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Sample records for carbon-13 nmr spectroscopy

  1. Comparison of soil organic carbon speciation using C NEXAFS and CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietzel, Jörg; Müller, Svenja; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Thieme, Jürgen; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel

    2018-07-01

    We compared synchrotron-based C near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and CPMAS 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with respect to their precision and accuracy to quantify different organic carbon (OC) species in defined mixtures of soil organic matter source compounds. We also used both methods to quantify different OC species in organic surface horizons of a Histic Leptosol as well as in mineral topsoil and subsoil horizons of two soils with different parent material, stage of pedogenesis, and OC content (Cambisol: 15-30 OC mgg -1 , Podzol: 0.9-7 OC mgg -1 ). CPMAS 13 C NMR spectroscopy was more accurate and precise (mean recovery of different C functional groups 96-103%) than C NEXAFS spectroscopy (mean recovery 92-113%). For organic surface and topsoil samples, NMR spectroscopy consistently yielded larger O-alkyl C percentages and smaller alkyl C percentages than C NEXAFS spectroscopy. For the Cambisol subsoil samples both methods performed well and showed similar C speciation results. NEXAFS spectroscopy yielded excellent spectra with a high signal-to-noise ratio also for OC-poor Podzol subsoil samples, whereas this was not the case for CPMAS 13 C NMR spectroscopy even after sample treatment with HF. Our results confirm the analytical power of CPMAS 13 C NMR spectroscopy for a reliable quantitative OC speciation in soils with >10mgOCg -1 . Moreover, they highlight the potential of synchrotron-based C NEXAFS spectroscopy as fast, non-invasive method to semi-quantify different C functional groups in soils with low C content (0.9-10mgg -1 ). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon-13 NMR of flavinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The present book has been written with the objective of introducing the organic chemists with the conceptual and experimental basis required for interpretation of 13 C NMR spectra of a flavonoid and to a discussion of general usefulness of the technique in solving flavonoid structural problem. After a brief general introduction to the essential aspects of flavonoids and 13 C NMR spectroscopy, considerable emphasis has been placed in chapter 2 on the various experimental methods and the interpretation of spectral details which enable individual resonance lines to be associated with the appropriate carbons in a molecule. The whole bulk of the literature, published on 13 C NMR of flavonoids in the major journals upto 1986 alongwith some recent references of 1987 has been classified in several categories such as: flavonoids, isflavonoids, other flavonoids, flavonoid glycosides, chalconoids and flavanoids. Each category constitutes a chapter. Finally the last chapter is devoted largely to a discussion for the differentiation of various categories and subcategories of flavonoids and for the establishment of aromatic substitution pattern in these compounds. It should be emphasized that the book is a data book and only concerned with the actual analysis of 13 C NMR spectra, thus a reasonable familiarity with basic instrumentation of 13 C NMR and general pattern of nuclear chemical shifts has been assumed. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  3. Identification and quantitation of anhydrosugars in biomass pyrolytic oils using carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castola, V.; Bighelli, A. [Universite de Corse, Equipe Chimie et Biomasse, Ajaccio (France); Conti, L.; Scano, G.; Mascia, S. [Universita di Sassari, Dipartimento di Chimica, Sassari (Italy); Casanova, J. [Universite de Corse, Equipe Chimie et Biomasse, Ajaccio (France)

    2000-07-01

    We described a method which allowed identification and quantitation of anhydrosugars in biomass pyrolysis liquids using carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy. The quantitative procedure was checked and validated (accuracy, precision and response linearity) with pure compounds and artificial mixtures. This method was then applied to the analysis of the glucidic fraction obtained after a simple and rapid fractionation of the bio oil. (author)

  4. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  5. C-13 NMR spectroscopy of plasma reduces interference of hypertriglyceridemia in the H-1 NMR detection of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossell, E.T.; Hall, F.M.; McDonagh, J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have previously described the application of water-suppressed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-1 NMR) spectroscopy of plasma for detection of malignancy. Subsequently, hypertriglyceridemia has been identified as a source of false positive results. Here is described a confirmatory, adjunctive technique -analysis of the carbon-13 (C-13) NMR spectrum of plasma- which also identifies the presence of malignancy but is not sensitive to the plasma triglyceride level. Blinded plasma samples from 480 normal donors and 208 patients scheduled for breast biopsy were analyzed by water-suppressed H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Triglyceride levels were also measured. Among the normal donors, there were 38 individuals with hypertriglyceridemia of whom 18 had results consistent with malignancy by H-1 NMR spectroscopy. However, the C-13 technique reduced the apparent H-1 false positive rate from 7.0 to 0.6 percent. Similarly, in the breast biopsy cohort, C-13 reduced the false positive rate from 2.8 to 0.9 percent. Furthermore, the accuracy of the combined H-1/C-13 test in this blinded study was greater than 96 percent in 208 patients studied. (author). 27 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  6. Styrylpyrylium Salts: 1H and 13C NMR High-Resolution Spectroscopy (1D and 2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Claude W. Ouédraogo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 1H and 13C NMR high-resolution spectroscopy (1D and 2D (1H, 1H-COSY, HSQC, HMBC for four styrylpyrylium perchlorates were carried out and signal attributions are reported. Chemical shifts observed on 13C NMR spectra for the styrylpyrylium salts were compared with net atomic charge for carbon obtained by AM1 semiempirical calculations. The position of the styryl group present low effect on chemical shifts for carbon atoms, while the presence of methyl group led to the unshielding of the substituted carbon.

  7. Solid-state 13C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy characterization of particle size structural variations in synthetic nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Todd M.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state 13 C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to quantify the different carbon species observed in synthetically produced nanodiamonds. Two different diamond-like carbon species were observed using 13 C MAS NMR, which have been attributed to a highly ordered crystalline diamond phase and a disordered crystalline diamond phase. The relative ratio of these different diamond phases was found to vary with the particle size of the nanodiamond materials

  8. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Sullivan, J.C.; Stout, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using 13 C NMR of 99.9% 13 C-enriched U VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- and Am VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- systems has been examined by variable temperature 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of ΔG double-dagger 295 = 56 kJ/M, ΔH double-dagger = 38 kJ/M, and ΔS double-dagger = -60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress

  9. Carbon-13 spin lattice relaxation and photoelectron spectroscopy of some aromatic sulphides and sulphones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellink, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to study the electronic structure of symmetric dithienothiophenes and corresponding sulphones. The physical data obtained from both spectroscopic techniques have been interpreted with the aid of quantum mechanical calculations. (Auth.)

  10. Application of 13C-labeling and 13C-13C COSY NMR experiments in the structure determination of a microbial natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yun; Park, Sunghyouk; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2014-08-01

    The elucidation of the structures of complex natural products bearing many quaternary carbons remains challenging, even in this advanced spectroscopic era. (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy shows direct couplings between (13)C and (13)C, which comprise the backbone of a natural product. Thus, this type of experiment is particularly useful for natural products bearing consecutive quaternary carbons. However, the low sensitivity of (13)C-based NMR experiments, due to the low natural abundance of the (13)C nucleus, is problematic when applying these techniques. Our efforts in the (13)C labeling of a microbial natural product, cyclopiazonic acid (1), by feeding (13)C-labeled glucose to the fungal culture, enabled us to acquire (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectra on a milligram scale that clearly show the carbon backbone of the compound. This is the first application of (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR experiments for a natural product. The results suggest that (13)C-(13)C COSY NMR spectroscopy can be routinely used for the structure determination of microbial natural products by (13)C-enrichment of a compound with (13)C-glucose.

  11. Measuring 13Cβ chemical shifts of invisible excited states in proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstroem, Patrik; Lin Hong; Kay, Lewis E.

    2009-01-01

    A labeling scheme is introduced that facilitates the measurement of accurate 13 C β chemical shifts of invisible, excited states of proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy. The approach makes use of protein over-expression in a strain of E. coli in which the TCA cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase is knocked out, leading to the production of samples with high levels of 13 C enrichment (30-40%) at C β side-chain carbon positions for 15 of the amino acids with little 13 C label at positions one bond removed (∼5%). A pair of samples are produced using [1- 13 C]-glucose/NaH 12 CO 3 or [2- 13 C]-glucose as carbon sources with isolated and enriched (>30%) 13 C β positions for 11 and 4 residues, respectively. The efficacy of the labeling procedure is established by NMR spectroscopy. The utility of such samples for measurement of 13 C β chemical shifts of invisible, excited states in exchange with visible, ground conformations is confirmed by relaxation dispersion studies of a protein-ligand binding exchange reaction in which the extracted chemical shift differences from dispersion profiles compare favorably with those obtained directly from measurements on ligand free and fully bound protein samples

  12. High-resolution proton and carbon-13 NMR of membranes: why sonicate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldfield, E.; Bowers, J.L.; Forbes, J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have obtained high-field (11.7-T) proton and carbon-13 Fourier transform (FT) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of egg lecithin and egg lecithin-chloresterol (1:1) multibilayers, using magic-angle sample spinning (MASS) techniques, and sonicated egg lecithin and egg lecithin-cholesterol (1:1) vesicles, using conventional FT NMR methods. Resolution of the proton and carbon-13 MASS NMR spectra of the pure egg lecithin samples is essentially identical with that of sonicated samples, but spectra of the unsonicated lipid, using MASS, can be obtained very much faster than with the more dilute, sonicated systems. With the 1:1 lecithin-cholesterol system, proton MASS NMR spectra are virtually identical with conventional FT spectra of sonicated samples, while the 13 C NMR, the authors demonstrate that most 13 C nuclei in the cholesterol moiety can be monitored, even though these same nuclei are essentially invisible, i.e., are severely broadened, in the corresponding sonicated systems. In addition, 13 C MASS NMR spectra can again be recorded much faster than with sonicated samples, due to concentration effects. Taken together, these results strongly suggest there will seldom be need in the future to resort to ultransonic disruption of lipid bilayer membranes in order to obtain high-resolution proton or carbon-13 NMR spectra

  13. On the structure of amorphous calcium carbonate--a detailed study by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Holger; Neumann, Markus; Mayer, Christian; Epple, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The calcium carbonate phases calcite, aragonite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite (calcium carbonate monohydrate), and ikaite (calcium carbonate hexahydrate) were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy ( (1)H and (13)C). Further model compounds were sodium hydrogencarbonate, potassium hydrogencarbonate, and calcium hydroxide. With the help of these data, the structure of synthetically prepared additive-free amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was analyzed. ACC contains molecular water (as H 2O), a small amount of mobile hydroxide, and no hydrogencarbonate. This supports the concept of ACC as a transient precursor in the formation of calcium carbonate biominerals.

  14. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.; Babaa, M.-R.; Bouhrara, M.; Kim, Y.; Saih, Y.; Dennler, S.; Mauri, F.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Goze-Bac, C.; Wå gberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled

  15. Determination of Hydrogen and Carbon contents in crude oil and Petroleum fractions by NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadim, Mohammad A.; Wolny, R.A.; Al-Dhuwaihi, Abdullah S.; Al-Hajri, E.A.; Al-Ghamdi, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopic methods were developed for determining hydrogen and carbon contents in petroleum products. These methods are applicable to a wide of petroleum streams. A new reference standard, bis (trimethylsilyl) methane, BTMSM, is introduced fro both proton and carbon-13 NMR for the first time, which offers several advantages over those customarily employed. These methods are important for the calculation of the mass balance and hydrogen consumption in pilot plant studies. Unlike the ASTM D-5291 combustion method, the NMR methods also allow for the measurement of hydrogen and carbon content in low boiling fractions and those containing hydrogen as low as 1%. The NMR methods can also determine aromatic and aliphatic hydrogens carbons in a given sample without additional experimentation. The precision and accuracy of the newly developed NMR methods are compared with those of currently employed ASTM D-5291 combustion method. Using the proton NMR method, hydrogen content was determined in fifteen model compounds and sixty-eight petroleum fractions. The NMR and ASTM methods show an agreement within +5%for 48 out of a total number of 68 oil fractions. Using carbon-13 NMR, the carbon content was determined for four representative compounds and three fractions of crude oil. Both carbon-13 NMR and ASTM methods give comparable carbon content in model compounds and crude oil fractions. (author)

  16. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    A 13 C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V H , V L , and C L domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with 13 C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with [1- 13 C]Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how 13 C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule

  17. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  18. Whole-core analysis by 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N.; Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance 13 C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. 13 C NMR can be used in cores where the 1 H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. 13 C/ 1 H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good 13 C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while 1 H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the 13 C and 1 H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the 13 C and 1 H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the 13 C and 1 H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. 13 C and 1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60 degrees API), and alkanes (C 5 through C 16 ) with viscosities at 77 degrees F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 x 10 7 cp. The 13 C and 1 H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The 13 C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled 13 C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, 13 C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the 13 C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon

  19. Pectins from apple pomace - characterization by 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcon, M.V.; Carneiro, P.I.B.; Wosiacki, G.; Beleski-Carneiro, E.; Petkowicz, C.L.O.

    2005-01-01

    Pectins were extracted from apple pomace flour with 5% (w/v) aqueous citric acid solutions under different time and temperature according to an experimental design (factorial 2 2 with triplicate of central point). Monosaccharide composition of fractions was determined by colorimetric analysis and gas chromatography. The structure of pectins was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The degree of esterification (DE=30.5-55.9), determined by FT-IR spectroscopy, was indirectly correlated with increasing temperature and time of extraction, showing that drastic conditions for extraction promote hydrolysis of esterified units. High content of galacturonic acid is consistent with the smooth region of the polysaccharide. 13 C and 1 H NMR spectroscopy confirmed the presence of uronic acids in the free and methyl ester forms. NMR data also showed the presence of arabinan and galactan as side chains. (author)

  20. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-02

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions.

  1. Detailed 1H and 13C NMR spectral data assignment for two dihydrobenzofuran neolignans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Talita C.T.; Dias, Herbert J.; Crotti, Antônio E.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a complete proton ( 1 H) and carbon 13 ( 13 C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analysis of two synthetic dihydrofuran neolignans (±)-trans-dehydrodicoumarate dimethyl ester and (±)-trans-dehydrodiferulate dimethyl ester. Unequivocal assignments were achieved by 1 H NMR, proton decoupled 13 C ( 13 C{ 1 H}) NMR spectra, gradient-selected correlation spectroscopy (gCOSY), J-resolved, gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (gHMBC) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. All hydrogen coupling constants were measured, clarifying all the hydrogen signals multiplicities. Computational methods were also used to simulate the 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts and showed good agreement with the trans configuration of the substituents at C 7 and C 8 . (author)

  2. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state 13 C NMR and solution 31 P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O–C–O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH 3 and COO/N–C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH 3 and COO/N–C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. - Highlights: • WEOM derived from aquatic macrophytes was characterized. • C and P in WEOM were characterized by solid 13 C NMR and solution 31 P NMR. • Degradation and transformation of macrophyte-derived C and P were investigated. • Macrophyte-derived WEOM are important source for bioavailable nutrients in lakes.

  3. 13C and 17O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- and (UO 2 ) 3 (CO 3 ) 6 6- in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = -log(a H + ) versus p[H] = -log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA

  4. Carbon-13 NMR of glycogen: Hydration response studied by using solids methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.L.; Bryant, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The carbon-13 NMR spectra of glycogen are reported by using the methods of magic-angle sample spinning and high-power proton decoupling to provide a dynamic report on the glucose monomer behavior as a function of hydration. Although the glycogen behaves as a typical polymer in the dry state, addition of water makes a significant difference in the spectral appearance. Water addition decreases the carbon spin-lattice relaxation times by 2 orders of magnitude over the range from 7% to 70% water by weight. The proton-carbon dipole-dipole coupling, which broadens the carbon spectrum and permits cross-polarization spectroscopy, is lost with increasing hydration over this range. By 60% water by weight, scalar decoupling methods are sufficient to achieve a reasonably high-resolution spectrum. Further, at this concentration, the carbon spin-lattice relaxation times are near their minimum values at a resonance frequency of 50.3 MHz, making acquisition of carbon spectra relatively insensitive to intensity distortions associated with saturation effects. Though motional averaging places the spectrum in the solution phase limit, the static spectrum shows a residual broader component that would not necessarily be detected readily by using high-resolution liquid-state experiments

  5. Combined chemometric analysis of (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and stable isotope data to differentiate organic and conventional milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erich, Sarah; Schill, Sandra; Annweiler, Eva; Waiblinger, Hans-Ulrich; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Monakhova, Yulia B

    2015-12-01

    The increased sales of organically produced food create a strong need for analytical methods, which could authenticate organic and conventional products. Combined chemometric analysis of (1)H NMR-, (13)C NMR-spectroscopy data, stable-isotope data (IRMS) and α-linolenic acid content (gas chromatography) was used to differentiate organic and conventional milk. In total 85 raw, pasteurized and ultra-heat treated (UHT) milk samples (52 organic and 33 conventional) were collected between August 2013 and May 2014. The carbon isotope ratios of milk protein and milk fat as well as the α-linolenic acid content of these samples were determined. Additionally, the milk fat was analyzed by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The chemometric analysis of combined data (IRMS, GC, NMR) resulted in more precise authentication of German raw and retail milk with a considerably increased classification rate of 95% compared to 81% for NMR and 90% for IRMS using linear discriminate analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  7. Actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) carbonate speciation studies by PAS and NMR spectroscopies. Yucca Mountain Project: Milestone report 3031-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.L.; Ekberg, S.A.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pulsed-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to study speciation of actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) ions (Np, Pu, Am) in aqueous carbonate solutions vs of pH, carbonate concentration, actinide content, and temperature. PAS focused on Pu(IV) speciation. Stability fields on a pH (8.4 to 12.0) versus total carbonate content (0.003 to 1.0 M) plot for dilute Pu(IV) carbonate species ([Pu] tot = 1 mM) were mapped. Four plutonium species, with absorption peaks at 486, 492, 500, and 512 nm were found. Loss of a single carbonate ligand does not account for the difference in speciation for the 486 and 492 nm absorption peaks, nor can any of the observed species be identified as colloidal Pu(IV). NMR data have been obtained for UO 2 2+ , PuO 2 2+ and AmO 2 2+ . This report focuses on results for PuO 2 2+ . The ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on the PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- systems has been examined by variable temperature 13 C NMR spectroscopy. In each of the six different PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- samples, two NMR signals are present, one for the free carbonate ligand and one for the carbonate ligand coordinated to a paramagnetic plutonium metal center. The single 13 C resonance line for coordinated carbonate is consistent with expectations of a monomeric PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- species in solution. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was used for determining of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Eyring analysis at standard conditions provided activation parameters of ΔH = 38 KJ/M and ΔS = -60 J/K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl(VI) carbonate complex self-exc

  8. The influence of feedstock and production temperature on biochar carbon chemistry: A solid-state 13C NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBeath, Anna V.; Smernik, Ronald J.; Krull, Evelyn S.; Lehmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to evaluate the carbon chemistry of twenty-six biochars produced from eleven different feedstocks at production temperatures ranging from 350 °C to 600 °C. Carbon-13 NMR spectra were acquired using both cross-polarisation (CP) and direct polarisation (DP) techniques. Overall, the corresponding CP and DP spectra were similar, although aromaticity was slightly higher and observability much higher when DP was used. The relative size and purity of the aromatic ring structures (i.e. aromatic condensation) were also gauged using the ring current technique. Both aromaticity and aromatic condensation increased with increasing production temperature, regardless of the feedstock source. However, there were clear differences in these two measures for biochars produced at the same temperature but from different feedstocks. Based on a relationship previously established in a long-term incubation study between aromatic condensation and the mean residence time (MRT) of biochar, the MRT of the biochars was estimated to range from 1400 years. This study demonstrates how the combination of feedstock composition and production temperature influences the composition of aromatic domains in biochars, which in turn is likely to be related to their recalcitrance and ultimately their carbon sequestration value. -- Highlights: • Sensitive NMR techniques were used to gauge differences in biochar carbon chemistry. • Varying pyrolysis conditions influences biochars recalcitrant properties. • The MRT of contrasting biochars varies considerably from 1400 years

  9. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments.

  10. Characterization of cover crops by NMR spectroscopy: impacts on soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus under tillage regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arminda Moreira de Carvalho

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of cover crops by solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and its effects on carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in a Typic Acrustox. Cover crops (Crotalaria juncea, Canavalia brasiliensis, Cajanus cajan, Mucuna pruriens and Raphanus sativus and natural fallow were studied in rotation with maize under conventional and no-tillage regimes. Tissues of Crotalaria juncea, Canavalia brasiliensis, Mucuna pruriens and Raphanus sativus were analyzed using CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy. Soil samples were collected at the end of the growing season of the cover crops (September 2002 and during the grain filling period in corn from 0-5 and 5-10 cm layers. Cajanus cajan presented the lowest content of polysaccharides and along with Mucuna pruriens presented the highest percentage of aromatic carbon compounds, reflecting the slow decomposition of highly lignified material. Carbon stocks were higher in the superficial soil layer and under no-tillage due to the accumulation and slower decomposition of plant tissues under these conditions. Increases in the C/N ratio of the soil with Mucuna pruriens and the C/P ratio with Cajanus cajan in the dry season were also related to slower rates of decomposition, caused by the large concentration of aromatic compounds in the tissues of these species. The higher C/P ratios found at 0-5 cm layer are due to higher values of P (Mehlich-1 at 5-10 cm (25 mg kg-1 layer and the higher concentration of carbon in the superficial soil layer as a result of the accumulation of plant residues.

  11. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shasha [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhu, Yuanrong, E-mail: zhuyuanrong07@mails.ucas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Meng, Wei, E-mail: mengwei@craes.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); He, Zhongqi [USDA-ARS Southern Regional Research Center, 1100 Robert E Lee Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70124 (United States); Feng, Weiying [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Biomedical and Veterinary Biosciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O–C–O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH{sub 3} and COO/N–C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH{sub 3} and COO/N–C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. - Highlights: • WEOM derived from aquatic macrophytes was characterized. • C and P in WEOM were characterized by solid {sup 13}C NMR and solution {sup 31}P NMR. • Degradation and transformation of macrophyte-derived C and P were investigated. • Macrophyte-derived WEOM are important source for bioavailable nutrients in lakes.

  12. Detailed {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectral data assignment for two dihydrobenzofuran neolignans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Talita C.T.; Dias, Herbert J.; Crotti, Antônio E.M., E-mail: millercrotti@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras. Departamento de Química

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present a complete proton ({sup 1}H) and carbon 13 ({sup 13}C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analysis of two synthetic dihydrofuran neolignans (±)-trans-dehydrodicoumarate dimethyl ester and (±)-trans-dehydrodiferulate dimethyl ester. Unequivocal assignments were achieved by 1 H NMR, proton decoupled {sup 13}C ({sup 13}C{"1H}) NMR spectra, gradient-selected correlation spectroscopy (gCOSY), J-resolved, gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (gHMQC), gradient-selected heteronuclear multiple bond coherence (gHMBC) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. All hydrogen coupling constants were measured, clarifying all the hydrogen signals multiplicities. Computational methods were also used to simulate the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts and showed good agreement with the trans configuration of the substituents at C{sub 7} and C{sub 8}. (author)

  13. Thermodynamical, kinetic and structural properties of simple and mixed complexes of zirconium (IV) with the hydroxyl and carbonate ions. Study by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veyland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Most of zirconium production is used by the nuclear industry for the cladding of nuclear fuels and for the storage of radioactive wastes. The aim of this work is the qualitative and quantitative study of the complexes made by zirconium with the hydroxyl and carbonate ions in order to evaluate the long-term pollution risks linked with the corrosion of confinement containers. The zirconium(IV)/hydroxyl system is studied by proto-metry and follows a protocol which reduces the local over-concentrations of reagent and the precipitation of zirconium hydroxide. In potassium nitrate environment and in a pH range of 1.5 to 3.5, three soluble species are evidenced: Zr(OH) 3 + , Zr 2 (OH) 7 + and Zr(OH) 4 . Their apparent constant of formation and the solubility product of zirconium hydroxide are determined with 4 ionic forces. Using these results, the corresponding thermodynamic constants are calculated by applying the theory of specific interactions. The formation of zirconium (IV) hydroxo-carbonate complexes is evidenced by proto-metry and 17 O and 13 C NMR. The number of carbonates fixed by zirconium varies from 0 to 4. The dialysis indicates that the degree of poly-condensation of species is an inverse function of the number of complex carbonates. The Raman polarized spectra and the 13 C NMR results demonstrate for all complexes the bidentate character of the complexation mode of the carbonates. The dynamical study made by 13 C NMR of the exchange between complexed carbonates of the tetra-carbonate-zirconate ion and free carbonates in solution allows to determine the kinetic constants and the corresponding velocity law. An associative mechanism is proposed, in agreement with the results obtained by mass spectroscopy with electro-spray ionization. These new thermodynamical and kinetic data allow to model the speciation of zirconium in natural waters. (J.S.)

  14. Heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Natural abundance 13C chemical shift editing of 1H-1H COSY spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesik, S.W.; Gampe, R.T. Jr.; Zuiderweg, E.R.P.

    1989-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy can be effectively applied to small molecules with 13 C at natural abundance. A 78mM solution of the aminoglycoside, kanamycin A was used for this experiment. The heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy is shown to be a useful method for resolving spectral overlap in all frequency domains. 10 refs., 2 figs

  15. Polymeric proanthocyanidins 13C NMR studies of procyanidins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence J. Porter; Roger H. Newman; Lai Yeap Foo; Herbert Wong; Richard W. Hemingway

    1982-01-01

    Proanthocyanidin polymers have been shown to consist entirely of flavan-3-ol units by a combination of techniques including 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy. The 13C n.m.r. spectra of the polymers and related molecules are now considered in more detail. Prior to this study UC n.m.r. data has been published of procyanidins and...

  16. Protolytic properties of polyamine wasp toxin analogues studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Piazzi, Lorna; Olsen, Christian A

    2006-01-01

    Acid-base properties of the natural polyamine wasp toxin PhTX-433 (1) and seven synthetic analogues [PhTX-343 (2), PhTX-334 (3), PhTX-443 (4), PhTX-434 (5), PhTX-344 (6), PhTX-444 (7), and PhTX-333 (8)], each having four protolytic sites, were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Nonlinear......, multiparameter, simultaneous fit of all chemical shift data obtained from the NMR titration curves yielded macroscopic pKa values as well as intrinsic chemical shift data of all differently protonated macrospecies. Analyses of the chemical shift data demonstrated strong interactions between all four sites...

  17. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  18. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, S. S.; Zhu, Y.; Meng, W.; Wu, F.

    2016-12-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes.

  19. NMR spectroscopy of coal pyrolysis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Shevchenko, G.G.

    1985-12-01

    The authors consider the scope for using H 1 and C 13 NMR spectroscopy to describe the products from coal pyrolysis and hydrogenization. The accuracy of the structural information provided by the best NMR methods is also considered. The stuctural parameters derived from H 1 and C 13 NMR spectra are presented. Results demonstrate the high accuracy and sensitivity of the structural information provided by H 1 AND C 13 NMR spectra for coal products. There are substantial structural differences between the soluble products from medium-temperature coking of Cheremkhov coal and high-speed pyrolysis of Kan-Acha coal, and also differences in behavior during hydrogenation. These differences are related to the structure of the organic matter in the initial coal and to differences in the pyrolysis mechanisms.

  20. Sub-minute kinetics of human red cell fumarase: 1 H spin-echo NMR spectroscopy and 13 C rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishmarev, Dmitry; Wright, Alan J; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Pileio, Giuseppe; Stevanato, Gabriele; Brindle, Kevin M; Kuchel, Philip W

    2018-03-01

    Fumarate is an important probe of metabolism in hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. It is used to detect the release of fumarase in cancer tissues, which is associated with necrosis and drug treatment. Nevertheless, there are limited reports describing the detailed kinetic studies of this enzyme in various cells and tissues. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the sub-minute kinetics of human red blood cell fumarase using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and to provide a quantitative description of the enzyme that is relevant to the use of fumarate as a probe of cell rupture. The fumarase reaction was studied using time courses of 1 H spin-echo and 13 C-NMR spectra. 1 H-NMR experiments showed that the fumarase reaction in hemolysates is sufficiently rapid to make its kinetics amenable to study in a period of approximately 3 min, a timescale characteristic of hyperpolarized 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. The rapid-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (RD-DNP) technique was used to hyperpolarize [1,4- 13 C]fumarate, which was injected into concentrated hemolysates. The kinetic data were analyzed using recently developed FmR α analysis and modeling of the enzymatic reaction using Michaelis-Menten equations. In RD-DNP experiments, the decline in the 13 C-NMR signal from fumarate, and the concurrent rise and fall of that from malate, were captured with high spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, which allowed the robust quantification of fumarase kinetics. The kinetic parameters obtained indicate the potential contribution of hemolysis to the overall rate of the fumarase reaction when 13 C-NMR RD-DNP is used to detect necrosis in animal models of implanted tumors. The analytical procedures developed will be applicable to studies of other rapid enzymatic reactions using conventional and hyperpolarized substrate NMR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Structural characterization of supramolecular assemblies by {sup 13}C spin dilution and 3D solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam, E-mail: adla@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 13}C spin diluted protein samples can be produced using [1-{sup 13}C] and [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose (Glc) carbon sources in the bacterial growth medium. The {sup 13}C spin dilution results in favorable {sup 13}C spectral resolution and polarization transfer behavior. We recently reported the combined use of [1-{sup 13}C]- and [2-{sup 13}C]-Glc labeling to facilitate the structural analysis of insoluble and non-crystalline biological systems by solid-state NMR (ssNMR), including sequential assignment, detection of long-range contacts and structure determination of macromolecular assemblies. In solution NMR the beneficial properties of sparsely labeled samples using [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol ({sup 13}C labeled C{alpha} sites on a {sup 12}C diluted background) have recently been exploited to provide a bi-directional assignment method (Takeuchi et al. in J Biomol NMR 49(1):17-26, 2011 ). Inspired by this approach and our own recent results using [2-{sup 13}C]-Glc as carbon sources for the simplification of ssNMR spectra, we present a strategy for a bi-directional sequential assignment of solid-state NMR resonances and additionally the detection of long-range contacts using the combination of {sup 13}C spin dilution and 3D NMR spectroscopy. We illustrate our results with the sequential assignment and the collection of distance restraints on an insoluble and non-crystalline supramolecular assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system needle.

  2. Structure and dynamics of porcine submaxillary mucin as determined by natural abundance carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerken, T.A.; Jentoft, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nearly all of the resonances in the 13 C NMR spectrum of porcine submaxillary mucin glycoprotein (PSM) have been assigned to the peptide core carbons and to the carbons in the eight different oligosaccharide side chains that arise from the incomplete biosynthesis of the sialylated A blood group pentasaccharide. By use of these assignments, a nearly complete structural analysis of intact PSM has been performed without resorting to degradative chemical methods. Considerable structural variability in the carbohydrate side chains was observed between mucins obtained from different animals, while no variability was observed between glands in a single animal. The dynamics of the PSM core and carbohydrate side chains were examined by using the carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser enhancements of each assigned carbon resonance. The peptide core of PSM exhibits internal segmental flexibility that is virtually identical with that of ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM), whose carbohydrate side chain consists of the α-NeuNAc(2-6)α-Ga1NAc disaccharide. These results differ from most reports of glycoprotein dynamics, which typically find the terminal carbohydrate residues to be undergoing rapid internal rotation about their terminal glycosidic bonds. The results reported here are consistent with previous studies on the conformations of the A and H determinants derived from model oligosaccharides and further indicate that the conformations of these determinants are unchanged when covalently bound to the mucin peptide core. In spite of their carbohydrate side-chain heterogeneity, mucins appear to be ideal glycoproteins for the study of O-linked oligosaccharide conformation and dynamics and for the study of the effects of glycosylation on polypeptide conformation and dynamics

  3. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  5. Characterization of coal structure by CP/MAS carbon-13 NMR spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Maekawa, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Cross-polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (n.m.r.) spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of the whole structures of different ranks of coal. Three basic structural parameters, namely carbon aromaticity fa, new carbon aromaticity fa', and atomic H/C ratio for the hypothetical unsubstituted aromatic nuclei Haru/Car, were derived from the combined data of ultimate analysis, the distributions of carbon and oxygen functional groups obtained from the spectrum and the distribution of four types of methylene carbon groups in coal. Both fa and fa' values generally increased with coal rank and ranged from 0.51 to 0.71 and from 0.62 to 0.76, respectively. Haru/Car value tended to decrease with coal rank although the value was greatly affected by the types of hydroaromatic methylene carbons to aromatic rings. The values indicated that lower-rank coals consisted mainly of 1-3 aromatic rings, and higher-rank coals, 3-5 aromatic rings. 24 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  6. Sensitivity enhancement of 13C nuclei in 2D J-resolved NMR spectroscopy using a recycled-flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, S.T.K.; Lee, R.W.K.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Recycled-flow nuclear magnetic resonance for sensitivity enhancement in 1/2 spin nuclei has been reported previously, achieving several-fold signal enhancement. The success of the method depends upon premagnetization of nuclei prior to flowing into the detector region, obviating the need for delays following data acquisition to allow spin-lattice relaxation and reduce experiment time. The actual gains of sensitivity enhancement for 13 C- 1 H 2D J-resolved NMR using a recycled-flow method are evaluated. Possible enhancements for two types of J-resolved measurements, namely, one-bond 13 C- 1 H and long range J-resolved spectroscopy, are estimated using a simple Carr-Purcell spin-echo approach to quantify the 13 C signals. The pulse sequence is simply 90 0 -t /sub 1/2/-180 0 -t/sub 1/2/-AT-t/sub d/, where t/sub 1/2/ is half the evolution time, AT is the acquisition time, and t/sub d/ the experiment repetition time. In a static 2D NMR experiment, t/sub d/ usually must be the same order of the longest spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1 ) of nuclei. Quantitative measurements using a recycled-flow system indicate t/dub d/ can be reduced to a fraction of T 1 ; hence significant time savings can be achieved. Time-savings of between 2 and 25 can be anticipated for 2D spectroscopy under flow measurement conditions used in the present study. Other types of 2D NMR spectroscopy (autocorrelation and double quantum NMR) are discussed

  7. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  8. 13C-NMR of diterpenes with pimarane skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcez, W.S.; Pereira, A.L.; Silva Queiroz, P.P. da; Silva, R.S. da; Valente, L.M.M.; Peixoto, E.M.; Cunha Pinto, A. da

    1981-01-01

    The effect of substituent groups on the chemical shift of carbons using nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of carbon 13 ( 13 C-NMR) is discussed. Diterpenes having pimarane skeleton, isolated from plants of Velloziaceae family are analysed. (ARHC) [pt

  9. 13C NMR investigation of the structure of cationic carbonyls in transition metal zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Taarit, Y.

    1979-01-01

    13 C NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of carbon monoxide adsorbed on transition metal ions hosted in a synthetic faujastite type zeolite. The adsorbed CO species was characterised by a highly shielded carbon nucleus. Using the Pople approximation for the paramagnetic shielding term, the observed chemical shift was rationalised assuming the formation of a cationic carbonyl species with an appreciable electronic transfer from the carbon lone pair to the transition metal ion and negligible π back-bonding if at all. (Auth.)

  10. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of synthetic polymers in bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komorski, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of high-resolution NMR of solid polymers; High-resolution NMR of glassy amorphous polymers; Carbon-13 solid-state NMR of semicrystalline polymers; Conformational analysis of polymers of solid-state NMR; High-resolution NMR studies of oriented polymers; High-resolution solid-state NMR of protons in polymers; and Deuterium NMR of solid polymers. This work brings together the various approaches for high-resolution NMR studies of bulk polymers into one volume. Heavy emphasis is, of course, given to 13C NMR studies both above and below Tg. Standard high-power pulse and wide-line techniques are not covered

  11. Compositional differences among Chinese soy sauce types studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Wang, Xiaohua; Bin Yuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-01

    Soy sauce a well known seasoning all over the world, especially in Asia, is available in global market in a wide range of types based on its purpose and the processing methods. Its composition varies with respect to the fermentation processes and addition of additives, preservatives and flavor enhancers. A comprehensive (1)H NMR based study regarding the metabonomic variations of soy sauce to differentiate among different types of soy sauce available on the global market has been limited due to the complexity of the mixture. In present study, (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis like principle component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to investigate metabonomic variations among different types of soy sauce, namely super light, super dark, red cooking and mushroom soy sauce. The main additives in soy sauce like glutamate, sucrose and glucose were easily distinguished and quantified using (13)C NMR spectroscopy which were otherwise difficult to be assigned and quantified due to serious signal overlaps in (1)H NMR spectra. The significantly higher concentration of sucrose in dark, red cooking and mushroom flavored soy sauce can directly be linked to the addition of caramel in soy sauce. Similarly, significantly higher level of glutamate in super light as compared to super dark and mushroom flavored soy sauce may come from the addition of monosodium glutamate. The study highlights the potentiality of (13)C NMR based metabonomics coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis in differentiating between the types of soy sauce on the basis of level of additives, raw materials and fermentation procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of the anomeric specificity of the Escherichia coli CTP:CMP-3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate cytidylyltransferase by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlbrenner, W.E.; Fesik, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    [99%, 1- 13 C]- and [90%, 2- 13 C]3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) were prepared enzymatically and used to determine the anomeric specificity of the CTP:CMP-3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate cytidylyl transferase (CMP-KDO synthetase) by 13 C NMR spectroscopy. Addition of CMP-KDO synthetase to reaction mixtures containing either 1- 13 C- or 2- 13 C-labeled KDO resulted in rapid CMP-KDO formation which was accompanied by a substantial decrease in the 13 C-enriched resonances of the beta-pyranose form of KDO relative to the resonances of other KDO species in solution, demonstrating that the beta-pyranose is the preferred substrate. Concomitant with the production of CMP-KDO was the appearance of peaks at 174.3 and 101.4 ppm when [1- 13 C]- and [2- 13 C]KDO, respectively, were used as substrates. The correspondence of these resonances to the enriched carbons in CMP-KDO was confirmed by the expected 3-bond (3JP,C-1 = 6.9 Hz) and 2-bond coupling (2JP,C-2 = 8.3 Hz) between the labeled carbons and the ketosidically linked phosphoryl group. A large coupling (3J = 5.7 Hz) was observed in proton-coupled spectra of CMP-[1- 13 C]KDO between carbon 1 and the axial proton at carbon 3 of KDO. The magnitude of this coupling constant supports a diaxial relationship between these two groups and, along with chemical shift data, indicates that KDO retains the beta-configuration when linked in CMP-KDO

  13. 13C NMR and EPR spectroscopic evaluation of oil shale mined soil recuperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.V. dos; Mangrich, A.S.; Pereira, B.F.; Pillon, C.N.; Bonagamba, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, native forest soil (NFS) organic matter (SOM) sample and SOM samples from a neighboring forest soil area of an oil shale mine which is being rehabilitated for thirty years (RFS) were analyzed. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to evaluate the soil reclamation of the Brazilian oil shale mining process. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation studies of the results obtained from EPRand 13 C NMR were used to obtain information about SOM structures and their interactions with residual paramagnetic metal ion. The signal of the residual metallic oxycation, VO 2+ correlated positively with uronic acid-type hydrophilic organic structures, determined from the 13 C NMR spectra, and correlated negatively with the organic free radical (OFR) signal associated with oxygen atoms (g = 2.0042). The hydrophobic aromatic structures correlate positively with the EPR OFR signal associated with carbon atoms (g = 2.0022). The data from the two spectroscopic magnetic techniques show that the used recuperation process is effective. (author)

  14. Functional Groups Determine Biochar Properties (pH and EC as Studied by Two-Dimensional (13C NMR Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Li

    Full Text Available While the properties of biochar are closely related to its functional groups, it is unclear under what conditions biochar develops its properties. In this study, two-dimensional (2D (13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR correlation spectroscopy was for the first time applied to investigate the development of functional groups and establish their relationship with biochar properties. The results showed that the agricultural biomass carbonized to biochars was a dehydroxylation/dehydrogenation and aromatization process, mainly involving the cleavage of O-alkylated carbons and anomeric O-C-O carbons in addition to the production of fused-ring aromatic structures and aromatic C-O groups. With increasing charring temperature, the mass cleavage of O-alkylated groups and anomeric O-C-O carbons occurred prior to the production of fused-ring aromatic structures. The regression analysis between functional groups and biochar properties (pH and electrical conductivity further demonstrated that the pH and electrical conductivity of rice straw derived biochars were mainly determined by fused-ring aromatic structures and anomeric O-C-O carbons, but the pH of rice bran derived biochars was determined by both fused-ring aromatic structures and aliphatic O-alkylated (HCOH carbons. In summary, this work suggests a novel tool for characterising the development of functional groups in biochars.

  15. NMR studies of stock process water and reaction pathways in hydrothermal carbonization of furfural residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Yue

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC is a valuable approach to convert furfural residue (FR into carbon material. The prepared biochars are usually characterized comprehensively, while the stock process water still remains to be studied in detail. Herein, a NMR study of the main components in stock process water generated at different HTC reaction conditions was reported. Various qualitative and quantitative NMR techniques (1H and 13C NMR, 1H–1H COSY and 1H13C HSQC etc. especially 1D selective gradient total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY NMR were strategically applied in the analysis of HTC stock process water. Without separation and purification, it was demonstrated that the main detectable compounds are 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, formic acid, methanol, acetic acid, levulinic acid, glycerol, hydroxyacetone and acetaldehyde in this complicate mixture. Furthermore, the relationship between the concentration of major products and the reaction conditions (180–240 °C at 8 h, and 1–24 h at 240 °C was established. Finally, reasonable reaction pathways for hydrothermal conversion of FR were proposed based on this result and our previously obtained characteristics of biochars. The routine and challenging NMR methods utilized here would be an alternative other than HPLC or GC for biomass conversion research and can be extended to more studies. Keywords: NMR, Hydrothermal carbonization, Furfural residue, Stock process water

  16. Improved characterization of the botanical origin of sugar by carbon-13 SNIF-NMR applied to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Freddy; Randet, Celia; Gilbert, Alexis; Silvestre, Virginie; Jamin, Eric; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gerald; Segebarth, Nicolas; Guillou, Claude

    2010-11-24

    Until now, no analytical method, not even isotopic ones, had been able to differentiate between sugars coming from C4-metabolism plants (cane, maize, etc.) and some crassulacean acid metabolism plants (e.g., pineapple, agave) because in both cases the isotope distributions of the overall carbon-13/carbon-12 and site-specific deuterium/hydrogen isotope ratios are very similar. Following recent advances in the field of quantitative isotopic carbon-13 NMR measurements, a procedure for the analysis of the positional carbon-13/carbon-12 isotope ratios of ethanol derived from the sugars of pineapples and agave using the site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) method is presented. It is shown that reproducible results can be obtained when appropriate analytical conditions are used. When applied to pineapple juice, this new method demonstrates a unique ability to detect cane and maize sugar, which are major potential adulterants, with a detection limit in the order of 15% of the total sugars, which provides an efficient mean of controlling the authenticity of juices made from this specific fruit. When applied to tequila products, this new method demonstrates a unique ability to unambiguously differentiate authentic 100% agave tequila, as well as misto tequila (made from at least 51% agave), from products made from a larger proportion of cane or maize sugar and therefore not complying with the legal definition of tequila.

  17. Visualising substrate-fingermark interactions: Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of amino acid reagent development on cellulose substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Xanthe; Shimmon, Ronald; Roux, Claude; Lennard, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Most spectroscopic studies of the reaction products formed by ninhydrin, 1,2-indanedione-zinc (Ind-Zn) and 1,8-diazafluoren-9-one (DFO) when reacted with amino acids or latent fingermarks on paper substrates are focused on visible absorption or luminescence spectroscopy. In addition, structural elucidation studies are typically limited to solution-based mass spectrometry or liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which does not provide an accurate representation of the fingermark development process on common paper substrates. The research presented in this article demonstrates that solid-state carbon-13 magic angle spinning NMR ((13)C-MAS-NMR) is a technique that can not only be utilised for structural studies of fingermark enhancement reagents, but is a promising technique for characterising the effect of paper chemistry on fingermark deposition and enhancement. The latter opens up a research area that has been under-explored to date but has the potential to improve our understanding of how fingermark secretions and enhancement reagents interact with paper substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 1H diffusion-weighted, 13C and 17O NMR spectroscopy: methodological developments to study brain structure and function in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najac, Chloe

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is a unique tool that allows acquiring brain biochemical profiles and quantifying many cellular parameters in vivo. During this thesis, three different techniques have been developed: (i) 1 H diffusion-weighted, (ii) carbon-13 ( 13 C) and (iii) oxygen-17 ( 17 O) NMR spectroscopy to study brain structure and function in vivo. Brain metabolites are cell-specific endogenous tracers of the intracellular space whose translational diffusion depends on many cellular properties (e.g.: cytosol viscosity and intracellular restriction). Studying the variation of the diffusion coefficient (ADC) as a function of diffusion time (td) allows untangling and quantifying those parameters. In particular, measuring metabolites ADC at long diffusion times gives information about the metabolites compartmentation in cells. In a first study, we measured neuronal and astrocytic metabolites ADC over a large time window (from 80 ms to 1 s) in a large voxel in the macaque brain. No dependence of all metabolites ADC on td was observed suggesting that metabolites primarily diffuse in neuronal (dendrites and axons) and astrocytic processes and are not confined inside the cell body and organelles (nucleus, mitochondria). The large size of the voxel, due to low detection sensitivity, did not allow us to study metabolites compartmentation in pure white (WM) and grey matters (GM). Therefore, we performed a new study in the human brain. Results showed that in both WM and GM metabolites diffuse in fiber-like cell structure. Finally, using an even larger time window (up to 2 s) in the macaque brain and analytical models mimicking the cell structure, we estimated the length of neuronal (∼110 μm) and astrocytic (∼70 μm) processes. ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the main source of energy in the organism, is produced thanks to glucose oxidation inside the mitochondria. 13 C NMR spectroscopy is a well-known technique to study brain energy metabolism and can be used to

  19. {sup 13} C-NMR of mesquite gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Cristina T; Garcia, Rosangela B [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas

    1992-12-31

    Mesquite and guar gums are galactomannans extracted from the seeds of Proposis Juliflora and Cyamopsis tetragonolobus, respectively. An experimental sample of mesquite gum and a commercial sample of guar gum were partially depolymerized by ultrasonic radiation and the produce analysed by high resolution {sup 13} C-NMR spectroscopy. The different carbon lines were resolved and their assignments were done as those reported in the literature. The galactose to mannose ratios (G/M) were estimated from the relative peak areas of the C-1 lines as G/M=61 for mesquite and G/M=0.54 for guar gum. The next nearest-neighbour probabilities (diad frequencies) of the D-galactosyl substitution to the D-mannose backbone were evaluated by integrating C-4 mannose splitted peaks. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. {sup 13}C NMR and EPR spectroscopic evaluation of oil shale mined soil recuperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.V. dos, E-mail: mangrich@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Mangrich, A.S. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia: Energia e Ambiente, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pereira, B.F. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Pillon, C.N. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Estacao Experimental Cascata; Novotny, E.H. [EMBRAPA Solos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bonagamba, T.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Abbt-Braun, G.; Frimmel, F.H. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe, TH (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    In this work, native forest soil (NFS) organic matter (SOM) sample and SOM samples from a neighboring forest soil area of an oil shale mine which is being rehabilitated for thirty years (RFS) were analyzed. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to evaluate the soil reclamation of the Brazilian oil shale mining process. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation studies of the results obtained from EPRand {sup 13}C NMR were used to obtain information about SOM structures and their interactions with residual paramagnetic metal ion. The signal of the residual metallic oxycation, VO{sup 2+} correlated positively with uronic acid-type hydrophilic organic structures, determined from the {sup 13}C NMR spectra, and correlated negatively with the organic free radical (OFR) signal associated with oxygen atoms (g = 2.0042). The hydrophobic aromatic structures correlate positively with the EPR OFR signal associated with carbon atoms (g = 2.0022). The data from the two spectroscopic magnetic techniques show that the used recuperation process is effective. (author)

  1. Unveiling the Interplay Between Diffusing CO2 and Ethanol Molecules in Champagne Wines by Classical Molecular Dynamics and (13)C NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David A; Perret, Alexandre; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Cilindre, Clara; Cours, Thibaud; Alijah, Alexander; Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2014-12-18

    The diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ethanol (EtOH) in carbonated hydroalcoholic solutions and Champagne wines are evaluated as a function of temperature by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and (13)C NMR spectroscopy measurements. The excellent agreement between theoretical and experimental diffusion coefficients suggest that ethanol is the main molecule, apart from water, responsible for the value of the CO2 diffusion coefficients in typical Champagne wines, a result that could likely be extended to most sparkling wines with alike ethanol concentrations. CO2 and EtOH hydrodynamical radii deduced from viscometry measurements by applying the Stokes-Einstein relationship are found to be mostly constant and in close agreement with MD predictions. The reliability of our approach should be of interest to physical chemists aiming to model transport phenomena in supersaturated aqueous solutions or water/alcohol mixtures.

