spectrometry (EBS). The results of this investigation showed that carbonaceous particles were dominant in the pollution sources of coal and oil combustions, diesel busexhaust and automobile exhaust, while inorganic particles were dominant in the sources of steel industry, cement dust and soil dust. Carbonaceous matter was enriched in particles from the city center, while mineral matter was the main component of airborne particles in the industrial area. Elemental mapping of single aerosol particles yielded important information on the chemical reactions of aerosol particles. The micro-PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) maps of S, Ca and Fe of individual carbonaceous particles showed that sulfuration reaction occurred between SO₂and mineral particles, which increased the sulfur content of particles. PMID:27078933

  7. Group IIE Iron Meteorites; Metal Composition, Formation, Relationship to Ordinary Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, J. T.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2011-03-01

    INAA data for metal in 8 new and 12 known IIE irons show they crystallized from various silicate-rich Fe-Ni melts with diverse S contents after impacts melted an ordinary chondrite asteroid that was probably more reduced than H chondrites.

  8. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. VII - Annealing studies of the Dhajala H3.8 chondrite and the thermal history of chondrules and chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, B. D.; Guimon, R. K.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of the Dhajala meteorite were annealed at 600-1000 C for 1, 2, 10, 20 and 100 h and their thermoluminescence (TL) properties were measured. After annealing at less than 900 deg, the TL sensitivity decreased by a factor of two; at higher temperatures, it fell by an order of magnitude. Data indicate that the annealing treatment caused the low-temperature feldspar in Dhajala to be converted to feldspar of a high-temperature (disordered) form. Low-temperature feldspar was found in the meteorite's TL-sensitive chondrules which comprised about 20 percent of those separated. It is suggested that these chondrules suffered greater crystallization of their mesostasis than the other chondrules, and equilibrated to lower temperatures. Based on TL data, there appears to be no relationship between post-metamorphic cooling rate and petrologic type for the 3.5-3.9 chondrites.

  9. Dynamic Crystallization Experiments Using Conventional and Solar Furnace Techniques--implications For The Formation of Refractory Forsterite In Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, A.; Sauerborn, M.; Klerner, S.; Palme, H.; Neumann, A.; Seboldt, W.

    A distinct generation of forsteritic olivine (Mg2SiO4) grains (RF) with unusually high concentrations of refractory components including CaO (0.7 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.4 wt.%), V, Sc, and REEs occurs in unequilibrated chondrites, including ordinary, carbonaceous, and the highly oxidized Rumurutiites. Contents of siderophile elements like FeO (1 wt.%), Ni, or Mn are extremly low in RF. It is inferred that formation of RF pre-dates the formation of chondrules and matrix as well as formation of the different types of parent bodies (CCs, OCs, oxidized R-chondrites). Hence, RF can help us to better understand the processes in the early stage of the solar system in the time between formation of CAIs and Si,Mg-chondrules. However, formation of RF is not well understood. Crystallization of RF in chon- drules requires chondrule melts with ca. 20 wt.% CaO. Most chondrules have typically <4 wt.% CaO (max. ca. 10 wt.% CaO). We have conducted dynamic crystallization experiments using a conventional furnace (1.5...1000 K·min-1) and the DLR solar furnace (approx. 100000 K·min-1) in order to test if rapid cooling of a chondrule- like melt would produce high CaO in RF. We demostrate that Ca-partitioning between olivine and silicate melt is only weakly influenced by rapid cooling even at extremly high cooling rates in the range of 105 K·min-1 as obtained in the solar furnace ex- periments. At a bulk composition of the starting melt of 7.5 wt.% CaO, no deviation from equilibrium fractionation was observed (T/t = 1.5 . . . 105 K·min-1). At a ol/melt bulk content of 17.5 wt.% CaO, in increase in DCa of approximately 10...20% was observed. Chondrules with CaO contents in the range of 10 wt.% (upper limit of CaO in chondrules) thus cannot be regarded to be the host of RF. Hence, there must have been an early generation of extremly CaO-rich chondrules (20 wt.% CaO). Alternatively, RF may have formed by other processes, e. g. direct condensation from the solar nebula.

  10. Petrology and In Situ Trace Element Chemistry of a Suite of R Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Torrano, Z. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rumuruti (R) chondrites are characterized by low chondrule/matrix modal ratios, high oxidation state, small mean chondrule size, abundant sulfides and low metal contents, and are of petrologic types 3 to 6 [1, 2]. LAP 04840 (R5, [3]) and MIL 11207 (R6), contain the high-T hydrous phases amphibole and mica [3, 4]; not all equilibrated R chondrites contain these [2]. R chondrites thus can provide evidence on whether there are compositional effects caused by high-T, high-fluid metamorphism of nebular materials. We are investigating a suite of R chondrites of diverse petrologic grades to further understand the nature of the metamorphic processes that engendered them [5]. We report on our petrological studies, plus preliminary in situ analyses of trace elements in amphibole-bearing R chondrites.

  11. Total Mass of Ordinary Chondrite Matter Originally Present in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2004-01-01

    Recently, I reported the discovery of a new fundamental relationship of the major elements (Fe, Mg, Si) of chondrites that admits the possibility that ordinary chondrite meteorites are derived from two components, a relatively oxidized and undifferentiated, primitive component and a somewhat differentiated, planetary component, with oxidation state like the highly reduced enstatite chondrites, which I suggested was identical to Mercury's complement of lost elements. Subsequently, on the basis of that relationship, I derived expressions, as a function of the mass of planet Mercury and the mass of its core, to estimate the mass of Mercury's lost elements, the mass of Mercury's alloy and rock protoplanetary core, and the mass of Mercury's gaseous protoplanet. Here, on the basis of the supposition that Mercury's complement of lost elements is in fact identical to the planetary component of ordinary chondrite formation, I estimate, as a function of Mercury's core mass, the total mass of ordinary chondrite matter o...

  12. On the siting of noble gases in E-chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, J.; Anders, E.

    1982-01-01

    Fractions of six E-chondrites were separated by density, grain size, and chemical resistance to determine the siting of noble gases. The samples were taken from the Qingzhen (E3), Indarch (E4), Abee and Saint Saveur (E4-5), and Yilmia and North West Forrest (E6) meteorites. The Ar-rich component of the E6s was concentrated in the enstatite-rich fraction. This subsolar component was resistant to HCl and HNO3 treatment, but could be partially dissolved by HF, implying that the subsolar component is located in the enstatite. The noble gases were transported there by metamorphism. Xe-129 was found in the same regions in the E6s, but was in areas associated with chondrules in the E4s. Additionally, the carbon-rich fraction of the E4 sample displayed Xe and Ne/CCF-Xe isotopic ratios similar to that found in C-chondrites. E3 and E4 primordial gases were analogous, with no subsolar contribution.

  13. Immobilization of pentachlorophenol in soil using carbonaceous material amendments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Bei [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: bwen@rcees.ac.cn; Li Ruijuan; Zhang Shuzhen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Shan Xiaoquan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: xiaoquan@rcees.ac.cn; Fang Jing; Xiao Ke [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Khan, Shahamat U. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, MSN 3E2, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, three pentachlorophenol (PCP) laboratory-spiked and one field-contaminated soil were amended with 2.0% char, humic acid (HA) and peat, respectively. The amended soils were aged for either 7 or 250 days. After amendment, CaCl{sub 2} extractability of PCP was significantly decreased. Desorption kinetics indicated that the proposed amendment could lead to a strong binding and slow desorption of PCP in soils. Amendment with char reduced the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of PCP most significantly for earthworms (Eisenia fetida) in all soils studied. The results of both physicochemical and biological tests suggested that amendment reduced PCP bioavailability quickly and enduringly, implying that carbonaceous material amendment, especially char amendment, was a potentially attractive in situ remediation method for sequestration of PCP in contaminated soil. - Carbonaceous material amendment was a potential in situ remediation method for pentachlorophenol contaminated soil.

  14. The kinetic parameters of carbonaceous materials activated with potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Z.; Han, B.X.

    2000-07-01

    On the basis of microspore formation in carbonaceous materials, the activation energy for the potassium hydroxide activation of Chinese petroleum coke and coal has been deduced theoretically as dB(O)/dt = A exp(-E(a)) is an element of/RT), where is an element of is the formation energy for the metastable solid formed at the activation temperature. The kinetic parameters (frequency factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E(a) were calculated from this equation as being 5.319 mg/(g min), 36.51 kJ/mol and 6.64 mg/(g min), 49.46 kJ/mol, respectively, for the two carbonaceous materials studied.

  15. Active coke: Carbonaceous materials as catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, J.; Huang, Z; Parrott, E.; Zeitler, J.; Nguyen, K.; Rawson, J.; Carley, A; Hansen, T.; Tessonnier, J.; Su, D.; Teschner, D; Vass, E.; Knop-Gericke, A.; Schlögl, R.; Gladden, L.

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic dehydrogenation (DH) and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of light alkanes are of significant industrial importance. In this work both carbonaceous materials deposited on VOx/Al2O3 catalysts during reaction and unsupported carbon nanofibres (CNFs) are shown to be active for the dehydrogenation of butane in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. Their activity in these reactions is shown to be dependent upon their structure, with different reaction temperatures yielding structurally dif...

  16. Uranium band types in carbonaceous sediments with different diagenesis levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uraniferous peats, lignites and coals were studied by chemical and geological methods in order to determine the influence of carbonaceous substances with different diagenesis levels on uranium enrichment in sediments. It was found that the main factor of deposit genesis is not the chemical bending of uranium to the organic substance but rather the reduction from mobile U(VI) to immobile U(IV) in the course of diagenesis to epigenesis. (orig./PW)

  17. Biomass-derived carbonaceous materials as components in wood briquettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stengl, S.; Koch, C.; Stadlbauer, E.A.; Scheer, J. [Univ. of Applied Sciences, THM Campus Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Weber, B. [Instituto de Ingenieria de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Coyoacan (Mexico); Strohal, U.; Fey, J. [Strohal Anlagenbau, Staufenberg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The present paper describes a briquette composed of a substantial amount of wooden biomass and up to 35% of carbonaceous materials derived from biogenic residues. The cellulosic component may be a mixture of any wooden residue. Suitable substrates for the carbonaceous fraction are vegetation wastes from land management or agriculture. Depending on physical and chemical nature of the substrate, Hydrothermal Carbonisation (HTC) or Low Temperature Conversion (LTC) may be used to produce the carbonaceous part of the briquette. HTC turns wet biomass at temperatures around 200 deg C in an autoclave into lignite whereas LTC treatment at 400 deg C and atmospheric pressure produces black coal. This is manifested by a molar ratio of 0.1 {<=} H/C (LTC) {<=} 0.7; 0.05{<=} O/C (LTC) {<=} 0.4 and 0.7 < H/C (HTC) <1.5 ; 0.2< O/C (HTC) < 0.5. Solid state {sup 13}C-NMR confirms these findings showing a strong absorption band for sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at chemical shifts of 100 ppm und 165 ppm for LTC biochar. Depending on the substrate, HTC gives rise to an increase in the specific calorific value (MJ/kg) by a factor of {Psi} {approx} 1.2 - 1.4; LTC by 1.5 - 1.8. In addition ash melting points are significantly increased; in case of wheat straw by about 200 deg C. Compacted products may have a cylindrical or rectangular profile.

  18. Modeling Orbital Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Experiments at Carbonaceous Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Lucy F; Evans, Larry G; Parsons, Ann M; Zolensky, Michael E; Boynton, William V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring differences in bulk composition among carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies from an asteroid or comet orbiter, we present the results of a performance simulation of an orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy ("GRS") experiment in a Dawn-like orbit around spherical model asteroids with a range of carbonaceous compositions. The orbital altitude was held equal to the asteroid radius for 4.5 months. Both the asteroid gamma-ray spectrum and the spacecraft background flux were calculated using the MCNPX Monte-Carlo code. GRS is sensitive to depths below the optical surface (to ~20--50 cm depth depending on material density). This technique can therefore measure underlying compositions beneath a sulfur-depleted (e.g., Nittler et al. 2001) or desiccated surface layer. We find that 3\\sigma\\ uncertainties of under 1 wt% are achievable for H, C, O, Si, S, Fe, and Cl for five carbonaceous meteorite compositions using the heritage Mars Odyssey GRS design in a spacecraft- deck-mounted configu...

  19. Kirishites—high-carbonaceous hairlike fibers associated with volkhovites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skublov, G. T.; Marin, Yu. B.; Skublov, S. G.; Vasil'Ev, E. V.; Gembitskaya, I. M.; Nechaeva, E. S.; Tarasenko, Yu. N.

    2009-12-01

    Kirishites are highly carbonaceous hairlike fibers 30-100 μm in thickness and 3-30 mm long, which jut out as bunches on the surface of cinder and shungite fragments associated with volkhovites (Holocene tectitelike glasses corresponding to the rocks of kimberlite-lamproite-carbonatite series in composition). Kirishite fibers are zonal. Their inner (axial) zone is composed of high-nitrogen proteinlike compounds, whereas the outer zone is essentially carbonaceous, with a high content of organoelemental complexes (Si, Fe) and numerous micrometer-sized anomalies of major, volatile, trace, and ore elements. Longitudinal zoning is established in aposhungite kirishites: the consecutive change of maximum concentrations—K, Na, Cl, C, Mn → C, S, V, Ni, Cu, Zn → S, N, Ba, Te, Pb, Bi, Nd—is traced from the roots of fibers to their ends. It is suggested that as volkhovites were forming, fragments of cinder and shungite underwent partial melting. The highly carbonaceous compounds released due decompression and explosion were squeezed out from fragments and solidified as fibers during fall of fragments on the Earth’s surface.

  20. Indigenous Carbonaceous Matter in the Nakhla Mars Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemett, S. J.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Rahman, Z.; Le, L.; Wentworth, S. J.; Gibson, E. K.; McKay, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed microanalysis of the Martian meteorite Nakhla has shown there are morphologically distinct carbonaceous features spatially associated with low-T aqueous alteration phases including salts and id-dingsite. A comprehensive suite of analytical instrumentation including optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), two-step laser mass spectrometry (mu-L(sup 2)MS), laser mu-Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) are being used to characterize the carbonaceous matter and host mineralogy. The search for carbonaceous matter on Mars has proved challenging. Viking Landers failed to unambiguously detect simple organics at either of the two landing sites although the Martian surface is estimated to have acquired at least 10(exp15) kg of C as a consequence of meteoritic accretion over the last several Ga. The dearth of organics at the Martian surface has been attributed to various oxidative processes including UV photolysis and peroxide activity. Consequently, investigations of Martian organics need to be focused on the sub-surface regolith where such surface processes are either severely attenuated or absent. Fortuitously since Martian meteorites are derived from buried regolith materials they provide a unique opportunity to study Martian organic geochemistry.

  1. Gallium and germanium in the metal and silicates of L- and LL-chondrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.-L.; Cohen, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Concentrations of Ga and Ge in the metal of 31 L-, 8 LL- and 2 H-chondrites, and in the silicates of 12 L- and LL-chondrites have been determined by spectrophotometric methods. The ranges of Ga contents in the metal of L- and LL-chondrites are 1.1 to 36.9 ppm and 1.0 to 34.1 ppm, respectively. The Ge content in the metal is positively correlated with Ga and ranges from 89.1 to 160 ppm and from 126 to 308 ppm for L- and LL-chondrites, respectively. The Ga content in the silicates of L-chondrites varies from 4.0 to 8.9 ppm. The Ga and Ge contents in the metal are clearly lower in unequilibrated than in equilibrated L- and LL-group chondrites. Unequilibrated and equilibrated chondrites are well separated in the plots of Ga vs Ge in the metal, and the L- and LL-groups are also well resolved. The Ga and Ge in the metal are well correlated with petrologic grade. This suggests that Ga and Ge variations in the metal are related to thermal metamorphism. There is evidence of an enrichment of Ga in the metal due to shock reheating.

  2. Airborne contamination of forest soils by carbonaceous particles from industrial coal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, M. W. I.; Knicker, Heike; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Kögel-Knabner, I.

    2000-01-01

    In the German Ruhr-area industrial coal processing emitted large amounts of carbonaceous particles for a century until 1970. Our objectives were to detect the presence of airborne carbonaceous particles and assess their impact on the chemical structure of soil organic matter in two forest soils (Podzols) with potential sources of carbonaceous particles approximately 10 to 30 km away. Contamination was not visible macroscopicaily. Organic matter was characterized in bulk soils and in particle-...

  3. Identification and Characterization of Early Solar system Organic Matter Preserved in Chondritic Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George; Wirick, Sue; Keller, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    The chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, have experienced minimal aqueous or thermal alteration since their formation. These CP IDPs are the best preserved samples of the minerals and organic matter that was present in the primitive Solar Nebula that are currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. The ~10 μm CP IDPs are aggregates of tens-of-thousands of mostly sub-micron grains of diverse compositions and mineralogies. Many of the individual mineral grains are coated by a 50 to 200 nm thick rims of carbonaceous material, and other carbonaceous material occurs as larger, discrete subunits within the particles [2]. We characterize this carbonaceous material using two high-resolution, synchrotron-based instruments: a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) to locate and map the carbon and to identify its major functional groups by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and a micro-Fourier Transform Infrared (μ-FTIR) spectrometer to further characterize the functional groups by mid-infrared spectroscopy. Carbon-XANES spectroscopy identifies the rims coating the individual grains in CP IDPs as organic matter, dominated by the C=C, likely C-rings, and the C=O functional groups [3]. This structure, with the organic rims being the contact surfaces between the grains, implies a 3-step formation sequence: grain condensation, organic rim emplacement, and, finally, aggregation of the grains to form the dust particles. This suggests these organic rims formed very early in the evolution of the Solar Nebula, after grain condensation but before grain aggregation [3]. These organic rims coat grains of diverse compositions, including silicates, sulfides, and carbonates, which is inconsistent with formation by Fischer-Tropsch-like, mineral-specific catalysis, one of the mechanisms suggested for the formation of primitive organic matter. Our observations are consistent with an

  4. Grain size distribution of the matrix in the Allende chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, M.

    1989-03-01

    Results are presented from analytical TEM, high-resolution TEM, and SEM studies of the Allende chondrite, showing that the matrix consists of very fine-grained Fe-rich olivine, Ca-poor and Fe-rich clinopyroxene, Fe-rich spinel, and Ni-bearing troilite. Slightly sintered and non-sintered very fine-grained aggregates are observed. The results suggest that the coarse-grained olivine aggregates experienced a heating event, whereas the ultrafine-grained aggregates did not. The size and frequency distributions of matrix grains are measured. The frequency distribution displays a long-term tail with power law and a log-normal pattern with a peak at 5 nm in the range from 1 to 10 nm. This suggests that the fine-grained matrix was probably formed at conditions far from equilibrium in the protosolar cloud.

  5. Cosmogenic Radionuclides in Recently Fallen Chondrites Mihonoseki and Tahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, M.; Honda, M.; Yabuki, S.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-07-01

    Introduction: The chondrite Mihonoseki, L6, 6.38 kg, fell on December 10, 1992 [1]. The other chondrite, Tahara, fell on March 26, 1991, on the deck of car- carrier ship, M.S. Century-Highway No.1 of Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd., anchored at T-3 berth of Toyota Pier, at Toyohashi harbor, in Tahara-Center, Toyota Motor Corp., Tahara-machi, Atsumi-gun, Aichi-ken, Japan. Although the total mass is estimated to be more than 5 kg, only several fragments were recovered by crews. In fact, this was recognized by the event of Mihonoseki. Tahara was classified as H5 [2]. Gamma-Ray Counting: With whole mass of Mihonoseki, nondestructive gamma-ray countings started on December 15, 1992, using a pure Ge detector (ORTEC), 45 mm x 39 mm, horizontal type. Data collections were performed every day in the beginning and later about every week through February 3, 1993. A sample chamber was shielded with 15-cm-thick lead, 6-cm-thick iron, and 0.5-cm-thick plastic plates. For Tahara, another set (Canberra), 44 mm x 42 mm, coaxial type, was used. The 420-g fragment was mounted in the sample chamber shielded with 15-cm-thick lead, 2-cm-thick iron, 2-cm-thick copper, and 2-cm-thick plastic plates. The counting started in January 1993. The counting efficiencies for gamma rays as a function of energy, ranging between 122 keV (57Co) and 1809 keV (26Al), have been determined using three different standards. A mixed standard solution of nine-species gamma-ray emitters, QCY-44, reference time 12:00 GMT on February 1, 1993, was supplied from Amersham, England. The solution was dropped onto (1) chips of Al-foil, (2) chips of filter paper, or (3) olivine sand. Those standards were mixed thoroughly with mock materials, fine and coarse olivine sand and iron powder, and reagent KCl, standard for 40K, then filled into mock shells of Mihonoseki and Tahara, which were made of hard plastic and aluminum foil with epoxy resin, respectively. For Tahara, mocks with all three types of standards were examined for

  6. Bright Stuff on Ceres = Sulfates and Carbonates on CI Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Chan, Queenie H. S.; Gounelle, Matthieu; Fries, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of the DAWN spacecraft's observations of the surface of Ceres indicate that there are bright areas, which can be explained by large amounts of the Mg sulfate hexahydrate (MgSO4•6(H2O)), although the identification appears tenuous. There are preliminary indications that water is being evolved from these bright areas, and some have inferred that these might be sites of contemporary hydro-volcanism. A heat source for such modern activity is not obvious, given the small size of Ceres, lack of any tidal forces from nearby giant planets, probable age and presumed bulk composition. We contend that observations of chondritic materials in the lab shed light on the nature of the bright spots on Ceres

  7. STARDUST INVESTIGATION INTO THE CR CHONDRITE GROVE MOUNTAIN 021710

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xuchao; Lin Yangting [Key Laboratory of the Earth' s Deep Interior, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Beituchengxi Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Floss, Christine [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bose, Maitrayee, E-mail: linyt@mail.igcas.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871604, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    We report the presolar grain inventory of the CR chondrite Grove Mountain 021710. A total of 35 C-anomalous grains ({approx}236 ppm) and 112 O-anomalous grains ({approx}189 ppm) were identified in situ using NanoSIMS ion imaging. Of 35 C-anomalous grains, 28 were determined to be SiC grains by Auger spectroscopy. Seven of the SiC grains were subsequently measured for N and Si isotopes, allowing classification as one nova grain, one Y grain, one Z grain, and four mainstream grains. Eighty-nine out of 112 O-anomalous grains belong to Group 1, indicating origins in low-to-intermediate-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. Twenty-one are Group 4 grains and have origins in supernovae. Auger spectroscopic elemental measurements of 35 O-anomalous grains show that 33 of them are ferromagnesian silicates. They have higher Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios than those reported in other meteorites, suggesting a lower degree of alteration in the nebula and/or asteroid parent bodies. Only two oxide grains were identified, with stoichiometric compositions of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}, respectively. The presolar silicate/oxide ratio of GRV 021710 is comparable with those of the CR3 chondrites (QUE 99177 and MET 00426) and primitive interplanetary dust particles. In order to search for presolar sulfides, the meteorite was also mapped for S isotopes. However, no presolar sulfides were found, suggesting a maximum abundance of 2 ppm. The scarcity of presolar sulfides may be due to their much faster sputtering rate by cosmic rays compared to silicates.

  8. Petrologic evidence for collisional heating of chondritic asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    The identification of the mechanism(s) responsible for heating asteroids is among the major problems in planetary science. Because of difficulties with models of electromagnetic induction and the decay of short-lived radionuclides, it is worthwhile to evaluate the evidence for collisional heating. New evidence for localized impact heating comes from the high proportion of relict type-6 material among impact-melt-bearing ordinary chondrites (OC). This relict material was probably metamorphosed by residual heat within large craters. Olivine aggregates composed of faceted crystals with 120 deg triple junctions occur within the melted regions of the Chico and Rose City OC melt rocks; the olivine aggregates formed from shocked, mosaicized olivine grains that underwent contact metamorphism. Large-scale collisional heating is supoorted by the correlation in OC between petrologic type and shock stage; no other heating mechanism can readily account for this correlation. The occurrence of impact-melt-rock clasts in OC that have been metamorphosed along with their whole rocks indicates that some impact events preceded or accompanied thermal metamorphism. Such impacts events, occurring during or shortly after accretion, are probably responsible for substantially melting approximately 0.5% of OC. These events must have heated a larger percentage of OC to subsolidus temperatures sufficient to have caused significant metamorphism. If collisional heating is viable, then OC parent asteroids must have been large; large OC asteroids in the main belt may include those of the S(IV) spectral subtype. Collisional heating is inconsistent with layered ('onion-shell') structures in OC asteroids (wherein the degree of metamorphism increases with depth), but the evidence for such structures is weak. It seems likely that collisional heating played an important role in metamorphosing chondritic asteroids.

  9. Thermal and Impact History of the H Chondrite Parent Asteroid during Metamorphism: Constraints from Metallic Fe-Ni

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Edward R D; Goldstein, Joseph I; Wakita, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We have studied cloudy taenite, metallographic cooling rates, and shock effects in 30 H3-6 chondrites to elucidate the thermal and early impact history of the H chondrite parent body. We focused on H chondrites with Ar-Ar ages greater than 4.4 Gyr and unshocked and mildly shocked H chondrites, as strongly shocked chondrites with such old ages are very rare. Cooling rates for most H chondrites at 500 C are 10-50 C/Myr and do not decrease systematically with increasing petrologic type as predicted by the onion-shell model in which types 3 to 5 are arranged in concentric layers around a type 6 core. Some type 4 chondrites cooled slower than some type 6 chondrites and type 3 chondrites did not cool faster than other types, contrary to the onion-shell model. Cloudy taenite particle sizes, which range from 40 to 120 nm, are inversely correlated with metallographic cooling rates and show that the latter were not compromised by shock heating. The three H4 chondrites that were used to develop the onion-shell model, St...

  10. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  11. The 'Porky' Inclusion from the Axtell Carbonaceous Chondrite: A Hercynite-bearing Condensate with Large 48Ca and 50Ti Excesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillet, C.; Zinner, E.

    1995-09-01

    Only a few hercynite-rich refractory inclusions have been identified to date [1,2]. Porky (450 micrometers long) is an unusual CAI with texturally distinct regions and dominant intergrown oxide mineral phases [3]. The core is a symplectitic vermicular intergrowth of ubiquitous ferroan spinel and ilmenite. Inwards branching of ilmenite crystals and projecting fan-shaped hibonite from the borders suggest crystallization from a fast cooling melt. Three marginal regions are mineralogically identical to the core: two fine-grained areas with acicular corroded crystals contrast with an altered spinel area. The inclusion is entirely rimmed by yellow luminescing Al-diopside. Hibonite exhibits pale orange luminescence. Broad beam analyses reveal high FeO (22.5 wt %) and low CaO/Al2O3 (0.024) for the whole CAI [3]. Si, Al and Ti concentrations are very similar to those of CM inclusions. There are no significant chemical differences between the coarse-grained core and the fine-grained regions. Hibonite shows widely varying concentrations (in wt %) of TiO2 (1.5-6.8), MgO (1.2-3.6) and FeO (0.7-4.7). Spinel contains much FeO (20.5-27). Hercynite close to the border of the inclusion next to hibonite has high MgO (11 wt%) and small amounts of Cr2O3 (0.15-1.55) and V2O3 (0.1-0.3), implying a melt origin. The Al-rich, Si-poor composition indicates that Porky experienced higher temperatures than CV3 inclusions. The presence of Fe-rich mineral phases, the lack of metal grains, the relatively high NiO concentration (average = 0.25), and the orange luminescence of hibonite indicate formation or re-equilibration in an oxidizing environment. Trace element patterns are basically volatility-fractionated and mostly ultrarefractory-depleted but vary from a Group II pattern in hercynite (to a lesser extent in hibonite and diopside) to extreme excesses of the less refractory elements Nb, Eu, Tm and Yb in a fine-grained region (Fig. 1). These patterns indicate condensation from a UR-depleted gas at varying temperatures (highest for the core, lowest for the fine-grained regions) and under varying redox conditions and trace element compositions. The refractory trace elements measured in hercynite are likely to reside in ilmenite (the abundances in this phase would then be ~15 times higher than shown in Fig. 1 for hercynite). In contrast to large 48Ca and 50Ti depletions in hibonite-hercynite inclusion Lanc HH-1 [2], Porky shows extreme excesses in 48Ca (37.3+/-5.9 (2s) per mil in hibonite and 27.4+/-4.8 per mil in diopside) and 50Ti (~62 per mil in hibonite and ilmenite). No clear 26Mg excess and no Mg and Fe isotopic mass fractionation were detected. Fe isotopic ratios in hercynite are normal; the Allende inclusion EK1-4-1 thus remains the only object in which a large 58Fe excess is associated with 48Ca and 50Ti excesses [4]. References: [1] Brigham C. A. et al. (1986) LPSC XVII, 85-86. [2] Fahey A. J. et al. (1994) GCA, 58, 4779-4793. [3] Caillet C. (1994) Meteoritics, 29, 453-454. [4] V"lkening J. and Papanastassiou D. A. (1989) Astrophys. J., 347, L43-L46.

  12. Formation of Secondary Ca-Fe-Rich Assemblages in CV Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganino, C.; Libourel, G.

    2016-08-01

    Chondrites have multiplied evidences for metasomatic processes during the early solar system formation. Diversity in secondary Ca-Fe silicate provides information on T-X conditions and the open/closed-system behavior.

  13. First investigation of noble gases in the Dengli H3,8 chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Assonov, S. S.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Dengli (H3,8) meteorite, which weighs 243.5 g, is a find from the Karakum desert. It is a complex microbreccia containing unusual clasts which are more typical for regolithic breccias than for H-chondrites. Based on comparisons of Xe and Kr content and isotopic composition, the Dengli does not differ significantly from other H-chondrites. Its exposure age is 7.6 Ma. That is in agreement with common data for the exposure age (6.2 + 0.2 Ma) of 350 H-chondrites. Dengli's K/Ar age (4.01 Ga) coincides with the same ages of many other H-chondrites. Thus the Dengli is not regolithic breccia, and it probably formed during accretion of its parent body.

  14. Preservation of ancient impact ages on the R chondrite parent body: 40Ar/39Ar age of hornblende-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Morgan, L. E.

    2016-09-01

    The hornblende- and biotite-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840 is a rare kind of meteorite possibly containing outer solar system water stored during metamorphism or postshock annealing deep within an asteroid. Because little is known regarding its age and origin, we determined 40Ar/39Ar ages on hornblende-rich separates of the meteorite, and obtained plateau ages of 4340(±40) to 4380(±30) Ma. These well-defined plateau ages, coupled with evidence for postshock annealing, indicate this meteorite records an ancient shock event and subsequent annealing. The age of 4340-4380 Ma (or 4.34-4.38 Ga) for this and other previously dated R chondrites is much older than most impact events recorded by ordinary chondrites and points to an ancient event or events that predated the late heavy bombardment that is recorded in so many meteorites and lunar samples.

  15. Preservation of ancient impact ages on the R chondrite parent body: 40Ar/39Ar age of hornblende-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M. A.; Morgan, L. E.

    2016-07-01

    The hornblende- and biotite-bearing R chondrite LAP 04840 is a rare kind of meteorite possibly containing outer solar system water stored during metamorphism or postshock annealing deep within an asteroid. Because little is known regarding its age and origin, we determined 40Ar/39Ar ages on hornblende-rich separates of the meteorite, and obtained plateau ages of 4340(±40) to 4380(±30) Ma. These well-defined plateau ages, coupled with evidence for postshock annealing, indicate this meteorite records an ancient shock event and subsequent annealing. The age of 4340-4380 Ma (or 4.34-4.38 Ga) for this and other previously dated R chondrites is much older than most impact events recorded by ordinary chondrites and points to an ancient event or events that predated the late heavy bombardment that is recorded in so many meteorites and lunar samples.

  16. Noble gases in the Bells (C2) and Sharps (H3) chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadnik, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    The Bells and Sharps chondrites are of uncertain classification in virtue of their mineralogical and chemical peculiarities, prompting the present elemental and isotopic measurements of the noble gases in them, together with such quantities derivable from them as cosmogenic exposure and gas retention ages, as well as primordial gas contents. The radiogenic and, above all, the cosmogenic gases link Bells to the C2 group, while Sharps is found to lie in the second largest peak of the H-chondrite distribution.

  17. Super-chondritic Sm/Nd in Mars, Earth, and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, G.; Bourdon, B.; Halliday, A. N.; Quitté, G.

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the isotopic abundance of 142Nd in planetary materials reflect the chronology and mechanisms by which crustal reservoirs formed during or shortly after accretion. Interpretation of these differences assumes that the terrestrial planets have a composition identical to that of chondritic meteorites. The ca. 20 ppm difference in 142Nd/144Nd between chondrites and the Earth's upper mantle may thus indicate very early (Rotenberg, E., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 223, 267-282 (2004).

  18. Production of ferroan andesites by the experimental partial melting of an LL chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcguire, J. C.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    A partial melting experiment on the St. Severin (LL) chondrite produced a melt that was andesitic, having 54-60 wt% silica, at 1200 C and an oxygen fugacity of IW+2, two log units above the iron-wustite (IW) buffer. Under these same conditions, CV, CM, and L chondrites produced low-silica melts resembling angrites. This experimental study attempts to reproduce and explain this unusual result.

  19. Microporous carbonaceous adsorbents for CO2 separation via selective adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Selective adsorption of CO2 has important implications for many energy and environment-related processes, which require the separation of CO2 from other gases (e.g. N2 and CH4) with high uptakes and selectivity. The development of high-performance adsorbents is one of the most promising solutions to the success of these processes. The present review is focused on the state-of-the-art of carbon-based (carbonaceous) adsorbents, covering microporous inorganic carbons and microporous organic polymers, with emphasis on the correlation between their textural and compositional properties and their CO2 adsorption/separation performance. Special attention is given to the most recently developed materials that were not covered in previous reviews. We summarize various effective strategies (N-doping, surface functionalization, extra-framework ions, molecular design, and pore size engineering) for enhancing the CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity of carbonaceous adsorbents. Our discussion focuses on CO2/N2 separation and CO2/CH4 separation, while including an introduction to the methods and criteria used for evaluating the performance of the adsorbents. Critical issues and challenges regarding the development of high-performance adsorbents as well as some overlooked facts and misconceptions are also discussed, with the aim of providing important insights into the design of novel carbonaceous porous materials for various selective adsorption based applications. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. The structural evolution of carbonaceous material during metamorphism : a geothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyssac, O.; Goffe, B.; Brunet, F.; Bollinger, L.; Avouac, J.; Rouzaud, J.