  2. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  3. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozar, O. [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucureşti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania); Filip, C.; Tripon, C. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cioica, N.; Coţa, C.; Nagy, E. M. [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucureşti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  4. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (1H, 13C, and 31P) and two-dimensional (1H-13C and 1H-31P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the 1H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative 1H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the 1H-31P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt. PMID:27322339

  6. Solid state CP/MAS 13C n.m.r. analysis of particle size and density fractions of soil incubated with uniformly labelled 13C-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, J.A.; Oades, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A soil incubated for 34 days in the absence (control) and presence (treated) of uniformly labelled 13 C-glucose was dispersed using an ultrasonic probe and fractionated by sedimentation in water and a polytungstate solution of density 2.0 Mg m -3 . Solid state CP/MAS 13 C n.m.r. (cross polarization/magic angle spinning 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure of the native soil organic carbon and the residual substrate carbon in the fractions of the control and treated soils. To obtain quantitative results it was essential to determine the spin lattice relaxation time in a rotating frame of the individual carbon types in the spectra as the relaxation behaviour of the native organic material in the clay fraction was different from that of the residual substrate carbon. The residual substrate carbon was found to accumulate in predominantly alkyl and O-alkyl structures in both fractions. However, significant amounts of acetal and carboxyl carbon were also observed in the clay fraction. Little if any aromatic or phenolic carbon was synthesized by the soil microorganisms utilizing substrate carbon. Dipolar dephasing CP/MAS 13 C n.m.r. experiments were also performed and allowed the proportion of each type of carbon which was protonated and nonprotonated to be estimated. Essentially all of the O-alkyl and acetal carbon, 25-40% of the aromatic carbon and 66-80% of the alkyl carbon was protonated in the fractions isolated from the treated soil. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Organic matter characterization during the anaerobic digestion of different biomasses by means of CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio; Gigliotti, Giovanni; Volpe, Daniela; Fabbri, Claudio; Provenzano, Maria Rosaria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize ingestates and their corresponding digestates obtained in two full-scale biogas production plants processing a) mixtures of organic wastes in co-digestion, and b) pig slurry in order to assess the organic matter transformation during anaerobic digestion by means of chemical analysis and 13 CPMAS-NMR spectroscopy. Results proved that digestates obtained by different organic substrates exhibited significant chemical differences related to the different initial composition of substrates. We proposed the use of the aliphaticity index in order to highlight the different chemical nature of ingestates and their corresponding digestates. In order to verify whether the AD process leads to stabilized final products regardless the initial composition of biomass in view of a possible agronomical use of digestate, a comparison of CPMAS 13 C NMR data of a number of ingestates and digestates available in literature was carried out. Results indicated that most of the aromatic structures present in the substrate tend to degrade during the process and that anaerobic digestion proceeds through preferential degradation of carbohydrates such as cellulose and hemicellulose and, as a consequence, concentration of more chemically recalcitrant aliphatic molecules occurs. -- Highlights: ► We studied anaerobic digestion by means of chemical analysis and 13 CPMAS-NMR spectroscopy. ► Significant chemical differences in digestates were highlighted. ► We proposed the use of the aliphaticity index in order to differentiate digestates. ► Most of the aromatic structures tend to degrade. ► Carbohydrates are degraded and recalcitrant aliphatic molecules concentrate

  8. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Roberts, William L.; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  9. Calculation of average molecular parameters, functional groups, and a surrogate molecule for heavy fuel oils using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2016-04-22

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is primarily used as fuel in marine engines and in boilers to generate electricity. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful analytical tool for structure elucidation and in this study, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy were used for the structural characterization of 2 HFO samples. The NMR data was combined with elemental analysis and average molecular weight to quantify average molecular parameters (AMPs), such as the number of paraffinic carbons, naphthenic carbons, aromatic hydrogens, olefinic hydrogens, etc. in the HFO samples. Recent formulae published in the literature were used for calculating various derived AMPs like aromaticity factor 〖(f〗_a), C/H ratio, average paraffinic chain length (¯n), naphthenic ring number 〖(R〗_N), aromatic ring number〖 (R〗_A), total ring number〖 (R〗_T), aromatic condensation index (φ) and aromatic condensation degree (Ω). These derived AMPs help in understanding the overall structure of the fuel. A total of 19 functional groups were defined to represent the HFO samples, and their respective concentrations were calculated by formulating balance equations that equate the concentration of the functional groups with the concentration of the AMPs. Heteroatoms like sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen were also included in the functional groups. Surrogate molecules were finally constructed to represent the average structure of the molecules present in the HFO samples. This surrogate molecule can be used for property estimation of the HFO samples and also serve as a surrogate to represent the molecular structure for use in kinetic studies.

  10. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Tamim A., E-mail: tamim.darwish@ansto.gov.au [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J. [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); James, Michael [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual {sup 1}H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D{sub 2}O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary {sup 13}C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing {sup 13}C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve {sup 13}C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H) resolves closely separated quaternary {sup 13}C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. - Graphical abstract: The relative intensities of quaternary {sup 13}C {"1H,"2H} resonances are equal despite the different relaxation delays, allowing the relative abundance of the different deuterated isotopologues to be calculated using NMR fast

  11. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy of 13C methanol at less than 5 μT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Seong-Joo; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon-Kyu; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy is one of the most significant applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Here, we demonstrate that the 2D NMR can be performed even at a low magnetic field of less than 5 μT, which is ten times less than the Earth’s magnetic field. The pulses used in the experiment were composed of circularly polarized fields for coherent as well as wideband excitations. Since the excitation band covers the entire spectral range, the simplest two-pulse sequence delivered the full 2D spectrum. At 5 μT, methanol with 13C enriched up to 99% belongs to a strongly coupled regime, and thus its 2D spectrum exhibits complicated spectral correlations, which can be exploited as a fingerprint in chemical analysis. In addition, we show that, with compressive sensing, the acquisition of the 2D spectrum can be accelerated to take only 45% of the overall duration.

  12. Application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize organic chemical components of decomposing coarse woody debris from different climatic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Hishinuma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was applied to coarse woody debris (CWD in different stages of decomposition and collected from forest floor of a subtropical, a cool temperate, and a subalpine forest in Japan. The purpose was to test its applicability to characterize organic chemical composition of CWD of broad-leaved and coniferous trees from different climatic conditions. O-alkyl-C, mainly representing carbohydrates, was the predominant component of CWD at the three sites, accounting for 43.5-58.1% of the NMR spectra. Generally, the relative area under the signals for aromatic-C and phenolic-C, mainly representing lignin, increased, whereas the relative area for O-alkyl-C decreased, as the decay class advanced. The relative area under NMR chemical shift regions was significantly correlated with the chemical properties examined with proximate analyses. That is, O-alkyl-C and di-O-alkyl-C NMR signal areas were positively correlated with the volumetric density of CWD and the content of total carbohydrates. Methoxyl-C, aromatic-C, phenolic-C, carboxyl-C, and carbonyl-C were positively correlated with the contents of acid-unhydrolyzable residues (lignin, tannins, and cutin and nitrogen. Lignin-C calculated from NMR signals increased, and polysaccharide-C decreased, with the decay class of CWD at the three study sites. A review of previous studies on 13C NMR spectroscopy for decomposing CWD suggested further needs of its application to broad-leaved trees from tropical and subtropical regions.

  13. Quantification of C=C and C=O Surface Carbons in Detonation Nanodiamond by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, J -F; Fang, X -W; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2014-05-08

    The ability of solid-state 13C NMR to detect and quantify small amounts of sp2-hybridized carbon on the surface of ~5 nm diameter nanodiamond particles is demonstrated. The C=C carbon fraction is only 1.1 ± 0.4% in pristine purified detonation nanodiamond, while a full single-layer graphitic or “bucky diamond” shell would contain ca. 25% of all C in a 5 nm diameter particle. Instead of large aromatic patches repeatedly proposed in the recent literature, sp3-hybridized CH and COH carbons cover most of the nanodiamond particle surface, accounting for ~5% each. C=O and COO groups also seen in X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) but not detected in previous NMR studies make up ca. 1.5% of all C. They are removed by heat treatment at 800 °C, which increases the aromatic fraction. 13C{1H} NMR demonstrates that the various sp2-hybridized carbons are mostly not protonated, but cross-polarization shows that they are separated from 1H by only a few bond lengths, which proves that they are near the protonated surface. Together, the observed C–H, C–OH, C=O, and C=C groups account for 12–14% of all C, which matches the surface fraction expected for bulk-terminated 5 nm diameter diamond particles.

  14. Carbon-deuterium rotational-echo double-resonance NMR spectroscopy of lyophilized aspartame formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Suman A; Utz, Marcel; Gorman, Eric M; Pikal, Michael J; Munson, Eric J; Lubach, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    In this study, changes in the local conformation of aspartame were observed in annealed lyophilized glasses by monitoring changes in the distance between two labeled sites using C-(2)H rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Confirmation that the REDOR experiments were producing accurate distance measurement was ensured by measuring the (13)C-(15)N distance in glycine. The experiment was further verified by measuring the REDOR dephasing curve on (13)C-(2)H methionine. (13)C-(2)H REDOR dephasing curves were then measured on lyophilized aspartame-disaccharide formulations. In aspartame-sucrose formulation, the internuclear distances increased upon annealing, which correlated with decreased chemical reactivity. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the dephasing curve in aspartame-trehalose formulation. The results show that stability is a function of both mobility and local structure (conformation), even in a small molecule system such as lyophilized aspartame-sucrose. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of strained organic molecules: III estimates of steric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.R.; Leal, K.Z.; Costa, V.E.U.; Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre

    1985-01-01

    A study of cyclic organic molecules using carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy is analysed. The preparation of compounds and the use of norbornyl compounds as a basis for chemical shifts, bicyclic, tricyclic and tetracyclic derivatives are compared. Relevant distances, angles and non-bonded interactions are shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  16. Computational characterization of 13C NMR lineshapes of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornan, P.; Woo, T.K. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Nonspherical large cages in structure one clathrates impose non-uniform motion of nonspherical guest molecules and anisotropic lineshapes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the guest. This paper presented a general method for calculating the chemical shift lineshape anisotropy of guest molecules in clathrate hydrate compounds from molecular dynamics simulations for the case of weak host, guest dipolar coupling. In order to calculate the cage chemical shielding tensors and the NMR lineshape produced by each guest molecule, the study involved the use of orientational distributions from molecular dynamics simulation along with time and powder angle averaging. The total predicted lineshape anisotropy was calculated from the superposition of the lineshapes of all guests. The approach was applied to calculate the temperature dependent 13C NMR lineshape anisotropy of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrates. The paper presented the computational methodology and results and discussion. It was concluded that the resulting lineshapes were in good agreement with the experimental 13C NMR spectrum at each temperature. The method provided a uniform procedure to calculate the lineshapes at different temperatures and no prior assumptions about the nature of the motion of the guest in cages was required. 37 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and sup 13 C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portais, J.C.; Pianet, I.; Merle, M.; Raffard, G.; Biran, M.; Labouesse, J.; Canioni, P. (Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 (FR)); Allard, M.; Kien, P.; Caille, J.M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 33 Bordeaux (FR))

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR (1-{sup 13}C) glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3}. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the controlateral unaffected side.

  18. Probing Metal Carbonation Reactions of CO2 in a Model System Containing Forsterite and H2O Using Si-29, C-13 Magic Angle Sample Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Kwak, J.; Hoyt, D. W.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    Ex situ solid state NMR have been used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+scCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80C and 96 bar. Si-29 NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. The surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1 (Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. Si-29 NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. C-13 MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediates as (MgCO3)4*Mg(OH)2*5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed. This research is part of a broader effort at PNNL to develop experimental tools and fundamental insights into chemical transformations affecting subsurface CO2 reactive transport. Si-29 (left) and C-13 (right) MAS NMR spectra of Mg2SiO4 under various reaction conditions. Si-29 NMR reveals that in scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is

  19. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy on complex biomolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renault, M.A.M.; Cukkemane, A.A.; Baldus, M.

    2010-01-01

    Biomolecular applications of NMR spectroscopy are often merely associated with soluble molecules or magnetic resonance imaging. However, since the late 1970s, solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has demonstrated its ability to provide atomic-level insight into complex biomolecular systems ranging

  20. DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Pinon, Arthur C; Emsley, Lyndon; Rossini, Aaron J

    2017-11-28

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has become a valuable tool for the characterization of both pure and formulated active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). However, NMR generally suffers from poor sensitivity that often restricts NMR experiments to nuclei with favorable properties, concentrated samples, and acquisition of one-dimensional (1D) NMR spectra. Here, we review how dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can be applied to routinely enhance the sensitivity of solid-state NMR experiments by one to two orders of magnitude for both pure and formulated APIs. Sample preparation protocols for relayed DNP experiments and experiments on directly doped APIs are detailed. Numerical spin diffusion models illustrate the dependence of relayed DNP enhancements on the relaxation properties and particle size of the solids and can be used for particle size determination when the other factors are known. We then describe the advanced solid-state NMR experiments that have been enabled by DNP and how they provide unique insight into the molecular and macroscopic structure of APIs. For example, with large sensitivity gains provided by DNP, natural isotopic abundance, 13 C- 13 C double-quantum single-quantum homonuclear correlation NMR spectra of pure APIs can be routinely acquired. DNP also enables solid-state NMR experiments with unreceptive quadrupolar nuclei such as 2 H, 14 N, and 35 Cl that are commonly found in APIs. Applications of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy for the molecular level characterization of low API load formulations such as commercial tablets and amorphous solid dispersions are described. Future perspectives for DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR experiments on APIs are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  2. Effect of substitution groups in carbon-13 NMR of tri-substituted camphors; Efeitos de substituintes em RMN de carbono-13 de canforas 3-substituidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Carlos R; Rittner, Roberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Basso, Ernani A [Universidade Estadual de Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica

    1994-12-31

    This work presents and discusses the empirical effects of substitution groups in the carbon-13 NMR spectra of tri-substituted camphors and their correlation with the chemical properties of such substitution groups such as electronegativity. The obtained results are presented and discussed

  3. Atomic substitutions in synthetic apatite; Insights from solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, John S.

    Apatite, Ca5(PO4)3X (where X = F, Cl, or OH), is a unique mineral group capable of atomic substitutions for cations and anions of varied size and charge. Accommodation of differing substituents requires some kind of structural adaptation, e.g. new atomic positions, vacancies, or coupled substitutions. These structural adaptations often give rise to important physicochemical properties relevant to a range of scientific disciplines. Examples include volatile trapping during apatite crystallization, substitution for large radionuclides for long-term storage of nuclear fission waste, substitution for fluoride to improve acid resistivity in dental enamel composed dominantly of hydroxylapatite, and the development of novel biomaterials with enhanced biocompatibility. Despite the importance and ubiquity of atomic substitutions in apatite materials, many of the mechanisms by which these reactions occur are poorly understood. Presence of substituents at dilute concentration and occupancy of disordered atomic positions hinder detection by bulk characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an isotope-specific structural characterization technique that does not require ordered atomic arrangements, and is therefore well suited to investigate atomic substitutions and structural adaptations in apatite. In the present work, solid-state NMR is utilized to investigate structural adaptations in three different types of apatite materials; a series of near-binary F, Cl apatite, carbonate-hydroxylapatite compositions prepared under various synthesis conditions, and a heat-treated hydroxylapatite enriched in 17O. The results indicate that hydroxyl groups in low-H, near binary F,Cl apatite facilitate solid-solution between F and Cl via column reversals, which result in average hexagonal symmetry despite very dilute OH concentration ( 2 mol percent). In addition, 19F NMR spectra indicate

  4. Conformational effects on Carbon-13 NMR spectra of half-cage alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, Peter Rudolf [Universidade Federal (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Carneiro, J. Walkimar de M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Geral e Inorganica; Tostes, Glauco R. [Universidade Federal do Norte Fluminense (UENSP). Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Pinto, Paulo S.S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Costa, Valentim E.U.; Alifantes, Joao [Rio Grande do Sul Univ. (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Bernassau, Jean-Marie; Sizun, Philippe [SANOFI Recherche, Montpellier (France)

    1999-05-01

    Rotation around the carbon=oxygen bond of the hydroxyl group of half-cage alcohols affects bond lengths and angles as well as charge distribution on carbon and hydrogen atoms. As derivatives of half-cage compounds have played an important role in the investigation of several phenomena of interest in the interpretation of NMR parameters, we calculated carbon -13 chemical shift for the three conformers of half-cage alcohols that were investigated at the 6-31 G{sup *} level. GIAO chemical shifts for 1 A, 1 B and 1 C (C{sub 6}-C{sub 5}-O-H dihedral angles of respectively, -73.6 deg C, 64.8 deg C and 178.0 deg C) were calculated by HF/6-31 g (d)// B3 LYP/6-31 g (d) and by B3LYP/6-31 g (d)//B3LYP/6-31 g (d). Since the later gave better agreement with the published chemical shifts and correctly predicts the order of shifts for 2-exo-norbornol, the bicyclic analog of 1, we took these calculations as a basis for analysis of conformational effects.

  5. Magnetization and 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation of nanodiamond powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, E.M.; Fang, X.W.; Bud' ko, S.L.; Straszheim, W.E.; McCallum, R.W.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2008-02-15

    The bulk magnetization at temperatures of 1.8-400 K and in magnetic fields up to 70 kOe, the ambient temperature {sup 13}C NMR spin-lattice relaxation, T{sub 1,c}, and the elemental composition of three nanodiamond powder samples have been studied. The total magnetization of nanodiamond can be explained in terms of contributions from (1) the diamagnetic effect of carbon, (2) the paramagnetic effect of unpaired electrons present in nanodiamond grains, and (3) ferromagnetic-like and (4) superparamagnetic contributions from Fe-containing particles detected in spatially resolved energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Contributions (1) and (2) are intrinsic to nanodiamond, while contributions (3) and (4) arise from impurities naturally present in detonation nanodiamond samples. {sup 13}C NMR T{sub 1,c} relaxation would be unaffected by the presence of the ferromagnetic particles with the bulk magnetization of {approx} 0.01 emu/g at 300 K. Thus, a reduction of T{sub 1,c} by 3 orders of magnitude compared to natural and synthetic microdiamonds confirms the presence of unpaired electrons in the nanodiamond grains. The spin concentration in nanodiamond powder corresponds to {approx}30 unpaired electrons per {approx}4.6 nm diameter nanodiamond grain.

  6. NMR spectroscopy of selenium and tellurium organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalabin, G.A.; Projdakov, A.G.; Radchenko, S.I.

    1980-01-01

    13 C NMR spectra of the substituted methylthio (seleno, telluro) acetylenes, CH 3 EC 1 identity sign C 2 R, E=S, Se, Te are measured. High sensitivity of the chemical shifts of ternary bond carbons to specific effects of heteroatoms is established. The substituent nature produces considerable effect on the sensitivity of C 1 -carbon atom to these effects. Chemical shifts of the substituent carbons do not depend on heteroatoms nature

  7. Polysaccharides of algae. Pt. 37. Characterization of hybrid structure of substituted agarose from Polysiphonia morrowii (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae) using. beta. -agarase and /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usov, A.I.; Ivanova, E.G.

    1987-09-01

    Structure of gel-forming galactan from Polysiphonia morrowii was analysed using bacterial ..beta..-agarase and /sup 13/C-nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 13/C-NMR) spectroscopy. The polysaccharide was shown to contain: a) blocks composed of agarobiose residues, partly 6-O-methylated and 6-sulfated, which are sensitive to enzymolysis; b) extended blocks composed of agarobiose 6-sulfate residues, which are resistant to ..beta..-agarase action. The latter blocks contain also ..beta..-D-galactopyranosyl-(1->4)-..cap alpha..-L-galactopyranose 6.6'-disulfate residues (biogenetic precursors of agarobiose 6-sulfate), which are hardly detectable by /sup 13/C-NMR spectrum of the starting polysaccharide. Action of alkali on the enzyme-resistant fraction afforded a polysaccharide preparation having /sup 13/C-NMR spectrum of agarose 6-sulfate.

  8. Metabolic pathways for ketone body production. 13C NMR spectroscopy of rat liver in vivo using 13C-multilabeled fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl-Wostl, C.; Seelig, J.

    1986-01-01

    The hormonal regulation of ketogenesis in the liver of living rat has been studied noninvasively with 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance. The spatial selection for the liver was better than 90%, with extrahepatic adipose tissue contribution only a very small amount of signal. The metabolic activities of the liver were investigated by infusion of 13 C-labeled butyrate in the jugular vein of the anesthetized rat. The rate of butyrate infusion was chosen to be close to the maximum oxidative capacity of the rat liver, and the 13 C signal intensities were enhanced by using doubly labeled [1,3- 13 C]butyrate as a substrate. Different 13 C NMR spectra and hence different metabolites were observed depending on the hormonal state of the animal. The 13 C NMR studies demonstrate that even when rate of acetyl-CoA production are high, the disposal of this compound is not identical in fasted and diabetic animals. This supports previous suggestions that the redox state of the mitochondrion represents the most important factor in regulation. For a given metabolic state of the animal, different signal intensities were obtained depending on whether butyrate was labeled at C-1, C-3, or C-1,3. From the ratios of incorporation of 13 C label into the carbons of 3-hydroxybutyrate, it could be estimated that a large fraction of butyrate evaded β-oxidation to acetyl-CoA but was converted directly to acetoacetyl-CoA. 13 C-labeled glucose could be detected in vivo in the liver of diabetic rats

  9. Development and applications of quantitative NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, quantitative NMR spectroscopy has attracted attention as an analytical method which can easily secure traceability to SI unit system, and discussions about its accuracy and inaccuracy are also started. This paper focuses on the literatures on the advancement of quantitative NMR spectroscopy reported between 2009 and 2016, and introduces both NMR measurement conditions and actual analysis cases in quantitative NMR. The quantitative NMR spectroscopy using an internal reference method enables accurate quantitative analysis with a quick and versatile way in general, and it is possible to obtain the precision sufficiently applicable to the evaluation of pure substances and standard solutions. Since the external reference method can easily prevent contamination to samples and the collection of samples, there are many reported cases related to the quantitative analysis of biologically related samples and highly scarce natural products in which NMR spectra are complicated. In the precision of quantitative NMR spectroscopy, the internal reference method is superior. As the quantitative NMR spectroscopy widely spreads, discussions are also progressing on how to utilize this analytical method as the official methods in various countries around the world. In Japan, this method is listed in the Pharmacopoeia and Japanese Standard of Food Additives, and it is also used as the official method for purity evaluation. In the future, this method will be expected to spread as the general-purpose analysis method that can ensure traceability to SI unit system. (A.O.)

  10. 13C-NMR spectra and bonding situation in ketenimines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firl, J.; Runge, W.; Hartmann, W.; Utikal, H.P.

    1975-01-01

    13 C-NMR spectra of a series of substituted ketenimines are reported. The terminal carbon resonances are found at unusual high fields between delta 37 and 78, while the central carbon signals appear around delta 189 - 196. On the basis of these results, the bonding situation in ketenimines has been discussed. (auth.)

  11. Study of the metabolism of 13C labeled substrates by 13C NMR spectroscopy of intact cells, tissues, and organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.; London, R.E.; Hutson, J.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labeling, has become an important analytical technique for the study of biological systems and biologically important molecules. The growing list of its well established applications to isolated molecules in solution includes the investigation of: metabolic pathways; the microenvironments of ligands bound to proteins; the architecture and dynamics of macromolecules; the structures of coenzymes and other natural products; and the mechanisms of reactions. Recently interest has been reawakened in the use of the technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The promise and problems in the use of 13 C labeling in such investigations can be illustrated by the results on suspensions of the yeast, Candida utilis

  12. Solution NMR Spectroscopy in Target-Based Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Kang, Congbao

    2017-08-23

    Solution NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study protein structures and dynamics under physiological conditions. This technique is particularly useful in target-based drug discovery projects as it provides protein-ligand binding information in solution. Accumulated studies have shown that NMR will play more and more important roles in multiple steps of the drug discovery process. In a fragment-based drug discovery process, ligand-observed and protein-observed NMR spectroscopy can be applied to screen fragments with low binding affinities. The screened fragments can be further optimized into drug-like molecules. In combination with other biophysical techniques, NMR will guide structure-based drug discovery. In this review, we describe the possible roles of NMR spectroscopy in drug discovery. We also illustrate the challenges encountered in the drug discovery process. We include several examples demonstrating the roles of NMR in target-based drug discoveries such as hit identification, ranking ligand binding affinities, and mapping the ligand binding site. We also speculate the possible roles of NMR in target engagement based on recent processes in in-cell NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Cyclohexanecarbonitriles: Assigning Configurations at Quaternary Centers From 13C NMR CN Chemical Shifts.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guoqing

    2009-01-01

    13C NMR chemical shifts of the nitrile carbon in cyclohexanecarbonitriles directly correlate with the configuration of the quaternary, nitrile-bearing stereocenter. Comparing 13C NMR chemical shifts for over 200 cyclohexanecarbonitriles reveals that equatorially oriented nitriles resonate 3.3 ppm downfield, on average, from their axial counterparts. Pairs of axial/equatorial diastereomers varying only at the nitrile-bearing carbon consistently exhibit downfield shifts of δ 0.4–7.2 for the equatorial nitrile carbon, even in angularly substituted decalins and hydrindanes. PMID:19348434

  14. Correlation of NMR and refractometry to evaluate the stability constant on carbon tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarress, H.; Pouryazadanpanah, N.

    2004-01-01

    An equation has been suggested which correlate the NMR and refractometry results to evaluate the stability constant of electron donor complexes. Using this equation the stability constant of complexation between carbon tetrachloride and toluene in cyclohexane has been studied by refractometry and NMR spectroscopy

  15. Assessing the extent of decomposition of natural organic materials using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddock, J.A.; Oades, J.M.; Nelson, P.N.; Skene, T.M.; Golchin, A.; Clarke, P.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for examining the chemical structure of natural organic materials and the chemical changes associated with decomposition. In this paper, solid-state 13 C NMR data pertaining to changes in the chemical composition of a diverse range of natural organic materials, including wood, peat, composts, forest litter layers, and organic materials in surface layers of mineral soils, were reviewed with the objective of deriving an index of the extent of decomposition of such organic materials based on changes in chemical composition. Chemical changes associated with the decomposition of wood varied considerably and were dependent on a strong interaction between the species of wood examined and the species composition of the microbial decomposer community, making the derivation of a single general index applicable to wood decomposition unlikely. For the remaining forms of natural organic residues, decomposition was almost always associated with an increased content of alkyl C and a decreased content of O-alkyl C. The concomitant increase and decrease in alkyl and O-alkyl C contents, respectively, suggested that the ratio of alkyl to O-alkyl carbon (A/O-A ratio) may provide a sensitive index of the extent of decomposition. Contrary to the traditional view that humic substances with an aromatic core accumulate as decomposition proceeds, changes in the aromatic region were variable and suggested a relationship with the activity of lignin-degrading fungi. The A/O-A ratio did appear to provide a sensitive index of extent of decomposition provided that its use was restricted to situations where the organic materials were derived from a common starting material. In addition, the potential for adsorption of highly decomposable materials on mineral soil surfaces and the impacts which such an adsorption may have on bioavailability required consideration when the A/O-A ratio was used to assess the

  16. Experimental (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) and theoretical study of alkali metal 2-aminobenzoates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Świsłocka, R.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2008-09-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium on the electronic system of the 2-aminobenzoic acid was studied by the methods of molecular spectroscopy. The vibrational (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and NMR ( 1H and 13C) spectra for 2-aminobenzoic acid and its alkali metal salts were recorded. The assignment of vibrational spectra was done on the basis of literature data, theoretical calculations and our previous experience. Characteristic shifts of bands and changes in intensities of bands along the metal series were observed. The changes of chemical shifts of protons ( 1H NMR) and carbons ( 13C NMR) in the series of studied alkali metal 2-aminobenzoates were observed too. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G ∗∗ basis set. Geometric aromaticity indices, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR and Raman spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  17. Identification and quantitative determination of carbohydrates in ethanolic extracts of two conifers using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph

    2008-04-07

    We developed a method for the direct identification and quantification of carbohydrates in raw vegetable extracts using (13)C NMR spectroscopy without any preliminary step of precipitation or reduction of the components. This method has been validated (accuracy, precision and response linearity) using pure compounds and artificial mixtures before being applied to authentic ethanolic extracts of pine needles, pine wood and pine cones and fir twigs. We determined that carbohydrates represented from 15% to 35% of the crude extracts in which pinitol was the principal constituent accompanied by arabinitol, mannitol, glucose and fructose.

  18. NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenert, J.

    1989-01-01

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs [de

  19. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy strongly enhances soil organic matter composition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Hedenström, Mattias; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is the largest terrestrial carbon pool and strongly affects soil properties. With climate change, understanding SOM processes and turnover and how they could be affected by increasing temperatures becomes critical. This is particularly key for organic soils as they represent a huge carbon pool in very sensitive ecosystems, like boreal ecosystems and peatlands. Nevertheless, characterization of SOM molecular composition, which is essential to elucidate soil carbon processes, is not easily achieved, and further advancements in that area are greatly needed. Solid-state one-dimensional (1D) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often used to characterize its molecular composition, but only provides data on a few major functional groups, which regroup many different molecular fragments. For instance, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. Here we show that two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state 1H-13C NMR spectra provided much richer data on the composition of boreal plant litter and organic surface soil. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra and displayed signals from hundreds of identifiable molecular groups. For example, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could be recognized. It was hence possible to follow the fate of specific structural moieties in soils. We observed differences between litter and soil samples, and were able to relate them to the decomposition of identifiable moieties. Sample preparation and data acquisition were both simple and fast. Further, using multivariate data analysis, we aimed at linking the detailed chemical fingerprints of SOM to turnover rates in a soil incubation experiment. With the multivariate models, we were able to identify specific molecular

  20. Remeasuring HEWL pKa values by NMR spectroscopy 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, Helen; Tynan-Connolly, Barbara Mary; Lee, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific pK(a) values measured by NMR spectroscopy provide essential information on protein electrostatics, the pH-dependence of protein structure, dynamics and function, and constitute an important benchmark for protein pK(a) calculation algorithms. Titration curves can be measured by track......Site-specific pK(a) values measured by NMR spectroscopy provide essential information on protein electrostatics, the pH-dependence of protein structure, dynamics and function, and constitute an important benchmark for protein pK(a) calculation algorithms. Titration curves can be measured...... by tracking the NMR chemical shifts of several reporter nuclei versus sample pH. However, careful analysis of these curves is needed to extract residue-specific pK(a) values since pH-dependent chemical shift changes can arise from many sources, including through-bond inductive effects, through-space electric...... protonated carbons and protons in this protein. We extracted pK(a) values from the resulting titration curves using standard fitting methods, and compared these values to each other, and with those measured previously by ¹H NMR (Bartik et al., Biophys J 1994;66:1180–1184). This analysis gives insights...

  1. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A 13C NMR study using [U-13C]glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalderon, B.; Korman, S.H.; Gutman, A.; Lapidot, A.

    1989-01-01

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-[U- 13 C]glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from 13 C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard [U- 13 C]glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% 13 C-enriched D-[U- 13 C]glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non- 13 C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined

  2. 13C and 31P NMR study of gluconeogenesis: utilization of 13C-labeled substrates by perfused liver from streptozotocin-diabetic and untreated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of 13 C-labeled substrates was followed by 13 C and 31 P NMR in perfused liver from the streptozotocin-treated rat model of insulin-dependent diabetes. Comparison was made with perfused liver from untreated littermates, fasted either 24 or 12 h. The major routes of pyruvate metabolism were followed by a 13 C NMR approach that provided for the determination of the metabolic fate of several substances simultaneously. The rate of gluconeogenesis was 2-4-fold greater and β-hydroxybutyrate production was 50% greater in liver from the chronically diabetic rats as compared with the control groups. Large differences in the distribution of 13 C label in hepatic alanine were measured between diabetic and control groups. The biosyntheses of 13 C-labeled glutathione and N-carbamoylaspartate were monitored in time-resolved 13 C NMR spectra of perfused liver. Assignments for the resonances of glutathione and N-carbamoylaspartate were made with the aid of 13 C NMR studies of perchloric acid extracts of the freeze-clamped livers. 13 C NMR spectroscopy of the perfusates provided a convenient, rapid assay of the rate of oxidation of [2- 13 C]ethanol, the hepatic output of [2- 13 ]acetaldehyde, and the accumulation of [2- 13 C]acetate in the perfusate. By 31 P NMR spectroscopy, carbamoyl phosphate was measured in all diabetic livers and an unusual P,P'-diesterified pyrophosphate was observed in one-fourth of the diabetic livers examined. Neither of these phosphorylated metabolites was detected in control liver. Both 13 C and 31 P NMR were useful in defining changes in hepatic metabolism in experimental diabetes

  3. Characterization of plant-derived carbon and phosphorus in lakes by sequential fractionation and NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shasha [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhu, Yuanrong, E-mail: zhuyuanrong07@mails.ucas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Wu, Fengchang, E-mail: wufengchang@vip.skleg.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Meng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); He, Zhongqi [USDA-ARS Southern Regional Research Center, 1100 Robert E Lee Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70124 (United States); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Environment Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Biomedical and Veterinary Biosciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-10-01

    Although debris from aquatic macrophytes is one of the most important endogenous sources of organic matter (OM) and nutrients in lakes, its biogeochemical cycling and contribution to internal load of nutrients in eutrophic lakes are still poorly understood. In this study, sequential fractionation by H{sub 2}O, 0.1 M NaOH and 1.0 M HCl, combined with {sup 13}C and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy, was developed and used to characterize organic carbon (C) and phosphorus (P) in six aquatic plants collected from Tai Lake (Ch: Taihu), China. Organic matter, determined by total organic carbon (TOC), was unequally distributed in H{sub 2}O (21.2%), NaOH (29.9%), HCl (3.5%) and residual (45.3%) fractions. For P in debris of aquatic plants, 53.3% was extracted by H{sub 2}O, 31.9% by NaOH, and 11% by HCl, with 3.8% in residual fractions. Predominant OM components extracted by H{sub 2}O and NaOH were carbohydrates, proteins and aliphatic acids. Inorganic P (P{sub i}) was the primary form of P in H{sub 2}O fractions, whereas organic P (P{sub o}) was the primary form of P in NaOH fractions. The subsequent HCl fractions extracted fewer species of C and P. Some non-extractable carbohydrates, aromatics and metal phytate compounds remained in residual fractions. Based on sequential extraction and NMR analysis, it was proposed that those forms of C (54.7% of TOC) and P (96.2% of TP) in H{sub 2}O, NaOH and HCl fractions are potentially released to overlying water as labile components, while those in residues are stable and likely preserved in sediments of lakes. These results will be helpful in understanding internal loading of nutrients from debris of aquatic macrophytes and their recycling in lakes. - Highlights: • Sequential fractionation combined with NMR analysis was applied on aquatic plants. • Labile and stable C and P forms in aquatic plants were characterized. • 54.7% of OM and 96.2% of P in aquatic plants are potentially available. • 45.3% of OM and 3.8% of P in aquatic

  4. Synthesis of carbon-13 labeled ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Stelzer, L.S.; Stolle, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the synthesis of 2-[4-(2-methyl)propyl-phenyl]propionic acid (ibuprofen) labeled with carbon-13 either at the terminal methyl carbons, or at the methine carbon of the isobutyl side chain. The synthetic route involves the removal of the isopropyl group in the isobutyl side-chain of ibuprofen via 2-[4-(2-methyl-1-propenyl)phenyl]propionic acid, followed by restoration of the isopropyl group with a Wittig reaction, using appropriate carbon-13 labeled acetone as the precursor of the isopropyl group. Interesting NMR coupling data attributable to phosphorous and carbon-13 are presented in the experimental section. (author)

  5. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs

  6. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Ligand-receptor Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak. P.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today NMR spectroscopy is a method of choice for elucidation of interactions between biomolecules and the potential ligands. Knowledge on these interactions is an essential prerequisite for the rational drug design. The most important contribution of NMR to drug design a few years ago was the 3D structure determination of proteins. Besides delivering the 3D structures of the free proteins as a raw material for the modeling studies on ligand binding, NMR can directly yield valuable experimental data on the biologically important protein-ligand complexes. In addition to X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy can provide information on the internal protein dynamics ordynamics of intermolecular interactions. Changes in NMR parameters allow us to detect ("SAR by NMR" and quantitatively determine binding affinities (titration, diffusion NMR experiments, etc. of potential ligands. Also, it is possible to determine the binding site and conformations of ligands, receptors and receptor-ligand complexes with the help of NMR methods such as tr-NOESY. Epitopes or functional groups responsible for binding of ligands to the receptor can be identified by employing STD or WaterLOGSY experiments. In this review are described some of the most frequent NMR methods for the characterization of the interactions between biomolecules and ligands, together with their advantages and disadvantages.

  8. Observation of immobile regions in natural rubber at ambient temperature by solid-state C-13 CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, F.H.; Rasmussen, T.; Pedersen, Walther Batsberg

    1999-01-01

    Employing C-13 CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, the existence of immobile regions in natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) corresponding to a few percent of the monomer units has been detected at ambient temperature. For synthetic rubbers no immobile regions have been detected at all. Applying different...... physical and chemical treatments to natural rubber it is shown that mastication, gamma-irradiation, and increasing the temperature, slightly above the ambient, reduce the amount of immobile regions. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. NMR spectroscopy and drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craik, D.; Munro, S.

    1990-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for structural and conformational studies on drug molecules, the three-dimensional investigation of proteins structure and their interactions with ligands are discussed. In-vivo NMR studies of the effects of drugs on metabolism in perfused organs and whole animals are also briefly presented. 5 refs., ills

  10. 1H-13C NMR-based profiling of biotechnological starch utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik K.; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Starch is used in food-and non-food applications as a renewable and degradable source of carbon and energy. Insight into the chemical detail of starch degradation remains challenging as the starch constituents amylose and amylopectin are homopolymers. We show that considerable molecular detail...... of starch fragmentation can be obtained from multivariate analysis of spectral features in optimized 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy of starch fragments to identify relevant features that distinguish processes in starch utilization. As a case study, we compare the profiles of starch fragments in commercial beer...... samples. Spectroscopic profiles of homooligomeric starch fragments can be excellent indicators of process conditions. In addition, differences in the structure and composition of starch fragments have predictive value for down-stream process output such as ethanol production from starch. Thus, high...

  11. 13C NMR Chemical Shifts of the Triclinic and Monoclinic Crystal forms of Valinomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori; McGeorge, Gary; Orendt, Anita M.; Grant, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Two different crystalline polymorphs of valinomycin, the triclinic and monoclinic forms, have been studied by high resolution, solid state 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Although the two polymorphs of the crystal are remarkably similar, there are distinct differences in the isotropic chemical shifts between the two spectra. For the triclinic form, the carbon chemical shift tensor components for the alpha carbons adjacent to oxygen in the lactic acid and hydroxyisovaleric acid residues and the ester carbonyls of the valine residue were obtained using the FIREMAT experiment. From the measured components, it was found that the behavior of the isotropic chemical shift, δ iso , for valine residue ester carbonyl carbons is predominately influenced by the intermediate component, δ 22 . Additionally it was found that the smallest shift component, δ 33 , for the L-lactic acid (L-Lac) and D-α-hydroxyisovaleric acid (D-Hyi) C α -O carbon was significantly displaced depending upon the nature of individual amino acid residues, and it is the δ 33 component that governs the behavior of δ iso in these alpha carbons

  12. NMR study of local diamagnetic properties of carbon structures with multiwalled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, E.G.; Omel'yanovsky, O.E.; Prudkovsky, V.S.; Sadakov, A.V.; Tsebro, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The reasons for the high diamagnetic susceptibility of carbon columns, which are covered with a nanotube mesh, from the interior part of cathode deposits have been studied by means of NMR. A comparative study is made of the 13 C NMR spectra and the magnetic susceptibility of carbon columns before and after ultrasonic processing as well as of finely dispersed material, obtained as a result of such processing, enriched with multilayer nanotubes. The strong diamagnetism of the carbon columns is apparently associated with a quite dense conglomerate of graphite particles, nanotubes, and multilayer polyhedral particles present in their core and not with the surface mesh of multilayer nanotubes. To make a more accurate determination of the character of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes, the form of the 13 C NMR spectra of samples enriched with multilayer nanotubes, where the nanotubes are either not oriented or only partially oriented, is analyzed. It is shown that the diamagnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes is highest when the magnetic field is oriented perpendicular to their axis

  13. Structure and equilibria of Ca 2+-complexes of glucose and sorbitol from multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR measurements supplemented with molecular modelling calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallagi, A.; Dudás, Cs.; Csendes, Z.; Forgó, P.; Pálinkó, I.; Sipos, P.

    2011-05-01

    Ca 2+-complexation of D-glucose and D-sorbitol have been investigated with the aid of multinuclear ( 1H, 13C and 43Ca) NMR spectroscopy and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Formation constants of the forming 1:1 complexes have been estimated from one-dimensional 13C NMR spectra obtained at constant ionic strength (1 M NaCl). Binding sites were identified from 2D 1H- 43Ca NMR spectra. 2D NMR measurements and ab initio calculations indicated that Ca 2+ ions were bound in a tridentate manner via the glycosidic OH, the ethereal oxygen in the ring and the OH on the terminal carbon for the α- and β-anomers of glucose and for sorbitol simultaneous binding of four hydroxide moieties (C1, C2, C4 and C6) was suggested.

  14. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in solid Polyethylene by NMR and EPR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assink, Roger A.; Celina, Mathias C.; Dunbar, Timothy D.; Alam, Todd M.; Clough, Roger Lee; Gillen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have shown that the hydroperoxide species in γ-irradiated 13 C-polyethylene can be directly observed by 13 C MAS NMR spectroscopy. The experiment was performed without the need for special sample preparation such as chemical derivatization or dissolution. Annealing experiments were employed to study the thermal decomposition of the hydroperoxide species and to measure an activation energy of 98 kJ/mol. EPR spectroscopy suggests that residual polyenyl and alkylperoxy radicals are predominantly trapped in interracial or crystalline regions, while the peroxy radicals observed after UV-photolysis of hydroperoxides are in amorphous regions

  15. Synthesis of [21-13C]-cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, G.M.; Gros, E.G.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of [21- 13 C]-cholesterol from 3β-O-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-17β-cyano-androst-5-ene is described. Labelled carbon-atom was introduced by Grignard reaction of nitrile derivative with [ 13 C]-methylmagnesium iodide. Location of label was confirmed by 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. (author)

  16. Optimized slice-selective 1H NMR experiments combined with highly accurate quantitative 13C NMR using an internal reference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jézéquel, Tangi; Silvestre, Virginie; Dinis, Katy; Giraudeau, Patrick; Akoka, Serge

    2018-04-01

    Isotope ratio monitoring by 13C NMR spectrometry (irm-13C NMR) provides the complete 13C intramolecular position-specific composition at natural abundance. It represents a powerful tool to track the (bio)chemical pathway which has led to the synthesis of targeted molecules, since it allows Position-specific Isotope Analysis (PSIA). Due to the very small composition range (which represents the range of variation of the isotopic composition of a given nuclei) of 13C natural abundance values (50‰), irm-13C NMR requires a 1‰ accuracy and thus highly quantitative analysis by 13C NMR. Until now, the conventional strategy to determine the position-specific abundance xi relies on the combination of irm-MS (isotopic ratio monitoring Mass Spectrometry) and 13C quantitative NMR. However this approach presents a serious drawback since it relies on two different techniques and requires to measure separately the signal of all the carbons of the analyzed compound, which is not always possible. To circumvent this constraint, we recently proposed a new methodology to perform 13C isotopic analysis using an internal reference method and relying on NMR only. The method combines a highly quantitative 1H NMR pulse sequence (named DWET) with a 13C isotopic NMR measurement. However, the recently published DWET sequence is unsuited for samples with short T1, which forms a serious limitation for irm-13C NMR experiments where a relaxing agent is added. In this context, we suggest two variants of the DWET called Multi-WET and Profiled-WET, developed and optimized to reach the same accuracy of 1‰ with a better immunity towards T1 variations. Their performance is evaluated on the determination of the 13C isotopic profile of vanillin. Both pulse sequences show a 1‰ accuracy with an increased robustness to pulse miscalibrations compared to the initial DWET method. This constitutes a major advance in the context of irm-13C NMR since it is now possible to perform isotopic analysis with high

  17. NMR spectroscopy using liquid crystal solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, JW

    2013-01-01

    NMR Spectroscopy using Liquid Crystal Solvents covers the importance of using a liquid crystal solvent in NMR to derive nuclear dipolar spin-spin coupling constants. This book is composed of ten chapters, and begins with a brief description of the features and benefits of liquid crystal in NMR spectroscopic analysis. The succeeding chapters deal with the mode of operation of nuclear spin Hamiltonian for partially oriented molecules and the analysis of NMR spectra of partially oriented molecules, as well as the determination of rigid molecule structure. These topics are followed by discussions

  18. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy links structural moieties of soil organic matter to the temperature sensitivity of its decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a huge carbon pool, specifically in boreal ecosystems. Warming-induced release of large amounts of CO2 from the soil carbon pool might become a significant exacerbating feedback to global warming, if decomposition rates of boreal soils were more sensitive to increased temperatures. Despite a large number of studies dedicated to the topic, it has proven difficult to elucidate how the organo-chemical composition of SOM influences its decomposition, or its quality as a substrate for microbial metabolism. A great part of this challenge results from our inability to achieve a detailed characterization of the complex composition of SOM on the level of molecular structural moieties. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to characterize SOM. However, SOM is a very complex mixture and the chemical shift regions distinguished in the 13C NMR spectra often represent many different molecular fragments. For example, in the carbohydrates region, signals of all monosaccharides present in many different polymers overlap. This overlap thwarts attempts to identify molecular moieties, resulting in insufficient information to characterize SOM composition. We applied two-dimensional (2D) NMR to characterize SOM with highly increased resolution. We directly dissolved finely ground litters and forest floors'fibric and humic horizons'of both coniferous and deciduous boreal forests in dimethyl sulfoxide and analyzed the resulting solution with a 2D 1H-13C NMR experiment. In the 2D planes of these spectra, signals of CH groups can be resolved based on their 13C and 1H chemical shifts, hence the resolving power and information content of these NMR spectra is hugely increased. The 2D spectra indeed resolved overlaps observed in 1D 13C spectra, so that hundreds of distinct CH groups could be observed and many molecular fragments could be identified. For instance, in the aromatics region, signals from individual lignin units could

  19. The radiation induced chemistry of uranyl cation in aqueous carbonate –bicarbonate solutions as followed by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Snow, Lanee A.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Cho, Herman M.; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-05-01

    Alpha radiation induced formation of hydrogen peroxide in carbonate ?bicarbonate media was followed by 13C NMR using dissolved [233UO2(13CO3)3]4- as the alpha source (Dalpha= 12.1 Gy/hr). Between the pH region between 5.9 and 11.6 hydrogen peroxide causes a varied speciation of the uranyl carbonates that is a function of the uranium, carbonate and the hydrogen peroxide concentrations. It is shown that the speciation of the peroxy carbonates (or other species) formed in solution by titration with hydrogen peroxide are common to those formed by hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis. The radiolysis experiment was carried out above pH = 9.96 to minimize the loss of 13CO2 over a 2800 hr period. Radiolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide was followed by formation of a uranyl peroxy carbonate complex and complex formation accelerated for about 1200 hours. Complex formation was observed to terminate at a concentration between 1x10-4 and 5x10-4 M. It is assumed that either a steady state H2O2 production rate was established in solution or that some limiting feature of the experiment was responsible for slowing the yield of product.

  20. Evolution of organic matter during composting of different organic wastes assessed by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caricasole, P.; Provenzano, M.R.; Hatcher, P.G.; Senesi, N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the evolution of organic matter (OM) during composting of different mixtures of various organic wastes was assessed by means of chemical analyses and CPMAS 13 C NMR spectroscopy measured during composting. The trends of temperatures and C/N ratios supported the correct evolution of the processes. The CPMAS 13 C NMR spectra of all composting substrates indicated a reduction in carbohydrates and an increase in aromatic, phenolic, carboxylic and carbonylic C which suggested a preference by microorganisms for easily degradable C molecules. The presence of hardly degradable pine needles in one of the substrates accounted for the lowest increase in alkyl C and the lowest reduction in carbohydrates and carboxyl C as opposite to another substrate characterized by the presence of a highly degradable material such as spent yeast from beer production, which showed the highest increase of the alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio. The highest increase of COOH deriving by the oxidative degradation of cellulose was shown by a substrate composed by about 50% of plant residues. The smallest increases in alkyl C/O-alkyl C ratio and in polysaccharides were associated to the degradation of proteins and lipids which are major components of sewage sludge. Results obtained were related to the different composition of fresh organic substrates and provided evidence of different OM evolution patterns as a function of the initial substrate composition.

  1. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  2. Unified integration intervals for the structural characterization of oil, coal or fractions there of by 1h NMR and 13c NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avella, Eliseo; Fierro, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Based on an analysis of publications reported between 1972 and 2006, it became clear that there are inaccuracies in the limits of the ranges of integration that the authors assigned to signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to the structural characterization of petroleum, coals and their derived fractions, from their hydrogen (1H NMR) and carbon (13C NMR) spectra. Consequently, consolidated limits were determined for the integration of 1H NMR spectra and 13C NMR of these samples using a statistical treatment applied to the limits of integration intervals already published. With these unified limits, correlation NMR charts were developed that are useful for the allocation of the integral at such intervals, and at smaller intervals defined in terms of the intersection between different assignments. Also raised equations needed to establish the integral attributable to specific fragments in an attempt to make a more accurate structural characterization from NMR spectra of oil, coal or fractions derived.

  3. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, and NMR spectroscopy and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando E; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Fortuna, Mario; Brandán, Silvia A

    2015-03-05

    In this work, FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to study the structural and vibrational properties of the labdane-type diterpene 13-epi-sclareol using the hybrid B3LYP method together with the 6-31G(∗) basis set. Three stable structures with minimum energy found on the potential energy curves (PES) were optimized, and the corresponding molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies and topological properties were computed at the same approximation level. The complete assignment of the bands observed in the vibrational spectrum of 13-epi-sclareol was performed taking into account the internal symmetry coordinates for the three structures using the scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology at the same level of theory. In addition, the force constants were calculated and compared with those reported in the literature for similar compounds. The predicted vibrational spectrum and the calculated (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shifts are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. The theoretical UV-Vis spectra for the most stable structure of 13-epi-sclareol demonstrate a better correlation with the corresponding experimental spectrum. The study of the three conformers by means of the theory of atoms in molecules (AIM) revealed different H bond interactions and a strong dependence of the interactions on the distance between the involved atoms. Furthermore, the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations showed the characteristics of the electronic delocalization for the two six-membered rings with chair conformations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of human muscle glycogen by natural abundance 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avison, M.J.; Rothman, D.L.; Nadel, E.; Shulman, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Natural abundance 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect signals from glycogen in the human gastrocnemius muscle. The reproducibility of the measurement was demonstrated, and the ability to detect dynamic changes was confirmed by measuring a decrease in muscle glycogen levels after exercise and its subsequent repletion. Single frequency gated 1 H decoupling was used to obtain decoupled natural abundance 13 C NMR spectra of the C-1 position of muscle glycogen

  5. Insights into reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysis revealed by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Teresa

    2010-12-01

    This tutorial review intends to show the possibilities of in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and the nature of the active sites in heterogeneous catalysis. After a brief overview of the more usual experimental devices used for in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy measurements, some examples of applications taken from the recent literature will be presented. It will be shown that in situ NMR spectroscopy allows: (i) the identification of stable intermediates and transient species using indirect methods, (ii) to prove shape selectivity in zeolites, (iii) the study of reaction kinetics, and (iv) the determination of the nature and the role played by the active sites in a catalytic reaction. The approaches and methodology used to get this information will be illustrated here summarizing the most relevant contributions on the investigation of the mechanisms of a series of reactions of industrial interest: aromatization of alkanes on bifunctional catalysts, carbonylation reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide, ethylbenzene disproportionation, and the Beckmann rearrangement reaction. Special attention is paid to the research carried out on the role played by carbenium ions and alkoxy as intermediate species in the transformation of hydrocarbon molecules on solid acid catalysts.

  6. Direct monitoring by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the metabolism and metabolic rate of 13C-labeled compounds in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, K; Hidoh, O; Fukami, J; Kajiwara, M

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to observe the transformations of [1-13C]-D-glucose to [1,1'-13C2]-D-trehalose, and [3-13C]-L-alanine to [2-13C]-L-glutamic acid in the living body of Gryllodes sigillatus. [3-13C]-D-Alanine was not metabolized. The metabolic rate of [1-13C]-D-glucose was found to be altered by prior injection of boric acid.

  7. Soil nitrogen mineralisation and organic matter composition revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy under repeated prescribed burning in eucalypt forests of south-east Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinto, D. F.; Saffigna, P. G.; Xu, Z. H.; House, A. P. N.; Perera, M. C. S.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of burning on in situ extractable nitrogen (NH + 4 -N+NO - 3 -N) and net N mineralisation following scheduled fuel reduction burns in repeatedly burnt dry and wet sclerophyll forest sites in south-east Queensland were assessed. In addition, soil organic matter composition in the wet sclerophyll site was assessed by 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The results showed that at the dry sclerophyll site, extractable N and net N mineralisation for 1 year were largely unaffected by burning, while at the wet sclerophyll site, these parameters decreased. 13 C NMR analysis of soil samples from the wet sclerophyll site revealed that there was a significant reduction in the proportion of O-alkyl (alkoxy/carbohydrate) C with increasing burning frequency. Statistically significant effects on the other chemical shift regions were not detected. The ratio of alkyl C to O-alkyl C, a proposed index of organic matter decomposition, increased with increasing burning frequency. A high ratio of alkyl C to O-alkyl C suggests low amounts of carbohydrates relative to waxes and cutins, which could in turn lead to slower mineralisation. The findings are in accord with this hypothesis. There were significant linear relationships between cumulative N mineralisation for 1 year and the proportions of alkyl C and O-alkyl C, and the ratio of alkyl C/O-alkyl C. Thus, in addition to reductions in substrate quantity (low organic C and total N for burnt soils), there was also an alteration of substrate quality as revealed by 13 C NMR spectroscopy which is reflected in low N mineralisation. Copyright (1999) CSIRO Publishing

  8. Recent Advances in Multinuclear NMR Spectroscopy for Chiral Recognition of Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio S. Silva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR is a powerful tool for the elucidation of chemical structure and chiral recognition. In the last decade, the number of probes, media, and experiments to analyze chiral environments has rapidly increased. The evaluation of chiral molecules and systems has become a routine task in almost all NMR laboratories, allowing for the determination of molecular connectivities and the construction of spatial relationships. Among the features that improve the chiral recognition abilities by NMR is the application of different nuclei. The simplicity of the multinuclear NMR spectra relative to 1H, the minimal influence of the experimental conditions, and the larger shift dispersion make these nuclei especially suitable for NMR analysis. Herein, the recent advances in multinuclear (19F, 31P, 13C, and 77Se NMR spectroscopy for chiral recognition of organic compounds are presented. The review describes new chiral derivatizing agents and chiral solvating agents used for stereodiscrimination and the assignment of the absolute configuration of small organic compounds.

  9. Structural characterization of alkyl-benzene fractions by carbon-13, hydrogen-1, NMR; Caracterizacao estrutural de fracoes de alquilbenzenos por RMN de {sup 13} C e de {sup 1} H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Jorge F. de; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Marques, Rosana G.G. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1994-12-31

    This work presents studies concerning the utilization of carbon-13, hydrogen-1, NMR as chemical analytical technique to evaluate molecular characteristics of alkyl-benzene fractions. The methodology is described, including standards solutions and their preparations, as well as the experimental techniques used. The results are presented and discussed 2 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Mechanisms of Action of (Methacrylates in Hemolytic Activity, in Vivo Toxicity and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC Liposomes Determined Using NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichiro Fujisawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the quantitative structure-activity relationships between hemolytic activity (log 1/H50 or in vivo mouse intraperitoneal (ip LD50 using reported data for α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds such as (methacrylate monomers and their 13C-NMR β-carbon chemical shift (δ. The log 1/H50 value for methacrylates was linearly correlated with the δCβ value. That for (methacrylates was linearly correlated with log P, an index of lipophilicity. The ipLD50 for (methacrylates was linearly correlated with δCβ but not with log P. For (methacrylates, the δCβ value, which is dependent on the π-electron density on the β-carbon, was linearly correlated with PM3-based theoretical parameters (chemical hardness, η; electronegativity, χ; electrophilicity, ω, whereas log P was linearly correlated with heat of formation (HF. Also, the interaction between (methacrylates and DPPC liposomes in cell membrane molecular models was investigated using 1H-NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The log 1/H50 value was related to the difference in chemical shift (ΔδHa (Ha: H (trans attached to the β-carbon between the free monomer and the DPPC liposome-bound monomer. Monomer-induced DSC phase transition properties were related to HF for monomers. NMR chemical shifts may represent a valuable parameter for investigating the biological mechanisms of action of (methacrylates.

  11. NMR strategies to study the local magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy; Kim, Younghyun; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Saih, Youssef; Wå gberg, Thomas; Luzzi, David E.; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The local magnetic properties of the one dimensional inner space of the nanotubes are investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of encapsulated fullerene molecules inside single walled carbon nanotubes. Isotope engineering and magnetically purified nanotubes have been advantageously used on our study to discriminate between the different diamagnetic and paramagnetic shifts of the resonances. Ring currents originating from the π electrons circulating on the nanotube, are found to actively screen the applied magnetic field by -36.9 ppm. Defects and holes in the nanotube walls cancel this screening locally. What is interesting, that at high magnetic fields, the modifications of the NMR resonances of the molecules from free to encapsulated can be exploited to determine some structural characteristics of the surrounding nanotubes, never observed experimentally. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. NMR strategies to study the local magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2012-02-01

    The local magnetic properties of the one dimensional inner space of the nanotubes are investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of encapsulated fullerene molecules inside single walled carbon nanotubes. Isotope engineering and magnetically purified nanotubes have been advantageously used on our study to discriminate between the different diamagnetic and paramagnetic shifts of the resonances. Ring currents originating from the π electrons circulating on the nanotube, are found to actively screen the applied magnetic field by -36.9 ppm. Defects and holes in the nanotube walls cancel this screening locally. What is interesting, that at high magnetic fields, the modifications of the NMR resonances of the molecules from free to encapsulated can be exploited to determine some structural characteristics of the surrounding nanotubes, never observed experimentally. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH Mixtures Using Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy and Adsorption by Powdered Activated Carbon and Biochar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong An

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in air and water sources is a key part of environmental chemistry research, since most PAHs are well known to be associated with negative health impacts on humans. This study explores an approach for analyzing PAH mixtures with advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopic techniques including high-resolution one-dimensional (1D NMR spectroscopy and diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY NMR. With this method, different kinds of PAHs can be detected and differentiated from a mixture with high resolution. The adsorption process of PAH mixtures by PAC and biochar was studied to understand the mechanism and assess the method.

  14. Carbon-13 composition of bulk dry wines by irm-EA/MS and irm-13C NMR: An indicator of vine water status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon Francois

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements performed on a set of 32 authentic wines (not submitted to any oenological treatment and their ethanol, recovered by distillation, show high correlation between δ13C of bulk wine and its ethanol. These measurements were performed by isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyzer (irm-EA/MS. Then a series of wines produced by vines of which water status was assessed during the growing season with predawn leaf water potential measurements, was studied by irm-EA/MS. As expected δ13C is correlated to vine water status conditions, as a result of stomatal closure. The ethanol of these specific wines was also analyzed by isotope ratio monitoring and by nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-13C NMR to determine carbon-13 composition on the two specific sites of the ethanol skeleton. If these measurements confirm the correlation between 13C composition and vine growth conditions, the 13C stereospecific information does not make vine water status assessment more precise.

  15. Structural study of ethyl 3-methyl-9-oxo-3-azabicyclo63.3.19nonane-1-carboxylate by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Pérez, M. S.; Alejo, A.; Gálvez, E.; Pérez, S. M.; Santos, M. J.

    1995-04-01

    Ethyl 3-methyl-9-oxo-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-1-carboxylate has been studied by 1H, 13C and 2D NMR spectroscopy in order to establish its conformational behaviour. The combined use of COSY and 1H- 13C correlation spectra helped in the unambiguous and complete assignment of the bicyclic carbon and proton resonances. It is found that the piperidone ring displays a slightly fattened chair conformation with the N-methyl group in the equatorial position, while a twist-chair form seems to be favoured for the cyclohexanone one. Two preferred orientations migth be proposed for the ethoxycarbonyl moiety.

  16. Methyl labeling and TROSY NMR spectroscopy of proteins expressed in the eukaryote Pichia pastoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Lindsay; Zahm, Jacob A.; Ali, Rustam; Kukula, Maciej; Bian, Liangqiao; Patrie, Steven M.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Rosen, Michael K.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    13 C Methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for studying the dynamics of large systems such as macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins. Specific 13 C labeling of aliphatic methyl groups and perdeuteration has been limited primarily to proteins expressed in E. coli, preventing studies of many eukaryotic proteins of physiological and biomedical significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of efficient 13 C isoleucine δ1-methyl labeling in a deuterated background in an established eukaryotic expression host, Pichia pastoris, and show that this method can be used to label the eukaryotic protein actin, which cannot be expressed in bacteria. This approach will enable NMR studies of previously intractable targets

  17. Conformational analysis of 9,10-dihydroanthracenes. Molecular mechanics calculations and /sup 13/C NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabideau, P.W.; Mooney, J.L.; Lipkowitz, K.B.

    1986-12-24

    The conformational analyses of 9, 10-dihydroanthracene and several of its methylated and ethylated derivatives are studied by empirical force field calculations (MM2 and MMPI). The computational results are considered in light of previous and current carbon NMR data. Model compounds are examined which involve fixed, planar, and boat-shaped conformations about the central ring, and these /sup 13/C NMR data are then compared with flexible systems. It is concluded that carbon chemical shifts and carbon-hydrogen coupling constants are consistent with the results of molecular mechanics calculations which indicate a greater tendency for planarity around the central ring than previously considered.

  18. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saether, Oddbjoern

    2005-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  19. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saether, Oddbjoern

    2005-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  20. 13C-NMR assignment, structure, and dynamics of deoxyoligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanatta, N.; Borer, P.N.; Levy, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    The unique spectral properties of 13 C-NMR for studying nucleic acids and some of the important features of 13 C-NMR in oligonucleotide studies are demostrated. The main difficulty in studying oligonucleotides by 13 C-NMR and recent improvements in NMR instrumentation and advances in oligonucleotide synthesis are presented. The high resolution 13 C-NMR spectra, T 1 relaxation times and NOEs were measured for duplex of the self-complementary oligo-DNAs: d(CG) 3 and d(GGTATACC) are studied. The target of this study is to developed a systematic 13 C-NMR spectral assignment and to investigate the structure and dynamics of these two sequences by this techniques. (M.J.C.) [pt

  1. Moessbauer and NMR study of novel Tin(IV)-lactames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmann, Erno; Szalay, Roland; Homonnay, Zoltan, E-mail: homonnay@ludens.elte.hu; Nagy, Sandor [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)

    2012-03-15

    N-tributylstannylated 2-pyrrolidinone was reacted with tributyltin triflate in different molar ratios and the complex formation monitored using {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR and {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy. Comparing the carbon NMR and tin Moessbauer results, a reaction scheme is suggested for the complexation which assumes the formation of a simultaneously O- and N-tributylstannylated pyrrolidinone cation. The formation of the only O-stannylated pyrrolidinone is also assumed to account for the non-constant Moessbauer parameters of the two tin environments in the distannylated pyrrolidinone cation when the ratio of tributyltin triflate is increased in the reaction.

  2. Retrobiosynthetic NMR studies with 13C-labeled glucose. Formation of gallic acid in plants and fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, I.; Bacher, A.; Eisenreich, W.

    1997-01-01

    The biosynthesis of gallic acid was studied in cultures of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus and in leaves of the tree Rhus typhina. Fungal cultures were grown with [1-13C]glucose or with a mixture of unlabeled glucose and [U-13C6]glucose. Young leaves of R. typhina were kept in an incubation chamber and were supplied with a solution containing a mixture of unlabeled glucose and [U-13C6]glucose via the leaf stem. Isotope distributions in isolated gallic acid and aromatic amino acids were analyzed by one-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. A quantitative analysis of the complex isotopomer composition of metabolites was obtained by deconvolution of the 13C13C coupling multiplets using numerical simulation methods. This approach required the accurate analysis of heavy isotope chemical shift effects in a variety of different isotopomers and the analysis of long range 13C13C coupling constants. The resulting isotopomer patterns were interpreted using a retrobiosynthetic approach based on a comparison between the isotopomer patterns of gallic acid and tyrosine. The data show that both in the fungus and in the plant all carbon atoms of gallic acid are biosynthetically equivalent to carbon atoms of shikimate. Notably, the carboxylic group of gallic acid is derived from the carboxylic group of an early intermediate of the shikimate pathway and not from the side chain of phenylalanine or tyrosine. It follows that the committed precursor of gallic acid is an intermediate of the shikimate pathway prior to prephenate or arogenate, most probably 5-dehydroshikimate. A formation of gallic acid via phenylalanine, the lignin precursor, caffeic acid, or 3,4, 5-trihydroxycinnamic acid can be ruled out as major pathways in the fungus and in young leaves of R. typhina. The incorporation of uniformly 13C-labeled glucose followed by quantitative NMR analysis of isotopomer patterns is suggested as a general method for biosynthetic studies. As shown by the plant experiment, this

  3. 1H NMR spectroscopy-based interventional metabolic phenotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Michael B; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2010-01-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolic phenotyping was used to identify biomarkers in the plasma of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Forty-seven patients with RA (23 with active disease at baseline and 24 in remission) and 51 healthy subjects were evaluated during a one-year follow-up with a......1H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolic phenotyping was used to identify biomarkers in the plasma of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Forty-seven patients with RA (23 with active disease at baseline and 24 in remission) and 51 healthy subjects were evaluated during a one-year follow......-up with assessments of disease activity (DAS-28) and 1H NMR spectroscopy of plasma samples. Discriminant analysis provided evidence that the metabolic profiles predicted disease severity. Cholesterol, lactate, acetylated glycoprotein, and lipid signatures were found to be candidate biomarkers for disease severity.......0007). However, after 31 days of optimized therapy, the two patient groups were not significantly different (P=0.91). The metabolic profiles of both groups of RA patients were different from the healthy subjects. 1H NMR-based metabolic phenotyping of plasma samples in patients with RA is well suited...

  4. Quality of spelt pasta enriched with eggs and identification of eggs using 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Jelena S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the characteristics of spelt pasta enriched with eggs. Eggs were added to spelt farina in the quantity of 0, 124 or 248 g/kg (equivalent to 0, 3 or 6 eggs, respectively. Post-hoc Tukey’s HSD test at 95% confidence limit showed significant differences between various samples. Relatively low coefficients of variation have been obtained for each applied assay (1.25-12.42%, which confirmed the high accuracy measurements and statistically significant results. Standard score analysis is applied for accessing the contribution of eggs content to spelt pasta quality. Maximum scores regarding quality (0.89 and chemical characteristics (0.70, have been obtained for 6 eggs spelt pasta formulation. It is also shown that the presence of eggs in pasta can be clearly confirmed by 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy. Simultaneous increase in area of peak positioned at 29.5 and 176 ppm is directly associated with the increase in the content of added eggs in the corresponding samples. Pertinent data point at positive contribution of eggs to the spelt pasta and also that NMR spectrum can be used in the egg quantity control. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TRI 46005 i br. TR 31029

  5. Configurations and conformations in acyclic, unsaturated hydrocarbons. A 13C NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de J.W.; Ven, van de L.J.M.

    1973-01-01

    13C NMR (CMR) spectra of a number of di- and trisubstituted ethylenes have been measured. Very consistent values are found for the differential shieldings of allylic carbons in a number of linear, (Z)- and (E)-disubstituted ethylenes. The discrepancies between the several structural elements are

  6. Stereochemistry of 16a-Hydroxyfriedelin and 3-Oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene Established by 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Fernandes Knupp

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Friedelin (1, 3b-friedelinol (2, 28-hydroxyfriedelin (3, 16a-hydroxyfriedelin (4, 30-hydroxyfriedelin (5 and 16a,28-dihydroxyfriedelin (6 were isolated through fractionation of the hexane extract obtained from branches of Salacia elliptica. After a week in CDCl3 solution, 16a-hydroxyfriedelin (4 reacted turning into 3-oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene (7. This is the first report of a dehydration followed by a Nametkin rearrangement of a pentacyclic triterpene in CDCl3 solution occurring in the NMR tube. These seven pentacyclic triterpenes was identified through NMR spectroscopy and the stereochemistry of compound 4 and 7 was established by 2D NMR (NOESY spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (GC-MS. It is also the first time that all the 13C-NMR and 2D NMR spectral data are reported for compounds 4 and 7.

  7. Hydrothermal liquefaction oil and hydrotreated product from pine feedstock characterized by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  8. Comparison of 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy for estimating humification and aromatization of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K.; Cooper, W. T.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Verbeke, B. A.; Chanton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Solid state direct polarization 13C NMR spectroscopy (DP-NMR) is generally considered the most quantitatively reliable method for soil organic matter (SOM) characterization, including determination of the relative abundances of carbon functional groups. These functional abundances can then be used to calculate important soil parameters such as degree of humification and extent of aromaticity that reveal differences in reactivity or compositional changes along gradients (e.g. thaw chronosequence in permafrost). Unfortunately, the 13C NMR DP-NMR experiment is time-consuming, with a single sample often requiring over 24 hours of instrument time. Alternatively, solid state cross polarization 13C NMR (CP-NMR) can circumvent this problem, reducing analyses times to 4-6 hours but with some loss of quantitative reliability. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is a quick and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing solid materials, and has been suggested as an alternative to NMR for analysis of soil organic matter and determination of humification (HI) and aromatization (AI) indices. However, the quantitative reliability of ATR-FTIR for SOM analyses has never been verified, nor have any ATR-FTIR data been compared to similar measurements by NMR. In this work we focused on FTIR vibrational bands that correspond to the three functional groups used to calculate HI and AI values: carbohydrates (1030 cm-1), aromatics (1510, 1630 cm-1), and aliphatics (2850, 2920 cm-1). Data from ATR-FTIR measurements were compared to analogous quantitation by DP- and CP-NMR using peat samples from Sweden, Minnesota, and North Carolina. DP- and CP-NMR correlate very strongly, although the correlations are not always 1:1. Direct comparison of relative abundances of the three functional groups determined by NMR and ATR-FTIR yielded satisfactory results for carbohydrates (r2= 0.78) and aliphatics (r2=0.58), but less so for aromatics (r2= 0

  9. Mössbauer and NMR study of novel Tin(IV)-lactames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmann, Erno; Szalay, Roland; Homonnay, Zoltan; Nagy, Sandor

    2012-01-01

    N-tributylstannylated 2-pyrrolidinone was reacted with tributyltin triflate in different molar ratios and the complex formation monitored using 1 H-NMR, 13 C-NMR and 119 Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. Comparing the carbon NMR and tin Mössbauer results, a reaction scheme is suggested for the complexation which assumes the formation of a simultaneously O- and N-tributylstannylated pyrrolidinone cation. The formation of the only O-stannylated pyrrolidinone is also assumed to account for the non-constant Mössbauer parameters of the two tin environments in the distannylated pyrrolidinone cation when the ratio of tributyltin triflate is increased in the reaction.

  10. Total assignment of 1 H and 13 C NMR of Cordiachrome C, a terpenoid benzoquinone from Cordia trichotoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, Jane Eire; Pessoa, Otilia Deusdenia Loiola; Lemos, Tlema Leda Gomes de; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Braz Filho, Raimundo

    1999-01-01

    1 D and 2 D NMR techniques were applied for establishing of the complete assignment of hydrogen and carbon-13 NMR of cordiachrome C. Th results were also used to confirm 1 H NMR data already published, as well as to define the relative stereochemistry, which has not been completely established for cordiachrome C, previously isolated from C. millenii

  11. Assessing raw materials for carbon black production using 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekarek, V.; Meic, Z.

    1980-01-01

    1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy in combination with elemental analysis and/or infrared spetroscopy were used in evaluating raw materials for the preparation of carbon black. Three models and seven industrial mixtures were analysed. The evaluation of experimental results by the Brown-Ladner method yielded information on the basic chemical characteristics of the raw material, ie., the contents of carbon and other elements, the contents of aromatic and aliphatic components and the nature of the aromatic compounds present. The obtained results are in good agreement with theoretical results for the model mixtures and with results of gas chromatography for the industrial mixtures

  12. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  13. PSYCHE Pure Shift NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Morris, Gareth; Nilsson, Mathias

    2018-03-13

    Broadband homodecoupling techniques in NMR, also known as "pure shift" methods, aim to enhance spectral resolution by suppressing the effects of homonuclear coupling interactions to turn multiplet signals into singlets. Such techniques typically work by selecting a subset of "active" nuclear spins to observe, and selectively inverting the remaining, "passive", spins to reverse the effects of coupling. Pure Shift Yielded by Chirp Excitation (PSYCHE) is one such method; it is relatively recent, but has already been successfully implemented in a range of different NMR experiments. Paradoxically, PSYCHE is one of the trickiest of pure shift NMR techniques to understand but one of the easiest to use. Here we offer some insights into theoretical and practical aspects of the method, and into the effects and importance of the experimental parameters. Some recent improvements that enhance the spectral purity of PSYCHE spectra will be presented, and some experimental frameworks including examples in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, for the implementation of PSYCHE will be introduced. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Identifying inter-residue resonances in crowded 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra of membrane proteins by solid-state MAS NMR difference spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao Yimin; Cross, Timothy A. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fu Riqiang, E-mail: rfu@magnet.fsu.edu [National High Magnet Field Lab (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The feasibility of using difference spectroscopy, i.e. subtraction of two correlation spectra at different mixing times, for substantially enhanced resolution in crowded two-dimensional {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C chemical shift correlation spectra is presented. With the analyses of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin diffusion in simple spin systems, difference spectroscopy is proposed to partially separate the spin diffusion resonances of relatively short intra-residue distances from the longer inter-residue distances, leading to a better identification of the inter-residue resonances. Here solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra of the full length M2 protein embedded in synthetic lipid bilayers have been used to illustrate the resolution enhancement in the difference spectra. The integral membrane M2 protein of Influenza A virus assembles as a tetrameric bundle to form a proton-conducting channel that is activated by low pH and is essential for the viral lifecycle. Based on known amino acid resonance assignments from amino acid specific labeled samples of truncated M2 sequences or from time-consuming 3D experiments of uniformly labeled samples, some inter-residue resonances of the full length M2 protein can be identified in the difference spectra of uniformly {sup 13}C labeled protein that are consistent with the high resolution structure of the M2 (22-62) protein (Sharma et al., Science 330(6003):509-512, 2010)

  15. Characterization of oil shale, isolated kerogen, and post-pyrolysis residues using advanced 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Birdwell, Justin E.; Chappell, Mark A.; Li, Yuan; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Mao, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of oil shale kerogen and organic residues remaining in postpyrolysis spent shale is critical to the understanding of the oil generation process and approaches to dealing with issues related to spent shale. The chemical structure of organic matter in raw oil shale and spent shale samples was examined in this study using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Oil shale was collected from Mahogany zone outcrops in the Piceance Basin. Five samples were analyzed: (1) raw oil shale, (2) isolated kerogen, (3) oil shale extracted with chloroform, (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C to mimic surface retorting, and (5) oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C to simulate in-situ retorting. The NMR methods applied included quantitative direct polarization with magic-angle spinning at 13 kHz, cross polarization with total sideband suppression, dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy filtering, and 1H-13C long-range recoupled dipolar dephasing. The NMR results showed that, relative to the raw oil shale, (1) bitumen extraction and kerogen isolation by demineralization removed some oxygen-containing and alkyl moieties; (2) unpyrolyzed samples had low aromatic condensation; (3) oil shale pyrolysis removed aliphatic moieties, leaving behind residues enriched in aromatic carbon; and (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C contained larger aromatic clusters and more protonated aromatic moieties than oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C, which contained more total aromatic carbon with a wide range of cluster sizes.

  16. 31-P NMR spectroscopy in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiricuta, I.C.; Schmitt, W.G.H.; Beyer, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results suggest 31-P NMR spectroscopy to allow a discrimination between good and bad blood supply to the tumour owing to different metabolic behaviour and to furnish important information on tumour response to radiotherapy just a few hours after the application of a relatively low dose. Spectroscopy showed the radiation-sensitive tumour cells to behave relatively uniformly after radiotherapy suggesting this behaviour to be interpreted as therapeutical effectiveness. (orig./SHA) [de

  17. Determination of the Nucleic Acid Adducts Structure at the Nucleoside/Nucleotide Level by NMR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Pohl, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2015), s. 155-165 ISSN 0893-228X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * nucleic acids * nucleotides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.025, year: 2015

  18. Studies on /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrates. Application of selective deuteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Kenji; Kajita, Hitomi; Tashima, Takako; Tanaka, Osamu (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    Recently, Stuart et al. have reported that on heating with deuterated Raney nickel in D/sub 2/O, hexopyranosides and oligosaccharides were deuterated selectively at carbon atoms bound to a free hydroxyl group. For the application of this procedure to chemistry and biochemistry of more complex carbohydrates, further study on this reaction was conducted. On prolonged treatment with Raney nickel (24h), methyl ..cap alpha..-L-arabinopyranoside (4) and ..beta..-D-xylopyranoside (5) were partially epimerized to give (5) and methyl ..cap alpha..-L-lyxopyranoside (6) from (4), and methyl ..beta..-D-ribopyranoside (7) and (4) from (5), respectively. Methyl ..cap alpha..-L-rhamnopyranoside (8) was epimerized more slowly to yield methyl 6-deoxy-..cap alpha..-L-glucopyranoside (9). The best conditions for the deuteration under minimizing the epimerization was refluxing with W-7 type deuterated Raney nickel in D/sub 2/O-dioxane (1 : 1) or methanol-d/sub 4/-D/sub 2/O (1 : 1) for about 9h. Methyl ..beta..-sophoroside (13), methyl ..beta..-cellobioside (23) and ..beta..-sophorosyl and ..beta..-gentiobiosyl units of ginsenoside-Rb/sub 1/ (24), a Ginseng-saponin, were deuterated as expected under these conditions, while C-2 and 4 of the inner ..beta..-glucopyranosyl moiety of methyl ..beta..-laminaribioside (18) and C-4 of the inner ..beta..-glucopyranosyl moiety of methyl 2,3-di-O-..beta..-D-glucopyranosyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside (22) remained almost undeuterated. Deuteration of ..cap alpha..-1,6-glucan (25) proceeded rather slowly than those of mono- and oligosaccharide to obtain the expected deuteration after treatment for 24h. In the case of the deuteration of cis- and dl-trans-1, 2-cyclohexanediols (11) and ( (12), both deuteration and epimerization proceeded very fast to give an equilibrated mixture of (11-d/sub 2/) and (12-d/sub 2/) within 9h, while the isolated carbinyl carbon (C-12) of (24) was not deuterated. Further, by means of the above selective deuteration, /sup 13

  19. 129 Xe-NMR of carbon black filled elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling-Ischinsky, K.; Veeman, W.S.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that 129 Xe-NMR is a powerful tool to investigate carbon black and carbon black filled elastomers. For the carbon black material itself the 129 Xe chemical shift of xenon adsorbed at the surface of carbon black aggregates yields information about the relative average pore size of the carbon black aggregates. The experimental 129 Xe-NMR results of carbon black filled ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) can be explained when it is assumed that the xenon atoms in the bound EPDM fraction exchange rapidly on the NMR time scale between a state where they are adsorbed on the carbon black surface and a state in which they are absorbed in the EPDM layer. This would imply that the carbon black aggregates are not completely covered with EPDM chains. (author)

  20. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of physiological fluids: from metabolism to physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vion-Dury, J.; Nicoli, F.; Torri, G.; Torri, J.; Kriat, M.; Sciaky, M.; Davin, A.; Viout, P.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Cozzone, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution NMR spectroscopy of physiological fluids provides quantitative, qualitative and dynamic information on the metabolic status of the interstitial and plasma compartments under a variety of pathophysiological conditions. The simultaneous detection and quantitation by NMR spectroscopy of numerous compounds of the intermediary metabolism offers a new insight in the understanding of the 'milieu interieur'.NMR spectroscopy of physiological fluids offers a unique way to define and monitor the global metabolic homeostasis in humans. The development of this analytical approach is still limited by the scarcity of pluridisciplinary teams able to fully exploit the wealth of information present on the NMR spectrum of a fluid. While application in pharmacology and toxicology is already established, the main areas of current development are cancer, hereditary metabolic disorders, organ transplantation and neurological diseases

  1. Continuous Flow 1H and 13C NMR Spectroscopy in Microfluidic Stripline NMR Chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosthoek-de Vries, Anna Jo; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, Johannes W.G.; van Bentum, Jan (P.J.M.); Gardeniers, Han J.G.E.; Kentgens, Arno P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic stripline NMR technology not only allows for NMR experiments to be performed on small sample volumes in the submicroliter range, but also experiments can easily be performed in continuous flow because of the stripline's favorable geometry. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of

  2. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaiswal, D.K.; Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G.

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by 1 H and 3 H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T 2 O, CH 3 COOT or CF 3 COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs

  3. Use of 13NMR to delineate the mode of association or binding of 13C-labeled pollutants with humic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortiatynski, J.M.; Minard, R.D.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    13 C NMR has recently been shown to be a powerful technique for the examination of the covalent binding of pollutants to humic materials when the latter are enriched with 13 C. Enhanced signals are observed for the carbons that are highly enriched with 13 C while the remaining signals due to naturally abundant 13 C form unlabeled pollutant carbons or humic substances are at the baseline noise level. If covalent bonding and/or non covalent associations take place at or near the site of the 13 C label(s), the nature of the bonding or association can be discerned and the adsorption coefficients can be calculated. In this paper, the authors present the results of such binding studies which demonstrate the great potential of this technique

  4. Synthesis of carbon-13 and carbon-14 labeled paldimycin tri-sodium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Witz, D.F.; Visser, J.; Stolle, W.T.; Ditto, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled paldimycin trisodium salt was prepared by addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine to [ 14 C]paulomycin, the radioactive antibiotic produced by fermentation of Streptomyces paulus in the presence of L-methionine labeled with carbon-14 in the S-methyl group. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of paulomycin produced when the fermentation was carried out in the presence of L-[S-methyl- 13 C]methionine showed that the isotope incorporation had occurred specifically at the methoxy group of ring C, i.e., the 2-deoxy sugar portion of paulomycin. With sustained slow feed of labeled precursors during the optimum antibiotic production period, carbon-14 isotope yields of up to 17.5% with specific activity of up to 11.4 μCi per milligram of paulomycin, and carbon-13 isotope yields of up to 24% with 17-fold isotope enrichment over natural abundance, were achieved. (author)

  5. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas; Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy; Selenko, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from 31P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M. J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-01

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and 31P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse 31P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO43-ν1 bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3-10.3 wt% CO32- range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the 31P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν1 band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalbot, Marie-Cecile G.; Kavouras, Ilias G.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole. - Highlights: • Organic aerosol composition by 1 H- and 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. • NMR fingerprints of specific sources, types and sizes of organic aerosol. • Source reconciliation and apportionment using NMR spectroscopy. • Research priorities towards understanding organic aerosol composition and origin. - This review presents the recent advances on the characterization of organic aerosol composition using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  8. Acid-base equilibrium in aqueous solutions of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid as studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryff-Keller, A.; Kraska-Dziadecka, A.

    2011-12-01

    13C NMR spectra of 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid in aqueous solutions of various acidities and for various solute concentrations have been recorded and interpreted. The spectra recorded at pH = 2 and below contain the signals of the neutral solute molecule exclusively, while the ones recorded at pH = 7 and above only the signals of the appropriate anion, which has been confirmed by theoretical GIAO-DFT calculations. The signals in the spectra recorded for solutions of pH pH variation have been observed for the parent barbituric acid.

  9. Investigating the Hydrolysis Reactions of a Chemical Warfare Agent Surrogate. A Systematic Study using 1H, 13C, 17O, 19F, 31P, and 35Cl NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, Brendan W. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-07-24

    During the summer of 2015, I participated in the DHS HS-STEM fellowship at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL, NM) under the supervision of Dr. Todd M. Alam in his Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy research group. While with the group, my main project involved pursing various hydrolysis reactions with Diethyl Chlorophosphate (DECP), a surrogate for the agent Sarin (GB). Specifically, I performed different hydrolysis reactions, monitored and tracked the different phosphorous containing species using phosphorous (31P) NMR spectroscopy. With the data collected, I performed kinetics studies mapping the rates of DECP hydrolysis. I also used the NMR of different nuclei such as 1H, 13C, 17O, and 35Cl to help understand the complexity of the reactions that take place. Finally, my last task at SNL was to work with Insensitive Nuclei Enhanced by Polarization Transfer (INEPT) NMR Spectroscopy optimizing conditions for 19F- 31P filtering NMR experiments.

  10. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). (authors)

  11. Direct 13C NMR Detection in HPLC Hyphenation Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Johansen, Kenneth; Nyberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Solid phase extraction (SPE) was introduced as a crucial step in the HPLC-SPE-NMR technique to enable online analyte enrichment from which proton-detected NMR experiments on submicrogram amounts from complex mixtures were possible. However, the significance of direct-detected (13)C NMR experiments...... application of HPLC-SPE-NMR analysis using direct-detected (13)C NMR spectra. HPLC column loading, accumulative SPE trappings, and the effect of different elution solvents were evaluated and optimized. A column loading of approximately 600 mug of a prefractionated triterpenoid mixture, six trappings...

  12. 13C NMR spectra and bonding situation of the B-C bond in alkynylboranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Moritani, Ichiro

    1975-01-01

    13 C NMR spectra of boron substituted alkynes reveal that the β-carbon is deshielded by ca. 21 ppm by a B(O-n-C 4 H 9 ) 2 group. This clearly indicates the presence of a B-C π-bonding in alkynylboranes. (auth.)

  13. NATURAL CYCLOPENTANOID CYANOHYDRIN GLYCOSIDES .13. STRUCTURE DETERMINATION OF NATURAL EPOXYCYCLOPENTANES BY X-RAY CRYSTALLOGRAPHY AND NMR-SPECTROSCOPY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olafsdottir, E. S.; Sorensen, A. M.; Cornett, Claus

    1991-01-01

    nonannellated cyclopentane derivatives. The new glucosides were shown, by NMR spectroscopy (including NOE measurements), X-ray crystallography, and enzymatic hydrolysis to the corresponding cyanohydrins, to be (1R,2R,3R,4R)- and (1S,2S,3S,4S)-1-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-2,3-epoxy-4-hydroxycyclopenta ne-1...

  14. TG/DTG, FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy Study of Heavy Fuel Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-11-12

    There is an increasing interest in the comprehensive study of heavy fuel oil (HFO) due to its growing use in furnaces, boilers, marines, and recently in gas turbines. In this work, the thermal combustion characteristics and chemical composition of HFO were investigated using a range of techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to study the nonisothermal HFO combustion behavior. Chemical characterization of HFO was accomplished using various standard methods in addition to direct infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APCI-FTICR MS), high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy. By analyzing thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) results, three different reaction regions were identified in the combustion of HFO with air, specifically, low temperature oxidation region (LTO), fuel deposition (FD), and high temperature oxidation (HTO) region. At the high end of the LTO region, a mass transfer resistance (skin effect) was evident. Kinetic analysis in LTO and HTO regions was conducted using two different kinetic models to calculate the apparent activation energy. In both models, HTO activation energies are higher than those for LTO. The FT-ICR MS technique resolved thousands of aromatic and sulfur containing compounds in the HFO sample and provided compositional details for individual molecules of three major class species. The major classes of compounds included species with one sulfur atom (S1), with two sulfur atoms (S2), and purely hydrocarbons (HC). The DBE (double bond equivalent) abundance plots established for S1 and HC provided additional information on their distributions in the HFO sample. The 1H NMR and 13C NMR results revealed that nearly 59% of the 1H nuclei were distributed as paraffinic CH2 and 5% were in aromatic groups. Nearly 21% of 13C nuclei were

  15. Enantiodiscrimination of flexible cyclic solutes using NMR spectroscopy in polypeptide chiral mesophases: investigation of cis-decalin and THF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroulanda, Christie; Lafon, Olivier; Lesot, Philippe

    2009-08-06

    The conformational dynamics and orientational behavior of two model cyclic molecules, cis-decalin (cis-dec) and tetrahydrofurane (THF), dissolved in weakly ordering, polypeptidic chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) are theoretically discussed and experimentally investigated using deuterium and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopies. The analysis of enantiomeric and enantiotopic discriminations in these compounds is shown to depend on the rate of conformational exchange regime, slow or fast. The slow exchange regime is illustrated through the case of cis-dec at low temperature (243 K). We show that the deuterium NMR spectra in this regime can be qualitatively and quantitatively interpreted by restricting the conformational pathway of cis-dec to two enantiomeric conformers of C(2)-symmetry. The orientational order parameters of these interconverting enantiomers are calculated by matching the (2)H quadrupolar splittings with calculated conformer structures. The fast exchange regime is investigated through the examples of cis-dec at high temperature (356 K) and THF at room temperature (300 K). The (2)H NMR spectra above the coalescence temperature are analyzed by introducing the concept of "average molecular structure". This fictitious structure allows easily identifying NMR equivalences of solutes dissolved in CLC. However, it cannot be applied to determine consistent orientational order parameters. This study emphasizes that enantiotopic discriminations observed for flexible molecules in the fast exchange regime can be quantitatively interpreted only by considering the orientational order of each conformer.

  16. Noninvasive brain metabolism measurement using carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 13}C-MRS); Tanso 13 jiki kyomei spectroscopy ({sup 13}C-MRS) ni yoru mushinshuteki notaisha keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Tsukada, Y. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-10

    Carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 13}C-MRS) and research and development efforts for brain metabolism measurement are described. Brain metabolism is a process characterized in that it not only extracts energy by disintegrating grape sugar that is the practically sole source of energy into H2O, CO2, etc., but also vigorously synthesizes amino acids that perform important functions in neural transmission, such as glutamic acid, glutamine, and {gamma}-amino acid. MRS is a technique that utilizes the magnetic resonance, which is generated when an atomic nucleus with a spin is placed in a magnetic field, for the isolation and identification of chemicals in a living body through examining the delicate difference in the magnetic resonance frequencies of the nuclei under observation. Since the signals from {sup 13}C are low in intensity as compared with those from other nuclides, a method was contrived around 1980, which observes {sup 1}H combined with {sup 13}C in grape sugar and amino acids, named the HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence) method. The author et al., combining gradient magnetic pulses with HSQC, actually measure Homo sapiens brain metabolism using {sup 13}C-MRS, and now believe that the technology will be put to practical application. 7 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The structure of poly(carbonsuboxide) on the atomic scale: a solid-state NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn; Beck, Johannes; Hoffbauer, Wilfried; Krieger-Beck, Petra

    2005-07-18

    In this contribution we present a study of the structure of amorphous poly(carbonsuboxide) (C3O2)x by 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy supported by infrared spectroscopy and chemical analysis. Poly(carbonsuboxide) was obtained by polymerization of carbonsuboxide C3O2, which in turn was synthesized from malonic acid bis(trimethylsilylester). Two different 13C labeling schemes were applied to probe inter- and intramonomeric bonds in the polymer by dipolar solid-state NMR methods and also to allow quantitative 13C MAS NMR spectra. Four types of carbon environments can be distinguished in the NMR spectra. Double-quantum and triple-quantum 2D correlation experiments were used to assign the observed peaks using the through-space and through-bond dipolar coupling. In order to obtain distance constraints for the intermonomeric bonds, double-quantum constant-time experiments were performed. In these experiments an additional filter step was applied to suppress contributions from not directly bonded 13C,13C spin pairs. The 13C NMR intensities, chemical shifts, connectivities and distances gave constraints for both the polymerization mechanism and the short-range order of the polymer. The experimental results were complemented by bond lengths predicted by density functional theory methods for several previously suggested models. Based on the presented evidence we can unambiguously exclude models based on gamma-pyronic units and support models based on alpha-pyronic units. The possibility of planar ladder- and bracelet-like alpha-pyronic structures is discussed.

  18. Temperature-induced transitions in disordered proteins probed by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are abundant in nature and perform many important physiological functions. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has been crucial for the understanding of the conformational properties of disordered proteins and is increasingly used to probe their conformational...... ensembles. Compared to folded proteins, disordered proteins are more malleable and more easily perturbed by environmental factors. Accordingly, the experimental conditions and especially the temperature modify the structural and functional properties of disordered proteins. NMR spectroscopy allows analysis...... of temperature-induced structural changes at residue resolution using secondary chemical shift analysis, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, and residual dipolar couplings. This chapter discusses practical aspects of NMR studies of temperature-induced structural changes in disordered proteins....

  19. Microstructure study of ethylene, propylene and 1-decene terpolymers by 13C-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Marcio; Escher, Fernanda Nunes; Galland, Griselda Barrera

    2001-01-01

    Terpolymers of ethylene-propylene-1-decene with different composition of monomers were obtained using the metallocenes catalyst rac-EtInd 2 ZrCl 2 . The complete 13 C-NMR characterization of these terpolymers was done qualitatively and quantitatively. Chemical shifts, carbon assignments and corresponding integrals for each triad sequence are presented. (author)

  20. Applications of NMR spectroscopy to xenobiotic metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent years have seen high field NMR spectrometers become commonplace in research laboratories. At the same time, major advances in methodology for structural analysis have occurred, particularly notable among these being the development of two-dimensional spectroscopic techniques. Many applications have been made of NMR spectroscopy in the study of xenobiotic metabolic processes. This deals with two specific applications which have been made in the author's laboratory and involve mechanistic studies of the reactions of the carcinogens ethylene dibromide and aflatoxin with DNA

  1. Total assignment of {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C NMR of Cordiachrome C, a terpenoid benzoquinone from Cordia trichotoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alencar, Jane Eire; Pessoa, Otilia Deusdenia Loiola; Lemos, Tlema Leda Gomes de; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Braz Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais

    1999-05-01

    1 D and 2 D NMR techniques were applied for establishing of the complete assignment of hydrogen and carbon-13 NMR of cordiachrome C. Th results were also used to confirm {sup 1} H NMR data already published, as well as to define the relative stereochemistry, which has not been completely established for cordiachrome C, previously isolated from C. millenii.

  2. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duma, L.

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C 13 -enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C 13 -labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C 13 -enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C 13 spin pairs. (author)

  3. 13C NMR and stereochestry of 1-β-phenylethylcyclohexanol derivatives obtained by synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, O.A.C.; Braz Filho, R.

    1986-01-01

    1-β-Phenylethylcyclohexanol derivatives substituted in position 2 have been synthesized and analysed by 13 C-NMR spectroscopy. Their stereochemistry have been considered as cis (hydroxyl in C-1 and substituent in C-2) which is in agreement with the pertinent literature. Derivatives obtained were 2-β-phenylethyl-2-allycyclohexanol, 1-β-phenylethyl-2-methylcyclohexanol, 7a-β-phenylethylperhy-drobenzo (b) furan, and 1-β-phenylethyl-2-β-hydroxyethylcyclohexanol. (author) [pt

  4. New methods for the correction of 31P NMR spectra in in vivo NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starcuk, Z.; Bartusek, K.; Starcuk, Z. jr.

    1994-01-01

    The new methods for the correction of 31 P NMR spectra in vivo NMR spectroscopy have been performed. A method for the baseline correction of the spectra which represents a combination of time-domain and frequency-domain has been discussed.The method is very fast and efficient for minimization of base line artifacts of biological tissues impact

  5. Quantitative 1H-NMR Spectroscopy for Profiling Primary Metabolites in Mulberry Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Liang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary metabolites in aqueous extract of mulberry (Morus alba L. leaves were characterized by using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy. With the convenience of resonance assignment, GABA together with the other 10 primary metabolites was simultaneously identified and quantified in one 1H-NMR spectrum. In this study, external calibration curves for metabolites were employed to calculate the concentrations of interests. The proposed quantitative approach was demonstrated with good linearity (r2 ranged in the interval of 0.9965–0.9999, precision, repeatability, stability (RSD values in the ranges of 0.35–4.89%, 0.77–7.13% and 0.28–2.33%, respectively and accuracy (recovery rates from 89.2% to 118.5%. The established 1H-NMR method was then successfully applied to quantify 11 primary metabolites in mulberry leaves from different geographical regions within a rapid analysis time and a simple sample preparation procedure.

  6. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  7. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  8. Application of NMR Spectroscopy in the Analysis of Petroleum Derivatives and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parlov Vuković, J.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex chemical composition and physical properties of oil and fuel make their complete cha racterization very difficult. Components present in oil and oil products differ in structure, size, po larity and functionality. The presence and structure of specific hydrocarbons in final products depend on the processing procedure and type of the fuel. In order to predict or improve fuel pro perties it is necessary to determine its composition. Thus, new and more sophisticated analytical methods and procedures are constantly being developed. NMR spectroscopy plays a significant role in analysis and identification of complex hydrocarbon mixtures of petroleum and petroleum products. In this review, we describe the application of NMR spectroscopy for analyzing gasoline and diesel fuels. Hence, by using NMR spectroscopy it is possible to determine gasoline composition and presence of benzene and oxygenates, as well as some important physical characteristics of gasoli ne such as the research octane number. An application of different NMR techniques made it pos sible to characterize diesel fuels and middle oil distillates from various refineries. Data so obtained can be used in combination with statistical methods to predict fuel properties and to monitor pro- duction processes in the petroleum industry. NMR spectroscopy has proven useful in analysis of FAME which has recently been used as an ecologically acceptable alternative fuel. Furthermore, techniques such as CP/MAS for characterization of solid state oil-geochemical samples are inclu- ded. Also, possibilities of using NMR spectroscopy in the analysis of polymeric additives are di- scussed.

  9. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  10. [Non-invasive analysis of proteins in living cells using NMR spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochio, Hidehito; Murayama, Shuhei; Inomata, Kohsuke; Morimoto, Daichi; Ohno, Ayako; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy enables structural analyses of proteins and has been widely used in the structural biology field in recent decades. NMR spectroscopy can be applied to proteins inside living cells, allowing characterization of their structures and dynamics in intracellular environments. The simplest "in-cell NMR" approach employs bacterial cells; in this approach, live Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a specific protein are subjected to NMR. The cells are grown in an NMR active isotope-enriched medium to ensure that the overexpressed proteins are labeled with the stable isotopes. Thus the obtained NMR spectra, which are derived from labeled proteins, contain atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of the proteins. Recent progress enables us to work with higher eukaryotic cells such as HeLa and HEK293 cells, for which a number of techniques have been developed to achieve isotope labeling of the specific target protein. In this review, we describe successful use of electroporation for in-cell NMR. In addition, (19)F-NMR to characterize protein-ligand interactions in cells is presented. Because (19)F nuclei rarely exist in natural cells, when (19)F-labeled proteins are delivered into cells and (19)F-NMR signals are observed, one can safely ascertain that these signals originate from the delivered proteins and not other molecules.

  11. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear

  12. Monitoring of liver glycogen synthesis in diabetic patients using carbon-13 MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Moyoko; Obata, Takayuki; Nishi, Yukio; Nakamoto, Hiromitsu; Nonaka, Hiroi; Takayama, Yukihisa; Autio, Joonas; Ikehira, Hiroo; Kanno, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between liver glucose, glycogen, and plasma glucose in diabetic patients, in vivo liver carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 13 C MRS) with a clinical 3.0 T MR system was performed. Subjects were healthy male volunteers (n = 5) and male type-2 diabetic patients (n = 5). Pre- and during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), 13 C MR spectra without proton decoupling were acquired in a monitoring period of over 6 h, and in total seven spectra were obtained from each subject. For OGTT, 75 g of glucose, including 5 g of [1- 13 C]glucose, was administered. The MR signals of liver [1- 13 C]glucose and glycogen were detected and their time-course changes were assessed in comparison with the plasma data obtained at screening. The correlations between the fasting plasma glucose level and liver glycogen/glucose rate (Spearman: ρ = -0.68, p 13 C MRS can perform noninvasive measurement of glycogen storage/degradation ability in the liver individually and can assist in tailor-made therapy for diabetes. In conclusion, 13 C MRS has a potential to become a powerful tool in diagnosing diabetes multilaterally.

  13. Sparse "1"3C labelling for solid-state NMR studies of P. pastoris expressed eukaryotic seven-transmembrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ying; Munro, Rachel A.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S.; Wang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel sparse "1"3C labelling approach for methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris expression system, towards solid-state NMR studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins. The labelling scheme was achieved by co-utilizing natural abundance methanol and specifically "1"3C labelled glycerol as carbon sources in the expression medium. This strategy improves the spectral resolution by 1.5 fold, displays site-specific labelling patterns, and has advantages for collecting long-range distance restraints for structure determination of large eukaryotic membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  14. Sorbate Transport in Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes and FAU/EMT Intergrowth by Diffusion NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Low

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present and discuss selected results of our recent studies of sorbate self-diffusion in microporous materials. The main focus is given to transport properties of carbon molecular sieve (CMS membranes as well as of the intergrowth of FAU-type and EMT-type zeolites. CMS membranes show promise for applications in separations of mixtures of small gas molecules, while FAU/EMT intergrowth can be used as an active and selective cracking catalyst. For both types of applications diffusion of guest molecules in the micropore networks of these materials is expected to play an important role. Diffusion studies were performed by a pulsed field gradient (PFG NMR technique that combines advantages of high field (17.6 T NMR and high magnetic field gradients (up to 30 T/m. This technique has been recently introduced at the University of Florida in collaboration with the National Magnet Lab. In addition to a more conventional proton PFG NMR, also carbon-13 PFG NMR was used.