    2003-12-01

    With increasing metamorphic temperature, the organic matter present in sedimentary rocks is progressively transformed into graphite (graphitization). The degree of organization of this carbonaceous material (CM) as characterized by Raman spectroscopy (RSCM), can be used as a geothermometer which yields the maximum temperature reached during the metamorphic cycle (Beyssac et al., 2002). We used this RSCM geothermometer to map the maximum metamorphic temperatures through the Lesser Himalaya (LH) in Nepal. This study provides a large dataset (80 samples) to estimate uncertainty of this method and to ascertain its reliability by comparison with conventional petrological investigations. We show that the RSCM geothermometer might be used to detect inter-samples temperature variations as small as 10° C or so, but absolute temperatures are only loosely determined to +/- 50° C due to the uncertainty on the calibration. This successful application of the RSCM geothermometer confirms that, at the timescale of regional metamorphism (several My), the transformation of CM is mainly controlled by temperature. However, laboratory investigations suggest that, in addition to temperature, pressure should also play a role (Beyssac et al. 2003). As a matter of fact, high degree of organizations encountered in natural CM cannot be reproduced in laboratory without pressure, even at temperatures as high as 3000° C. In addition to the data acquired on natural CM, we will discuss laboratory experiments performed up to 8 GPa which show that (1) a few kbar of hydrostatic pressure are required to initiate microtextural and subsequent structural transformations within CM and (2) the overall effect of increasing pressure is to speed up graphitization process. Beyssac, O., Goffe, B., Chopin, C., and Rouzaud, J.N., 2002, Raman spectra of carbonaceous material in metasediments: a new geothermometer. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 20, 859-871. Beyssac, O., Brunet, F., Petitet, J.P., Goffe, B

  1. Screening of carbonaceous nanoporous materials for capture of nerve agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for combined experimental and computational screening of candidate carbonaceous materials for capturing highly volatile nerve agents at ambient temperature using physisorption. Based on theoretical calculations of Henry constants and zero-coverage adsorption enthalpies for sarin and DMMP (its common stimulant) adsorbed in model slit-shaped carbon pores at 298 K, we found the following. Slit-shaped carbon pores with pore width ~0.5 nm are optimal for agent adsorption due to strong confinement of adsorbed molecules. Agent adsorption enthalpy at zero coverage computed for optimal pore width is very high and reaches ~83 kJ mol(-1). Widening of pore width above ~1 nm results in a significant decrease of the Henry constant and zero-coverage adsorption enthalpy (~44 kJ mol(-1)). Polydispersity of studied candidate carbonaceous materials strongly affects adsorption capacity for DMMP under the operating conditions. The optimal carbonaceous adsorbent, pitch-based P7 activated carbon fiber, adsorbed ~100 μg g(-1) DMMP at 0.03 μg m(-3). Commercial Norit activated carbon adsorbed only ~20 μg g(-1) DMMP at 0.03 μg m(-3). Surprisingly, a small shift of the pore size distribution towards wider micropores has a great impact on agent adsorption. Because the adsorption enthalpies computed at zero coverage weakly dependent on pore size, the heat released during agent adsorption is similar for all studied candidate adsorbents (i.e.~55-60 kJ mol(-1)). PMID:23165364

  2. Source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol in southern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Genberg

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A one-year study was performed at the Vavihill background station in southern Sweden to estimate the anthropogenic contribution to the carbonaceous aerosol. Weekly samples of the particulate matter PM10 were collected on quartz filters, and the amounts of organic carbon, elemental carbon, radiocarbon (14C and levoglucosan were measured. This approach enabled source apportionment of the total carbon in the PM10 fraction using the concentration ratios of the sources. The sources considered in this study were emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, as well as biogenic sources. During the summer, the carbonaceous aerosol mass was dominated by compounds of biogenic origin (82 %, which are associated with biogenic primary and secondary organic aerosols. During the winter months, biomass combustion (38 % and fossil fuel combustion (33 % were the main contributors to the carbonaceous aerosol. Elemental carbon concentrations in winter were about twice as large as during summer, and can be attributed to biomass combustion, probably from domestic wood burning. The contribution of fossil fuels to elemental carbon was stable throughout the year, although the fossil contribution to organic carbon increased during the winter. Thus, the organic aerosol originated mainly from natural sources during the summer and from anthropogenic sources during the winter. The result of this source apportionment was compared with results from the EMEP model. The model and measurements were generally consistent for total atmospheric organic carbon, however, the contribution of the sources varied substantially. E.g. the biomass burning contributions of OC were underestimated by the model by a factor of 8.2 compared to the measurements.

  3. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identity and ambient mass concentrations of radiatively important carbonaceous aerosols were measured for a boreal forest prescribed burn conducted in northern Ontario, CAN in August 1989. Nonsize-segregated airborne particles were collected for smoldering-fire and full-fire conditions using a helicopter sampling platform. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were measured. Smoke plume mass concentrations of the OC and EC particles were greatest for full-fire conditions and had ranges of 1.560 to 2.160 mg/m-1 (OC) and 0.120 to 0.160 mg/m-3 (EC) with OC:EC ratios of 10 to 18, respectively. Smoldering fire conditions showed smoke plume OC and EC levels of 0.570--1.030 mg/m-3 (OC) and 0.006--0.050 mg/m-3 (EC) and much higher ratios of OC:EC (21 to 95). These aerosol data indicate the formation of EC particles is greatest during full-fire combustion of boreal forest material relative to smoldering combustion. However, EC particles comprise a minor fraction of the particulate carbon smoke aerosols for both full-fire and smoldering conditions; the major component of carbonaceous smoke aerosols emitted during the prescribed burn is OC. Overall, the OC and EC in-plume smoke aerosol data show nonuniform production of these particles during various stages of the prescribed burn, and major differences in the type of carbonaceous aerosol that is generated (OC versus EC)

  4. Characteristics and sources of carbonaceous aerosols from Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, J.-J.; Zhu, C.-S.; Tie, X.-X.; Geng, F.-H.; Xu, H.-M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Wang, G.-H.; Han, Y.-M.; Ho, K.-F.

    2013-01-01

    An intensive investigation of carbonaceous PM2.5 and TSP (total suspended particles) from Pudong (China) was conducted as part of the MIRAGE-Shanghai (Megacities Impact on Regional and Global Environment) experiment in 2009. Data for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), organic species, including C17 to C40 n-alkanes and 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and stable carbon isotopes OC (δ13COC) and EC (δ13CEC) were used to evaluate the aerosols' temporal variations and identify presumptive sources. High OC/EC ratios indicated a large fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); high char/soot ratios indicated stronger contributions to EC from motor vehicles and coal combustion than biomass burning. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated that much of the SOA was produced via coal combustion. Isotope abundances (δ13COC = -24.5 ± 0.8‰ and δ13CEC = -25.1 ± 0.6‰) indicated that fossil fuels were the most important source for carbonaceous PM2.5 (particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter), with lesser impacts from biomass burning and natural sources. An EC tracer system and isotope mass balance calculations showed that the relative contributions to total carbon from coal combustion, motor vehicle exhaust, and SOA were 41%, 21%, and 31%; other primary sources such as marine, soil and biogenic emissions contributed 7%. Combined analyses of OC and EC, n-alkanes and PAHs, and stable carbon isotopes provide a new way to apportion the sources of carbonaceous particles.

  5. Comets, carbonaceous meteorites, and the origin of the biosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    r. b. Hoover

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Biosphere is considered to represent the Earth's crust, atmosphere, oceans, and ice caps and the living organisms that survive within this habitat. This paper considers the significance of comets and carbonaceous meteorites to the origin and evolution of the Biosphere and presents new Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM images of indigenous microfossils in the Orgueil and Murchison meteorites. The discovery of microbial extremophiles in deep crustal rocks, hydrothermal vents and ancient ice has established that the biosphere is far more extensive than previously recognized. Chemical and molecular biomarkers and microfossils in Archaean rocks indicate that life appeared very early on the primitive Earth and the origin of the biosphere is closely linked with the emergence of life. The role of comets, carbonaceous meteorites, interstellar dust and asteroids in the delivery of water, organics and prebiotic chemicals to Earth during the Hadean (4.5–3.8 Ga period of heavy bombardment has become more widely recognized. Spacecraft observations of the chemical compositions and characteristics of the nuclei of several comets (Halley, Borrelly, Wild 2, and Tempel 1 have established that comets contain complex organic chemicals; that water is the predominant volatile; and that high temperatures (~400 K can be reached on the black (albedo~0.03 nuclei when near perihelion. The microscopic dust particles in the Tempel 1 ejecta are similar in size to the particulates of the Orgueil meteorite and evidence is mounting that comets may represent the parent bodies of the CI meteorites. Impact craters and pinnacles on comet Wild 2 suggest a thick crust. Episodic outbursts and jets of Halley, Borrelly, Wild 2 and Tempel 1 near perihelion indicate that localized regimes of liquid water may periodically exist beneath the thick crust of many comets. This increases the possibility that microbial life might survive in comets and therefore the

  6. Liquefaction of solid carbonaceous material with catalyst recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Avinash; Greene, Marvin I.

    1992-01-01

    In the two stage liquefaction of a carbonaceous solid such as coal wherein coal is liquefied in a first stage in the presence of a liquefaction solvent and the first stage effluent is hydrogenated in the presence of a supported hydrogenation catalyst in a second stage, catalyst which has been previously employed in the second stage and comminuted to a particle size distribution equivalent to 100% passing through U.S. 100 Mesh, is passed to the first stage to improve the overall operation.

  7. Modal mineralogy of CI and CI-like chondrites by X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A. J.; Schofield, P. F.; Howard, K. T.; Russell, S. S.

    2015-09-01

    The CI chondrites are some of the most hydrated meteorites available to study, making them ideal samples with which to investigate aqueous processes in the early Solar System. Here, we have used position-sensitive-detector X-ray diffraction (PSD-XRD) to quantify the abundance of minerals in bulk samples of the CI chondrite falls Alais, Orgueil and Ivuna, and the Antarctic CI-like chondrites Y-82162 and Y-980115. We find that Alais, Orgueil and Ivuna are dominated by a mixed serpentine/saponite phyllosilicate (81-84 vol%), plus minor magnetite (6-10%), sulphides (4-7%) and carbonates (500 °C. Similarly, Y-980115 contains disordered serpentine/saponite (71 vol%), sulphide (19%), olivine (8%) and magnetite (2%), confirming that it too is a thermally metamorphosed CI-like chondrite. We suggest that the CI-like chondrites are derived from a different parent body than the CI chondrites, which underwent short-lived thermal metamorphism due to impacts and/or solar radiation.

  8. Some refractory and volatile element chemistry of CaS in enstatite chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永亨; Paul H.Benoit

    1996-01-01

    INAA data for REE, Sc, Se, Br and Zn in CaS extracted from 5 enstatite chondrites (Qingzhen EH3, St. Marks EH5, Atlanta EL6, Hvittis EL6 and Pillistfer EL6) are reported. The results indicate that the REE abundances in CaS from unequilibrated enstatite chondrite, Qingzhen, are much higher than that from equilibrated ones. Similarly, the abundances of Sc, Se, Br and Zn in CaS from Qingzhen are higher than that in CaS grains from equilibrated chondrites, revealing that CaS is a previous condensate and is not simple residues of an evaporative process. Secondly, metamorphism has caused the redistribution of the trace elements among the minerals in enstatite chondrites, and this metamorphic fractionation reflects the differences from element volatilities and chemical properties. The REE patterns of CaS of enstatite chondrites and aubrites could not explain that aubrites were derived from known enstatite chondrites by igneous processing. And depleted europium in metamorphism and igneous process may be carried

  9. Partial melting of ordinary chondrites: Lost City (H) and St. Severin (LL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurewicz, Amy J. G.; Jones, John H.; Weber, Egon T.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Eucrites and diogenites are examples of asteroidal basalts and orthopyroxenites, respectively. As they are found intermingled in howardites, which are inferred to be regolith breccias, eucrites and diogenites are thought to be genetically related. But the details of this relationship and of their individual origins remain controversial. Work by Jurewicz et al. showed that 1170-1180 C partial melts of the (anhydrous) Murchison (CM) chondrite have major element compositions extremely similar to primitive eucrites, such as Sioux County. However, the MnO contents of these melts were about half that of Sioux County, a problem for the simple partial melting model. In addition, partial melting of Murchison could not produce diogenites, because residual pyroxenes in the Murchison experiments were too Fe- and Ca-rich and were minor phases at all but the lowest temperatures. A parent magma for diogenites needs an expanded low-calcium pyroxene field. In their partial melting study of an L6 chondrite, Kushiro and Mysen found that ordinary chondrites did have an expanded low-Ca pyroxene field over that of CV chondrites (i.e., Allende), probably because ordinary chondrites have lower Mg/Si ratios. This study expands that of both Kushiro and Mysen and Jurewicz et al. to the Lost City (H) and St. Severin (LL) chondrites at temperatures ranging from 1170 to 1325 C, at an fO2 of one log unit below the iron-wuestite buffer (IW-1).

  10. The abundance of presolar grains in comet 81P/WILD 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Ong, W. J. [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Kearsley, Anton T. [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, Mark J., E-mail: floss@wustl.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    We carried out hypervelocity impact experiments in order to test the possibility that presolar grains are preferentially destroyed during impact of the comet 81P/Wild 2 samples into the Stardust Al foil collectors. Powdered samples of the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 were shot at 6 km s{sup -1} into Stardust flight spare Al foil. Craters from the Acfer 094 test shots, as well as ones from the actual Stardust cometary foils, were analyzed by NanoSIMS ion imaging to search for presolar grains. We found two O-rich presolar grains and two presolar SiC grains in the Acfer 94 test shots, with measured abundances in the foils of 4 and 5 ppm, respectively, significantly lower than the amount of presolar grains actually present in this meteorite. Based on known abundances of these phases in Acfer 094, we estimate a loss of over 90% of the O-rich presolar grains; the fraction of SiC lost is lower, reflecting its higher resistance to destruction. In the Stardust cometary foils, we identified four O-rich presolar grains in 5000 {mu}m{sup 2} of crater residue. Including a presolar silicate grain found by Leitner et al., the overall measured abundance of O-rich presolar grains in Wild 2 is {approx}35 ppm. No presolar SiC has been found in the foil searches, although one was identified in the aerogel samples. Based on the known abundances of presolar silicates and oxides in Acfer 094, we can calculate the pre-impact abundances of these grains in the Stardust samples. Our calculations indicate initial abundances of 600-830 ppm for O-rich presolar grains. Assuming a typical diameter of {approx}300 nm for SiC suggests a presolar SiC abundance of {approx}45 ppm. Analyses of the Stardust samples indicated early on that recognizable presolar components were not particularly abundant, an observation that was contrary to expectations that the cometary material would, like interplanetary dust particles, be dominated by primitive materials from the early solar system

  11. Enantiomeric and Isotopic Analysis of Sugar Derivatives in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George; Asiyo, Cynthia; Turk, Kendra; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several classes of organic compounds are found in carbonaceous meteorites including amino acids, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, purines, and pyrimidines. Such compounds are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets and may have played a role in the origin of life. Likewise, sugar derivatives are critical to all known lifeforms. Recent analyses of the Murchison and Murray carbonaceous meteorites revealed a diverse suite of such derivatives, i.e., sugar alcohols, and sugar acids. This presentation will focus primarily on the analysis of individual sugar acids - their enantiomeric and isotopic composition. Analysis of these compounds may reveal the nature of past (or present) meteoritic sugars themselves. For example, if parent sugars decomposed (by well-known mechanisms) to give the present acids, were their enantiomeric ratios preserved? Combined with other evidence, the enantiomeric composition of such compounds as glyceric acid and (especially) rare acids may help to answer such questions. C-13 and D isotope analysis of meteoritic sugar alcohols (glycerol, threitol, ribitol, etc.) as a group revealed that they were indigenous to the meteorite. Preliminary C-13 analysis of glyceric acid shows that it is also extraterrestrial.

  12. A new extraction process of carbonaceous refractory gold concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Yu-qun

    2005-01-01

    A new hydrometallurgical process for a carbonaceous refractory gold concentrate at ambient temperature and pressure was presented, including grinding-leaching, intensified alkaline leaching(IAL), thiosulfate leaching and cementation by zinc powder. The experimental results show that the grinding-leaching and intensified alkaline leaching process result in the selective oxidation of arsenopyrite and pyrite. The oxidation ratio of As is 96.6%, and 46.7 % for S. The total consumption of NaOH in alkaline leaching is only 28 % of that theoretically calculated under the conditions of full oxidization for the same amount of arsenopyrite and pyrite transforming into arsenates and sulfates, and 83. 6 % of gold is synchro-dissoluted by thiosulfate self-generated during pretreatment. Since the carbonaceous matter in concentrate possesses a strong capability of preg robbing, the cyanidation process is not suitable for the extraction of gold after pretreatment. However, the gold leaching rate by thiosulfate leaching for 24 h is increased to 91.7% from 0 - 3.2% by ultra-fine grinding without the pretreatment. The recovery of gold by zinc cementation gets to 99.6 %. Due to the thiosulfate self-generated during alkaline leaching, the reagent addition in thiosulfate leaching afterwards is lower than the normal one.

  13. Carbonaceous aerosols from different tropical biomass burning sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachier, Hélène; Brémond, Marie-Pierre; Buat-Ménard, Patrick

    1989-08-01

    FOLLOWING a repetitive pattern, biomass burning affects the intertropical belt on a continental scale during the dry season1. The importance of these anthropogenic activities with regard to carbonaceous-component emissions into the global atmosphere is now well recognized2-4. It has been suggested that large injections of black carbon aerosols from the Tropics are of potential importance for the radiative and chemical balance of the troposphere5-10. Studies on carbonaceous aerosols have indicated that, on an annual basis, the intensity of the emissions from tropical biomass burning could compare with that of emissions from fossil-fuel burning in industrial countries7,8. Also, results from combustion chamber experiments have determined the important range of the emission factor for both the organic and the black carbon components of the aerosol1-16. Following on from our earlier studies on total atmospheric particulate carbon (Ct) and isotopic composition (δ13C) (ref. 2), we now present new data on the black carbon content (Cb) of atmospheric particles sampled during the biomass-burning season in the wooden savannah of the Ivory Coast. The Cb/Ct ratio is generally lower than expected and highly variable. This variability indicates that there are drastic changes in source apportionment, which from our isotope studies may be ascribed to the variety of vegetation fuel and also to the mode of combustion. Therefore the Cb/Ct ratio can potentially discriminate biomass-burning emissions from different tropical ecosystems.

  14. Metal-free carbonaceous electrocatalysts and photocatalysts for water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, You; Kraft, Markus; Xu, Rong

    2016-05-31

    Water splitting driven by sunlight or renewable resource-derived electricity has attracted great attention for sustainable production of hydrogen from water. Current research interest in this field is focused on the development of earth-abundant photo- or electrocatalytic materials with high activity and long-term stability for hydrogen and/or oxygen evolution reactions. Due to their unique properties and characteristics, carbon and related carbon-based materials show great potential to replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts in water splitting technology. This tutorial review summarizes the recent significant progress in the fabrication and application of metal-free carbonaceous materials as photo- or electrocatalysts for water splitting. Synthetic strategies and applications of various carbonaceous materials, including graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as well as other forms of carbon-containing materials, for electrochemical or photochemical water splitting are presented, accompanied by a discussion of the key scientific issues and prospects for the future development of metal-free photo- and electrocatalysts. PMID:27094875

  15. Origins of interstellar and solar system: Carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-10-01

    Carbon is a crucial atom in cosmochemistry. It is well-established that carbon is synthesized in stellar interiors after the main sequence, is ejected by red giants as small carbonaceous grains during their 'carbon star' phase, resides in the interstellar medium, and was later incorporated into the solar system. The mechanisms of carbon grain formation and later chemical processing are complex because, with only small thermodynamic differences, carbon can take on a bewildering variety of forms: diamond; oxides; carbides; graphite; aliphatic hydrocarbons; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's); fullerenes; amorphous carbon; and other compounds. These are evidence for many of the forms of carbon found in astronomical observations. We seek to understand the possible astrophysical sites and conditions of the origins of different forms of carbon by combining state-of-the-art capabilities of carbon chemistry with astrophysical modeling. The work is a collaboration between Prof. Frenklach, a leading carbon materials scientist with both laboratory and computer modeling expertise and Prof. Feigelson, an astrophysicist with interests in star formation. The largest effort under this grant was devoted to developing this concept into a comprehensive quantitative model. In addition to explaining the astronomical properties of red giants producing carbonaceous grains, our model also can incorporate recent meteoritic findings. Finally, our induced nucleation grain formation model provides a natural explanation for the widespread presence of PAH emission bands in the Galactic interstellar medium. A brief synopsis of other activities sponsored under this grant and a list of publications from this grant is included.

  16. Ethanol and other oxygenateds from low grade carbonaceous resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Anhydrous ethanol and other oxygenates of C2 up can be produced quite competitively from low grade carbonaceous resources in high yield via gasification, methanol synthesis, carbonylation of methanol an hydrogenation consecutively. Gas phase carbonylation of methanol to form methyl acetate is the key step for the whole process. Methyl acetate can be produced very selectively in one step gas phase reaction on a fixed bed column reactor with GHSV over 5,000. The consecutive hydrogenation of methyl or ethyl acetate produce anhydrous ethanol in high purity. It is also attempted to co-produce methanol and DME in IGCC, in which low grade carbonaceous resources are used as energy sources, and the surplus power and pre-power gas can be stored in liquid form of methanol and DME during base load time. Further integration of C2 up oxygenate production with IGCC can improve its economics. The attempt of above extensive technology integration can generate significant industrial profitability as well as reduce the environmental complication related with massive energy consumption.

  17. Magnetite in the unequilibrated CK chondrites: Implications for metamorphism and new insights into the relationship between the CV and CK chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Tasha L.; Gross, Juliane; Ivanova, Marina A.; Runyon, Simone E.; Bruck, Andrea M.

    2016-09-01

    Bulk isotopic and elemental compositions of CV and CK chondrites have led to the suggestion that both originate from the same asteroid. It has been argued that magnetite compositions also support this model; however, magnetite has been studied almost exclusively in the equilibrated (type 4-6) CKs. Magnetite in seven unequilibrated CKs analyzed here is enriched in MgO, TiO2, and Al2O3 relative to the equilibrated CKs, suggesting that magnetite compositions are affected by metamorphism. Magnetite in CKs is compositionally distinct from CVs, particularly in abundances of Cr2O3, NiO, and TiO2. Although there are minor similarities between CV and equilibrated CK chondrite magnetite, this is contrary to what we would expect if the CVs and CKs represent a single metamorphic sequence. CV magnetite should resemble CK3 magnetite, as both were metamorphosed to type 3 conditions. Oxygen fugacities and temperatures of CVox and CK chondrites are also difficult to reconcile using existing CV-CK parent body models. Mineral chemistries, which eliminate issues of bulk sample heterogeneity, provide a reliable alternative to techniques that involve a small amount of sample material. CV and CK chondrite magnetite has distinct compositional differences that cannot be explained by metamorphism.

  18. Mineralized Remains of Morphotypes of Filamentous Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    ) investigations of freshly fractured interior surfaces of carbonaceous meteorites, terrestrial rocks, and recent microbial extremophiles and filamentous cyanobacteria. These studies have resulted in the detection in a several carbonaceous meteorites of the mineralized remains of a wide variety of complex filamentous trichomic microorganisms. These embedded forms are consistent in size and microstructure with well-preserved morphotypes of mat- forming filamentous trichomic cyanobacteria and the degraded remains of microfibrils of cyanobacterial sheaths. We present the results of comparative imaging studies and EDAX elemental analyses of recent cyanobacteria (e.g. Calothrix, Oscillatoria, and Lyngbya) that are similar in size, morphology and microstructure to morphotypes found embedded in meteorites. EDAX elemental studies reveal that forms found in carbonaceous meteorites often have highly carbonized sheaths in close association with permineralized filaments, trichomes and microbial cells. Ratios of critical bioelements (C:O, C:N, C:P, and C:S) reveal dramatic differences between microfossils in Earth rocks and meteorites and in filaments, trichomes, hormogonia, and cells of recent cyanobacteria.

  19. Cosmic-ray exposure ages of the ordinary chondrites and their significance for parent body stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, J.; Schultz, L.

    1981-01-01

    Improved exposure ages are derived for 201 H, 203 L, and 38 LL chondrites in an effort to understand the characteristics of the chondrite parent body. The Ne-21 exposure ages were calculated from literature values taking into account shielding differences, a trapped component and radiogenic He. The exposure age distributions show clear peaks at 4.5 and 20 million years for the H chondrites, while the Ls and LLs appear more as a continuous series of intermediate peaks which may be modeled by at least six peaks between 1 and 35 million years in the case of L chondrites. The observations that every petrological type occurs in each large peak and contain solar wind gases suggest that the parent bodies have been fragmented and reassembled into a megabreccia. The H meteorites are proposed to represent the surface layer of a body with a substantial, active regolith as indicated by the relatively high abundances of solar gases. The L chondrites, on the other hand, are attributed to a parent body that was fragmented by collision about 500 million years ago.

  20. FIB-TEM Investigations of Fe-NI-Sulfides in the CI Chondrites Alais and Orgueil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Lauretta, D. S.; Zega, T. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    The CI chondrites are primitive meteorites with bulk compositions matching the solar photosphere for all but the lightest elements. They have been extensively aqueously altered, and are composed primarily of fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix material which is host to carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and minor amounts of olivine and pyroxene. The alteration, while extensive, is heterogeneous. For example, CI-chondrite cubanite and carbonate grains differ on mm to sub-mm scales, demonstrating multiple aqueous episodes. CI-chondrite variability is also evidenced by degree of brecciation, abundance and size of coarse-grained phyllosilicates, olivine and pyroxene abundance, as well as Ni-content and size of sulfide grains. Our previous work revealed Orgueil sulfide grains with variable Ni-contents, metal:S ratios, crystal structures and textures. We continue to explore the variability of CI-chondrite pyrrhotite (Po, (FeNi)1-xS) and pentlandite (Pn, (Fe,Ni)9S8) grains. We investigate the microstructure of sulfides within and among CI-chondrite meteorites in order to place constraints on the conditions under which they formed.

  1. On thermodynamics of methane+carbonaceous materials adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Kazi Afzalur

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the theoretical frameworks for the thermodynamic quantities namely the heat of adsorption, specific heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy for the adsorption of methane onto various carbonaceous materials. The proposed theoretical frameworks are developed from the rigor of thermodynamic property surfaces of a single component adsorbate-adsorbent system and by incorporating the micropore filling theory approach, where the effect of adsorbed phase volume is considered. The abovementioned thermodynamic properties are quantitatively evaluated from the experimental uptake data for methane adsorption onto activated carbons such as Maxsorb III at temperatures ranging from 120 to 350 K and pressures up to 25 bar. Employing the proposed thermodynamic approaches, this paper shows the thermodynamic maps of the charge and discharge processes of adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage system for understanding the behaviors of natural gas in ANG vessel. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. On the carbonaceous carriers of IR plateau and continuum emission

    CERN Document Server

    Papoular, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the molecular origins of plateaus and continuum underlying IR and FIR bands emitted by compact nebulae, especially proto-planetary nebulae. Computational organic chemistry codes are used to deliver the vibrational integrated band intensities of various large, typical carbonaceous structures. These spectra are composed of a rather continuous distribution of weak modes from which emerge the fingerprints. The 6 to 18-mu region is interspersed with a great many weak lines, to which the plateaus are assigned. Similarly, the far IR spectrum is ascribed to the phonon (skeletal) spectrum which is readily identified beyond 18 mu. The absorptivities and absorption cross-sections per interstellar H atom deduced from these spectra are comparable with those of laboratory dust analogs and astronomical measurements, respectively. Moreover, the 5-35 mu spectra of two typical Proto-Planetary Nebula were reasonably well simulated with combinations of molecules containing functional groups which carry the 21...

  3. Proton catalysis with active carbons and partially pyrolyzed carbonaceous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. V. Strelko; S. S. Stavitskaya; Yu. I. Gorlov

    2014-01-01

    The development of environmentally friendly solid acid catalysts is a priority task. Highly oxidized activated carbon and their ion-substituted (saline) forms are effective proton transfer catalysts in esterification, hydrolysis, and dehydration, and thus are promising candidates as solid acid cata-lysts. Computations by the ab initio method indicated the cause for the enchanced acidity of the carboxylic groups attached to the surface of highly oxidized carbon. The synthesis of phosphorilated carbon was considered, and the proton transfer reactions catalyzed by them in recent studies were analyzed. The development of an amorphous carbon acid catalyst comprising polycyclic carbonaceous (graphene) sheets with-SO3H,-COOH and phenolic type OH-groups was carried out. These new catalysts were synthesized by partial pyrolysis and subsequent sulfonation of carbohydrates, polymers, and other organic compounds. Their high catalytic activities in proton transfere reactions including the processing of bio-based raw materials was demonsrated.

  4. Adsorption of dyes onto carbonaceous materials produced from coffee grounds by microwave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Mizuho; Kawasaki, Naohito; Nakamura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Kazuoki; Kabayama, Mineaki; Tamura, Takamichi; Tanada, Seiki

    2002-10-01

    Organic wastes have been burned for reclamation. However, they have to be recycled and reused for industrial sustainable development. Carbonaceous materials were produced from coffee grounds by microwave treatment. There are many phenolic hydroxyl and carboxyl groups on the surface of carbonaceous materials. The base consumption of the carbonaceous materials was larger than that of the commercially activated carbon. The carbonaceous materials produced from coffee grounds were applied to the adsorbates for the removal of basic dyes (methylene blue and gentian violet) in wastewater. This result indicated that the adsorption of dyes depended upon the surface polar groups on the carbonaceous materials. Moreover, the Freundlich constants of isotherms for the adsorption of methylene blue and gentian violet onto the carbonaceous materials produced from coffee grounds were greater than those for adsorption onto activated carbon or ceramic activated carbon. The interaction was greatest between the surface or porosity of the carbonaceous materials and methylene blue and gentian violet. The microwave treatment would be useful for the carbonization of organic wastes to save energy. PMID:12702420

  5. In situ growth of copper nanocrystals from carbonaceous microspheres with electrochemical glucose sensing properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: In situ growth of copper nanoparticles from hydrothermal copper-containing carbonaceous microspheres was induced by annealing or electron beam irradiation. Obtained micro-nano carbon/copper composite microspheres show electrochemical glucose sensing properties. - Highlights: • We synthesized carbonaceous microspheres containing non-nanoparicle copper species through a hydrothermal route. • By annealing or electron beam irradiation, copper nanoparticles would form from the carbonaceous microspheres in situ. • By controlling the annealing temperature, particle size of copper could be controlled in the range of 50–500 nm. • The annealed carbon/copper hierarchical composite microspheres were used to fabricate an electrochemical glucose sensor. - Abstract: In situ growth of copper nanocrystals from carbon/copper microspheres was observed in a well-controlled annealing or an electron beam irradiation process. Carbonaceous microspheres containing copper species with a smooth appearance were yielded by a hydrothermal synthesis using copper nitrate and ascorbic acid as reactants. When annealing the carbonaceous microspheres under inert atmosphere, copper nanoparticles were formed on carbon microspheres and the copper particle sizes can be increased to a range of 50–500 nm by altering the heating temperature. Similarly, in situ formation of copper nanocrystals from these carbonaceous microspheres was observed on the hydrothermal product carbonaceous microspheres with electron beam irradiation in a vacuum transmission electron microscopy chamber. The carbon/copper composite microspheres obtained through annealing were used to modify a glassy carbon electrode and tested as an electrochemical glucose sensor

  6. Contrasting Early and Late Shock Effects on the L Chondrite Parent Body: Evidence from Ar Ages and Olivine Microstructures for Two Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, A. M.; Clay, P. L.; Hugo, R.; Joy, K. H.; Busemann, H.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss Ar age and olivine microstructure data for two L6 chondrites that provide a case study of contrasting shock effects in similar chondritic materials deformed in different epochs and under different conditions.

  7. Chondritic xenon in the Earth’s mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Antonio; Avice, Guillaume; Burnard, Peter G.; Füri, Evelyn; Marty, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Noble gas isotopes are powerful tracers of the origins of planetary volatiles, and the accretion and evolution of the Earth. The compositions of magmatic gases provide insights into the evolution of the Earth’s mantle and atmosphere. Despite recent analytical progress in the study of planetary materials and mantle-derived gases, the possible dual origin of the planetary gases in the mantle and the atmosphere remains unconstrained. Evidence relating to the relationship between the volatiles within our planet and the potential cosmochemical end-members is scarce. Here we show, using high-precision analysis of magmatic gas from the Eifel volcanic area (in Germany), that the light xenon isotopes identify a chondritic primordial component that differs from the precursor of atmospheric xenon. This is consistent with an asteroidal origin for the volatiles in the Earth’s mantle, and indicates that the volatiles in the atmosphere and mantle originated from distinct cosmochemical sources. Furthermore, our data are consistent with the origin of Eifel magmatism being a deep mantle plume. The corresponding mantle source has been isolated from the convective mantle since about 4.45 billion years ago, in agreement with models that predict the early isolation of mantle domains. Xenon isotope systematics support a clear distinction between mid-ocean-ridge and continental or oceanic plume sources, with chemical heterogeneities dating back to the Earth’s accretion. The deep reservoir now sampled by the Eifel gas had a lower volatile/refractory (iodine/plutonium) composition than the shallower mantle sampled by mid-ocean-ridge volcanism, highlighting the increasing contribution of volatile-rich material during the first tens of millions of years of terrestrial accretion.

  8. CR chondrites: Shock, aqueous alteration and terrestrial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    CR chondrite are a group asteroidal meteorites, whose importance lies in the exotic organic and presolar material [1] found in its most pristine members and in the broad range of alteration features represented in the remaining specimens in this group [2]. This FE-SEM, EMPA, FIB/TEM study takes advantage of the CR's mineralogical diversity to define different trends of secondary alteration, by comparing the CR3s to the Antarctic CRs: MIL 07525, MIL 07513, GRA 06100, LAP 04516, GRO 03116, GRO 95577, and EET 96259. Collisions and subsequent annealing have affected MIL 07513, GRA 06100, and GRO 03116. Shock stages are often assigned based on progressive changes in the textures of olivines and feldspars. However, the large olivines in shocked CRs do not appear to record these process. Opaques, on the other hand, preserve hallmark signatures of impacts, such as crystalline metal/sulfide veins. Opaque nodules in MIL 07513, GRA 06100, GRO 03116 consist of intergrowths of μm-sub μm FeNi-rich metal, kamacite, Fe-sulfides, Fe-oxides, nm-sized metallic Cu and CuFe (~85 wt.% Cu, 14 wt.% Fe ± Floss et al. 2009. Ap. J. 697: 1242-1255. [2] Abreu N. M. 2007. [3] Tomeoka K. & Buseck P. R. 1988. GCA 52: 1627-1640. [4] Tomeoka K. & Buseck P. R. 1985. GCA 49: 21-49-2163. [5] Rubin A. et al. 2007. GCA 71: 2361-2382. Acknowledgements: Funded by NNX11AH10G grant and conducted at Penn State and ARES-JSC. Meteorite kindly pro-vided by the JSC Antarctic meteorite curators.

  9. Pyrolysis of carbonaceous particles and properties of Carbonaceous-g-Poly (acrylic acid-co-acrylamide superabsorbent polymer for agricultural applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazali S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilisation of fertilizer and water are very important in determining the production of agriculture nowadays. The excessive use of fertilizer in plantation somehow could leads to environmental pollution. The present study reported a synthesis of controlled release water retention (CRWR fertilizer coating with superabsorbent polymer (SAPs. Superabsorbent polymer (SAPs are polymers that have ability to absorb and retain large amounts of water relative to their own mass. The presence of coating layer of SAPs on fertilizer granules was believed could reduce excessive used of fertilizer by controlling their dissolution rates and also reduce the environmental pollution. In this study, the effect on the addition of carbonaceous filler in SAPs on the water absorbency was also be compared with control SAPs (without carbonaceous particles. In this study, the carbonaceous filler were obtained from pyrolysis process of empty fruit bunch (EFB biomass. The synthesized of SAPs and carbonaceous-SAPs were carried out via solution polymerization technique by using monomer of poly(acrylic acid (AA, acrylamide (AM, cross linker, methylene bisacrylamide (MBA and initiator, ammonium peroxodisulfate (APS that partially neutralized with sodium hydroxide (NaOH. The CRWR fertilizer was later be prepared by coated the fertilizer granule with SAPs and carbonaceous-SAPs. The water absorbency, morphology and the bonding formation of both CRWR fertilizer were investigated by using tea-beg method, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometer (FTIR, respectively. Moreover, the water retention studies was conducted in order to investigate the efficiency of CRWR coated with SAP and carbonaceous-SAP in retaining the water content in different soil (organic and top soil. Based on the results, the CRWR fertilizer that was coated with carbonaceous-SAP had higher water absorbency value than the CRWR fertilizer without carbonaceous-SAP. Meanwhile

  10. Sepctral Reflectance of Recently Fallen Chondrites and Some Igneous Rocks in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文祝; 高来之

    1991-01-01

    Polarization and radiation measurements and microwave studies show that the planets and the great majority of asteroids in the solar system are covered by soils similar to regolith on the moon surface.The soils repesent the composition of the asteroids and the geological elements of the planets. The spectral reflectance shows a tendency of decreasing from near ultraviolet,visible to near-infrared in order of LL→L→H→H with increasing Fe0/Fet rato and toward to absorption for Jilin,Xinyang and Zanoyang ordinary chondrites and Qinzhen enstatite chondrite recently fallen in China,The same chemical group of meteorites feature deeper absorption valleys with increasing metamorphic grade.The spectal reflectance of igneous rocks varies from strong to what is like that of H-group chondrites in order of acid→basic→ultrabasic rocks.