  15. Determination of gluconeogenesis in man by the use of deuterium-NMR-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosian, E.

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this dissertation is the quantification of the deuterium--distribution in human glucose by the use of the deuterium NMR spectroscopy of deuteriated water. The glucose production in human organism is composed of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. The quantification of the part of gluconeogenesis on the total glucose production was determined by the use of deuterium NMR spectroscopy. (boteke)

  16. Selected topics in solution-phase biomolecular NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Lewis E.; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-05-01

    Solution bio-NMR spectroscopy continues to enjoy a preeminent role as an important tool in elucidating the structure and dynamics of a range of important biomolecules and in relating these to function. Equally impressive is how NMR continues to 'reinvent' itself through the efforts of many brilliant practitioners who ask increasingly demanding and increasingly biologically relevant questions. The ability to manipulate spin Hamiltonians - almost at will - to dissect the information of interest contributes to the success of the endeavor and ensures that the NMR technology will be well poised to contribute to as yet unknown frontiers in the future. As a tribute to the versatility of solution NMR in biomolecular studies and to the continued rapid advances in the field we present a Virtual Special Issue (VSI) that includes over 40 articles on various aspects of solution-state biomolecular NMR that have been published in the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in the past 7 years. These, in total, help celebrate the achievements of this vibrant field.

  17. NMR investigation of coal extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, I; Sebor, G [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Hornicky Ustav; Sebor, G Jr; Hajek, M; Mostecky, J [Vysoka Skola Chemicko-Technologicka, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1978-07-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy was used for the evaluation of 10% coal extract solutions in deuterated pyridine. Four types of Czechoslovak coal were analyzed. Agreement was found between the aromaticity of coal extracts calculated from /sup 1/H NMR data using Brown's method and Ladner's and Williams' method and the characterization of an average molecule of the coal extract by the number of non-bridge carbon atoms of aromatic rings, by the overall number of aromatic ring carbon atoms and the number of aromatic rings, determined by the Williams and Ferris methods. The methods for calculating carbon distribution from /sup 1/H NMR data, however, contain some constants theoretically estimated or experimentally found using the method which still remain to be verified.

  18. Determining pH at elevated pressure and temperature using in situ ¹³C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface, J Andrew; Wang, Fei; Zhu, Yanzhe; Hayes, Sophia E; Giammar, Daniel E; Conradi, Mark S

    2015-02-03

    We have developed an approach for determining pH at elevated pressures and temperatures by using (13)C NMR measurements of inorganic carbon species together with a geochemical equilibrium model. The approach can determine in situ pH with precision better than 0.1 pH units at pressures, temperatures, and ionic strengths typical of geologic carbon sequestration systems. A custom-built high pressure NMR probe was used to collect (13)C NMR spectra of (13)C-labeled CO2 reactions with NaOH solutions and Mg(OH)2 suspensions at pressures up to 107 bar and temperatures of 80 °C. The quantitative nature of NMR spectroscopy allows the concentration ratio [CO2]/[HCO3(-)] to be experimentally determined. This ratio is then used with equilibrium constants calculated for the specific pressure and temperature conditions and appropriate activity coefficients for the solutes to calculate the in situ pH. The experimentally determined [CO2]/[HCO3(-)] ratios agree well with the predicted values for experiments performed with three different concentrations of NaOH and equilibration with multiple pressures of CO2. The approach was then applied to experiments with Mg(OH)2 slurries in which the change in pH could track the dissolution of CO2 into solution, rapid initial Mg(OH)2 dissolution, and onset of magnesium carbonate precipitation.

  19. Rapid Determination of Total Thujone in Absinthe Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia B. Monakhova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 1H NMR spectroscopy is utilized to quantify total thujone (sum of α- and β-isomers in absinthe. For sample preparation, a simple dilution with buffer is required. Thujone produces a distinct peak of the CH2 group in the cyclopentanone moiety in the 2.13–2.11 ppm range. No overlap with other typical constituents such as anethole or fenchone occurs. The detection limit of 0.3 mg/L is adequate to control the EU maximum limit. The relative standard deviation was 6%, and linearity was observed from 1 to 100 mg/L. Applicability was proven by analysis of 69 authentic absinthes. The correlation between NMR and our previous method consisting of liquid-liquid extraction followed by GC/MS was significant (P<0.0001,R=0.93. The simple and cheap NMR method can be used for rapid screening of absinthes for total thujone content while chromatographic techniques are recommended for more specific (α- and β-thujone isomers analysis if required.

  20. 13C and 31P NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance] studies of prostate tumor metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillerud, L.O.; Halliday, K.R.; Freyer, J.P; Griffey, R.H.; Fenoglio-Preiser, C.

    1989-01-01

    The current research on prostate cancer by NMR spectroscopy and microscopy will most significantly contribute to tumor diagnosis and characterization only if sound biochemical models of tumor metabolism are established and tested. Prior searches focused on universal markers of malignancy, have to date, revealed no universal markers by any method. It is unlikely that NMRS will succeed where other methods have failed, however, NMR spectroscopy does provide a non-invasive means to analyze multiple compounds simultaneously in vivo. In order to fully evaluate the ability of NMRS to differentiate non-malignant from malignant tissues it is necessary to determine sufficient multiple parameters from specific, well-diagnosed, histological tumor types that, in comparison to normal tissue and non-neoplastic, non-normal pathologies from which the given neoplasm must be differentiated, one has enough degrees of freedom to make a mathematically and statistically significant determination. Confounding factors may consist of tumor heterogeneity arising from regional variations in differentiation, ischemia, necrosis, hemorrhage, inflammation and the presence of intermingled normal tissue. One related aspect of our work is the development of { 13 C}- 1 H metabolic imaging of 13 C for metabolic characterization, with enhanced spatial localization (46). This should markedly extend the range of potential clinical NMR uses because the spatial variation in prostate metabolism may prove to be just as important in tumor diagnoses as bulk (volume-averaged) properties themselves. It is our hope that NMRS and spectroscopic imaging will reveal a sound correlation between prostate metabolism and tumor properties that will be clinically straightforward and useful for diagnosis

  1. Photochromism of indolino-benzopyrans studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Delbaere

    2006-01-01

    is described. The structures of photomerocyanines elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and spectrokinetic data (λmax⁡ of colored form, colorability, and rate constant of bleaching obtained by UV-visible spectroscopy are reported.

  2. Structural Identification of 19 Purified Isomers of the OPV Acceptor Material bisPCBM by 13C NMR and UV-Vis Absorption Spectroscopy and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Abrahams, Isaac; Dennis, T John S

    2018-04-26

    The molecular structures of 19 purified isomers of bis-phenyl-C 62 -butyric acid methyl ester were identified by a combination of 13 C NMR and UV-vis absorption spectroscopies and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) retention time analysis. All 19 isomers are dicyclopropafullerenes (none are homofullerenes). There were seven isomers with C 1 molecular point-group symmetry, four with C s , six with C 2 , one with C 2 v , and one with C 2 h symmetry. The C 2 h , C 2 v , and all five nonequatorial C 1 isomers were unambiguously assigned to their respective HPLC fractions. For the other 12 isomers, the 13 C NMR and UV-vis spectra placed them in six groups of two same-symmetry isomers. On the basis of the widely spaced HPLC retention times of the two isomers within each of these six groups, and the empirical inverse correlation between retention time and addend spacing, each isomer was assigned to its corresponding HPLC fraction. In addition, the missing trans-1 isomer was found, purified, and characterized.

  3. A primer to nutritional metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savorani, Francesco; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Mikkelsen, Mette Skau

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of using high throughput NMR metabolomics for nutritional studies with emphasis on the workflow and data analytical methods for generation of new knowledge. The paper describes one-by-one the major research activities in the interdisciplinary...... metabolomics platform and highlights the opportunities that NMR spectra can provide in future nutrition studies. Three areas are emphasized: (1) NMR as an unbiased and non-destructive platform for providing an overview of the metabolome under investigation, (2) NMR for providing versatile information and data...... structures for multivariate pattern recognition methods and (3) NMR for providing a unique fingerprint of the lipoprotein status of the subject. For the first time in history, by combining NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics we are able to perform inductive nutritional research as a complement to the deductive...

  4. Rapid Determination of Total Thujone in Absinthe Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia B. Monakhova; Thomas Kuballa; Dirk W. Lachenmeier

    2011-01-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy is utilized to quantify total thujone (sum of alpha- and beta-isomers) in absinthe. For sample preparation, a simple dilution with buffer is required. Thujone produces a distinct peak of the CH2 group in the cyclopentanone moiety in the 2.13–2.11 ppm range. No overlap with other typical constituents such as anethole or fenchone occurs. The detection limit of 0.3 mg/L is adequate to control the EU maximum limit. The relative standard deviation was 6%, and linearity was obse...

  5. Authentication of the origin of vanillin using quantitative natural abundance 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenailleau, Eve J; Lancelin, Pierre; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge

    2004-12-29

    The use of 13C isotopic distribution as an efficient means to determine the origin of vanillin has been substantiated. Using quantitative 13C NMR, the 13C/12C ratios at all eight carbon positions can be exploited. On a set of 21 samples of vanillin from five different origins, complete discrimination can be achieved. It is shown that, for many purposes, a rapid analysis in which only five sites are used is sufficient. However, improved discrimination using all eight sites is preferable to differentiate between different methods of production from natural ferulic acid or between natural and lignin-derived vanillin on the basis of the 13C/12C ratios characteristic of different origins. The C1 and C8 positions are demonstrated to be the most significant sites for discrimination using principle component analysis. However, aromatic carbon positions make an essential contribution, notably in differentiating between natural and lignin-derived vanillin.

  6. Acetylenes bearing Aromatic Terminal Groups. : II 13C-NMR Spectra of Monosubstituted Diphenylacetylenes

    OpenAIRE

    野本, 健雄; Nomoto, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Six monosubstituted diphenylacetylenes, p-X-C6H4-C≡C-C6H5 1 (Ⅹ=NMe2, NH2, OMe, Cl, and NO2), were synthesized, and 13C-NMR spectra of their acetylenic carbons were measured. Hammett plots of the chemical shifts of the acetylenic α-13C and β-13C (against substituent constants σ) respectively showed a linear relationship, eXCept for β-13C on NMe2 and NH2 groups. The effects of substituents on 13C-Chemical shifts of diphenylacetylenes and effeciency of the C≡C bonds in transmitting the substitue...

  7. An Oil Spill in a Tube: An Accessible Approach for Teaching Environmental NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andre´ J.; Mitchell, Perry J.; Masoom, Hussain; Mobarhan, Yalda Liaghati; Adamo, Antonio; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has great potential as an instrumental method for environmental chemistry research and monitoring but may be underused in teaching laboratories because of its complexity and the level of expertise required in operating the instrument and interpreting data. This laboratory experiment introduces environmental NMR spectroscopy to…

  8. 1D and 2D NMR Spectroscopy of Bonding Interactions within Stable and Phase-Separating Organic Electrolyte-Cellulose Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Matthew T; Farès, Christophe; Rinaldi, Roberto

    2017-09-11

    Organic electrolyte solutions (i.e. mixtures containing an ionic liquid and a polar, molecular co-solvent) are highly versatile solvents for cellulose. However, the underlying solvent-solvent and solvent-solute interactions are not yet fully understood. Herein, mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, the co-solvent 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone, and cellulose are investigated using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The use of a triply- 13 C-labelled ionic liquid enhances the signal-to-noise ratio for 13 C NMR spectroscopy, enabling changes in bonding interactions to be accurately pinpointed. Current observations reveal an additional degree of complexity regarding the distinct roles of cation, anion, and co-solvent toward maintaining cellulose solubility and phase stability. Unexpectedly, the interactions between the dialkylimidazolium ring C 2 -H substituent and cellulose become more pronounced at high temperatures, counteracted by a net weakening of acetate-cellulose interactions. Moreover, for mixtures that exhibit critical solution behavior, phase separation is accompanied by the apparent recombination of cation-anion pairs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. 13C-NMR Study on Structure Evolution Characteristics of High-Organic-Sulfur Coals from Typical Chinese Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution characteristics of high-organic-sulfur (HOS coals with a wide range of ranks from typical Chinese areas were investigated using 13C-CP/MAS NMR. The results indicate that the structure parameters that are relevant to coal rank include CH3 carbon (fal*, quaternary carbon, CH/CH2 carbon + quaternary carbon (falH, aliphatic carbon (falC, protonated aromatic carbon (faH, protonated aromatic carbon + aromatic bridgehead carbon (faH+B, aromaticity (faCP, and aromatic carbon (farC. The coal structure changed dramatically in the first two coalification jumps, especially the first one. A large number of aromatic structures condensed, and aliphatic structures rapidly developed at the initial stage of bituminous coal accompanied by remarkable decarboxylation. Compared to ordinary coals, the structure evolution characteristics of HOS coals manifest in three ways: First, the aromatic CH3 carbon, alkylated aromatic carbon (faS, aromatic bridgehead carbon (faB, and phenolic ether (faP are barely relevant to rank, and abundant organic sulfur has an impact on the normal evolution process of coal. Second, the average aromatic cluster sizes of some super-high-organic-sulfur (SHOS coals are not large, and the extensive development of cross bonds and/or bridged bonds form closer connections among the aromatic fringes. Moreover, sulfur-containing functional groups are probably significant components in these linkages. Third, a considerable portion of “oxygen-containing functional groups” in SHOS coals determined by 13C-NMR are actually sulfur-containing groups, which results in the anomaly that the oxygen-containing structures increase with coal rank.

  10. MULTIVARIATE CURVE RESOLUTION OF NMR SPECTROSCOPY METABONOMIC DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandia National Laboratories is working with the EPA to evaluate and develop mathematical tools for analysis of the collected NMR spectroscopy data. Initially, we have focused on the use of Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) also known as molecular factor analysis (MFA), a tech...

  11. In vivo NMR spectroscopy of ripening avocado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, A.B.; Smith, G.M.; Nichols, B.

    1987-01-01

    Ripening of avocado fruit is associated with a dramatic increase in respiration. Previous studies have indicated that the increase in respiration is brought about by activation of the glycolytic reaction catalyzing the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The authors reinvestigated the proposed role of glycolytic regulation in the respiratory increase using in vivo 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using an external surface coil and analysis of phosphofructokinase (PFK), phosphofructophosphotransferase (PFP), and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (fru 2,6-P 2 ) levels in ripening avocado fruit. In vivo 31 P NMR spectroscopy revealed large increases in ATP levels accompanying the increase in respiration. Both glycolytic enzymes, PFK and PFP, were present in avocado fruit, with the latter activity being highly stimulated by fru 2,6-P 2 . Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate levels increased approximately 90% at the onset of ripening, indicating that the respiratory increase in ripening avocado may be regulated by the activation of PFP brought about by an increase in fru 2,6-P 2

  12. Luther-Emery liquid in the NMR relaxation rate of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulacsi, Miklos; Simon, Ferenc; Wzietek, Pawel; Kuzmany, Hans; Dora, Balazs

    2008-01-01

    We analyze a recent NMR experiments by Singer et al.[Singer et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 236403 (2005).], which showed a deviation from Fermi-liquid behavior in carbon nanotubes with an energy gap evident at low temperatures. A comprehensive theory for the magnetic field and temperature dependent NMR 13 C spin-lattice relaxation is given in the framework of the Luther-Emery and Luttinger liquids. The low temperature properties are governed by a gapped relaxation due to a spin gap (∝30 K), described by the Luther-Emery liquid picture, which crosses over smoothly to the Luttinger liquid behaviour with increasing temperature. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Methodology for the identification of tri-terpenes mixtures components by {sup 13} C NMR; Metodologia para identificao dos componentes de misturas de triterpenos por RMN de {sup 13} C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, Roberto S.G.

    1990-12-31

    This work describes a methodology for the identification of tri terpenes complex mixtures by {sup 13} C NMR. The use of {sup 13} C NMR techniques, such as obtention of noise decoupled spectra, DEPT 135 and DEPT 90 sequences, allowed the identification of components of triterpene mixtures with identical functionality through comparison of observed {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts with {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts reported in the literature. The method proved to be specially helpful in the identification of triterpenes by analysis of chemical shifts assignable to doubly bonded carbons, since the particular position of such double bonds is characteristic of some triterpene skeletons. Application of this methodology indicated the presence of bauerenol, {alpha}-amyrin and {beta}-amyrin in Acmanthera latifolis Griseb. (Malpighiaceae); of germanicone, lupenone, {alpha}-amyrenone and {beta}-amyrenone in Alibertia macrophylla A. Rich. (Rubiaceae); of {alpha}-amyrin acetate, lupeol acetate and {beta}-amyrin acetate in Vernonia polyanthes Schreb. (Asteraceae); {alpha}-amyrenone, {beta}-amyrenone, boehmerone, friedelin, lupenone, {alpha}-amyrin, {beta}-amyrin and glutinol in Scoparia dulcis L. (Scrophulariaceae). (author). 37 refs., 93 figs.

  14. Methodology for the identification of tri-terpenes mixtures components by {sup 13} C NMR; Metodologia para identificao dos componentes de misturas de triterpenos por RMN de {sup 13} C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olea, Roberto S.G.

    1991-12-31

    This work describes a methodology for the identification of tri terpenes complex mixtures by {sup 13} C NMR. The use of {sup 13} C NMR techniques, such as obtention of noise decoupled spectra, DEPT 135 and DEPT 90 sequences, allowed the identification of components of triterpene mixtures with identical functionality through comparison of observed {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts with {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts reported in the literature. The method proved to be specially helpful in the identification of triterpenes by analysis of chemical shifts assignable to doubly bonded carbons, since the particular position of such double bonds is characteristic of some triterpene skeletons. Application of this methodology indicated the presence of bauerenol, {alpha}-amyrin and {beta}-amyrin in Acmanthera latifolis Griseb. (Malpighiaceae); of germanicone, lupenone, {alpha}-amyrenone and {beta}-amyrenone in Alibertia macrophylla A. Rich. (Rubiaceae); of {alpha}-amyrin acetate, lupeol acetate and {beta}-amyrin acetate in Vernonia polyanthes Schreb. (Asteraceae); {alpha}-amyrenone, {beta}-amyrenone, boehmerone, friedelin, lupenone, {alpha}-amyrin, {beta}-amyrin and glutinol in Scoparia dulcis L. (Scrophulariaceae). (author). 37 refs., 93 figs.

  15. Solid state NMR studies for a new carbonization process with high temperature preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Koji; Hatakeyama, Moriaki; Komaki, Ikuo; Katoh, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    A new carbonization process with rapid preheating and coke discharging at medium temperature has been developed in Japan. The result of this process shows that even when no or slightly coking coal is by 50 wt% the coking property is improved and a coking coke with cold strength usable at blast furnace can be manufactured with the new carbonization process. The mechanism of the coking property improvement was examined by coal properties using mainly solid state NMR ( 1H CRAMPS and 13C SPE/MAS, CP/MAS) and NMR imaging (single point imaging, in-situ imaging). It has been clarified that the molecular structure of coal is relaxed by the rapid heating treatment and, in addition, there is a close relation between hydrogen bonding and relaxation of the molecular structure of coal.

  16. Oxidative stress-induced metabolic changes in mouse C2C12 myotubes studied with high-resolution 13C, 1H, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Petersen, Bent O

    2010-01-01

    In this study, stress in relation to slaughter was investigated in a model system by the use of (13)C, (1)H, and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for elucidating changes in the metabolites in C2C12 myotubes exposed to H(2)O(2)-induced stress. Oxidative stress resulted in lower...... to lower levels of the unlabeled ((12)C) lactate were identified in the (1)H spectra after stress exposure. These data indicate an increase in de novo synthesis of alanine, concomitant with a release of lactate from the myotubes to the medium at oxidative stress conditions. The changes in the metabolite...

  17. Application of Solution NMR Spectroscopy to Study Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Göbl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in spectroscopic methods allow the identification of minute fluctuations in a protein structure. These dynamic properties have been identified as keys to some biological processes. The consequences of this structural flexibility can be far‑reaching and they add a new dimension to the structure-function relationship of biomolecules. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy allows the study of structure as well as dynamics of biomolecules in a very broad range of timescales at atomic level. A number of new NMR methods have been developed recently to allow the measurements of time scales and spatial fluctuations, which in turn provide the thermodynamics associated with the biological processes. Since NMR parameters reflect ensemble measurements, structural ensemble approaches in analyzing NMR data have also been developed. These new methods in some instances can even highlight previously hidden conformational features of the biomolecules. In this review we describe several solution NMR methods to study protein dynamics and discuss their impact on important biological processes.

  18. In-situ annotation of carbohydrate diversity, abundance, and degradability in highly complex mixtures using NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Many functions of carbohydrates depend on the detection of short structural motifs, approximately up to hexasaccharide length, by receptors or catalysts. This study investigates the usefulness of state-of-the-art 1H–13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for characterizing the diversity......, abundance, and degradability of such short structural motifs in plant-derived carbohydrates. Assignments of carbohydrate signals for 1H–13C NMR spectra of beer, wine, and fruit juice yield up to >130 assignments in situ, i.e. in individual samples without separation or derivatization. More than 500...... structural motifs can be resolved over a concentration range of ~103 in experiments of a few hours duration. The diversity of carbohydrate units increases according to power laws at lower concentrations for both cereal and fruit-derived samples. Simple graphs resolve the smaller overall contribution of more...

  19. 1H-NMR/13C-NMR studies of branched structures in PVC obtained at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, D.; Holzer, G.; Hjertberg, T.

    1981-01-01

    The 1 H-NMR-spectra of raw poly (vinyl cloride) obtained at atmospheric pressure (U-PVC) have revealed the presence of high concentrations of branches. The content of labile chlorine was determined by reaction with phenole in order to estimate the branch points with tertiary chlorine. The branch length of reductively dehalogenated U-PVC by 13 C-NMR analysis have provided evidence for both short chain branches including chloromethyl groups and 2.4-dichloro-n-butyl groups and long chain branching. For a number of U-polymers the total amount of branching ranges from 7.5 to 13.5/1000 C. The 13 C-NMR measurements point to a ratio of methyl/butyl branches of 1:1 and short chains/long chains of 6:1. (orig.)

  20. Application of unsymmetrical indirect covariance NMR methods to the computation of the (13)C (15)N HSQC-IMPEACH and (13)C (15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary E; Hilton, Bruce D; Irish, Patrick A; Blinov, Kirill A; Williams, Antony J

    2007-10-01

    Utilization of long-range (1)H--(15)N heteronuclear chemical shift correlation has continually grown in importance since the first applications were reported in 1995. More recently, indirect covariance NMR methods have been introduced followed by the development of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing methods. The latter technique has been shown to allow the calculation of hyphenated 2D NMR data matrices from more readily acquired nonhyphenated 2D NMR spectra. We recently reported the use of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing to combine (1)H--(13)C GHSQC and (1)H--(15)N GHMBC long-range spectra to yield a (13)C--(15)N HSQC-HMBC chemical shift correlation spectrum that could not be acquired in a reasonable period of time without resorting to (15)N-labeled molecules. We now report the unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing of (1)H--(13)C GHMBC and (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectra to afford a (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH spectrum that has the potential to span as many as six to eight bonds. Correlations for carbon resonances long-range coupled to a protonated carbon in the (1)H--(13)C HMBC spectrum are transferred via the long-range (1)H--(15)N coupling pathway in the (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectrum to afford a much broader range of correlation possibilities in the (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectrum. The indole alkaloid vincamine is used as a model compound to illustrate the application of the method. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Positional enrichment by proton analysis (PEPA). A one-dimensional "1H-NMR approach for "1"3C stable isotope tracer studies in metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinaixa, Maria; Yanes, Oscar; Rodriguez, Miguel A.; Capellades, Jordi; Aivio, Suvi; Stracker, Travis H.; Gomez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau

    2017-01-01

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of "1"3C-satellite peaks using 1D-"1H-NMR spectra. In comparison with "1"3C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of "1"3C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of "1H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  2. 13CHD2–CEST NMR spectroscopy provides an avenue for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennella, Enrico; Huang, Rui; Velyvis, Algirdas; Kay, Lewis E.

    2015-01-01

    An NMR experiment for quantifying slow (millisecond) time-scale exchange processes involving the interconversion between visible ground state and invisible, conformationally excited state conformers is presented. The approach exploits chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and makes use of 13 CHD 2 methyl group probes that can be readily incorporated into otherwise highly deuterated proteins. The methodology is validated with an application to a G48A Fyn SH3 domain that exchanges between a folded conformation and a sparsely populated and transiently formed unfolded ensemble. Experiments on a number of different protein systems, including a 360 kDa half-proteasome, establish that the sensitivity of this 13 CHD 2 13 C–CEST technique can be upwards of a factor of 5 times higher than for a previously published 13 CH 3 13 C–CEST approach (Bouvignies and Kay in J Biomol NMR 53:303–310, 2012), suggesting that the methodology will be powerful for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins

  3. Contribution of extracellular glutamine as an anaplerotic substrate to neuronal metabolism: a re-evaluation by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy in primary cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokati, Touraj; Zwingmann, Claudia; Leibfritz, Dieter

    2005-10-01

    Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of glutamine on neuronal glucose metabolism. Primary neurons were incubated with [1-(13C)]glucose in the absence or presence of glutamine (2 mM) and/or NH4Cl (5 mM). After ammonia-treatment, the concentrations of high-energy phosphates decreased up to 84% of control, which was aggravated in glutamine-containing medium (up to 42% of control). These effects could not be attributed to changes in mitochondrial glucose oxidation. Withdrawal of glutamine decreased amino acid concentrations, e.g. of glutamate to 53%, but also considerably lessened the 13C enrichment in [4-(13C)]glutamate to 8.3% of control, and decreased the 13C-enrichment in acetyl-CoA entering the Krebs cycle (P neuronal glutamate stores, glutamate formation is mainly attributed to its de novo synthesis from glucose. Furthermore, mitochondrial glucose metabolism strongly depends on the supply of carbons from glutamine, indicating that exogenous glutamine is a well-suited substrate to replenish neuronal Krebs cycle intermediates.

  4. 19F labelled dextrans and antibodies as NMR imaging and spectroscopy agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antich, P.P.; Kulkarni, P.V.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described of NMR imaging or spectroscopy, comprising the steps of administering to a living subject a 19 F labelled NMR agent, the NMR agent comprising (a) a transport polymer selected from the group consisting of dextran polymers and amino dextrans, having a molecular weight between approximately 100 d and 500 kd, and antibodies and fragments thereof, and (b) a 19F-containing sensor moiety selected from the group consisting of fluorinated alkyls, fluorinated acetates, fluoroaniline, and fluoroalkyl phosphonates, in an amount effective to provide a detectable NMR signal; and then detecting the 19 F NMR signal produced

  5. Novel NMR tools to study structure and dynamics of biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrisch, Klaus; Eldho, Nadukkudy V; Polozov, Ivan V

    2002-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on biomembranes have benefited greatly from introduction of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques. Improvements in MAS probe technology, combined with the higher magnetic field strength of modern instruments, enables almost liquid-like resolution of lipid resonances. The cross-relaxation rates measured by nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) provide new insights into conformation and dynamics of lipids with atomic-scale resolution. The data reflect the tremendous motional disorder in the lipid matrix. Transfer of magnetization by spin diffusion along the proton network of lipids is of secondary relevance, even at a long NOESY mixing time of 300 ms. MAS experiments with re-coupling of anisotropic interactions, like the 13C-(1)H dipolar couplings, benefit from the excellent resolution of 13C shifts that enables assignment of the couplings to specific carbon atoms. The traditional 2H NMR experiments on deuterated lipids have higher sensitivity when conducted on oriented samples at higher magnetic field strength. A very large number of NMR parameters from lipid bilayers is now accessible, providing information about conformation and dynamics for every lipid segment. The NMR methods have the sensitivity and resolution to study lipid-protein interaction, lateral lipid organization, and the location of solvents and drugs in the lipid matrix.

  6. Characterizing Slow Chemical Exchange in Nucleic Acids by Carbon CEST and Low Spin-Lock Field R1ρ NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Hansen, Alexandar L.; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of dynamic exchange between various conformational states provides essential insights into the molecular basis of many regulatory RNA functions. Here, we present an application of nucleic-acid-optimized carbon chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and low spin-lock field R1ρ relaxation dispersion (RD) NMR experiments in characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids that is otherwise difficult if not impossible to be quantified by the ZZ-exchange NMR experiment. We demonstrated the application on a 47-nucleotide fluoride riboswitch in the ligand-free state, for which CEST and R1ρ RD profiles of base and sugar carbons revealed slow exchange dynamics involving a sparsely populated (p ~ 10%) and shortly lived (τ ~ 10 ms) NMR “invisible” state. The utility of CEST and low spin-lock field R1ρ RD experiments in studying slow exchange was further validated in characterizing an exchange as slow as ~60 s−1. PMID:24299272

  7. Characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids by carbon CEST and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Hansen, Alexandar L; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-08

    Quantitative characterization of dynamic exchange between various conformational states provides essential insights into the molecular basis of many regulatory RNA functions. Here, we present an application of nucleic-acid-optimized carbon chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) relaxation dispersion (RD) NMR experiments in characterizing slow chemical exchange in nucleic acids that is otherwise difficult if not impossible to be quantified by the ZZ-exchange NMR experiment. We demonstrated the application on a 47-nucleotide fluoride riboswitch in the ligand-free state, for which CEST and R(1ρ) RD profiles of base and sugar carbons revealed slow exchange dynamics involving a sparsely populated (p ~ 10%) and shortly lived (τ ~ 10 ms) NMR "invisible" state. The utility of CEST and low spin-lock field R(1ρ) RD experiments in studying slow exchange was further validated in characterizing an exchange as slow as ~60 s(-1).

  8. Synthesis of selectively 13C-labelled benzoic acid for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurement of glycine conjugation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Baba, Shigeo

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of [4- 13 C]benzoic acid (BA) labelled in a single protonated carbon, for use as a probe to measure glycine conjugation activity by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, has been reported. The labelled compound was prepared by a seven-step synthetic scheme on a relatively small scale using [2- 13 C] acetone as the source of label in overall yield of 16%. The usefulness of [4- 13 C]BA was demonstrated by the NMR spectroscopic monitoring of urinary excretion of [4- 13 C]hippuric acid in the rat administered with the labelled BA. (Author)

  9. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  10. Effect of pressure on the short-range structure and speciation of carbon in alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glasses and melts at high pressure up to 8 GPa: 13C, 27Al, 17O and 29Si solid-state NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Fei, Yingwei; Lee, Sung Keun

    2018-03-01

    Despite the pioneering efforts to explore the nature of carbon in carbon-bearing silicate melts under compression, experimental data for the speciation and the solubility of carbon in silicate melts above 4 GPa have not been reported. Here, we explore the speciation of carbon and pressure-induced changes in network structures of carbon-bearing silicate (Na2O-3SiO2, NS3) and sodium aluminosilicate (NaAlSi3O8, albite) glasses quenched from melts at high pressure up to 8 GPa using multi-nuclear solid-state NMR. The 27Al triple quantum (3Q) MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite melts revealed the pressure-induced increase in the topological disorder around 4 coordinated Al ([4]Al) without forming [5,6]Al. These structural changes are similar to those in volatile-free albite melts at high pressure, indicating that the addition of CO2 in silicate melts may not induce any additional increase in the topological disorder around Al at high pressure. 13C MAS NMR spectra for carbon-bearing albite melts show multiple carbonate species, including [4]Si(CO3)[4]Si, [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al, [4]Al(CO3)[4]Al, and free CO32-. The fraction of [4]Si(CO3)[4]Al increases with increasing pressure, while those of other bridging carbonate species decrease, indicating that the addition of CO2 may enhance mixing of Si and Al at high pressure. A noticeable change is not observed for 29Si NMR spectra for the carbon-bearing albite glasses with varying pressure at 1.5-6 GPa. These NMR results confirm that the densification mechanisms established for fluid-free, polymerized aluminosilicate melts can be applied to the carbon-bearing albite melts at high pressure. In contrast, the 29Si MAS NMR spectra for partially depolymerized, carbon-bearing NS3 glasses show that the fraction of [5,6]Si increases with increasing pressure at the expense of Q3 species ([4]Si species with one non-bridging oxygen as the nearest neighbor). The pressure-induced increase in topological disorder around Si is evident from an

  11. High-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy of cerebrospinal fluid: methodological issues and potential clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriat, M.; Nicoli, F.; Vion-Dury, J.; Confort-Gouny, S.; Cozzone, P.J.; Nicoli, F.; Gastaut, J.L.; Dano, P.; Grisoli, F.

    1991-01-01

    High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a new analytical technique which allows to readily identify and quantitate a variety of key metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relation to normal and pathological brain activity. Proton NMR spectroscopy can be performed on native CSF, with or without addition of exchange reagent (NH 4 Cl). The analysis of native CSF provides qualitative information (identification) of metabolites or xenobiotics present in the fluid. Alternately, CSF can be lyophilized and dissolved in deuterated water. This concentration offers 2 advantages: additional compounds are detected and a precise quantification of all CSF metabolites can be obtained. Both protocols require a very small volume of CFS (1-2 ml). The high informational content available on the NMR spectra of CSF, the ease-of-use of NMR spectroscopy and its cost effectiveness concur to predict that this analytical approach will keep developing to completement the array of existing tests which are already routinely performed on CSF. 6 figs [fr

  12. Positional enrichment by proton analysis (PEPA). A one-dimensional {sup 1}H-NMR approach for {sup 13}C stable isotope tracer studies in metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinaixa, Maria; Yanes, Oscar [Department of Electronic Engineering-Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), Reus (Spain); Rodriguez, Miguel A.; Capellades, Jordi [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spanish Biomedical Research Center in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), Reus (Spain); Aivio, Suvi; Stracker, Travis H. [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (Spain); Gomez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau [Department of Electronic Engineering-, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

    2017-03-20

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of {sup 13}C-satellite peaks using 1D-{sup 1}H-NMR spectra. In comparison with {sup 13}C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of {sup 13}C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of {sup 1}H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  13. Photochromism of indolino-benzopyrans studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Delbaere; J. Berthet; M. A. Salvador; G. Vermeersch; M. M. Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of photochromic 3,3-di(4′-fluorophenyl)-3H-benzopyrans fused to an indole moiety is described. The structures of photomerocyanines elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and spectrokinetic data (λmax⁡ of colored form, colorability, and rate constant of bleaching) obtained by UV-visible spectroscopy are reported.

  14. Characterization of two minor saponins from Cordia piauhiensis by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renata P; Silveira, Edilberto R; Lemos, Telma Leda G; Viana, Francisco Arnaldo; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia L

    2005-06-01

    A careful NMR analysis with full assignment of the 1H and 13C spectral data for two minor saponins isolated from stems of Cordia piauhiensis is reported. These saponins were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography and characterized as 3beta-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]pomolic acid 28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester (1) and 3beta-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]oleanolic acid 28-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] ester (2). Their structures were established using a combination of 1D and 2D (1H, 1H-COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, gs-HMQC and gs-HMBC) NMR techniques, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and chemical evidence. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Determination of the three-dimensional structure for weakly aligned biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G

    2002-01-01

    The key achievements and the potential of NMR spectroscopy for weakly aligned biomolecules are considered. Due to weak alignment, it becomes possible to determine a number of NMR parameters dependent on the orientation of biomolecules, which are averaged to zero in usual isotropic media. The addition of new orientational constraints to standard procedures of 3D structure determination markedly increases the achievable accuracy. The possibility of structure determination for biomolecules using only orientation-dependent parameters without invoking other NMR data is discussed. The methods of orientation, experimental techniques, and calculation methods are systematised. The main results obtained and the prospects of using NMR spectroscopy of weakly aligned systems to study different classes of biomolecules and to solve various problems of molecular biology are analysed. Examples of biomolecules whose structures have been determined using orientation-dependent parameters are given. The bibliography includes 508 references.

  16. Principles of Carbon Catabolite Repression in the Rice Blast Fungus: Tps1, Nmr1-3, and a MATE–Family Pump Regulate Glucose Metabolism during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartline, David; Quispe, Cristian F.; Madayiputhiya, Nandakumar; Wilson, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the genetic pathways that regulate how pathogenic fungi respond to their environment is paramount to developing effective mitigation strategies against disease. Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) is a global regulatory mechanism found in a wide range of microbial organisms that ensures the preferential utilization of glucose over less favourable carbon sources, but little is known about the components of CCR in filamentous fungi. Here we report three new mediators of CCR in the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae: the sugar sensor Tps1, the Nmr1-3 inhibitor proteins, and the multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE)–family pump, Mdt1. Using simple plate tests coupled with transcriptional analysis, we show that Tps1, in response to glucose-6-phosphate sensing, triggers CCR via the inactivation of Nmr1-3. In addition, by dissecting the CCR pathway using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated mutagenesis, we also show that Mdt1 is an additional and previously unknown regulator of glucose metabolism. Mdt1 regulates glucose assimilation downstream of Tps1 and is necessary for nutrient utilization, sporulation, and pathogenicity. This is the first functional characterization of a MATE–family protein in filamentous fungi and the first description of a MATE protein in genetic regulation or plant pathogenicity. Perturbing CCR in Δtps1 and MDT1 disruption strains thus results in physiological defects that impact pathogenesis, possibly through the early expression of cell wall–degrading enzymes. Taken together, the importance of discovering three new regulators of carbon metabolism lies in understanding how M. oryzae and other pathogenic fungi respond to nutrient availability and control development during infection. PMID:22570632

  17. Monovacancy paramagnetism in neutron-irradiated graphite probed by 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z T; Xu, C; Dmytriieva, D; Molatta, S; Wosnitza, J; Wang, Y T; Helm, M; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kühne, H

    2017-10-20

    We report on the magnetic properties of monovacancy defects in neutron-irradiated graphite, probed by 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The bulk paramagnetism of the defect moments is revealed by the temperature dependence of the NMR frequency shift and spectral linewidth, both of which follow a Curie behavior, in agreement with measurements of the macroscopic magnetization. Compared to pristine graphite, the fluctuating hyperfine fields generated by the defect moments lead to an enhancement of the 13 C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate [Formula: see text] by about two orders of magnitude. With an applied magnetic field of 7.1 T, the temperature dependence of [Formula: see text] below about 10 K can well be described by a thermally activated form, [Formula: see text], yielding a singular Zeeman energy of ([Formula: see text]) meV, in excellent agreement with the sole presence of polarized, non-interacting defect moments.

  18. High resolution NMR spectroscopy of nanocrystalline proteins at ultra-high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of uniformly- 13 C, 15 N labeled protein samples provides insight into atomic-resolution chemistry and structure. Data collection efficiency has advanced remarkably in the last decade; however, the study of larger proteins is still challenged by relatively low resolution in comparison to solution NMR. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of SSNMR protein spectra acquired at 11.7, 17.6 and 21.1 Tesla ( 1 H frequencies of 500, 750, and 900 MHz). For two protein systems-GB1, a 6 kDa nanocrystalline protein and DsbA, a 21 kDa nanocrystalline protein-line narrowing is demonstrated in all spectral regions with increasing field. Resolution enhancement is greatest in the aliphatic region, including methine, methylene and methyl sites. The resolution for GB1 increases markedly as a function of field, and for DsbA, resolution in the C-C region increases by 42%, according to the number of peaks that can be uniquely picked and integrated in the 900 MHz spectra when compared to the 500 MHz spectra. Additionally, chemical exchange is uniquely observed in the highest field spectra for at least two isoleucine Cδ1 sites in DsbA. These results further illustrate the benefits of high-field MAS SSNMR spectroscopy for protein structural studies.

  19. Raman and NMR studies of aged LiFePO4 cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpure, Shrikant C.; Bhushan, Bharat; Babu, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Raman spectroscopy used to characterize the quality of carbon coating in LiFePO 4 commercial cells aged with C-rate. ► Structural change in the carbon coating leading to low electrical conductivity is observed for the cells aged at higher C-rate. ► Nuclear magnetic spectroscopy used to characterize LiFePO 4 nanoparticles for the presence of Li. ► 7 Li peak is observed in an unaged cell, while the similar peak is absent in the aged cells. - Abstract: The carbon coated LiFePO 4 nanoparticles are used in advanced lithium-ion batteries due to low cost, high energy and power density. In this paper Raman spectroscopy is used to analyze the degradation of carbon coating around these nanoparticles in several commercial cells aged with different C-rate. Magic angle spinning 7 Li Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to characterize these nanoparticles for the presence of Li. In Raman spectroscopy data, structural change in the carbon leading to low electrical conductivity is observed for the cells aged at higher C-rate. In NMR spectroscopy data, isotropic 7 Li peak is observed in an unaged cell, while the similar peak is absent in the aged cells.

  20. NMR in the SPINE Structural Proteomics project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab, E; Atkinson, A R; Banci, L; Bertini, I; Ciofi-Baffoni, S; Brunner, K; Diercks, T; Dötsch, V; Engelke, F; Folkers, G E; Griesinger, C; Gronwald, W; Günther, U; Habeck, M; de Jong, R N; Kalbitzer, H R; Kieffer, B; Leeflang, B R; Loss, S; Luchinat, C; Marquardsen, T; Moskau, D; Neidig, K P; Nilges, M; Piccioli, M; Pierattelli, R; Rieping, W; Schippmann, T; Schwalbe, H; Travé, G; Trenner, J; Wöhnert, J; Zweckstetter, M; Kaptein, R

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the developments, role and contributions of the NMR spectroscopy groups in the Structural Proteomics In Europe (SPINE) consortium. Focusing on the development of high-throughput (HTP) pipelines for NMR structure determinations of proteins, all aspects from sample preparation, data acquisition, data processing, data analysis to structure determination have been improved with respect to sensitivity, automation, speed, robustness and validation. Specific highlights are protonless (13)C-direct detection methods and inferential structure determinations (ISD). In addition to technological improvements, these methods have been applied to deliver over 60 NMR structures of proteins, among which are five that failed to crystallize. The inclusion of NMR spectroscopy in structural proteomics pipelines improves the success rate for protein structure determinations.

  1. Sensitivity enhanced NMR spectroscopy by quenching scalar coupling mediated relaxation: Application to the direct observation of hydrogen bonds in 13C/15N-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Aizhuo; Hu Weidong; Qamar, Seema; Majumdar, Ananya [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Cellular Biochemistry and Biophysics Program (United States)

    2000-05-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the sensitivity of triple-resonance NMR experiments can be enhanced significantly through quenching scalar coupling mediated relaxation by using composite-pulse decoupling (CPD) or an adiabatic decoupling sequence on aliphatic, in particular alpha-carbons in {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins. The CPD-HNCO experiment renders 50% sensitivity enhancement over the conventional CT-HNCO experiment performed on a 12 kDa FK506 binding protein, when a total of 266 ms of amide nitrogen-carbonyl carbon defocusing and refocusing periods is employed. This is a typical time period for the direct detection of hydrogen bonds in proteins via trans-hydrogen bond {sup 3h}J{sub NC'} couplings. The experimental data fit theoretical analysis well. The significant enhancement in sensitivity makes the experiment more applicable to larger-sized proteins without resorting to perdeuteration.

  2. Characteristics of Biochar Obtained by Hydrothermal Carbonization of Cellulose for Renewable Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Daegi Kim; Kunio Yoshikawa; Ki Young Park

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydrothermal carbonization on the properties of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass was investigated for converting it into a renewable energy resource with high energy recovery efficiency. The biochar obtained from cellulose subjected to hydrothermal carbonization showed a significant increase in its carbon content and a calorific value. 13C NMR spectroscopy showed that when raw cellulose was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization above 220 °C, the resulting biochar h...

  3. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (δ 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hertkorn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available High-performance, non-target, high-resolution organic structural spectroscopy was applied to solid phase extracted marine dissolved organic matter (SPE-DOM isolated from four different depths in the open South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3° E, 18° S; Angola Basin and provided molecular level information with extraordinary coverage and resolution. Sampling was performed at depths of 5 m (Angola Current; near-surface photic zone, 48 m (Angola Current; fluorescence maximum, 200 m (still above Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; upper mesopelagic zone and 5446 m (North Atlantic Deep Water, NADW; abyssopelagic, ~30 m above seafloor and produced SPE-DOM with near 40% carbon yield and beneficial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxation properties, a crucial prerequisite for the acquisition of NMR spectra with excellent resolution. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of all four marine SPE-DOM showed smooth bulk envelopes, reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap, with a few percent of visibly resolved signatures and variable abundances for all major chemical environments. The abundance of singly oxygenated aliphatics and acetate derivatives in 1H NMR spectra declined from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM, whereas C-based aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM increased in abundance. Surface SPE-DOM contained fewer methyl esters than all other samples, likely a consequence of direct exposure to sunlight. Integration of 13C NMR spectra revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to depth, reflecting a progressive oxygenation, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Aliphatic branching increased with depth, whereas the fraction of oxygenated aliphatics declined for methine, methylene and methyl carbon. Lipids in the oldest SPE-DOM at 5446 m showed a larger share of ethyl groups and methylene carbon than observed in the other samples. Two-dimensional NMR spectra showed

  5. Effects of glycosylation on the conformation and dynamics of O-linked glycoproteins: Carbon-13 NMR studies of ovine submaxillary mucin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerken, T.A.; Butenhof, K.J.; Shogren, R.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopic studies of native and sequentially deglycosylated ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM) have been performed to examine the effects of glycosylation on the conformation and dynamics of the peptide core of O-linked glycoproteins. OSM is a large nonglobular glycoprotein in which nearly one-third of the amino acid residues are Ser and Thr which are glycosylated by the α-Neu-NAc(2-6)α-Ga1NAc- disaccharide. The β-carbon resonances of glycosylated Ser and Thr residues in intact and asialo mucin display considerable chemical shift heterogeneity which, upon the complete removal of carbohydrate, coalesces to single sharp resonances. This chemical shift heterogeneity is due to peptide sequence variability and is proposed to reflect the presence of sequence-dependent conformations of the peptide core. These different conformations are thought to be determined by steric interactions of the Ga1NAc residue with adjacent peptide residues. The absence of chemical shift heterogeneity in apo mucin is taken to indicate a loss in the peptide-carbohydrate steric interactions, consistent with a more relaxed random coiled structure. On the basis of the 13 C relaxation behavior the dynamics of the α-carbons appear to be unique to each amino acid type and glycosylation state. These results are consistent with the changes in molecular dimensions determined by light-scattering techniques for the same series of modified mucins. Taken together, these results further demonstrate that mucins possess a highly expanded conformation that is dominated by steric interactions between the peptide core and the O-linked Ga1NAc residue

  6. [Detection of peranesthetic malignant hyperthermia by muscle contracture tests and NMR spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak-Reiss, G; Gascard, J P; Redouane-Bénichou, K

    1986-01-01

    To diagnose malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS), caffeine and halothane contracture tests were performed on six patients. One of them, who presented a peroperative crisis, was recognized as MHS; the five others were negative (MHN). By means of 31P-NMR spectroscopy, the muscular energetic metabolism of these patients was studied during and after moderate exercise in normal and moderate ischaemic conditions. Metabolic abnormalities appeared in the MHS patient. It must be concluded therefore that malignant hyperthermia is a latent myopathy. 31P-NMR spectroscopy appeared to be a useful non-invasive tool for screening for this affliction.

  7. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, Adrian J. [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: adrian.charlton@csl.gov.uk; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A.; Godward, John [Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-23

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare {sup 1}H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications.

  8. Non-targeted detection of chemical contamination in carbonated soft drinks using NMR spectroscopy, variable selection and chemometrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, Adrian J.; Robb, Paul; Donarski, James A.; Godward, John

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method for detecting malicious and accidental contamination of foods has been developed using a combined 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics approach. The method has been demonstrated using a commercially available carbonated soft drink, as being capable of identifying atypical products and to identify contaminant resonances. Soft-independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to compare 1 H NMR profiles of genuine products (obtained from the manufacturer) against retail products spiked in the laboratory with impurities. The benefits of using feature selection for extracting contaminant NMR frequencies were also assessed. Using example impurities (paraquat, p-cresol and glyphosate) NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate methods resulting in detection limits of approximately 0.075, 0.2, and 0.06 mM for p-cresol, paraquat and glyphosate, respectively. These detection limits are shown to be approximately 100-fold lower than the minimum lethal dose for paraquat. The methodology presented here is used to assess the composition of complex matrices for the presence of contaminating molecules without a priori knowledge of the nature of potential contaminants. The ability to detect if a sample does not fit into the expected profile without recourse to multiple targeted analyses is a valuable tool for incident detection and forensic applications

  9. 31P NMR spectroscopy of tumors in the evaluation of response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sijens, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the effects of different kinds of therapy on tumour metabolism were investigated by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy. From the first five chapters (laboratory-animal studies) it turns out that after radiotherapy as well as after hyperthermy or chemoterapy changes can be observed in the 31P NMR spectra of tumours. In a number of cases a durable decline occurred in the ratio of the high-energetic adenosinephosphate (ATP) and the low-energeic anorganic phosphate, cuased by the mortification of tumourcells. On the other hand, tumour regression after effective chemotherapy resulted in a growth of the ATP/Pi ratio. In one case a temporary drop occurred which could be related to a temporary decrease in tumour perfusion. In anoter case a temporary drop of the ATP/Pi ratio correlated with resistence against treatment with cis-diaminodichoroplatina. In contrast with the changes in ATP/Pi ratio, the changes, after (chemo)therapy, in tumour pH do not seem to be related with the respons of the tumour. The results of the laboratory-animal experiments indicate that in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy could be applied in the clinic in order to establish betime the response of tumours on therapy. In ch. 6 initial experiences with clinical NMR spectroscopy of human breast cancer are described. The results indicate that by 31P NMR spectroscopy malignant breast tissues can be discerned from normal breast tissues, following radiotherapy and subsequent tumour regression, in the spectrum of the tumorous region an intense PCr signal developed which appeared to reflect a metabolic change in the tumous itself. 177 refs.; 27 figs.; 6 tabs

  10. Use of NMR spectroscopy in combination with pattern recognition techniques for elucidation of origin and adulteration of foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standal, Inger Beate

    2009-07-01

    Consumers and food authorities are, to an increasing extent, concerned about factors such as the origin of food, how it is produced, and if it is healthy and safe. There are methods for general quality control to map the safety and nutritional value; however there is a need for suitable analytical methods to verify information such as the production method (wild/farmed), geographical origin, species, and process history of foods. This thesis evaluates the applicability of using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combined with pattern recognition techniques for authentication of foodstuffs. Fish and marine oils were chosen as materials. 13C NMR was applied to authenticate marine oils and muscle lipids of both fatty and lean fish, according to production method (wild/farmed), geographical origin, species, and process history. 1H NMR was applied on low molecular weight compounds extracted from cod muscle to authenticate fish according to species and processing conditions. 13C NMR combined with pattern recognition techniques enabled the differentiation of marine oils according to wild/farmed and geographical origin of the raw material. It is suggested that this was mainly due to the different diets of the fish from which the oil was produced. It was also possible to authenticate marine oils according to species, and to say something about the level of mixtures detectable. The Sn-2 position specificity of fatty acids in triacylglycerols was shown to be an important characteristic to separate oils of different species. Esterified fish oil (concentrates) could easily be differentiated from natural fish oil by their 13C NMR profile. (Author)

  11. Rapid and novel discrimination and quantification of oleanolic and ursolic acids in complex plant extracts using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-Comparison with HPLC methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G.; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Troganis, Anastassios; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.

    2009-01-01

    A novel strategy for NMR analysis of mixtures of oleanolic and ursolic acids that occur in natural products is described. These important phytochemicals have similar structure and their discrimination and quantification is rather difficult. We report herein the combined use of proton-carbon heteronuclear single-quantum coherence ( 1 H- 13 C HSQC) and proton-carbon heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation ( 1 H- 13 C HMBC) NMR spectroscopy, in the identification and quantitation of oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA)in plant extracts of the Lamiaceae and Oleaceae family. The combination of 1 H- 13 C HSQC and 1 H- 13 C HMBC techniques allows the connection of the proton and carbon-13 spins across the molecular backbone resulting in the identification and, thus, discrimination of oleanolic and ursolic acid without resorting to physicochemical separation of the components. The quantitative results provided by 2D 1 H- 13 C HSQC NMR data were obtained within a short period of time (∼14 min) and are in excellent agreement with those obtained by HPLC, which support the efficiency of the suggested methodology

  12. Modeling Ne-21 NMR parameters for carbon nanosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupka, T.; Nieradka, M.; Kaminský, Jakub; Stobinski, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 10 (2013), s. 676-681 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Ne-21 NMR * GIAO NMR * molecular modeling * carbon nanostructures Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2013

  13. Dynamics in photosynthetic transient complexes studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scanu, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on fundamental aspects of protein-protein interactions. A multidisciplinary methodology for the detection and visualization of transient, lowly-populated encounter protein complexes is described. The new methodology combined paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with computational

  14. Monovacancy paramagnetism in neutron-irradiated graphite probed by 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi Tao; Xu, C; Dmytriieva, Daryna; Molatta, Sebastian; Wosnitza, J; Wang, Y T; Helm, Manfred; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kuehne, Hannes

    2017-09-18

    We report on the magnetic properties of monovacancy defects in neutron-irradiated graphite, probed by $^{13}$C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The bulk paramagnetism of the defect moments is revealed by the temperature dependence of the NMR frequency shift and spectral linewidth, both of which follow a Curie behavior, in agreement with measurements of the macroscopic magnetization. Compared to pristine graphite, the fluctuating hyperfine fields generated by the defect moments lead to an enhancement of the $^{13}$C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate $1/T_{1}$ by about two orders of magnitude. With an applied magnetic field of 7.1 T, the temperature dependence of $1/T_{1}$ below about 10 K can well be described by a thermally activated form, $1/T_{1}\\propto\\exp(-\\Delta/k_{B}T)$, yielding a singular Zeeman energy of ($0.41\\pm0.01$) meV, in excellent agreement with the sole presence of polarized, non-interacting defect moments. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  15. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    McCartt, A. Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels...

  16. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of comb-shaped polyesters based on 2-octadecyl-1,3-propanediol and phthalic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andruzzi, F.; Hvilsted, S.; Paci, M.

    1994-01-01

    of 110 000 and higher. High-resolution, solution C-13 n.m.r. spectroscopy analysis of both the diphenyl ester precursors and polyesters identified the main-chain units, the isomeric aromatic acid residue and glycol carbons, the linking and the terminal ends of the octadecyl side chain, and finally...

  18. [1-13C]Glucose entry in neuronal and astrocytic intermediary metabolism of aged rats. A study of the effects of nicergoline treatment by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccheli, Alfredo; Puccetti, Caterina; Capuani, Giorgio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Giardino, Luciana; Calzà, Laura; Battaglia, Angelo; Battistin, Leontino; Conti, Filippo

    2003-03-14

    Age-related changes in glucose utilization through the TCA cycle were studied using [1-13C]glucose and 13C, 1H NMR spectroscopy on rat brain extracts. Significant increases in lactate levels, as well as in creatine/phosphocreatine ratios (Cr/PCr), and a decrease in N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and aspartate levels were observed in aged rat brains as compared to adult animals following glucose administration. The total amount of 13C from [1-13C]glucose incorporated in glutamate, glutamine, aspartate and GABA was significantly decreased in control aged rat brains as compared to adult brains. The results showed a decrease in oxidative glucose utilization of control aged rat brains. The long-term nicergoline treatment increased NAA and glutamate levels, and decreased the lactate levels as well as the Cr/PCr ratios in aged rat brains as compared to adult rats. The total amount of 13C incorporated in glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, NAA and GABA was increased by nicergoline treatment, showing an improvement in oxidative glucose metabolism in aged brains. A significant increase in pyruvate carboxylase/pyruvate dehydrogenase activity (PC/PDH) in the synthesis of glutamate in nicergoline-treated aged rats is consistent with an increase in the transport of glutamine from glia to neurons for conversion into glutamate. In adult rat brains, no effect of nicergoline on glutamate PC/PDH activity was observed, although an increase in PC/PDH activity in glutamine was, suggesting that nicergoline affects the glutamate/glutamine cycle between neurons and glia in different ways depending on the age of animals. These results provide new insights into the effects of nicergoline on the CNS.

  19. Chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy: computation of the relevant molecular pseudoscalars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, A. David; Lazzeretti, Paolo; Pelloni, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is normally blind to chirality but it has been predicted that precessing nuclear spins in a strong magnetic field induce a rotating electric polarisation that is of opposite sign for enantiomers. The polarisation is determined by two pseudoscalars, ? and ?. The former arises from the distortion of the electronic structure by the nuclear magnetic moment in the presence of the strong magnetic field and is equivalent to the linear effect of an electric field on the nuclear shielding tensor. ? determines the temperature-dependent partial orientation of the permanent electric dipole moment of the molecule by the antisymmetric part of the nuclear shielding tensor. Computations of these two contributions are reported for the nuclei in the chiral molecules N-methyloxaziridine, 2-methyloxirane, 1,3-dimethylallene, 1-fluoroethanol, 2-fluoroazirine, 1,2-M-dioxin, 1,2-M-dithiin, 1,2-M-diselenin and 1,2-M-ditellurin. For strongly dipolar molecules, ? is typically two to three orders of magnitude greater than ?, raising hopes for the detection of chirality in NMR spectroscopy. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Nicholas Handy, F.R.S.

  20. (Cicer arietinum L.) seeds during germination by NMR spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the changes in water status during imbibition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in chickpea seeds exposed to static magnetic fields of 100 mT for 1 h. Water uptake during seed germination showed three phases with rapid initial hydration phase I, followed by ...

  1. Combined In Situ Illumination-NMR-UV/Vis Spectroscopy: A New Mechanistic Tool in Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegerer, Andreas; Nitschke, Philipp; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2018-06-18

    Synthetic applications in photochemistry are booming. Despite great progress in the development of new reactions, mechanistic investigations are still challenging. Therefore, we present a fully automated in situ combination of NMR spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and illumination to allow simultaneous and time-resolved detection of paramagnetic and diamagnetic species. This optical fiber-based setup enables the first acquisition of combined UV/Vis and NMR spectra in photocatalysis, as demonstrated on a conPET process. Furthermore, the broad applicability of combined UVNMR spectroscopy for light-induced processes is demonstrated on a structural and quantitative analysis of a photoswitch, including rate modulation and stabilization of transient species by temperature variation. Owing to the flexibility regarding the NMR hardware, temperature, and light sources, we expect wide-ranging applications of this setup in various research fields. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. [Rapid analysis of suppositories by quantitative 1H NMR spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovich, R A; Kovaleva, S A; Goriainov, S V; Vorob'ev, A N; Kalabin, G A

    2012-01-01

    Rapid analysis of suppositories with ibuprofen and arbidol by quantitative 1H NMR spectroscopy was performed. Optimal conditions for the analysis were developed. The results are useful for design of rapid methods for quality control of suppositories with different components

  3. Two flavonoids from Iboza riparia and the unambiguous assignments of the 1H and 13C NMR signals of their methoxyle groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, A.; Matida, A.; Zelnik, R.

    1988-01-01

    Two rare flavonoids, salvigenin and cirsimaritin, were isolated from the leaves of Iboza riparia. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra as well as non-quaternary carbon signals shift are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  4. Validated ¹H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for the Quantitative Determination of Glycerol in Drug Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiaxi; Wang, Pengli; Wang, Qiuying; Wang, Yanan; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2018-05-15

    In the current study, we employed high-resolution proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H and 13 C NMR) for quantitative analysis of glycerol in drug injections without any complex pre-treatment or derivatization on samples. The established methods were validated with good specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, stability, and repeatability. Our results revealed that the contents of glycerol were convenient to calculate directly via the integration ratios of peak areas with an internal standard in ¹H NMR spectra, while the integration of peak heights were proper for 13 C NMR in combination with an external calibration of glycerol. The developed methods were both successfully applied in drug injections. Quantitative NMR methods showed an extensive prospect for glycerol determination in various liquid samples.

  5. Unprecedented Carbonato Intermediates in Cyclic Carbonate Synthesis Catalysed by Bimetallic Aluminium(Salen) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Osma, José A; North, Michael; Offermans, Willem K; Leitner, Walter; Müller, Thomas E

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism by which [Al(salen)]2 O complexes catalyse the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide in the absence of a halide cocatalyst has been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) studies, mass spectrometry and (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR and infrared spectroscopies provide evidence for the formation of an unprecedented carbonato bridged bimetallic aluminium complex which is shown to be a key intermediate for the halide-free synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide. Deuterated and enantiomerically-pure epoxides were used to study the reaction pathway. Based on the experimental and theoretical results, a catalytic cycle is proposed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the effects of retinal on the dynamic structure and stability of lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yoshio; Hanafusa, Yoshito; Toda, Masakazu; Chujo, Riichiro

    1982-01-01

    The effects of retinal and vitamin A on the dynamic structure and stability of hen egg yolk lecithin bilayers have been studied by means of carbon-13 and proton NMR spectroscopies. 13 C spin-lattice relaxation and paramagnetic ion permeability studies on lecithin bilayers indicate a marked decrease in flexibility of the lipid acyl chain and a breakdown of membrane impermeableness to ion by the intercalated all-trans- and 11-cis-retinal, whereas the effect of incorporated vitamin A on the fluidity of bilayers is small and its impermeableness to ion remains effective even in the presence of higher concentration of vitamin A. The experimental results are discussed in connection with the mechanism of the permeability change in photoreceptive disk membrane. (author)

  7. Novel insights from NMR spectroscopy into seasonal changes in the composition of dissolved organic matter exported to the Bering Sea by the Yukon River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Aiken, George R.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal (spring freshet, summer–autumn, and winter) variability in the chemical composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Yukon River was determined using advanced one- and two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, coupled with isotopic measurements and UV–visible spectroscopy. Analyses were performed on two major DOM fractions, the hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) and transphilic organic acid (TPIA) fractions obtained using XAD resins. Together these two fractions comprised 64–74% of the total DOM. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) accounted for the majority of carbon atoms in the HPOA (63–77%) and TPIA (54–78%) samples, and more so in winter and summer than in spring samples. 2D and selective NMR data revealed association of abundant nonprotonated O-alkyl and quaternary alkyl C (OCnp, OCnpO and Cq, 13–17% of HPOA and 15–20% of TPIA) and isolated O–CH structures with CRAM, which were not recognized in previous studies. Spectral editing and 2D NMR allowed for the discrimination of carbohydrate-like O-alkyl C from non-carbohydrate O-alkyl C. Whereas two spring freshet TPIA samples contained carbohydrate clusters such as carboxylated carbohydrates (16% and 26%), TPIA samples from other seasons or HPOA samples mostly had small amounts (<8%) of sugar rings dispersed in a nonpolar alkyl environment. Though nonprotonated aromatic C represented the largest fraction of aromatic C in all HPOA/TPIA isolates, only a small fraction (∼5% in HPOA and 3% in TPIA) was possibly associated with dissolved black carbon. Our results imply a relatively stable portion of DOM exported by the Yukon River across different seasons, due to the predominance of CRAM and their associated nonprotonated C–O and O–C–O structures, and elevated reactivity (bio- and photo-lability) of spring DOM due to the presence of terrestrial inputs enriched in carbohydrates and aromatic structures.

  8. Carbon magnetic resonance spectroscopy on carbon-13-labeled uracil in 5S ribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamill, W.D.; Grant, D.M.; Cooper, R.B.; Harmon, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    The carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the 13 C-enriched C-4 uridine carbons in 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid of Salmonella typhimurium, strain JL-1055, was obtained. The most striking feature of the 5S RNA spectrum was the large number of well-resolved lines in the uridine band covering a chemical shift range of approximately 3.6 ppM. This data was used to obtain information on the secondary structure. The number of uridines involved in secondary interactions is estimated to be at least 75% and may be as high as 95%

  9. Synergistic effect of the simultaneous chemometric analysis of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic and stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C) data: Application to wine analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monakhova, Yulia B., E-mail: yul-monakhova@mail.ru [Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt (CVUA) Karlsruhe, Weissenburger Strasse 3, Karlsruhe 76187 (Germany); Bruker Biospin GmbH, Silberstreifen, Rheinstetten 76287 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya Street 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Godelmann, Rolf [Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt (CVUA) Karlsruhe, Weissenburger Strasse 3, Karlsruhe 76187 (Germany); Hermann, Armin [Landesuntersuchungsamt -Institut für Lebensmittelchemie und Arzneimittelprüfung, Emy-Roeder-Straße 1, Mainz 55129 (Germany); Kuballa, Thomas [Chemisches und Veterinäruntersuchungsamt (CVUA) Karlsruhe, Weissenburger Strasse 3, Karlsruhe 76187 (Germany); Cannet, Claire; Schäfer, Hartmut; Spraul, Manfred [Bruker Biospin GmbH, Silberstreifen, Rheinstetten 76287 (Germany); Rutledge, Douglas N. [AgroParisTech, UMR 1145, Ingénierie Procédés Aliments, 16 rue Claude Bernard, Paris F-75005 (France)

    2014-06-23

    Highlights: • {sup 1}H NMR profilings of 718 wines were fused with stable isotope analysis data (SNIF-NMR, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C). • The best improvement was obtained for prediction of the geographical origin of wine. • Certain enhancement was also obtained for the year of vintage (from 88 to 97% for {sup 1}H NMR to 99% for the fused data). • Independent component analysis was used as an alternative chemometric tool for classification. - Abstract: It is known that {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy represents a good tool for predicting the grape variety, the geographical origin, and the year of vintage of wine. In the present study we have shown that classification models can be improved when {sup 1}H NMR profiles are fused with stable isotope (SNIF-NMR, {sup 18}O, {sup 13}C) data. Variable selection based on clustering of latent variables was performed on {sup 1}H NMR data. Afterwards, the combined data of 718 wine samples from Germany were analyzed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), factorial discriminant analysis (FDA) and independent components analysis (ICA). Moreover, several specialized multiblock methods (common components and specific weights analysis (ComDim), consensus PCA and consensus PLS-DA) were applied to the data. The best improvement in comparison with {sup 1}H NMR data was obtained for prediction of the geographical origin (up to 100% for the fused data, whereas stable isotope data resulted only in 60–70% correct prediction and {sup 1}H NMR data alone in 82–89% respectively). Certain enhancement was obtained also for the year of vintage (from 88 to 97% for {sup 1}H NMR to 99% for the fused data), whereas in case of grape varieties improved models were not obtained. The combination of {sup 1}H NMR data with stable isotope data improves efficiency of classification models for geographical origin and vintage of wine and can be potentially used for other food products as well.

  10. Cerebral glucose metabolism and the glutamine cycle as detected by in vivo and in vitro 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Espinosa, María A; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Sierra, Alejandra; Benito, Marina; Fonseca, Carla; Gray, Heather L; Bartnik, Brenda L; García-Martín, María L; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2004-01-01

    We review briefly 13C NMR studies of cerebral glucose metabolism with an emphasis on the roles of glial energetics and the glutamine cycle. Mathematical modeling analysis of in vivo 13C turnover experiments from the C4 carbons of glutamate and glutamine are consistent with: (i) the glutamine cycle being the major cerebral metabolic route supporting glutamatergic neurotransmission, (ii) glial glutamine synthesis being stoichiometrically coupled to glycolytic ATP production, (iii) glutamine serving as the main precursor of neurotransmitter glutamate and (iv) glutamatergic neurotransmission being supported by lactate oxidation in the neurons in a process accounting for 60-80% of the energy derived from glucose catabolism. However, more recent experimental approaches using inhibitors of the glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (trifluoroacetic acid, TFA) or of glutamine synthase (methionine sulfoximine, MSO) reveal that a considerable portion of the energy required to support glutamine synthesis is derived from the oxidative metabolism of glucose in the astroglia and that a significant amount of the neurotransmitter glutamate is produced from neuronal glucose or lactate rather than from glial glutamine. Moreover, a redox switch has been proposed that allows the neurons to use either glucose or lactate as substrates for oxidation, depending on the relative availability of these fuels under resting or activation conditions, respectively. Together, these results suggest that the coupling mechanisms between neuronal and glial metabolism are more complex than initially envisioned.

  11. NMR-based approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals: radiochemical purity, specific activity, and radioactive concentration values by proton and tritium NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, David J; Dormer, Peter G; Hesk, David; Pollack, Scott R; Lavey, Carolee Flader

    2015-06-15

    Compounds containing tritium are widely used across the drug discovery and development landscape. These materials are widely utilized because they can be efficiently synthesized and produced at high specific activity. Results from internally calibrated (3)H and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggests that at least in some cases, this calibrated approach could supplement or potentially replace radio-high-performance liquid chromatography for radiochemical purity, dilution and scintillation counting for the measurement of radioactivity per volume, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis for the determination of specific activity. In summary, the NMR-derived values agreed with those from the standard approaches to within 1% to 9% for solution count and specific activity. Additionally, the NMR-derived values for radiochemical purity deviated by less than 5%. A benefit of this method is that these values may be calculated at the same time that (3)H NMR analysis provides the location and distribution of tritium atoms within the molecule. Presented and discussed here is the application of this method, advantages and disadvantages of the approach, and a rationale for utilizing internally calibrated (1)H and (3)H NMR spectroscopy for specific activity, radioactive concentration, and radiochemical purity whenever acquiring (3)H NMR for tritium location. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. NMR spectroscopy of organic compounds of selenium and tellurium. Communication 8. Constants of spin-spin interaction of /sup 125/Te-/sup 1/o/sup 3/C in nmr spectra of unsaturated organtellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalabin, G.A.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Valeev, R.B. (Irkutskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1981-06-01

    On the basis of /sup 13/C NMR spectra of a series of unsaturated and aromatic tellurium compounds the constants of spin-spin interaction (SSIC) (sup(1.2)J(Te, C)) are measured. A reliable linear relation between /sup 1/J(Te, C) and s-character of a carbon orbitale forming bond with tellurium is found. Correlation of straight SSIC of carbon with selenium and tellurium in isological compounds is established.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of the biosynthetic pathways leading to δ-aminolevulinic acid from the Shemin precursor glycine via the C5 pathway in Arthrobacter hyalinus by analysis of 13C-labeled coproporphyrinogen III biosynthesized from [2-13C]glycine, [1-13C]acetate, and [2-13C]acetate using 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumi Iida

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathways leading to δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) from the Shemin precursor glycine via the C5 pathway in Arthrobacter hyalinus were quantitatively evaluated by means of feeding experiments with [2- 13 C]glycine, sodium [1- 13 C]acetate, and sodium [2- 13 C]acetate, followed by analysis of the labeling patterns of coproporphyrinogen III (Copro'gen III) (biosynthesized from ALA) using 13 C NMR spectroscopy. Two biosynthetic pathways leading to ALA from glycine via the C5 pathway were identified: i.e., transformation of glycine to l-serine catalyzed by glycine hydroxymethyltransferase, and glycine synthase-catalyzed catabolism of glycine to N 5 , N 10 -methylene-tetrahydrofolic acid (THF), which reacts with another molecule of glycine to afford l-serine. l-Serine is transformed to acetyl-CoA via pyruvic acid. Acetyl-CoA enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle, affording 2-oxoglutaric acid, which in turn is transformed to l-glutamic acid. The l-glutamic acid enters the C5 pathway, affording ALA in A. hyalinus. A 13 C NMR spectroscopic comparison of the labeling patterns of Copro'gen III obtained after feeding of [2- 13 C]glycine, sodium [1- 13 C]acetate, and sodium [2- 13 C]acetate showed that [2- 13 C]glycine transformation and [2- 13 C]glycine catabolism in A. hyalinus proceed in the ratio of 52 and 48 %. The reaction of [2- 13 C]glycine and N 5 , N 10 -methylene-THF, that of glycine and N 5 , N 10 -[methylene- 13 C]methylene-THF generated from the [2- 13 C]glycine catabolism, and that of [2- 13 C]glycine and N 5 , N 10 -[methylene- 13 C]methylene-THF transformed the fed [2- 13 C]glycine to [1- 13 C]acetyl-CoA, [2- 13 C]acetyl-CoA, and [1,2- 13 C 2 ]acetyl-CoA in the ratios of 42, 37, and 21 %, respectively. These labeled acetyl-CoAs were then incorporated into ALA. Our results provide a quantitative picture of the pathways of biosynthetic transformation to ALA from glycine in A. hyalinus. (author)

  14. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins; Amelioration de la resolution dans la resonance magnetique nucleaire multidimensionnelle des proteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, L

    2004-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C{sup 13}-enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C{sup 13}-labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C{sup 13}-enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C{sup 13} spin pairs. (author)

  15. Analysis of neuron–astrocyte metabolic cooperation in the brain of db/db mice with cognitive decline using 13C NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Yongquan; Wang, Dan; Cai, Aimin; Lin, Qiuting; Zhao, Liangcai; Chen, Minjiang; Deng, Mingjie; Ye, Xinjian; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been linked to cognitive impairment, but its potential metabolic mechanism is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore neuron–astrocyte metabolic cooperation in the brain of diabetic (db/db, BKS.Cg-m+/+ Leprdb/J) mice with cognitive decline using 13C NMR technique in combination with intravenous [2-13C]-acetate and [3-13C]-lactate infusions. We found that the 13C-enrichment from [2-13C]-acetate into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate, succinate, was significant...

  16. Exploring high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy for metabonomic analysis of apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermathen, Martina; Marzorati, Mattia; Vermathen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Classical liquid-state high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy has proved a powerful tool in the metabonomic analysis of liquid food samples like fruit juices. In this paper the application of (1)H high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy to apple tissue is presented probing its potential for metabonomic studies. The (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra are discussed in terms of the chemical composition of apple tissue and compared to liquid-state NMR spectra of apple juice. Differences indicate that specific metabolic changes are induced by juice preparation. The feasibility of HR-MAS NMR-based multivariate analysis is demonstrated by a study distinguishing three different apple cultivars by principal component analysis (PCA). Preliminary results are shown from subsequent studies comparing three different cultivation methods by means of PCA and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of the HR-MAS NMR data. The compounds responsible for discriminating organically grown apples are discussed. Finally, an outlook of our ongoing work is given including a longitudinal study on apples.

  17. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaturonrusmee, Wasna; Arthonvorakul, Areerat; Assateranuwat, Adisorn

    2005-10-01

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  18. Carbon-13 solid state NMR studies in the aromatization of residual coals from hydropyrolised cellulose; Estudo por {sup 13} C RMN em estado solido da aromatizacao em carvoes residuais de celulose hidropirolisada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, J.D.; Luengo, C.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Snape, C.A. [Dept. Pure and Apllied Chemistry, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Pure cellulose was pyrolyzed is a fixed-bed reactor under hydrogen pressure (hydropyrolysis). Residual chars were collected and analysed by solid state nmr {sup 13} C (CP-MAS) and elemental. Hydrophyrolysis parameters such as final temperature in the range of 300 to 520 deg C and hydrogen pressure from 5 to 100 atm gave different char samples. CP-MAS spectra were obtained in a BRUKER MSL-100 spectrometer. The results showed that the aromatic and aliphatic fractions had strong dependence with temperature and no influence with pressure. Elemental analysis indicated the carbon content increased more with temperature than the pressure increasing. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy? NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  20. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures

  1. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  2. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy as a tool to link soil organic matter composition to ecosystem processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Environmental factors (e.g. temperature and moisture) and the size and composition of soil microbial populations are often considered the main drivers of soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization. Less consideration is given to the role of SOM as a substrate for microbial metabolism and the importance of the organo-chemical composition of SOM on decomposition. In addition, a fraction of the SOM is often considered as recalcitrant to mineralization leading to accumulation of SOM. However, recently the concept of intrinsic recalcitrance of SOM to mineralization has been questioned. The challenge in investigating the role of SOM composition on its mineralization to a large extent stems from the difficulties in obtaining high resolution characterization of a very complex matrix. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a widely used tool to characterize SOM. However, SOM is a very complex mixture and in the resulting 13C NMR spectra, the identified functional groups may represent different molecular fragments that appear in the same spectral region leading to broad peaks. These overlaps defy attempts to identify molecular moieties, and this makes it impossible to derive information at a resolution needed for evaluating e.g. recalcitrance of SOM. Here we applied a method, developed in wood science for the pulp paper industry, to achieve a better characterization of SOM. We directly dissolved finely ground organic layers of boreal forest floors-litters, fibric and humic horizons of both coniferous and broadleaved stands-in dimethyl sulfoxide and analyzed the resulting solution with a two-dimensional (2D) 1H-13C NMR experiment. We will discuss methodological aspects related to the ability to identify and quantify individual molecular moieties in SOM. We will demonstrate how the spectra resolve signals of CH groups in a 2D plane determined by the 13C and 1H chemical shifts, thereby vastly increasing the resolving power and information content of NMR spectra. The

  3. Probing Spin Crossover in a Solution by Paramagnetic NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander A; Denisov, Gleb L; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Nelyubina, Yulia V; Novikov, Valentin V

    2017-12-18

    Spin transitions in spin-crossover compounds are now routinely studied in the solid state by magnetometry; however, only a few methods exist for studies in solution. The currently used Evans method, which relies on NMR spectroscopy to measure the magnetic susceptibility, requires the availability of a very pure sample of the paramagnetic compound and its exact concentration. To overcome these limitations, we propose an alternative NMR-based technique for evaluating spin-state populations by only using the chemical shifts of a spin-crossover compound; those can be routinely obtained for a solution that contains unknown impurities and paramagnetic admixtures or is contaminated otherwise.

  4. Characterizing crystal disorder of trospium chloride: a comprehensive,(13) C CP/MAS NMR, DSC, FTIR, and XRPD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanova, Martina; Sturcova, Adriana; Brus, Jiri; Benes, Hynek; Skorepova, Eliska; Kratochvil, Bohumil; Cejka, Jan; Sedenkova, Ivana; Kobera, Libor; Policianova, Olivia; Sturc, Antonin

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction data of trospium chloride (TCl) products crystallized from different mixtures of water-ethanol [φ(EtOH) = 0.5-1.0] at various temperatures (0°C, 20°C) and initial concentrations (saturated solution, 30%-50% excess of solvent) revealed extensive structural variability of TCl. Although (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra indicated broad variety of structural phases arising from molecular disorder, temperature-modulated DSC identified presence of two distinct components in the products. FTIR spectra revealed alterations in the hydrogen bonding network (ionic hydrogen bond formation), whereas the X-ray diffraction reflected unchanged unit cell parameters. These results were explained by a two-component character of TCl products in which a dominant polymorphic form is accompanied by partly separated nanocrystalline domains of a secondary phase that does not provide clear Bragg reflections. These phases slightly differ in the degree of molecular disorder, in the quality of crystal lattice and hydrogen bonding network. It is also demonstrated that, for the quality control of such complex products, (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy combined with factor analysis (FA) can satisfactorily be used for categorizing the individual samples: FA of (13) C CP/MAS NMR spectra found clear relationships between the extent of molecular disorder and crystallization conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 102:1235-1248, 2013. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Carbonaceous species (coke) characterization in zeolites by solid state {sup 13} C NMR; Caracterizacao de especies carbonaceas (coque) em zeolitos por RMN de {sup 13} C estado solido (CP/MAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Claudio J.A.; Menezes, Sonia C [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1992-12-31

    This work applies solid state {sup 13} C NMR for characterization of carbonaceous species (coke) deposited on zeolites after contact with n-hexane at 370 deg C. The results have shown two types of carbon: saturated (sp{sup 3}) and unsaturated (sp{sup 2}) 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Ion counting in supercapacitor electrodes using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Wang, Hao; Trease, Nicole M; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2014-01-01

    (19)F NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the local environments of anions in supercapacitor electrodes and to quantify changes in the populations of adsorbed species during charging. In the absence of an applied potential, anionic species adsorbed within carbon micropores (in-pore) are distinguished from those in large mesopores and spaces between particles (ex-pore) by a characteristic nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). Adsorption experiments and two-dimensional exchange experiments confirm that anions are in dynamic equilibrium between the in- and ex-pore environments with an exchange rate in the order of tens of Hz. (19)F in situ NMR spectra recorded at different charge states reveal changes in the intensity and NICS of the in-pore resonances, which are interpreted in term of changes in the population and local environments of the adsorbed anions that arise due to the charge-storage process. A comparison of the results obtained for a range of electrolytes reveals that several factors influence the charging mechanism. For a tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, positive polarisation of the electrode is found to proceed by anion adsorption at a low concentration, whereas increased ion exchange plays a more important role for a high concentration electrolyte. In contrast, negative polarization of the electrode proceeds by cation adsorption for both concentrations. For a tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, anion expulsion is observed in the negative charging regime; this is attributed to the reduced mobility and/or access of the larger cations inside the pores, which forces the expulsion of anions in order to build up ionic charge. Significant anion expulsion is also observed in the negative charging regime for alkali metal bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide electrolytes, suggesting that more subtle factors also affect the charging mechanism.

  7. Adducts of nitrogenous ligands with rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates and tetraformamidinate: NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cmoch, Piotr; Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Kamieński, Bohdan; Senkara, Elżbieta

    2014-03-01

    Complexation of tetrakis(μ2-N,N'-diphenylformamidinato-N,N')-di-rhodium(II) with ligands containing nitrile, isonitrile, amine, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl, isocyanate, and isothiocyanate functional groups has been studied in liquid and solid phases using (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR, (13)C and (15)N cross polarisation-magic angle spinning NMR, and absorption spectroscopy in the visible range. The complexation was monitored using various NMR physicochemical parameters, such as chemical shifts, longitudinal relaxation times T1 , and NOE enhancements. Rhodium(II) tetraformamidinate selectively bonded only unbranched amine (propan-1-amine), pentanenitrile, and (1-isocyanoethyl)benzene. No complexation occurred in the case of ligands having hydroxyl, sulfhydryl, isocyanate, and isothiocyanate functional groups, and more expanded amine molecules such as butan-2-amine and 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane. Such features were opposite to those observed in rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates, forming adducts with all kind of ligands. Special attention was focused on the analysis of Δδ parameters, defined as a chemical shift difference between signal in adduct and corresponding signal in free ligand. In the case of (1)H NMR, Δδ values were either negative in adducts of rhodium(II) tetraformamidinate or positive in adducts of rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates. Experimental findings were supported by density functional theory molecular modelling and gauge independent atomic orbitals chemical shift calculations. The calculation of chemical shifts combined with scaling procedure allowed to reproduce qualitatively Δδ parameters. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Erisa; Sugase, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  9. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Structural and Chemical Biology (United States); Harada, Erisa [Suntory Foundation for Life Sciences, Bioorganic Research Institute (Japan); Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@sunbor.or.jp, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  10. NMR spectroscopy in the optimization and evaluation of RAFT agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, B.; McLeary, J.B.; van den Dungen, E.; Pound, G.

    2007-01-01

    The selection of a suitable mediating agent in Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) mediated polymerization is crucial to the degree of control that can be achieved. An overview of work from the Stellenbosch group is presented in which the use of NMR spectroscopy as a tool for

  11. 5-Chlorouracil and 5-bromouracil acid-base equilibrium study in water and DMSO by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrakhimova, G. S.; Ovchinnikov, M. Yu; Lobov, A. N.; Spirikhin, L. V.; Khursan, S. L.; Ivanov, S. P.

    2018-04-01

    Mechanism of 5-chloro- and 5-bromouracil deprotonation in water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been studied by the 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy. NMR spectra were interpreted using DFT quantum chemical calculations at the CSGT-PCM-TPSSTPSS/6-311+G(d, p) level of theory. It was found that 5-chloro- (5ClU) and 5-bromouracil (5BrU) are present as a mixture of two anionic forms where the deprotonation is realized at the first (N1) and the third (N3) positions of the pyrimidine ring. N1 form is major for water-alkaline [xAN1/xAN3 (5ClU) = 0.65/0.35 and xAN1/xAN3 (5BrU) = 0.72/0.28, x - molar fraction] and the only one for DMSO solution.

  12. Monitoring the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with chitosan and folic acid by two-dimensional diffusion-ordered nmr spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Torres, Mary H.; Molina, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    A conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan and folic acid has been prepared. It was characterized by diffusion ordered two-dimensional hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy which revealed the presence of a conjugate that was......A conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes, chitosan and folic acid has been prepared. It was characterized by diffusion ordered two-dimensional hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy which revealed the presence of a conjugate...... that was generated by the linkage between the carboxyl moiety of the folic acid and the amino group of the chitosan, which in turn was non-covalently bound to the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The obtained diffusion coefficient values demonstrated that free folic acid diffused more rapidly than the folic acid...... conjugated to single-walled carbon nanotubes-chitosan. The values of the proton signal of hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and two-dimensional hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy further confirmed that the folic acid was conjugated to the chitosan, wrapping the single...

  13. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVSCARD filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  14. In vivo NMR analysis of incorporation of [2-13C] glycine into silk fibroin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Nagashima, Mariko; Demura, Makoto; Osanai, Minoru.

    1990-01-01

    The biosynthetic mechanism of silk fibroin in silkworms, Bombyx mori, is unique because this fibrous protein composed mainly of glycine, alanine and serine is produced very rapidly in large quantity in the posterior silk glands. It is very meaningful to investigate into the biosynthesis of silk protein under nondestructive condition by in vivo NMR and C-13 labeling techniques. The sugar metabolism related to the production of silk fibroin was analyzed by monitoring the change in the C-13 labeled peaks in the NMR spectra for silkworms. In this paper, the monitoring of the 2-(C-13) glycine metabolism in Bombyx mori by the C-13 NMR in vivo is reported. In particular, the in vivo transport of glycine from the midgut to the posterior silk gland was measured, and the rate constants were determined with the course of the peak intensity in the C-13 NMR spectra. It is possible to discuss quantitatively the in vivo production of silk fibroin with these rate constants. The experiment and the results are reported. The in vivo C-13 NMR spectra of a 5 day old, 5th instar larva of Bombyx mori after the oral administration of 2-(C-13) glycine are shown. The significant increase of the peak intensity occurred. (K.I.)

  15. Studies of the pH dependence of 13C shifts and carbon-carbon coupling constants of [U-13C]aspartic and -glutamic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.; Walker, T.E.; Kollman, V.H.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    13 C NMR studies of the chemical shifts and carbon--carbon spin--spin coupling constants of 90% [U- 13 C]aspartic and -glutamic acids are reported. Effects of titration of the two carboxyl groups are separated computationally and the results compared with those for asparagine and glutamine, aspartate and glutamate containing peptides, and a series of amino-n-butyric acids. The results indicate that the carboxyl carbon shift resulting from titration of the carboxyl group is strongly dependent on its distance (number of bonds) from an amino group. Alternatively, remote methyl groups exhibit a much smaller titration induced shift than carboxyl groups in the corresponding position. Significant remote effects of pH titration on the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling are also observed, particularly for couplings involving the side-chain carboxyl carbons. These results are discussed in terms of polarization of the C--O bonds in response to titration of a remote carboxyl group. Values of 3 J/sub CC/ in asparate and glutamate indicate a strong conformational dependence. Rotamer populations predicted on the basis of the observed couplings and theoretical INDO calculations are in good agreement with values based on analysis of the 3 J/sub HH/ and 3 J/sub CH/ couplings. For a given conformation of glutamic acid, it is found that 3 J 14 is considerably smaller than 3 J 25 . This result is consistent with obsrvations on a number of other 13 C-labeled amino acids. 5 figures, 4 tables

  16. The contribution of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to understanding biomineralization: Atomic and molecular structure of bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of mineralized tissues, in particular bone. Bone exemplifies the organic-inorganic composite structure inherent in mineralized tissues. The organic component of the extracellular matrix in bone is primarily composed of ordered fibrils of collagen triple-helical molecules, in which the inorganic component, calcium phosphate particles, composed of stacks of mineral platelets, are arranged around the fibrils. This perspective argues that key factors in our current structural model of bone mineral have come about through NMR spectroscopy and have yielded the primary information on how the mineral particles interface and bind with the underlying organic matrix. The structure of collagen within the organic matrix of bone or any other structural tissue has yet to be determined, but here too, this perspective shows there has been real progress made through application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other techniques. In particular, NMR spectroscopy has highlighted the fact that even within these structural proteins, there is considerable dynamics, which suggests that one should be cautious when using inherently static structural models, such as those arising from X-ray diffraction analyses, to gain insight into molecular roles. It is clear that the NMR approach is still in its infancy in this area, and that we can expect many more developments in the future, particularly in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bone diseases and ageing.

  17. Structural characterization of homogalacturonan by NMR spectroscopy - assignment of reference compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2008-01-01

    Complete assignment of 1H and 13C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2 mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure...

  18. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  19. Application of DRIFTS, 13 C NMR, and py-MBMS to Characterize the Effects of Soil Science Oxidation Assays on Soil Organic Matter Composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margenot, Andrew J.; Calderón, Francisco J.; Magrini, Kimberly A.; Evans, Robert J.

    2016-12-20

    Chemical oxidations are routinely employed in soil science to study soil organic matter (SOM), and their interpretation could be improved by characterizing oxidation effects on SOM composition with spectroscopy. We investigated the effects of routinely employed oxidants on SOM composition in a Mollic Xerofluvent representative of intensively managed agricultural soils in the California Central Valley. Soil samples were subjected to oxidation by potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Additionally, non-oxidized and oxidized soils were treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) to evaluate reduction of the mineral component to improve spectroscopy of oxidation effects. Oxidized non-HF and HF-treated soils were characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS), and for particle size distribution (PSD) using laser diffractometry (LD). Across the range of soil organic carbon (OC) removed by oxidations (14-72%), aliphatic C-H stretch at 3000-2800 cm-1 (DRIFTS) decreased with OC removal, and this trend was enhanced by HF treatment due to significant demineralization in this soil (70%). Analysis by NMR spectroscopy was feasible only after HF treatment, and did not reveal trends between OC removal and C functional groups. Pyrolysis-MBMS did not detect differences among oxidations, even after HF treatment of soils. Hydrofluoric acid entailed OC loss (13-39%), and for H2O2 oxidized soils increased C:N and substantially decreased mean particle size. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using HF to improve characterizations of SOM composition following oxidations as practiced in soil science, in particular for DRIFTS. Since OC removal by oxidants, mineral removal by HF, and the interaction of oxidants and HF observed for this soil may

  20. Recombinant Kinase Production and Fragment Screening by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Byeonggu; Ahn, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has rapidly evolved and several drugs or drug candidates developed by FBDD approach are clinically in use or in clinical trials. For example, vemurafenib, a V600E mutated BRAF inhibitor, was developed by utilizing FBDD approach and approved by FDA in 2011. In FBDD, screening of fragments is the starting step for identification of hits and lead generation. Fragment screening usually relies on biophysical techniques by which the protein-bound small molecules can be detected. NMR spectroscopy has been extensively used to study the molecular interaction between the protein and the ligand, and has many advantages in fragment screening over other biophysical techniques. This chapter describes the practical aspects of fragment screening by saturation transfer difference NMR.

  1. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Kanmi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-γ nuclei (e.g., 13C and 15N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., 1H and 19F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of 1H-1H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in 1H detected 2D 1H{l_brace}13C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional 13C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear 1H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5m$\\bar{x}$, PMLG5mm$\\bar{x}$x and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based

  2. Utilization of carbon 13-labelled stable isotopes for studying drug toxicity on cellular metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, M.; Wietzerbin, J.; Tran-Dinh, S.

    1994-01-01

    A new approach for studying the effects of two drugs, amphotericine B (AMB), an anti-fungal antibiotic, and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DG), on the glucose metabolism in brewer yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), is presented; AMB interacts with the membrane sterols, inducing formation of pores through which ions and small molecules can pass. DG may enter in the cytosol, where it is phosphoryled by hexokinase into deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (DG6P) which disappears very slowly. DG slows down the glycolysis process and induces the formation of new substances. This paper shows the advantages of utilizing carbon 13-labelled substrates combined to the NMR-13C and NMR-1H techniques. 6 figs., 5 refs

  3. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bax, A.; Lerner, L.

    1986-01-01

    Great spectral simplification can be obtained by spreading the conventional one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum in two independent frequency dimensions. This so-called two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy removes spectral overlap, facilitates spectral assignment, and provides a wealth of additional information. For example, conformational information related to interproton distances is available from resonance intensities in certain types of two-dimensional experiments. Another method generates 1 H NMR spectra of a preselected fragment of the molecule, suppressing resonances from other regions and greatly simplifying spectral appearance. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy can also be applied to the study of 13 C and 15 N, not only providing valuable connectivity information but also improving sensitivity of 13 C and 15 N detection by up to two orders of magnitude. 45 references, 10 figures

  4. Chemical exchange in novel spirobicyclic zwitterionic Janovsky complexes using dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culf, A S; Cuperlović-Culf, M; Ouellette, R J

    2009-02-01

    Highly coloured Janovsky complexes have been known for over 120 years, being used in many colourimetric analytical procedures. In this present study, two novel and stable nitrocyclohexadienyl spirobicyclic, zwitterionic Janovsky anionic hydantoin sigma-complexes, rac-1,3-diisopropyl-6-nitro-2,4-dioxo-1,3-diazaspiro[4.5]deca-6,9-dien-8-ylideneazinate, ammonium internal salt (1) and 1,3-diisopropyl-2,4-dioxo-1,3-diazaspiro[4.5]deca-6,9-dien-8-ylideneazinate, ammonium internal salt (2) have been prepared and characterised by NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and UV/visible methods. For the p-mononitro-substituted complex (2), we discovered chemical exchange behaviour using 1D saturation transfer and 2D exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) (1)H NMR techniques. The coalescence temperature was determined to be 62 degrees C in d(3)-acetonitrile. Analysis of these data provided a Gibbs free energy of activation, DeltaG double dagger, of + 67 kJ mole(-1), a rate constant, k, coalescence of 220 Hz and an equilibrium constant, K(eqm), of 0.98 as estimates of the exchange process in this solvent. Of the two mechanisms proposed for this fluxional behaviour, ring opening to a substituted benzene or proton exchange, a further theoretical modelling study of 1D (1)H NMR spectra was able to confirm that simple proton exchange between the two nitrogen sites of the hydantoin ring provided an accurate simulation of the observed experimental evidence. Interestingly, the o,p-dinitro-substituted complex (1) did not show any chemical exchange behaviour up to 150 degrees C in d(3)-acetonitrile (to 75 degrees C) and d(6)-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Molecular modelling at the MM2 level suggests that steric collisions of an N-acyl isopropyl substituent of the hydantoin ring with the ortho-nitro group of the spirofused cyclohexadienyl ring prevents the proposed proton exchange mechanism occurring in this case. 2008 Crown in the right of Canada. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Solid-State NMR and DFT Studies on the Formation of Well-Defined Silica-Supported Tantallaaziridines: From Synthesis to Catalytic Application

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Bilel; Pelletier, Jeremie; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Chen, Yin; El Eter, Mohamad; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and 1H,13C HETCOR and DQ TQ solid-state (SS) NMR spectroscopy. The formation mechanism, by β-H abstraction, was investigated by SS NMR spectroscopy and supported by DFT calculations. The C-H activation of the dimethylamide

  6. C-13 NMR spectra of all-trans-N-retinylidene-n-butylamine as an analogue of the Schiff base linkage compound in visual pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokito, Y; Inoue, Y; Chujo, R [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Miyoshi, Y

    1975-01-01

    In the process of visual excitation, a visual pigment, rhodopsin, plays a role of a photoreceptor, and it has been known that the first step in the process is the photoisomerization of the rhodopsin visual chromophore. The bathochromic shift has been regarded as the result of the formation of Schiff base linkage of retinal with opsin. In this study, C-13 NMR spectra were obtained for the analogue of the compound with Schiff base linkage in the visual pigment, and the chemical shift change for going from all trans-retinal to all trans-N-retinylidene-n-butylamine (NRB) was discussed. Further, the effect of N protonation in NRB was examined as the reflection of the function of visual pigment. The compound with Schiff base linkage of all trans-retinal with n-butylamine, namely NRB, was used. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of carbon-13 Fourier transformation were obtained for this sample at natural abundance with a JNM PS-100 spectrometer. In the C-13 FT NMR spectrum of NRB, besides eight peaks in the C-13 NMR of all trans-retinal, four peaks were observed in higher field region. They originated from the portion of n-butylamine in the compound with Schiff base linkage. The peaks in lower field region were assigned to eleven conjugated polyene carbons by the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time and shift. The chemical shift change for going from retinal to NRB is shown. It is concluded that the ..pi..-electrons in polyene chains are considerably delocalized by the collapse of bond alteration in the retinal forming Schiff base linkage.

  7. Applications of /sup 43/Ca, /sup 25/Mg, and /sup 67/Zn NMR spectroscopies to biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tohru; Hatano, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Chemical Research Inst. of Non-Aqueous Solutions

    1983-12-01

    /sup 43/Ca, /sup 25/Mg and /sup 67/Zn NMR spectroscopies applied to biologically important systems are summarized mainly on the basis of our findings. It was found from our studies that (1) /sup 25/Mg NMR can be utilized for studying the dynamic and/or static behavior of Mg/sup 2 +/ in the Mg/sup 2 +/ -ATP (ADP)-kinase ternary complexes and (2) /sup 67/Zn NMR bands of diluted Zn/sup 2 +/ are much narrower than predicted and thus can be applicable for studying the dynamic and/or static behavior of Zn/sup 2 +/ in Zn/sup 2 +/ -enzyme solutions. In addition, /sup 43/Ca NMR spectra were successfully applied to some Ca/sup 2 +/ -binding proteins. In concluding remarks, we discussed possibilities of applications of those metal NMR spectroscopies to medical purposes.

  8. Trans and surface membrane bound zervamicin IIB: 13C-MAOSS-NMR at high spinning speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raap, J.; Hollander, J.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.; Swischeva, N. V.; Skladnev, D.; Kiihne, S.