  11. Gradistic vs. Cladistic Views in the Classification of Chondrites: The (L,H) Dichotomy and the Missing L/LL Precursors (NIPR Statistics VI.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, B.; Holba, A.; Bérczi, Sz.

    1999-03-01

    Chondritic parent body evolutionary trends were projected -- on the basis of the NIPR Antarctic dataset (Yanai et al, 1995) -- in multicomponent functions (i.e. Fe-C-H2O race) of chondrite types for all groups. We looked for the possible precursors of L/LL chondrites.

  12. Exposure history and terrestrial ages of ordinary chondrites from the Dar al Gani region, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Finkel, R. C.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Franke, L.; Schultz, L.

    2004-03-01

    We measured the concentrations of noble gases in 32 ordinary chondrites from the Dar al Gani (DaG) region, Libya, as well as concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides 14C, 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, and 41Ca in 18 of these samples. Although the trapped noble gases in five DaG samples show ratios typical of solar or planetary gases, in all other DaG samples, they are dominated by atmospheric contamination, which increases with the degree of weathering. Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of DaG chondrites range from ~1 Myr to 53 Myr. The CRE age distribution of 10 DaG L chondrites shows a cluster around 40 Myr due to four members of a large L6 chondrite shower. The CRE age distribution of 19 DaG H chondrites shows only three ages coinciding with the main H chondrite peak at ~7 Myr, while seven ages are soils during wetter periods and were recently exhumed by removal of these soils due to deflation during more arid periods, such as the current one, which started ~3000 years ago. Finally, based on the 26Al/21Ne and 10Be/21Ne systematics in 16 DaG meteorites, we derived more reliable estimates of the 10Be/21Ne production rate ratio, which seems more sensitive to shielding than was predicted by the semi-empirical model of Graf et al. (1990) but less sensitive than was predicted by the purely physical model of Leya et al. (2000).

  13. Chemical zoning and homogenization of olivines in ordinary chondrites and implications for thermal histories of chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Masamichi; Mckay, David S.; Mckay, Gordon A.; Duke, Michael B.

    1986-01-01

    The extent and degree of homogenization of chemical zoning of olivines in type 3 ordinary chondrites is studied in order to obtain some constraints on cooling histories of chondrites. Based on Mg-Fe and CaO zoning, olivines in type 3 chondrites are classified into four types. A single chondrule usually contains olivines with the same type of zoning. Microporphyritic olivines show all four zoning types. Barred olivines usually show almost homogenized chemical zoning. The cooling rates or burial depths needed to homogenize the chemical zoning are calculated by solving the diffusion equation, using the zoning profiles as an initial condition. Mg-Fe zoning of olivine may be altered during initial cooling, whereas CaO zoning is hardly changed. Barred olivines may be homogenized during initial cooling because their size is relatively small. To simulated microporphyritic olivine chondrules, cooling from just below the liquidus at moderately high rates is preferable to cooling from above the liquidus at low rates. For postaccumulation metamorphism of type 3 chondrites to keep Mg-Fe zoning unaltered, the maximum metamorphic temperature must be less than about 400 C if cooling rates based on Fe-Ni data are assumed. Calculated cooling rates for both Fa and CaO homogenization are consistent with those by Fe-Ni data for type 4 chondrites. A hot ejecta blanket several tens of meters thick on the surface of a parent body is sufficient to homogenize Mg-Fe zoning if the temperature of the blanket is 600-700 C. Burial depths for petrologic types of ordinary chondrites in a parent body heated by Al-26 are broadly consistent with those previously proposed.

  14. Almahata Sitta—Fragment MS-CH: Characterization of a new chondrite type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Marian; Bischoff, Addi; Pack, Andreas; Laubenstein, Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Among the several hundred, mostly small meteorite fragments, recovered within the Almahata Sitta strewn field, one fragment (MS-CH), weighing 5.68 g, was detected that represents a new type of chondritic meteorite. The detection of short-lived cosmogenic radionuclides clearly indicates that this chondrite fragment results from a fresh meteorite fall consistent with the Almahata Sitta event in October 2008. The fundamental mineralogical characteristics of the Almahata Sitta fragment MS-CH can be summarized as follows: (1) the almost equilibrated olivine has high Fa contents of about 36 mole%. The fragment is of petrologic type 3.8 ± 0.1; (2) the metal abundance of the rock is on the order of 2.5 vol%; (3) the mean chondrule size has been determined to be roughly 450 μm; (4) point-counting and imaging indicate that the matrix abundance is approximately 45 vol%; (5) Cr-spinels have much lower TiO2 concentrations than typical spinels within R chondrites; (6) calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions are spinel-rich and severely altered having abundant Na- and/or Cl-rich alteration products. Spinel also contains significant concentrations of Fe and Zn; (7) magnetites and platinum-group element-rich phases (sulfides, tellurides, and arsenides) characteristic of both R and CK chondrites were not found in fragment MS-CH; and (8) the mean oxygen isotope composition of three small fragments of Almahata Sitta MS-CH is δ17O = +4.35‰, δ18O = +4.94‰, and Δ17O = +1.76‰. The oxygen isotopes relate MS-CH to R chondrites. No established chondrite group having all these characteristics exists.

  15. Assessing the Formation of Ungrouped Achondrite Northwest Africa 8186: Residue, Crystallization Product, or Recrystallized Chondrite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P.; McCubbin, F. M.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of primitive achondrites, metachondrites, and type 7 chondrites challenge the long held idea that all chondrites and achondrites form on separate parent bodies. These meteorites have experienced metamorphic temperatures above petrologic type 6 and have partially melted to various degrees. However, because of their isotopic and compositional similarities to both undifferentiated and differentiated groups, the provenance of these 'type 6+' meteorites remains largely unknown. CK and CV chondrites have recently been linked to a few achondrites due to their strong compositional, mineralogical, and isotopic similarities], suggesting a common origin between these meteorites. Although CVs have generally undergone low degrees of alteration near petrologic type 3, CKs have experienced a wide range of thermal alteration from petrologic type 3 to 6. Thermal evolution models on early accreting bodies predict that an early forming body can partially differentiate due to radiogenic heating, and, as a result, form radial layers of material increasing in thermal grade (types 3 to 6+) from the unmelted chondritic surface towards the differentiated core.Northwest Africa (NWA) 8186 is an ungrouped achondrite that provides compelling evidence for higher degrees of thermal processing and/or melting and differentiation on some CK/CV parent bodies. NWA 8186 plots on the CCAM line on a 3-oxygen isotope diagram directly with CK and CV chondrites and also plots with the CKs in regards to Cr isotopes. This meteorite is dominated by Nickel(II)Oxygen-rich olivine (less than 80%), lacks iron metal, and contains four oxide phases, indicating a high fOxygen (above FMQ) similar to the CKs. Additionally, NWA 8186 does not contain chondrules. We have further investigated the origins of NWA 8186 by examining and comparing the bulk composition of this CK-like achondrite with CK and CV chondrites, allowing us to assess the various scenarios in which NWA 8186 may have formed from

  16. Pb-Pb dating of individual chondrules from the CBa chondrite Gujba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollard, Jean Francois André; Connelly, James; Bizzarro, Martin

    2015-01-01

    with a weighted mean age of 4562.49±0.21Myr, consistent with its origin from the vapor-melt impact plume generated by colliding planetesimals. Formation in a debris disk mostly devoid of nebular gas and dust sets an upper limit for the solar protoplanetary disk lifetime at 4.8±0.3Myr. Finally, given the well......-stage impact origin. Here, we report high-precision internal isochrons for four individual chondrules of the Gujba chondrite to probe the formation history of CB chondrites and evaluate the concordancy of relevant short-lived radionuclide chronometers. All four chondrules define a brief formation interval...

  17. 40Ar - 39Ar dating of meteorites and the history of chondrite parent bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 40Ar-39Ar analyses of eleven ordinary chondrites and the unique meteorite Pontylyfni are presented. Results of previous 40Ar-39Ar age analyses have shown that the uncertainty in the calculated ages arises principally from the difficulties of interpretation of release patterns obtained from stepped heating experiments. For this reason considerable attention is paid to identifying the causes of complicating features in the age spectra. The ages obtained range from 4.52Ga to a lower limit of 4.38Ga and it is inferred that these date the time of cooling of the chondrites after formation and metamorphism. (author)

  18. Fullerenes in asphaltenes and other carbonaceous materials: natural constituents or laser artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Vanessa G; Fasciotti, Maíra; Pudenzi, Marcos A; Klitzke, Clécio F; Nascimento, Heliara L; Pereira, Rosana C L; Bastos, Wagner L; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2016-04-25

    The presence of fullerenes as natural constituents of carbonaceous materials or their formation as laser artifacts during laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis is reinvestigated and reviewed. The results using asphaltene samples with varying composition as well as standard polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and fullerene samples as models have demonstrated that indeed Cn ring fullerenes are not natural constituents but they are formed as common and often as predominant artifacts upon laser radiation, and a series of incorrect assignments based on LDI-MS data of several carbonaceous materials seems unfortunately to have been made. When the present results are evaluated also in the light of the vast literature on LDI-MS of carbonaceous materials, the formation of fullerene artifacts seems particularly common for LDI-MS analysis of asphaltenes and other carbonaceous samples with considerably high levels of PAH and varies according to the type of laser used, and the intensity of the laser beam. PMID:26805430

  19. Functional Group Compositions of Carbonaceous Materials of Hayabusa-Returned Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuta, H.; Uesugi, M.; Naraoka, H.; Ito, M.; Kilcoyne, D.; Sandford, S. A.; Kitajima, F.; Mita, H.; Takano, Y.; Yada, T.; Karouji, Y.; Ishibashi, Y.; Okada, T.; Abe, M.

    2014-09-01

    We have analyzed the functional group compositions of the carbonaceous materials of Hayabusa-returned samples by STXM-XANES, in order to identify whether the materials are terrestrial or extraterrestrial.

  20. A study of carbonaceous char oxidation in air by semi-quantitative FTIR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, A.; Krzton, A.; Finqueneisel, G.; Heintz, O.; Weber, J.-V.; Zimny, T. [IUT Saint-Avold (France). Departement Chimie

    1998-05-01

    The paper describes the methodology of semi-quantitative characterization of coal-derived carbonaceous material oxidized under mild thermal conditions. Infrared spectroscopic analysis was applied to the determination of chemical changes induced by oxidation. A curve fitting model has thus been developed to evidence the evolution of specific chemical groups during treatment. The possibility to follow mechanisms and kinetics of carbonaceous char oxidation through data obtained by this model has been demonstrated. 28 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The anthropogenic influence on carbonaceous aerosol in the European background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Barbara; Wagenbach, Dietmar; Hammer, Samuel (Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany)). e-mail: barbara.may@iup.uni-heidelberg.de; Steier, Peter (VERA laboratory, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Puxbaum, Hans (Inst. for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna Univ. of Technology, Vienna (Austria)); Pio, Casimiro (CESAM and Dept. of Environment, Univ. of Aveiro (Portugal))

    2009-07-01

    To constrain the relatively uncertain anthropogenic impact on the organic aerosol load, radiocarbon analyses were performed on aerosol samples, collected year-round, at six non-urban sites including a maritime background and three remote mountain stations, lying on a west-east transect over Western Europe. From a crude three component model supported by TOC and levoglucosan filter data, the fossil fuel, biomass burning and biogenic TOC fraction are estimated, showing at all stations year-round, a relatively constant fossil fuel fraction of around (26 +- 6)%, a dominant biogenic contribution of on average (73 +- 7)% in summer and the continental as well as the maritime background TOC to be only about 50% biogenic. Assuming biomass burning as completely anthropogenic, the carbonaceous aerosol concentration at the mountain sites was found to have increased by a factor of up to (1.4 +- 0.2) in summer and up to (2.5 +- 1.0) in winter. This figure is significantly lower, however, than the respective TOC change since pre-industrial times seen in an Alpine ice core. Reconciling both observations would require an increase, since pre-industrial times, of the background biogenic aerosol load, which is estimated at a factor of 1.3-1.7.

  2. Home-made carbonaceous adsorbents for the iodine filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assuming, that at the moment, an activated charcoal is the most widely used adsorbent in off-gas cleaning systems for elemental iodine removal, it was analyzed how to improve the adsorption properties of this filter material for removing the organic iodine compounds, especially in the presence of high relative humidity. Three different indigenous activated charcoals were selected for studies: two kinds of charcoal, designated as type A and N, as well as the charcoals used for flue gas desulfurization, as the third type S. These charcoals were impregnated with tin iodide (SnI2), potassium iodide (KI) and triethylenediamine (TEDA). Considering the results of the laboratory tests of the efficiency methyl iodide retention by the impregnated charcoals, it was concluded, that the carbonaceous adsorbent containing 1+1.5% KI showed efficient retention of the methyl iodide (CH3I), compared with, for example, foreign activated charcoals, as, NORIT-CGI 1% KI (West Germany) and GA-1 0.5% KI (Czechoslovakia). (author)

  3. High and rapid alkali cation storage in ultramicroporous carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Soo; Lee, Seulbee; Kim, Na Rae; Kang, Minjee; Leal, Cecilia; Park, Kyu-Young; Kang, Kisuk; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2016-05-01

    To achieve better supercapacitor performance, efforts have focused on increasing the specific surface area of electrode materials to obtain higher energy and power density. The control of pores in these materials is one of the most effective ways to increase the surface area. However, when the size of pores decreases to a sub-nanometer regime, it becomes difficult to apply the conventional parallel-plate capacitor model because the charge separation distance (d-value) of the electrical double layer has a similar length scale. In this study, ultramicroporous carbonaceous materials (UCMs) containing sub-nanometer-scale pores are fabricated using a simple in situ carbonization/activation of cellulose-based compounds containing potassium. The results show that alkali cations act as charge carriers in the ultramicropores (<0.7 nm), and these materials can deliver high capacitances of ∼300 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and 130 F g-1, even at a high current rate of 65 A g-1 in an aqueous medium. In addition, the UCM-based symmetric supercapacitors are stable over 10,000 cycles and have a high energy and power densities of 8.4 Wh kg-1 and 15,000 W kg-1, respectively. This study provides a better understanding of the effects of ultramicropores in alkali cation storage.

  4. Carbonaceous species emitted from handheld two-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckens, John; Olson, David A.; Hays, Michael D.

    Small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work (e.g., string trimmers, leaf blowers, etc.) can emit a variety of potentially toxic carbonaceous air pollutants. Yet, the emissions effluents from these machines go largely uncharacterized, constraining the proper development of human exposure estimates, emissions inventories, and climate and air quality models. This study samples and evaluates chemical pollutant emissions from the dynamometer testing of six small, handheld spark-ignition engines—model years 1998-2002. Four oil-gas blends were tested in each engine in duplicate. Emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and gas-phase hydrocarbons were predominant, and the PM emitted was organic matter primarily. An ANOVA model determined that engine type and control tier contributed significantly to emissions variations across all identified compound classes; whereas fuel blend was an insignificant variable accounting for engines were generally intermediate in magnitude compared with other gasoline-powered engines, numerous compounds traditionally viewed as motor vehicle markers are also present in small engine emissions in similar relative proportions. Given that small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work account for 5-10% of total US emissions of CO, CO 2, NO x, HC, and PM 2.5, source apportionment models and human exposure studies need to consider the effect of these small engines on ambient concentrations in air polluted environments.

  5. Measurement of carbonaceous aerosol with different sampling configurations and frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosol in Beijing, China was measured with different sampling configurations (denuded vs. un-denuded and frequencies (24 vs. 48 h averaged. Our results suggest that the negative sampling artifact of a bare quartz filter could be remarkably enhanced due to the uptake of water vapor by the filter medium, indicating that the positive sampling artifact tends to be underestimated under high humidity conditions. It was also observed that the analytical artifact (i.e., the underestimation of elemental carbon by the operationally defined value of the thermal-optical method was more apparent for the low frequency samples such that their elemental carbon (EC concentrations were about 15% lower than the reference values measured by the high-frequency, denuded filters. Moreover, EC results of the low frequency samples were found to exhibit a stronger dependence on the charring correction method. In addition, optical attenuation (ATN of EC was retrieved from the carbon analyzer, and the low frequency samples were shown to be more significantly biased by the shadowing effect.

  6. Generation of oil from coal and carbonaceous shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, D.W.; Tsui, T.F.; Stockton, M.L.

    1987-05-01

    Coal and carbonaceous shale contain the remains of higher terrestrial (vascular) plants, remains commonly referred to as Type III kerogen. Given sufficient thermal exposure, such organic matter is commonly considered to generate only natural gas. Coaly sequences, however, are not always strictly gas producers. Many coaly sequences, particularly those of Tertiary age, have generated important volumes of oil. Those oils are usually paraffinic and waxy, or naphthenic; have a pristane-to-phytane ratio of 2-12; contain definitive biomarkers such as tricyclic diterpenoids; and are low in sulfur (much less than 1%). These oils are clearly distinct from those derived predominantly from marine algal remains. The principal source sequences of oils derived from coaly material occur in Tertiary deltas. Such source sequences contain abundant coaly material with favorable generative quality. Evaluation of generative quality is based either on geochemical analysis (e.g., atomic H/C > 0.9) or on petrographic analysis: source potential being proportional to the abundance and hydrogen richness of organic constituents (macerals). In approximate ranking, oil-generating potential of the hydrogen-rich macerals is exudatinite > alginite > resinite > liptodetrinite > cutinite > sporinite > vitrinite-B (fluorescing vitrinite). Examples of basins containing both a major Tertiary deltaic sequence (hundreds of cubic miles) and major volumes of oil (billions of barrels) derived predominantly from higher terrestrial plate remains are: the Ardjuna and Kutei basins, Indonesia; and the Gippsland basin, Australia.

  7. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-07-12

    The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

  8. Origin and history of chondrite regolith, fragmental and impact-melt breccias from Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, I.; Keil, K.; Wieler, R.; San Miguel, A.; King, E. A.

    1990-06-01

    Six ordinary chondrite breccias from the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Madrid (Spain), are described and classified as follows: the solar gas-rich regolith breccia Oviedo (H5); the premetamorphic fragmental breccias Cabezo de Mayo (type 6, L-LL), and Sevilla (LL4); the fragmental breccias Canellas (H4) and Gerona (H5); and the impact melt breccia, Madrid (L6). It is confirmed that chondrites with typical light-dark structures and petrographic properties typical of regolith breccias may (Oviedo) or may not (Canellas) be solar gas-rich. Cabezo de Mayo and Sevilla show convincing evidence that they were assembled prior to peak metamorphism and were equilibrated during subsequent reheating. Compositions of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene in host chondrite and breccia clasts in Cabezo de Mayo are transitional between groups L and LL. It is suggested, based on mineralogic and oxygen isotopic compositions of host and clasts, that the rock formed on the L parent body by mixing, prior to peak metamorphism. This was followed by partial equilibrium of two different materials: the indigenous L chondrite host and exotic LL melt rock clasts.

  9. Type distribution pattern and pairing of ordinary chondrites from Grove Mountains, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-eight meteorites were collected on blue ice in the Grove Mountains region, Antarctica, by the 16th Chinese Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE). 26 out of the stones are ordinary chondrites, and their chemical-petrographic types are assigned based on electron probe microanalyses, petrography and mineralogy. 6 of them are unequilibrated L-chondrites, and the other 20 chondrites are equilibrated, including 6 H-group (3 H4, 1 H5 and 2 H6), 9 L-group (3 L4, 1 L5 and 5 L6) and 5 LL-group (2 LL4 and 3 LL5). Detailed comparative study suggests that 10 of them (including other 2 chondrites collected by the 15th CHINARE) could be paired, and represent 5 individual fall events. Hence, all 32 meteorites collected from the Grove Mountains probably belong to 27 fall events, suggestive of meteorite transferring and concentrating processes. The Grove Mountains are likely a new meteorite-enriched region. Distribution patterns of chemical-petrographic type and mass of the Grove Mountains meteorites are significantly distinct from those found in other regions, indicative of their unique sources and/or concentration mechanism. However, more studies are required in order to clarify these differences.

  10. The Compositions of Six Chinese Ordinary Chondrites and Element Distributions in Their Different Phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈永亨; ERNSTPERNICKA; 等

    1992-01-01

    Six Chinese ordinary chondrites (four of them have fallen in recent years and the trace element abundances have not yet been reported for the other two) were examined.The contents of 21 elements (Na,Cr,Mn,Sc,Se,Zn,Br,Ni,Fe,Co,Ir,Cu,Ga,As,Au,Sb,Os,W,Re,Pt,and Ru)in the magnetic fractions and 20 elements (Na,K,Ca,Sc,Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni,Zn,Se,Br,La,Sm,Eu,Yb,Lu,Ir,Au,and As) in the non-magnetic fractions were de-termined by INAA. The results indicate that the 5 H-group chondrites show almost no difference in composition,but they are different from the Zhaodong L-group chondrite in elemental abundance.As a normalized element(relative to CI),the concentrations of Ga in the magnetic fractions can be used to classify ordinary chondrites(H-,L- and LL-group).The bulk composition and modal weight of each component calculated from element concentrations in different phases are in good agreement with the bulk rock analyses presented in the literature.

  11. Characteristics in naturally and experimentally shocked chondrites: A clue to P-T conditions of impacted asteroids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢先德; 陈鸣; 戴诚达; A.EI; Goresy

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the experimentally shock-induced features with those in naturally shocked chondrites and to test the feasibility of experimentally calibrating naturally induced features in shocked H- and L-chondrites. Samples of the Jilin chondrite (H5) were experimentally shock-loaded at the following peak pressures: 12, 27, 39, 53, 78, 83, 93 and 133 GPa respectively. Chondritic melts were first obtained at P>78 GPa and more than 60% melting was achieved at P~133 GPa. No high-pressure phases were observed in any of the shocked samples, neither in the deformed nor in the molten regions. Textural relations and mineral assemblages of the shocked samples are comparable to those encountered in the heavily shocked H-chondrite Yanzhuang but differ considerably from those found in heavily shocked L6 chondrites. Shock melt veins in L6 chondrites contain high-pressure polymorphs of olivine and pyroxene and high pressure liquidus phases. Scaling from shock experiments on millimeter-sized sam

  12. Characteristics in naturally and experimentally shocked chondrites: A clue to P-T conditions of impacted asteroids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the experimentally shock-induced features with those in naturally shocked chondrites and to test the feasibility of experimentally calibrating naturally induced features in shocked H- and L-chondrites. Samples of the Jilin chondrite (H5) were experimentally shock-loaded at the following peak pressures: 12, 27, 39, 53, 78, 83, 93 and 133 GPa respectively. Chondritic melts were first obtained at P>78 GPa and more than 60% melting was achieved at P~133 GPa. No high-pressure phases were observed in any of the shocked samples, neither in the deformed nor in the molten regions. Textural relations and mineral assemblages of the shocked samples are comparable to those encountered in the heavily shocked H-chondrite Yanzhuang but differ considerably from those found in heavily shocked L6 chondrites. Shock melt veins in L6 chondrites contain high-pressure polymorphs of olivine and pyroxene and high pressure liquidus phases. Scaling from shock experiments on millimeter-sized samples to natural shock features on kilometer-sized asteroids poses considerable problems in quantifying the P-T conditions during natural shock events on asteroids.

  13. Trace element evidence for contrastive thermal histories of H4-6 and L4-6 chondrite parent bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingner, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Earlier studies at Purdue revealed that tertiary shock (impact) heating is the main post-accretionary fractionation process for mobile and siderophilic trace elements in L4-6 chondrites. Lower contents of these elements in samples evidencing shock are attributable to loss (transport in an Fe-Ni-S eutectic or volatilization from collisional debris) upon breakup of the L parent body 500-650 Myr ago. Reported here are new radiochemical neutron activation analysis results for Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Co, Cs, Ga, In, K, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl and Zn in H4-6 chondrites as a function of /sup 40/Ar retention (a reliable shock indicator in L chondrites). Mobile element depletion in H chondrites with undisturbed /sup 40/Ar vs. unshocked L chondrites indicates a hotter environment (a shock event or higher accretion temperatures) for the former. Siderophiles are enriched in H relative to L chondrites, as expected. Within the H chondrite population, trace element relationships with /sup 40/Ar retention and petrologic type are complex and puzzling. These are discussed in detail in light of several proposed parent body models.

  14. Late Chondritic Additions and Planet and Planetesimal Growth: Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Studies of terrestrial peridotite and martian and achondritic meteorites have led to the conclusion that addition of chondritic material to growing planets or planetesimals, after core formation, occurred on Earth, Mars, asteroid 4 Vesta, and the parent body of the angritic meteorites [1-4]. One study even proposed that this was a common process in the final stages of growth [5]. These conclusions are based almost entirely on the highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os). The HSE are a group of eight elements that have been used to argue for late accretion of chondritic material to the Earth after core formation was complete (e.g., [6]). This idea was originally proposed because the D(metal/silicate) values for the HSE are so high, yet their concentration in the mantle is too high to be consistent with such high Ds. The HSE also are present in chondritic relative abundances and hence require similar Ds if this is the result of core-mantle equilibration. Since the work of [6] there has been a realization that core formation at high PT conditions can explain the abundances of many siderophile elements in the mantle (e.g., [7]), but such detailed high PT partitioning data are lacking for many of the HSE to evaluate whether such ideas are viable for all four bodies. Consideration of other chemical parameters reveals larger problems that are difficult to overcome, but must be addressed in any scenario which calls on the addition of chondritic material to a reduced mantle. Yet these problems are rarely discussed or emphasized, making the late chondritic (or late veneer) addition hypothesis suspect.

  15. Silicate sulfidation and chemical differences between enstatite chondrites and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, S. W.; Petaev, M. I.; Buseck, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic similarity between the Earth-Moon system and enstatite chondrites (ECs) led to the idea that ECs were Earth's building blocks [1-3]. However, compared to Earth's mantle, ECs have low Fe0/Fe ratios, are enriched in volatile elements, and depleted in refractory lithophile elements and Mg [4]. Therefore, deriving Earth composition from ECs requires a loss of volatiles during or prior to accretion and sequestering a large fraction of Si in the deep Earth. Alternatively, the isotopic similarity between the Earth and ECs is explained by their formation from a common precursor that experienced different evolutionary paths resulting in the chemical difference [4]. The vestiges of such a precursor are still present in the unequilibrated ECs as FeO-rich silicates with O isotopic compositions identical to bulk ECs and Earth [5]. Conversion of such a precursor into the characteristic EC mineral assemblage requires high-temperature processing in an H-poor environment with high fS2 and fO2 close to that of the classic solar nebula [6], consistent with redox conditions inferred from Ti4+/Ti3+ ratios in EC pyroxene [7]. Under such conditions reaction of FeO-rich silicates with S-rich gas results in their replacement by the assemblage of FeO-poor silicates; Fe, Mg, Ca sulfides; free silica; and Si-bearing Fe,Ni metal alloy. The progressive sulfidation of ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules results in loss of Mg and addition of Fe, Mn, S, Na, K and, perhaps, other volatiles [6]. At the advanced stages of silicate sulfidation recorded in the metal-sulfide nodules [8], a portion of Si is reduced and dissolved in the Fe,Ni metal. This process is known to fractionate Si isotopes [9,10] and would explain the differences between the ECs and Earth's mantle [11]. The sulfidation of silicates also produces porous S-rich silica, a peculiar phase observed so far only in the ECs. It consists of a sinewy SiO2-rich framework enclosing numerous vesicles filled with beam

  16. Dating recent lake sediments using spheroidal carbonaceous particle (SCP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yanhong; WANG Sumin; XIA Weilan; LIU Jian

    2005-01-01

    Dating lake sediment using sedimentary event is the supplement and calibration to traditional dating by radionuclide such as 210Pb and 137Cs. Based on the change of spheroidal carbonaceous particle (SCP) concentration, the age sequence of lake sediments can be deduced. It is one of the dating methods using sedimentary event. SCP is formed from combustion of fossil fuel at high temperature up to 1750℃ and at a rate of heating of approaching 104 ℃/s. It can be dispersed to several hundred kilometers away from its source and deposited with precipitation or dryly deposited, and kept in sediments. Compared with Cs or Pb, there is no evidence for SCP that it decays in lake sediments and is un-removable once stored except by physical disturbance because it is mainly composed of element carbon. Handy method to extract, identify and calculate has been developed. Although fossil fuel has been used early in China, combustion at high temperature started later since emergence of electricity generation. The productivity of SCP is positively related with the generated thermal power, which is reflected as the SCP concentration in lake sediments increases with the increase of generated thermal power. Therefore, reliable sediment markers from the start of the SCP record and the remarkable variation can be used for dating purpose. In China, electricity industry started from the 1950s, and rapid increase of generated power took place since 1978. Based on these time markers, SCP time sequences of lake sediment cores LH and LL-4 from Longgan Lake, the middle reach of the Yangtze River, have been established, which is comparable with the results from 137Cs and 210Pb, and has eliminated the errors of dating using 137Cs and 210Pb.

  17. Impact of carbonaceous aerosol emissions on regional climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeckner, E.; Stier, P.; Feichter, J.; Kloster, S.; Esch, M.; Fischer-Bruns, I.

    2006-11-01

    The past and future evolution of atmospheric composition and climate has been simulated with a version of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). The system consists of the atmosphere, including a detailed representation of tropospheric aerosols, the land surface, and the ocean, including a model of the marine biogeochemistry which interacts with the atmosphere via the dust and sulfur cycles. In addition to the prescribed concentrations of carbon dioxide, ozone and other greenhouse gases, the model is driven by natural forcings (solar irradiance and volcanic aerosol), and by emissions of mineral dust, sea salt, sulfur, black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM). Transient climate simulations were performed for the twentieth century and extended into the twenty-first century, according to SRES scenario A1B, with two different assumptions on future emissions of carbonaceous aerosols (BC, POM). In the first experiment, BC and POM emissions decrease over Europe and China but increase at lower latitudes (central and South America, Africa, Middle East, India, Southeast Asia). In the second experiment, the BC and POM emissions are frozen at their levels of year 2000. According to these experiments the impact of projected changes in carbonaceaous aerosols on the global mean temperature is negligible, but significant changes are found at low latitudes. This includes a cooling of the surface, enhanced precipitation and runoff, and a wetter surface. These regional changes in surface climate are caused primarily by the atmospheric absorption of sunlight by increasing BC levels and, subsequently, by thermally driven circulations which favour the transport of moisture from the adjacent oceans. The vertical redistribution of solar energy is particularly large during the dry season in central Africa when the anomalous atmospheric heating of up to 60 W m-2 and a corresponding decrease in surface solar radiation leads to a marked surface cooling, reduced

  18. A 3.6-b.y.-old impact-melt rock fragment in the Plainview chondrite: Implications for the age of the H-group chondrite parent body regolith formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, minor, trace and REE abundances as well as mineralogical and textural properties of a light-colored, poikilitic, metallic nickel-iron- and troilite-poor lithic fragment in the brecciated Plainview, Texas, H5 chondrite unambiguously show that the fragment is of H-group chondrite parentage, despite its non-chondritic texture and appearance. 40Ar-39Ar age dating indicates that the fragment is 3.63 b.y. old, whereas the Plainview host chondrite is 4.4 b.y. old. The fragment's texture and certain mineral compositions, such as relatively high CaO in olivine and orthopyroxene, the presence of alkali-rich feldspar and interstitial material, and metallic nickel-iron of Ni contents of 10-15 wt.% (martensite), indicate that the fragment formed by relatively fast cooling from a melt. (orig./ME)

  19. Analyses and characterization of fossil carbonaceous materials for silicon production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrvaagnes, Viktor

    2008-01-15

    Production of high silicon alloys is carried out in submerged arc furnaces by reduction of silicon bearing oxides (typically quartz) with carbon materials. Carbonaceous materials like coal, coke, charcoal and woodchips are commonly used as reduction materials in the process. Primarily based on historical prices of charcoal compared to fossil reduction materials, the Norwegian Ferroalloy Industry has mostly been using coal and coke (char) as the source of carbon. From a process point of view, the most important role of the carbonaceous material is to react with SiO gas to produce SiC. The ability of the reduction materials to react with SiO gas can be measured and the value is recognized as the reactivity of the carbon source. Reactivity is one of the most important parameters in the smelting process and is commonly acknowledged to strongly affect both productivity and specific energy consumption. The main objectives of this work has been to establish methods to characterize the material properties of fossil carbonaceous reduction materials used in the silicon process and to evaluated how these properties affect the reactivity towards SiO gas. In order to accomplish these objectives, three run of mine (ROM) single seam coals which are particularly well suited for ferroalloy production were selected. Two Carboniferous coals from USA (Blue Gem) and Poland (Staszic) with similar rank, but significantly different composition as well as a Permian coal from Australia (Peak Downs) have been characterized by chemical- and petrographical methods. Blue Gem is a homogeneous coal, low in mineral inclusions and macerals of the inertinite group and determined to have a random vitrinite reflectance of 0.71 %. Staszic has a similar reflectance of vitrinite (0.72 %), but is determined to be a very inhomogeneous coal with both inertinite macerals and minerals embedded in the vitrinite matrix. Peak Downs has a random reflectance of vitrinite of 1.32 % and is hence the coal sample of

  20. Analyses and characterization of fossil carbonaceous materials for silicon production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrvaagnes, Viktor

    2008-01-15

    Production of high silicon alloys is carried out in submerged arc furnaces by reduction of silicon bearing oxides (typically quartz) with carbon materials. Carbonaceous materials like coal, coke, charcoal and woodchips are commonly used as reduction materials in the process. Primarily based on historical prices of charcoal compared to fossil reduction materials, the Norwegian Ferroalloy Industry has mostly been using coal and coke (char) as the source of carbon. From a process point of view, the most important role of the carbonaceous material is to react with SiO gas to produce SiC. The ability of the reduction materials to react with SiO gas can be measured and the value is recognized as the reactivity of the carbon source. Reactivity is one of the most important parameters in the smelting process and is commonly acknowledged to strongly affect both productivity and specific energy consumption. The main objectives of this work has been to establish methods to characterize the material properties of fossil carbonaceous reduction materials used in the silicon process and to evaluated how these properties affect the reactivity towards SiO gas. In order to accomplish these objectives, three run of mine (ROM) single seam coals which are particularly well suited for ferroalloy production were selected. Two Carboniferous coals from USA (Blue Gem) and Poland (Staszic) with similar rank, but significantly different composition as well as a Permian coal from Australia (Peak Downs) have been characterized by chemical- and petrographical methods. Blue Gem is a homogeneous coal, low in mineral inclusions and macerals of the inertinite group and determined to have a random vitrinite reflectance of 0.71 %. Staszic has a similar reflectance of vitrinite (0.72 %), but is determined to be a very inhomogeneous coal with both inertinite macerals and minerals embedded in the vitrinite matrix. Peak Downs has a random reflectance of vitrinite of 1.32 % and is hence the coal sample of

  1. Preparation and characterization of a new carbonaceous material for electrochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZI JI LIN

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A new carbonaceous material was successfully prepared by the py-rolysis of scrap tire rubber at 600 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The physical characteristics of the prepared carbonaceous material were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. It was proved that the carbonaceous material had a disordered structure and spherical morphology with an average particle size about 100 nm. The prepared carbonaceous material was also used as electrodes in electrochemical systems to examine its electrochemical performances. It was demonstrated that it delivered a lithium insertion capacity of 658 mA h g-1 during the first cycle with a coulombic efficiency of 68 %. Cyclic voltammograms test results showed that a redox reaction occurred during the cycles. The chemical diffusion coefficient based on the impedance diagram was about 10-10 cm2 s-1. The pyrolytic carbonaceous material derived from scrap tire rubber is therefore considered to be a potential anode material in lithium secondary batteries or capacitors. Furthermore, it is advantageous for environmental protection.