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between 15 N-labelled peptides or proteins and lipids can be investigated using membranes aligned on a thin polymer film, which is rolled into a cylinder and inserted into the MAS-NMR rotor. This can be spun at high speed, which is often useful at high field strengths. Unfortunately, substrate films like commercially available polycarbonate or PEEK produce severe overlap with peptide and protein signals in 13 C-MAOSS NMR spectra. We show that a simple house hold foil support allows clear observation of the carbonyl, aromatic and C α signals of peptides and proteins as well as the ester carbonyl and choline signals of phosphocholine lipids. The utility of the new substrate is validated in applications to the membrane active peptide zervamicin IIB. The stability and macroscopic ordering of thin PC10 bilayers was compared with that of thicker POPC bilayers, both supported on the household foil. Sidebands in the 31 P-spectra showed a high degree of alignment of both the supported POPC and PC10 lipid molecules. Compared with POPC, the PC10 lipids are slightly more disordered, most likely due to the increased mobilities of the shorter lipid molecules. This mobility prevents PC10 from forming stable vesicles for MAS studies. The 13 C-peptide peaks were selectively detected in a 13 C-detected 1 H-spin diffusion experiment. Qualitative analysis of build-up curves obtained for different mixing times allowed the transmembrane peptide in PC10 to be distinguished from the surface bound topology in POPC. The 13 C-MAOSS results thus independently confirms previous findings from 15 N spectroscopy [Bechinger, B., Skladnev, D.A., Ogrel, A., Li, X., Rogozhkina, E.V., Ovchinnikova, T.V., O'Neil, J.D.J. and Raap, J. (2001) Biochemistry, 40, 9428-9437]. In summary, application of house hold foil opens the possibility of measuring high resolution 13 C-NMR spectra of peptides and proteins in well ordered membranes, which are required to determine the secondary and

  9. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of heterocyclic salts and its precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of 1,2,3,6 - tetrahydro - 1, 1 dimethyl - 3 - oxo - 5 phenylpyridinium bromides containing the substituents: H, Me, Cl, Br, OMe and NO 2 is described. The phenacyl bromides (8a-f) were characterized by their melting points and by their I.r. and 1 H n.m.r. spectra. Some studies on 13 C n.m.r. spectra of the phenacyl bromides (8a-f), the quartenary ammonium salts (7a-f) and the cyclic salts(6a-f) are shown. The effect of substituents on the eletronic structure of these compounds and on the chemical shifts of the different carbon atoms in terms of electronic and steric effects are discussed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  10. Which kind of aromatic structures are produced during biomass charring? New insights provided by modern solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike; Paneque-Carmona, Marina; Velasco-Molina, Marta; de la Rosa, José Maria; León-Ovelar, Laura Regina; Fernandez-Boy, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Intense research on biochar and charcoal of the last years has revealed that depending on the production conditions, the chemical and physical characteristics of their aromatic network can greatly vary. Since such variations are determining the behavior and stability of charred material in soils, a better understanding of the structural changes occurring during their heating and the impact of those changes on their function is needed. One method to characterize pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) represents solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy applying the cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning technique (MAS). A drawback of this technique is that the quantification of NMR spectra of samples with highly condensed and proton-depleted structures is assumed to be bias. Typical samples with such attributes are charcoals produced at temperatures above 700°C under pyrolytic conditions. Commonly their high condensation degree leads to graphenic structures that are not only reducing the CP efficiency but create also a conductive lattice which acts as a shield and prevents the entering of the excitation pulse into the sample during the NMR experiments. Since the latter can damage the NMR probe and in the most cases the obtained NMR spectra show only one broad signal assignable to aromatic C, this technique is rarely applied for characterizing high temperature chars or soot. As a consequence, a more detailed knowledge of the nature of the aromatic ring systems is still missing. The latter is also true for the aromatic domains of PyOM produced at lower temperatures, since older NMR instruments operating at low magnetic fields deliver solid-state 13C NMR spectra with low resolution which turns a more detailed analysis of the aromatic chemical shift region into a challenging task. In order to overcome this disadvantages, modern NMR spectroscopy offers not only instruments with greatly improved resolution but also special pulse sequences for NMR experiments which allow a more

  11. Observation of isolated carbon atoms and the study of their mobility on Pt clusters by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.; Ansermet, J.; Slichter, C.P.; Sinfelt, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have used NMR to determine the structure of surface species after the C-C bond scission of adsorbed acetylene and ethylene on Pt clusters produced by heating the samples to 690 K. They have found the species to be predominantly isolated carbon atoms adsorbed on Pt surfaces. They have studied the mobility of adsorbed carbon atoms from motional narrowing of the 13 C line shapes and motion-induced shortening of the spin-lattice relaxation times. They have found that the carbon atoms on Pt clusters are very mobile, their activation energy of 7 +- 1 kcal/mole for translational motion being less than half that of CO on Pt clusters

  12. Improved cycling and high rate performance of core-shell LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/carbon nanocomposites for lithium-ion batteries: Effect of the carbon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huanhuan; Chen, Yi; Chen, Long; Jiang, Haobin; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Hongbo; Li, Guochun; Li, Yunxing; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report a fast microwave heating way to prepare LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /C. • The effects of different carbon sources were discussed in detail. • LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /BP2000 shows a discharge capacity of 160 mA h g −1 at 0.1 C. • LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /BP2000 elucidates excellent cyclic stability. • LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /BP2000 exhibits attractive rate capability. - Abstract: Core-shell type olivine solid solutions, LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /C, are synthesized via a very simple and rapid microwave heating route with different carbon sources. The obatined LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /C materials are characterized thoroughly by various analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy instrument. The particle sizes and distribution of the carbon layer of BP2000 carbon black coated LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 (LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /BP) are more uniform than that obtained from acetylene black (LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /AB) and Super P (LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /SP). Moreover, the LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /BP nanocomposite shows superior electrochemical properties such as high discharge capacity of 160 mA h g −1 at 0.1 C, excellent cyclic stability (143 mA h g −1 at 0.1 C after 30 cycles) and rate capability (76 mAh g −1 at 20 C), which are better than other two samples. Cyclic voltammetric and electrical tests disclose that the Li-ion diffusion, the reversibility of lithium extraction/insertion and electrical conductivity are significantly improved in LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /BP composite. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy illustrates that LiFe 1/3 Mn 1/3 Co 1/3 PO 4 /BP composite electrode possesses low contact and charge-transfer impedances, which can lead to rapid electron transport during the electrochemical lithium insertion/extraction reaction. It is believed that olivine solid

  13. A New Way to Produce Cellobiose Carbonates Using Green Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiari, R; Brochier-Salon, M-C; Mhenni, M F; Mauret, E; Belgacem, M N

    2016-08-23

    The preparation of cellulose derivatives using green (i.e., environmentally friendly) reagents would improve sustainability and reduce concerns arising from the use of non-green reagents. The objective of this work was to prepare cellobiose carbonate using a green reagent, dimethyl carbonate. The carbonation reaction was carried out in the presence of ethanolic potassium hydroxide solution and dimethyl carbonate for 6 h at a range of temperatures (25-70 °C). A cellobiose derivative was successfully prepared with a recovered yield of more than 70 % and characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy techniques. The presence of a grafted disaccharide with a degree of substitution higher than 2 was determined by (13) C NMR analysis. The spectra of the prepared cellobiose carbonate exhibited peaks that were associated with cellulose molecules (C1 -C6 ) and corresponded to carbonate functions at around 159.4 ppm. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Non-invasive measurement of brain glycogen by NMR spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen non-invasively, but in the past several years, the development of a non-invasive localized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has enabled the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, 13C-glucose is administered intravenously and its incorporation into and wash-out from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, 13C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions. PMID:21732401

  15. Fate of [15N]glycine in peat as determined by 13C and 15N CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzing-Purdie, L.M.; Cheshire, M.V.; Williams, B.L.; Sparling, G.P.; Ratcliffe, C.I.; Ripmeester, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Peat samples, nonsterile, sterilized by γ irradiation or autoclaving, were incubated with [ 15 N]glycine for a period of 6 months. The 13 C NMR data showed the established trend of increased humification with decreasing particle size and that autoclaving had significantly disturbed the humification-particle size distribution. The 15 N CP-MAS NMR spectra showed the presence of [ 15 N]glycine in all fractions after incubation. 15 NH 4 + , a result of either biological or chemical deamination, was one of the main products in the nonsterile peat series. The 15 N spectra also showed resonances corresponding to amine, secondary amide, and pyrrole-type nitrogen and the presence of glycine derivatives and melanoidins. The results presented give the first spectroscopic evidence of the possible involvement of the Maillard reaction in the humification process

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of nucleic acid components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Hodgkinson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 16 (2015), s. 12300-12310 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * nucleic acid s * solid-state NMR Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.289, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/ra/c4ra14404j

  17. Chemical structures of coal lithotypes before and after CO2 adsorption as investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X.; Mastalerz, Maria; Chappell, M.A.; Miller, L.F.; Li, Y.; Mao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four lithotypes (vitrain, bright clarain, clarain, and fusain) of a high volatile bituminous Springfield Coal from the Illinois Basin were characterized using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR techniques included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS), cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, and recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing techniques. The lithotypes that experienced high-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherm analysis were also analyzed to determine possible changes in coal structure as a result of CO2 saturation at high pressure and subsequent evacuation. The main carbon functionalities present in original vitrain, bright clarain, clarain and fusain were aromatic carbons (65.9%-86.1%), nonpolar alkyl groups (9.0%-28.9%), and aromatic C-O carbons (4.1%-9.5%). Among these lithotypes, aromaticity increased in the order of clarain, bright clarain, vitrain, and fusain, whereas the fraction of alkyl carbons decreased in the same order. Fusain was distinct from other three lithotypes in respect to its highest aromatic composition (86.1%) and remarkably small fraction of alkyl carbons (11.0%). The aromatic cluster size in fusain was larger than that in bright clarain. The lithotypes studied responded differently to high pressure CO2 saturation. After exposure to high pressure CO2, vitrain and fusain showed a decrease in aromaticity but an increase in the fraction of alkyl carbons, whereas bright clarain and clarain displayed an increase in aromaticity but a decrease in the fraction of alkyl carbons. Aromatic fused-rings were larger for bright clarain but smaller for fusain in the post-CO2 adsorption samples compared to the original lithotypes. These observations suggested chemical CO2-coal interactions at high pressure and the selectivity of lithotypes in response to CO2 adsorption. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Analysis of Hydroperoxides in Solid Polyethylene by MAS (13)C NMR and EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASSINK, ROGER A.; CELINA, MATHIAS C.; DUNBAR, TIMOTHY D.; ALAM, TODD M.; CLOUGH, ROGER LEE; GILLEN, KENNETH T.

    1999-01-01

    13 C-enriched polyethylene was subjected to γ-irradiation in the presence of air at 25 and 80 C for total doses ranging from 71 to 355 kGy. Significant quantities of hydroperoxides were detected in the 25 C irradiated sample by 13 C magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. This method of detection was performed on the solid polymer and required no chemical derivatization or addition of solvent. The chemical stability and subsequent products of the hydroperoxide species were studied by annealing the irradiated samples in air at temperatures ranging from 22 to 110 C. A time-temperature superposition analysis provided an activation energy of 108 kJ/mol for the hydroperoxide decomposition process. The primary products of hydroperoxide decomposition were ketones and secondary alcohols with lesser amounts of acids and esters. EPR measurements suggest that the reactive hydroperoxide species reside in the amorphous phase of polyethylene, consistent with degradation occurring in the amorphous phase

  19. NMR analysis of silk for the interpretation of ancient history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chujo, Riichiro

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the characterization of archaeological silk with the aid of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In this paper the nucleus is confined to 13C as a stable isotope carbon which is the most basic element in organic compounds. Among the stable carbon isotopes 12C is the most abundant but it has no magnetic moment and the natural abundance of 13C is only 1.108% and this isotope is frequently used in NMR due to its non-zero magnetic moment

  20. In situ NMR spectroscopy of supercapacitors: insight into the charge storage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Forse, Alexander C; Griffin, John M; Trease, Nicole M; Trognko, Lorie; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-18

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode-electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations.

  1. NMR spectroscopy up to 35.2T using a series-connected hybrid magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhehong; Hung, Ivan; Wang, Xiaoling; Paulino, Joana; Wu, Gang; Litvak, Ilya M; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Lendi, Pietro; Schiano, Jeffrey L; Bird, Mark D; Dixon, Iain R; Toth, Jack; Boebinger, Gregory S; Cross, Timothy A

    2017-11-01

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has brought to field a Series-Connected Hybrid magnet for NMR spectroscopy. As a DC powered magnet it can be operated at fields up to 36.1T. The series connection between a superconducting outsert and a resistive insert dramatically minimizes the high frequency fluctuations of the magnetic field typically observed in purely resistive magnets. Current-density-grading among various resistive coils was used for improved field homogeneity. The 48mm magnet bore and 42mm outer diameter of the probes leaves limited space for conventional shims and consequently a combination of resistive and ferromagnetic shims are used. Field maps corrected for field instabilities were obtained and shimming achieved better than 1ppm homogeneity over a cylindrical volume of 1cm diameter and height. The magnetic field is regulated within 0.2ppm using an external 7 Li lock sample doped with paramagnetic MnCl 2 . The improved field homogeneity and field regulation using a modified AVANCE NEO console enables NMR spectroscopy at 1 H frequencies of 1.0, 1.2 and 1.5GHz. NMR at 1.5GHz reflects a 50% increase in field strength above the highest superconducting magnets currently available. Three NMR probes have been constructed each equipped with an external lock rf coil for field regulation. Initial NMR results obtained from the SCH magnet using these probes illustrate the very exciting potential of ultra-high magnetic fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Elucidation of the electronic spectrum changes of KA-Al3+ complex by potentiometric titration, FTIR, 13C NMR and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piantavini, Mário S.; Gonçalves, Alan G.; Trindade, Ângela C.L.B.; Noseda, Miguel D.; Mercê, Ana L.R.; Pontarolo, Roberto; Machado, Antonio E.H.

    2017-01-01

    Kojic acid (KA) is an organic acid widely used in pharmaceutical industry, mainly as a skin lightening agent. Based on the ability of KA to form complexes with ions, we found the most possible kind of complex formed with cation aluminum. KA-Al 3+ complex structures were studied using potentiometric and spectrophotometric (UV) titrations, FTIR and 13 C NMR. The electronic spectroscopy showed that the KA-Al 3+ complexes absorb at higher wavelengths (λ max = 305 nm) than do the non-complexed KA (λ max = 269 nm), confirming complexation. The IR spectra of KA complexed and not complexed allowed to correlate the changes in the absorption of enol and carbonyl groups in absence and presence of Al 3+ in aqueous solutions. The complexation suggested by the potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy are in accordance with the data obtained from NMR results. Calculations based on quantum mechanics were utilized to understand the differences found in the non complexed and complexed KAH electronic spectra. (author)

  3. Cellular applications of 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, R.G.; Brown, T.R.; Ugurbil, K.; Ogawa, S.; Cohen, S.M.; den Hollander, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of cells and purified mitochondria are discussed to show the kind of information that can be obtained in vivo. In suspensions of Escherichia coli both phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 NMR studies of glycolysis of bioenergetics are presented. In rat liver cells the pathways of gluconeogenesis from carbon-13-labeled glycerol are followed by carbon-13 NMR. In the intact liver cells cytosolic and mitochondrial pH's were separately measured by phosphorus-31 NMR. In purified mitochondria the internal and external concentrations of inorganic phosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate were determined by phosphorus-31 while the pH difference across the membrane was measured simultaneously

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Chemistry Using Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirich, Gennady; Holliday, Michael J; Lin, Jasper C; Nandy, Aditya

    2018-03-01

    One-dimensional heteronuclear relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy at 13 C natural abundance successfully characterized the dynamics of the hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction occurring at the N ε position in l-arginine by monitoring C δ in varying amounts of D 2 O. A small equilibrium isotope effect was observed and quantified, corresponding to ΔG = -0.14 kcal mol -1 . A bimolecular rate constant of k D = 5.1 × 10 9 s -1 M -1 was determined from the pH*-dependence of k ex (where pH* is the direct electrode reading of pH in 10% D 2 O and k ex is the nuclear spin exchange rate constant), consistent with diffusion-controlled kinetics. The measurement of ΔG serves to bridge the millisecond time scale lifetimes of the detectable positively charged arginine species with the nanosecond time scale lifetime of the nonobservable low-populated neutral arginine intermediate species, thus allowing for characterization of the equilibrium lifetimes of the various arginine species in solution as a function of fractional solvent deuterium content. Despite the system being in fast exchange on the chemical shift time scale, the magnitude of the secondary isotope shift due to the exchange reaction at N ε was accurately measured to be 0.12 ppm directly from curve-fitting D 2 O-dependent dispersion data collected at a single static field strength. These results indicate that relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy is a robust and general method for studying base-catalyzed hydrogen-deuterium exchange chemistry at equilibrium.

  5. Detection of Apoptosis and Necrosis in Normal Human Lung Cells Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chwen-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Lo, Tsui-Yun; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Chien-Tsu

    2005-05-01

    This study aimed to detect apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5, a normal human lung cell line, by using noninvasive proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Live MRC-5 cells were processed first for 1H NMR spectroscopy; subsequently their types and the percentage of cell death were assessed on a flow cytometer. Cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) induced apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5 cells, respectively, as revealed by phosphatidylserine externalization on a flow cytometer. The spectral intensity ratio of methylene (CH2) resonance (at 1.3 ppm) to methyl (CH3) resonance (at 0.9 ppm) was directly proportional to the percentage of apoptosis and strongly and positively correlated with PI staining after Cd treatment (r2 = 0.9868, P In contrast, this ratio only increased slightly within 2-h Hg treatment, and longer Hg exposure failed to produce further increase. Following 2-h Hg exposure, the spectral intensity of choline resonance (at 3.2 ppm) was abolished, but this phenomenon was absent in Cd-induced apoptosis. These findings together demonstrate that 1H NMR is a novel tool with a quantitative potential to distinguish apoptosis from necrosis as early as the onset of cell death in normal human lung cells.

  6. Dynamics and interactions of ibuprofen in cyclodextrin nanosponges by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Ferro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different formulations of cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNS, obtained by polycondensation of β-cyclodextrin with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid dianhydride (EDTAn, were treated with aqueous solutions of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa affording hydrogels that, after lyophilisation, gave two solid CDNS-drug formulations. 1H fast MAS NMR and 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra showed that IbuNa was converted in situ into its acidic and dimeric form (IbuH after freeze-drying. 13C CP-MAS NMR spectra also indicated that the structure of the nanosponge did not undergo changes upon drug loading compared to the unloaded system. However, the 13C NMR spectra collected under variable contact time cross-polarization (VCT-CP conditions showed that the polymeric scaffold CDNS changed significantly its dynamic regime on passing from the empty CDNS to the drug-loaded CDNS, thus showing that the drug encapsulation can be seen as the formation of a real supramolecular aggregate rather than a conglomerate of two solid components. Finally, the structural features obtained from the different solid-state NMR approaches reported matched the information from powder X-ray diffraction profiles.

  7. Spectroscopy 101: A Practical Introduction to Spectroscopy and Analysis for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Lucas A.; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K.; Garg, Neil K.

    2017-01-01

    An undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory that provides an introduction to various spectroscopic techniques is reported. Whereas organic spectroscopy is most often learned and practiced in the context of reaction analyses, this laboratory experiment allows students to become comfortable with [superscript 1]H NMR, [superscript 13]C NMR, and IR…

  8. NMR imaging of human atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of atherosclerosis can no longer be evaluated with morphological parameters only. A description of atherosclerotic plaque composition is necessary to study the mechanisms of plaque rupture, which depends on collagenous cap and lipid core thicknesses. NMR, as a biochemical imaging technique, allows visualization of these components using T1 contrast (mobile lipids), T2 contrast (cap vs. core), spin density (calcifications), diffusion imaging, 1H and 13C spectroscopy. Today, these imaging sequences allow to study in vitro the effects of interventional techniques such as angioplasty or atherectomy. Clinical investigations begin, which will attempt to develop in vivo microscopy and test the ability of NMR to predict plaque rupture. (author). 13 refs., 7 figs

  9. Structural characteristics of marine sedimentary humic acids by CP/MAS sup(13)C NMR spectroscopy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Wahidullah, S.

    quino- nes or semiquinones which exhibit 13C resonance at around 195 ppm. Free radicals of semiquinone type have been reported from the aquatic environment [2]. Spectra of all the four samples show absorption at 195 ppm. The total acidity of marine..., significant resonance at 55 ppm (8.9) from aromatic methoxy carbon suggests that phenol is present mostly as methyl ether and not as free phenol. The signal at 55 ppm is also attributed to aliphatic carbon adjacent to the amino functional group as in amino...

  10. APPLICATION OF A C-13 NMR TOPOLOGICAL MODEL TO THE STRUCTURE ELUCIDATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁身刚; 彭琛; 郑崇直

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an approach which can elucidate automatically the structures of simple organic compounds from their C-13 NMR spectral data by using a computer. Based on a substructure/C-13 NMR chemical shift topological correlation model, the approach deduces the candidate substructures and the constraints for the substructure assembling from the molecular formula and C-13 NMR spectral data. Then, candidate structures are generated under these constraints by assembling the candidate substructures in a partial superposition manner. Candidate substructures or structures are evaluated once they are generated in order to eliminate those conflicting with the original data as early as possible. The evaluation of a (sub)structure is mainly carried out by simulating its C-13 NMR (sub) spectrum, which is again based on the model, and comparing the simulated spectrum with the original data.

  11. Liquid state sup1H and sup13C-NMR studies on polymerisation reaction of 2,2'-difurfuryloxy-2- silapropane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli bin Omar

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare the copolymer of 2,2'-difurfuryloxy-2-silapropane (DFS) and 1,1'-(methylenedi-4, 1-phenylene) bismaleimide (BM). DFS was prepared at 0 degC through the reaction of 2 moles of furfuryl alcohol (FA) with 1 mole of dichlorodimethylsilane (DCMS) in the presence of pyridine and chloroform as a solvent. The formation of this compound was characterized by the sup1H and sup13C-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. DFS has the ability to undergo the Diels-Alder reaction. The furan end groups of DFS could react with dienophile groups of other materials. The adduct of DFS-BM was prepared by the reaction of DFS with BM at room temperature (18degC) in chloroform (CDClsub3). Characterization of the adduct was carried out through a study of the sup1H and sup13C-NMR spectra of the adduct

  12. "1H and "1"3C NMR Data on Hydroxy/methoxy Flavonoids and the Effects of Substituents on Chemical Shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyuk; Eom, Sung Lock; Hyun, Ji Ye; Jo, Geun Hyeong; Hwang, Do Seok; Lee, Sun Hee; Yong, Yeon Joong; Lee, Young Han; Lim, Yoong Ho; Park, Jun Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Polyphenols have recently been examined for such applications, and they are classified based on their carbon skeletons: phenolic acids with C6-C1 skeleton, hydrocinammates with C6-C_3 skeleton, stilbenes with C6-C2-C6 skeleton, and flavonoids with C6-C_3-C6 skeleton.2 Of these compounds, flavonoids are ubiquitously found in most plants. Since flavonoids belong to polyphenols, they have many hydroxy groups. From a bioavailability point of view, hydroxy groups prevent cell membrane transport, and hydroxyflavonoids can be metabolized by O-methyltransferases. However, methoxylated flavonoids may not have these problems. Hydroxylated or methoxylated flavonoids are found from natural sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used to identify different compounds including hydroxylated or methoxylated flavonoids. Because the position and the number of substituted hydroxy or/and methoxy groups will change the "1H and "1"3C chemical shifts, it is important to understand these changes so that the structures of newly isolated hydroxy/methoxy-flavonoids can be easily identified

  13. Synthesis and applications of 13C glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-01-01

    The authors are currently developing new synthetic routes to the various isotopomers of glycerol. Labeled glycerol is useful for 13 C enrichment of biomolecules. However, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment or have poor overall yields (12-15%). In addition, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability depends on the level of demand. The authors have developed a short de novo synthesis of [U- 13 C]glycerol from carbon dioxide (∼53% overall yield for four steps) and are currently examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific 13 C labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from methanol and carbon dioxide. The authors have examined the enzymatic conversion of [U- 13 C]glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25-50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). The authors are also pursuing the chemical conversion of 13 C labeled DHA to DHAP and the results are presented. Labeled DHAP is a possible enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids

  14. /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopic study of glucose metabolism in eggs of Angiostrongylus cantonensis during their development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M.; Kato, K.; Ohsaka, A.; Nishina, M.; Hori, E.; Matsushita, K.

    1987-02-01

    /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study aerobic glucose metabolism in eggs of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in an NCTC-109 medium supplemented with fetal calf serum. Without any pretreatment of the spent medium, we were able to identify and quantitate, by NMR, the end-products of glucose metabolism in eggs after cultivation for 2, 4, and 8 days. We demonstrated that A. cantonensis eggs took up glucose rapidly; among the major end products were found lactic acid, acetic acid and alanine. The eggs are parasitic in a sense that the energy metabolism in them is dependent mainly upon the energy source present in outer medium.

  15. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst; Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro; Pagelot, Alain; Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor; Schleucher, Jürgen; Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic 13 C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic 13 C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular 13 C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the 13 C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic 13 C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular 13 C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic 13 C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ 13 C i profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ 13 C i in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results

  16. 1H, 13C and 31P-NMR spectroscopic study of glucose metabolism of muscle larva Trichinella spiralis (U.S.A. strain), and the effects of the end-products on the host (mouse)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, Masami

    1988-01-01

    1 H- and 13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify and quantitate metabolites excreted by muscle larva Trichinella spiralis maintained aerobically in the presence of D- ( 13 C 6 ) glucose and (1, 1'- 13 C 2 ) succinate. End-products of glucose metabolism studied by 1 H-NMR were lactate, acetate, succinate, proionate, n-valerate and alanine, at the molar ratio of 1:2:1:0.6:0.5:0.6. 13 C-NMR measurement proved that all the products originated from the glucose in the medium via the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-succinate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo 31 P-NMR spectra were also taken by the surface coil method from the leg muscle of mice which had been infected with T. spiralis. Intracelluar pH and relative amount of ATP in the leg muscle of the infected mice were found to decrease significantly as compared with that of control mice. (author)

  17. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state 13 C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes

  18. {sup 13}C-NMR studies on disulfide bond isomerization in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro [Kumamoto University, Department of Structural BioImaging, Faculty of Life Sciences (Japan); Miyanoiri, Yohei [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Terauchi, Tsutomu [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan); Kainosho, Masatsune, E-mail: kainosho@tmu.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Conformational isomerization of disulfide bonds is associated with the dynamics and thus the functional aspects of proteins. However, our understanding of the isomerization is limited by experimental difficulties in probing it. We explored the disulfide conformational isomerization of the Cys14–Cys38 disulfide bond in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), by performing an NMR line-shape analysis of its Cys carbon peaks. In this approach, 1D {sup 13}C spectra were recorded at small temperature intervals for BPTI samples selectively labeled with site-specifically {sup 13}C-enriched Cys, and the recorded peaks were displayed in the order of the temperature after the spectral scales were normalized to a carbon peak. Over the profile of the line-shape, exchange broadening that altered with temperature was manifested for the carbon peaks of Cys14 and Cys38. The Cys14–Cys38 disulfide bond reportedly exists in equilibrium between a high-populated (M) and two low-populated states (m{sub c14} and m{sub c38}). Consistent with the three-site exchange model, biphasic exchange broadening arising from the two processes was observed for the peak of the Cys14 α-carbon. As the exchange broadening is maximized when the exchange rate equals the chemical shift difference in Hz between equilibrating sites, semi-quantitative information that was useful for establishing conditions for {sup 13}C relaxation dispersion experiments was obtained through the carbon line-shape profile. With respect to the m{sub c38} isomerization, the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C signals at the β-position of the minor state were resolved from the major peaks and detected by exchange experiments at a low temperature.

  19. Non-polymeric asymmetric binary glass-formers. II. Secondary relaxation studied by dielectric, 2H NMR, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzschner, B.; Mohamed, F.; Bächer, C.; Wagner, E.; Lichtinger, A.; Bock, D.; Kreger, K.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Rössler, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the secondary (β-) relaxations of an asymmetric binary glass former consisting of a spirobichroman derivative (SBC; Tg = 356 K) as the high-Tg component and the low-Tg component tripropyl phosphate (TPP; Tg = 134 K). The main relaxations are studied in Paper I [B. Pötzschner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 164503 (2017)]. A high Tg contrast of ΔTg = 222 K is put into effect in a non-polymeric system. Component-selective studies are carried out by combining results from dielectric spectroscopy (DS) for mass concentrations cTPP ≥ 60% and those from different methods of 2H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. In the case of NMR, the full concentration range (10% ≤ cTPP ≤ 100%) is covered. The neat components exhibit a β-relaxation (β1 (SBC) and β2 (TPP)). The latter is rediscovered by DS in the mixtures for all concentrations with unchanged time constants. NMR spectroscopy identifies the β-relaxations as being alike to those in neat glasses. A spatially highly restricted motion with angular displacement below ±10° encompassing all molecules is involved. In the low temperature range, where TPP shows the typical 31P NMR echo spectra of the β2-process, very similar spectral features are observed for the (deuterated) SBC component by 2H NMR, in addition to its "own" β1-process observed at high temperatures. Apparently, the small TPP molecules enslave the large SBC molecules to perform a common hindered reorientation. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time of both components is the same and reveals an angular displacement of the SBC molecules somewhat smaller than that of TPP, though the time constants τβ2 are the same. Furthermore, T1(T) of TPP in the temperature region of the β2-process is absolutely the same as in the mixture TPP/polystyrene investigated previously. It appears that the manifestations of the β-process introduced by one component are essentially independent of the second component. Finally, at cTPP ≤ 20% one

  20. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with 13 C or 1 H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for 13 C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for 1 H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for 15 N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The 1 H-detected solid-state NMR 1 H/ 15 N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR 1 H/ 15 N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  1. Solid state 13C NMR analysis of shales and coals from Laramide Basins. Final report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miknis, F.P.; Jiao, Z.S.; Zhao, Hanqing; Surdam, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    This Western Research Institute (WRI) jointly sponsored research (JSR) project augmented and complemented research conducted by the University of Wyoming Institute For Energy Research for the Gas Research Institute. The project, {open_quotes}A New Innovative Exploitation Strategy for Gas Accumulations Within Pressure Compartments,{close_quotes} was a continuation of a project funded by the GRI Pressure Compartmentalization Program that began in 1990. That project, {open_quotes}Analysis of Pressure Chambers and Seals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,{close_quotes} characterized a new class of hydrocarbon traps, the discovery of which can provide an impetus to revitalize the domestic petroleum industry. In support of the UW Institute For Energy Research`s program on pressure compartmentalization, solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on sets of shales and coals from different Laramide basins in North America. NMR measurements were made on samples taken from different formations and depths of burial in the Alberta, Bighorn, Denver, San Juan, Washakie, and Wind River basins. The carbon aromaticity determined by NMR was shown to increase with depth of burial and increased maturation. In general, the NMR data were in agreement with other maturational indicators, such as vitrinite reflectance, illite/smectite ratio, and production indices. NMR measurements were also obtained on residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Washakie Basin. These data were used in conjunction with mass and elemental balance data to obtain information about the extent of carbon aromatization that occurs during artificial maturation. The data indicated that 41 and 50% of the original aliphatic carbon in the Almond and Lance coals, respectively, aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis.

  2. Heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy of the inflammatory protein C5a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuiderweg, E.R.P.; Fesik, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    The utility of three-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy for the assignment of 1 H and 15 N resonances of the inflammatory protein C5a (MW 8500), uniformly labeled with 15 N, is demonstrated at a protein concentration of 0.7 mM. It is shown that dramatic simplification of the 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectrum (NOESY) is obtained by editing with respect to the frequency of the 15 N heteronucleus in a third dimension. The improved resolution in the 3D experiment largely facilitates the assignment of protein NMR spectra and allows for the determination of distance constraints from otherwise overlapping NOE cross peaks for purposes of 3D structure determination. The results show that 15 N heteronuclear 3D NMR can facilitate the structure determination of small proteins and promises to be a useful tool for the study of larger systems that cannot be studied by conventional 2D NMR techniques

  3. Heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy of the inflammatory protein C5a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuiderweg, E.R.P.; Fesik, S.W. (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL (USA))

    1989-03-21

    The utility of three-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy for the assignment of {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances of the inflammatory protein C5a (MW 8500), uniformly labeled with {sup 15}N, is demonstrated at a protein concentration of 0.7 mM. It is shown that dramatic simplification of the 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectrum (NOESY) is obtained by editing with respect to the frequency of the {sup 15}N heteronucleus in a third dimension. The improved resolution in the 3D experiment largely facilitates the assignment of protein NMR spectra and allows for the determination of distance constraints from otherwise overlapping NOE cross peaks for purposes of 3D structure determination. The results show that {sup 15}N heteronuclear 3D NMR can facilitate the structure determination of small proteins and promises to be a useful tool for the study of larger systems that cannot be studied by conventional 2D NMR techniques.

  4. A 13C NMR Study of 7-Norbornadienyl Cation by Modified Hammett-Brown Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Kyu; Shin, Jung Hyu

    1999-01-01

    A series of the para-substituted 7-aryl-norbornadienyl cation (3) was prepared in FSO 3 H/SO 2 ClF solution at -100 .deg. C and their 13 C NMR shifts were measured at -80 .deg. C. The plots of the chemical shifts (changes in chemical shifts) of cationic carbon, Δδ C+ , against our calculated new substituent constant, σ c+ s, gave an excellent correlation (r = 0.994), with a p c+ value of 12.63. These results indicate that the new substituent onstants, σ c+ s, can be successfully employed to compare the relative charge demand of the carbonium ion by π- and πσ-participation

  5. Two-site jumps in dimethyl sulfone studied by one- and two-dimensional 17O NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerwerth, J.; Storek, M.; Greim, D.; Lueg, J.; Siegel, R.; Cetinkaya, B.; Hiller, W.; Zimmermann, H.; Senker, J.; Böhmer, R.

    2018-03-01

    Polycrystalline dimethyl sulfone is studied using central-transition oxygen-17 exchange NMR. The quadrupolar and chemical shift tensors are determined by combining quantum chemical calculations with line shape analyses of rigid-lattice spectra measured for stationary and rotating samples at several external magnetic fields. Quantum chemical computations predict that the largest principal axes of the chemical shift anisotropy and electrical field gradient tensors enclose an angle of about 73°. This prediction is successfully tested by comparison with absorption spectra recorded at three different external magnetic fields. The experimental one-dimensional motionally narrowed spectra and the two-dimensional exchange spectrum are compatible with model calculations involving jumps of the molecules about their two-fold symmetry axis. This motion is additionally investigated by means of two-time stimulated-echo spectroscopy which allows for a determination of motional correlation functions over a wider temperature range than previously reported using carbon and deuteron NMR. On the basis of suitable second-order quadrupolar frequency distributions, sin-sin stimulated-echo amplitudes are calculated for a two-site model in the limit of vanishing evolution time and compared with experimental findings. The present study thus establishes oxygen-17 NMR as a powerful method that will be particularly useful for the study of solids and liquids devoid of nuclei governed by first-order anisotropies.

  6. Synthesis, single crystal X-ray, spectroscopic (FT-IR, UV-vis, fluorescence, 1H &13C NMR), computational (DFT/B3LYP) studies of some imidazole based picrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockia doss, M.; Rajarajan, G.; Thanikachalam, V.; Selvanayagam, S.; Sridhar, B.

    2018-04-01

    2,4,5-triphenyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium picrate (1), 2-(4-fluorophenyl)-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium picrate (2), 2-(4-methylphenyl)-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium picrate (3) were synthesised. These compounds 1-3 were characterized by elemental, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR analyses. The structure of compound 3 was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The studies reveal that the molecule is associated with weak Nsbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯N and van der Waals interactions which are responsible for the formation and strengthening of supramolecular assembly. The nature of the interactions and their importance are explored using the Hirshfeld surface method. The physicochemical properties of the compounds 1-3 were evaluated by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. According to thermal data the salts possess excellent thermal stabilities with decomposition temperatures ranging from 220 to 280 °C. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) results exposed that the picrates 1-3 were about 1.13-1.50 times greater than potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). Here we also used Density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to investigate the opto-electronic properties. The obtained theoretical results validate with available experimental data.

  7. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastián C.

    2006-03-01

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon® seat, and Kalrez® O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  8. Synthetic routes to a nanoscale inorganic cluster [Ga13(μ3-OH)6(μ2-OH)18(H2O)](NO3)15 evaluated by solid-state 71Ga NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammann, Blake A.; Marsh, David A.; Ma, Zayd L.; Wood, Suzannah R.; Eric West, Michael; Johnson, Darren W.; Hayes, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state 71 Ga NMR was used to characterize a series of [Ga 13 (μ 3 -OH) 6 (μ 2 -OH) 18 (H 2 O)](NO 3 ) 15 “Ga 13 ” molecular clusters synthesized by multiple methods. These molecular clusters are precursors to thin film electronics and may be employed in energy applications. The synthetic routes provide varying levels of impurities in the solid phase, and these impurities often elude traditional characterization techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR can provide a window into the gallium species even in amorphous phases. This information is vital in order to prevent the impurities from causing defect sites in the corresponding thin films upon gelation and condensation (polymerization) of the Ga 13 clusters. This work demonstrates the resolving power of solid-state NMR to evaluate structure and synthetic quality in the solid state, and the application of high-field NMR to study quadrupolar species, such as 71 Ga. - Graphical abstract: The various synthetic routes and 71 Ga solid-state NMR spectra of the nanoscale inorganic cluster [Ga 13 (μ 3 -OH) 6 (μ 2 -OH) 18 (H 2 O)](NO 3 ) 15 . - Highlights: • Solid-state 71 Ga NMR of hydroxo-aquo metal clusters and the impurities present. • High-field NMR capability allows for quadrupolar species, such as 71 Ga, to be routinely studied. • Efficient and environmentally friendly synthetic routes have been developed to prepare hydroxo-aquo metal clusters.

  9. Predicting Fuel Ignition Quality Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Multiple Linear Regression

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Naser, Nimal; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Dooley, Stephen; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    An improved model for the prediction of ignition quality of hydrocarbon fuels has been developed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple linear regression (MLR) modeling. Cetane number (CN) and derived cetane number (DCN

  10. Toward high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of microscopic liquid samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Mark C.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Chen, Ying; Reardon, Patrick N.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Khbeis, Michael; Irish, Duane; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-01-01

    A longstanding limitation of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is the requirement for samples to have macroscopic dimensions. Commercial probes, for example, are designed for volumes of at least 5 mL, in spite of decades of work directed toward the goal of miniaturization. Progress in miniaturizing inductive detectors has been limited by a perceived need to meet two technical requirements: (1) minimal separation between the sample and the detector, which is essential for sensitivity, and (2) near-perfect magnetic-field homogeneity at the sample, which is typically needed for spectral resolution. The first of these requirements is real, but the second can be relaxed, as we demonstrate here. By using pulse sequences that yield high-resolution spectra in an inhomogeneous field, we eliminate the need for near-perfect field homogeneity and the accompanying requirement for susceptibility matching of microfabricated detector components. With this requirement removed, typical imperfections in microfabricated components can be tolerated, and detector dimensions can be matched to those of the sample, even for samples of volume << 5 uL. Pulse sequences that are robust to field inhomogeneity thus enable small-volume detection with optimal sensitivity. We illustrate the potential of this approach to miniaturization by presenting spectra acquired with a flat-wire detector that can easily be scaled to subnanoliter volumes. In particular, we report high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of an alanine sample of volume 500 pL.

  11. Radiation oxidation of polypropylene: A solid-state 13C NMR study using selective isotopic labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowery, Daniel M.; Assink, Roger A.; Derzon, Dora K.; Klamo, Sara B.; Bernstein, Robert; Clough, Roger L.

    2007-01-01

    Polypropylene samples, in which the three different carbon atoms along the chain were selectively labeled with carbon-13, were subjected to radiation under inert and air atmospheres, and to post-irradiation exposure in air at various temperatures. By using solid-state 13 C NMR measurements at room temperature, we have been able to identify and quantify the oxidation products. The isotopic labeling provides insight into chemical reaction mechanisms, since oxidation products can be traced back to their positions of origin on the macromolecule. The major products include peroxides and alcohols, both formed at tertiary carbon sites along the chain. Other products include methyl ketones, acids, esters, peresters, and hemiketals formed from reaction at the tertiary carbon, together with in-chain ketones and esters from reaction at the secondary chain carbon. No evidence is found of products arising from reactions at the methyl side chain. Significant temperature-dependent differences are apparent; for example much higher yields of chain-end methyl ketones, which are the indicator product of chain scission, are generated for both elevated temperature irradiation and for post-irradiation treatment at elevated temperatures. Time-dependent plots of yields of the various oxidation products have been obtained under a wide range of conditions, including the post-irradiation oxidation of a sample at room temperature in air that has been monitored for 2 years. Radiation-oxidation products of polypropylene are contrasted to products measured for 13 C-labeled polyethylene in an earlier investigation: the peroxides formed in irradiated polypropylene are remarkably longer lived, the non-peroxidic products are significantly different, and the overall ratios of oxidation products in polypropylene change relatively little as a function of the extent of oxidation

  12. 13C NMR and XPS characterization of anion adsorbent with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Wang, Zhenqian; Zeng, Qingling; Shen, Chunhua

    2016-12-01

    Despite amino groups modified crop straw has been intensively studied as new and low-cost adsorbent for removal of anionic species from water, there is still a lack of clear characterization for amino groups, especially quaternary ammonium groups in the surface of crop straw. In this study, we used 13C NMR and XPS technologies to characterize adsorbents with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse. 13C NMR spectra clearly showed the presence of quaternary ammonium groups in lignocelluloses structure of modified crop straw. The increase of nitrogen observed in XPS survey spectra also indicated the existence of quaternary ammonium group in the surface of the adsorbents. The curve fitting of high-resolution XPS N1s and C1s spectra were conducted to probe the composition of nitrogen and carbon contained groups, respectively. The results showed the proportion of quaternary ammonium group significantly increased in the prepared adsorbent's surface that was dominated by methyl/methylene, hydroxyl, quaternary ammonium, ether and carbonyl groups. This study proved that 13C NMR and XPS could be successfully utilized for characterization of quaternary ammonium modified crop straw adsorbents.

  13. EASY: a simple tool for simultaneously removing background, deadtime and acoustic ringing in quantitative NMR spectroscopy--part I: basic principle and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Christian; Hemmann, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Elimination of Artifacts in NMR SpectroscopY (EASY) is a simple but very effective tool to remove simultaneously any real NMR probe background signal, any spectral distortions due to deadtime ringdown effects and -specifically- severe acoustic ringing artifacts in NMR spectra of low-gamma nuclei. EASY enables and maintains quantitative NMR (qNMR) as only a single pulse (preferably 90°) is used for data acquisition. After the acquisition of the first scan (it contains the wanted NMR signal and the background/deadtime/ringing artifacts) the same experiment is repeated immediately afterwards before the T1 waiting delay. This second scan contains only the background/deadtime/ringing parts. Hence, the simple difference of both yields clean NMR line shapes free of artefacts. In this Part I various examples for complete (1)H, (11)B, (13)C, (19)F probe background removal due to construction parts of the NMR probes are presented. Furthermore, (25)Mg EASY of Mg(OH)2 is presented and this example shows how extremely strong acoustic ringing can be suppressed (more than a factor of 200) such that phase and baseline correction for spectra acquired with a single pulse is no longer a problem. EASY is also a step towards deadtime-free data acquisition as these effects are also canceled completely. EASY can be combined with any other NMR experiment, including 2D NMR, if baseline distortions are a big problem. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Pre-physical treatment: an important procedure to improve spectral resolution in polymers microstructure studies using 13C solution NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroza, Oscar J.O.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in physical properties of polymeric materials can be evaluated from their microstructures, which can be investigated using solution carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In this type of study spectral resolution is very important, which obviously depend on the sample and solvent. A pre physical treatment allows for an improvement in the spectral resolution. Consequently, more information on chain linking can be obtained, thus facilitating the determination of the stereo sequences. (author)

  15. Quantitative measurement of carbon isotopic composition in CO2 gas reservoir by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Li, Rongxi; Zhao, Bangsheng; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Shuan; Cheng, Jinghua; Wu, Xiaoli

    2018-04-01

    The use of Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology for quantitatively determining gas carbon isotope composition is presented. In this study, 12CO2 and 13CO2 were mixed with N2 at various molar fraction ratios to obtain Raman quantification factors (F12CO2 and F13CO2), which provide a theoretical basis for calculating the δ13C value. And the corresponding values were 0.523 (0 Laser Raman analysis were carried out on natural CO2 gas from Shengli Oil-field at room temperature under different pressures. The δ13C values obtained by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technology are in good agreement with each other, and the relative errors range of δ13C values is 1.232%-6.964%. This research provides a fundamental analysis tool for determining gas carbon isotope composition (δ13C values) quantitatively by using Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy. Experiment of results demonstrates that this method has the potential for obtaining δ13C values in natural CO2 gas reservoirs.

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of form I of atorvastatin calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei David; Gao, Xudong; Strohmeier, Mark; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2012-03-22

    Solid-state (13)C, (19)F, and (15)N magic angle spinning NMR studies of Form I of atorvastatin calcium are reported, including chemical shift tensors of all resolvable carbon sites and fluorine sites. The complete (13)C and (19)F chemical shift assignments are given based on an extensive analysis of (13)C-(1)H HETCOR and (13)C-(19)F HETCOR results. The solid-state NMR data indicate that the asymmetric unit of this material contains two atorvastatin molecules. A possible structure of Form I of atorvastatin calcium (ATC-I), derived from solid-state NMR data and density functional theory calculations of various structures, is proposed for this important active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

  17. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldridge, S.M., E-mail: simon.eldridge@dpi.nsw.gov.au [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); NSW Department of Primary Industries, Bruxner Highway, Wollongbar, NSW 2477 (Australia); Chen, C.R. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Xu, Z.H. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Nelson, P.N. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870 (Australia); Boyd, S.E. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Meszaros, I. [Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia); Chan, K.Y. [Graduate School of Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  18. Determination of the percentage of quitine desacetilation reaction by solid state carbon-13 NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferracin, Ricardo J.; Cass, Quezia B.; Bassi, Ana L.

    1997-01-01

    Quitine is a bi-polymer largely found in invertebrates. As most compounds of this class are insoluble in common organic solvents, the des-acetylation percentile was obtained by carbon-13 solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The methodology is presented. Results are presented

  19. NMR spectroscopy study of agar-based polymers electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, R.I.; Tambelli, C.E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos; Raphael, E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rey (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Silva, I.D.A.; Magon, C.J.; Donoso, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This communication presents the results of preparation and characterization of transparent films obtained from agar and acetic acid. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The film formed by agar (Sigma Aldrich) was dispersed in water and kept under stirring and heating at 100 deg C. Next, glycerol, formaldehyde and different quantities of acetic acid (25 and 50 wt%) were added to this solution. The obtained solution was placed on a glass plate and left to dry for 48 hours in oven at 50 deg C to obtain the films, which were kept under vacuum before characterization. The ionic conductivity of the films display an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy E{sub a} = 78 (25 wt% of acetic acid) and E{sub a} = 87 kJ/mol (50 wt% of acetic acid). The conductivity values were 3:0 X 10{sup -6} and 1:2 X 10{sup -4} S/cm at room temperature and 4:4 X 10{sup -4} and 1:5 X 10{sup -3}S/cm at 70 deg C, for the 25 and 50 wt% of acetic acid respectively. To investigate the mechanism of protonic conduction in the polymer proton conductor proton NMR measurements were performed in the temperature range 200-370 K. The {sup 1}H-NMR results exhibit the qualitative feature associated with the proton mobility, namely the presence of well defined {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation maxima at 300 K. Activation energy of the order of 40 kJ/mol was obtained from the {sup 1}H-NMR line narrowing data. The ionic conductivity of the film combined with their transparency, flexibility, homogeneity and good adhesion to the glasses or metals indicate that agar-based SPEs are promising materials for used on optoelectronic applications. (author)

  20. Interlaboratory Comparison Test as an Evaluation of Applicability of an Alternative Edible Oil Analysis by 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zailer, Elina; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Diehl, Bernd W K

    2017-11-01

    A proton (1H) NMR spectroscopic method was established for the quality assessment of vegetable oils. To date, several research studies have been published demonstrating the high potential of the NMR technique in lipid analysis. An interlaboratory comparison was organized with the following main objectives: (1) to evaluate an alternative analysis of edible oils by using 1H NMR spectroscopy; and (2) to determine the robustness and reproducibility of the method. Five different edible oil samples were analyzed by evaluating 15 signals (free fatty acids, peroxides, aldehydes, double bonds, and linoleic and linolenic acids) in each spectrum. A total of 21 NMR data sets were obtained from 17 international participant laboratories. The performance of each laboratory was assessed by their z-scores. The test was successfully passed by 90.5% of the participants. Results showed that NMR spectroscopy is a robust alternative method for edible oil analysis.

  1. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance 13 C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the 1 H- 13 C NOE were determined in this study. The CαH relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured 15 N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the χ 1 dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than ±25 deg

  2. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbp.edu [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with {sup 13}C or {sup 1}H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for {sup 13}C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for {sup 1}H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for {sup 15}N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The {sup 1}H-detected solid-state NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  3. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  4. TG/DTG, FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy Study of Heavy Fuel Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.; Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Hourani, Nadim; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Sarathy, Mani; Roberts, William L.

    2015-01-01

    infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APCI-FTICR MS), high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC

  5. Using an Interactive Web-Based Learning NMR Spectroscopy as a Means to Improve Problem Solving Skills for Undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supasorn, Saksri; Vibuljun, Sunantha; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Rajviroongit, Shuleewan

    2005-10-01

    An Interactive Web-Based Learning NMR Spectroscopy course is developed to improve and facilitate student ' s learning as well as achievement of learning objectives in the concepts of multiplicity, chemical shift, and problem solving. This web-based learning course is emphasized on NMR problem solving, therefore, the concepts of multiplicity and chemical shift, basic concepts for practice problem solving, are also emphasized. Most of animations and pictures in this web-based learning are new created and simplified to explain processes and principles in NMR spectroscopy. With meaningful animations and pictures, simplified English language used, step-by-step problem solving, and interactive test, it can be self-learning web site and best on the student ' s convenience

  6. Illumination of Nanoliter-NMR Spectroscopy Chips for Real-Time Photochemical Reaction Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez, M.V.; Juan, Alberto; Jiménez-Márquez, Francisco; La Hoz, De Antonio; Velders, Aldrik H.

    2018-01-01

    We report the use of a small-volume nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR)-spectroscopy device with integrated fiber-optics for the real-time detection of UV-vis-light-assisted chemical reactions. An optical fiber is used to guide the light from LEDs or a laser diode positioned safely outside the magnet

  7. {sup 13}C NMR spectral data and molecular descriptors to predict the antioxidant activity of flavonoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Mariane Balerine; Muramatsu, Eric [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP). Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmauceuticas; Emereciano, Vicente de Paula [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Scotti, Marcus Tullius [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPA), Joao Pessoa, PA (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas e Educacao; Scotti, Luciana; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Silva, Marcelo Sobral da [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPA), Joao Pessoa, PA (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica

    2011-04-15

    Tissue damage due to oxidative stress is directly linked to development of many, if not all, human morbidity factors and chronic diseases. In this context, the search for dietary natural occurring molecules with antioxidant activity, such as flavonoids, has become essential. In this study, we investigated a set of 41 flavonoids (23 flavones and 18 flavonols) analyzing their structures and biological antioxidant activity. The experimental data were submitted to a QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationships) study. NMR {sup 13}C data were used to perform a Kohonen self-organizing map study, analyzing the weight that each carbon has in the activity. Additionally, we performed MLR (multilinear regression) using GA (genetic algorithms) and molecular descriptors to analyze the role that specific carbons and substitutions play in the activity. (author)

  8. PVT Degradation Studies: NMR Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the state of water inside the PVT. The deuterium NMR results show that water absorbed by PVT under warm, humid conditions enters several distinct environments, and when the PVT is transferred from incubation to ambient temperature and humidity the water is lost on a time scale of a few hours from these samples. Most of the deuterium NMR peaks can be assigned to bulk liquid water, but almost 35% of the detected signal intensity is contained in a resonance that resembles spectra of water contained in nanometer-scale pores in mesoporous carbon.

  9. Uptake of BSH in M2R melanoma cells monitored by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudinova, N.; Elhanati, G.; Salomon, Y.; Bendel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The accumulation ratio of BSH, relative to that of boric acid, in M2R mouse melanoma cells, was measured using 11 B NMR of the cell extracts. The cells were incubated in growth medium for up to 24 h, in the presence of 0.8 mM boric acid and 0.25-1.5 mM BSH. The aqueous phase of the cellular extracts was re-suspended for NMR spectroscopy. The relative accumulation ratio of BSH/boric acid determined from 9 separate experiments was 0.45±0.09. (author)

  10. Dynamic membrane interactions of antibacterial and antifungal biomolecules, and amyloid peptides, revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Akira; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2018-02-01

    A variety of biomolecules acting on the cell membrane folds into a biologically active structure in the membrane environment. It is, therefore, important to determine the structures and dynamics of such biomolecules in a membrane environment. While several biophysical techniques are used to obtain low-resolution information, solid-state NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful means for determining the structure and dynamics of membrane bound biomolecules such as antibacterial biomolecules and amyloidogenic proteins; unlike X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy, applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy are not limited by non-crystalline, non-soluble nature or molecular size of membrane-associated biomolecules. This review article focuses on the applications of solid-state NMR techniques to study a few selected antibacterial and amyloid peptides. Solid-state NMR studies revealing the membrane inserted bent α-helical structure associated with the hemolytic activity of bee venom melittin and the chemical shift oscillation analysis used to determine the transmembrane structure (with α-helix and 3 10 -helix in the N- and C-termini, respectively) of antibiotic peptide alamethicin are discussed in detail. Oligomerization of an amyloidogenic islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or also known as amylin) resulting from its aggregation in a membrane environment, molecular interactions of the antifungal natural product amphotericin B with ergosterol in lipid bilayers, and the mechanism of lipid raft formation by sphingomyelin studied using solid state NMR methods are also discussed in this review article. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopic study of glucose metabolism of muscle larva Trichinella spiralis (U. S. A. strain), and the effects of the end-products on the host (mouse)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishina, Masami

    1988-11-01

    /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify and quantitate metabolites excreted by muscle larva Trichinella spiralis maintained aerobically in the presence of D- (/sup 13/C/sub 6/) glucose and (1, 1'-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) succinate. End-products of glucose metabolism studied by /sup 1/H-NMR were lactate, acetate, succinate, proionate, n-valerate and alanine, at the molar ratio of 1:2:1:0.6:0.5:0.6. /sup 13/C-NMR measurement proved that all the products originated from the glucose in the medium via the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-succinate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo /sup 31/P-NMR spectra were also taken by the surface coil method from the leg muscle of mice which had been infected with T. spiralis. Intracelluar pH and relative amount of ATP in the leg muscle of the infected mice were found to decrease significantly as compared with that of control mice.

  12. Two-Dimensional NMR Evidence for Cleavage of Lignin and Xylan Substituents in Wheat Straw Through Hydrothermal Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; Prasad Kaparaju; Christopher G. Hunt; Kolby Hirth; Hoon Kim; John Ralph; Claus Felby

    2012-01-01

    Solution-state two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of plant cell walls is a powerful tool for characterizing changes in cell wall chemistry during the hydrothermal pretreatment process of wheat straw for second-generation bioethanol production. One-bond 13C-1H NMR correlation spectroscopy, via...

  13. 13C NMR and XPS characterization of anion adsorbent with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wei; Wang, Zhenqian; Zeng, Qingling; Shen, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 13 C NMR and XPS were successfully used to characterize quaternary ammonium groups in the surface of crop straw based anion adsorbents. • The results obtained from different kinds of crop straw material clearly confirmed the presence of quaternary ammonium groups. • The composition of C-groups and N-groups also were determined by curving fitting of high-resolution XPS C1 and N1 spectra. - Abstract: Despite amino groups modified crop straw has been intensively studied as new and low-cost adsorbent for removal of anionic species from water, there is still a lack of clear characterization for amino groups, especially quaternary ammonium groups in the surface of crop straw. In this study, we used 13 C NMR and XPS technologies to characterize adsorbents with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse. 13 C NMR spectra clearly showed the presence of quaternary ammonium groups in lignocelluloses structure of modified crop straw. The increase of nitrogen observed in XPS survey spectra also indicated the existence of quaternary ammonium group in the surface of the adsorbents. The curve fitting of high-resolution XPS N1s and C1s spectra were conducted to probe the composition of nitrogen and carbon contained groups, respectively. The results showed the proportion of quaternary ammonium group significantly increased in the prepared adsorbent’s surface that was dominated by methyl/methylene, hydroxyl, quaternary ammonium, ether and carbonyl groups. This study proved that 13 C NMR and XPS could be successfully utilized for characterization of quaternary ammonium modified crop straw adsorbents.

  14. Study on the interactions PVC/plasticizers by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Maria I.B.; Monteiro, Elisabeth E.C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Harris, Robin [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-12-31

    The nature of the interactions between PVC and plasticizers as di-butyl phthalate and di-2-ethyl-hexyl phthalate can be investigated using proton/carbon-13 NMR techniques. The measurements of T{sub 1} for protons and carbon-13 and T{sub 1} P for protons can provide a good source of information about the complex behaviour for those two systems which were investigated. (author) 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Chrestensen, Inge Byg; Damager, Iben

    2011-01-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by 13C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by 2H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains...... hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side...... chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose...

  16. Structural characterization of heat treated pitch by solid state /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfihi, H.; Tougne, P.; Legrand, A.P.; Couderc, P.; Saint-Romain, J.L.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine structural parameters (aromaticity factor, fractions of protonated and non-protonated aromatic carbons) of some pitches, and to follow their evolution as a function of the heat treatment duration. For such a determination, /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H cross polarization combined with magic angle spinning and dipolar dephasing (CP/MAS/DD) NMR was used. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Site-specific {sup 13}C content by quantitative isotopic {sup 13}C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst [Firmenich SA, Corporate R and D Division, P.O. Box 239, 1211 Geneva 8 (Switzerland); Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Pagelot, Alain [Bruker Biospin SAS, 34 rue de l‘Industrie, 67166 Wissembourg Cedex (France); Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor [Bruker Biospin AG, Industriestrasse 26, 8117 Fällanden (Switzerland); Schleucher, Jürgen [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, S-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude [European Commission, Joint Research Centre – Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the {sup 13}C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic {sup 13}C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ{sup 13}C{sub i} profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ{sup 13}C{sub i} in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results.

  18. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....

  19. Nanodisc-Targeted STD NMR Spectroscopy Reveals Atomic Details of Ligand Binding to Lipid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Juan C; Inacio Dos Reis, Rosana; Taylor, Richard J; Henry, Alistair J; Watts, Anthony

    2018-05-18

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. This is due to its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need for NMR information on the macromolecular target. This technique is most commonly applied to systems involving different types of ligands (e.g., small organic molecules, carbohydrates or lipids) and a protein as the target, in which the latter is selectively saturated. However, only a few examples have been reported where membrane mimetics are the macromolecular binding partners. Here, we have employed STD NMR spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of the neurotransmitter dopamine with mimetics of lipid bilayers, such as nanodiscs, by saturation of the latter. In particular, the interactions between dopamine and model lipid nanodiscs formed either from charged or zwitterionic lipids have been resolved at the atomic level. The results, in agreement with previous isothermal titration calorimetry studies, show that dopamine preferentially binds to negatively charged model membranes, but also provide detailed atomic insights into the mode of interaction of dopamine with membrane mimetics. Our findings provide relevant structural information for the design of lipid-based drug carriers of dopamine and its structural analogues and are of general applicability to other systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Identification of Imitation Cheese and Imitation Ice Cream Based on Vegetable Fat Using NMR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia B. Monakhova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils and fats may be used as cheap substitutes for milk fat to manufacture imitation cheese or imitation ice cream. In this study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy of the fat fraction of the products was used in the context of food surveillance to validate the labeling of milk-based products. For sample preparation, the fat was extracted using an automated Weibull-Stoldt methodology. Using principal component analysis (PCA, imitation products can be easily detected. In both cheese and ice cream, a differentiation according to the type of raw material (milk fat and vegetable fat was possible. The loadings plot shows that imitation products were distinguishable by differences in their fatty acid ratios. Furthermore, a differentiation of several types of cheese (Edamer, Gouda, Emmentaler, and Feta was possible. Quantitative data regarding the composition of the investigated products can also be predicted from the same spectra using partial least squares (PLS regression. The models obtained for 13 compounds in cheese (R2 0.75–0.95 and 17 compounds in ice cream (R2 0.83–0.99 (e.g., fatty acids and esters were suitable for a screening analysis. NMR spectroscopy was judged as suitable for the routine analysis of dairy products based on milk or on vegetable fat substitutes.

  1. Identification of Imitation Cheese and Imitation Ice Cream Based on Vegetable Fat Using NMR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhova, Yulia B.; Godelmann, Rolf; Andlauer, Claudia; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable oils and fats may be used as cheap substitutes for milk fat to manufacture imitation cheese or imitation ice cream. In this study, 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the fat fraction of the products was used in the context of food surveillance to validate the labeling of milk-based products. For sample preparation, the fat was extracted using an automated Weibull-Stoldt methodology. Using principal component analysis (PCA), imitation products can be easily detected. In both cheese and ice cream, a differentiation according to the type of raw material (milk fat and vegetable fat) was possible. The loadings plot shows that imitation products were distinguishable by differences in their fatty acid ratios. Furthermore, a differentiation of several types of cheese (Edamer, Gouda, Emmentaler, and Feta) was possible. Quantitative data regarding the composition of the investigated products can also be predicted from the same spectra using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The models obtained for 13 compounds in cheese (R 2 0.75–0.95) and 17 compounds in ice cream (R 2 0.83–0.99) (e.g., fatty acids and esters) were suitable for a screening analysis. NMR spectroscopy was judged as suitable for the routine analysis of dairy products based on milk or on vegetable fat substitutes. PMID:26904597

  2. Structure and Dynamics Studies of Cytolytic Peptides in Lipid Bilayers using NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Krogh

    2015-01-01

    different and cytolytic peptides were investigated in this work. The peptides were SPF-5506-A4 from Trichoderma sp, Conolysin-Mt1 from Conus mustelinus, and Alamethicin from Trichoderma viride. The studies employed solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with different biophysical methods...

  3. Characterization and quantification of N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine biocide by NMR, HPLC/MS and titration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondin, Andrea; Bogialli, Sara; Venzo, Alfonso; Favaro, Gabriella; Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The present paper reports the determination of the tri-amine N-(3-aminopropyl)-N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (TA) present in a raw material called LONZABAC used to formulate various, widely used commercial biocides. The active principle, TA, is present in LONZABAC together with other molecules at lower concentration levels. Three independent analytical approaches, namely solution NMR spectroscopy, liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC/HRMS) and acid-base titration in mixed solvent, were used to overcome the problem of the non-availability of the active principle as high purity standard. NMR analysis of raw material, using a suitable internal standard, evidenced in all analyzed lots the presence of the active principle, the N-dodecyl-1,3-propanediamine (DA) and the n-dodecylamine (MA) and the absence of non-organic, NMR-inactive species. NMR peak integration led to a rough composition of the MA:DA:TA as 1:9:90. The LC/HRMS analysis allowed the accurate determination of DA and MA and confirmed in all samples the presence of the TA, which was estimated by difference: MA=1.4±0.3%, DA=11.1±0.7%, TA=87.5±1.3%. The obtained results were used to setup an easy, rapid and cheap acid-base titration method able to furnish a sufficiently accurate evaluation of the active principle both in the raw material and in diluted commercial products. For the raw material the results were: TA+MA=91.1±0.8% and DA-MA=8.9±0.8%, statistically coherent with LC/MS ones. The LC/MS approach demonstrated also its great potentialities to recognize trace of the biocide components both in environmental samples and in the formulated commercial products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and applications of 13C glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-01-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the 13 C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide (∼53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific 13 C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of 13 C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of 13 C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in 13 C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids

  5. Li dynamics in carbon-rich polymer-derived SiCN ceramics probed by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Reinold, Lukas; Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena; Riedel, Ralf; Hammerath, Franziska; Buechner, Bernd; Grafe, Hajo

    2014-03-01

    We report 7Li, 29Si, and 13C NMR studies of two different carbon-rich SiCN ceramics SiCN-1 and SiCN-3 derived from the preceramic polymers polyphenylvinylsilylcarbodiimide and polyphenylvinylsilazane, respectively. From the spectral analysis of the three nuclei at room temperature, we find that only the 13C spectrum is strongly influenced by Li insertion/extraction, suggesting that carbon phases are the major electrochemically active sites for Li storage. Temperature and Larmor frequency (ωL) dependences of the 7Li linewidth and spin-lattice relaxation rates T1-1 are described by an activated law with the activation energy EA of 0.31 eV and the correlation time τ0 in the high temperature limit of 1.3 ps. The 3 / 2 power law dependence of T1-1 on ωL which deviates from the standard Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) model implies that the Li motion on the μs timescale is governed by continuum diffusion mechanism rather than jump diffusion. On the other hand, the rotating frame relaxation rate T1ρ-1 results suggest that the slow motion of Li on the ms timescale may be affected by complex diffusion and/or non-diffusion processes.

  6. Experimental and analytical variation in human urine in 1H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolic phenotyping studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Anthony D; Zirah, Séverine F M; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2007-07-15

    1H NMR spectroscopy potentially provides a robust approach for high-throughput metabolic screening of biofluids such as urine and plasma, but sample handling and preparation need careful optimization to ensure that spectra accurately report biological status or disease state. We have investigated the effects of storage temperature and time on the 1H NMR spectral profiles of human urine from two participants, collected three times a day on four different days. These were analyzed using modern chemometric methods. Analytical and preparation variation (tested between -40 degrees C and room temperature) and time of storage (to 24 h) were found to be much less influential than biological variation in sample classification. Statistical total correlation spectroscopy and discriminant function methods were used to identify the specific metabolites that were hypervariable due to preparation and biology. Significant intraindividual variation in metabolite profiles were observed even for urine collected on the same day and after at least 6 h fasting. The effect of long-term storage at different temperatures was also investigated, showing urine is stable if frozen for at least 3 months and that storage at room temperature for long periods (1-3 months) results in a metabolic profile explained by bacterial activity. Presampling (e.g., previous day) intake of food and medicine can also strongly influence the urinary metabolic profiles indicating that collective detailed participant historical meta data are important for interpretation of metabolic phenotypes and for avoiding false biomarker discovery.

  7. Fourier transform n.m.r. spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, D.

    1976-01-01

    This book is orientated to techniques rather than applications. The basic theory of n.m.r. is dealt with in a unified approach to the Fourier theory. The middle section of the book concentrates on the practical aspects of Fourier n.m.r., both instrumental and experimental. The final chapters briefly cover general application of n.m.r., but concentrate strongly on those areas where Fourier n.m.r. can give information which is not available by conventional techniques

  8. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: (1) Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen; (2) Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure; (3) Hydrogen storage material made from activated PEEK

  9. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-07-11

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from

  10. Cotranslational structure acquisition of nascent polypeptides monitored by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cédric; Preissler, Steffen; Riek, Roland; Deuerling, Elke

    2010-05-18

    The folding of proteins in living cells may start during their synthesis when the polypeptides emerge gradually at the ribosomal exit tunnel. However, our current understanding of cotranslational folding processes at the atomic level is limited. We employed NMR spectroscopy to monitor the conformation of the SH3 domain from alpha-spectrin at sequential stages of elongation via in vivo ribosome-arrested (15)N,(13)C-labeled nascent polypeptides. These nascent chains exposed either the entire SH3 domain or C-terminally truncated segments thereof, thus providing snapshots of the translation process. We show that nascent SH3 polypeptides remain unstructured during elongation but fold into a compact, native-like beta-sheet assembly when the entire sequence information is available. Moreover, the ribosome neither imposes major conformational constraints nor significantly interacts with exposed unfolded nascent SH3 domain moieties. Our data provide evidence for a domainwise folding of the SH3 domain on ribosomes without significant population of folding intermediates. The domain follows a thermodynamically favorable pathway in which sequential folding units are stabilized, thus avoiding kinetic traps during the process of cotranslational folding.

  11. Isobutylene Dimerization: A Discovery-Based Exploration of Mechanism and Regioselectivity by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Mariah L.; Peterson, Karl P.; Stoffregen, Stacey A.

    2018-01-01

    This two-period undergraduate laboratory experiment involves the synthesis of a mixture of isomeric unknowns, isolation of the mixture by means of distillation, and characterization of the two products primarily by NMR spectroscopy (1D and 2D) supported with IR spectroscopy and GC-MS techniques. Subsequent calculation and examination of the…

  12. Occurrence, biological activities and 13C NMR data of amides from Piper (Piperaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Jeferson C. do; Paula, Vanderlucia F. de; David, Jorge M.; David, Juceni P.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript describes an update review with up to 285 references concerning the occurrence of amides from a variety of species of the genus Piper (Piperaceae). Besides addressing occurrence, this review also describes the biological activities attributed to extracts and pure compounds, a compiled 13 C NMR data set, the main correlations between structural and NMR spectroscopic data of these compounds, and employment of hyphened techniques such as LC-MS, GC-MS and NMR for analysis of amides from biological samples and crude Piper extracts. (author)

  13. Symmetry Breaking in NMR Spectroscopy: The Elucidation of Hidden Molecular Rearrangement Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. McGlinchey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy is probably the most convenient and sensitive technique to monitor changes in molecular structure in solution. Rearrangements that are rapid on the NMR time-scale exhibit simplified spectra, whereby non-equivalent nuclear environments yield time-averaged resonances. At lower temperatures, when the rate of exchange is sufficiently reduced, these degeneracies are split and the underlying “static” molecular symmetry, as seen by X-ray crystallography, becomes apparent. Frequently, however, such rearrangement processes are hidden, even when they become slow on the NMR time-scale, because the molecular point group remains unchanged. Judicious symmetry breaking, such as by substitution of a molecular fragment by a similar, but not identical moiety, or by the incorporation of potentially diastereotopic (chemically non-equivalent nuclei, allows the elucidation of the kinetics and energetics of such processes. Examples are chosen that include a wide range of rotations, migrations and other rearrangements in organic, inorganic and organometallic chemistry.

  14. Complexation of rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates with aliphatic diamines in solution: 1H and 13C NMR and DFT investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Sadlej, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    The complexation of rhodium(II) tetraacetate, tetrakistrifluoroaceate and tetrakisoctanoate with a set of diamines (ethane-1,diamine, propane-1,3-diamine and nonane-1,9-diamine) and their N,N'-dimethyl and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl derivatives in chloroform solution has been investigated by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modelling. A combination of two bifunctional reagents, diamines and rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates, yielded insoluble coordination polymers as main products of complexation and various adducts in the solution, being in equilibrium with insoluble material. All diamines initially formed the 2 : 1 (blue), (1 : 1)n oligomeric (red) and 1 : 2 (red) axial adducts in solution, depending on the reagents' molar ratio. Adducts of primary and secondary diamines decomposed in the presence of ligand excess, the former via unstable equatorial complexes. The complexation of secondary diamines slowed down the inversion at nitrogen atoms in NH(CH3 ) functional groups and resulted in the formation of nitrogenous stereogenic centres, detectable by NMR. Axial adducts of tertiary diamines appeared to be relatively stable. The presence of long aliphatic chains in molecules (adducts of nonane-1,9-diamines or rhodium(II) tetrakisoctanoate) increased adduct solubility. Hypothetical structures of the equatorial adduct of rhodium(II) tetraacetate with ethane-1,2-diamine and their NMR parameters were explored by means of DFT calculations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Study of acute biochemical effects of thallium toxicity in mouse urine by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ritu; Rana, Poonam; Khan, Ahmad Raza; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Devi, M Memita; Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Tripathi, Rajendra P; Khushu, Subash

    2011-10-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a toxic heavy metal and its exposure to the human body causes physiological and biochemical changes due to its interference with potassium-dependent biological reactions. A high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy based metabonomic approach has been applied for investigating acute biochemical effects caused by thallium sulfate (Tl(2)SO(4)). Male strain A mice were divided in three groups and received three doses of Tl(2)SO(4) (5, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) b.w., i.p.). Urine samples collected at 3, 24, 72 and 96 h post-dose time points were analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. NMR spectral data were processed and analyzed using principal components analysis to represent biochemical variations induced by Tl(2)SO(4). Results showed Tl-exposed mice urine to have distinct metabonomic phenotypes and revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering of treated groups. The metabolic signature of urine analysis from Tl(2)SO(4)-treated animals exhibited an increase in the levels of creatinine, taurine, hippurate and β-hydroxybutyrate along with a decrease in energy metabolites trimethylamine and choline. These findings revealed Tl-induced disturbed gut flora, membrane metabolite, energy and protein metabolism, representing physiological dysfunction of vital organs. The present study indicates the great potential of NMR-based metabonomics in mapping metabolic response for toxicology, which could ultimately lead to identification of potential markers for Tl toxicity. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens

  17. New strategy for stable-isotope-aided, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of DNA oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Okira; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Kainosho, Masatsune [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the most efficient method for determining the solution structures of biomolecules. By applying multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques to {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins, we can determine the solution structures of proteins with molecular mass of 20 to 30kDa at an accuracy similar to that of x-ray crystallography. Improvements in NMR instrumentation and techniques as well as the development of protein engineering methods for labeling proteins have rapidly advanced multidimensional heteronuclear NMR of proteins. In contrast, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR studies of nucleic acids is less advanced because there were no efficient methods for preparing large amounts of labeled DNA/RNA oligomers. In this report, we focused on the chemical synthesis of DNA oligomers labeled at specific residue(s). RNA oligomers with specific labels, which are difficult to synthesize by the enzyme method, can be synthesized by the chemical method. The specific labels are useful for conformational analysis of larger molecules such as protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  18. Syntheses of carbon-13 labeled protoporphyrin-IX for spectroscopic studies of heme proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinari, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The development of various methodologies for synthesis of selectively tailored protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester are presented. The iron(II) complex of protoporphyrin-IX is the heme, the prosthetic group for Hb, Mb, cytochromes and peroxidases. The significance of this research is to provide direct means to establish definitive carbon-13 NMR assignments of heme proteins in order to study not only the structure-function relationships, but also protein dynamics of these vital systems. Carbon-13 labeling at the beta-vinyl position was first achieved by ozonolysis of protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester. Column LC method were used to first isolate 2,4-diformyldeuteroporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester. Concomitantly, monofomyl-monovinyl porphyrins were obtained as a mixture of two isomers. This mixture was separated by MPLC or prep HPLC to afford the isomerically pure products, Spirographis porphyrin dimethyl ester and Iso-Spirographis porphyrin dimethyl ester. A Wittig reaction to each of these porphyrins with 13 C-methyltriphenylphosphonium iodide gave 2,4-bis[ 13 C 2 ]-vinyl protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester, 2-[ 13 C 2 ]-vinyl protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester, and the 4-[ 13 C 2 ]-vinyl protoporphyrin-IX dimethyl ester, respectively

  19. Theory and Applications of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy to Biomembrane Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolin

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the premiere biophysical methods that can be applied for addressing the structure and dynamics of biomolecules, including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. It illustrates the general problem of determining the average biomolecular structure, including the motional mean-square amplitudes and rates of the fluctuations. Lineshape and relaxtion studies give us a view into the molecular properties under different environments. To help the understanding of NMR theory, both lineshape and relaxation experiments are conducted with hexamethylbezene (HMB). This chemical compound with a simple structure serves as a perfect test molecule. Because of its highly symmetric structure, its motions are not very difficult to understand. The results for HMB set benchmarks for other more complicated systems like membrane proteins. After accumulating a large data set on HMB, we also proceed to develop a completely new method of data analysis, which yields the spectral densities in a body-fixed frame revealing internal motions of the system. Among the possible applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we study the light activation mechanism of visual rhodopsin in lipid membranes. As a prototype of G-protein-coupled receptors, which are a large class of membrane proteins, the cofactor isomerization is triggered by photon absorption, and the local structural change is then propagated to a large-scale conformational change of the protein. Facilitation of the binding of transducin then passes along the visual signal to downstream effector proteins like transducin. To study this process, we introduce 2H labels into the rhodopsin chromophore retinal and the C-terminal peptide of transducin to probe the local structure and dynamics of these two hotspots of the rhodopsin activation process. In addition to the examination of local sites with solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy, wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) provides us the chance of

  20. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  1. Metabolomic Characterization of Ovarian Epithelial Carcinomas by HRMAS-NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ben Sellem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of the present study are to determine if a metabolomic study by HRMAS-NMR can (i discriminate between different histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue, (ii generate statistical models capable of classifying borderline tumors and (iii establish a potential relationship with patient's survival or response to chemotherapy. Methods. 36 human epithelial ovarian tumor biopsies and 3 healthy ovarian tissues were studied using 1H HRMAS NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis. Results. The results presented in this study demonstrate that the three histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas present an effective metabolic pattern difference. Furthermore, a metabolic signature specific of serous (N-acetyl-aspartate and mucinous (N-acetyl-lysine carcinomas was found. The statistical models generated in this study are able to predict borderline tumors characterized by an intermediate metabolic pattern similar to the normal ovarian tissue. Finally and importantly, the statistical model of serous carcinomas provided good predictions of both patient's survival rates and the patient's response to chemotherapy. Conclusions. Despite the small number of samples used in this study, the results indicate that metabolomic analysis of intact tissues by HRMAS-NMR is a promising technique which might be applicable to the therapeutic management of patients.

  2. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, CIHR Group in Protein Structure and Function and Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada)

    2004-06-15

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C NOE were determined in this study. The C{alpha}H relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured {sup 15}N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the {chi}{sub 1} dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than {+-}25 deg.

  3. Trace level detection of compounds related to the chemical weapons convention by 1H-detected 13C NMR spectroscopy executed with a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, David B; Hondrogiannis, George; Henderson, Terry J

    2008-04-15

    Two-dimensional 1H-13C HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum correlation) and fast-HMQC (heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation) pulse sequences were implemented using a sensitivity-enhanced, cryogenic probehead for detecting compounds relevant to the Chemical Weapons Convention present in complex mixtures. The resulting methods demonstrated exceptional sensitivity for detecting the analytes at trace level concentrations. 1H-13C correlations of target analytes at chemical shift information could be derived quickly and simultaneously from the resulting spectra. The fast-HMQC pulse sequences generated magnitude mode spectra suitable for detailed analysis in approximately 4.5 h and can be used in experiments to efficiently screen a large number of samples. The HSQC pulse sequences, on the other hand, required roughly twice the data acquisition time to produce suitable spectra. These spectra, however, were phase-sensitive, contained considerably more resolution in both dimensions, and proved to be superior for detecting analyte 1H-13C correlations. Furthermore, a HSQC spectrum collected with a multiplicity-edited pulse sequence provided additional structural information valuable for identifying target analytes. The HSQC pulse sequences are ideal for collecting high-quality data sets with overnight acquisitions and logically follow the use of fast-HMQC pulse sequences to rapidly screen samples for potential target analytes. Use of the pulse sequences considerably improves the performance of NMR spectroscopy as a complimentary technique for the screening, identification, and validation of chemical warfare agents and other small-molecule analytes present in complex mixtures and environmental samples.

  4. Microfabricated inserts for magic angle coil spinning (MACS wireless NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Badilita

    Full Text Available This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the "magic angle" of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning - MAS, accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds.

  5. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  6. Occurrence, biological activities and 13C NMR data of amides from Piper (Piperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson C. do Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes an update review with up to 285 references concerning the occurrence of amides from a variety of species of the genus Piper (Piperaceae. Besides addressing occurrence, this review also describes the biological activities attributed to extracts and pure compounds, a compiled 13C NMR data set, the main correlations between structural and NMR spectroscopic data of these compounds, and employment of hyphened techniques such as LC-MS, GC-MS and NMR for analysis of amides from biological samples and crude Piper extracts.

  7. Elucidation of the electronic spectrum changes of KA-Al{sup 3+} complex by potentiometric titration, FTIR, {sup 13}C NMR and quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piantavini, Mário S.; Gonçalves, Alan G.; Trindade, Ângela C.L.B.; Noseda, Miguel D.; Mercê, Ana L.R.; Pontarolo, Roberto, E-mail: pontarolo@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba (Brazil); Machado, Antonio E.H. [Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), MG (Brazil)

    2017-08-15

    Kojic acid (KA) is an organic acid widely used in pharmaceutical industry, mainly as a skin lightening agent. Based on the ability of KA to form complexes with ions, we found the most possible kind of complex formed with cation aluminum. KA-Al{sup 3+} complex structures were studied using potentiometric and spectrophotometric (UV) titrations, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. The electronic spectroscopy showed that the KA-Al{sup 3+} complexes absorb at higher wavelengths (λ{sub max}= 305 nm) than do the non-complexed KA (λ{sub max}= 269 nm), confirming complexation. The IR spectra of KA complexed and not complexed allowed to correlate the changes in the absorption of enol and carbonyl groups in absence and presence of Al{sup 3+} in aqueous solutions. The complexation suggested by the potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy are in accordance with the data obtained from NMR results. Calculations based on quantum mechanics were utilized to understand the differences found in the non complexed and complexed KAH electronic spectra. (author)

  8. Detection and assignment of phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues by {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin-echo difference NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, Lawrence P., E-mail: mcintosh@chem.ubc.ca; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Okon, Mark [University of British Columbia, Department of Biochemistry (Canada); Nelson, Mary L.; Graves, Barbara J. [University of Utah, Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute (United States); Brutscher, Bernhard [CNRS, CEA, UJF, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel (France)], E-mail: bernhard.brutscher@ibs.fr

    2009-01-15

    A simple NMR method is presented for the identification and assignment of phosphorylated serine and threonine residues in {sup 13}C- or {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins. By exploiting modest ({approx}5 Hz) 2- and 3-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P scalar couplings, the aliphatic {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C signals from phosphoserines and phosphothreonines can be detected selectively in a {sup 31}P spin-echo difference constant time {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C HSQC spectrum. Inclusion of the same {sup 31}P spin-echo element within the {sup 13}C frequency editing period of an intraHNCA or HN(CO)CA experiment allows identification of the amide {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N signals of residues (i) for which {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}(i) or {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}(i - 1), respectively, are coupled to a phosphate. Furthermore, {sup 31}P resonance assignments can be obtained by applying selective low power cw {sup 31}P decoupling during the spin-echo period. The approach is demonstrated using a PNT domain containing fragment of the transcription factor Ets-1, phosphorylated in vitro at Thr38 and Ser41 with the MAP kinase ERK2.

  9. Site blocking in silver-exchanged zeolite Y by carbon monoxide and ethene using xenon adsorption and 129Xe NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddenberg, B.; Watermann, J.

    1993-03-01

    The adsorption isotherms and 129Xe NMR chemical shifts of xenon in the zeolites NaY, AgY, and in AgY preloaded with ≈ 1 molecule/supercage ethene and carbon monoxide were measured at 25°C. The experimental data reveal the blocking of the silver-cation sites for xenon by the preadsorbed molecules. Ethene and CO are found to block the previously postulated two types of silver-cation species in the supercages of AgY in a different way.

  10. Physico-chemical characterization of products from vacuum oil under delayed coking process by infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meléndez, L V; Cabanzo, R; Mejía-Ospino, E; Guzmán, A

    2016-01-01

    Eight vacuum residues and their delayed coking liquids products from Colombian crude were study by infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and principal component analysis (PCA). For the samples the structural parameters of aromaticity factor (fa), alifaticity (A2500-3100cm -1 ), aromatic condensation degree (GCA), length of aliphatic chains (LCA) and aliphatic chain length associated with aromatic (LACAR) were determined through the development of a methodology, which includes the previous processing of spectroscopy data, identifying the regions in the IR spectra of greatest variance using PCA and molecules patterns. The parameters were compared with the results obtained from proton magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) and 13 C-NMR. The results showed the influence and correlation of structural parameters with some physicochemical properties such as API gravity, weight percent sulphur (% S) and Conradson carbon content (% CCR) (paper)

  11. An unprecedented up-field shift in the 13C NMR spectrum of the carboxyl carbons of the lantern-type dinuclear complex TBA[Ru2(O2CCH3)4Cl2] (TBA+ = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Yuya; Ikeue, Takahisa; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Guégan, Frédéric; Luneau, Dominique; Gillon, Béatrice; Hiromitsu, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Mikuriya, Masahiro; Kataoka, Yusuke; Handa, Makoto

    2015-08-14

    A large up-field shift (-763 ppm) has been observed for the carboxyl carbons of the dichlorido complex TBA[Ru(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4)Cl(2)] (TBA(+) = tetra(n-butyl)ammonium cation) in the (13)C NMR spectrum (CD(2)Cl(2) at 25 °C). The DFT calculations showed spin delocalization from the paramagnetic Ru(2)(5+) core to the ligands, in agreement with the large up-field shift.

  12. A First Laboratory Utilizing NMR for Undergraduate Education: Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils by Quantitative [superscript 13]C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Charles G.; Hofstetter, Heike; Bowman, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative [superscript 13]C NMR provides a straightforward method of analyzing edible oils in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. [superscript 13]C spectra are relatively easy to understand, and are much simpler to analyze and workup than corresponding [superscript 1]H spectra. Average chain length, degree of saturation, and average…

  13. Some new insights into biology and medicine through NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radda, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    The contributions to biology and medicine by NMR spectroscopy in vivo require careful definition of the problems that are studied. Temporal and spatial resolution of the biochemical information obtained are the key to success, although the latter is limited owing to low sensitivity and small concentrations of the metabolites studied. Using 31 P NMR investigations in four areas are described. Control of energetics by ADP in normal and diseased muscle is shown to be important. Enzyme catalysed fluxes are obtained for creatine kinase and ATP synthase in muscle and in the human brain enzyme activity maps are derived. The measurements on the ionic environment and fluxes for H + , Na + and K + (Rb + ) give us new information about the role of ions in cell proliferation (e.g. in cancer) and hypertension. Molecular architecture of phospholipids in vivo is readily observed and is perturbed in the brain in chronic head injury and demyelination. (author)

  14. Complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments and anti fungal activity of two 8-hydroxy flavonoids in mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johann, Susana; Smania Junior, Artur; Branco, Alexsandro

    2007-01-01

    A mixture of the two new flavonols 8-hydroxy-3, 4', 5, 6, 7-pentamethoxyflavone (1) and 8-hydroxy-3, 3', 4', 5, 6, 7-hexamethoxyflavone (2) was isolated from a commercial sample of Citrus aurantifolia. An array of one- ( 1 H NMR, { 1 H} -13 C NMR, and APT -13 C NMR) and two-dimensional NMR techniques (COSY, NOESY, HMQC and HMBC) was used to achieve the structural elucidation and the complete 1 H and 13 C chemical shift assignments of these natural compounds. In addition, the antifungal activity of these compounds against phytopathogenic and human pathogenic fungi was investigated. (author)

  15. Influence of water on stability of geopolymers investigated by NMR solid state spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiří; Urbanová, Martina; Slavík, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2008), s. 86 ISSN 1896-2203. [Mid-European Clay Conference MECC 08 /4./. 22.09.2008-27.09.2008, Zakopane] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : stability * NMR * solid state spectroscopy * geopolymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  16. Thiol-thione tautomeric analysis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis) properties and DFT computations of 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökce, Halil; Öztürk, Nuri; Ceylan, Ümit; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan

    2016-06-15

    In this study, the 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule (C7H6N4S) molecule has been characterized by using FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to investigate the molecular structure (thione-thiol tautomerism), vibrational wavenumbers, electronic transition absorption wavelengths in DMSO solvent and vacuum, proton and carbon-13 NMR chemical shifts and HOMOs-LUMOs energies at DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level for all five tautomers of the title molecule. The obtained results show that the calculated vibrational wavenumbers, NMR chemical shifts and UV-vis wavelengths are in a good agreement with experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural Elucidation of Metabolites of Synthetic Cannabinoid UR-144 by Cunninghamella elegans Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Fu, Shanlin

    2018-03-08

    The number of new psychoactive substances keeps on rising despite the controlling efforts by law enforcement. Although metabolism of the newly emerging drugs is continuously studied to keep up with the new additions, the exact structures of the metabolites are often not identified due to the insufficient sample quantities for techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The aim of the study was to characterise several metabolites of the synthetic cannabinoid (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl) (2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl) methanone (UR-144) by NMR spectroscopy after the incubation with the fungus Cunninghamella elegans. UR-144 was incubated with C. elegans for 72 h, and the resulting metabolites were chromatographically separated. Six fractions were collected and analysed by NMR spectroscopy. UR-144 was also incubated with human liver microsomes (HLM), and the liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry analysis was performed on the HLM metabolites with the characterised fungal metabolites as reference standards. Ten metabolites were characterised by NMR analysis including dihydroxy metabolites, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, a hydroxy and ketone metabolite, and a carboxy and ketone metabolite. Of these metabolites, dihydroxy metabolite, carboxy and hydroxy metabolites, and a hydroxy and ketone metabolite were identified in HLM incubation. The results indicate that the fungus is capable of producing human-relevant metabolites including the exact isomers. The capacity of the fungus C. elegans to allow for NMR structural characterisation by enabling production of large amounts of metabolites makes it an ideal model to complement metabolism studies.

  18. Systematic Evaluation of Non-Uniform Sampling Parameters in the Targeted Analysis of Urine Metabolites by 1H,1H 2D NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlippenbach, Trixi von; Oefner, Peter J; Gronwald, Wolfram

    2018-03-09

    Non-uniform sampling (NUS) allows the accelerated acquisition of multidimensional NMR spectra. The aim of this contribution was the systematic evaluation of the impact of various quantitative NUS parameters on the accuracy and precision of 2D NMR measurements of urinary metabolites. Urine aliquots spiked with varying concentrations (15.6-500.0 µM) of tryptophan, tyrosine, glutamine, glutamic acid, lactic acid, and threonine, which can only be resolved fully by 2D NMR, were used to assess the influence of the sampling scheme, reconstruction algorithm, amount of omitted data points, and seed value on the quantitative performance of NUS in 1 H, 1 H-TOCSY and 1 H, 1 H-COSY45 NMR spectroscopy. Sinusoidal Poisson-gap sampling and a compressed sensing approach employing the iterative re-weighted least squares method for spectral reconstruction allowed a 50% reduction in measurement time while maintaining sufficient quantitative accuracy and precision for both types of homonuclear 2D NMR spectroscopy. Together with other advances in instrument design, such as state-of-the-art cryogenic probes, use of 2D NMR spectroscopy in large biomedical cohort studies seems feasible.

  19. Metabolic Profiling of Food Protective Cultures by in vitro NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebrahimi, Parvaneh

    Food spoilage is of major concern to the food industry, because it leads to considerable economic losses, a deteriorated environmental food-print, and to possible public health hazards. In order to limit food spoilage, research on the preservation of food products has always received particular......-called protective cultures) has unexploited potential to inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganisms and enhance the shelf life of the final food product. In order to apply biopreservation in food products effectively, detailed knowledge on the metabolism of protective cultures is required. The present Ph......D project is mainly focused on the application of in vitro NMR spectroscopy for studying the metabolism of protective cultures. As an important part of this work, an analytical protocol was developed for realtime in vitro NMR measurements of bacterial fermentation, which includes guidelines from the sample...

  20. An instrument control and data analysis program for NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, M.S.; Mushlin, R.A.; Veklerov, E.; Port, J.D.; Ladd, C.; Harrison, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a software environment created to support real-time instrument control and signal acquisition as well as array-processor based signal and image processing in up to five dimensions. The environment is configured for NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. It is designed to provide flexible tools for implementing novel NMR experiments in the research laboratory. Data acquisition and processing operations are programmed in macros which are loaded in assembled from to minimize instruction overhead. Data arrays are dynamically allocated for efficient use of memory and can be mapped directly into disk files. The command set includes primitives for real-time control of data acquisition, scalar arithmetic, string manipulation, branching, a file system and vector operations carried out by an array processor. 6 figs

  1. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  2. Structural investigations of flavonol glycosides from sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) pomace by NMR spectroscopy and HPLC-ESI-MS(n).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Daniel; Krumbein, Angelika; Mügge, Clemens; Kroh, Lothar W

    2004-06-30

    Four flavonol glycosides were isolated from an extract of sea buckthorn pomace (Hippophaë rhamnoides) by Sephadex LH-20 gel chromatography and semipreparative HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by hydrolysis studies, ESI-MS(n), UV, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The occurrence of the major flavonol glycoside kaempferol 3-O-beta-sophoroside-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside in sea buckthorn is described here for the first time. A further 21 flavonol glycosides of Sephadex LH-20 fractions of sea buckthorn pomace were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS. The characteristic MS-MS and MS(3) fragmentation pattern of flavonol glycosides previously identified in sea buckthorn juice and of flavonol glycosides identified by NMR spectroscopy gave valuable indications for their identification. The results demonstrate that loss of the sugar moiety from C-7 of the aglycon is more favored than fission of the glycosidic linkage at the C-3 position. Thus, most of the compounds identified were 7-rhamnosides of isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin, which exhibit different substitution patterns at the C-3 position, mainly glucosides, rutinosides, and sophorosides. In addition, numerous flavonol glycosides were detected lacking a sugar moiety at C-7. Finally, eight flavonol derivatives were identified that are acylated by hydroxybenzoic or hydoxycinnamic acids.

  3. {sup 13}C NMR and XPS characterization of anion adsorbent with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Wei, E-mail: weicao@hqu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhenqian; Zeng, Qingling; Shen, Chunhua

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • {sup 13}C NMR and XPS were successfully used to characterize quaternary ammonium groups in the surface of crop straw based anion adsorbents. • The results obtained from different kinds of crop straw material clearly confirmed the presence of quaternary ammonium groups. • The composition of C-groups and N-groups also were determined by curving fitting of high-resolution XPS C1 and N1 spectra. - Abstract: Despite amino groups modified crop straw has been intensively studied as new and low-cost adsorbent for removal of anionic species from water, there is still a lack of clear characterization for amino groups, especially quaternary ammonium groups in the surface of crop straw. In this study, we used {sup 13}C NMR and XPS technologies to characterize adsorbents with quaternary ammonium groups prepared from rice straw, corn stalk and sugarcane bagasse. {sup 13}C NMR spectra clearly showed the presence of quaternary ammonium groups in lignocelluloses structure of modified crop straw. The increase of nitrogen observed in XPS survey spectra also indicated the existence of quaternary ammonium group in the surface of the adsorbents. The curve fitting of high-resolution XPS N1s and C1s spectra were conducted to probe the composition of nitrogen and carbon contained groups, respectively. The results showed the proportion of quaternary ammonium group significantly increased in the prepared adsorbent’s surface that was dominated by methyl/methylene, hydroxyl, quaternary ammonium, ether and carbonyl groups. This study proved that {sup 13}C NMR and XPS could be successfully utilized for characterization of quaternary ammonium modified crop straw adsorbents.

  4. An in Situ NMR Study of the Mechanism for the Catalytic Conversion of Fructose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural and then to Levulinic Acid Using 13 C Labeled d -Fructose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Atom Efficient; Weitz, Eric [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Atom Efficient

    2012-04-26

    The pathways for the formation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) by dehydration of d-fructose and for the formation of levulinic acid and formic acid from HMF by rehydration were investigated by in situ13C and 1H NMR using both unlabeled and 13C-labeled fructose. Water or DMSO was used as the solvent with Amberlyst 70, PO43–/niobic acid, or sulfuric acid as catalysts. Only HMF is observed using NMR for fructose dehydration in DMSO with any of the three catalysts or without a catalyst. For each system, results with 13C-labeled fructose indicate that the first carbon (C-1) or sixth carbon (C-6) of fructose maps onto the corresponding carbons of HMF. For fructose dehydration in H2O with a PO43–/niobic acid catalyst, in addition to HMF, furfural was observed as a product. However, we show that furfural is not a reaction product deriving from HMF under our conditions. Rather our data indicate that there is a parallel reaction pathway open to fructose when the reaction takes place in H2O with a PO43–/niobic acid catalyst. The corresponding 13C-labeled results show that the first carbon in fructose maps onto the first carbon (aldehyde carbon) in furfural. Using 13C-enriched HMF formed from dehydration of 13C-labeled fructose in DMSO or H2O, we investigated the pathway for HMF rehydration to levulinic and formic acid. The data in different solvents and with different catalysts are consistent with a common mechanism for HMF rehydration, which results in the C-1 and C-6 carbon of HMF being transformed to the carbon of formic acid and methyl carbon (C-5) of levulinic acid, respectively.

  5. 1H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Corsaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication.

  6. Phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses for solid state quadrupole echo NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, A.; Narasimhan, P.T.

    1991-01-01

    Phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses have been constructed for spin I=1 to overcome quadrupole interaction effects in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) spectroscopy. Magnus expansion approach is used to design these sequences in a manner similar to the NMR coherent averaging theory. It is inferred that the symmetric phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses reported here are quite successful in producing quadrupole echo free phase distortions. This effectiveness of the present composite pulses is due to the fact that most of them are of shorter durations as compared to the ones reported in literature. In this theoretical procedure, irreducible spherical tensor operator formalism is employed to simplify the complexity involved in the evaluation of Magnus expansion terms. It has been argued in this paper that composite π/2 pulse sequences for this purpose can also be derived from the broadband inversion π pulses which are designed to compensate electric field gradient(efg) inhomogeniety in spin I=1 nuclear quadrupole resonance(NQR) spectroscopy. (author). 28 refs

  7. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO.

  8. The structure of phosphate and borosilicate glasses and their structural evolution at high temperatures as studied with solid state NMR spectroscopy: Phase separation, crystallisation and dynamic species exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, S.; Van Wullen, L.; Tricot, G.; Tricot, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we present an in-depth study of the network structure of different phosphate based and borosilicate glasses and its evolution at high temperatures. Employing a range of advanced solid state NMR methodologies, complemented by the results of XPS, the structural motifs on short and intermediate length scales are identified. For the phosphate based glasses, at temperatures above the glass transition temperature Tg, structural relaxation processes and the devitrification of the glasses were monitored in situ employing MAS NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dynamic species exchange involving rapid P-O-P and P-O-Al bond breaking and reforming was observed employing in situ 27 Al and 31 P MAS NMR spectroscopy and could be linked to viscous flow. For the borosilicate glasses, an atomic scale investigation of the phase separation processes was possible in a combined effort of ex situ NMR studies on glass samples with different thermal histories and in situ NMR studies using high temperature MAS NMR spectroscopy including 11 B MAS, 29 Si MAS and in situ 29 Si{ 11 B} REAPDOR NMR spectroscopy. (authors)

  9. Identification of Diethyl 2,5-Dioxahexane Dicarboxylate and Polyethylene Carbonate as Decomposition Products of Ethylene Carbonate Based Electrolytes by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Feifei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Gao; Ross, Philip N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-01-01

    The formation of passive films on electrodes due to electrolyte decomposition significantly affects the reversibility of Li-ion batteries (LIBs); however, understanding of the electrolyte decomposition process is still lacking. The decomposition products of ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolytes on Sn and Ni electrodes are investigated in this study by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The reference compounds, diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate (DEDOHC) and polyethylene carbonate (poly-EC), were synthesized, and their chemical structures were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Assignment of the vibration frequencies of these compounds was assisted by quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations. The effect of Li-ion solvation on the FTIR spectra was studied by introducing the synthesized reference compounds into the electrolyte. EC decomposition products formed on Sn and Ni electrodes were identified as DEDOHC and poly-EC by matching the features of surface species formed on the electrodes with reference spectra. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of accounting for the solvation effect in FTIR analysis of the decomposition products forming on LIB electrodes. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  10. Identification of Diethyl 2,5-Dioxahexane Dicarboxylate and Polyethylene Carbonate as Decomposition Products of Ethylene Carbonate Based Electrolytes by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Feifei

    2014-07-10

    The formation of passive films on electrodes due to electrolyte decomposition significantly affects the reversibility of Li-ion batteries (LIBs); however, understanding of the electrolyte decomposition process is still lacking. The decomposition products of ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolytes on Sn and Ni electrodes are investigated in this study by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The reference compounds, diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate (DEDOHC) and polyethylene carbonate (poly-EC), were synthesized, and their chemical structures were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Assignment of the vibration frequencies of these compounds was assisted by quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations. The effect of Li-ion solvation on the FTIR spectra was studied by introducing the synthesized reference compounds into the electrolyte. EC decomposition products formed on Sn and Ni electrodes were identified as DEDOHC and poly-EC by matching the features of surface species formed on the electrodes with reference spectra. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of accounting for the solvation effect in FTIR analysis of the decomposition products forming on LIB electrodes. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  11. Variable-temperature NMR and conformational analysis of Oenothein B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Suzana C.; Carvalho, Ariadne G.; Fortes, Gilmara A.C.; Ferri, Pedro H.; Oliveira, Anselmo E. de

    2014-01-01

    Oenothein B is a dimeric hydrolyzable tannin with a wide range of biological activities, such as antitumour, anti-inflammatory and antiviral. Its nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at room temperature show duplications and broadening of signals. Experiments of 1D and 2D NMR at lower temperatures were useful for the complete NMR assignments of all hydrogens and carbons. The 3D structure of the most stable conformer was determined for the first time by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiment (-20 deg C) and density functional theory (DFT)(B3LYP/6-31G)/ polarizable continuum model (PCM) quantum chemical calculations. The favoured conformation showed a highly compacted geometry and a lack of symmetry, in which the two valoneoyl groups showed distinct conformational parameters and stabilities. (author)

  12. Variable-temperature NMR and conformational analysis of Oenothein B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Suzana C.; Carvalho, Ariadne G.; Fortes, Gilmara A.C.; Ferri, Pedro H.; Oliveira, Anselmo E. de, [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFGO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-02-15

    Oenothein B is a dimeric hydrolyzable tannin with a wide range of biological activities, such as antitumour, anti-inflammatory and antiviral. Its nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at room temperature show duplications and broadening of signals. Experiments of 1D and 2D NMR at lower temperatures were useful for the complete NMR assignments of all hydrogens and carbons. The 3D structure of the most stable conformer was determined for the first time by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiment (-20 deg C) and density functional theory (DFT)(B3LYP/6-31G)/ polarizable continuum model (PCM) quantum chemical calculations. The favoured conformation showed a highly compacted geometry and a lack of symmetry, in which the two valoneoyl groups showed distinct conformational parameters and stabilities. (author)

  13. Pulse NMR-spectroscopy of structural changes of chemically modified polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gafarov, A.M.; Galibeev, S.S.; Kochnev, A.M.; Sukhanov, P.P.; Arkhireev, V.P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of polypropylene compositions is studied by the method of pulse NMR-spectroscopy. The polypropylene compositions are derived by means of the modification by multicomponent systems. The analysis of relaxation times in a wide temperature range is carried out. Character of changes going on at a level of supermolecular structures is described. It is shown that the amplifications that manifest themselves under the polypropylene modification by the mixtures based on 2,4-tolyilendiisocyanate and e-caprolactam, are related to the change in the intermolecular interaction and formation of a more ordered polymer structure. (authors)

  14. Anatomising proton NMR spectra with pure shift 2D J-spectroscopy: A cautionary tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Peter; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A.