  2. Efficacy of carbonaceous nanocomposites for sorbing ionizable antibiotic sulfamethazine from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Lai, Cui; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Yang, Chunping; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Yaoyu; Cheng, Min

    2016-05-15

    This paper investigated the key factors and mechanisms of sulfamethazine (SMT) sorption on a novel carbonaceous nanocomposite, and the effects of harsh aging on SMT sorption in the presence and absence of soil and before as well as after aging. The carbonaceous nanocomposites were synthesized by dip-coating straw biomass in carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes solution and then pyrolyzed at 300 °C and 600 °C in the absence of air. The sorption performance of high temperature carbonaceous nanocomposite on SMT was excellent, as measured sorption distribution coefficient in the order of 10(3)-10(5.5) L kg(-1). Carbonaceous nanocomposites were aged either alone or mixed with soil via exposure to nutrients and soil extract (biological aging) or 80 °C for 100 d (chemical aging). No obvious effects of harsh aging on SMT sorption were observed in the presence of soil and/or biological and chemical aging. The primary mechanisms for SMT sorption included partition caused by Van der Waals forces and adsorption caused by hydrogen bonding and π-π electron-donor-acceptor interaction. Comprehensively considering the cost, renewability, and the application to real water samples, the carbonaceous nanocomposites have potential in removal of SMT and possibly other persistent organic pollutants from wastewater. PMID:26986499

  3. Oxygen Isotopic and Petrological Constraints on the Origin and Relationship of IIE Iron Meteorites and H Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, K. H.; Greenwood, R. C.; Franchi, I. A.; Anand, M.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2011-03-01

    New oxygen isotopic measurements of IIEs and H chondrites are indistinguishable — strengthening a possible common origin for these groups. Combining oxygen results with mineralogy, the nature of their parent body or bodies can be explored.

  4. Rare Earth Element Abundances and Pb-Pb Ages of Merrillite in Jinju H5 Chondrite: Implications to Shock Metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, S.; Choi, B.-G.

    2016-08-01

    Jinju merrillite shows homogeneous REE abundances and relatively young Pb-Pb ages. Jinju H5 chondrite was probably neither equilibrated nor compacted prior to the impact and the shock made trace elements including REEs and U-Pb equilibrated.

  5. Genesis and organic geochemical characteristics of the carbonaceous rock stratabound gold deposits, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡凯; 翟建平; 刘英俊; 王鹤年; 张景荣; 贾蓉芬

    2000-01-01

    The organic matter of three different chronological major carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China (Middle Proterozoic Shangqiaoshan group of northeastern Jiangxi, Lower Cambrian Shuikou group of northern Guangxi and Devonian Shetianqiao group of eastern Hunan) and related carbonaceous stratabound gold deposits such as Jinshan, Longshui and Shixia deposits, respectively, has been characterized by organic geochemical techniques. These organic geochemical results show that the average total organic carbon (TOC) content of the three chronological carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China ranges from 0.15% to 1.56%. The thermal maturity of the organic matter of host rocks in the three gold-bearing formations is high. The micro-component of the organic matter of the host rocks consists primarily of solid bitumen and graphite. The organic carbon and gold of the host rocks appear to syndeposit in situ during the formation of the gold-bearing formations. The organic carbon played

  6. Pyrolysis oil from carbonaceous solid wastes in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The agro-industrial sector of Malaysia produces a huge amount of oil palm and paddy rice. These generate a significant amount of renewable biomass solid wastes in the forms of oil palm shell and rice husk. Apart from this a huge quantity of scrap tyre is generated from the country's faster increasing usage of transportation vehicles like motorcycle, car, bus and lorries. These wastes are producing pollution and disposal problems affecting the environment. Besides energy is not recovered efficiently from these waste resources. From the elemental composition and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) studies of the wastes, it appeared that the wastes could be used for pyrolysis liquid oil production. Pyrolysis at present is deemed to be a potential method for the conversion of carbonaceous solid wastes into upgraded liquid products which can either be tried for liquid fuel or value-added chemical. A fluidized bed bench scale fast pyrolysis system was employed for this thermochemical conversion process of solid wastes. Silica sand was used as fluidized bed material and nitrogen gas as the fluidising medium. The products obtained were liquid oil, solid char and gas. The liquid oil and solid char were collected separately while the gas was flared. The maximum liquid product yield was found to vary with feedstock material fluidized bed temperature. The maximum liquid product yield was found to be 58, 53 and 40 wt. % of biomass fed at fluidized bed temperature at 500, 525 and 4500C respectively for oil palm shell, scrap tyre and rice husk. The solid char yield was 25, 36 and 53 wt. % of biomass fed at the condition of maximum liquid product yield for oil palm shell, scrap tyre and rice husk respectively. The oil products were subjected to FTIR, GC and GC/MS analysis for their group composition and detailed chemical compositions. The pyrolysis oil from scrap tyre was found to contain highest percentage of pure hydrocarbons (25 wt. % of total feed) with esters and oxygenated

  7. Chondrites isp. Indicating Late Paleozoic Atmospheric Anoxia in Eastern Peninsular India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biplab Bhattacharya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic sandstone-mudstone-coal succession of the Barakar Formation (early Permian manifests a transition from lower braided-fluvial to upper tide-wave influenced, estuarine setting. Monospecific assemblage of marine trace fossil Chondrites isp. in contemporaneous claystone beds in the upper Barakar succession from two Gondwana basins (namely, the Raniganj Basin and the Talchir Basin in eastern peninsular India signifies predominant marine incursion during end early Permian. Monospecific Chondrites ichnoassemblage in different sedimentary horizons in geographically wide apart (~400 km areas demarcates multiple short-spanned phases of anoxia in eastern India. Such anoxia is interpreted as intermittent falls in oxygen level in an overall decreasing atmospheric oxygenation within the late Paleozoic global oxygen-carbon dioxide fluctuations.

  8. Cosmic-ray exposure and gas retention ages of the Guangmingshan (H5) chondrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of noble gases from the Guangmingshan chondrite were analyzed. Based on the analyses of cosmogenic nuclei, cosmic-ray exposure age of the meteorite is (65± 10.0) Ma (3He), (80 ± 12) Ma (21Ne) and (65 ± 10.0) Ma (38Ar), with an average of 70 Ma. This is the highest exposure age of H-group ordinary chondrites. Gas retention ages of K-Ar and U, Th-4He are (4230±100) Ma and (3300±60) Ma, respectively. The smaller ages of 3He than 21Ne and 4He than 40Ar suggest that both 3He and 4He lost together. This is probably related to a solar heating effect of a meteorite with a small perihelion during the last exposure period.``

  9. Mineralogy and Microstructures of Shock-Induced Melt Veins in Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thomas G.

    2000-01-01

    The applicability of phase equilibrium data to the interpretation of shock-induced melt veins can only be tested by a detailed study of melt- vein mineralogy to see how high-pressure assemblages vary as a function of shock conditions inferred from other indicators. We have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), analytical electron microscopy (AEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMA) and optical petrography to characterize the mineralogy, microstructures, and compositions of melt veins and associated high-pressure minerals in shocked chondrites and SNC meteorites. In the processes, we have gained a better understanding of what melt veining can tell us about shock conditions and we have discovered new mineral phases in chondritic and SNC meteorites.

  10. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals II. Improved treatment of the compaction process

    CERN Document Server

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Trieloff, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of the thermal history of individual meteorites which can be assigned to the same parent body allows to derive general characteristics of the parent body, which hold important clues on the planetary formation process. This requires to construct models for the heating of such bodies by short lived radioactives, in particular by 26Al, and its cooling by heat conduction, which then are compared with the cooling histories of the meteorites. The heat conductivity of the planetesimal material depends critically on the porosity of the chondritic material and changes by sintering of the material at elevated temperatures and pressures. Compaction of a granular material is a key process for the thermal history of the parent bodies of meteorites. The modelling of the compaction process is improved by applying concepts originally developed for hot isostatic pressing in metallurgical processes. It is extended to a binary mixture of matrix and chondrules, as observed in chondrites. By comparison with publish...

  11. Microfossils and biomolecules in carbonaceous meteorites: possibility of life in water-bearing asteroids and comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that carbonaceous meteorites contain water, carbon, biogenic elements and a host of organic chemicals and biomolecules. Several independent lines of evidence indicate that the parent bodies of the CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites are most probably the C-type asteroids or cometary nuclei. Several of the protein amino acids detected in the meteorites exhibit chirality and have an excess of the L-enantiomer -- such as in the amino acids present in the proteins of all known life forms on Earth. Isotopic studies have established that the amino acids and nucleobases in the CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites are both indigenous and extraterrestrial. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy studies carried out by researchers during the past half century have revealed the presence of complex biogenic microstructures embedded in the rock-matrix of many of carbonaceous meteorites similar to extinct life-forms known as acritarchs and hystrichospheres. Carbonaceous meteorites also contain a wide variety of large filaments that exhibit the complex morphologies and correct size ranges of known genera and species of photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria and diatoms. However, EDAX investigations have shown that these carbon-rich filaments typically have nitrogen content below the level of detection (hair and teeth of Pleistocene Mammoths. Hence, the absence of detectable nitrogen in the filaments provides direct evidence that they do not represent recent biological contaminants that invaded these meteorite stones after they were observed to fall to Earth. The spectral and fluorescence properties of pigments found in several species of terrestrial cyanobacteria which are similar to some microfossils found in carbonaceous meteorites may provide valuable clues to help search for evidence for biomolecules and life on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn, asteroids and comets.

  12. Experimental Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites by Nanopulse Laser: TEM Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Hiroi, T.; Keller, L. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A set of ordinary chondrite meteorites has been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser to simulate the effects of micrometeorite bombardment. Three meteorites, an H (Ehole), L (Chateau Renard - CR), and LL (Appley Bridge - AB) were lasered following the method of Sasaki et al [1]. Near IR spectra were taken before and after exposure to examine the optical changes induced and the samples were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to understand the physical changes.

  13. Carbon dioxide capture on amine-rich carbonaceous materials derived from glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Bacsik, Zoltan; Hedin, Niklas; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan; Antonietti, Markus; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2010-07-19

    The synthesis of carbonaceous materials with a high surface density of amino functions for CO(2) sorption and sequestration is reported. The amino-rich carbonaceous materials are characterized by elemental analysis, N(2) sorption, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential, TGA and FTIR measurements. A detailed discussion on the use of these materials in CO(2) capture is provided. The materials show significant sorption capabilities for CO(2) (4.3 mmol g(-1)at -20 degrees C and 1 bar). Furthermore, they show a high apparent selectivity for CO(2) over N(2) at both low and high temperatures.

  14. Nebular dead zone effects on the D/H ratio in chondrites and comets

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Petit, Jean-Marc; Mousis, Olivier; Vernazza, Pierre; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2015-01-01

    Comets and chondrites show non-monotonic behaviour of their Deuterium to Hydrogen (D/H) ratio as a function of their formation location from the Sun. This is difficult to explain with a classical protoplanetary disk model that has a decreasing temperature structure with radius from the Sun. We want to understand if a protoplanetary disc with a dead zone, a region of zero or low turbulence, can explain the measured D/H values in comets and chondrites. We use time snapshots of a vertically layered disk model with turbulent surface layers and a dead zone at the midplane. The disc has a non-monotonic temperature structure due to increased heating from self-gravity in the outer parts of the dead zone. We couple this to a D/H ratio evolution model in order to quantify the effect of such thermal profiles on D/H enrichment in the nebula. We find that the local temperature peak in the disk can explain the diversity in the D/H ratios of different chondritic families. This disk temperature profile leads to a non-monoton...

  15. Phosphate control on the Th/U variations in ordinary chondrites: Improving solar system abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreva, J. S.; Burnett, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    Isotope dilution thorium and uranium analyses by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry of 12 samples of Harleton (L6) show a much larger scatter than was previously observed in equilibrated ordinary chondrites. Th/U linearly correlates with 1/U in Harleton and in the total equilibrated ordinary chondrite data set as well. Such a correlation suggests a two component mixture and this trend can be quantitatively modeled as reflecting variations in the mixing ratio between two phosphate phases: chlorapatite and merrillite. The major effect is due to apatite variations, which strongly control the whole rock U concentrations. Phosphorous variations will tend to destroy the Th/U vs. 1/U correlation, and measured P concentrations on exactly the same samples as U and Th show a factor of 3 range. It appears that the P variations are compensated by inverse variations in U (a dilution effect) to preserve the Th/U vs. 1/U correlation. Because variations in whole rock Th/U are consequences of phosphate sampling, a weighted average of high accuracy Th/U measurements in equilibrated ordinary chondrites should converge to a significantly improved average solar system Th/U. Our best estimate of this ratio is 3.53 with ?mean = 0.10.

  16. Origins and Asteroid Main-Belt Stratigraphy for H-, L-, LL-Chondrite Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, Richard; DeMeo, Francesca; Burbine, Thomas; Polishook, David; Birlan, Mirel

    2016-10-01

    We trace the origins of ordinary chondrite meteorites to their main-belt sources using their (presumably) larger counterparts observable as near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). We find the ordinary chondrite stratigraphy in the main belt to be LL, H, L (increasing distance from the Sun). We derive this result using spectral information from more than 1000 near-Earth asteroids [1]. Our methodology is to correlate each NEA's main-belt source region [2] with its modeled mineralogy [3]. We find LL chondrites predominantly originate from the inner edge of the asteroid belt (nu6 region at 2.1 AU), H chondrites from the 3:1 resonance region (2.5 AU), and the L chondrites from the outer belt 5:2 resonance region (2.8 AU). Each of these source regions has been cited by previous researchers [e.g. 4, 5, 6], but this work uses an independent methodology that simultaneously solves for the LL, H, L stratigraphy. We seek feedback from the planetary origins and meteoritical communities on the viability or implications of this stratrigraphy.Methodology: Spectroscopic and taxonomic data are from the NASA IRTF MIT-Hawaii Near-Earth Object Spectroscopic Survey (MITHNEOS) [1]. For each near-Earth asteroid, we use the Bottke source model [2] to assign a probability that the object is derived from five different main-belt source regions. For each spectrum, we apply the Shkuratov model [3] for radiative transfer within compositional mixing to derive estimates for the ol / (ol+px) ratio (and its uncertainty). The Bottke source region model [2] and the Shkuratov mineralogic model [3] each deliver a probability distribution. For each NEA, we convolve its source region probability distribution with its meteorite class distribution to yield a likelihood for where that class originates. Acknowledgements: This work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant 0907766 and NASA Grant NNX10AG27G.References: [1] Binzel et al. (2005), LPSC XXXVI, 36.1817. [2] Bottke et al. (2002). Icarus 156, 399. [3

  17. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2

  18. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovits, Paul [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  19. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Volatile Trace Elements in H Chondrites: Implications for Parent Body Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1993-07-01

    The perception among meteoriticists is that contents of the volatile trace elements systematically decrease with shock and particularly petrologic type. This perception affects views that investigators have of the early history and structure of the H chondrite parent body. Measurement of a variety of volatile trace elements in a statistically significant number of samples accompanied by chemometric data analysis techniques developed for interpretation of trace- element data [1] should maximize the amount of genetic information available from the volatile trace elements and offer clues to the early thermal history of the H chondrite parent body. Volatile trace-element data exist for 58 H chondrite falls: the complete dataset includes Co, Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, and In (listed in increasing order of volatility) [2,3]. This dataset includes 13 H4, 32 H5, and 13 H6 chondrites, which cover the full range of shock facies from a through f. To examine the effect that shock has on volatile trace-element concentrations in H4-6 chondrites, we have compared data for the least-shocked samples (shock facies a-b) with the most shocked samples (shock facies c-f) using both univariate (Student's t-test) and multivariate techniques (linear discriminant analysis). The results demonstrate no reason to doubt the null hypothesis of no difference in volatile trace-element composition between shocked and unshocked H4-6 chondrites at any reasonable significance level. This situation contrasts sharply with the strong difference found between shocked and unshocked L chondrites [4]. The role of shock in establishing volatile trace- element contents in H and L chondrites clearly differs. Univariate comparisons between H4, H5, and H6 chondrites demonstrate that only Cs varies significantly with petrologic type (prob. > F 0.0006) with concentration decreasing monotonically with increasing petrographic type. Box- and-whisker plots of volatile trace-element contents reveal a general

  20. Genesis and organic geochemical characteristics of the carbonaceous rock stratabound gold deposits, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The organic matter of three different chronological major carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China (Middle Proterozoic Shangqiaoshan group of northeastern Jiangxi, Lower Cambrian Shuikou group of northern Guangxi and Devonian Shetianqiao group of eastern Hunan) and related carbonaceous stratabound gold deposits such as Jinshan, Longshui and Shixia deposits, respectively, has been characterized by organic geochemical techniques. These organic geochemical results show that the average total organic carbon (TOC) content of the three chronological carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China ranges from 0.15% to 1.56%. The thermal maturity of the organic matter of host rocks in the three gold-bearing formations is high. The micro-component of the organic matter of the host rocks consists primarily of solid bitumen and graphite. The organic carbon and gold of the host rocks appear to syndeposit in situ during the formation of the gold-bearing formations. The organic carbon played a certain role in controlling the geochemical environment of the gold-bearing formations. The metallogenetic mechanism of the carbonaceous rock stratabound gold deposits of South China is closely associated in genesis with the sedimentation, diagenesis and thermal evolution history of the organic matter of host rocks in the gold-bearing formations.

  1. Carbonaceous Aerosols Emitted from Light-Duty Vehicles Operating on Gasoline and Ethanol Fuel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examines the chemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from three light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDVs) operating on gasoline (e0) and ethanol-gasoline fuel blends (e10 and e85). Vehicle road load simulations were performed on a chassis dynamometer using the t...

  2. Functionalization of biomass carbonaceous aerogels: selective preparation of MnO2@CA composites for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yumei; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Hongxia; Wang, Bo; Yang, Daoyuan; Hu, Junhua; Liu, Zhimin

    2014-06-25

    Functionalized porous carbon materials with hierarchical structure and developed porosity coming from natural and renewable biomass have been attracting tremendous attention recently. In this work, we present a facile and scalable method to synthesize MnO2 loaded carbonaceous aerogel (MnO2@CA) composites via the hydrothermal carbonaceous (HTC) process. We employ two reaction systems of the mixed metal ion precursors to study the optimal selective adsorption and further reaction of MnO2 precursor on CA. Our experimental results show that the system containing KMnO4 and Na2S2O3·5H2O exhibits better electrochemical properties compared with the reaction system of MnSO4·H2O and (NH4)2S2O8. For the former, the obtained MnO2@CA displays the specific capacitance of 123.5 F·g(-1). The enhanced supercapacitance of MnO2@CA nanocomposites could be ascribed to both electrochemical contributions of the loaded MnO2 nanoparticles and the porous structure of three-dimensional carbonaceous aerogels. This study not only indicates that it is vital for the reaction systems to match with porous carbonaceous materials, but also offers a new fabrication strategy to prepare lightweight and high-performance materials that can be used in energy storage devices. PMID:24882146

  3. Magnetite in CI carbonaceous meteorites - Origin by aqueous activity on a planetesimal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Mackay, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.

    1979-01-01

    The composition and morphology of magnetite in CI carbonaceous meteorites appear incompatible with a nebular origin. Mineralization on the meteorite parent body is a more plausible mode of formation. The iodine-xenon age of this material therefore dates an episode of secondary mineralization on a planetesimal rather than the epoch of condensation in the primitive solar nebula.

  4. Development of a carbonaceous selective absorber for solar thermal energy collection and process for its formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, John D.

    1989-02-01

    The main goal of the US Department of Energy supported part of this project is to develop information about controlling the complicated chemical processes involved in the formation of a carbonaceous selective absorber and learn what equipment will allow production of this absorber commercially. The work necessary to accomplish this goal is not yet complete. Formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber in the conveyor oven tried so far has been unsatisfactory, because the proper conditions for applying the carbonaceous coating in each conveyor oven fabricated, either have been difficult to obtain, or have been difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. A new conveyor oven is nearing completion which is expected to allow formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber on absorber tubes in a continuous operation over many days without the necessity of cleaning the conveyor oven or changing the thickness of the electroplated nickel catalyst to compensate for changes in the coating environment in the oven. Work under this project concerned with forming and sealing glass panels to test ideas on evacuated glass solar collector designs and production have been generally quite satisfactory. Delays in completion of the selective absorber work, has caused postponement of the fabrication of a small prototype evacuated glass solar collector panel. Preliminary cost estimates of the selective absorber and solar collector panel indicate that this collector system should be lower in cost than evacuated solar collectors now on the market.

  5. Impact of anthropogenic emissions and open biomass burning on regional carbonaceous aerosols in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonaceous aerosols were studied at three background sites in south and southwest China. Hok Tsui in Hong Kong had the highest concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols (OC = 8.7 ± 4.5 μg/m3, EC = 2.5 ± 1.9 μg/m3) among the three sites, and Jianfeng Mountains in Hainan Island (OC = 5.8 ± 2.6 μg/m3, EC = 0.8 ± 0.4 μg/m3) and Tengchong mountain over the east edge of the Tibetan Plateau (OC = 4.8 ± 4.0 μg/m3, EC = 0.5 ± 0.4 μg/m3) showed similar concentration levels. Distinct seasonal patterns with higher concentrations during the winter, and lower concentrations during the summertime were observed, which may be caused by the changes of the regional emissions, and monsoon effects. The industrial and vehicular emissions in East, Southeast and South China, and the regional open biomass burning in the Indo-Myanmar region of Asia were probably the two major potential sources for carbonaceous matters in this region. - Anthropogenic emissions in China and open biomass burning in the Indo-Myanmar region were the two major potential sources for carbonaceous matters in South China region.

  6. Impact of anthropogenic emissions and open biomass burning on regional carbonaceous aerosols in South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Gan, E-mail: zhanggan@gig.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Li Jun [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Li Xiangdong [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Xu Yue; Guo Lingli [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tang Jianhui [Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Lee, Celine S.L. [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Liu Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen Yingjun [Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Carbonaceous aerosols were studied at three background sites in south and southwest China. Hok Tsui in Hong Kong had the highest concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols (OC = 8.7 {+-} 4.5 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, EC = 2.5 {+-} 1.9 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) among the three sites, and Jianfeng Mountains in Hainan Island (OC = 5.8 {+-} 2.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, EC = 0.8 {+-} 0.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) and Tengchong mountain over the east edge of the Tibetan Plateau (OC = 4.8 {+-} 4.0 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, EC = 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) showed similar concentration levels. Distinct seasonal patterns with higher concentrations during the winter, and lower concentrations during the summertime were observed, which may be caused by the changes of the regional emissions, and monsoon effects. The industrial and vehicular emissions in East, Southeast and South China, and the regional open biomass burning in the Indo-Myanmar region of Asia were probably the two major potential sources for carbonaceous matters in this region. - Anthropogenic emissions in China and open biomass burning in the Indo-Myanmar region were the two major potential sources for carbonaceous matters in South China region.

  7. Isotropic and high density carbon made from carbonaceous powder prepared by distillation under reduced pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is attempted to produce high density, high strength and isotropic carbon made from carbonaceous powder. The carbonaceous powder was prepared by carbonization of coal-tar pitch at a temperature of 440 - 5000C and subsequent distillation under reduced pressure. The distillation was performed at a temperature of 300 - 5000C below the carbonization temperature. In some cases additional quinoline extraction was carried out on the powder. Green carbon body was formed without binder pitch under isostatic pressure at room temperature. The body was heat-treated at a temperature of 1100 - 28000C. Bulk density, weight loss, shrinkage, strength, lattice parameter, crystallite size and BAF of the obtained carbon body were measured. It is confirmed that high density, high strength and isotropic carbon made from the carbonaceous powder and the following results were obtained. 1) BS (benzene soluble) fraction, β-resin (benzene insoluble and quinoline soluble) fraction and QI (quinoline insoluble) fraction were able to fractionate by distillation under reduced pressure. Concentration gradient of each fraction seems to exist in the carbonaceous powder. 2) Using the powder prepared by a lower temperature of the carbonization and/or the distillation, the carbon body had higher bulk density and higher strength. 3) The β-resin fraction had the effects of increasing the green density and enhancing the shrinkage of carbon body during the heat treatment. (author)

  8. A review and analysis of microwave absorption in polymer composites filled with carbonaceous particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Brosseau, C.

    2012-03-01

    Carbon (C) is a crucial material for many branches of modern technology. A growing number of demanding applications in electronics and telecommunications rely on the unique properties of C allotropes. The need for microwave absorbers and radar-absorbing materials is ever growing in military applications (reduction of radar signature of aircraft, ships, tanks, and targets) as well as in civilian applications (reduction of electromagnetic interference among components and circuits, reduction of the back-radiation of microstrip radiators). Whatever the application for which the absorber is intended, weight reduction and optimization of the operating bandwidth are two important issues. A composite absorber that uses carbonaceous particles in combination with a polymer matrix offers a large flexibility for design and properties control, as the composite can be tuned and optimized via changes in both the carbonaceous inclusions (C black, C nanotube, C fiber, graphene) and the embedding matrix (rubber, thermoplastic). This paper offers a perspective on the experimental efforts toward the development of microwave absorbers composed of carbonaceous inclusions in a polymer matrix. The absorption properties of such composites can be tailored through changes in geometry, composition, morphology, and volume fraction of the filler particles. Polymer composites filled with carbonaceous particles provide a versatile system to probe physical properties at the nanoscale of fundamental interest and of relevance to a wide range of potential applications that span radar absorption, electromagnetic protection from natural phenomena (lightning), shielding for particle accelerators in nuclear physics, nuclear electromagnetic pulse protection, electromagnetic compatibility for electronic devices, high-intensity radiated field protection, anechoic chambers, and human exposure mitigation. Carbonaceous particles are also relevant to future applications that require environmentally benign and

  9. Spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous aerosol aging in Central California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of pollution accumulation event (27–29 June 2010, when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm diameter increased with plume age as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic data set with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that individual particles in Mexico City contained twice as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (30% was larger than at the CARES urban site (10% and the most aged samples from CARES contained less carbon-carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol precursors. The detailed results provided by these spectro

  10. Spectro-Microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; Rodel, Tobias; Kelly, Stephen T.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Carroll, Gregory; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2013-10-29

    Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of pollution accumulation event (June 27-29, 2010), when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm diameter) increased with plume age as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic data set with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that individual particles in Mexico City contained twice as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (30%) was larger than at the CARES urban site (10%) and the most aged samples from CARES contained less carbon-carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol precursors. The detailed results provided by these spectro-microscopic measurements

  11. Spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous aerosol aging in Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffet, R. C.; Rödel, T. C.; Kelly, S. T.; Yu, X. Y.; Carroll, G. T.; Fast, J.; Zaveri, R. A.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.

    2013-10-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of the Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of a pollution accumulation event (27-29 June 2010), when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm equivalent circular diameter) increased with plume age, as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic dataset with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that fresh particles in Mexico City contained three times as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (ranging from 16.6 to 47.3%) was larger than at the CARES urban site (13.4-15.7%), and the most aged samples from CARES contained fewer carbon-carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol precursors. The detailed

  12. Asteroid 6 Hebe: The probable parent body of the H-Type ordinary chondrites and the IIE iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Michael J.; Gilbert, Sarah L.

    1998-11-01

    The S(IV)-type asteroid 6 Hebe is identified as the probable parent body of the H-type ordinary chondrites and of the IIE iron meteorites. The ordinary chondrites are the most common type of meteorites falling to Earth, but prior to the present study no large mainbelt source bodies have been confirmed. Hebe is located adjacent to both the (6 and 3:1 resonances, and has been previously suggested as a major potential source of the terrestrial meteorite flux. Hebe exhibits subtle rotational spectral variations indicating the presence of some compositional variations across its surface. The silicate portion of the surface assemblage of Hebe is consistent, both in overall average and in its range of variation, with the silicate components in the suite of H-type chondrites. The high albedo of Hebe rules out a lunar-style space weathering process to produce the weakened absorption features and reddish spectral slope in the S-type spectrum of Hebe. Linear unmixing models show that a typical nickel-iron metal spectrum is consistent with the component which modifies an H-chondrite spectrum to produce the S-type spectrum of Hebe. Based on the association between the H chondrites and the IIE iron meteorites, our model suggests that large impacts onto the relatively metal-rich H chondrite target produced melt bodies (sheets or pods) which differentiated to form thin, laterally extensive near-surface layers of NiFe metal. Fragments of the upper silicate portions of these melt bodies are apparently represented by some of the igneous inclusions in H-chondrite breccias. Alternately, masses of metal could have been deposited on the surface of Hebe by the impact of a core or core fragment from a differentiated parent body of H chondrite composition. Subsequent impacts preferentially eroded and depleted the overlying silicate and regolith components exposing and maintaining large masses of metal at the optical surface of Hebe. In this interpretation, the nonmagmatic IIE iron

  13. Refractory Inclusion Size Distribution and Fabric Measured in a Large Slab of the Allende CV3 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, P.; Simon, Justin I.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregate textures of chondrites reflect accretion of early-formed particles in the solar nebula. Explanations for the size and density variations of particle populations found among chondrites are debated. Differences could have risen out of formation in different locations in the nebula, and/or they could have been caused by a sorting process [1]. Many ideas on the cause of chondrule sorting have been proposed; some including sorting by mass [2,3], by X-winds [4], turbulent concentration [5], and by photophoresis [6]. However, few similar studies have been conducted for Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). These particles are known to have formed early, and their distribution could attest to the early stages of Solar System (ESS) history. Unfortunately, CAIs are not as common in chondrites as chondrules are, reducing the usefulness of studies restricted to a few thin sections. Furthermore, the largest sizes of CAIs are generally much larger than chondrules, and therefore rarely present in most studied chondrite thin sections. This study attempts to perform a more representative sampling of the CAI population in the Allende chondrite by investigating a two decimeter-sized slab.

  14. Petrologic evolution of CM chondrites: The difficulty of discriminating between nebular and parent-body effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, J. F.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Bunch, T. E.

    1994-07-01

    We wish to draw attention to a major controversy that has arisen in the area of CM-chondrite petrology. The problem is important because its resolution will have profound implications for ideas concerning nebular dynamics, gas-solid interactions in the nebula, and accretionary processes in the nebula, among other issues. On the one hand, cogent arguments have been presented that 'accretionary dust mantles,' were formed in the solar nebula prior to accretion of the CM parent asteroid(s). On the other hand, no-less-powerful arguments have been advanced that a significant fraction of the CM lithology is secondary, produced by aqueous alteration in the near-surface regions of an asteroid-sized object. Because most, if not all, CM chondrites are breccias, these two views could coexist harmoniously, were it not for the fact that some of the coarse-grained lithologies surrounded by 'accretion dust mantles' are themselves of apparently secondary origin. Such an observation must clearly force a reassessment of one or both of the present schools of thought. Our objective here is to stimulate such a reassessment. Four possible resolutions of this conflict may be postulated. First, perhaps nature found a way of permitting such secondary alteration to take place in the nebula. Second, maybe dust mantles could form in a regolith, rather than a nebular, environment. Third, it is possible that dust mantles around secondary lithologies are different from those around primary lithologies. Finally, perhaps formation of CM chondrites involved a more complex sequence of events than visualized so far, so that some apparently 'primary' processes postdated certain 'secondary' processes.

  15. Exposure ages and radiogenic ages of ureilite(GRV 024516) and ordinary chondrite(GRV 024517) from Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The GRV 024516 and GRV 024517 meteorite samples collected from Grove Montains,Antactica are ureilite and H5 ordinary chondrite,respectively.Based on the study of mineralogy-petrology ,the cosmic-ray exposure ages and gas retention ages of these two meteorites were determinated and calculated.Their cosmic-ray exposure ages are 33.3 Ma ,51.7 Ma,and gas retention ages are 1936.8 Ma and 3720 Ma,respectively.The ureilite contains diamond,graphite and amorphous C,which are mainly carrier of noble gases indicating obviously shock metamorphism effects,which induced 40Ar partial loss. The H5 chondrite indicates thermal metamorphism of parent body,its gas retention age fall the range between 3220 Ma and 4510 Ma of the least shocked H5 chondrites.

  16. High-pressure phases in shock-induced melt of the unique highly shocked LL6 chondrite Northwest Africa 757

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinping; Sharp, Thomas G.

    2016-07-01

    Northwest Africa 757 is unique in the LL chondrite group because of its abundant shock-induced melt and high-pressure minerals. Olivine fragments entrained in the melt transform partially and completely into ringwoodite. Plagioclase and Ca-phosphate transform to maskelynite, lingunite, and tuite. Two distinct shock-melt crystallization assemblages were studied by FIB-TEM analysis. The first melt assemblage, which includes majoritic garnet, ringwoodite plus magnetite-magnesiowüstite, crystallized at pressures of 20-25 GPa. The other melt assemblage, which consists of clinopyroxene and wadsleyite, solidified at ~15 GPa, suggesting a second veining event under lower pressure conditions. These shock features are similar to those in S6 L chondrites and indicate that NWA 757 experienced an intense impact event, comparable to the impact event that disrupted the L chondrite parent body at 470 Ma.

  17. Striking Graphite Bearing Clasts Found in Two Ordinary Chondrite Samples; NWA6169 and NWA8330

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jessica M.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Chan, Queenie; Kring, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Meteorites play an integral role in understanding the history of the solar system. Not only can they contain some of the oldest material found in the solar system they also can contain material that is unique. Many lithologies are only found as foreign clasts within distinctly different host meteorites. In this investigation two foreign clasts within the meteorites, NWA6169 and NWA8330 were studied. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the mineralogy and petrography of the clasts within the samples. From there an identification and possible origin were to be inferred. NWA6169 is an unclassified ordinary chondrite that has a presumed petrologic type of L3. NWA8330 is a classified ordinary chondrite that has a petrologic type of LL3. Both meteorites were found to contain clasts that were similar; both modally were comprised of about 5% acicular graphite. Through SEM and Raman Spectroscopy it was found that they contained olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, Fe-Ni sulfides, graphite, and metals. They were found to portray an igneous texture with relationships that suggest concurrent growth. Analytical microprobe results for NWA6169 revealed mineral compositions of Fa31-34, Fs23-83, and Ab7-85. For NWA8330 these were Fa28-32, Fs10-24, and Ab4-83. Only one similar material has been reported, in the L3 chondrite Krymka (Semenenko & Girich, 1995). The clast they described exhibited similar mineralogies including the unusual graphite. Krymka data displayed compositional values of Fa28.5-35.0 and Fs9-25.9. These ranges are fairly similar to that of NWA6169 and NWA8330. These samples may all be melt clasts, probably of impact origin. Two possibilities are (1) impact of a C-type asteroid onto the L chondrite parent asteroid, and (2) a piece of proto-earth ejected from the moon-forming collision event. These possibilities present abundant questions, and can be tested. The measurement of oxygen isotope compositions from the clasts should reveal the original source of the

  18. The magnetic effects of brecciation and shock in meteorites. I - The LL-chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, A.; Stein, J.; Fuhrman, M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic behavior of eight LL chondrites is analyzed in detail, and some implications for their modes of formation and evolutionary history are examined. Petrographic features of the specimens are described, and their initial magnetic characteristics are discussed. The demagnetization behavior of the initial magnetization is investigated along with the saturation remanence behavior and paleomagnetic-field intensities. The results indicate that a magnetic field of 0.01 to 0.1 Oe may have been present during postimpact cooling and that severe shock metamorphism may have given rise to the observed magnetic moments and behavior, even in the absence of ambient magnetic fields.

  19. Sorption characteristics and mechanisms of organic contaminant to carbonaceous biosorbents in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN BaoLiang; ZHOU DanDan; ZHU LiZhong; SHEN XueYou

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbonaceous biosorbents was prepared by pyrolyzing pine needles, a model biomass, at various temperatures (100-700℃) under an oxygen-limited condition for 6 h. The elemental composi-tions and the specific surface areas (BET-N2) of the biosorbents were analyzed. Sorption properties of 4-nitrotoluene to the biosorbents and their mechanisms were investigated, and then correlated with the structures of the biosorbents. The result shows that with the increase of the pyrolytic temperature, the sromaticity of the carbonaceous biosorbents increases dramatically and the polarity (the (N+O)/C atomic ratio) decreases sharply. Correspondingly, conformations of the organic matter in the biosor-bents transform gradually from a "soft-state" to a "hard-state" and the specific surface areas of the resultant biosorbents extend rapidly. The sorption isotherms fit well with the Freundlich equation. The regression parameters (I.e., N and IgKf) are linearly related to the aromaticity indices (the H/C atomic ratio). Contributions of adsorption and partition to total sorption of the carbonaceous biosorbents are quantified. The adsorption of the carbonaceous biosorbents increases quickly with the increase of the pyrolytic temperature. The saturated adsorption amounts (Qmax) increase linearly with the increase of the specific surface areas (SA) of the biosorbents. For the carbonaceous biosorbents with hard-state carbon, the calculated normalized-Qmax values by SA are comparable to the theoretical estimation (2.45 μmol/m2). In comparison, for the carbonaceous sorbents with soft-state carbon, the calculated nor-malized-Qmax values by SA are much higher than the theoretical estimation. The partition coefficients (Kom) increase with the decrease of the polarity of the biosorbents, reaching a maximum, and then de-crease sharply with further decreasing the polarity, suggesting that partition mechanism be dominated by the compatibility and accessibility of the sorbent medium with

  20. Sorption characteristics and mechanisms of organic contaminant to carbonaceous biosorbents in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbonaceous biosorbents was prepared by pyrolyzing pine needles,a model biomass,at various temperatures (100-700℃) under an oxygen-limited condition for 6h. The elemental composi-tions and the specific surface areas (BET-N2) of the biosorbents were analyzed. Sorption properties of 4-nitrotoluene to the biosorbents and their mechanisms were investigated,and then correlated with the structures of the biosorbents. The result shows that with the increase of the pyrolytic temperature,the aromaticity of the carbonaceous biosorbents increases dramatically and the polarity (the (N+O)/C atomic ratio) decreases sharply. Correspondingly,conformations of the organic matter in the biosor-bents transform gradually from a "soft-state" to a "hard-state" and the specific surface areas of the resultant biosorbents extend rapidly. The sorption isotherms fit well with the Freundlich equation. The regression parameters (i.e.,N and lgKf) are linearly related to the aromaticity indices (the H/C atomic ratio). Contributions of adsorption and partition to total sorption of the carbonaceous biosorbents are quantified. The adsorption of the carbonaceous biosorbents increases quickly with the increase of the pyrolytic temperature. The saturated adsorption amounts (Qmax) increase linearly with the increase of the specific surface areas (SA) of the biosorbents. For the carbonaceous biosorbents with hard-state carbon,the calculated normalized-Qmax values by SA are comparable to the theoretical estimation (2.45 μmol/m2). In comparison,for the carbonaceous sorbents with soft-state carbon,the calculated nor-malized-Qmax values by SA are much higher than the theoretical estimation. The partition coefficients (Kom) increase with the decrease of the polarity of the biosorbents,reaching a maximum,and then de-crease sharply with further decreasing the polarity,suggesting that partition mechanism be dominated by the compatibility and accessibility of the sorbent medium with organic

  1. The Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia—Sampling a rapidly cooled impact melt dike on an H chondrite asteroid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Martin; Kring, David A.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Bond, Jade C.; Moore, Carleton B.

    2016-06-01

    The Gao-Guenie H5 chondrite that fell on Burkina Faso (March 1960) has portions that were impact-melted on an H chondrite asteroid at ~300 Ma and, through later impact events in space, sent into an Earth-crossing orbit. This article presents a petrographic and electron microprobe analysis of a representative sample of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia consisting of a chondritic clast domain, quenched melt in contact with chondritic clasts, and an igneous-textured impact melt domain. Olivine is predominantly Fo80-82. The clast domain contains low-Ca pyroxene. Impact melt-grown pyroxene is commonly zoned from low-Ca pyroxene in cores to pigeonite and augite in rims. Metal-troilite orbs in the impact melt domain measure up to ~2 mm across. The cores of metal orbs in the impact melt domain contain ~7.9 wt% of Ni and are typically surrounded by taenite and Ni-rich troilite. The metallography of metal-troilite droplets suggest a stage I cooling rate of order 10 °C s-1 for the superheated impact melt. The subsolidus stage II cooling rate for the impact melt breccia could not be determined directly, but was presumably fast. An analogy between the Ni rim gradients in metal of the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia and the impact-melted H6 chondrite Orvinio suggests similar cooling rates, probably on the order of ~5000-40,000 °C yr-1. A simple model of conductive heat transfer shows that the Gao-Guenie impact melt breccia may have formed in a melt injection dike ~0.5-5 m in width, generated during a sizeable impact event on the H chondrite parent asteroid.

  2. Deformation and thermal histories of ordinary chondrites: Evidence for post-deformation annealing and syn-metamorphic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Alex; Hugo, Richard; Hutson, Melinda

    2015-08-01

    We show that olivine microstructures in seven metamorphosed ordinary chondrites of different groups studied with optical and transmission electron microscopy can be used to evaluate the post-deformation cooling setting of the meteorites, and to discriminate between collisions affecting cold and warm parent bodies. The L6 chondrites Park (shock stage S1), Bruderheim (S4), Leedey (S4), and Morrow County (S5) were affected by variable shock deformation followed by relatively rapid cooling, and probably cooled as fragments liberated by impact in near-surface settings. In contrast, Kernouvé (H6 S1), Portales Valley (H6/7 S1), and MIL 99301 (LL6 S1) appear to have cooled slowly after shock, probably by deep burial in warm materials. In these chondrites, post-deformation annealing lowered apparent optical strain levels in olivine. Additionally, Kernouvé, Morrow County, Park, MIL 99301, and possibly Portales Valley, show evidence for having been deformed at an elevated temperature (⩾800-1000 °C). The high temperatures for Morrow County can be explained by dynamic heating during intense shock, but Kernouvé, Park, and MIL 99301 were probably shocked while the H, L and LL parent bodies were warm, during early, endogenically-driven thermal metamorphism. Thus, whereas the S4 and S5 chondrites experienced purely shock-induced heating and cooling, all the S1 chondrites examined show evidence for static heating consistent with either syn-metamorphic shock (Kernouvé, MIL 99301, Park), post-deformation burial in warm materials (Kernouvé, MIL 99301, Portales Valley), or both. The results show the pitfalls in relying on optical shock classification alone to infer an absence of shock and to construct cooling stratigraphy models for parent bodies. Moreover, they provide support for the idea that "secondary" metamorphic and "tertiary" shock processes overlapped in time shortly after the accretion of chondritic planetesimals, and that impacts into warm asteroidal bodies were

  3. Uranium-lead Isotope Evidence in the Shelyabinsk LL5 Chondrite Meteorite for Ancient and Recent Thermal Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapen, T. J.; Kring, D. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Swindle, T. D.; Beard, S. P.; Swindle, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    The impact histories on chondrite parent bodies can be deduced from thermochronologic analyses of materials and isotope systems with distinct apparent closure temperatures. It is especially critical to better understand the geological histories and physical properties of potenally hazardous near-Earth asteroids. Chelyabinsk is an LL5 chondrite meteorite that was dispersed over a wide area tens of kilometers south of the town of Chelyabinsk, Russia by an explosion at an altitude of 27 km at 3:22 UT on 15 Feb 2013 [1,2]. The explosion resulted in significant damage to surrounding areas and over 1500 injuries along with meteorite fragments being spread over a wide area [1].

  4. Two-step flotation recovery of iron concentrate from Donganshan carbonaceous iron ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Wan-zhong; HAN Yue-xin; XIE Feng

    2010-01-01

    The flotation of pure and natural carbonaceous iron ore samples in the oleate flotation system was investigated.Starch can depress hematite effectively in a wide pH range,but cannot depress siderite efficiently in neutral conditions.The flotation recovery of pure hematite,siderite,and quartz in the oleate-starch-CaCl2 system is significantly different when the slurry pH varies from 4 to 12.A novel two-step flotation process was developed for the separation of iron concentrate from Donganshan carbonaceous iron ore through which the siderite concentrate is first recovered and the high quality hematite concentrates with relative high iron recovery can be obtained in the second step flotation.The siderite concentrate may be utilized directly or undergo further concentration steps to increase iron grade.

  5. Formation of PAHs and Carbonaceous Solids in Gas-Phase Condensation Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, C; Jansa, I Llamas; Henning, T; Huisken, F

    2009-01-01

    Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. In order to understand their formation pathways, they have been prepared in the laboratory by gas-phase condensation reactions such as laser pyrolysis and laser ablation. Our studies demonstrate that the temperature in the condensation zone determines the formation pathway of carbonaceous particles. At temperatures lower than 1700 K, the condensation by-products are mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), that are also the precursors or building blocks for the condensing soot grains. The low-temperature condensates contain PAH mixtures that are mainly composed of volatile 3-5 ring systems. At condensation temperatures higher than 3500 K, fullerene-like carbon grains and fullerene compounds are formed. Fullerene fragments or complete fullerenes equip the nucleating particles. Fullerenes can be identified as soluble components. Consequently, condensation products in cool and hot astrophysical environments such as cool and hot AGB stars or W...

  6. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  7. Early history of Earth's crust-mantle system inferred from hafnium isotopes in chondrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Haack, Henning; Rosing, M.;

    2003-01-01

    The Lu to Hf decay series has been widely used to understand the nature of Earth's early crust-mantle system. The interpretation, however, of Lu-Hf isotope data requires accurate knowledge of the radioactive decay constant of Lu (¿176), as well as bulk-Earth reference parameters. A recent...... calibration of the ¿176 value calls for the presence of highly unradiogenic hafnium in terrestrial zircons with ages greater than 3.9 Gyr, implying widespread continental crust extraction from an isotopically enriched mantle source more than 4.3 Gyr ago, but does not provide evidence for a complementary...... depleted mantle reservoir. Here we report Lu-Hf isotope measurements of different Solar System objects including chondrites and basaltic eucrites. The chondrites define a Lu-Hf isochron with an initial Hf/Hf ratio of 0.279628 ± 0.000047, corresponding to ¿176 = 1.983 ± 0.033 x 10yr using an age of 4.56 Gyr...

  8. Chondritic-like xenon trapped in Archean rocks: A possible signature of the ancient atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Magali; Marty, Bernard; Burgess, Ray

    2011-08-01

    Ancient sedimentary rocks may have retained a record of the past atmospheric composition. We present evidence for the geological preservation of remnants of the Archean atmosphere. Hydrothermal quartz containing fluid inclusions from a core drilled in 3.5 Ga-old terrains at North Pole, (Western Australia), has a Ar-Ar plateau age of 3.0 ± 0.2 Ga. An Archean age is confirmed independently by 130Ba- 130Xe dating of fluid inclusions. Xenon trapped in the present sample and in 3.5 Ga-old barite from the same locality (Pujol et al., 2009; Srinivasan, 1976) presents an isotopic composition intermediate between the atmospheric composition and that of chondritic, or solar, xenon. In contrast, the stable isotopes of neon and krypton are isotopically atmospheric. This observation suggests that the well known but unexplained enrichment of heavy Xe isotopes in the atmosphere relative to cosmochemical (chondritic or solar) end-members was progressive, and not complete ≥ 3 Ga ago. This Xe isotopic fractionation might have taken place during prolongated irradiation of the atmosphere by the ancient Sun.

  9. Classification of 24 New Ordinary Chondrites from the Grove Mountains, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ren; MIAO Bingkui; WANG Guiqing; DAI Deqiu; LIN Yangting; OUYANG Ziyuan; LI Chunlai

    2004-01-01

    Petrography and mineral chemistry of 24 ordinary chondrites from the Grove Mountains, Antarctica, have been studied in order to identify their chemical-petrographic types. These samples were selected from a total of 4448 Grove Mountains (GRV) meteorites collected during the 19th Chinese Antarctic Research Expedition so as to make an estimation of the large GRV meteorite collection. The chemical-petrographic types of these meteorites are presented below: 1 H3, 2 H4,4 H5, 2 H6, 1 L4, 7 L5, 5 L6, 1 LL4 and 1 LL6. The new data weaken the previous report that unequilibrated ordinary chondrites are unusually abundant in the Grove Mountains region. However, this work confirms significant differences in distribution patterns of chemical-petrographic types between the Grove Mountains and other regions in Antarctica. Many of these meteorites show significant terrestrial weathering, probably due to a high abundance ratio of meteorites found in moraines to those on blue ice. Nine meteorites experienced severe shock metamorphism, as evidenced by undulose extinction and intense fracturing of silicates and presence of shock-induced melt veins and pockets. These heavily shocked meteorites provided us with natural samples for the study of high-pressure polymorphs of minerals.

  10. New Nd-142 Evidence for a Non-Chondritic Composition of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, L.; Touboul, M.; Kleine, T.; Bourdon, B.; Shih, C.Y.

    2009-01-01

    The coupled Sm-147,146-Nd-143,142 systematics of lunar samples has been extensively studied for estimating the timescale of lunar differentiation. The published datasets yield consistent ages for Nd isotopic closure within the lunar mantle of approx.200 Myr after CAI formation. Although this time constraint is consistent with estimates derived from Hf-W chronometry of the Moon (>60 Myr after CAI formation), there is debate as to whether this age has chronological significance. Furthermore, there are discrepancies regarding the Nd isotope composition of the bulk Moon. Rankenburg et al. obtained a epsilon Nd-142 vs. Sm-147/Nd-144 correlation for lunar samples passing though the chondritic reference value (Sm-147/Nd-144 = 0.1967, epsilon Nd-142 = -0.21), suggesting that the Moon has a chondritic bulk composition. In contrast, the other datasets define a correlation line that passes approx.10-20 ppm above, suggesting that the Moon has a superchondritic Sm-147/Nd-144 (approx.0.206), close to that of the early depleted Earth (EDM). We present new Sm-Nd data for a high-Ti mare basalt (70135), two low-Ti mare basalt (LAP 02205 and MIL 05035) and a KREEPy low-Ti mare basalt (NWA 2977). These data are used to evaluate the significance of the Sm-Nd systematics for constraining the timescale of lunar differentiation and the bulk Nd isotope composition of the Moon.

  11. Raman Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Materials geothermometry: a reliable method to investigate thermal history of foreland basins.

    OpenAIRE

    Lahfid, Abdeltif; Lacroix, Brice; Hoareau, Guilhem; Delchini, Sylvain; Bourrat, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the thermal evolu-tion of foreland basins, many classical methods includ-ing clay mineralogy, vitrinite reflectance, fluid inclu-sions and illite cristalinity are used. These methods are probably not perfectly reliable taken individually, but provides a robust estimate when they give a coherent results. Raman Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Materials (RSCM) could be an alternative method to constrain paleotempeartures of rocks. This method has been calibrated firstly in the range ...

  12. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  13. Origin of fine carbonaceous particulate matter in the Western Mediterranean Basin: fossil versus modern sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Minguillón, María.; Perron, Nolwenn; Querol, Xavier; Szidat, Sönke; Fahrni, Simon; Wacker, Lukas; Reche, Cristina; Cusack, Michael; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2010-05-01

    The present work was carried out in the frame of the international field campaign DAURE (Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean). The objective of this campaign is to study the aerosol pollution episodes occurring at regional scale during winter and summer in the Western Mediterranean Basin. As part of this campaign, this work focuses on identifying the origin of fine carbonaceous aerosols. To this end, fine particulate matter (PM1) samples were collected during two different seasons (February-March and July 2009) at two sites: an urban site (Barcelona, NE Spain) and a rural European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (Montseny, NE Spain). Subsequently, 14C analyses were carried out on these samples, both in the elemental carbon (EC) fraction and the organic carbon (OC) fraction, in order to distinguish between modern carbonaceous sources (biogenic emissions and biomass burning emissions) and fossil carbonaceous sources (mainly road traffic). Preliminary results from the winter period show that 40% of the OC at Barcelona has a fossil origin whereas at Montseny this percentage is 30%. These values can be considered as unexpected given the nature of the sites. Nevertheless, the absolute concentrations of fossil OC at Barcelona and Montseny differ by a factor of 2 (the first being higher), since the total OC at Montseny is lower than at Barcelona. Further evaluation of results and comparison with other measurements carried out during the campaign are required to better evaluate the origin of the fine carbonaceous matter in the Western Mediterranean Basin. Acknowledgements: Spanish Ministry of Education and Science, for a Postdoctoral Grant awarded to M.C. Minguillón in the frame of Programa Nacional de Movilidad de Recursos Humanos del Plan nacional de I-D+I 2008-2011. Spanish Ministry of Education and Science, for the Acción Complementaria DAURE CGL2007-30502-E/CLI.

  14. Key parameters when developing carbonaceous materials for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Rui; Silva, Adrián; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) is an advanced oxidation process, operated using simple equipment and mild operating conditians, in which highly oxidizing hydraxyl radicaIs (HO') are generated fram the catalytic decompasition af hydrogen peroxide (H,O,) [L 2). Sinee the report of Lüeking el ai. in 1998 [3], the develapment af suitab-Ie -carbonaceous materials (without any added metal phase) for CWPO has been intensively explored [4). lhe influenee of struetUfal and surr...

  15. Carbon Paste Electrodes Made from Different Carbonaceous Materials: Application in the Study of Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin Apetrei; Maria Luz Rodriguez-Mendez; Jose Antonio De Saja; Irina Mirela Apetrei

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the sensing properties of carbon paste electrodes (CPEs) prepared from three different types of carbonaceous materials: graphite, carbon microspheres and carbon nanotubes. The electrochemical responses towards antioxidants including vanillic acid, catechol, gallic acid, L-ascorbic acid and L-glutathione have been analyzed and compared. It has been demonstrated that the electrodes based on carbon microspheres show the best performances in terms of kinetics and stability, wh...

  16. Implementing a new EPR lineshape parameter for organic radicals in carbonaceous matter

    OpenAIRE

    Bourbin, Mathilde; Du, Yann Le; Binet, Laurent; Gourier, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Background Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a non-destructive, non-invasive technique useful for the characterization of organic moieties in primitive carbonaceous matter related to the origin of life. The classical EPR parameters are the peak-to-peak amplitude, the linewidth and the g factor; however, such parameters turn out not to suffice to fully determine a single EPR line. Results In this paper, we give the definition and practical implementation of a new EPR parameter based on ...

  17. Annual variations of carbonaceous PM2.5 in Malaysia: Influence by Indonesian peatland fires

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Y.; S. Tohno; Amil, N.; M. T. Latif; Oda, M.; Matsumoto, J.; A. Mizohata

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we quantified carbonaceous PM2.5 in Malaysia through annual observations of PM2.5, focusing on organic compounds derived from biomass burning. We determined organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon and concentrations of solvent-extractable organic compounds (biomarkers derived from biomass burning sources and n-alkanes). We observed seasonal variations in the concentrations of pyrolyzed OC (OP), levoglucosan (LG), mannosan (MN), galactosan, syringaldehyde, vanillic acid (VA) and c...

  18. Spheroidal carbonaceous particles are a defining stratigraphic marker for the Anthropocene

    OpenAIRE

    Swindles, GT; Watson, E.; Turner, TE; Galloway, JM; Hadlari, T; Wheeler, J; Bacon, KL

    2015-01-01

    There has been recent debate over stratigraphic markers used to demarcate the Anthropocene from the Holocene Epoch. However, many of the proposed markers are found only in limited areas of the world or do not reflect human impacts on the environment. Here we show that spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs), a distinct form of black carbon produced from burning fossil fuels in energy production and heavy industry, provide unambiguous stratigraphic markers of the human activities that have ra...

  19. Combined method for simultaneously dewatering and reconstituting finely divided carbonaceous material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wu-Wey; Deurbrouck, Albert W.

    1990-01-01

    A finely-divided carbonaceous material is dewatered and reconstituted in a combined process by adding a binding agent directly into slurry of finely divided material and dewatering the material to form a cake or consolidated piece which can be hardened by drying at ambient or elevated temperatures. Alternatively, the binder often in the form of a crusting agent is sprayed onto the surface of a moist cake prior to curing.

  20. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  1. Fermentation, gasification and pyrolysis of carbonaceous residues towards usage in fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sequeira, C.A.C.; Santos, D.M.F. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); Brito, P.S.D.; Mota, A.F.; Carvalho, J.L.; Rodrigues, L.F.F.T.T.G. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao de Portalegre, Apartado 148, 7300-901 Portalegre (Portugal); Barrio, D.B.; Justo, D.M. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, c/Real de Burgos sin, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    In this paper, the technologies of fermentation, gasification and pyrolysis of carbonaceous residues for the production of biohydrogen and other gaseous, liquid or solid fuels, are analysed. The energetic, economic and environmental advantages of linking these energy areas with the fuel cell engines are stressed. In addition, the current status of fuel cell technologies, namely their historic trends, basic electrode mechanisms, cell types, market drivers and leading issues, are reviewed. (author)

  2. Carbonaceous matter deposition in the high glacial regions of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoliu; Chen, Pengfei; Kang, Shichang; Yan, Fangping; Li, Xiaofei; Qu, Bin; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-09-01

    Carbonaceous matter at glacial region plays important role in river ecosystems fed by glacier and albedo reduction of glacier surface. However, currently, limited knowledge are available on the carbonaceous matter within the glacial region of the Tibetan Plateau (TP). In this study, the data from six snowpits in the glacial region across the TP were reported. The results showed that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of snowpit samples of the TP were comparable to those of European Alps and the Arctic. The ratio of DOC to carbonaceous matter (40.25 ± 8.98%) was lower than that of Alpine glaciers, thus indicating greater particulate carbon content in the TP glacial region. In addition, the DOC was significantly correlated with insoluble particulate carbon (IPC), indicating that IPC and DOC likely came from the same sources. Spatially, the DOC concentration decreased from the north (0.42 ± 0.29 mg-C L-1) to the south TP (0.15 ± 0.06 mg-C L-1), which was consistent with variations in the distribution of dust storm on the TP. Principal component analysis of major ions and DOC showed that mineral dust contributed the major part of DOC, followed by biogenic sources such as agriculture and livestock. Finally, based on DOC concentrations and precipitation amounts at different periods, the mean annul flux of DOC in the glacial region of the TP was calculated to be 0.11 ± 0.05 g-C m-2 yr-1.

  3. Enhanced Removal of Lead by Chemically and Biologically Treated Carbonaceous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid sorbents and biosorbents were synthesized via chemical and biological treatment of active carbon by simple and direct redox reaction followed by surface loading of baker’s yeast. Surface functionality and morphology of chemically and biologically modified sorbents and biosorbents were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. Hybrid carbonaceous sorbents and biosorbents were characterized by excellent efficiency and superiority toward lead(II sorption compared to blank active carbon providing a maximum sorption capacity of lead(II ion as 500 μmol g−1. Sorption processes of lead(II by these hybrid materials were investigated under the influence of several controlling parameters such as pH, contact time, mass of sorbent and biosorbent, lead(II concentration, and foreign ions. Lead(II sorption mechanisms were found to obey the Langmuir and BET isotherm models. The potential applications of chemically and biologically modified-active carbonaceous materials for removal and extraction of lead from real water matrices were also studied via a double-stage microcolumn technique. The results of this study were found to denote to superior recovery values of lead (95.0–99.0±3.0–5.0% by various carbonaceous-modified-bakers yeast biosorbents.

  4. Garnet-filled trails associated with carbonaceous matter mimicking microbial filaments in Archean basalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepot, K; Philippot, P; Benzerara, K; Wang, G-Y

    2009-09-01

    The study of the earliest traces of life on Earth can be complicated by abiotically formed biomorphs. We report here the finding of clustered micrometer-sized filaments of iron- and calcium-rich garnets associated with carbonaceous matter in an agate amygdale from a 2.7-billion-year-old basalt of the Maddina Formation, Western Australia. The distribution of carbonaceous matter and the mineral phases composing the filaments were analyzed using a combination of confocal laser scanning microscopy, laser-Raman micro-spectroscopy, focused ion beam sectioning and transmission electron microscopy. The results allow consideration of possible biogenic and abiotic processes that produced the filamentous structures. The filaments have a range of sizes, morphologies and distributions similar to those of certain modern iron-mineralized filamentous bacteria and some ancient filamentous structures interpreted as microfossils. They also share a high morphological similarity with tubular structures produced by microbial boring activity. However, the microstructures and the distribution of carbonaceous matter are more suggestive of an abiotic origin for the filaments. They are characteristic features of trails produced by the displacement of inclusions associated with local dissolution of their silica matrix. Organic compounds found in kerogen or bitumen inclusions may have contributed significantly to the dissolution of the quartz (or silica gel) matrix driving filamentous growth. Discriminating the products of such abiotic organic-mediated processes from filamentous microfossils or microbial borings is important to the interpretation of the scarce Precambrian fossil record and requires investigation down to the nanoscale.

  5. A Carbonaceous Membrane based on a Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity (PIM-1) for Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Joong; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Lee, Kyuchul; Baek, Youngbin; Yoo, Youngjae; Kim, Yong Seok; Kim, Byoung Gak; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    As insufficient access to clean water is expected to become worse in the near future, water purification is becoming increasingly important. Membrane filtration is the most promising technologies to produce clean water from contaminated water. Although there have been many studies to prepare highly water-permeable carbon-based membranes by utilizing frictionless water flow inside the carbonaceous pores, the carbon-based membranes still suffer from several issues, such as high cost and complicated fabrication as well as relatively low salt rejection. Here, we report for the first time the use of microporous carbonaceous membranes via controlled carbonization of polymer membranes with uniform microporosity for high-flux nanofiltration. Further enhancement of membrane performance is observed by O2 plasma treatment. The optimized membrane exhibits high water flux (13.30 LMH Bar−1) and good MgSO4 rejection (77.38%) as well as antifouling properties. This study provides insight into the design of microporous carbonaceous membranes for water purification. PMID:27782212

  6. Comets: Cosmic connections with carbonaceous meteorites, interstellar molecules and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.

    1979-01-01

    The ions, radicals, and molecules observed in comets may be derived intact or by partial decomposition from parent compounds of the sort found either in the interstellar medium or in carbonaceous meteorites. The early loss of highly reducing primitive atmosphere and its replacement by a secondary atmosphere dominated by H2O, CO2, and N2, as depicted in current models of the earth's evolution, pose a dilemma for the origin of life: the synthesis of organic compounds necessary for life from components of the secondary atmosphere appears to be difficult, and plausible mechanisms have not been evaluated. Both comets and carbonaceous meteorites are implicated as sources for the earth's atmophilic and organogenic elements. A mass balance argument involving the estimated ratios of hydrogen to carbon in carbonaceous meteorites, comets, and the crust and upper mantle suggests that comets supplied the earth with a large fraction of its volatiles. The probability that comets contributed significantly to the earth's volatile inventory suggests a chemical evolutionary link between comets, prebiotic organic synthesis, and the origin of life.

  7. Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain and Central Himalaya: impact of anthropogenic sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Kirpa; Sarin, M M

    2015-01-15

    In the present-day scenario of growing anthropogenic activities, carbonaceous aerosols contribute significantly (∼20-70%) to the total atmospheric particulate matter mass and, thus, have immense potential to influence the Earth's radiation budget and climate on a regional to global scale. In addition, formation of secondary organic aerosols is being increasingly recognized as an important process in contributing to the air-pollution and poor visibility over urban regions. It is, thus, essential to study atmospheric concentrations of carbonaceous species (EC, OC and WSOC), their mixing state and absorption properties on a regional scale. This paper presents the comprehensive data on emission sources, chemical characteristics and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols from selected urban sites in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and from a high-altitude location in the central Himalaya. The mass concentrations of OC, EC and WSOC exhibit large spatio-temporal variability in the IGP. This is attributed to seasonally varying emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning, their source strength, boundary layer dynamics and secondary aerosol formation. The high concentrations of OC and SO4(2-), and their characteristic high mass scattering efficiency, contribute significantly to the aerosol optical depth and scattering coefficient. This has implications to the assessment of single scattering albedo and aerosol radiative forcing on a regional scale. PMID:25199599

  8. Anticorrosion properties of tin oxide coatings for carbonaceous bipolar plates of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinumoto, Taro; Nagano, Keita; Yamamoto, Yuji; Tsumura, Tomoki; Toyoda, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    An anticorrosive surface treatment of a carbonaceous bipolar plate used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) was demonstrated by addition of a tin oxide surface coating by liquid phase deposition (LPD), and its effectiveness toward corrosion prevention was determined. The tin oxide coating was deposited by immersion in tin fluoride and boric acid solutions, without any observable decrease in the bipolar plate electrical conductivity. Anticorrosion properties of a flat carbonaceous bipolar plate were investigated in an aqueous HClO4 electrolyte solution (10 μmol dm-3) at 80 °C. CO2 release due to corrosion was significant for the bare specimen above 1.3 V, whereas no CO2 release was noted for the tin-oxide-coated specimen, even approaching 1.5 V. Moreover, minimal changes in contact angle against a water droplet before and after treatment indicated suppressed corrosion of the surface-coated specimen. Anticorrosion properties were also confirmed for a model bipolar plate having four gas flow channels. The tin oxide layer remained on the channel surfaces (inner walls, corners and intersections) after durability tests. Based on these results, tin-oxide-based surface coatings fabricated by LPD show promise as an anticorrosion technique for carbonaceous bipolar plates for PEMFCs.

  9. Low extraction recovery of fullerene from carbonaceous geological materials spiked with C{sub 60}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehlicka, J.; Frank, O.; Hamplova, V.; Pokorna, Z.; Juha, L.; Bohacek, Z.; Weishauptova, Z. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. for Geochemical Mineral & Mineral Resources

    2005-08-01

    Soxhlet extraction, sonication, and ultracritical extraction were tested with respect to their capacity to extract fullerenes from natural carbonaceous materials. Toluene solutions with various contents of synthetic C{sub 60} were added to powdered graphite, shungite, bituminous coal, and quartz, with final C{sub 60} concentration 0.1-100 ppm. The C{sub 60}-doped materials were leached in three kinds of extraction apparatus. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyse the fullerene content in the obtained toluene extracts. Surprisingly low yields of the C{sub 60} extraction (most of them well below 5%) were determined for all the carbonaceous matrices and all the extraction techniques employed in the fullerene isolation. This finding has serious consequences for better understanding of the reported fullerene occurrence in the geological environment, because a greatly limited extraction yield can be responsible for some negative results of fullerene analyses in various geological samples. Both fullerene stability in solvents and fullerene interaction with the surfaces of geological carbonaceous matrices are discussed to explain the obtained results.

  10. Anomalous Lithium Adsorption Propensity of Monolayer Carbonaceous Materials: A Density Functional Study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SWATI PANIGRAHI; DEIVASIGAMANI UMADEVI; G NARAHARI SASTRY

    2016-10-01

    Interaction between lithium and carbonaceous materials has gained a lot of importance in lithium battery industry as an important source of energy and storage. The size, dimension, curvature and chirality of the carbonaceous materials are found to be very important factors in controlling the sequential binding oflithium. The propensity of lithium binding to the monolayer carbonaceous materials has been studied using Density functional theory (DFT). Structural and energetical parameters of the complexes have been analyzed through interaction energy, sequential energy, Mulliken population analysis and spin density distribution. Spindensity of odd Li doped systems reveals the preferences for addition of further lithium atoms on the surface. Upon analyzing the interaction energy in armchair carbon nanotubes (A-CNTs) and zigzag carbon nanotubes (Z-CNTs), it has been observed that external and internal surfaces of CNTs have contrasting binding preferences for sequential addition of Li atoms. Internal surface is found to be more feasible site for lithium adsorption than the external surface. This current study provides fundamental understanding of the mechanism of lithium adsorption in lithium battery.

  11. Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrite Parent Bodies, Its Impact on the Method of Distinguishing H, L, and LL Types and Implications for Itokawa Samples Returned by the Hayabusa Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, T.; Sasaki, S.; Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    As the most abundance meteorites in our collections, ordinary chondrites potentially have very important implications on the origin and formation of our Solar System. In order to map the distribution of ordinary chondrite-like asteroids through remote sensing, the space weathering effects of ordinary chondrite parent bodies must be addressed through experiments and modeling. Of particular importance is the impact on distinguishing different types (H/L/LL) of ordinary chondrites. In addition, samples of asteroid Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft may re veal the mechanism of space weathering on an LLchondrite parent body. Results of space weathering simulations on ordinary chondrites and implications for Itokawa samples are presented here.

  12. Carbonaceous aerosols in PM10 and pollution gases in winter in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ren-Jian; CAO Jun-ji; LEE Shun-cheng; SHEN Zhen-xing; HO Kin-Fai

    2007-01-01

    An intensive observation of organic carbon (OC) and element carbon (EC) in PM10 and gaseous materials (SO2, CO, and O3,) was conducted continuously to assess the characteristics of wintertime carbonaceous aerosols in an urban area of Beijing, China. Results showed that the averaged total carbon (TC) and PM10 concentrations in observation period are 30.2±120.4 and 172.6±198.3 μ/m3, respectively. Average OC concentration in nighttime (24.9±19.6 μ/m3) was 40% higher than that in daytime (17.7±10.9 μ/m3). Average EC concentrations in daytime (8.8±15.2 μ/m3) was close to that in nighttime (8.9±15.1 μ/m3). The OC/EC ratios in nighttime ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 are higher than that in daytime ranging from 1.9 to 2.0. The concentrations of OC, EC, PM10 were low with strong winds and high with weak winds. The OC and EC were well correlated with PM10, CO and SO2, which implies they have similar sources. OC and EC were not well correlated with O3. By considering variation of OC/EC ratios in daytime and night time, correlations between OC and O3, and meteorological condition, we speculated that OC and EC in Beijing PM10 were emitted as the primary particulate form. Emission of motor vehicle with low OC/EC ratio and coal combustion sources with high OC/EC ratio are probably the dominant sources for carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing in winter. A simple method was used to estimate the relative contribution of sources to carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing PM10. Motor vehicle source accounts for 80% and 68%, while coal combustion accounts for 20% and 32% in daytime and nighttime, respectively in Beijing. Averagely, the motor vehicle and coal combustion accounted for 74% and 26%, respectively, for carbonaceous aerosols during the observation period. It points to the motor vehicle is dominant emission for carbonaceous aerosols in Beijing PM10 in winter period, which should be paid attention to control high level of PM10 in Beijing effectively.

  13. Comets as Parent Bodies of CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites and Possible Habitats of Ice-Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra; Wallis, Daryl H.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of comets and cometary dust have confirmed the presence of biologically relevant organic molecules along with clay minerals and water ice. It is also now well established by deuterium/hydrogen ratios that the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites contain indigenous extraterrestrial water. The evidence of extensive aqueous alteration of the minerals in these meteorites led to the hypothesis that water-bearing asteroids or comets represent the parent bodies of the CI1 (and perhaps CM2) carbonaceous meteorites. These meteorites have also been shown to possess a diverse array of complex organics and chiral and morphological biomarkers. Stable isotope studies by numerous independent investigators have conclusively established that the complex organics found in these meteorites are both indigenous and extraterrestrial in nature. Although the origin of these organics is still unknown, some researchers have suggested that they originated by unknown abiotic mechanisms and may have played a role in the delivery of chiral biomolecules and the origin of life on Early Earth. In this paper we review these results and investigate the thermal history of comets. We show that permanent as well as transient domains of liquid water can be maintained on a comet under a plausible set of assumptions. With each perihelion passage of a comet volatiles are preferentially released, and during millions of such passages the comet could shed crustal debris that may survive transit through the Earth s atmosphere as a carbonaceous meteorite. We review the current state of knowledge of comets and carbonaceous meteorites. We also present the results of recent studies on the long-term viability of terrestrial ice-microbiota encased in ancient glacial ice and permafrost. We suggest that the conditions which have been observed to prevail on many comets do not preclude either survivability (or even the active metabolism and growth) of many types of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbial

  14. Spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous aerosol aging in Central California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and adverse health effects. The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES was designed to study carbonaceous aerosols in the natural environment of the Central Valley, California, and learn more about their atmospheric formation and aging. This paper presents results from spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous particles collected during CARES at the time of a pollution accumulation event (27–29 June 2010, when in situ measurements indicated an increase in the organic carbon content of aerosols as the Sacramento urban plume aged. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (CCSEM/EDX and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS were used to probe the chemical composition and morphology of individual particles. It was found that the mass of organic carbon on individual particles increased through condensation of secondary organic aerosol. STXM/NEXAFS indicated that the number fraction of homogenous organic particles lacking inorganic inclusions (greater than ~50 nm equivalent circular diameter increased with plume age, as did the organic mass per particle. Comparison of the CARES spectro-microscopic dataset with a similar dataset obtained in Mexico City during the MILAGRO campaign showed that fresh particles in Mexico City contained three times as much carbon as those sampled during CARES. The number fraction of soot particles at the Mexico City urban site (ranging from 16.6 to 47.3% was larger than at the CARES urban site (13.4–15.7%, and the most aged samples from CARES contained fewer carbon–carbon double bonds. Differences between carbonaceous particles in Mexico City and California result from different sources, photochemical conditions, gas phase reactants, and secondary organic aerosol

  15. Chemical studies of H chondrites-10 : contents of thermally labile trace elements are unaffected by late heating.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.-S.; Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Chemical Engineering; Purdue Univ.

    1999-09-01

    We have used radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) to determine 15 trace elements, including 10 moderately and highly volatile ones - Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, In (in increasing volatility order) - in 6 H chondrite falls with low 3He contents. These plus prior RNAA data provide a compositional database of 92 H4-6 chondrite falls. Three suites of samples can be identified from their noble gas contents: 44 with 'normal' contents, and, therefore, 'normal' orbits and cosmic ray exposure histories; 8 that lost radiogenic gases, presumably by shock late in their histories; and 17 that lost cosmogenic gases by heating during close solar approach. We used the standard multivariate statistical techniques of linear discriminant analysis and logistic regression to compare contents of the 10 moderately and highly volatile trace elements, listed above, in these 3 suites. We found no significant differences. This contrasts sharply with similar comparisons involving random falls and H4-6 chondrites that landed on Earth at specific time intervals. Apparently, contents of volatile trace elements in H4-6 chondrites were established early in their histories and they are so retentively sited that loss during later heating episodes did not occur.

  16. Outgassing of Ordinary Chondritic Material and Some of its Implications for the Chemistry of Asteroids, Planets, and Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, L; Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    We used chemical equilibrium calculations to model thermal outgassing of ordinary chondritic material as a function of temperature, pressure, and bulk compositions and use our results to discuss outgassing on asteroids and the early Earth. The calculations include ~1,000 solids and gases of the elements Al, C, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, F, Fe, H, K, Mg, Mn, N, Na, Ni, O, P, S, Si, and Ti. The major outgassed volatiles from ordinary chondritic material are CH4, H2, H2O, N2, and NH3(the latter at conditions where hydrous minerals form). Contrary to widely held assumptions, CO is never the major C-bearing gas during ordinary chondrite metamorphism. The calculated oxygen fugacity (partial pressure) of ordinary chondritic material is close to that of the quartz-fayalite-iron (QFI) buffer. Our results are insensitive to variable total pressure, variable volatile element abundances, and kinetic inhibition of C and N dissolution in Fe metal. Our results predict that Earth's early atmosphere contained CH4, H2, H2O, N2, and NH3; ...

  17. A Complex Exposure History of the Gold Basin L4-Chondrite Shower from Cosmogenic Radionuclides and Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Wieler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in samples of the Gold Basin L-chondrite shower indicate a complex exposure history, with a first stage exposure on the parent body, followed by a second stage of approx. 19 Myr in a meteoroid 3-4 m in radius. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Oxygen isotope and petrological study of silicate inclusions in IIE iron meteorites and their relationship with H chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Kathryn H.; Greenwood, Richard C.; Scott, Edward R. D.; Franchi, Ian A.; Anand, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    The origin of silicate-bearing irons, especially those in groups IAB, IIICD, and IIE, is poorly understood as silicate should have separated rapidly from molten metal. Here we report the results of high precision oxygen isotope analysis of silicate inclusions in eleven group IIE meteorites and a petrological study of silicate inclusions in ten IIE irons including those in Garhi Yasin and Tarahumara, which have not been described in detail before. Oxygen isotopes have also been analysed in 20 H chondrites to investigate their possible relationship with the IIE irons. Based on petrographic observations and mineral analysis, the silicate-bearing IIE meteorites have been divided into four types according to the nature of their silicate inclusions: (1) primitive chondritic, (2) evolved chondritic, (3) differentiated with >10 vol.% orthopyroxene, and (4) differentiated with oxygen isotope compositions, a genetic relationship between IIE irons and H chondrites is supported by our new data. However, derivation of both groups from one parent body seems unlikely. Instead, both groups probably sampled similar precursor materials and accreted at a similar nebular location. Our data suggest that the IIE meteorites formed on an internally heated H/HH chondrite-like body that experienced the initial stages of differentiation in response to radiogenic heating. However, prior to full differentiation the IIE parent body experienced a major hit-and-run style collision that resulted in silicate-metal mixing. The initial stages of this event involved a phase of rapid cooling that prevented unmixing of metal and silicates. Reassembly of the IIE parent body produced a large regolith blanket that facilitated subsequent slow cooling. The IIE parent body has probably experienced numerous subsequent less catastrophic collisions. The development of alkali glass textures in some differentiated inclusions is probably the result of one of these later events.

  19. Bulk compositions of metallic Fe-Ni of chondrites: Constraints on fractionation of siderophile and chalcophile elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lin; LIN Yangting; WANG Shijie; OUYANG Ziyuan

    2009-01-01

    Bulk compositions of metallic Fe-Ni from two equilibrated ordinary chondrites, Jilin (H5) and Anlong (H5), and two unequilibrated ones, GRV 9919 (L3) and GRV 021603 (H3), were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The CI-, Co-normalized abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements of metallic Fe-Ni from the unequilibrated ordinary chondrites correlate with 50% condensation temperatures (i.e., volatility) of the elements. The refractory siderophile elements (i.e., platinum group elements, Re), Au, Ni and Co show a flat pattern (1.01(CI Co-normalized), while moderate elements (As, Cu, Ag, Ga, Ge, Zn) decrease with volatility from 0.63(CI (Co-normalized, As) to 0.05(CI (Co-normalized, Zn). Cr and Mn show deficit relative to the trend, probably due to their main partition in silicates and sulfides (nonmagnetic). Metallic Fe-Ni from the equilibrated ordinary chondrites shows similar patterns, except for strong deficit of Cr, Mn, Ag and Zn. It is indicated that these elements were almost all partitioned into silicates and/or sulfides during thermal metamorphism. The similar deficit of Cr, Mn, Ag and Zn was also found in iron meteorites.Our analyses demonstrate similar behaviors of W and Mo as refractory siderophile elements during condensation of the solar nebula, except for slight depletion of Mo in the L3 and H5 chondrites. The Mo-depletion of metallic Fe-Ni from GRV 9919 (L3) relative to GRV 021603 (H3) could be due to a more oxidizing condition of the former than the latter in the solar nebula. In contrast, the Mo-depletion of the metallic Fe-Ni from the H5 chondrites may reflect partition of Mo from metal to silicates and/or sulfides during thermal metamorphism in the asteroidal body.

  20. K-Ca Dating of Alkali-Rich Fragments in the Y-74442 and Bhola LL-Chondritic Breccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T; Misawa, K.; Okano, O; Shih, C. -Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simon, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Alkali-rich igneous fragments in the brecciated LL-chondrites, Krahenberg (LL5) [1], Bhola (LL3-6) [2], Siena (LL5) [3] and Yamato (Y)-74442 (LL4) [4-6], show characteristic fractionation patterns of alkali and alkaline elements [7]. The alkali-rich fragments in Krahenberg, Bhola and Y-74442 are very similar in mineralogy and petrography, suggesting that they could have come from related precursor materials [6]. Recently we reported Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of alkali-rich igneous rock fragments in Y-74442: nine fragments from Y-74442 yield the Rb-Sr age of 4429 plus or minus 54 Ma (2 sigma) for lambda(Rb-87) = 0.01402 Ga(exp -1) [8] with the initial ratio of Sr-87/Sr-86 = 0.7144 plus or minus 0.0094 (2 sigma) [9]. The Rb-Sr age of the alkali-rich fragments of Y-74442 is younger than the primary Rb-Sr age of 4541 plus or minus 14 Ma for LL-chondrite whole-rock samples [10], implying that they formed after accumulation of LL-chondrite parental bodies, although enrichment may have happened earlier. Marshall and DePaolo [11,12] demonstrated that the K-40 - Ca-40 decay system could be an important chronometer as well as a useful radiogenic tracer for studies of terrestrial rocks. Shih et al. [13,14] and more recently Simon et al. [15] determined K-Ca ages of lunar granitic rocks, and showed the application of the K-Ca chronometer for K-rich planetary materials. Since alkali-rich fragments in the LL-chondritic breccias are highly enriched in K, we can expect enhancements of radiogenic Ca-40. Here, we report preliminary results of K-Ca isotopic systematics of alkali-rich fragments in the LL-chondritic breccias, Y-74442 and Bhola.

  1. The structure and composition of metal particles in two type 6 ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland-Duffield, C. E.; Williams, D. B.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    The microstructure and composition of taenite particles were examined in two type-6 ordinary chondrites, Kernouve (H6) and Saint Severin (LL6), using reflected light microscopy and a combination of electron optical instruments. It was found that, in both meteorites, the taenite particles consisted of a narrow rim of high-Ni taenite and a central region of cloudy zone similar to those present in iron meteorites. The microstructure of the cloudy zone in Saint Severin was coarser than that in Kernouve , due to the higher Ni content and slower cooling rate of the former. Three microstructural zones were observed in the outer taenite rim of both meteorites, the origin of which is considered likely to be due to the presence of ordered domain boundaries or to the presence of two phases FeNi and FeNi3 in the high-Ni region of the outer taenite rim.

  2. Trace-Element Constraints on Origin of SiO2-bearing Clasts in Ordinary Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, K.; Kanazawa, M.; Bridges, J. C.; Nakamura, N.; Hutchison, R.

    1995-09-01

    Silica-rich igneous-textured clasts are found in OC [1-6]. The SiO2-bearing clasts found in the Parnallee (LL3.6) and Farmington (L5) chondrites are isotopically unique [4-6]. They plot on a mixing line defined between UOC chondrules and an 16(sub)O-depleted end member in the oxygen three isotope diagram. We analyzed trace elements including REE by MSID technique for SiO2-bearing clasts (CB1, CB4, CB7, and CB8) from Parnallee. Some major and minor elements of CB8 were determined by AA or ICP-AES. The CI-chondrite normalized REE patterns of the clasts are shown in Fig. 1. CB8 has a high Si/Mg ratio (2.5), although its bulk Mg/(Mg + Fe) and Fe/Mn ratios (0.79 and 51, respectively) are within the range of chondritic values. Refractory elements Ca and Al are highly fractionated in CB8; the clast is enriched in Ca (3 x CI) but depleted in Al (0.7 x CI). CB1, CB4, and CB7 also show Ca enrichment (3-7 x CI). CB8 is depleted in moderately volatile lithophiles Mn, Na, K, and Rb (0.18-0.71 x CI), siderophile elements Fe, Co, and Ni (0.0041-0.39 x CI), and chalcophile element Zn (0.076 x CI). The SiO2-bearing clasts analyzed exhibit a gradual depletion from LREE to HREE (CI-normalized La/Lu ratios vary from 1.6 to 18) and a large positive Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu*=2.4-14) along with a depletion of La. This LREE/HREE fractionation is inversely correlated with SiO2 contents of the clasts. Abundance of Sr is parallel to that of Eu in CB8. However, Sr is depleted compared with Eu in the other clasts. These abundance patterns are quite different from those of typical ferromagnesian chondrules in UOCs, SiO2-bearing pyroxene-rich clast in Hedjaz (L3.7) [3], and silica-rich orthopyroxenite Bo-1 in Bovedy (L3) [7]. Absence of metal and sulfide, low abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the clasts imply that metal and sulfide were removed from precursor material before or during clast formation. General REE patterns of SiO2-bearing clasts from Parnallee suggest that they were

  3. The structure and composition of metal particles in two type 6 ordinary chondrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland-duffield, C.E.; Williams, D.B.; Goldstein, J.I. (Intel Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA) Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The microstructure and composition of taenite particles were examined in two type-6 ordinary chondrites, Kernouve (H6) and Saint Severin (LL6), using reflected light microscopy and a combination of electron optical instruments. It was found that, in both meteorites, the taenite particles consisted of a narrow rim of high-Ni taenite and a central region of cloudy zone similar to those present in iron meteorites. The microstructure of the cloudy zone in Saint Severin was coarser than that in Kernouve , due to the higher Ni content and slower cooling rate of the former. Three microstructural zones were observed in the outer taenite rim of both meteorites, the origin of which is considered likely to be due to the presence of ordered domain boundaries or to the presence of two phases FeNi and FeNi3 in the high-Ni region of the outer taenite rim. 21 refs.

  4. A depleted, not ideally chondritic bulk Earth: The explosive-volcanic basalt loss hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Paul H.

    2008-04-01

    It has long been customary to assume that in the bulk composition of the Earth, all refractory-lithophile elements (including major oxides Al 2O 3 and CaO, all of the REE, and the heat-producing elements Th and U) occur in chondritic, bulk solar system, proportion to one another. Recently, however, Nd-isotopic studies (most notably Boyet M. and Carlson R. W. (2006) A new geochemical model for the Earth's mantle inferred from 146Sm- 142Nd systematics. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.250, 254-268) have suggested that at least the outer portion of the planet features a Nd/Sm ratio depleted to ˜0.93 times the chondritic ratio. The primary reaction to this type of evidence has been to invoke a "hidden" reservoir of enriched matter, sequestered into the deepest mantle as a consequence of primordial differentiation. I propose a hypothesis that potentially explains the evidence for Nd/Sm depletion in a very different way. Among the handful of major types of differentiated asteroidal meteorites, two (ureilites and aubrites) are ultramafic restites so consistently devoid of plagioclase that meteoriticists were once mystified as to how all the complementary plagioclase-rich matter (basalt) was lost. The explanation appears to be basalt loss by graphite-fueled explosive volcanism on roughly 100-km sized planetesimals; with the dispersiveness of the process dramatically enhanced, relative to terrestrial experience, because the pyroclastic gases expand into vacuous space (Wilson L. and Keil K. (1991) Consequences of explosive eruptions on small Solar System bodies: the case of the missing basalts on the aubrite parent body. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.104, 505-512). By analogy with lunar pyroclastic products, the typical size of pyroclastic melt/glass droplets under these circumstances will be roughly 0.1 mm. Once separated from an asteroidal or planetesimal gravitational field, droplets of this size will generally spiral toward the Sun, rather than reaccrete, because drag forces such the

  5. The fractionation of noble gases in diamonds of CV3 Efremovka chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Semjonova, L. F.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    It was shown that in diamonds of Efremovka CV3 the noble gases with normal isotopic compositions are fractionated in different degree while the correlation of isotopic anomalous components is nearly constant. Some data for noble gases in DE-4 sample of Efremovka chondrite are considered. In contrast to DE-2 sample the DE-4 was treated except conc. HClO4, 220 C in addition with mixture of conc. H2SO4+H3PO4 (1:1), 220 C, twice. Noble gases analysis were performed in Germany at Max Plank Institute fur Chemie. Noble gases were released by oxidation of samples at stepped heating from 420 C to 810 C and by pyrolysis at 580, 590, and 680 C.

  6. Spade: An H Chondrite Impact-melt Breccia that Experienced Post-shock Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Jones, Rhian H.

    2006-01-01

    The low modal abundances of relict chondrules (1.8 Vol%) and of coarse (i.e. >= 2200 micron-size) isolated mafic silicate grains (1.8 Vol%) in Spade relative to mean H6 chondrites (11.4 and 9.8 vol%, respectively) show Spade to be a rock that has experienced a significant degree of melting. Various petrographic features (e.g., chromite-plagioclase assemblages, chromite veinlets, silicate darkening) indicate that melting was caused by shock. Plagioclase was melted during the shock event and flowed so that it partially to completely surrounded nearby mafic silicate grains. During crystallization, plagioclase developed igneous zoning. Low-Ca pyroxene that crystallized from the melt (or equilibrated with the melt at high temperatures) acquired relatively high amounts of CaO. Metallic Fe-Ni cooled rapidly below the Fe-Ni solws and transformed into martensite. Subsequent reheating of the rock caused transformation of martensite into abundant duplex plessite. Ambiguities exist in the shock stage assignment of Spade. The extensive silicate darkening, the occurrence of chromite-plagioclase assemblages, and the impact-melted characteristics of Spade are consistent with shock stage S6. Low shock (stage S2) is indicated by the undulose extinction and lack of planar fractures in olivine. This suggests that Spade reached a maximum prior shock level equivalent to stage S6 and then experienced post-shock annealing (probably to stage Sl). These events were followed by a less intense impact that produced the undulose extinction in the olivine, characteristic of shock stage S2. Annealing could have occurred if Spade were emplaced near impact melts beneath the crater floor or deposited in close proximity to hot debris within an ejecta blanket. Spade firmly establishes the case for post-shock annealing. This may have been a common process on ordinary chondrites (OC) asteroids.

  7. Dynamic behavior of an ordinary chondrite: The effects of microstructure on strength, failure and fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, James David; Kimberley, Jamie; Hazeli, Kavan; Plescia, Jeffrey; Ramesh, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the relationships between microstructure, stress-state and failure mechanisms is important in the development and validation of numerical models simulating large-scale impact events. In this study, we investigate the effects of microstructural constituent phases and defects on the compressive and tensile strength, failure, and fragmentation of a stony meteorite (GRO 85209). In the first part of the paper we consider the effect of defects on the strength and failure. Strengths are measured and linked with detailed quantification of the important defects in this material. We use the defect statistic measurements in conjunction with our current understanding of rate-dependent strengths to discuss the uniaxial compressive strength measurements of this ordinary chondrite with those of another ordinary chondrite, with a different defect population. In the second part of the paper, we consider the effects of the microstructure and defects on the fragmentation of GRO 85209. Fragment size distributions are measured using image processing techniques and fragments were found to result from two distinct fragmentation mechanisms. The first is a mechanism that is associated with relatively smaller fragments arising from individual defect grains and the coalescence of fractures initiating from microstructure defects. This mechanism becomes more dominant as the strain-rate is increased. The second mechanism is associated with larger fragments that are polyphase and polygrain in character and is dependent on the structural failure mechanisms that are activated during load. In turn, these are dependent on (for example) the strain-rate, stress state, and specimen geometry. The implications of these results are briefly discussed in terms of regolith generation and catastrophic disruption.

  8. Results of core drilling for uranium-bearing carbonaceous shale and lignite in the Goose Creek district, Cassia County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, William J.; Hail, William J.

    1954-01-01

    Thirteen core holes, totaling 2,023 feet, were drilled during the fall of 1953 to explore the grade and extent of uranium-bearing beds of carbonaceous shale and lignite in the east-central part of the Goose Creek district, Cassia County, Idaho. The beds tested are interbedded with volcanic ash, bentonite, greenish-gray shale, sandstone, and conglomerate in two fairly well defined zones in the lower part of the Salt Lake formation of lower Pliocene age. Nine holes penetrated carbonaceous shale beds in the Barrett zone, and one hole penetrated carbonaceous shale and lignite beds in zone B, 160 feet stratigraphically below the Barrett zone. The highest concentration of uranium found by drilling is 0.10 percent in the upper part of a 4-foot bed of carbonaceous shale and lignite in zone B. The grade of carbonaceous shale beds in the Barrett zone ranges from 0.044 percent to less than 0.003 percent uranium. Inferred reserves in the district are estimated to be 790,000 tons in beds 1 foot or more thick containing an average of 0.014 percent or 120 tons of uranium.

  9. A Modeling Study of the Effects of Direct Radiative Forcing Due to Carbonaceous Aerosol on the Climate in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; WANG Zhili; GUO Pinwen; WANG Zaizhi

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of global direct radiative forcing due to carbonaceous aerosol on the climate in East Asia, using the CAM3 developed by NCAR. The results showed that carbonaceous aerosols cause negative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and surface under clear sky conditions, but positive forcing at the TOA and weak negative forcing at the surface under all sky conditions. Hence, clouds could change the sign of the direct radiative forcing at the TOA, and weaken the forcing at the surface. Carbonaceous aerosols have distinct effects on the summer climate in East Asia. In southern China and India, it caused the surface temperature to increase, but the total cloud cover and precipitation to decrease. However, the opposite effects are caused for most of northern China and Bangladesh. Given the changes in temperature, vertical velocity, and surface streamflow caused by carbonaceous aerosol in this simulation, carbonaceous aerosol could also induce summer precipitation to decrease in southern China but increase in northern China.

  10. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Reticulated N-Doped Carbonaceous Submicron Spheres for Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiawei; Long, Yuan; Wang, Yiyan; Wei, Chaoliang; Zhan, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article described a facile one-step method to prepare reticulated N-doped carbonaceous submicron spheres. Through a simple aerosol-assisted technology, glucosamine sulfate used as a carbon source was aerosolized and carbonized to functionalized carbonaceous submicron spheres. The electrostatic attraction between protonated amino groups and sulfate in the aerosol droplets induced a self-assembly and led to the formation of reticular structure, avoiding the use of templates. Compared to bare carbonaceous materials produced from glucose, reticulated N-doped carbonaceous spheres exhibit higher efficiency in the removal of Cr(VI), where the doping of element nitrogen led to electrostatic attraction between protonated nitrogen and chromium ions, and reticulated structure created relatively higher surface area and pore volume, facilitating materials to contact with Cr(VI) ions. XPS characterization proved these novel N-doped carbonaceous materials could effectively transform Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III) because of the surface reducing groups. For the practical application, several factors including the initial pH, materials dosage and recycle numbers on the removal performance were studied.

  11. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Reticulated N-Doped Carbonaceous Submicron Spheres for Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiawei; Long, Yuan; Wang, Yiyan; Wei, Chaoliang; Zhan, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article described a facile one-step method to prepare reticulated N-doped carbonaceous submicron spheres. Through a simple aerosol-assisted technology, glucosamine sulfate used as a carbon source was aerosolized and carbonized to functionalized carbonaceous submicron spheres. The electrostatic attraction between protonated amino groups and sulfate in the aerosol droplets induced a self-assembly and led to the formation of reticular structure, avoiding the use of templates. Compared to bare carbonaceous materials produced from glucose, reticulated N-doped carbonaceous spheres exhibit higher efficiency in the removal of Cr(VI), where the doping of element nitrogen led to electrostatic attraction between protonated nitrogen and chromium ions, and reticulated structure created relatively higher surface area and pore volume, facilitating materials to contact with Cr(VI) ions. XPS characterization proved these novel N-doped carbonaceous materials could effectively transform Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III) because of the surface reducing groups. For the practical application, several factors including the initial pH, materials dosage and recycle numbers on the removal performance were studied. PMID:27299376

  12. Microfossils, biomolecules and biominerals in carbonaceous meteorites: implications to the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2012-11-01

    Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM and FESEM) investigations have shown that a wide variety of carbonaceous meteorites contain the remains of large filaments embedded within freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorite rock matrix. The filaments occur singly or in dense assemblages and mats and are often encased within carbon-rich, electron transparent sheaths. Electron Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) spot analysis and 2D X-Ray maps indicate the filaments rarely have detectable nitrogen levels and exhibit elemental compositions consistent with that interpretation that of the meteorite rock matrix. Many of the meteorite filaments are exceptionally well-preserved and show evidence of cells, cell-wall constrictions and specialized cells and processes for reproduction, nitrogen fixation, attachment and motility. Morphological and morphometric analyses permit many of the filaments to be associated with morphotypes of known genera and species of known filamentous trichomic prokaryotes (cyanobacteria and sulfur bacteria). The presence in carbonaceous meteorites of diagenetic breakdown products of chlorophyll (pristane and phytane) along with indigenous and extraterrestrial chiral protein amino acids, nucleobases and other life-critical biomolecules provides strong support to the hypothesis that these filaments represent the remains of cyanobacteria and other microorganisms that grew on the meteorite parent body. The absence of other life-critical biomolecules in the meteorites and the lack of detectable levels of nitrogen indicate the filaments died long ago and can not possibly represent modern microbial contaminants that entered the stones after they arrived on Earth. This paper presents new evidence for microfossils, biomolecules and biominerals in carbonaceous meteorites and considers the implications to some of the major hypotheses for the Origin of Life.

  13. Ultrastructural Heterogeneity of Carbonaceous Material in Ancient Cherts: Investigating Biosignature Origin and Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuangao; Engdahl, Anders; Zhu, Shixing; Vajda, Vivi; McLoughlin, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Opaline silica deposits on Mars may be good target sites where organic biosignatures could be preserved. Potential analogues on Earth are provided by ancient cherts containing carbonaceous material (CM) permineralized by silica. In this study, we investigated the ultrastructure and chemical characteristics of CM in the Rhynie chert (c. 410 Ma, UK), Bitter Springs Formation (c. 820 Ma, Australia), and Wumishan Formation (c. 1485 Ma, China). Raman spectroscopy indicates that the CM has experienced advanced diagenesis or low-grade metamorphism at peak metamorphic temperatures of 150-350°C. Raman mapping and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy were used to document subcellular-scale variation in the CM of fossilized plants, fungi, prokaryotes, and carbonaceous stromatolites. In the Rhynie chert, ultrastructural variation in the CM was found within individual fossils, while in coccoidal and filamentous microfossils of the Bitter Springs and formless CM of the Wumishan stromatolites ultrastructural variation was found between, not within, different microfossils. This heterogeneity cannot be explained by secondary geological processes but supports diverse carbonaceous precursors that experienced differential graphitization. Micro-FTIR analysis found that CM with lower structural order contains more straight carbon chains (has a lower R3/2 branching index) and that the structural order of eukaryotic CM is more heterogeneous than prokaryotic CM. This study demonstrates how Raman spectroscopy combined with micro-FTIR can be used to investigate the origin and preservation of silica-permineralized organics. This approach has good capability for furthering our understanding of CM preserved in Precambrian cherts, and potential biosignatures in siliceous deposits on Mars.

  14. Origin and formation of carbonaceous material veins in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Li, Haibing; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    This paper establishes a reference data set of carbonaceous materials (CMs) from the active fault zone of the Longmen Shan fault belt that ruptured in the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake and presents an application of these data for studies of both other exhumed carbonaceous-rich fault zones and deep-drilling cores. The CMs distributed in the active fault zone are found as narrow veins and located along the slip surfaces. Microstructural observation shows that the carbonaceous material veins (CMVs) are located along slip surfaces in the fault gouge zones. Some CMVs have a cataclastic fabric, and their branches intrude into voids around the slip surfaces. Raman spectra of the CMVs show a wide (full width at half maximum >200 cm-1) D-peak at ~1345 cm-1 (defect peak), which is much lower than the O-peak at ~1595 cm-1 (ordered peak), indicating a metamorphic temperature of zeolite facies or lower than 250 °C. In addition, the stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C values) of the CMVs, ranging from -23.4 to -26.4‰, are very similar to that of the kerogen collected from the Late Triassic Xujiahe Formation in Sichuan Basin. Given the data at which it may be formed, the Xujiahe Formation is the most likely origin of CMs for the CMVs, and it seems that some CMVs in the fault zone were crushed and intruded into the voids during coseismic events, possibly driven by an enhanced pore fluid pressure. Since graphitization is suggested as an indicator of transient frictional heating in this area, our study providing a reference data set of CMs would help future CM-rich fault-zone research to retrieve seismic signatures presumably occurring in the Longmen Shan fault zone belt.

  15. Characteristics and major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in PM2.5 from Sanya, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PM2.5 samples were collected in Sanya, China in summer and winter in 2012/2013. Organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and non-polar organic compounds including n-alkanes (n-C14-n-C40) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified. The concentrations of these carbonaceous matters were generally higher in winter than summer. The estimated secondary organic carbon (OCsec) accounted for 38% and 54% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in winter and summer, respectively. The higher value of OCsec in addition to the presences of photochemically-produced PAHs in summer supports that photochemical conversions of organics are much active at the higher air temperatures and with stronger intense solar radiation. Carbon preference index (CPI) and percent contribution of wax n-alkanes suggest that anthropogenic sources were more dominant than derivation from terrestrial plants in Sanya. Diagnostic ratios of atmospheric PAHs further indicate that there was a wide mix of pollution sources in winter while fossil fuel combustion was the most dominant in summer. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis with 18 PAHs in the winter samples found that motor vehicle emissions and biomass burning were the two main pollution sources, contributing 37.5% and 24.6% of the total quantified PAHs, respectively. - Highlights: • The first comprehensive study to investigate carbonaceous PM2.5 in Sanya, China • Higher carbonaceous levels in winter while more SOC formation in summer • Anthropogenic emission is the dominant sources of n-alkanes • Vehicle emission and biomass burning contributed ≥60% of the total PAHs in winter • The result supports better air quality in Sanya than most megacities in China

  16. Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-12-11

    Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles

  17. Fossils of Cyanobacteria in CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites: Implications to Life on Comets, Europa and Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-10-01

    Environmental (ESEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) investigations of the internal surfaces of the CI1 Carbonaceous Meteorites have yielded images of large complex filaments. The filaments have been observed to be embedded in freshly fractured internal surfaces of the stones. They exhibit recognizable features (e.g., the size and size ranges of the internal cells and their location and arrangement within sheaths) that are diagnostic of known genera and species of filamentous trichomic cyanobacteria and other trichomic prokaryotes (such as filamentous sulfur bacteria). ESEM and FESEM studies of living and fossil cyanobacteria show features similar to the filaments found in the meteorites -- uniseriate and multiseriate, branched or unbranched, isodiametric or tapered, polarized or unpolarized filaments with trichomes encased within thin or thick external sheaths. Some of the filaments found in the CI1 meteorites also exhibit specialized cells and structures used by cyanobacteria for reproduction (baeocytes, akinetes and hormogonia), nitrogen fixation (basal, intercalary or apical heterocysts), attachment (pili or fimbriae) or indicative of oscillatoria type locomotion (escaped or coiling hormogonia and flattened and coiled empty sheaths). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the Orgueil meteorite filaments are typically carbon-rich sheaths infilled with magnesium sulfate and other minerals characteristic of the CI1 carbonaceous meteorites. However, the size, structure, detailed morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of the meteorite filaments are not consistent with known species of abiotic minerals. The nitrogen content of the meteorite filaments are almost always below the detection limit of the EDS detector. EDS analysis of living and dead biological materials (e.g., filamentous cyanobacteria; bacteria, mummy and mammoth hair and tissues, and fossils of cyanobacteria, trilobites and insects in

  18. Indigenous Carbonaceous Phases Embedded Within Surface Deposits on Apollo 17 Volcanic Glass Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Ross, D. K.; Le, L.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Gonzalez, C.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of indigenous organic matter in returned lunar samples was one of the primary scientific goals of the Apollo program. Prior studies of Apollo samples have shown the total amount of organic matter to be in the range of approx 50 to 250 ppm. Low concentrations of lunar organics may be a consequence not only of its paucity but also its heterogeneous distribution. Several processes should have contributed to the lunar organic inventory including exogenous carbonaceous accretion from meteoroids and interplanetary dust particles, and endogenous synthesis driven by early planetary volcanism and cosmic and solar radiation.

  19. Method and apparatus for conversion of carbonaceous materials to liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, Kenneth W.; Namazian, Mehdi; Kelly, John T.

    2015-12-01

    Embodiments of the invention relates to conversion of hydrocarbon material including but not limited to coal and biomass to a synthetic liquid transportation fuel. The invention includes the integration of a non-catalytic first reaction scheme, which converts carbonaceous materials into a solid product that includes char and ash and a gaseous product; a non-catalytic second reaction scheme, which converts a portion of the gaseous product from the first reaction scheme to light olefins and liquid byproducts; a traditional gas-cleanup operations; and the third reaction scheme to combine the olefins from the second reaction scheme to produce a targeted fuel like liquid transportation fuels.

  20. Carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants over Delhi urban environment: Temporal evolution, source apportionment and radiative forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisht, D.S. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, New Delhi (India); Dumka, U.C., E-mail: dumka@aries.res.in [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Nainital (India); Kaskaoutis, D.G. [School of Natural Sciences, Shiv Nadar University, Tehsil Dadri (India); Pipal, A.S. [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune (India); Srivastava, A.K. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, New Delhi (India); Soni, V.K.; Attri, S.D.; Sateesh, M. [India Meteorology Department, Lodhi Road, New Delhi (India); Tiwari, S. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, New Delhi (India)

    2015-07-15

    Particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) samples were collected over Delhi, India during January to December 2012 and analysed for carbonaceous aerosols and inorganic ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and NO{sub 3}{sup −}) in order to examine variations in atmospheric chemistry, combustion sources and influence of long-range transport. The PM{sub 2.5} samples are measured (offline) via medium volume air samplers and analysed gravimetrically for carbonaceous (organic carbon, OC; elemental carbon, EC) aerosols and inorganic ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and NO{sub 3}{sup −}). Furthermore, continuous (online) measurements of PM{sub 2.5} (via Beta-attenuation analyser), black carbon (BC) mass concentration (via Magee scientific Aethalometer) and carbon monoxide (via CO-analyser) are carried out. PM{sub 2.5} (online) range from 18.2 to 500.6 μg m{sup −3} (annual mean of 124.6 ± 87.9 μg m{sup −3}) exhibiting higher night-time (129.4 μg m{sup −3}) than daytime (103.8 μg m{sup −3}) concentrations. The online concentrations are 38% and 28% lower than the offline during night and day, respectively. In general, larger night-time concentrations are found for the BC, OC, NO{sub 3}{sup −}and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, which are seasonally dependent with larger differences during late post-monsoon and winter. The high correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.74) between OC and EC along with the OC/EC of 7.09 (day time) and 4.55 (night-time), suggest significant influence of biomass-burning emissions (burning of wood and agricultural waste) as well as secondary organic aerosol formation during daytime. Concentrated weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis reveals that the potential sources for the carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants are local emissions within the urban environment and transported smoke from agricultural burning in northwest India during post-monsoon. BC radiative forcing estimates result in very high atmospheric heating rates (~ 1.8–2.0 K day{sup −1}) due to agricultural burning effects

  1. Characteristics of atmospheric depositions of ionic and carbonaceous components at remote sites in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Inomata, Y.; Kajino, M.; Tang, N.; Hayakawa, K.; Hakamata, M.; Morisaki, H.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition process is important to evaluate lifetimes and budget of atmospheric components. Deposition amounts of sulfur and nitrogen compounds have been evaluated not only in East Asian region but also worldwide. On the other hand, atmospheric deposition of carbonaceous components including organic carbon (OC), elementary carbon (EC) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored only at a few sites in Europe, North America and Africa, which will obscure removal process and atmospheric concentration distribution of those components. In this study, ionic and carbonaceous components in precipitation and aerosol are monitored at remote sites in Japan, and the characteristics of atmospheric deposition amounts were evaluated.Field observations have been implemented at the Noto station since November 2013 and the Sado station since May 2011. Wet deposition samples were collected by rain samplers, and dry deposition samples were collected by high volume or low volume aerosol samplers. Concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ were measured by ion chromatography, EC and OC by the IMPROVE protocol, and PAHs by HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Wet deposition amounts were calculated as the products of aqueous concentration and precipitation amounts, and dry deposition amounts were as the products of aerosol concentrations and deposition velocity estimated by the Inferential Method.Total (wet and dry) annual deposition amounts of carbonaceous components of NO3-, SO42-, EC, water insoluble OC, Fluoranthene at Noto (Nov. 2013 to Oct. 2014) were 4353.81 mg/m2, 7020.50 mg/m2, 149.84 mg/m2, 1191.09 mg/m2, 28.6 μg/m2, respectively. These amounts are comparable total annual deposition amounts of OC and EC at Sado (May 2011 to Feb. 2012), which were 166.04 mg/m2 and 834.0 mg/m2. Higher deposition amounts of ionic and carbonaceous components were observed, which would be attributable to long range transportation of the East Asian

  2. CO2 Separation and Capture Properties of Porous Carbonaceous Materials from Leather Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Arenillas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous porous materials derived from leather skin residues have been found to have excellent CO2 adsorption properties, with interestingly high gas selectivities for CO2 (α > 200 at a gas composition of 15% CO2/85% N2, 273K, 1 bar and capacities (>2 mmol·g−1 at 273 K. Both CO2 isotherms and the high heat of adsorption pointed to the presence of strong binding sites for CO2 which may be correlated with both: N content in the leather residues and ultrasmall pore sizes.

  3. Carbonaceous aerosol over semi-arid region of western India: Heterogeneity in sources and characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, A. K.; Aslam, M. Y.; Upadhyay, M.; Rengarajan, R.; Bhushan, R.; Rathore, J. S.; Singh, S. K.; Kumar, S.

    2016-09-01

    Carbonaceous species (elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC)) and water-soluble inorganic species (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2 +, Mg2 +, Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -) in PM10 and PM2.5 from Ahmedabad and Jodhpur (urban and semi-urban locations, respectively) in western India were measured during May-September, 2011. Stable isotope composition of carbonaceous aerosol (δ13C of TC) in PM10 samples was also determined. Average EC concentration in PM10 at Ahmedabad was 1 μg m- 3 (range: 0.34 to 3.4 μg m- 3), almost 80% of which remained in PM2.5. Similarly, 70% of EC in PM10 (average: 0.9 μg m- 3) resided in PM2.5 at Jodhpur. Average OC concentration at Ahmedabad was 6.4 μg m- 3 and ~ 52% of this was found in PM2.5. On the contrary, OC concentration at Jodhpur was 40 μg m- 3, 80% of which was found in coarse particles contributing substantially to aerosol mass. δ13C of TC (average: - 27.5‰, range: - 29.6 to - 25.8‰) along with WSOC/EC ratio shows an increasing trend at Jodhpur suggesting the possibility of aging of aerosol, since aging results in enrichment of heavier isotope. OC and WSOC show significant correlations with K+ and not with EC, indicating biogenic origin of OC. Different size distributions are also exhibited by WSOC at the two stations. On the other hand, δ13C exhibits an inverse trend with sea-salt constituents at Ahmedabad, indicating the influence of air masses transported from the western/south-western region on carbonaceous aerosol. These results suggest that a strong heterogeneity exists in the sources of carbonaceous aerosol over this region and potential sources of non-combustion emissions such as bio-aerosol that need further investigation.

  4. Carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants over Delhi urban environment: Temporal evolution, source apportionment and radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were collected over Delhi, India during January to December 2012 and analysed for carbonaceous aerosols and inorganic ions (SO42− and NO3−) in order to examine variations in atmospheric chemistry, combustion sources and influence of long-range transport. The PM2.5 samples are measured (offline) via medium volume air samplers and analysed gravimetrically for carbonaceous (organic carbon, OC; elemental carbon, EC) aerosols and inorganic ions (SO42− and NO3−). Furthermore, continuous (online) measurements of PM2.5 (via Beta-attenuation analyser), black carbon (BC) mass concentration (via Magee scientific Aethalometer) and carbon monoxide (via CO-analyser) are carried out. PM2.5 (online) range from 18.2 to 500.6 μg m−3 (annual mean of 124.6 ± 87.9 μg m−3) exhibiting higher night-time (129.4 μg m−3) than daytime (103.8 μg m−3) concentrations. The online concentrations are 38% and 28% lower than the offline during night and day, respectively. In general, larger night-time concentrations are found for the BC, OC, NO3−and SO42−, which are seasonally dependent with larger differences during late post-monsoon and winter. The high correlation (R2 = 0.74) between OC and EC along with the OC/EC of 7.09 (day time) and 4.55 (night-time), suggest significant influence of biomass-burning emissions (burning of wood and agricultural waste) as well as secondary organic aerosol formation during daytime. Concentrated weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis reveals that the potential sources for the carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants are local emissions within the urban environment and transported smoke from agricultural burning in northwest India during post-monsoon. BC radiative forcing estimates result in very high atmospheric heating rates (~ 1.8–2.0 K day−1) due to agricultural burning effects during the 2012 post-monsoon season. - Highlights: • Very high PM2.5 (> 200 µg m−3) levels over Delhi during agricultural

  5. Sorption of indigo carmine by a Fe-zeolitic tuff and carbonaceous material from pyrolyzed sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indigo carmine removal from aqueous solution has been evaluated using Fe-zeolitic tuff and carbonaceous material from pyrolyzed sewage sludge treated with HCl (CM). The adsorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area and X-ray diffraction. Sorption kinetics and isotherms were determined and the adsorption behaviors analyzed. Kinetic pseudo-second order and Langmuir-Freundlich models were successfully applied to the experimental results obtained with the Fe-zeolitic material, while kinetic first order and Langmuir-Freundlich models were applied to the results from the carbonaceous materials. This indicates mechanisms of chemisorption and physic sorption, respectively, on the heterogeneous materials. The results indicate that the carbonaceous material from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge (sorption capacity 92.83 mg/g) is a better adsorbent of indigo carmine than the zeolitic material (sorption capacity 32.83 mg/g).

  6. Acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterial with large surface area: Preparation, characterization, and adsorption properties for cationic and anionic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured carbonaceous materials are extremely important in the nano field, yet developing simple, mild, and “green” methods that can make such materials possess large surface area and rich functional groups on their surfaces still remains a considerable challenge. Herein, a one-pot and environment-friendly method, i.e., thermal treatment (180 °C; 18 h) of water mixed with glucose and chitosan (CTS), has been proposed. The resultant carbonaceous nanomaterials were characterized by field emitting scanning electron microscope, N2 adsorption/desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. It was found that, in contrast to the conventional hydrothermally carbonized product from pure glucose, with low surface area (9.3 m2 g−1) and pore volume (0.016 cm3 g−1), the CTS-added carbonaceous products showed satisfactory textural parameters (surface area and pore volume up to 254 m2 g−1 and 0.701 cm3 g−1, respectively). Moreover, it was also interestingly found that these CTS-added carbonaceous products possessed both acidic (–COOH) and basic (–NH2) groups on their surfaces. Taking the advantages of large surface area and –COOH/–NH2 bifunctional surface, the carbonaceous nanomaterials exhibited excellent performance for adsorptions of cationic compound (i.e., methylene blue) at pH 10 and anionic compound (i.e., acid red 18) at pH 2, respectively. This work not only provides a simple and green route to prepare acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterials with large surface area but also well demonstrates their potential for application in adsorption. - Highlights: • A simple and green method was proposed to prepare carbon nanomaterials. • The carbon product showed acid/base bifunctional surface with large surface area. • The carbon material could efficiently adsorb both cationic and anionic compounds

  7. Reconstruction of exposure histories of meteorites from Antarctica and the Sahara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupert, U.; Neumann, S.; Leya, I.; Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Zentraleinrichtung fuer Strahlenschutz (ZfS); Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Bonani, G.; Hajdas, I.; Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, and {sup 26}Al were analyzed in H-, L-, and LL-chondrites from the Acfer region in the Algerian Sahara and from the Allan Hills/Antarctica. Exposure histories and terrestrial ages could be determined. (author) 3 figs., 2 refs.

  8. Production of activated charcoal beads or green moldnings useful in stationary or fluidized bed uses rotary stirrer(s) for mixing carbonaceous powder with binder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    In the production of activated charcoal beads or green moldings by mixing carbonaceous powder with a binder, mixing is carried out in a stirred vessel with rotary stirrer(s).......In the production of activated charcoal beads or green moldings by mixing carbonaceous powder with a binder, mixing is carried out in a stirred vessel with rotary stirrer(s)....

  9. Search for extinct natural radioactivity of Pb205 via thallium-isotope anomalies in chondrites and lunar soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, J. M.; Kohman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Thallium and Pb204 contents were determined by stable-isotope-dilution analysis in 16 chondrites, one achondrite, and Apollo 11 and 12 lunar fines. Meteoritic thallium contents vary over a large range, 0.02 to 100 ppb, corresponding to the fact that thallium is a highly fractionated volatile element. Lunar thallium contents are less than 5 ppb. The Tl205/Tl203 ratio was determined in most of the samples, with precision ranging from 0.03% to several percent depending mainly on the amount of thallium present. No variations from the terrestrial ratio were observed. The chondritic isochron slope for Pb205 (13.8-m.y. half-life) is less than or equal to 0.00009 (99% confidence level), corresponding to an interval of at least 60 m.y. and possibly exceeding 120 m.y. between the termination of s-process nucleosynthesis and the lead-thallium fractionations.

  10. Multi-scale three-dimensional characterization of iron particles in dusty olivine: Implications for paleomagnetism of chondritic meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einsle, Joshua F.; Harrison, Richard J.; Kasama, Takeshi;

    2016-01-01

    Dusty olivine (olivine containing multiple sub-micrometer inclusions of metallic iron) in chondritic meteorites is considered an ideal carrier of paleomagnetic remanence, capable of maintaining a faithful record of pre-accretionary magnetization acquired during chondrule formation. Here we show how...... the magnetic architecture of a single dusty olivine grain from the Semarkona LL3.0 ordinary chondrite meteorite can be fully characterized in three dimensions, using a combination of focused ion beam nanotomography (FIB-nT), electron tomography, and finite-element micromagnetic modeling. We present a three...... and remanence vectors can sometimes lie at very large (tens of degrees) angles to the principal axes. The subtle details of the morphology can control the overall remanence state, leading in some cases to a dominant contribution from the bulk spins to the net remanence, with profound implications for predicting...

  11. Carbonaceous thin film coating with Fe-N4 site for enhancement of dioxovanadium ion reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Jun; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Fukuhara, Tomoko; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2016-08-01

    It has been found that carbonaceous materials containing a transition metal coordinated by 4 nitrogens in the square-planar configuration (metal-N4 site) on the surface possessed a catalytic activity for various electrochemical reactions related to energy conversion and storage; i.e., oxygen reduction, hydrogen evolution, and quite recently, the electrode reactions in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB). The catalyst for the VRFB positive electrode discharge reaction, i.e., the dioxovanadium ion reduction, was formed by coating the surface of cup-stack carbon nanotubes with a carbonaceous thin film with the Fe-N4 site generated by the sublimation, deposition, and pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine. In this study, the influence of the physical properties of the catalyst on the electrochemical reactions was investigated to optimize the coating. With an increase in the coating, the specific surface area increased, whereas the pore size decreased. The surface Fe concentration was increased in spite of the Fe aggregation inside the carbon matrix. The catalytic activity enhancement was achieved due to the increase in the specific surface area and the surface Fe concentration, but was lowered due to the decrease in the pore size, which was disadvantageous for the penetration of the electrolyte and the mass transfer.

  12. Role of air bubbles overlooked in the adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate on hydrophobic carbonaceous adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Pingping; Deng, Shubo; Lu, Xinyu; Du, Ziwen; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic interaction has been considered to be responsible for adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) on the surface of hydrophobic adsorbents, but the long C-F chain in PFOS is not only hydrophobic but also oleophobic. In this study, for the first time we propose that air bubbles on the surface of hydrophobic carbonaceous adsorbents play an important role in the adsorption of PFOS. The level of adsorption of PFOS on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphite (GI), graphene (GE), and powdered activated carbon (PAC) decreases after vacuum degassing. Vacuum degassing time and pressure significantly affect the removal of PFOS by these adsorbents. After vacuum degassing at 0.01 atm for 36 h, the extent of removal of PFOS by the pristine CNTs and GI decreases 79% and 74%, respectively, indicating the main contribution of air bubbles to PFOS adsorption. When the degassed solution is recontacted with air during the adsorption process, the removal of PFOS recovers to the value obtained without vacuum degassing, further verifying the key role of air bubbles in PFOS adsorption. By theoretical calculation, the distribution of PFOS in air bubbles on the adsorbent surfaces is discussed, and a new schematic sorption model of PFOS on carbonaceous adsorbents in the presence of air bubbles is proposed. The accumulation of PFOS at the interface of air bubbles on the adsorbents is primarily responsible for its adsorption, providing a new mechanistic insight into the transport, fate, and removal of PFOS. PMID:25365738

  13. Enantiomer excesses of rare and common sugar derivatives in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George; Rios, Andro C.

    2016-06-01

    Biological polymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are constructed of only one—the d or l—of the two possible nonsuperimposable mirror images (enantiomers) of selected organic compounds. However, before the advent of life, it is generally assumed that chemical reactions produced 50:50 (racemic) mixtures of enantiomers, as evidenced by common abiotic laboratory syntheses. Carbonaceous meteorites contain clues to prebiotic chemistry because they preserve a record of some of the Solar System’s earliest (˜4.5 Gy) chemical and physical processes. In multiple carbonaceous meteorites, we show that both rare and common sugar monoacids (aldonic acids) contain significant excesses of the d enantiomer, whereas other (comparable) sugar acids and sugar alcohols are racemic. Although the proposed origins of such excesses are still tentative, the findings imply that meteoritic compounds and/or the processes that operated on meteoritic precursors may have played an ancient role in the enantiomer composition of life’s carbohydrate-related biopolymers.

  14. Characterization of the carbonaceous materials obtained from different agro-industrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensuncho-Muñoz, A E; Carriazo, J G

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation and characterization of carbonaceous materials obtained from three types of vegetable wastes provided by agricultural industries. Soft carbonization (280°C) and H3PO4-activation procedures were used to convert the agricultural wastes to carbon powders with high adsorbent capacities. This process is excellent for eliminating and exploiting the huge masses (many tons) of vegetable residues remaining after each harvest every year in several Colombian agro-industries. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2-adsorption isotherms. XRD and IR verified the formation of carbons, and SEM showed small particles (20-500 µm) with characteristic morphology for each type of residue used and abundant cavities of different sizes. The N2-adsorption analyses showed that the carbons had high adsorption capacities with important surface area values and large pore volumes. The use of the activated carbonaceous materials as adsorbent of azo dyes (allura red and sunset yellow) from aqueous solutions was evaluated. The results showed a good adsorption capacity indicating the potentiality of these materials as pollutant adsorbents in food industry wastewaters. These results indicate that these powders can be used as potential adsorbents for different gaseous or liquid pollutants. PMID:25189634

  15. Precursor soot synthesis of fullerenes and nanotubes without formation of carbonaceous soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2007-03-20

    The present invention is a method for the synthesis of fullerenes and/or nanotubes from precursor soot without the formation of carbonaceous soot. The method comprises the pyrolysis of a hydrocarbon fuel source by heating the fuel source at a sufficient temperature to transform the fuel source to a condensed hydrocarbon. The condensed hydrocarbon is a reaction medium comprising precursor soot wherein hydrogen exchange occurs within the reaction medium to form reactive radicals which cause continuous rearrangement of the carbon skeletal structure of the condensed hydrocarbon. Then, inducing dehydrogenation of the precursor soot to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes free from the formation of carbonaceous soot by continued heating at the sufficient temperature and by regulating the carbon to hydrogen ratio within the reaction medium. The dehydrogenation process produces hydrogen gas as a by-product. The method of the present invention in another embodiment is also a continuous synthesis process having a continuous supply of the fuel source. The method of the present invention can also be a continuous cyclic synthesis process wherein the reaction medium is fed back into the system as a fuel source after extraction of the fullerenes and/or nanotube products. The method of the present invention is also a method for producing precursor soot in bulk quantity, then forming fullerenes and/or nanotubes from the precursor bulk.

  16. Filamentous Trichomic Prokaryotes in Carbonaceous Meteorites: Indigenous Microfossils, Minerals, or Modern Bio-Contaminants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Large complex filaments have been detected in freshly fractured interior surfaces of a variety of carbonaceous meteorites. Many exhibit the detailed morphological and morphometric characteristics of known filamentous trichomic prokaryotic microorganisms. In this paper we review prior studies of filamentous microstructures encountered in the meteorites along with the elemental compositions and characteristics of the, fibrous evaporite minerals and filamentous cyanobacteria and homologous trichomic sulfur bacteria. The meteorite images and elemental compositions will compared with data obtained with the same instruments for abiotic microstructures and living and fossil microorganisms in order to evaluate the relative merits of the alternate hypotheses that have been advanced to explain the nature and characteristics of the meteorite filaments. The possibiility that the filaments found in the meteorites may be comprise modern bio-contaminants will be evaluated in light of their observed elemental compositions and data by other researchers on the detection of indigenous complex organic biosignatures, and extraterrestrial amino acids and nucleobases found in the Murchison CM2 and the Orgueil CI1 carbonaceous meteorites.

  17. Testing for fullerenes in geologic materials: Oklo carbonaceous substances, Karelian shungites, Sudbury Black Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, David; Eigendorf, Guenter; Tokaryk, Dennis; Gauthier-Lafaye, François; Guckert, Kristal D.; Melezhik, Victor; Farrow, Catharine E. G.

    2003-03-01

    Fullerenes have been reported from diverse geologic environments since their discovery in shungite from Karelian Russia. Our investigation is prompted by the presence of onionskin-like structures in some carbonaceous substances associated with the fossil nuclear fission reactors of Oklo, Gabon. The same series of extractions and the same instrumental techniques, laser desorption ionization and high-resolution mass spectroscopy (electron-impact mass spectroscopy), were employed to test for fullerenes in samples from three different localities: two sites containing putative fullerenes (Sudbury Basin and Russian Karelia) and one new location (Oklo, Gabon). We confirm the presence of fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Black Tuff of the Onaping Formation impact breccia in the Sudbury Basin, but we find no evidence of fullerenes in shungite samples from various locations in Russian Karelia. Analysis of carbonaceous substances associated with the natural nuclear fission reactors of Oklo yields no definitive signals for fullerenes. If fullerenes were produced during sustained nuclear fission at Oklo, then they are present below the detection limit (˜100 fmol), or they have destabilized since formation. Contrary to some expectations, geologic occurrences of fullerenes are not commonplace.

  18. The interplay between chemistry and nucleation in the formation of carbonaceous dust in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzati, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are considered to be important contributors to the primitive dust enrichment of the interstellar medium in the high-redshift universe. Theoretical models of dust formation in stellar explosions have so far provided controversial results and a generally poor fit to the observations of dust formation in local supernovae. We present a new methodology for the calculation of carbonaceous dust formation in young supernova remnants. Our new technique uses both the nucleation theory and a chemical reaction network to allow us to compute the dust growth beyond the molecular level as well as to consider chemical erosion of the forming grains. We find that carbonaceous dust forms efficiently in the core of the ejecta, but takes several years to condensate, longer than previously estimated. It forms unevenly and remains concentrated in the inner part of the remnant. These results support the role of core-collapse supernovae as dust factories and provide new insight on the observations of SN 1987A...

  19. Possible effects of diagenesis on the stable isotope composition of amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael H.

    2015-09-01

    The initial report of indigenous, non-racemic protein amino acids (L-enantiomer excess) in the Murchison meteorite was based on the fact that only eight of the twenty amino acids characteristic of all life on Earth was present in this stone1. The absence of the other protein amino acids indicated that contamination subsequent to impact was highly unlikely. The development of new techniques for determining the stable isotope composition of individual amino acid enantiomers in the Murchison meteorite further documented the extraterrestrial origins of these compounds2,3. The stable isotope approach continues to be used to document the occurrence of an extraterrestrial L-enantiomer excess of protein amino acids in other carbonaceous meteorites4. It has been suggested that this L-enantiomer excess may result from aqueous reprocessing on meteorite parent bodies4,5. Preliminary results of simulation experiments are presented that are used to determine the extent to which the stable isotope compositions of amino acid constituents of carbonaceous meteorites may have been altered by these types of diagenetic processes subsequent to synthesis.

  20. Carbonaceous particles in Muztagh Ata ice core, West Kunlun Mountains, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU XianQin; XU BaiQing; YAO TanDong; WANG NingLian; WU GuangJian

    2008-01-01

    Carbonaceous particles concentrations of OC and EC are determined using a two-step gas chroma-tography system in Muztagh Ata ice core covering the time period of 1955-2000. Over the period rep-resented by the core, OC and EC concentrations appear to have changed significantly, varied in the range of 17.7-216.7 and 6.5-124.6, and averaged 61.8, 32.9 ng·g-1, respectively. The average concen-tration of EC in Muztagh Ata ice core is much lower than that in an Alpine ice core record (100-300 ng·g-1) during the same period, but it is a factor of 14 in Greenland ice core (2.3 ng.g-1), this may induce a strong impact on the snow albedo in the last 46 years in our study area. Observations indicate two periods with obviously high deposition concentrations (1955-1965 and 1974-1989) and two periods with low concentrations (1966-1973 and 1990-1995), as well as a recent increasing trend. By com-paring EC and SO42- concentration variations and deciphering OC/EC ratios recorded in the same ice core, we can judge roughly that the carbonaceous particles deposited in Muztagh Ata ice core were attributed to fossil fuel combustion sources.

  1. Characteristics of Anthropogenic Sulfate and Carbonaceous Aerosols over East Asia: Regional Modeling and Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan HUANG; William L. CHAMEIDES; Qian TAN; Robert E. DICKINSON

    2008-01-01

    The authors present spatial and temporal characteristics of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols over East Asia using a 3-D coupled regional climate-chemistry-aerosol model, and compare the simulation with the limited aerosol observations over the region. The aerosol module consists of SO2, SO42-, hydrophobic and hydrophilic black carbon (BC) and organic carbon compounds (OC), including emission, advections, dry and wet deposition, and chemical production and conversion. The simulated patterns of SO2 are closely tied to its emission rate, with sharp gradients between the highly polluted regions and more rural areas. Chemical conversion (especially in the aqueous phase) and dry deposition remove 60% and 30% of the total SO2 emission, respectively. The SO42- shows less horizontal gradient and seasonality than SO2, with wet deposition (60%) and export (27%) being two major sinks. Carbonaceous aerosols are spatially smoother than sulfur species. The aging process transforms more than 80% of hydrophobic BC and OC to hydrophilic components, which are removed by wet deposition (60%) and export (30%). The simulated spatial and seasonal SO42-, BC and OC aerosol concentrations and total aerosol optical depth are generally consistent with the observations in rural areas over East Asia, with lower bias in simulated OC aerosols, likely due to the underestimation of anthropogenic OC emissions and missing treatment of secondary organic carbon. The results suggest that our model is a useful tool for characterizing the anthropogenic aerosol cycle and for assessing its potential climatic and environmental effects in future studies.

  2. Morphology, composition and mixing state of individual carbonaceous aerosol in urban Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available 834 individual aerosol particles were collected during Octoberober and Novemberember 2010 in urban Shanghai, China. Morphologies, compositions and mixing states of carbonaceous aerosols were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX. Structures of some particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED. Among the aerosol particles observed, carbonaceous aerosols were categorized into five types: polymeric organic compound (POC, soot, tar ball, char, and biogenic particle. Based on the detailed TEM-EDX analysis, most of particles were coated with secondary organic aerosols (SOA, which commonly formed through condensation or heterogeneous reactions of precursor gases on pre-existing particles. The internally particles of sulphates, organics and soot were encountered frequently. Such internally mixed particles may be preferentially formed during a stagnated air mass which often occurred during serious pollution events, such as a haze episode on 13 Novemberember. Although relative number counts varied with different species, sulphates (38 %–71 % and soot (11 %–22 % constituted the most dominant species observed in the samples. With an exception of the sample collected during a dust storm on 12 Novemberember, soil-derived particles (68 % were relatively more frequently observed. Of particular interest was the biogenic particles encountered almost as frequently as soot on the sample collected on 13 November (18 % vs. 22 %. The result from air mass back-trajectory analysis indicated that these particles were marine-originated, most likely from the Yellow Sea.

  3. Partition coefficients for Al, Ca, Ti, Cr, and Ni in olivine obtained by melting experiment on an LL6 chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, M.; Mikouchi, T.; Mckay, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    We report the partition coefficients for Ca, Al, Ti, Cr, and Ni in olivine obtained through a series of melting experiments on an LL6 chondrite under varying conditions of temperature and oxygen fugacity. It is necessary to examine the variation of partition coefficients up to extremely reducing conditions in order to study meteoritic olivines. For Ca, Al, and Cr, the partition coefficients tend to decrease as temperature increases, but do not change even under extremely reducing conditions.

  4. Evidence for 26Al in Feldspars from the H4 Chondrite Ste. Marguerite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, E.; Gopel, C.

    1992-07-01

    One of the important questions for the history of the early solar system is whether or not there was enough ^26Al to melt small planetary bodies through the heat released by its decay. Although there is ample evidence for the existence of live ^26Al in refractory inclusions (Wasserburg and Papanastassiou, 1982; Hutcheon, 1982; Podosek et al., 1991), CAIs are special objects with peculiar properties and their Al is not necessarily representative of that of their host meteorites nor the early solar systems. Furthermore, some inclusions do not show any evidence for ^26Al (Wasserburg and Papanastassiou, 1982; Ireland, 1990; Virag et al., 1991), raising the possibility of ^26Al heterogeneity. The only previous observation of ^26Mg excesses attributed to the decay of ^26Al outside of CAIs was in an igneous clast from Semarkona (Hutcheon and Hutchison, 1989) leading to the conclusion that ^26Al indeed could have been a heat source for planetary melting. We have measured Al-Mg in plagioclase grains from the H4 chondrite Ste. Marguerite by ion microprobe mass spectrometry. Feldspars from H4 chondrites are good samples for addressing the problem of ^26Al as heat source because most Al resides in this phase and some H4s experienced fast cooling (Pellas and Storzer, 1981); in fact, the possibility of live ^26Al in feldspars from H4 chondrites that cooled fast has been predicted by Pellas and Storzer (1981). Furthermore, extremely precise absolute Pb/Pb ages exist for these meteorites (Gopel et al., 1991). Figure 1 shows the measurements on five feldspar crystals. All show ^26Mg excesses. A fit through the data points and the normal ^26Mg/^24Mg ratio of 0.13962 obtained from Lake County plagioclase measured under the same instrumental conditions as the Ste. Marguerite samples yields a (^26Al/^27Al)(sub)0 ratio of (2.0 +- 0.6) x 10^-7. If interpreted chronologically this ratio dates the retention of radiogenic ^26Mg in Ste. Marguerite feldspar to 5.6 +- 0.4 Ma after the

  5. Hydrogen and major element concentrations on 433 Eros: Evidence for an L- or LL-chondrite-like surface composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Patrick N.; Bazell, David; Evans, Larry G.; Goldsten, John O.; Lawrence, David J.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2015-03-01

    A reanalysis of NEAR X-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) data provides robust evidence that the elemental composition of the near-Earth asteroid 433 Eros is consistent with the L and LL ordinary chondrites. These results facilitated the use of the gamma-ray measurements to produce the first in situ measurement of hydrogen concentrations on an asteroid. The measured value, 1100-700+1600 ppm, is consistent with hydrogen concentrations measured in L and LL chondrite meteorite falls. Gamma-ray derived abundances of hydrogen and potassium show no evidence for depletion of volatiles relative to ordinary chondrites, suggesting that the sulfur depletion observed in X-ray data is a surficial effect, consistent with a space-weathering origin. The newfound agreement between the X-ray, gamma-ray, and spectral data suggests that the NEAR landing site, a ponded regolith deposit, has an elemental composition that is indistinguishable from the mean surface. This observation argues against a pond formation process that segregates metals from silicates, and instead suggests that the differences observed in reflectance spectra between the ponds and bulk Eros are due to grain size differences resulting from granular sorting of ponded material.

  6. Cosmic-ray exposure histories of two Antarctic meteorites from Chinese collections and the Guangmingshan and Zhuanghe chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Daode(王道德); LIN; Yangting(林杨挺); LIU; Xiaohan(刘小汉); JU; Yitai(琚宜太)

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of noble gases of two Antarctic meteorites (GRV 98002, 98004) from Chinese collections, and the Guangmingshan and Zhuanghe chondrites were measured. Based on the petrography and mineralogy of these meteorites, and production rates of the cosmogenic nuclides, we calculated cosmic-ray exposure and gas retention ages of the four chondrites. Exposure ages of the four chondrites are 0.052 Ma ± 0.008 Ma (GRV 98004, H5), 17.0 Ma ± 2.5 Ma (GRV98002, L5), 3.8 Ma ± 0.6 Ma (Zhuanghe, H5), and 68.9 Ma ± 10 Ma (Guangmingshan, H5), respectively. The exposure age of GRV 98004 is the lowest value of Antarctic meteorites reported up to date; while that of Guangmingshan is higher than other Chinese meteorites of H-group. Both GRV 98002 and Zhuanghe have low 4He concentrations, probably due to shock effects or solar heating at orbits with small perihelion distances during cosmic-ray exposure. On the other hand, losses of cosmogenic 3He and 4He are correlated with both GRV 98002 and Guangmingshan.

  7. Earth's Uranium and Thorium content and geoneutrinos fluxes based on enstatite chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javoy, Marc; Kaminski, Edouard

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's thermal evolution is controlled by the amount of heat released by the radioactive decay of 40K, 238U, 235U and 232Th. Their crust and upper mantle content is inferred from direct sampling, whereas estimating the lower mantle concentrations requires indirect constraints, such as those brought by primitive chondrites, or by geoneutrinos. Here we follow the framework of "E-Earth" models, based on the isotopic and chemical composition of E-chondrites (EC), to calculate U and Th concentrations in the Earth's present day mantle, and the corresponding geoneutrinos flux. The model uses a compilation of data of U and Th contents of EC and account for the Earth differentiation and crust extraction. We obtain that the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) contains 15.4±1.8 ppb of Uranium and 51.3±4.4 ppb of Thorium, and has an average Th/U mass ratio of 3.4±0.4, with a peak value around 3.15. The prediction of geoneutrinos events originating from the mantle (i.e., without taking into account the local contribution of the crust) is 5.1±1.0 TNU, with 4.3±0.9 TNU coming from Uranium, and 0.8±0.2 TNU from Thorium. These numbers are in good agreement with the most recent KamLAND detector estimate, and compatible with the (higher) Borexino flux. On the other hand, the KamLAND constraints are not consistent with the high content of heat producing elements in the mantle predicted by the simple application of parameterized convection model to the thermal evolution of the Earth's mantle. Since the measurement error in the mantle neutrino flux is currently dominated by the crustal contribution, geoneutrinos cannot for now discriminate between CI-based and EH-base models of the Earth's composition. Further progress is expected if an ocean based geoneutrino detector is deployed.

  8. The Origin of Non-chondritic HSE Ratios in the Earth's Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenz, V.; Rubie, D. C.; Frost, D. J.; Jacobson, S. A.; Morbidelli, A.; Palme, H.; Vogel, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally thought that Earth's mantle abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE) were established by the addition of a chondritic late veneer to a mantle that was stripped of HSEs by core formation. A long-standing problem with this hypothesis is that the mantle's suprachondritic Pd/Ir and Ru/Ir ratios cannot be reconciled with any known meteorite group. To address this issue, we modelled the effect of metal-silicate segregation on abundances of the HSE and S in the Earth's mantle by including these elements in a combined accretion/core-formation model. Because in our model only a small fraction of the mantle equilibrates with core-forming metal, the bulk mantle HSE abundances are too large by the end of accretion. Sulfur abundances also greatly exceed S-saturation levels at magma ocean crystallisation temperatures, leading to the formation of a global immiscible sulfide melt that segregated to the core, thus removing HSEs from the mantle [1]. To better constrain the role of sulfide segregation on the HSE budget of the mantle, we experimentally determined the sulfide-silicate partitioning of Pt, Pd, Ru and Ir under high P-T conditions. Results show that Pd and Ru are less chalcophile at pressures above ~20 GPa compared to Pt and Ir, as opposed to the metal-silicate system where Ru is more siderophile than Pt [2]. These results are included in our model, which now involves localized segregation of core-forming metal followed by widespread exsolution and segregation of immiscible sulfide liquids. Platinum and Ir are efficiently extracted from the mantle whereas significant concentrations of Ru and Pd remain. Late veneer addition occurs after sulfide segregation has ceased due to magma ocean solidification. This model reproduces perfectly the non-chondritic Ru/Ir and Pd/Ir ratios of the mantle, reflecting incomplete removal of Ru and Pd from the mantle with core-forming sulfide melts. [1] O'Neill (1991) GCA 55, 1159-1172. [2] Mann et al. (2012) GCA 84, 593-613.

  9. Rubidium isotopes in primitive chondrites: Constraints on Earth's volatile element depletion and lead isotope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, O.; Mezger, K.; van Westrenen, W.

    2011-05-01

    The bulk silicate Earth (BSE) shows substantial deficits in volatile elements compared to CI-chondrites and solar abundances. These deficits could be caused by pre-accretionary depletion in the solar nebula during condensation of solids, or by later heat-driven evaporation during collision of small bodies that later accreted to form the Earth. The latter is considered to result in isotope fractionation for elements with low condensation temperatures that correlates with the degree of depletion. Here, we report first high-precision isotope ratio measurements of the moderately volatile and lithophile trace element Rb. Data from seventeen chondrite meteorites show that their Rb isotope abundances are nearly indistinguishable from Earth, not deviating more than 1 per mil in their 87Rb/85Rb. The almost uniform solar system Rb isotope pool suggests incomplete condensation or evaporation in a single stage is unlikely to be the cause of the volatile element deficit of the Earth. As Rb and Pb have similar condensation temperatures, we use their different degrees of depletion in the BSE to address the mechanisms and timing of terrestrial volatile depletion. The Rb isotope data are consistent with a scenario in which the volatile budget of the Earth was generated by a mixture of a highly volatile-element depleted early Proto-Earth with undepleted material in the course of terrestrial accretion. Observed Pb and Rb abundances and U-Pb and Rb-Sr isotope systematics suggest that volatile addition occurred at approximately the same time at which last core-mantle equilibration was achieved. In line with previous suggestions, this last equilibration involved a second stage of Pb (but not Rb) depletion from the BSE. The timing of this second Pb loss event can be constrained to ~ 110 Ma after the start of the solar system. This model supports a scenario with core storage of Pb in the aftermath of a putative Moon forming giant impact that also delivered the bulk of the volatile

  10. A Deep Moho in "Small Planet" Vesta and Implication Regarding the Chondritic Nature of Protoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clenet, H.; Jutzi, M.; Barrat, J. A.; Asphaug, E. I.; Benz, W.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    Asteroid 4-Vesta is the only differentiated protoplanet [1] which has been extensively explored by a space probe, and is represented by a large collection of basaltic and ultramafic samples, the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite (HED) meteorites. High-resolution global mapping by the Dawn probe revealed that the south polar depression is composed of two overlapping impact basins, Veneneia and Rheasilvia [2]. Numerical simulations taking into account both sequential events [3] show that surface material in the northern hemisphere of Vesta came from a depth of about 20 km, whereas the exposed southern material comes from a depth of 60 to 100 km. Recent magma-ocean crystallization models [4], which consider a chondritic initial composition, predict a crustal thickness of 30-40 km. Thus a succession of two impacts would have dug well into the olivine-rich mantle. Here we use the results from 3D smooth particle hydrodynamics impact simulations to show that, not only the floor of the basins should expose very deep lithologies, but that a significant proportion of the rocks which have escaped from Vesta during the second impact originated from depth much greater than 40 km. We also mapped locally Vesta's mineralogy with images from the Dawn VIR spectrometer. The lack of olivine-rich lithologies in the Veneneia/Rheasilvia region, and the simultaneous lack of mantle samples among the vestoids and HEDs together provide evidence that the crust-mantle boundary (or Moho) was not reached during the two impacts, and entails that Vesta's Moho is deeper than 80 km [5]. With a deep Moho, it appears clear that the mantle is much thinner than expected, leading to the conclusion that Vesta contains far less olivine than predicted by magma-ocean crystallization models. This could be an evidence that its bulk chemical composition deviates substantially from a chondritic composition for major elements, alike as for sodium and other volatiles. [1] Russell et al, Science 336, 684-686, 2012

  11. The Anatomy and Bulk Composition of CAI Rims in the Vigarano (CV3) Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, A.; Boynton, W. V.

    1993-07-01

    A striking feature of Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in chondrites is the presence of mineralogical layers that typically form rim sequences up to 50 micrometers thick [1]. Many ideas regarding the origin of CAI rims have been proposed, but none are entirely satisfactory. The detailed mineralogy and bulk compositions of relatively unaltered CAI rims in the Vigarano (CV3) chondrite described here provide constraints on hypotheses of rim formation. Rim Mineralogy: CAIs in Vigarano consist of melilite (mel)- and spinel (sp)- rich varieties, both of which are rimmed [2]. Around mel-rich objects, the layer sequence is CAI interior --> sp-rich layer (sometimes absent) --> mel/anorthite (anor) layer --> Ti-Al-rich clinopyroxene (Tpx) layer --> Al- diopside (Al-diop) layer --> olivine (ol) +/- Al-diop layer --> host matrix. The sequence around sp-rich objects differs from this in that the mel/anor layer is absent. Both the sp-rich layer around mel-cored CAIs and the cores of sp-rich CAIs in Vigarano are largely comprised of a fine-grained (anor layer is sometimes monomineralic, consisting of mel alone, or bimineralic, consisting of both mel and anor. Where bimineralic, anor typically occurs in the outer part of the layer. In places, anor (An(sub)99-100) has partially altered to nepheline and voids. Rim mel is systematically less gehlenitic than mel in the CAI interiors, especially compared to mel in the interior adjacent to the rims. The Tpx layer (>2 and up to 15 wt% TiO2) and Al-diop layer ( sp + fo --> sp + fo + anor or mel or Tpx) that does not correspond to observed rim sequences. It thus appears that (1) the rim region did not form through crystallization of molten CAIs; and (2) rim layers did not originate solely by the crystallization of a melt layer present on a solid CAI core [4,5]. References: [1] Wark D. A. and Lovering J. F. (1977) Proc. LSC 8th, 95-112. [2] Ruzicka A. and Boynton W. V. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 390-391. [3] Stolper E. (1982) GCA, 46, 2159

  12. Thermal history of the H-chondrite parent body: Implications for metamorphic grade and accretionary time-scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, Marc; Toplis, Michael J.; Baratoux, David; Guignard, Jérémy

    2013-10-01

    Multiple temperature-age constraints for eight H-chondrite samples have been used to provide insight into the thermal history of their parent-body through combination with numerical models of thermal evolution assuming internal heating by 26Al and conductive cooling. The effect of spreading accretion out over time is the principal focus of this work. A wide range of body size and date of accretion is systematically tested for different values of accretion rate in order to quantify and illustrate the parameter space that is consistent with the available thermo-chronological data. We conclude that the H-chondrite samples considered have a thermal history consistent with a parent body that at some stage had a concentric 'onion-shell' internal structure. That body had a radius no larger than 130 km, and accretion most probably took place over a time interval on the order of 0.0-0.2 Myr, approximately 2 Myr after CAI condensation. In any case, the time interval of accretion is unlikely to have been more than 0.5 Myr supporting evidence in favour of rapid accretion, possibly through reassembly of the fragments of an earlier generation of bodies. Furthermore, the H-chondrites studied here are inferred to have come from a wide depth range within the body where they experienced metamorphism, indicating that preservation of the onion-shell structure is unlikely. The presence of an insulating regolith does not modify this conclusion, as appropriate thermal histories for the three H6 samples considered cannot be reproduced at depths near the surface. Asteroid 6-Hebe may be the parent body of the H-chondrites, but the high bulk density of the latter is difficult to reconcile with a 'rubble-pile' structure of pure H-chondrite material. Finally, optimized thermal histories are used to constrain the temperatures characterizing boundaries between petrological types (800, 1000, and 1140 K for the H3/4, H4/5, and H5/6 boundaries respectively). In detail, the type 6 samples studied

  13. Petrology of the Baszkowka L5 chondrite: A record of surface-forming processes on the parent body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przylibski, T. A.; Pilski, A. S.; Zagożdżon, P. P.; Kryza, R.

    2003-06-01

    We review the petrology of Baszkowka, present new microprobe data on mineral constituents, and propose a model for surface properties of the parent body consistent with these data. The low shock index and high porosity of the Baszkowka L5 chondrite mean that considerable primary textural and petrographic detail is preserved, allowing insight into the structure and evolution of the parent body. This meteorite formed in a sedimentary environment resembling that in which pyroclastic rocks are deposited. The origin of the component chondrules, achondritic fragments (mostly olivine and pyroxene aggregates), chondritic-achondritic aggregates, and compound chondrules can be explained by invoking collision of 2 melted or partially melted planetesimals, each covered with a thin crust. This could have happened at an early stage in the evolution of the solar system, between 1 and 2 Myr after its origin. The collision resulted in the formation of a cloud containing products of earlier magmatic crystallization (chondrite and achondrite fragments) from which new chondrules were created. Particle collision in this cloud produced fragmented chondrules, chondritic-achondritic aggregates, and compound chondrules. Within this low-density medium, these particles were accreted on the surface of the larger of the planetesimals involved in the collision. The density of the medium was low enough to prevent grain-size sorting of the components but high enough to prevent the total loss of heat and to enable the welding of fragments on the surface of the body. The rock material was homogenized within the cloud and, in particular, within the zone close to the planetesimal surface. The hot material settled on the surface and became welded as molten or plastic metal, and sulfide components cemented the grains together. The process resembled the formation of welded ignimbrites. Once these processes on the planetesimal surface were completed, no subsequent recrystallization occurred. The high

  14. Global climate impacts of country-level primary carbonaceous aerosol from solid-fuel cookstove emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Forrest; Henze, Daven

    2015-11-01

    Cookstove use is globally one of the largest unregulated anthropogenic sources of primary carbonaceous aerosol. While reducing cookstove emissions through national-scale mitigation efforts has clear benefits for improving indoor and ambient air quality, and significant climate benefits from reduced green-house gas emissions, climate impacts associated with reductions to co-emitted black (BC) and organic carbonaceous aerosol are not well characterized. Here we attribute direct, indirect, semi-direct, and snow/ice albedo radiative forcing (RF) and associated global surface temperature changes to national-scale carbonaceous aerosol cookstove emissions. These results are made possible through the use of adjoint sensitivity modeling to relate direct RF and BC deposition to emissions. Semi- and indirect effects are included via global scaling factors, and bounds on these estimates are drawn from current literature ranges for aerosol RF along with a range of solid fuel emissions characterizations. Absolute regional temperature potentials are used to estimate global surface temperature changes. Bounds are placed on these estimates, drawing from current literature ranges for aerosol RF along with a range of solid fuel emissions characterizations. We estimate a range of 0.16 K warming to 0.28 K cooling with a central estimate of 0.06 K cooling from the removal of cookstove aerosol emissions. At the national emissions scale, countries’ impacts on global climate range from net warming (e.g., Mexico and Brazil) to net cooling, although the range of estimated impacts for all countries span zero given uncertainties in RF estimates and fuel characterization. We identify similarities and differences in the sets of countries with the highest emissions and largest cookstove temperature impacts (China, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal), those with the largest temperature impact per carbon emitted (Kazakhstan, Estonia, and Mongolia), and those that would provide the

  15. Source apportionment of the summer time carbonaceous aerosol at Nordic rural background sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Yttri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, natural and anthropogenic sources of particulate organic carbon (OCp and elemental carbon (EC have been quantified based on weekly filter samples of PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter <10 μm collected at four Nordic rural background sites [Birkenes (Norway, Hyytiälä (Finland, Vavihill (Sweden, Lille Valby, (Denmark] during late summer (5 August–2 September 2009. Levels of source specific tracers, i.e. cellulose, levoglucosan, mannitol and the 14C/12C ratio of total carbon (TC, have been used as input for source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol, whereas Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS was used to statistically treat the multitude of possible combinations resulting from this approach. The carbonaceous aerosol (here: TCp; i.e. particulate TC was totally dominated by natural sources (69–86%, with biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA being the single most important source (48–57%. Interestingly, primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP were the second most important source (20–32%. The anthropogenic contribution was mainly attributed to fossil fuel sources (OCff and ECff (10–24%, whereas no more than 3–7% was explained by combustion of biomass (OCbb and ECbb in this late summer campaign i.e. emissions from residential wood burning and/or wild/agricultural fires. Fossil fuel sources totally dominated the ambient EC loading, which accounted for 4–12% of TCp, whereas <1.5% of EC was attributed to combustion of biomass. The carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment showed only minor variation between the four selected sites. However, Hyytiälä and Birkenes showed greater resemblance to each other, as did Lille Valby and Vavihill, the two latter being somewhat more influenced by anthropogenic sources. Ambient levels of organosulphates and nitrooxy-organosulphates in the Nordic rural

  16. Source apportionment of the summer time carbonaceous aerosol at Nordic rural background sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Yttri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, natural and anthropogenic sources of particulate organic carbon (OCp and elemental carbon (EC have been quantified based on weekly filter samples of PM10 collected at four Nordic rural background sites (Birkenes (Norway, Hyytiälä (Finland Vavihill (Sweden, Lille Valby (Denmark during late summer (5 August–2 September 2009. Levels of source specific tracers, i.e. cellulose, levoglucosan, mannitol and the 14C/12C ratio of total carbon (TC, have been used as input for source apportionment of the carbonaceous aerosol, whereas Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS was used to statistically treat the multitude of possible combinations resulting from this approach.

    The carbonaceous aerosol (here: TCp; i.e. particulate TC was totally dominated by natural sources (69–86 %, with biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA being the single most important source (48–57 %. Interestingly, primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP were the second most important source (20–32 %. The anthropogenic contribution was mainly attributed to fossil fuel sources (OCff and ECff (10–24 %, whereas no more than 3–7 % was explained by combustion of biomass (OCbb and ECbb in this late summer campaign i.e. emissions from residential wood burning and/or wild/agricultural fires. Fossil fuel sources totally dominated the ambient EC loading, accounting for 4–12 % of TCp, whereas <1.5 % was attributed to combustion of biomass. The carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment showed only minor variation between the four selected sites. However, Hyytiälä and Birkenes showed greater resemblance to each other, as did Lille Valby and Vavihill, the two latter being somewhat more influenced by anthropogenic sources.

    Ambient levels of organosulphates and nitrooxy-organosulphates in the Nordic rural background environment are reported for

  17. Global climate impacts of country-level primary carbonaceous aerosol from solid-fuel cookstove emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cookstove use is globally one of the largest unregulated anthropogenic sources of primary carbonaceous aerosol. While reducing cookstove emissions through national-scale mitigation efforts has clear benefits for improving indoor and ambient air quality, and significant climate benefits from reduced green-house gas emissions, climate impacts associated with reductions to co-emitted black (BC) and organic carbonaceous aerosol are not well characterized. Here we attribute direct, indirect, semi-direct, and snow/ice albedo radiative forcing (RF) and associated global surface temperature changes to national-scale carbonaceous aerosol cookstove emissions. These results are made possible through the use of adjoint sensitivity modeling to relate direct RF and BC deposition to emissions. Semi- and indirect effects are included via global scaling factors, and bounds on these estimates are drawn from current literature ranges for aerosol RF along with a range of solid fuel emissions characterizations. Absolute regional temperature potentials are used to estimate global surface temperature changes. Bounds are placed on these estimates, drawing from current literature ranges for aerosol RF along with a range of solid fuel emissions characterizations. We estimate a range of 0.16 K warming to 0.28 K cooling with a central estimate of 0.06 K cooling from the removal of cookstove aerosol emissions. At the national emissions scale, countries’ impacts on global climate range from net warming (e.g., Mexico and Brazil) to net cooling, although the range of estimated impacts for all countries span zero given uncertainties in RF estimates and fuel characterization. We identify similarities and differences in the sets of countries with the highest emissions and largest cookstove temperature impacts (China, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal), those with the largest temperature impact per carbon emitted (Kazakhstan, Estonia, and Mongolia), and those that would provide the

  18. Seasonal variation of urban carbonaceous aerosols in a typical city Nanjing in Yangtze River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yu; Yuan, Siyu; Zhao, Qiuyue; Shen, Guofeng; Wu, Haisuo

    2015-04-01

    The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) is one of the regions with the most dynamic economy and severe atmospheric pollution in China. In order to characterize the particle features, especially the carbonaceous component in the YRD, particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and 10 μm (PM10) samples in each season were collected in urban Nanjing, a typical city that locates in the west part of the YRD. The organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) was differentiated using the thermal optical reflectance method. The average concentrations of PM2.5, OC and EC during the study periods were observed to be 117.6, 13.8, and 5.3 μg/m3 respectively, with all the highest levels in winter. The mass fraction of the Total carbonaceous aerosol (TCA) in PM2.5 was estimated at 23% on average, lower than those reported for other cities in the YRD. The OC and EC correlated well in all the seasons, especially in spring and winter, implying that OC and EC were attributed to common emission sources. Good correlation was observed between OC and estimated K+ from biomass burning in the harvest season in autumn and summer, indicating biomass burning a significant source of carbonaceous aerosols. This could also be confirmed by the lower fraction of OC3 + OC4 in OC during autumn and summer. The secondary organic carbon (SOC) estimated by EC-tracer method was the highest in winter (7.3 μg/m3) followed by autumn (6.7 μg/m3), summer (3.7 μg/m3) and spring (2.0 μg/m3). However, the SOC/OC in winter was not as high as that in summer and autumn, implying the high concentration of OC in winter was probably due to the stable weather but not mainly caused by SOC formation. The high SOC/OC ratio in summer was attributed to stronger oxidation, which could be suggested by higher sulfur oxidation ratio (SOR).

  19. The thermal release of HG from chondrites and their thermal histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G. W.

    1985-08-01

    A quantitative treatment and implications of isothermal and linear heating data on Hg in meteorites are given as a sequel to a more qualitative analysis of meteorite thermal histories (Reed and Jovanovic, 1968). Studies of Hg in terrestrial metamorphic rocks establish that thermal events to which meteorites were subjected fall in the same temperature range, of 400-900 C, as exists during terrestrial metamorphism. Hg diffusion parameters based on data from the linear and isothermal heating experiments are calculated. The conclusions are: (1) Meteorites experienced thermal events of the same magnitude as those measured by primarily mineralogical metamorphic indicators reviewed by Dodd (1969); (2) no correspondence with mineralogical-petrological metamorphic grade is evident; (3) Hg data for some chondrites correlate with shock facies (non-thermal) indicators (Dodd and Jarosewich, 1979); (4) small Hg activation energies (6-14 kcal/mole) require that the meteorites must have been stored in closed systems until low temperatures were attained. Hg must be presented as an involatile mineral(s) or as a substituent in a host phase at temperatures below 100 C. Consistent with this interpretation is the fact that despite diffusion times of 100-1,000,000 years at 200 K, Hg was retained in small objects over cosmic ray exposure periods of a hundred-million years.

  20. Hydrogen Isotopes of Glassy and Phyllosilicate Spherules in Al Rais (CR) and Orgueil (CI) Chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yunbin; Michael E. ZOLENSKY

    2004-01-01

    The hydroxyl in phyllosilicate minerals is the most common occurrence of water in primitive meteorites.Direct hydrogen isotopic analysis of this water component using an ion microprobe has been made in some glassy or phyllosilicate spherules from the Al Rais (CR) and Orgueil (CI) chondrites. The spherules from Al Rais show large deuterium excesses (δD = +200 - +800) relative to terrestrial standards, whereas deuterium-enrichments in the spherules from Orgueil are much smaller (δD = +40 - +130‰). The phyllosilicate spherules are products of aqueous alteration of glassy precursors. In A1 Rais the phyllosilicate spherules have relatively higher δD values than the glassy ones, indicating that water introduced during aqueous alteration was deuterium-enriched. The deuterium-enrichments in the phyllosilicate spherules from Orgueil could result from isotopic exchange under thermodynamic conditions within the solar nebula. The much larger δD excesses of the Al Rais spherules, however, cannot be attributed to the similar process;instead, an interstellar origin needs to be invoked.

  1. Aluminum-, Calcium- And Titanium-Rich Oxide Stardust In Ordinary Chondrite Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Nittler, Larry R; Gallino, Roberto; Hoppe, Peter; Nguyen, Ann N; Stadermann, Frank J; Zinner, Ernst K

    2008-01-01

    We report isotopic data for a total of 96 presolar oxide grains found in residues of several unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites. Identified grain types include Al2O3, MgAl2O4, hibonite (CaAl12O19) and Ti oxide. This work greatly increases the presolar hibonite database, and is the first report of presolar Ti oxide. O-isotopic compositions of the grains span previously observed ranges and indicate an origin in red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of low mass (<2.5 MSun) for most grains. Cool bottom processing in the parent AGB stars is required to explain isotopic compositions of many grains. Potassium-41 enrichments in hibonite grains are attributable to in situ decay of now-extinct 41Ca. Inferred initial 41Ca/40Ca ratios are in good agreement with model predictions for low-mass AGB star envelopes, provided that ionization suppresses 41Ca decay. Stable Mg and Ca isotopic ratios of most of the hibonite grains reflect primarily the initial compositions of the parent stars and are gener...

  2. Hibonite, Ca2/Al, Ti/24O38, from the Leoville and Allende chondritic meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, K.; Fuchs, L. H.

    1971-01-01

    Hibonite was discovered in light-colored, Ca-Al-Ti-rich and Si-Fe-poor, achondritic inclusions of the Leoville and Allende HL-group chondrites. Two varieties of hibonite occur: one emits a bright red-orange luminescence under electron bombardment and has high amounts of Al2O3 (87.7; 87.9) and low amounts of MgO (0.65; 0.8) and TiO2 (0.68; 0.8). The other emits a bright blue luminescence and is low in Al2O3 (78.7; 79.2) and high in MgO (3.3; 3.7) and TiO2 (6.5; 7.9) (in wt. %). The oxide CaO is about the same in both varieties. It is suggested that the change in the color of the visible luminescence results from changes in composition. The origin of hibonite which occurs in complex mineral assemblages together with anorthite, gelhenite, wollastonite, aluminous diopside, andradite, Ca-pyroxene, perovskite, spinel, taenite, chromite, and pentlandite, and in close proximity to nodules containing calcite, whewellite, forsterite and many of the aforementioned phases, is discussed. The proposition that hibonite and associated phases originated by contact metamorphism and metasomatism of calcite-dolomite bearing assemblages cannot, at this time, be completely ruled out.

  3. Orbit and dynamic origin of the recently recovered Annama's H5 chondrite

    CERN Document Server

    Trigo-Rodriguez, Josep M; Gritsevich, Maria; Moreno-Ibáñez, Manuel; Bottke, William F; Williams, Iwan; Lupovka, Valery; Dmitriev, Vasily; Kohout, Tomas; Grokhovsky, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We describe the fall of Annama meteorite occurred in the remote Kola Peninsula (Russia) close to Finnish border on April 19, 2014 (local time). The fireball was instrumentally observed by the Finnish Fireball Network. From these observations the strewnfield was computed and two first meteorites were found only a few hundred meters from the predicted landing site on May 29th and May 30th 2014, so that the meteorite (an H4-5 chondrite) experienced only minimal terrestrial alteration. The accuracy of the observations allowed a precise geocentric radiant to be obtained, and the heliocentric orbit for the progenitor meteoroid to be calculated. Backward integrations of the orbits of selected near-Earth asteroids and the Annama meteoroid showed that they rapidly diverged so that the Annama meteorites are unlikely related to them. The only exception seems to be the recently discovered 2014UR116 that shows a plausible dynamic relationship. Instead, analysis of the heliocentric orbit of the meteoroid suggests that the ...

  4. Composition and clues to the origin of refractory metal nuggets extracted from chondritic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwander, D.; Berg, T.; Harries, D.; Schönhense, G.; Ott, U.

    2014-10-01

    Refractory metal nuggets (RMNs) contain elements, such as Os, Ir, Mo, and Ru, which are predicted to condense from a cooling gas of solar composition simultaneously with CAI-minerals. Berg et al. identified a large number of RMNs in acid-resistant residues of the Murchison meteorite and suggested that they are pristine condensates. In extending the work of these authors, we have improved the chemical extraction process to enrich the concentration of RMNs in the residue sample and prepared three additional RMN-rich residues from the chondritic meteorites Murchison, Allende, and Leoville. The results show that, while their origin is clearly solar, the compositions in detail of RMNs from all three meteorites do not match well with a simple condensation model based on equilibrium thermodynamics and ideal solid solution of all metals. Thus, we find that a primary formation by direct condensation, as suggested previously, is unlikely for most of the studied grains and that alternative scenarios should be considered in future work. The results also show that several, but not all, alloys from Allende and Leoville have undergone processes, such as metamorphic oxidation and sulfidization in the meteoritic environment, in which they lost, e.g., W and Mo. For Murchison and several Leoville and Allende RMNs, we propose a pristine nature.

  5. The production rate of cosmogenic 21-Ne in chondrites deduced from 81-Kr measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, L.; Freundel, M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic Ne-21 is used widely to calculate exposure ages of stone meteorites. In order to do so, the production rate P(21) must be known. This rate, however, is dependent on the chemical composition of the meteorite as well as the mass of, and position within, the meteoroid during its exposure to the cosmic radiation. Even for a mean shielding the production rates determined from measurments of different radionuclides vary by a factor of two. A method that can be used to determine exposure ages of meteorites that avoids shielding and chemical composition corrections is the -81-Kr-Kr-method. However, for chondrites, in many cases, the direct determination of production rates for the Kr isotopes is prevented by the trapped gases and the neutron effects on bromine. Therefore, this method was applied to four eucrite falls and then their 81-Kr-83-Kr-ages were compared to their cosmogenic Ne-21 and Ar-38 concentrations. The eucrites Bouvante-le-Haut, Juvinas, Sioux County, and Stannern were chosen for these measurements because of their similar chemical composition regarding the major elements.

  6. A Search for Subkilometer-sized Ordinary Chondrite Like Asteroids in the Main-Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, H W; Chen, Y T; Ip, W H; Chang, C K

    2015-01-01

    The size-dependent effects of asteroids on surface regolith and collisional lifetimes suggest that small asteroids are younger than large asteroids. In this study, we performed multicolor main-belt asteroid (MBA) survey by Subaru telescope/Suprime-Cam to search for subkilometer-sized ordinary chondrite (Q-type) like MBAs. The total survey area was 1.5 deg^2 near ecliptic plane and close to the opposition. We detected 150 MBAs with 4 bands (B, V , R, I) in this survey. The range of absolute magnitude of detected asteroids was between 13 and 22 magnitude, which is equivalent to the size range of kilometer to sub-kilometer diameter in MBAs. From this observation, 75 of 150 MBAs with color uncertainty less than 0.1 were used in the spectral type analysis, and two possible Q-type aster- oids were detected. This mean that the Q-type to S-type ratio in MBAs is < 0.05. Meanwhile, the Q/S ratio in near Earth asteroids (NEAs) has been estimated to be 0.5 to 2 (Binzel et al., 2004; Dandy et al., 2003). Therefore, Q-t...

  7. Photoluminescence of silicon-vacancy defects in nanodiamonds of different chondrites

    CERN Document Server

    Shiryaev, A A; Semjonova, L F; Khomich, A A; Vlasov, I I

    2015-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectra show that silicon impurity is present in lattice of some nanodiamond grains (ND) of various chondrites as a silicon-vacancy (SiV) defect. The relative intensity of the SiV band in the diamond-rich separates depends on chemical composition of meteorites and on size of ND grains. The strongest signal is found for the size separates enriched in small grains; thus confirming our earlier conclusion that the SiV defects preferentially reside in the smallest (less than 2 nm) grains. The difference in relative intensities of the SiV luminescence in the diamond-rich separates of individual meteorites are due to variable conditions of thermal metamorphism of their parent bodies and/or uneven sampling of nanodiamonds populations. Annealing of separates in air eliminates surface sp2-carbon, consequently, the SiV luminescence is enhanced. Strong and well-defined luminescence and absorption of the SiV defect is a promising feature to locate cold (< 250 {\\deg}C) nanodiamonds in space.

  8. Simulating the formation of carbonaceous aerosol in a European Megacity (Paris) during the Megapoli summer and winter campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountoukis, C.; Megaritis, A.G.; Skyllakou, K.; Charalampidis, P.E.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Crippa, M.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Fachinger, F.; Wiedensohler, A.; Pilinis, C.; Pandis, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    We use a three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx) with high grid resolution and high-resolution emissions (4 x 4 km2) over the Paris greater area to simulate the formation of carbonaceous aerosol dur-ing a summer (July 2009) and a winter (January/February 2010) period as part of

  9. Sustainable and scalable production of monodisperse and highly uniform colloidal carbonaceous spheres using sodium polyacrylate as the dispersant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yutong; Xie, Lei; Li, Haoran; Wang, Yong

    2014-10-28

    Monodisperse, uniform colloidal carbonaceous spheres were fabricated by the hydrothermal treatment of glucose with the help of a tiny amount of sodium polyacrylate (PAANa). This synthetic strategy is effective at high glucose concentration and for scale-up experiments. The sphere size can be easily tuned by the reaction time, temperature and glucose concentration. PMID:25199065

  10. Carbonaceous PM2.5 emitted from light-duty vehicles operating on low-level ethanol fuel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aims to examine carbonaceous aerosol emissions from three Tier 2-certified 2008 model year LDVs burning e0, e10, and e85 fuel blends at -7°C and 24°C. The LDVs were tested on an electric chasis dynamometer using the LA-92 Urban Driving Cycle (UDC). Exhaust was ...

  11. Hydrogen Production by Thermo-catalytic Decomposition of Natural Gas: Carbonaceous Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TCD of CH4 using different kinds of carbon catalyst, activated carbons (AC) and carbon blacks (CB) have been studied. AC showed an acceptable initial reaction rate but they become rapidly deactivated, while CB with high surface area provided more stable and sustainable hydrogen production. Regeneration of the carbonaceous catalysts after deactivation, using CO2 as activating agent has been studied. A commercial active carbon has been selected for the regeneration tests. The optimum operation conditions for the catalysts regeneration have been studied, attending to the burn off of the catalysts during the regeneration, which is important for the self-consistence of the process, and the recovering in the surface area, which is one of the most important factors affecting the activity of these catalysts. (authors)

  12. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29% from 2000 (2127 Gg to 2012 (2749 Gg and EC by 37% (from 1356 to 1857 Gg. The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 76 ± 2, 19 ± 2 and 5 ± 1% of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 52 ± 3, 32 ± 2 and 16 ± 2% of EC. Updated emission factors based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, lead to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while larger OC/EC and SOC/OC ratios are found in southern cities, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher SOC/OC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC/OC is reduced, particularly at

  13. The Role of Carbonaceous Aerosols On Short-term Variations on Precipitation Over North Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Vinoj, V.; Ganguly, Dilip

    2016-06-16

    Northern Africa has been subject to extensive droughts in the late 20th century, which are frequently linked to changes in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. However, climate models forced by observed Sea Surface Temperatures have been unable to reproduce the magnitude of rainfall reduction over the last several decades. In this study, we propose that aerosol indirect effects (AIE) may be an important feedback mechanism to contribute this recent reduction. The climate model used here has a fully predictive aerosol life cycle. Results are presented for a set of sensitivity experiments designed to distinguish the role of aerosol direct/semi-­direct and indirect effects on regional precipitation. Changes in cloud lifetime due to the presence of carbonaceous aerosols are proposed as a key mechanism to explain the reduced rainfall over the tropical and North Africa.

  14. Method of treating oils derived by thermal treatment of solid carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culbertson, W.J.; Nevens, T.D.; Schnackenberg, W.D.

    1966-08-09

    A method for treating a heavy fraction separated under substantially non-cracking conditions from a crude oil derived by thermal treatment of solid carbonaceous material in order to produce a heavy fraction and a light fraction consists of heat treating the separated heavy fraction at a temperature above about 600$F. This temperature is below the point of incipient thermal decomposition of the heavy fraction. The heat treatment takes place for a period of time which is inversely proportional to the temperature to produce a product which, when combined with at least part of a light fraction, results in an oil having a pour point lower than that of the original crude oil. The heat treatment produces substantially no non-condensible hydrocarbons and substantially no elemental carbon. (21 claims)

  15. Comparison of Ablation Predictions for Carbonaceous Materials Using CEA and JANAF-Based Species Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    In most previous work at NASA Ames Research Center, ablation predictions for carbonaceous materials were obtained using a species thermodynamics database developed by Aerotherm Corporation. This database is derived mostly from the JANAF thermochemical tables. However, the CEA thermodynamics database, also used by NASA, is considered more up to date. In this work, the FIAT code was modified to use CEA-based curve fits for species thermodynamics, then analyses using both the JANAF and CEA thermodynamics were performed for carbon and carbon phenolic materials over a range of test conditions. The ablation predictions are comparable at lower heat fluxes where the dominant mechanism is carbon oxidation. However, the predictions begin to diverge in the sublimation regime, with the CEA model predicting lower recession. The disagreement is more significant for carbon phenolic than for carbon, and this difference is attributed to hydrocarbon species that may contribute to the ablation rate.

  16. Predicting heating values of lignocellulosics and carbonaceous materials from proximate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, T.; Marquez, F.; Rodriguez-Morasol, J.; Rodriguez, J.J. [University of Malaga, Malaga (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-09-21

    A simple equation based on proximate analysis (volatile matter and fixed carbon contents) is presented which allows calculation of the higher heating value of lignocellulosics as well as the charcoals resulting form their carbonization. The equation has been tested with different lignocellulosic wastes and chars obtained from carbonization at different temperatures. Deviations from the experimental heating values fall in most cases below 2%. A comparison is presented with some other equations from the literature based on proximate, ultimate and chemical analysis data. As a general conclusion the equation proposed in this paper leads to comparable and in many cases more accurate predictions of heating values and has the advantage of being applicable to a wide range of carbonaceous materials, requiring only a simple rapid and cheap proximate analysis of the samples. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Nitrogen-Doped Carbonaceous Materials for Removal of Phenol from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Hofman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous material (brown coal modified by pyrolysis, activation, and enrichment in nitrogen, with two different factor reagents, have been used as adsorbent of phenol from liquid phase. Changes in the phenol content in the test solutions were monitored after subsequent intervals of adsorption with selected adsorbents prepared from organic materials. Significant effect of nitrogen present in the adsorbent material on its adsorption capacity was noted. Sorption capacity of these selected materials was found to depend on the time of use, their surface area, and pore distribution. A conformation to the most well-known adsorption isotherm models, Langmuir, and Freundlich ones, confirms the formation of mono- and heterolayer solute (phenol coverage on the surface of the adsorbent applied herein. The materials proposed as adsorbents of the aqueous solution contaminants were proved effective, which means that the waste materials considered are promising activated carbon precursors for liquid phase adsorbents for the environmental protection.

  18. Carbon Paste Electrodes Made from Different Carbonaceous Materials: Application in the Study of Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Apetrei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the sensing properties of carbon paste electrodes (CPEs prepared from three different types of carbonaceous materials: graphite, carbon microspheres and carbon nanotubes. The electrochemical responses towards antioxidants including vanillic acid, catechol, gallic acid, L-ascorbic acid and L-glutathione have been analyzed and compared. It has been demonstrated that the electrodes based on carbon microspheres show the best performances in terms of kinetics and stability, whereas G-CPEs presented the smallest detection limit for all the antioxidants analyzed. An array of electrodes has been constructed using the three types of electrodes. As demonstrated by means of Principal Component Analysis, the system is able to discriminate among antioxidants as a function of their chemical structure and reactivity.

  19. Filaments in Carbonaceous Meteorites: Mineral Crystals, Modern Bio-Contaminants or Indigenous Microfossils of Trichomic Prokaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Borisyak, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental (ESEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) investigations have resulted in the detection of a large number of complex filaments in a variety of carbonaceous meteorites. Many of the filaments were observed to be clearly embedded the rock matrix of freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorites. The high resolution images obtained combined with tilt and rotation of the stage provide 3-dimensional morphological and morphometric data for the filaments. Calibrated Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and 2-D elemental X-ray maps have provided information on the chemical compositions of the filaments and the minerals of the associated meteorite rock matrix. These observations are used to evaluate diverse hypotheses regarding the possible abiotic or biogenic nature of the filaments found embedded in these meteorites.

  20. Determination of ultimate carbonaceous BOD and the specific rate constant (K1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamer, J.K.; Bennett, J.P.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1982-01-01

    Ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BODu) and the specific rate constant (K1) at which the demand is exerted are important parameters in designing biological wastewater treatment plants and in assessing the impact of wastewater on receiving streams. An analytical method is presented which uses time-series concentrations of BOD, defined as the calculated sum of dissolved oxygen (DO) losses at each time of measurement, for determining BODu and K1. Time-series DO measurements are obtained from a water sample that is incubated in darkness at 20 degrees Celsius in the presence of nitrapyrin, a chemical nitrification inhibitor. Time-series concentrations of BOD that approximate first order kinetics can be analyzed graphically or mathematically to compute BODu and K1.