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of proton NMR spectra has been a key tool in structure determination for over 60 years. A classic tool is 2D J-spectroscopy, but common problems are the difficulty of obtaining the absorption mode lineshapes needed for accurate results, and the need for a 45° shear of the final 2D spectrum. A novel 2D NMR method is reported here that allows straightforward determination of homonuclear couplings, using a modified version of the PSYCHE method to suppress couplings in the direct dimension. The method illustrates the need for care when combining pure shift data acquisition with multiple pulse methods.

  15. NMR spectroscopy, Hammett correlations and biological activity of some Schiff bases derived from piperonal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echevarria, Aurea; Giesbrecht, Astrea

    1999-01-01

    A series of eleven Schiff Bases have been synthesized. They were obtained by condensation of piperonal (3,4-methylenedioxybenzaldehyde) with the corresponding aromatic primary amines. Their 1 H and 13 C-NMR spectra have been obtained and the Hammett correlations including chemical shifts and the substituent constants (σ p , σR e σI) were studied. Linear and bilinear significant correlations were observed for iminic carbon (C-α) and C-1 ' , showing a more significant resonance effect on chemical shifts. The chemical shifts for C-4 ' were highly affected by substituent effects, especially for halogens in the expected direction. Their biological activity against microorganisms has also been measured and significant activity was showed against Epidermophyton floccosum. The biological activity did not give a reasonable relationship with electronic effects. (author)

  16. Structure determination of the single glycan of rabbit serotransferrin by methylation analysis and 360 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, D.; Tordera, V.; Spik, G.; Dorland, L.; Haverkamp, J.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1978-01-01

    The glycopeptide fraction of rabbit serotransferrin (STF) has been investigated applying an original method for the determination of glycan primary structure combining monosaccharide determination, permethylation and 360 MHz 1 H NMR. It is concluded that the highly purified rabbit transferrin contains only 1 glycan chain/molecule. A heterogeneity of the glycan moiety in the sialic acid residues was observed on isolation by paper electrophoresis of a disialylglycopeptide G-1 and a monosialylglycopeptide 2. The primary structure of glycopeptide G-1 deduced on the basis of the data of carbohydrate composition, permethylation analysis and 360 MHz 1 H NMR spectroscopy is identical to the primary structure of human serotransferrin glycan and the glycopeptide G-2 was shown by 1 H NMR spectroscopy, to be a mixture of two isomeric monosialylglycopeptides. (Auth.)

  17. 13C NMR for the assessment of human brain glucose metabolism in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, N.; Seelig, J.; Turkalj, I.; Keller, U.

    1991-01-01

    Proton-decoupled 13 C NMR spectra of the human head were obtained during hyperglycemic glucose clamping using intravenous infusions of [1- 13 C]glucose in normal volunteers. In addition to 13 C signals of mobile lipids, a variety of new metabolite resonances could be resolved for the first time in the human brain. At an enrichment level of 20% [1- 13 C]glucose, the signals of α- and β-glucose at 92.7 and 96.6 ppm, respectively, could be detected in the human brain after only an infusion period of 15 minutes. The spatial localization of the different regions of interest was confirmed by 13 C NMR spectroscopic imaging with a time resolution of 9 minutes. Increasing the enrichment level to 99% [1- 13 C]glucose not only improved the time resolution but allowed the detection of metabolic breakdown products of [1- 13 C]glucose. The time course of 13 C label incorporation into the C 2 , C 3 , and C 4 resonances of glutamate/glutamine and into lactate could be recorded in the human brain. These results suggest the possibility of obtaining time-resolved, spatially selective, and chemically specific information on the human body

  18. Synthesis of biodiesel from rocket seed oil and its characterization by FT-IR, NMR (/sup 1/H and /sup 13/C) and GC-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.

    2012-01-01

    The limited resources of fossil fuel, increasing prices of crude oils and environmental concerns have motivated the researcher for alternate fuels, such as bio diesel that is obtained from vegetable oils. Therefore, bio diesel was synthesized from Rocket seed oil by base catalyzed transesterification with methanol. The physical parameters like dynamic viscosity (3.88 cp), specific gravity (0.893 g cm/sup 3/), kinematic viscosity (5.85 mm/sup 2/s/sup 1/)), density (0.877 g cm/sup 3/), cloud point (3 deg. C), flash point (110 deg. C) and acid number (0.07 mg KOH g/sup 1/) of the synthesized rocket seed oil bio diesel (RSOB) were determined and were found to be comparable with ASTM recommended values for diesels. Chemical composition of the bio diesels formed was determined by various techniques like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (/sup 1/H, 13/C) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of RSOB is given. (Orig./A.B.)

  19. Combined use of EPR and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy for assessing the properties of the mixed cobalt-nickel-manganese layers of P3-NayCo1-2xNixMnxO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapsazova, M; Ivanova, S; Kukeva, R; Simova, S; Wegner, S; Zhecheva, E; Stoyanova, R

    2017-10-11

    Knowledge on the formation of mixed transition metal layers on lithium and sodium transition metal oxides, Li/Na(Co,Ni,Mn,)O 2 , determines the ability to control their electrochemical properties as electrode materials in alkaline ion batteries. Taking this into account, herein we combine the EPR and 23 Na MAS NMR spectroscopic techniques to gain insights into the structural peculiarities of the mixed cobalt-nickel-manganese layers of Na y Co 1-2x Ni x Mn x O 2 with a three-layer stacking (P3-type) structure. Two types of compositions are examined where diamagnetic Co 3+ and paramagnetic Ni 3+ and Mn 4+ are stabilized: Na 2/3 Co 1/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 and Na 1/2 Ni 1/2 Mn 1/2 O 2 . EPR spectroscopy operating in the X- and Q-band region is applied with an aim to improve the spectra resolution and, on the other hand, to provide straightforward information on the coordination of the transition metal ions inside the layers. The analysis of EPR spectra is based on the reference for the Mn 4+ and Ni 2+ ions occurring simultaneously in oxides with two layer stacking, P2-Na 2/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 2/3 O 2 . Complementary to EPR, 23 Na MAS NMR spectroscopy at high spinning rates is undertaken to assess the local structure of the Na nucleus in the layered P3-Na y Co 1-2x Ni x Mn x O 2 oxides. All results are discussed taking into account the EPR and NMR data for the well-known lithium analogues O3-LiCo 1/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 and O3-LiNi 1/2 Mn 1/2 O 2 . Finally, the structure peculiarities of the transition metal layers extracted from the EPR and NMR methods are demonstrated by electrochemical intercalation of Li + ions into P3-Na y Co 1-2x Ni x Mn x O 2 .

  20. Quantitative measurement of carbon isotopic composition in CO2 gas reservoir by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Li, Rongxi; Zhao, Bangsheng; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Shuan; Cheng, Jinghua; Wu, Xiaoli

    2018-04-15

    The use of Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology for quantitatively determining gas carbon isotope composition is presented. In this study, 12 CO 2 and 13 CO 2 were mixed with N 2 at various molar fraction ratios to obtain Raman quantification factors (F 12CO2 and F 13CO2 ), which provide a theoretical basis for calculating the δ 13 C value. And the corresponding values were 0.523 (0Raman peak area can be used for the determination of δ 13 C values within the relative errors range of 0.076% to 1.154% in 13 CO 2 / 12 CO 2 binary mixtures when F 12CO2 /F 13CO2 is 0.466972625. In addition, measurement of δ 13 C values by Micro-Laser Raman analysis were carried out on natural CO 2 gas from Shengli Oil-field at room temperature under different pressures. The δ 13 C values obtained by Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy technology and Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technology are in good agreement with each other, and the relative errors range of δ 13 C values is 1.232%-6.964%. This research provides a fundamental analysis tool for determining gas carbon isotope composition (δ 13 C values) quantitatively by using Micro-Laser Raman spectroscopy. Experiment of results demonstrates that this method has the potential for obtaining δ 13 C values in natural CO 2 gas reservoirs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance data of lanosterol derivatives—Profiling the steric topology of the steroid skeleton via substituent effects on its 13C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jerry Ray; Gao, Hongwu

    2009-12-01

    The 13C NMR spectra of over 24 tetracyclic triterpenoid derivatives have been structurally analyzed. The 13C NMR chemical shifts allow one to probe the steric topology of the rigid steroid skeleton and inductive effects of its substituents. Use of deuterium labeling in chemical shift assignment and B-ring aromatic terpenoids are also featured.

  2. Reaction pathways of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylate complexes explored by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Tolstoy, Peter M; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-05-25

    Combined low-temperature NMR/UV-vis spectroscopy (UVNMR), where optical and NMR spectra are measured in the NMR spectrometer under the same conditions, has been set up and applied to the study of H-bonded anions A··H··X(-) (AH = 1-(13)C-2-chloro-4-nitrophenol, X(-) = 15 carboxylic acid anions, 5 phenolates, Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), and BF(4)(-)). In this series, H is shifted from A to X, modeling the proton-transfer pathway. The (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and the H/D isotope effects on the latter provide information about averaged H-bond geometries. At the same time, red shifts of the π-π* UV-vis absorption bands are observed which correlate with the averaged H-bond geometries. However, on the UV-vis time scale, different tautomeric states and solvent configurations are in slow exchange. The combined data sets indicate that the proton transfer starts with a H-bond compression and a displacement of the proton toward the H-bond center, involving single-well configurations A-H···X(-). In the strong H-bond regime, coexisting tautomers A··H···X(-) and A(-)···H··X are observed by UV. Their geometries and statistical weights change continuously when the basicity of X(-) is increased. Finally, again a series of single-well structures of the type A(-)···H-X is observed. Interestingly, the UV-vis absorption bands are broadened inhomogeneously because of a distribution of H-bond geometries arising from different solvent configurations.

  3. Studies of carbon deposition and consumption on Ru/TiO2 during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, G.; Bell, A.T.; Duncan, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Isotropic tracer techniques have been used to characterize the dynamics of carbon deposition on the surface of a Ru/TiO 2 catalyst during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and 13 C-NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structure of the deposited carbon. Elemental carbon, designated C/sub α/ is formed very rapidly, whereas alkyl carbon, designated C/sub β/ accumulates much more slowly. The influence of catalyst reduction on temperature, reaction conditions, and time under reaction conditions on the surface concentrations and reactivity of C/sub α/ and C/sub β/ will be discussed. It will be shown that C/sub β/ progressively becomes less reactive and may be the precursor to the formation of graphitic carbon

  4. Chemical behavior of methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside in aqueous solution studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Joana; Petrov, Vesselin; Parola, A Jorge; Pina, Fernando; Azevedo, Joana; Teixeira, Natércia; Brás, Natércia F; Fernandes, Pedro A; Mateus, Nuno; Ramos, Maria João; de Freitas, Victor

    2011-02-17

    In the present work, the proton-transfer reactions of the methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside pigment in water with different pH values was studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies. The results showed four equilibrium forms: the methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside cation, the neutral quinoidal base, the respective anionic quinoidal base, and a dianionic base unprotonated at the methyl group. According to the NMR data, it seems that for methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside besides the acid-base equilibrium between the pyranoflavylium cation and the neutral quinoidal base, a new species is formed at pD 4.88-6.10. This is corroborated by the appearance of a new set of signals in the NMR spectrum that may be assigned to the formation of hemiketal/cis-chalcone species to a small extent. The two ionization constants (pK(a1) and pK(a2)) obtained by both methods (NMR and UV-visible) for methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside are in agreement (pK(a1) = 5.17 ± 0.03; pK(a2) = 8.85 ± 0.08; and pK(a1) = 4.57 ± 0.07; pK(a2) = 8.23 ± 0.04 obtained by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies, respectively). Moreover, the fully dianionic unprotonated form (at the methyl group) of the methylpyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside is converted slowly into a new structure that displays a yellow color at basic pH. On the basis of the results obtained through LC-MS and NMR, the proposed structure was found to correspond to the flavonol syringetin-3-glucoside.

  5. Occurrence, biological activities and {sup 13}C NMR data of amides from Piper (Piperaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Jeferson C. do; Paula, Vanderlucia F. de [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, Jequie, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica e Exatas; David, Jorge M. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; David, Juceni P., E-mail: jmdavid@ufba.br [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Farmacia

    2012-07-01

    This manuscript describes an update review with up to 285 references concerning the occurrence of amides from a variety of species of the genus Piper (Piperaceae). Besides addressing occurrence, this review also describes the biological activities attributed to extracts and pure compounds, a compiled {sup 13}C NMR data set, the main correlations between structural and NMR spectroscopic data of these compounds, and employment of hyphened techniques such as LC-MS, GC-MS and NMR for analysis of amides from biological samples and crude Piper extracts. (author)

  6. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Contribution of exogenous substrates to acetyl coenzyme A: Measurement by 13C NMR under non-steady-state conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloy, C.R.; Jeffrey, F.M.H.; Thompson, J.R.; Sherry, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for the rapid determination of substrate selection in a manner that is not restricted to conditions of metabolic and isotopic steady state. Competition between several substrates can be assessed directly and continuously in a single experiment, allowing the effect of interventions to be studied. It is shown that a single proton-decoupled 13 C NMR spectrum of glutamate provides a direct measure of the contribution of exogenous 13 C-labeled substrates to acetyl-CoA without measurement of oxygen consumption and that steady-state conditions need not apply. Two sets of experiments were performed: one in which a metabolic steady state but a non-steady-state 13 C distribution was achieved and another in which both metabolism and labeling were not at steady state. In the first group, isolated rat hearts were supplied with [1,2- 13 C]acetate, [3- 13 C]lactate, and unlabeled glucose. 13 C NMR spectra of extracts from hearts perfused under identical conditions for 5 or 30 min were compared. In spite of significant differences in the spectra, the measured contributions of acetate, lactate, and unlabeled sources to acetyl-CoA were the same. In the second set of experiments, the same group of labeled substrates was used in a regional ischemia model in isolated rabbit hearts to show regional differences in substrate utilization under both metabolic and isotopic non steady state. The time resolution of these measurements may not be limited by technical contraints but by the rate of carbon flux in the citric acid cycle. Although this technique is demonstrated for the heart, it is applicable to all tissues

  9. Aspects of reaction of N-oxide radical with ethers in 13C NMR spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziejski, W.

    1980-01-01

    The stable radical N-oxide 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine was dissolved in ethers. The 13 C NMR spectra were recorded in the temperature 313K at the frequency 22,625 MHz on the spectrometers with Fourier transformation. The dissolution of the radical in ether caused the contact shifts in NMR spectra. The shifts were measured. (A.S.)

  10. Application of 31P-NMR spectroscopy to the study of striated muscle metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Kushmerick, M.J.; Brown, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    This review presents the principles and limitations of phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P-NMR) spectroscopy as applied to the study of striated muscle metabolism. Application of the techniques discussed include noninvasive measurement of high-energy phosphate, intracellular pH, intracellular free Mg 2+ , and metabolite compartmentation. In perfused cat biceps (fast-twitch) muscles, but not in soleus (slow-twitch), NMR spectra indicate a substantially lower (1 mM) free inorganic phosphate level than when measured chemically (6 mM). In addition, saturation and inversion spin-transfer methods that enable direct measurement of the unidirectional fluxes through creatine kinase are described. In perfused cat biceps muscle, results suggest that this enzyme and its substrates are in simple chemical equilibrium

  11. Chemically Methylated and Reduced Pectins: Preparation and Characterisation by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy, Enzymatic Degradation and Gelling Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbohm, Christoph; Lundt, Inge; Christensen, T.M.I.E.

    2003-01-01

    with lower DM. A simple method for determination of DM by 1H-NMR spectroscopy is presented. New modified pectins have been prepared by treatment of pectins having different DM’s with NaBH4 to reduce selectively the methyl esters to primary alcohols in the presence of free acids. The degree of reduction (DR......) and the DM of the remaining carboxylic acids could likewise be determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The new reduced pectins can be tolerated by the pectin degrading enzymes polygalacturonase PGI and PGII as well as by pectin lyase, all from Aspergillus niger, but the enzymes exhibit lower specific activities...

  12. Micro-raman and tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy of carbon allotropes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, G.G.; With, de G.; Loos, J.

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data are obtained on various carbon allotropes like diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene and single wall carbon nanotubes by micro-Raman spectroscopy, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging, and the potentials of these techniques for

  13. NMR spectroscopy: a tool for conformational analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tormena, Claudio F.; Cormanich, Rodrigo A.; Rittner, Roberto; Freitas, Matheus P.

    2011-01-01

    The present review deals with the application of NMR data to the conformational analysis of simple organic compounds, together with other experimental methods like infrared spectroscopy and with theoretical calculations. Each sub-section describes the results for a group of compounds which belong to a given organic function like ketones, esters, etc. Studies of a single compound, even of special relevance, were excluded since the main goal of this review is to compare the results for a given function, where different substituents were used or small structural changes were introduced in the substrate, in an attempt to disclose their effects in the conformational equilibrium. Moreover, the huge amount of data available in the literature, on this research field, imposed some limitations which will be detailed in the Introduction, but it can be reminded in advance that these limitations include mostly the period when these results were published. (author)

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the structure elucidation and biosynthesis of natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meksuriyen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of a chloroform extract of Dracaena loureiri Gagnep (Agavaceae), a Thia medicinal plant possessing antibacterial activity, has led to the isolation of fifteen flavenoids. The biogenic relationships among these flavenoids isolated were briefly discussed. Definition of the skeleton and the unambiguous assignment of all of the protons of the isolates was achieved through extensive 2D-homonuclear chemical shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference spectroscopy and 2D-NOE experiments. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra of staurosporine, a potent biologically active agent from Streptomyces staurosporeus, were unambiguously assigned by using 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation, NOE, 1 H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence via direct coupling and via multiple-bond coupling for resonance assignments of protonated and nonprotonated carbons, respectively. S. Staurosporeus was found to utilize endogenous and exogenous D- and L-isomers of trytophan in the production of staurosporine. The biosynthesis of staurosporine was examined by employing carbon-14, tritium, and carbon-13 labeled precursors

  15. Laser spectroscopy and beta-NMR measurements of short-lived Mg isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalska, M

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of studying the neutron-rich 29Mg, 31Mg and 33Mg isotopes has been demonstrated with the laser and beta-NMR spectroscopy setup at ISOLDE/CERN. The values of the magnetic moment and the nuclear spin of 31Mg are reported and reveal an intruder ground state. This proves the weakening of N=20 shell gap and places this nucleus inside the so called "island of inversion". The experimental setup and technique, as well as the results, are presented.

  16. /sup 13/C NMR spectra and electron conduction in 4-substituted diphenylamines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filimonov, V.D.; Kogan, R.M.; Tverdokhlebova, N.E.; Shcherbakov, V.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-07-10

    The /sup 13/C NMR spectra were recorded for a series of 4-X-diphenylamines, and correlations equations relating the /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts of the C/sup 1/ and C/sup 4/ positions to the electronic characteristics of the substituent X were obtained. It was established that the conduction of the substituted ring in the 4-X-diphenylamines is practically the same as in 4-X-biphenyls. Joint analysis of the spectral characteristics of the diphenylamines, biphenyls, N-substituted anilines, and carbazoles made it possible to conclude that the increased transmission characteristics of the diphenylamines are determined by the conformational mobility of the two benzene rings and by the unidirectional effect of changes in the introduction and resonance factors with variation in the substituent X.

  17. Transport and NMR characteristics of the skutterudite-related compound Ca3Rh4Sn13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C. W.; Kuo, C. N.; Li, B. S.; Wang, L. M.; Gippius, A. A.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lue, C. S.

    2018-02-01

    We report the electronic properties of the Yb3Rh4Sn13-type single crystalline Ca3Rh4Sn13 by means of the electrical resistivity, Hall coefficient, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, as well as 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The negative sign of the Hall coefficient and Seebeck coefficient at low temperatures suggests that the n-type carriers dominate the electrical transport in Ca3Rh4Sn13, in contrast to the observations in Sr3Rh4Sn13 which has a p-type conduction. Such a finding indicates a significant difference in the electronic features between these two stannides. Furthermore, we analyzed the temperature-dependent 119Sn NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for Ca3Rh4Sn13, (Sr0.7Ca0.3)3Rh4Sn13, and Sr3Rh4Sn13 to examine the change of the electronic Fermi-level density of states (DOS) in (Sr1-xCax)3Rh4Sn13. It indicates that the Sn 5s partial Fermi-level DOS enhances with increasing the Ca content, being consistent with the trend of the superconducting temperature. Since the total Fermi-level DOS usually obeys the same trend of the partial Fermi-level DOS, the NMR analysis provides microscopic evidence for the correlation between the electronic DOS and superconductivity of the (Sr1-xCax)3Rh4Sn13 system.

  18. Molecular motion of micellar solutes: a 13C NMR relaxation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, R.E.; Kasakevich, M.L.; Granger, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of simple NMR relaxation experiments have been performed on nitrobenzene and aniline dissolved in the ionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Using 13 C relaxation rates at various molecular sites, and comparing data obtained in organic media with those for micellar solutions, the viscosity at the solubilization site was estimated and a detailed picture of motional restrictions imposed by the micellar enviroment was derived. Viscosities of 8 to 17 cp indicate a rather fluid environment for solubilized nitrobenzene; both additives exhibit altered motional preferences in CTAB solutions only. As an aid in interpretation of the NMR data, quasi-elastic light scattering and other physical techniques have been used to evaluate the influence of organic solutes on micellar size and shape. The NMR methods are examined critically in terms of their general usefulness for studies of solubilization in detergent micelles. 48 references

  19. Substitution effect in nuclear magnetic resonance of C-13: α methoxicyclohexanones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Holland, M.A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Eletronic and steric interactions between the carbonyl and methoxyl groups in α-methoxicyclohexanones by H-1 and C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (n.m.r) is studied. Interpretation of H-1 n.m.r measurements based on the carbonyl group anisotropy is made. The asigment of spectral lines to specific nuclear by Lanthanide Shift Reagent Experiments is confirmed. Interpretation of C-13 n.m.r. spectra with respect to molecular effects and emphirical relationships associated with the substituent was analysed. The C-13 chemical shift asignment by comparison with results of partially (SFORD) and fully decompled spectra and also by relating the measured chemical shift with values cited in the literature for similar compounds are made. A qualitative study using I.R. spectroscopy in attempt to evaluate the predominance of one the conformers of the studied compounds in solutions of n-hexan and chloroform is made. (M.J.C.) [pt

  20. Intracellular PHB conversion in a type II methanotroph studied by 13 C NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecherskaya, M.; Dijkema, C.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Poly-g-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) formation under aerobic conditions via incorporation of [13C-2]acetate as a cosubstrate and its intracellular degradation under anaerobic conditions in a Type II methanotroph was studied by 13C NMR. During PHB synthesis in the presence of labelled acetate, low levels of

  1. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy: correlated, homonuclear-correlated, and nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy. January 1975-December 1988 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1975-December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the enhanced analytical techniques of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2-D NMR). Applications to specific molecules, biomolecules, and compounds as well as comparisons of three 2-D NMR techniques: correlated spectroscopy (COSY), nuclear Overhauser (NOSEY), and homonuclear-correlated spectroscopy (HOMCOR). (Contains 190 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  2. Observation by flow 1H NMR and dimerization kinetics and products of reactive ortho-quinodimethanes and benzocyclobutadiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.

    1990-01-01

    The reactive o-quinodimethanes, 1,2-dimethylene-1,2-dihydronaphthalene (9) and o-xylylene (1) were observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The 1 H NMR spectrum of 9 was obtained in the absence of precursor and dimers. However, the 1 H NMR spectrum of the more reactive 1, generated in a similar manner from [o-((trimethylsilyl)methyl)benzyl]trimethylammonium iodide (5.) could be obtained only in the presence of its stable [4 + 2] and [4 + 4] dimers. The dimerization kinetics of 3-methyl- (5'), 3,6-dimethyl- (11), 3-isopropyl- (12), and 3,6-diisoproply-1,2-xylylene (13) in acetonitrile (CH 3 CN) were studied by stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy. Fluoride ion induced 1,2-elimination from 2-elimination from 2-trimethylsilylbenzocyclobutenyl-1 mesylate (26) was used to generate the reactive molecule benzocyclobutadiene (1') in CD 3 CN, which was observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The 1 H NMR spectrum (in CD 3 CN) of 1,2-dimethylene-1,2-dihydrothiophene (1 double-prime), obtained by fluoride ion induced 1,4-elimination from 3-(trimethylammoniummethyl)-2-(trimethylsilylmethyl)thiophene iodine was observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The dimerization rate of 1 double-prime in CH 3 CN, generated in the same manner, was measured by UV-visible spectroscopy. 166 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs

  3. Efficient Modeling of NMR Parameters in Carbon Nanosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupka, T.; Stachów, M.; Chelmecka, E.; Pasterny, K.; Stobinska, M.; Stobinski, L.; Kaminský, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 9 (2013), s. 4275-4286 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 13C NMR * zigzag SWCNT * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  4. Investigation of Oxidative Degradation in Polymers Using (17)O NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathew; Assink, Roger A.; Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.; Wheeler David R.

    1999-07-20

    The thermal oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}), and of the homopolymer polyisoprene, has been investigated using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. By performing the oxidation using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas, it is possible to easily identify degradation products, even at relatively low concentrations. It is demonstrated that details of the degradation mechanism can be obtained from analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra as a function of total oxidation. Pentacontane reveals the widest variety of reaction products, and exhibits changes in the relative product distributions with increasing O{sub 2} consumption. At low levels of oxygen incorporation, peroxides are the major oxidation product, while at later stages of degradation these species are replaced by increasing concentrations of ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters. Analyzing the product distribution can help in identification of the different free-radical decomposition pathways of hydroperoxides, including recombination, proton abstraction and chain scission, as well as secondary reactions. The {sup 17}O NMR spectra of thermally oxidized polyisoprene reveal fewer degradation functionalities, but exhibit an increased complexity in the type of observed degradation species due to structural features such as unsaturation and methyl branching. Alcohols and ethers formed from hydrogen abstraction and free radical termination.

  5. Role of hydration in the phase transition of polypeptides investigated by NMR and Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dybal, Jiří; Schmidt, Pavel; Kříž, Jaroslav; Kurková, Dana; Rodriguez-Cabello, J. C.; Alonso, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 205, - (2004), s. 143-150 ISSN 1022-1360 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : NMR * quantum chemistry * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.691, year: 2004

  6. A new Schiff base compound N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone): synthesis, experimental and theoretical studies on its crystal structure, FTIR, UV-visible, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheb, Vahid; Sheikhshoaie, Iran

    2011-10-15

    The Schiff base compound, N,N'-(2,2-dimetylpropane)-bis(dihydroxylacetophenone) (NDHA) is synthesized through the condensation of 2-hydroxylacetophenone and 2,2-dimethyl 1,3-amino propane in methanol at ambient temperature. The yellow crystalline precipitate is used for X-ray single-crystal determination and measuring Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-visible, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. Electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 levels of theory are performed to optimize the molecular geometry and to calculate the FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra of the compound. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method is used to calculate the UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. Vibrational frequencies are determined experimentally and compared with those obtained theoretically. Vibrational assignments and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are also performed. All theoretical methods can well reproduce the structure of the compound. The (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculated by all DFT methods are consistent with the experimental data. However, the NMR shielding tensors computed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory are in better agreement with experimental (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra. The electronic absorption spectrum calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level by using TD-DFT method is in accordance with the observed UV-visible spectrum of NDHA. In addition, some quantum descriptors of the molecule are calculated and conformational analysis is performed and the results were compared with the crystallographic data. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon-13 Labeling Used to Probe Cure and Degradation Reactions of High- Temperature Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature, crosslinked polyimides are typically insoluble, intractible materials. Consequently, in these systems it has been difficult to follow high-temperature curing or long-term degradation reactions on a molecular level. Selective labeling of the polymers with carbon-13, coupled with solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), enables these reactions to be followed. We successfully employed this technique to provide insight into both curing and degradation reactions of PMR-15, a polymer matrix resin used extensively in aircraft engine applications.

  8. CP/MAS ¹³C NMR study of pulp hornification using nanocrystalline cellulose as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idström, Alexander; Brelid, Harald; Nydén, Magnus; Nordstierna, Lars

    2013-01-30

    The hornification process of paper pulp was investigated using solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Nanocrystalline cellulose was used to serve as a model system of the crystalline parts of the fibrils in pulp fibers. Characterization of the nanocrystalline cellulose dimensions was carried out using scanning electron microscopy. The samples were treated by drying and wetting cycles prior to NMR analysis where the hornification phenomenon was recorded by spectral changes of the cellulose C-4 carbon signals. An increase of the crystalline signal and a decrease of the signals corresponding to the accessible amorphous domains were found for both paper pulp and nanocrystalline cellulose. These spectral changes grew stronger with repeating drying and wetting cycles. The results show that cellulose co-crystallization contribute to hornification. Another conclusion is that the surfaces of higher hydrophobicity in cellulose fibrils have an increased preference for aggregation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct 13C-detected NMR experiments for mapping and characterization of hydrogen bonds in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fürtig, Boris; Schnieders, Robbin; Richter, Christian; Zetzsche, Heidi; Keyhani, Sara; Helmling, Christina; Kovacs, Helena; Schwalbe, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In RNA secondary structure determination, it is essential to determine whether a nucleotide is base-paired and not. Base-pairing of nucleotides is mediated by hydrogen bonds. The NMR characterization of hydrogen bonds relies on experiments correlating the NMR resonances of exchangeable protons and can be best performed for structured parts of the RNA, where labile hydrogen atoms are protected from solvent exchange. Functionally important regions in RNA, however, frequently reveal increased dynamic disorder which often leads to NMR signals of exchangeable protons that are broadened beyond 1 H detection. Here, we develop 13 C direct detected experiments to observe all nucleotides in RNA irrespective of whether they are involved in hydrogen bonds or not. Exploiting the self-decoupling of scalar couplings due to the exchange process, the hydrogen bonding behavior of the hydrogen bond donor of each individual nucleotide can be determined. Furthermore, the adaption of HNN-COSY experiments for 13 C direct detection allows correlations of donor–acceptor pairs and the localization of hydrogen-bond acceptor nucleotides. The proposed 13 C direct detected experiments therefore provide information about molecular sites not amenable by conventional proton-detected methods. Such information makes the RNA secondary structure determination by NMR more accurate and helps to validate secondary structure predictions based on bioinformatics.

  10. Observation of methanol behavior in fuel cells in situ by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Oc Hee; Han, Kee Sung; Shin, Chang Woo; Lee, Juhee; Kim, Seong-Soo; Um, Myung Sup; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Soo-Kil; Ha, Heung Yong

    2012-04-16

    The chemical conversion of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells was followed in situ by NMR spectroscopy. Comparing data of the methanol oxidation on Pt and PtRu anode catalysts allowed the role of Ru in both Faradaic and non-Faradaic reactions to be investigated. The spatial distributions of chemicals could also be determined. (Picture: T1-T4=inlet and outlet tubes.). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Structure determination of the single glycan of rabbit serotransferrin by methylation analysis and 360 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, D; Tordera, V; Spik, G [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Dorland, L; Haverkamp, J; Vliegenthart, J F.G. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1978-09-15

    The glycopeptide fraction of rabbit serotransferrin (STF) has been investigated applying an original method for the determination of glycan primary structure combining monosaccharide determination, permethylation and 360 MHz /sup 1/H NMR. It is concluded that the highly purified rabbit transferrin contains only 1 glycan chain/molecule. A heterogeneity of the glycan moiety in the sialic acid residues was observed on isolation by paper electrophoresis of a disialylglycopeptide G-1 and a monosialylglycopeptide 2. The primary structure of glycopeptide G-1 deduced on the basis of the data of carbohydrate composition, permethylation analysis and 360 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy is identical to the primary structure of human serotransferrin glycan and the glycopeptide G-2 was shown by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, to be a mixture of two isomeric monosialylglycopeptides.

  12. Solid state 13 C NMR quantitative study of wood tar pitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prauchner, Marcos Juliano; Pasa, Vanya Marcia Duarte; Menezes, Sonia Maria Cabral de

    1999-01-01

    In this work, solid-state 13 C NMR is used with other techniques to characterize Eucalyptus tar pitches and to follow their polymerization reactions. The pitches are the residues of distillation (about 50% m;m) of the tar generated in Eucalyptus slow pyrolysis for charcoal production in metal industry

  13. Dynamics of the carbohydrate chains attached to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G as studied by NMR spectroscopy assisted by selective 13C labeling of the glycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Kato, Koichi; Shindo, Mitsuru; Aoki, Shin; Furusho, Kumiko; Koga, Kenji; Takahashi, Noriko; Arata, Yoji; Shimada, Ichio

    1998-01-01

    A systematic method for 13 C labeling of the glycan of immunoglobulin G for NMR study has been developed. A mouse immunoglobulin of subclass IgG2b has been used for the experiment. On the basis of chemical shift and linewidth data, it has been concluded that (1) the mobility of the carbohydrate chain in IgG2b is comparable to that of the backbone polypeptide chain with the exception of the galactose residue at the nonreducing end of the Man α 1-3 branch, which is extremely mobile and (2) agalactosylation does not induce any significant change in the mobility. The results obtained indicate that even in the agalactosyl form the glycans are buried in the protein. Biological significance of the NMR results obtained is also briefly discussed

  14. Photoswitchable Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in 5-Phenylazopyrimidines Revealed By In Situ Irradiation NMR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Eliška; Čechová, Lucie; Kind, J.; Janeba, Zlatko; Thiele, C. M.; Dračínský, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2018), s. 492-498 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : azopyrimidines * heterocycles * hydrogen bonds * NMR spectroscopy * UV/Vis in situ irradiation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  15. Redox-dependent conformational changes in eukaryotic cytochromes revealed by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, Alexander N.; Vanwetswinkel, Sophie; Van de Water, Karen; Nuland, Nico A. J. van, E-mail: nvnuland@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Jean Jeener NMR Centre, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    Cytochrome c (Cc) is a soluble electron carrier protein, transferring reducing equivalents between Cc reductase and Cc oxidase in eukaryotes. In this work, we assessed the structural differences between reduced and oxidized Cc in solution by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. First, we have obtained nearly-complete backbone NMR resonance assignments for iso-1-yeast Cc and horse Cc in both oxidation states. These were further used to derive pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) arising from the paramagnetic haem group. Then, an extensive dataset comprising over 450 measured PCSs and high-resolution X-ray and solution NMR structures of both proteins were used to define the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility tensor, {Delta}{chi}. For most nuclei, the PCSs back-calculated from the {Delta}{chi} tensor are in excellent agreement with the experimental PCS values. However, several contiguous stretches-clustered around G41, N52, and A81-exhibit large deviations both in yeast and horse Cc. This behaviour is indicative of redox-dependent structural changes, the extent of which is likely conserved in the protein family. We propose that the observed discrepancies arise from the changes in protein dynamics and discuss possible functional implications.

  16. Redox-dependent conformational changes in eukaryotic cytochromes revealed by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Alexander N.; Vanwetswinkel, Sophie; Van de Water, Karen; Nuland, Nico A. J. van

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome c (Cc) is a soluble electron carrier protein, transferring reducing equivalents between Cc reductase and Cc oxidase in eukaryotes. In this work, we assessed the structural differences between reduced and oxidized Cc in solution by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. First, we have obtained nearly-complete backbone NMR resonance assignments for iso-1-yeast Cc and horse Cc in both oxidation states. These were further used to derive pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) arising from the paramagnetic haem group. Then, an extensive dataset comprising over 450 measured PCSs and high-resolution X-ray and solution NMR structures of both proteins were used to define the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility tensor, Δχ. For most nuclei, the PCSs back-calculated from the Δχ tensor are in excellent agreement with the experimental PCS values. However, several contiguous stretches—clustered around G41, N52, and A81—exhibit large deviations both in yeast and horse Cc. This behaviour is indicative of redox-dependent structural changes, the extent of which is likely conserved in the protein family. We propose that the observed discrepancies arise from the changes in protein dynamics and discuss possible functional implications.

  17. An experimental validation of a Bayesian model for quantification in NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matviychuk, Yevgen; von Harbou, Erik; Holland, Daniel J.

    2017-12-01

    The traditional peak integration method for quantitative analysis in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is inherently limited by its ability to resolve overlapping peaks and is susceptible to noise. The alternative model-based approaches not only extend quantification capabilities to these challenging examples but also provide a means for automation of the entire process of NMR data analysis. In this paper, we present a general model for an NMR signal that, in a principled way, takes into account the effects of chemical shifts, relaxation, lineshape imperfections, phasing, and baseline distortions. We test the model using both simulations and experiments, concentrating on simple spectra with well-resolved peaks where we expect conventional analysis to be effective. Our results of quantifying mixture compositions compare favorably with the established methods. At high SNR (> 40dB), all approaches usually achieve for these test systems an absolute accuracy of at least 0.01mol /mol for the concentrations of all species. Our model-based approach is successful even for SNR < 20dB ; it achieves 0.05 - 0.1mol /mol accuracy in cases where precise phasing is practically impossible due to high levels of noise in the data.

  18. Structural Characterization of Amadori Rearrangement Product of Glucosylated Nα-Acetyl-Lysine by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is a nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and free amino acid moieties, which is known as one of the most important modifications in food science. It is essential to characterize the structure of Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs formed in the early stage of Maillard reaction. In the present study, the Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose model had been successfully set up to produce ARP, Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose. After HPLC purification, ARP had been identified by ESI-MS with intense [M+H]+ ion at 351 m/z and the purity of ARP was confirmed to be over 90% by the relative intensity of [M+H]+ ion. Further structural characterization of the ARP was accomplished by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, including 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR, the distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT-135 and 2D 1H-1H and 13C-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY and 2D nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY. The complexity of 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR was observed due to the presence of isomers in glucose moiety of ARP. However, DEPT-135 and 2D NMR techniques provided more structural information to assign the 1H and 13C resonances of ARP. 2D NOESY had successfully confirmed the glycosylated site between 10-N in Nα-acetyl-lysine and 7′-C in glucose.

  19. NMR studies on 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxides to norbornenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gucma, Mirosław; Gołębiewski, W. Marek; Krawczyk, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of nitrile oxides to norbornenes substituted with an acrylate-derived moiety was examined. Only adducts to norbornene system were formed with a good exo selectivity and complete site-selectivity. Structures of the products were elucidated by an extensive application of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and 2D 1 H and 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). (author)

  20. NMR studies on 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxides to norbornenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gucma, Miroslaw; Golebiewski, W. Marek; Krawczyk, Maria, E-mail: golebiewski@ipo.waw.pl [Institute of Industrial Organic Chemistry, Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of nitrile oxides to norbornenes substituted with an acrylate-derived moiety was examined. Only adducts to norbornene system were formed with a good exo selectivity and complete site-selectivity. Structures of the products were elucidated by an extensive application of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and 2D {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). (author)

  1. Analysis of neuron–astrocyte metabolic cooperation in the brain of db/db mice with cognitive decline using 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Yongquan; Wang, Dan; Cai, Aimin; Lin, Qiuting; Zhao, Liangcai; Chen, Minjiang; Deng, Mingjie; Ye, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been linked to cognitive impairment, but its potential metabolic mechanism is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore neuron–astrocyte metabolic cooperation in the brain of diabetic (db/db, BKS.Cg-m+/+ Leprdb/J) mice with cognitive decline using 13C NMR technique in combination with intravenous [2-13C]-acetate and [3-13C]-lactate infusions. We found that the 13C-enrichment from [2-13C]-acetate into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate, succinate, was significantly decreased in db/db mice with cognitive decline compared with wild-type (WT, C57BLKS/J) mice, while an opposite result was obtained after [3-13C]-lactate infusion. Relative to WT mice, db/db mice with cognitive decline had significantly lower 13C labeling percentages in neurotransmitters including glutamine, glutamate, and γ-aminobutyric acid after [2-13C]-acetate infusion. However, [3-13C]-lactate resulted in increased 13C-enrichments in neurotransmitters in db/db mice with cognitive decline. This may indicate that the disturbance of neurotransmitter metabolism occurred during the development of cognitive decline. In addition, a reduction in 13C-labeling of lactate and an increase in gluconeogenesis were found from both labeled infusions in db/db mice with cognitive decline. Therefore, our results suggest that the development of cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes may be implicated to an unbalanced metabolism in neuron–astrocyte cooperation and an enhancement of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26762505

  2. Analysis of neuron-astrocyte metabolic cooperation in the brain of db/db mice with cognitive decline using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Yongquan; Wang, Dan; Cai, Aimin; Lin, Qiuting; Zhao, Liangcai; Chen, Minjiang; Deng, Mingjie; Ye, Xinjian; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been linked to cognitive impairment, but its potential metabolic mechanism is still unclear. The present study aimed to explore neuron-astrocyte metabolic cooperation in the brain of diabetic (db/db, BKS.Cg-m +/+ Leprdb/J) mice with cognitive decline using 13 C NMR technique in combination with intravenous [2- 13 C]-acetate and [3- 13 C]-lactate infusions. We found that the 13 C-enrichment from [2- 13 C]-acetate into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate, succinate, was significantly decreased in db/db mice with cognitive decline compared with wild-type (WT, C57BLKS/J) mice, while an opposite result was obtained after [3- 13 C]-lactate infusion. Relative to WT mice, db/db mice with cognitive decline had significantly lower 13 C labeling percentages in neurotransmitters including glutamine, glutamate, and γ-aminobutyric acid after [2- 13 C]-acetate infusion. However, [3- 13 C]-lactate resulted in increased 13 C-enrichments in neurotransmitters in db/db mice with cognitive decline. This may indicate that the disturbance of neurotransmitter metabolism occurred during the development of cognitive decline. In addition, a reduction in 13 C-labeling of lactate and an increase in gluconeogenesis were found from both labeled infusions in db/db mice with cognitive decline. Therefore, our results suggest that the development of cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes may be implicated to an unbalanced metabolism in neuron-astrocyte cooperation and an enhancement of gluconeogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Determination of aromatic fragment content in phenol-containing fractions of solid fuel conversion products using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanitskaya, L.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    Optimum conditions are determined for obtaining quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C spectra of fragments in phenol-containing fraction of coal products. Causes are analyzed of residual signals in spectra of un-protonized carbon atoms. The tests were carried out on: low-temperature carbonization tar and phenol fraction obtained during medium-temperature coking of Cherenkhovskii coal (which contains 84.13% C; 9.68% H; 1.23% S; 4.96% O); products of tar hydrogenation with various phenol content; standard phenol mixture. It was found that quantitative determination of aromatic fraction content in coal conversion products and other phenol- and amine-containing complex mixtures, using NMR spectroscopy requires the addition of dimethylsulfide or acetone in order to suppress specific interactions of phenols (amines) with relaxants and obtain quantitative subspectra of Tertiary and Quaternary aromatic carbon atoms. 16 references.

  4. Applications of NMR in biological metabolic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Jiarui; Li Xiuqin; He Chunjian

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance has become a powerful means of studying biological metabolism in non-invasive and non-destructive way. Being used to study the metabolic processes of living system in normal physiological conditions as well as in molecular level, the method is better than other conventional approaches. Using important parameters such as NMR-chemical shifts, longitudinal relaxation time and transverse relaxation time, it is possible to probe the metabolic processes as well as conformation, concentration, transportation and distribution of reacting and resulting substances. The NMR spectroscopy of 1 H, 31 P and 13 C nuclei has already been widely used in metabolic researches

  5. Enhanced detection of aldehydes in Extra-Virgin Olive Oil by means of band selective NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Giacomo; Rotondo, Archimede; Mallamace, Domenico; Cicero, Nicola; Salvo, Andrea; Rotondo, Enrico; Corsaro, Carmelo

    2015-02-01

    High resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a very powerful tool for comprehensive food analyses and especially for Extra-Virgin Olive Oils (EVOOs). We use the NMR technique to study the spectral region of aldehydes (8-10 ppm) for EVOOs coming from the south part of Italy. We perform novel experiments by using mono and bidimensional band selective spin-echo pulse sequences and identify four structural classes of aldehydes in EVOOs. For the first time such species are identified in EVOOs without any chemical treatment; only dilution with CDCl3 is employed. This would allow the discrimination of different EVOOs for the aldehydes content increasing the potentiality of the NMR technique in the screening of metabolites for geographical characterization of EVOOs.

  6. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  7. Biosynthesis of quinolizidine alkaloids. Incorporation of [1-amino-15N, 1-13C] cadaverine into lupanine, 13-hydroxylupanine, and angustifoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, J.; Robins, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The labelling patterns in (+)-lupanine, (+)-13-hydroxylupanine, and (+)-angustifoline derived biosynthetically from [1-amino- 15 N,1- 13 C]-1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) have been established by 13 C n.m.r. spectroscopy. Three cadaverine units are incorporated to about the same extent into each of these three alkaloids. The presence of two doublets due to 13 C- 15 N coupling in the 13 C brace 1 H brace n.m.r. spectra associated with C-2 and C-15 of lupanine and 13-hydroxylupanine, and one 13 C- 15 N doublet at C-2 of angustifoline, indicate that two of the cadaverine units are converted into the outer rings of the tetracyclic quinolizidine alkaloids in a specific fashion. (author)

  8. Ground-state properties of K-isotopes from laser and $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Lievens, P; Rajabali, M M; Krieger, A R

    By combining high-resolution laser spectroscopy with $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy on polarized K-beams we aim to establish the ground-state spins and magnetic moments of the neutron-rich $^{48,49,50,51}$K isotopes from N=29 to N=32. Spins and magnetic moments of the odd-K isotopes up to N=28 reveal an inversion of the ground-state, from the normal $\\,{I}$=3/2 ($\\pi{d}_{3/2}^{-1}$) in $^{41-45}$K$\\to\\,{I}$=1/2 ($\\pi{s}_{1/2}^{-1}$) in $^{47}$K. This inversion of the proton single particle levels is related to the strong proton $d_{3/2}$ - neutron $f_{7/2}$ interaction which lowers the energy of the $\\pi{d}_{3/2}$ single particle state when filling the $\

  9. Thermal heterogeneity within aqueous materials quantified by 1H NMR spectroscopy: Multiparametric validation in silico and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Norbert W.; Bernard, Monique

    2018-02-01

    We recently suggested a new paradigm for statistical analysis of thermal heterogeneity in (semi-)aqueous materials by 1H NMR spectroscopy, using water as a temperature probe. Here, we present a comprehensive in silico and in vitro validation that demonstrates the ability of this new technique to provide accurate quantitative parameters characterizing the statistical distribution of temperature values in a volume of (semi-)aqueous matter. First, line shape parameters of numerically simulated water 1H NMR spectra are systematically varied to study a range of mathematically well-defined temperature distributions. Then, corresponding models based on measured 1H NMR spectra of agarose gel are analyzed. In addition, dedicated samples based on hydrogels or biological tissue are designed to produce temperature gradients changing over time, and dynamic NMR spectroscopy is employed to analyze the resulting temperature profiles at sub-second temporal resolution. Accuracy and consistency of the previously introduced statistical descriptors of temperature heterogeneity are determined: weighted median and mean temperature, standard deviation, temperature range, temperature mode(s), kurtosis, skewness, entropy, and relative areas under temperature curves. Potential and limitations of this method for quantitative analysis of thermal heterogeneity in (semi-)aqueous materials are discussed in view of prospective applications in materials science as well as biology and medicine.

  10. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic characterization of humic substances from municipal refuse decomposing in a landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.H.; Theng, B.K.G.; Filip, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Municipal refuse was disposed of in simulated landfills and left for periods of more than 20 months. Three different 40 m 3 systems of disposals were studied, namely (i) where the refuse was compacted, (ii) where it was mixed with sewage sludge and left uncompacted, and (iii) where it was compacted with sewage sludge. At 2, 6, 12 and 20 months, the humic substances were extracted from each system, purified, and characterised by cross-polarisation 13 C NMR spectroscopy with 'magic-angle' sample spinning. The areas under the various signals were related to carbon percentages in different structural categories. The aromaticity of the humic acids increased with time of decomposition; those from refuse mixed with sewage sludge were particularly high in phenolic content. A signal at 174 p.p.m., assigned primarily to secondary amide linkages, reached maximum strength after 6 to 12 months decomposition. The carbohydrate contents of the humic acids showed only small variations as decomposition progressed. Polymethylene chains in lipids, particularly for the uncompacted system, accounted for a diminishing fraction of total carbon as time of refuse disposal increased. The spectrum of a soil humic acid showed features similar to those observed in spectra of humic acids derived from refuse, but the signals were less well resolved. 19 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  11. Development of a superconducting bulk magnet for NMR and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Tamada, Daiki; Yanagi, Yousuke; Itoh, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Takahiro; Utumi, Hiroaki; Kose, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    A superconducting bulk magnet composed of six vertically stacked annular single-domain c-axis-oriented Eu-Ba-Cu-O crystals was energized to 4.74 T using a conventional superconducting magnet for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Shim coils, gradient coils, and radio frequency coils for high resolution NMR and MRI were installed in the 23 mm-diameter room-temperature bore of the bulk magnet. A 6.9 ppm peak-to-peak homogeneous region suitable for MRI was achieved in the central cylindrical region (6.2 mm diameter, 9.1 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a single layer shim coil. A 21 Hz spectral resolution that can be used for high resolution NMR spectroscopy was obtained in the central cylindrical region (1.3 mm diameter, 4 mm length) of the bulk magnet by using a multichannel shim coil. A clear 3D MR image dataset of a chemically fixed mouse fetus with (50 μm)(3) voxel resolution was obtained in 5.5 h. We therefore concluded that the cryogen-free superconducting bulk magnet developed in this study is useful for high-resolution desktop NMR, MRI and mobile NMR device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneeland, J.B.; Lee, B.C.P.; Whalen, J.P.; Knowles, R.J.R.; Cahill, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Although still quite new, NMR imaging has already emerged as a safe, noninvasive, painless, and effective diagnostic modality requiring no ionizing radiation. Also, NMR appears already to have established itself as the method of choice for the examination of the brain spinal cord (excluding herniated disks). Another area in which NMR excels is in the examination of the pelvis. The use of surface coils offers the promise of visualizing structures with resolution unobtainable by any other means. In addition, NMR, with its superb visualization of vascular structures and potential ability to measure flow, may soon revolutionize the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Finally, NMR, through biochemically and physiologically based T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ indices or through spectroscopy, may provide a means of monitoring therapeutic response so as to permit tailoring of treatment to the individual patient. In short, NMR is today probably at the same stage as the x-ray was in Roentgen's day

  13. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Rigo, Vagner A. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, UTFPR, Cornélio Procópio, PR (Brazil); Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal Fluminense, UFF, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  14. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowgr