WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon surface chemical

  1. Synthesis, chemical modification, and surface assembly of carbon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amma, A.; St. Angelo, S.K.; Mallouk, T.E. [Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Razavi, B.; Mayer, T.S. [Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Carbon nanotubules and nanowires were synthesized by pyrolysis of polymer precursors in the pores of alumina membranes. The nanowires were released by dissolving the membranes, and were then made hydrophobic or hydrophilic by chemical surface derivatization. These nanowires could be placed into lithographically defined wells on surfaces by means of electrostatic interactions with monolayers at the bottoms of the wells. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents. PMID:24080293

  3. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  4. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien [CEA, LETI-Minatec, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel, E-mail: fabien.sauter@cea.fr, E-mail: michel.dewaard@ujf-grenoble.fr [Inserm U836, Grenoble Institute of Neuroscience, Site Sante la Tronche, Batiment Edmond J Safra, Chemin Fortune Ferrini, BP170, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-05-13

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  5. IR study on surface chemical properties of catalytic grown carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hua TENG; Tian-di TANG

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the surface chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown by catalytic decomposition of methane on nickel and cobalt based catalysts were studied by DRIFT (Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform) and transmission Infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The results show that the surface exists not only carbon-hydrogen groups, but also carboxyl, ketene or quinone (carbonyl) oxygen-containing groups. These functional groups were formed in the process of the material growth, which result in large amount of chemical defect sites on the walls.

  6. Surface morphology stabilization by chemical sputtering in carbon nitride film growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buijnsters, J G [Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM), Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vazquez, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-07

    We have studied the influence of chemical sputtering effects on the morphology of carbon nitride films grown on silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapour deposition. This study has been performed by comparing the evolution of their morphology with that of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown under similar conditions, where these effects are not present. When chemical sputtering effects operate we observe a film surface stabilization for length scales in the 60-750 nm range after a threshold roughness of about 3-4 nm has been developed. This stabilization is explained on the basis of the re-emission of nitrogen etching species, which is confirmed by growth experiments on microstructured substrates. (fast track communication)

  7. Tailoring activated carbon by surface chemical modification with O, S, and N containing molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel RibeiroVieira Azzi Rios

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the surface of activated carbon was chemically modified in order to introduce O, S and N containing groups. The activated carbon surface was selectively oxidized with concentrated HNO3 under controlled conditions. Characterization by thermogravimetric analyses, infrared spectroscopy and NaOH titration suggested the formation of mainly -COOH and small amounts of -OH groups, with concentration of approximately 4.10(21 groups/g of carbon. These -COOH functionalized carbons showed high adsorption capacity for metal cations in aqueous solution in the following order: Pb+2>Cu+2>Ni+2 >Cd+2~Co+2>Ca+2 , suggesting a cation exchange mechanism via a surface complex [COO-M+2]. These -COOHsurf groups can be reacted with SOCl2 to produce a surface acylchloride group, -COCl. This surface -COCl group proved to be a very reactive and versatile intermediate for the grafting of different S and N containing molecules onto the carbon surface, such as 1,2-ethaneditiol (EDT-, HSCH2CH2SH 1,7-dimercapto-4-thioheptane (DMTH-HSCH2CH2CH2SCH2CH 2CH2SH or 1,2-ethylenediamine (EDA- NH2CH2CH2NH2 and triethyltetraamine, TEA (H2NCH2CH2NHCH2CH 2NHCH2CH2 NH2. The characterization of these materials was carried out by TG, IR and TPDMS (Temperature Programmed Decomposition Mass Spectrometry experiments suggesting the formation of thioesther and amide surface groups, i.e. -COSR and -CONHR, with yields of approximately 50 and 75% for the reaction with DME and EDA, respectively. Preliminary adsorption experiments showed that these materials can efficiently remove metals such as Pb+2, Cu+2 and Ni+2 from aqueous medium.

  8. Chemical Bath Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Buffer on Curved Surfaces for Growing Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-07-01

    Direct growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on substrates requires the deposition of an aluminum oxide buffer (AOB) layer to prevent the diffusion and coalescence of catalyst nanoparticles. Although AOB layers can be readily created on flat substrates using a variety of physical and chemical methods, the preparation of AOB layers on substrates with highly curved surfaces remains challenging. Here, we report a new solution-based method for preparing uniform layers of AOB on highly curved surfaces by the chemical bath deposition of basic aluminum sulfate and annealing. We show that the thickness of AOB layer can be increased by extending the immersion time of a substrate in the chemical bath, following the classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov crystallization kinetics. The increase of AOB thickness in turn leads to the increase of CNT length and the reduction of CNT curviness. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized dense aligned CNT arrays of micrometers in length on substrates with highly curved surfaces including glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and porous ceramic foam. PMID:26053766

  9. Effect of activation agents on the surface chemical properties and desulphurization performance of activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Flue gas pollution is a serious environmental problem that needs to be solved for the sustainable development of China.The surface chemical properties of carbon have great influence on its desulphurization performance.A series of activated carbons (ACs) were prepared using HNO3,H2O2,NH3·H2O and steam as activation agents with the aim to introduce functional groups to carbon surface in the ACs preparation process.The ACs were physically and chemically characterized by iodine and SO2 adsorption,ultimate analysis,Boehm titration,and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR).Results showed that the iodine number and desulphurization capacity of NH3·H2O activated carbon (AC-NH3) increase with both activation time,and its desulphurization capacity also increases with the concentration of activation agent.However,HNO3 activated carbon (AC-HNO3) and H2O2 activated carbon (AC-H2O2) exhibit more complex behavior.Only their iodine numbers increase monotonously with activation time.Compared with steam activated AC (AC-H2O),the nitrogen content increases 0.232% in AC-NH3 and 0.077% in AC-HNO3.The amount of total basic site on AC-HNO3 is 0.19 mmol·g-1 higher than that on AC-H2O.H2O2 activation introduces an additional 0.08 mmol·g-1 carboxyl groups to AC surface than that introduced by steam activation.The desulphurization capacity of ACs in simulate flue gas desulphurization decreases as follows: AC-NH3 > AC-HNO3 > AC-H2O2 > AC-H2O.This sequence is in accord with the SO2 catalytic oxidation/oxidation ratio in the absence of oxygen and the oxidation property reflected by TPR.In the presence of oxygen,all adsorbed SO2 on ACs can be oxidized into SO3.The desulphurization capacity increases differently according to the activation agents;the desulphurization capacity of AC-NH3 and AC-HNO3 improves by 4.8 times,yet AC-H2O increases only by 2.62 as compared with the desulphurization of corresponding ACs in absence of oxygen.

  10. Incorporation of Nitrogen into Amorphous Carbon Films Produced by Surface-Wave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yuxiang(吴玉祥); Zhu Xiaodong(朱晓东); Zhan Rujuan(詹如娟)

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the influence of nitrogen incorporated into amorphous carbon films,nitrogenated amorphous carbon films have been deposited by using surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition under various ratios of N2/CH4 gas flow. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to monitor plasma features near the deposition zone. After deposition, the samples are checked by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS). Optical emission intensities of CH and N atom in the plasma are found to be enhanced with the increase in the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio, and then reach their maximums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. A contrary variation is found in Raman spectra of deposited films. The intensity ratio of the D band to the G band (ID/IG) and the peak positions of the G and D bands all reach their minimums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. These show that the structure of amorphous carbon films has been significantly modified by introduction of nitrogen.

  11. Chemically Synthesised Pt Particles on Surface Oxidized Carbon Nanotubes as an Effective Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad; yari; Sajjad; Sadaghat; Sharehjini

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The synthesis, physical characterization and electrochemical analysis of Pt particles prepared using the surface oxidized carbon nanotubes prepared by chemically anchoring Pt onto the surface of the CNTs with 2.0 mol/L HNO3 by refluxing for 10 h to introduce surface functional groups.The particles of Pt are synthesized by reduction with sodium borohydride of H2PtCl6. The electro-oxidation of liquid methanol of this catalyst as a thin layer on glassy carbon electrode is investigated at room te...

  12. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhi; Daly, Michael; Clémence, Lopez; Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L.; Devine, Declan M.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO3 thermoplastic composite's interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the "complex" process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the "complex" surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the "complex" treatment process, the CaCO3 particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the "dry" treated CaCO3 composites. Furthermore, "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites have a significantly higher tensile strength than the composites containing untreated and "dry" treated CaCO3. This is mainly because the "wet" and "complex" treatment processes have increased adsorption density of stearate, which enhances the interfacial interaction between matrix and filler. These results confirm that the chemical adsorption of the surfactant ions at the solid-liquid interface is higher than at other interface. From this study, it was concluded that the utilization of the "complex" method minimised the negative effects of void

  13. Influence of the pore structure and surface chemical properties of activated carbon on the adsorption of mercury from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Activated carbons with different pore structure and surface chemical properties were prepared by modification process. • HgCl2 as a pollution target to evaluate the adsorption performance. • Influence of pore structure and surface chemical properties of activated carbon on adsorption of mercury was investigated. -- Abstract: Reactivation and chemical modification were used to obtain modified activated carbons with different pore structure and surface chemical properties. The samples were characterized by nitrogen absorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the Bothem method. Using mercury chloride as the target pollutant, the Hg2+ adsorption ability of samples was investigated. The results show that the Hg2+ adsorption capacity of samples increased significantly with increases in micropores and acidic functional groups and that the adsorption process was exothermic. Different models and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated to establish the mechanisms. It was concluded that the adsorption occurred through a monolayer mechanism by a two-speed process involving both rapid adsorption and slow adsorption. The adsorption rate was determined by chemical reaction

  14. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Aerogels of High-Surface Area and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work carbon aerogels were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD. Ferrocene were employed as a source both of catalytic material (Fe and of carbon. Gaseous hydrogen and argon were used as reductant and carrier gas, respectively. The products of reaction were collected over alumina. The morphology and textural properties of the soot produced in the reaction chamber were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption (BET and BHJ methods. After the evaluation of the porous structure of the synthesized products, 780 ± 20 m2/g of SBET and 0.55 ± 0.02 cm3/g of VBJH were found. The presence of iron carbide and the partial oxidation of carbon nanostructures were revealed by XPS.

  15. Comparative temporal analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotube oxidation reactions: Evaluating chemical modifications on true nanotube surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Flávia G.; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Gorgulho, Honória F.; Santos, Adelina P.; Macedo, Waldemar A. A.; Furtado, Clascídia A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of extensive purification on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube surface composition was studied through the characterization and differentiation of the actual surface submitted to three oxidation methods: microwave-assisted acid oxidation, hydrogen peroxide reflux, and Fenton reaction. The oxidized samples were purified by a multi-step procedure including the sequential use of basic reflux and dispersion in dimethylformamide (DMF). The results showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidation debris with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction times longer than 8 h and strong surface characteristic modification. With regard to sample purification, basic reflux led to a reduction in oxygenated group concentration of only 10% in the samples treated by acid oxidation. On the other hand, the subsequent use of DMF led to a further decrease in concentration of 39%, proving to be a more efficient method for the removal of oxidation debris.

  16. Low-toxic and safe nanomaterials by surface-chemical design, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, metallofullerenes, and graphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    YanEqual Contribution, Liang; Zhao, Feng; Li, Shoujian; Hu, Zhongbo; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-02-01

    The toxicity grade for a bulk material can be approximately determined by three factors (chemical composition, dose, and exposure route). However, for a nanomaterial it depends on more than ten factors. Interestingly, some nano-factors (like huge surface adsorbability, small size, etc.) that endow nanomaterials with new biomedical functions are also potential causes leading to toxicity or damage to the living organism. Is it possible to create safe nanomaterials if such a number of complicated factors need to be regulated? We herein try to find answers to this important question. We first discuss chemical processes that are applicable for nanosurface modifications, in order to improve biocompatibility, regulate ADME, and reduce the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, metallofullerenes, and graphenes). Then the biological/toxicological effects of surface-modified and unmodified carbon nanomaterials are comparatively discussed from two aspects: the lowered toxic responses or the enhanced biomedical functions. We summarize the eight biggest challenges in creating low-toxicity and safer nanomaterials and some significant topics of future research needs: to find out safer nanofactors; to establish controllable surface modifications and simpler chemistries for low-toxic nanomaterials; to explore the nanotoxicity mechanisms; to justify the validity of current toxicological theories in nanotoxicology; to create standardized nanomaterials for toxicity tests; to build theoretical models for cellular and molecular interactions of nanoparticles; and to establish systematical knowledge frameworks for nanotoxicology.

  17. Surface transformations of carbon (graphene, graphite, diamond, carbide), deposited on polycrystalline nickel by hot filaments chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of carbon has been studied at high temperature on polycrystalline nickel by hot filaments activated chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). The sequences of carbon deposition are studied by surface analyses: Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron loss spectroscopy (ELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in a chamber directly connected to the growth chamber. A general scale law of the (C/Ni) intensity lines is obtained with a reduced time. Both, shape analysis of the AES C KVV line and the C1s relative intensity suggest a three-step process: first formation of graphene and a highly graphitic layer, then multiphase formation with graphitic, carbidic and diamond-like carbon and finally at a critical temperature that strongly depends on the pretreatment of the polycrystalline nickel surface, a rapid transition to diamond island formation. Whatever the substrate diamond is always the final product and some graphene layers the initial product. Moreover it is possible to stabilize a few graphene layers at the initial sequences of carbon deposition. The duration of this stabilization step is strongly depending however on the pre-treatment of the Ni surface.

  18. Chemical Reaction CO+OH(•) → CO2+H(•) Autocatalyzed by Carbon Dioxide: Quantum Chemical Study of the Potential Energy Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunov, Artëm E; Wait, Elizabeth; Vasu, Subith S

    2016-08-01

    The supercritical carbon dioxide medium, used to increase efficiency in oxy combustion fossil energy technology, may drastically alter both rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Here we investigate potential energy surface of the second most important combustion reaction with quantum chemistry methods. Two types of effects are reported: formation of the covalent intermediates and formation of van der Waals complexes by spectator CO2 molecule. While spectator molecule alter the activation barrier only slightly, the covalent bonding opens a new reaction pathway. The mechanism includes sequential covalent binding of CO2 to OH radical and CO molecule, hydrogen transfer from oxygen to carbon atoms, and CH bond dissociation. This reduces the activation barrier by 11 kcal/mol at the rate-determining step and is expected to accelerate the reaction rate. The finding of predicted catalytic effect is expected to play an important role not only in combustion but also in a broad array of chemical processes taking place in supercritical CO2 medium. It may open a new venue for controlling reaction rates for chemical manufacturing. PMID:27351778

  19. Luminescent Surface Quaternized Carbon Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-10

    Thermal oxidation of a salt precursor made from the acid base combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and betaine hydrochloride results in light-emitting surface quaternized carbon dots that are water-dispersible, display anion exchange properties, and exhibit uniform size/surface charge. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Physico-chemical Conditions of the Surface Modification Process of Steels by Vanadium, Carbon and Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Harchenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations of the physical and chemical conditions of the nitrogenvanading process of steels are performed. The diagrams of the equilibrium composition of the reaction medium are presented. The phase composition of gaseous and condensed states of the systems, the optimum saturation temperature and mixture composition are derived. The optimal temperature range of nitrogenvanading of steels is established as follows: 1100-1300 K.

  1. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  2. A study of the chemical, mechanical, and surface properties of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandentop, G.J.

    1990-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were studied with the objective of elucidating the nucleation and growth mechanisms, and the origin of their unique physical properties. The films were deposited onto Si(100) substrates both on the powered (negatively self-biased) and on the grounded electrodes from methane in an rf plasma (13.56 MHz) at 65 mTorr and 300 to 370 K. The films produced at the powered electrode exhibited superior mechanical properties, such as high hardness. A mass spectrometer was used to identify neutral species and positive ions incident on the electrodes from the plasma, and also to measure ion energies. The effect of varying ion energy flux on the properties of a-C:H films was investigated using a novel pulsed biasing technique. It was demonstrated that ions were not the dominant deposition species as the total ion flux measured was insufficient to account for the observed deposition rate. The interface between thin films of a-C:H and silicon substrates was investigated using angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A silicon carbide layer was detected at the interface of a hard a-C:H film formed at the powered electrode. At the grounded electrode, where the kinetic energy is low, no interfacial carbide layer was observed. Scanning tunneling microscopy and high energy electron energy loss spectroscopy was used to investigate the initial stages of growth of a-C:H films. On graphite substrates, films formed at the powered electrode were observed to nucleate in clusters approximately 50 {Angstrom} in diameter, while at the grounded electrode no cluster formation was observed. 58 figs.

  3. Critical role of surface chemical modifications induced by length shortening on multi-walled carbon nanotubes-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussy Cyrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Given the increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNT in composite materials and their possible expansion to new areas such as nanomedicine which will both lead to higher human exposure, a better understanding of their potential to cause adverse effects on human health is needed. Like other nanomaterials, the biological reactivity and toxicity of CNT were shown to depend on various physicochemical characteristics, and length has been suggested to play a critical role. We therefore designed a comprehensive study that aimed at comparing the effects on murine macrophages of two samples of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT specifically synthesized following a similar production process (aerosol-assisted CVD, and used a soft ultrasonic treatment in water to modify the length of one of them. We showed that modification of the length of MWCNT leads, unavoidably, to accompanying structural (i.e. defects and chemical (i.e. oxidation modifications that affect both surface and residual catalyst iron nanoparticle content of CNT. The biological response of murine macrophages to the two different MWCNT samples was evaluated in terms of cell viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and oxidative stress. We showed that structural defects and oxidation both induced by the length reduction process are at least as responsible as the length reduction itself for the enhanced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative response observed with short (oxidized compared to long (pristine MWCNT. In conclusion, our results stress that surface properties should be considered, alongside the length, as essential parameters in CNT-induced inflammation, especially when dealing with a safe design of CNT, for application in nanomedicine for example.

  4. Chemical State of Surface Oxygen on Carbon and Its Effects on the Capacity of the Carbon Anode in a Lithium-Ion Battery Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    2001-01-01

    In a lithium-ion battery, the lithium-storage capacity of the carbon anode is greatly affected by a surface layer formed during the first half cycle of lithium insertion and release into and out of the carbon anode. The formation of this solid-electrolyte interface, in turn, is affected by the chemistry of the carbon surface. A study at the NASA Glenn Research Center examined the cause-and-effect relations. Information obtained from this research could contribute in designing a high-capacity lithium-ion battery and, therefore, small, powerful spacecraft. In one test, three types of surfaces were examined: (1) a surface with low oxygen content (1.5 at.%) and a high concentration of active sites, (2) a surface with 4.5 at.% -OH or -OC type oxygen, and (3) a surface with 6.5 at.% O=C type oxygen. The samples were made from the same precursor and had similar bulk properties. They were tested under a constant current of 10 mA/g in half cells that used lithium metal as the counter electrode and 0.5 M lithium iodide in 50/50 (vol%) ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate as the electrolyte. For the first cycle of the electrochemical test, the graph describes the voltage of the carbon anode versus the lithium metal as a function of the capacity (amount of lithium insertion or release). From these data, it can be observed that the surface with low oxygen and a high concentration of active sites could result in a high irreversible capacity. Such a high irreversible capacity could be prevented if the active sites were allowed to react with oxygen in air, producing -OH or -OC type oxygen. The O=C type oxygen, on the other hand, could greatly reduce the capacity of lithium intercalation and, therefore, needs to be avoided during battery fabrication.

  5. Surface characteristic of chemically converted graphene coated low carbon steel by electro spray coating method for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell bipolar plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Yang Do; Nam, Dae Geun

    2013-05-01

    Graphene was coated on low carbon steel (SS400) by electro spray coating method to improve its properties of corrosion resistance and contact resistance. Exfoliated graphite was made of the graphite by chemical treatment (Chemically Converted Graphene, CCG). CCG is distributed using dispersing agent, and low carbon steel was coated with diffuse graphene solution by electro spray coating method. The structure of the CCG was analyzed using XRD and the coating layer of surface was analyzed using SEM. Analysis showed that multi-layered graphite structure was destroyed and it was transformed in to fine layers graphene structure. And the result of SEM analysis on the surface and the cross section, graphene layer was uniformly formed with 3-5 microm thickness on the surface of substrate. Corrosion resistance test was applied in the corrosive solution which is similar to the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack inside. And interfacial contact resistance (ICR) test was measured to simulate the internal operating conditions of PEMFC stack. As a result of measuring corrosion resistance and contact resistance, it could be confirmed that low carbon steel coated with CCG was revealed to be more effective in terms of its applicability as PEMFC bipolar plate. PMID:23858864

  6. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polymers by surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas barrier characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin films coated on polymer sheets using the large-area surface-wave plasma (SWP) were studied. With SWP in He and CH4 gas mixture, a-C:H films were deposited over about 100 mm in diameter on high density polyethylene or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets at temperature less than 70 deg. C. Experimental results show that gas permeation in the case of a-C:H film coating on PET sheet was reduced by a factor of more than 150 (0.27 cm3/m2 day atm), compared with that before coating. Plasma characteristics of SWP, such as electron density and electron energy distribution functions, and other film characteristics measured with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope are presented and discussed

  7. Microstructure of carbon fiber preform and distribution of pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建勋; 黄伯云

    2004-01-01

    The carbon/carbon composites were made by chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) with needled felt preform. The distribution of the pyrolytic carbon in the carbon fiber preform was studied by polarized light microscope(PLM) and scanning electronic microscope(SEM). The experimental results indicate that the amount of pyrolytic carbon deposited on the surface of chopped carbon fiber is more than that on the surface of long carbon fiber. The reason is the different porosity between the layer of chopped carbon fiber and long carbon fiber. The carbon precursor gas which passes through the part of chopped carbon fibers decomposes and deposits on the surface of chopped carbon fiber. The pyrolytic carbon on the surface of long carbon fibers is produced by the carbon precursor gas diffusing from the chopped fiber and the Z-d fiber. Uniform pore distribution and porosity in preform are necessary for producing C/C composites with high properties.

  8. Carbon Materials for Chemical Capacitive Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y.; Dou, Y.; Zhao, D.; Fulvio, P. F.; Mayes, R. T.; Dai, S.

    2011-09-26

    Carbon materials have attracted intense interests as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost. Activated carbons produced by different activation processes from various precursors are the most widely used electrodes. Recently, with the rapid growth of nanotechnology, nanostructured electrode materials, such as carbon nanotubes and template-synthesized porous carbons have been developed. Their unique electrical properties and well controlled pore sizes and structures facilitate fast ion and electron transportation. In order to further improve the power and energy densities of the capacitors, carbon-based composites combining electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC)-capacitance and pseudo-capacitance have been explored. They show not only enhanced capacitance, but as well good cyclability. In this review, recent progresses on carbon-based electrode materials are summarized, including activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, and template-synthesized porous carbons, in particular mesoporous carbons. Their advantages and disadvantages as electrochemical capacitors are discussed. At the end of this review, the future trends of electrochemical capacitors with high energy and power are proposed.

  9. Carbon materials for chemical capacitive energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yunpu; Zhao, Dongyuan [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers of the Chinese, Ministry of Education, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Dou, Yuqian [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Shenyang (China); Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-11-09

    Carbon materials have attracted intense interests as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors, because of their high surface area, electrical conductivity, chemical stability and low cost. Activated carbons produced by different activation processes from various precursors are the most widely used electrodes. Recently, with the rapid growth of nanotechnology, nanostructured electrode materials, such as carbon nanotubes and template-synthesized porous carbons have been developed. Their unique electrical properties and well controlled pore sizes and structures facilitate fast ion and electron transportation. In order to further improve the power and energy densities of the capacitors, carbon-based composites combining electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC)-capacitance and pseudo-capacitance have been explored. They show not only enhanced capacitance, but as well good cyclability. In this review, recent progresses on carbon-based electrode materials are summarized, including activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, and template-synthesized porous carbons, in particular mesoporous carbons. Their advantages and disadvantages as electrochemical capacitors are discussed. At the end of this review, the future trends of electrochemical capacitors with high energy and power are proposed. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Carbon speciation and surface tension of fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; Gunde, R.; Zurcher, F.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    The speciation of carbon (dissolved/particulate, organic/inorganic) and surface tension of a number of radiation fogs from the urban area of Zurich, Switzerland, were measured. The carbon species were dominated by "dissolved" organic carbon (DOC; i.e., the fraction that passes through a filter), which was typically present at levels of 40-200 mg/L. Less than 10% of the DOC was identified as specific individual organic compounds. Particulate organic carbon (POC) accounted for 26-41% of the mass of the particles, but usually less than 10% of the total organic carbon mass. Inorganic carbon species were relatively minor. The surface tensions of all the measured samples were less than pure water and were correlated with their DOC concentrations. The combination of high DOC and POC and low surface tension suggests a mechanism for the concentration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in the fog droplet, which have been observed by numerous investigators. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  11. The influence of the carbon surface chemical composition on Dubinin-Astakhov equation parameters calculated from SF{sub 6} adsorption data-grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A [Department of Chemistry, Physicochemistry of Carbon Materials Research Group, N Copernicus University, Gagarin Street 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kowalczyk, Piotr [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University, PO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Harris, Peter J F, E-mail: aterzyk@chem.uni.torun.pl [Centre for Advanced Microscopy, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AF (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-05

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation we show, for the first time, the influence of the carbon porosity and surface oxidation on the parameters of the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) adsorption isotherm equation. We conclude that upon carbon surface oxidation, the adsorption decreases for all carbons studied. Moreover, the parameters of the DA model depend on the number of surface oxygen groups. That is why in the case of carbons containing surface polar groups, SF{sub 6} adsorption isotherm data cannot be used for characterization of the porosity. (paper)

  12. The Enhanced Physico-Chemical and Electrochemical Properties for Surface Modified NiO Cathode for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Seon; Kim, Keon [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Cheolwoo [Sungshin Women' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nickel oxide, the most widely used cathode material for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), has several disadvantages including NiO dissolution, poor mechanical strength, and corrosion phenomena during MCFC operation. The surface modification of NiO with lanthanum maintains the advantages, such as performance and stability, and suppresses the disadvantages of NiO cathode because the modification results in the formation of LaNiO{sub 3} phase which has high conductivity, stability, and catalytic activity. As a result, La-modified NiO cathode shows low NiO dissolution, high degree of lithiation, and mechanical strength, and high cell performance and catalytic activity in comparison with the pristine NiO. These enhanced physico-chemical and electrochemical properties and the durability in marine environment allow MCFC to marine application as a auxiliary propulsion system.

  13. Probing Chemical Dynamics at Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KLEYN, A.W.; KLEYN, A.W

    2001-01-01

    An account is given of recent progress concerning chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The goal is to elucidate the reaction dynamics at the molecular level, both as time and distance is concerned. The methods of study include molecular beam scattering, scanning tunnelling microscopy, and (femtosecond) laser spectroscopy. Systems studied include elementary interactions of NO, CO, and O2 at single crystal metal surfaces.

  14. Scattering and Chemical Investigations of Semiconductor Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Robert Milo

    1988-12-01

    This two-part thesis describes: (i) the design of an ion scattering system to examine the surface and near-surface region of semiconductors, and (ii) the chemical reaction channels of unsaturated hydrocarbons on the silicon (100) surface. Details on the design and construction of an ultrahigh vacuum, high-energy ion scattering system are presented. The use of MeV ion scattering to investigate surface and near -surface regions of materials is described and the combination of ion scattering with complimentary surface science techniques is stressed. The thermal activation of chemical bonds of the adsorbed unsaturated hydrocarbon molecules ethylene, propylene, and acetylene is investigated on the Si(100)-(2 times 11) surface with a goal of understanding the surface chemistry of Si-C formation. The use of precision dosing techniques, Low Energy Electron Diffraction, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, and Temperature Programmed Desorption in the investigation of the remaining carbonaceous species is described. Comparisons of the adsorption and desorption behavior of these molecules is made in terms of the carbon -carbon double and triple bonds (ethylene to acetylene) and the methyl functional group (ethylene to propylene). We find that the monolayer saturation coverage of these hydrocarbons is in very good agreement with the number of dimer sites on the surface estimated from scanning-tunneling microscopy, which suggests that the bonding of these hydrocarbons to the Si(100) surface is similar. It is also found that ethylene, in particular, does not provide an efficient Si-C reaction channel upon thermal activation, with nearly 100% of the ethylene molecules desorbing. In contrast, acetylene is found to be very efficient in SiC formation: >=q90% of the adsorbed acetylene thermally dissociates and eventually leads to SiC formation. Propylene has an efficiency of roughly 70% upon heating. Evidence for the diffusion of carbon into the bulk is seen at >=q850 K for propylene and

  15. Modeling heterogeneous chemical processes on aerosol surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junjun Deng; Tijian Wang; Li Liu; Fei Jiang

    2010-01-01

    To explore the possible impact of heterogeneous chemical processes on atmospheric trace components,a coupled box model including gas-phase chemical processes,aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium processes,and heterogeneous chemical processes on the surface of dust,black carbon(BC)and sea salt is set up to simulate the effects of heterogeneous chemistry on the aerosol surface,and analyze the primary factors affecting the heterogeneous processes.Results indicate that heterogeneous chemical processes on the aerosol surface in the atmosphere will affect the concentrations of trace gases such as H2O2,HO2,O3,NO2,NO3,HNO3 and SO2,and aerosols such as SO42-,NO3-and NH4+.Sensitivity tests suggest that the magnitude of the impact of heterogeneous processes strongly depends on aerosol concentration and the surface uptake coefficients used in the box model.However,the impact of temperature on heterogeneous chemical processes is considerably less.The"renoxification"of HNO3 will affect the components of the troposphere such as nitrogen oxide and ozone.

  16. Substrate and material transfer effects on the surface chemistry and texture of diamond-like carbon deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Benjamin; Ojeda, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC), a thin amorphous carbon film, has many uses in tribological systems. Exploiting alternative substrates and interlayers can enable the control of the hardness and modulus of the multilayer system and improve wear or friction properties. We used XPS and atomic force microscopy to examine DLC that had been concurrently coated on an epoxy interlayer and a steel substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. sp2/sp3 ratios were calculated both by the deconvolut...

  17. Densification mechanism of chemical vapor infiltration technology for carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-xun; XIONG Xiang; HUANG Qi-zhong; YI Mao-zhong; HUANG Bai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Carbon/carbon composites were fabricated using pressure-gradient chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) technology with propane (C3H6) as the carbon precursor gas and nitrogen (N2) as the carrier gas. The chemical process of deposition of pyrolytic carbon was deduced by analyzing the component of molecules in gas phase and observing the microstructure of deposition carbon. The results show that the process of deposition starts from the breakdown of C-C single bond of propene (C3H6), and forms two kinds of active groups in the heterogeneous gas phase reaction. Afterwards, these active groups form many stable bigger molecules and deposit on carbon fiber surface. At the same time, hydrogen atoms of the bigger molecules absorbed on carbon fiber surface are eliminated and the solid pyrolytic carbon matrix is formed in the heterogeneous reaction process.

  18. The chemical physics of surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Stanley Roy

    1990-01-01

    Even more importantly, some authors who have contributed substantially to an area may have been overlooked. For this I apologize. I have, however, not attempted to trace techniques or observa­ tions historically, so there is no implication (unless specified) that the authors referred to were or were not the originators of a given method or observation. I would like to acknowledge discussions with co-workers at SFU for input relative to their specialties, to acknowledge the help of students who have pointed out errors and difficulties in the earlier presentation, and to acknowledge the infinite patience of my wife Phyllis while I spent my sabbatical and more in libraries and punching computers. S. Roy Morrison 0 1 Contents Notation XV 1. Introduction 1 1. 1. Surface States and Surface Sites . 1 1. 1. 1. The Chemical versus Electronic Representation of the Surface. 1 1. 1. 2. The Surface State on the Band Diagram 4 1. 1. 3. The Fermi Energy in the Surface State Model. 6 1. 1. 4. Need for Both Surface...

  19. Water Condensation on Zinc Surfaces Treated by Chemical Bath Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Narhe, R.D. (Ramchandra D.); González-Viñas, W.; Beysens, D.A. (Daniel A.)

    2010-01-01

    Water condensation, a complex and challenging process, is investigated on a metallic (Zn) surface, regularly used as anticorrosive surface. The Zn surface is coated with hydroxide zinc carbonate by chemical bath deposition, a very simple, low-cost and easily applicable process. As the deposition time increases, the surface roughness augments and the contact angle with water can be varied from 75º to 150º , corresponding to changing the surface properties from hydrophobic to ultrahydrophobic a...

  20. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2005-10-02

    During this quarter a general forest monitoring program was conducted to measure treatment effects on above ground and below ground carbon C and Nitrogen (N) pools for the tree planting areas. Detailed studies to address specific questions pertaining to Carbon cycling was initiated with the development of plots to examine the influence of mycorrhizae, spoil chemical and mineralogical properties, and use of amendment on forest establishment and carbon sequestration. Efforts continued during this period to examine decomposition and heterotrophic respiration on C cycling in the reforestation plots. Projected climate change resulting from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide has given rise to various strategies to sequester carbon in various terrestrial ecosystems. Reclaimed surface mine soils present one such potential carbon sink where traditional reclamation objectives can complement carbon sequestration. New plantings required the modification and design and installation on monitoring equipment. Maintenance and data monitoring on past and present installations are a continuing operation. The Department of Mining Engineering continued the collection of penetration resistance, penetration depth, and bulk density on both old and new treatment areas. Data processing and analysis is in process for these variables. Project scientists and graduate students continue to present results at scientific meetings, tours and field days presentations of the research areas are being conducted on a request basis.

  1. The Ocular Surface Chemical Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medi Eslani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular chemical burns are common and serious ocular emergencies that require immediate and intensive evaluation and care. The victims of such incidents are usually young, and therefore loss of vision and disfigurement could dramatically affect their lives. The clinical course can be divided into immediate, acute, early, and late reparative phases. The degree of limbal, corneal, and conjunctival involvement at the time of injury is critically associated with prognosis. The treatment starts with simple but vision saving steps and is continued with complicated surgical procedures later in the course of the disease. The goal of treatment is to restore the normal ocular surface anatomy and function. Limbal stem cell transplantation, amniotic membrane transplantation, and ultimately keratoprosthesis may be indicated depending on the patients’ needs.

  2. Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Steven; Hedges, John

    The principles of chemical oceanography provide insight into the processes regulating the marine carbon cycle. The text offers a background in chemical oceanography and a description of how chemical elements in seawater and ocean sediments are used as tracers of physical, biological, chemical and geological processes in the ocean. The first seven chapters present basic topics of thermodynamics, isotope systematics and carbonate chemistry, and explain the influence of life on ocean chemistry and how it has evolved in the recent (glacial-interglacial) past. This is followed by topics essential to understanding the carbon cycle, including organic geochemistry, air-sea gas exchange, diffusion and reaction kinetics, the marine and atmosphere carbon cycle and diagenesis in marine sediments. Figures are available to download from www.cambridge.org/9780521833134. Ideal as a textbook for upper-level undergraduates and graduates in oceanography, environmental chemistry, geochemistry and earth science and a valuable reference for researchers in oceanography.

  3. Plasma-surface modification vs air oxidation on carbon obtained from peach stone: Textural and chemical changes and the efficiency as adsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S.; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Montes-Morán, Miguel A.

    2016-10-01

    Carbons were prepared from peach stones (Prunus persica) using different carbonization temperatures (600, 800 and 1000 °C). A selected sample was modified by oxidation using conventional oxidation techniques (thermal treatment in air atmosphere) and with cold oxygen plasma oxidation, under different conditions. Samples were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms at -196 °C, SEM/EDX analysis, potentiometric titration and XPS analysis. Carbons with and without oxidation were employed in the adsorption of Pb2+ in aqueous solution. Results obtained indicated that the materials with high contents of acidic oxygen groups were more efficient in the removal of Pb2+, values as high as approx. 40 mg g-1 being obtained for the best performing carbon. Textural properties of the original, un-oxidized carbon were significantly altered only after oxidation under air atmosphere at 450 °C. On the other hand, the samples oxidized with plasma show little changes in the textural parameters and a slight increase in the specific surface was observed for the sample treated at high RF power (100 W). Additionally, a significant increment of the oxygen content was observed for the plasma oxidized samples, as measured by XPS.

  4. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  5. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  6. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  7. Mobile ions on carbonate surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Treavor A.; Martin, Scot T.

    2005-07-01

    Surface ions move during the dissolution and growth of minerals. The present study investigates the density and the mobility of surface ions and the structure of the adsorbed water layer with changes in relative humidity (RH). The time evolution of the polarization force, which is induced by an electrically biased tip of an atomic force microscope, shows that the density and the mobility of surface ions increase with rising humidity, a finding which is consistent with increasing surface hydration. A marked change in the observations above 55% RH indicates a transition from a water layer formed by heteroepitaxial two-dimensional growth at low RH to one formed by multilayer three-dimensional growth at high RH. A comparison of the results of several rhombohedral carbonates ( viz. CaCO 3, FeCO 3, ZnCO 3, MgCO 3, and MnCO 3) shows that a long relaxation time of the polarization force at high RH is predictive of a rapid dissolution rate. This finding is rationalized by long lifetimes in terrace positions and hence greater opportunities for detachment of the ion to aqueous solution (i.e., dissolution). Our findings on the density and the mobility of surface ions therefore help to better constrain mechanistic models of hydration, ion exchange, and dissolution/growth.

  8. Carbon nanowalls grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition during the carbonization of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jiangling; Su Shi; Kundrat, Vojtech; Abbot, Andrew M.; Ye, Haitao [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Zhou Lei [Department of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mushtaq, Fajer [Department of Mechanical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8092 (Switzerland); Ouyang Defang [School of Life and Health Science, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); James, David; Roberts, Darren [Thermo Fisher Scientific, Stafford House, Hemel Hempstead HP2 7GE (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-14

    We used microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) to carbonize an electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor to form carbon fibers. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the fibers at different evolution stages. It was found that MPECVD-carbonized PAN fibers do not exhibit any significant change in the fiber diameter, whilst conventionally carbonized PAN fibers show a 33% reduction in the fiber diameter. An additional coating of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) was formed on the surface of the carbonized PAN fibers during the MPECVD process without the assistance of any metallic catalysts. The result presented here may have a potential to develop a novel, economical, and straightforward approach towards the mass production of carbon fibrous materials containing CNWs.

  9. Carbon nanowalls grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition during the carbonization of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangling; Su, Shi; Zhou, Lei; Kundrát, Vojtěch; Abbot, Andrew M.; Mushtaq, Fajer; Ouyang, Defang; James, David; Roberts, Darren; Ye, Haitao

    2013-01-01

    We used microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) to carbonize an electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor to form carbon fibers. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the fibers at different evolution stages. It was found that MPECVD-carbonized PAN fibers do not exhibit any significant change in the fiber diameter, whilst conventionally carbonized PAN fibers show a 33% reduction in the fiber diameter. An additional coating of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) was formed on the surface of the carbonized PAN fibers during the MPECVD process without the assistance of any metallic catalysts. The result presented here may have a potential to develop a novel, economical, and straightforward approach towards the mass production of carbon fibrous materials containing CNWs.

  10. INFLUENCIA DE LA COMPOSICIÓN QUÍMICA SUPERFICIAL DEL CARBÓN ACTIVADO EN LA ADSORCIÓN DE BENZOTIAZOLES INFLUENCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON CHEMICAL SURFACE COMPOSITION ON THE ADSORPTION OF BENZOTHIAZOLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Valdés

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Los benzotiazoles están esparcidos en el ambiente debido a su gran variedad de aplicaciones. Dentro de ellos, el benzotiazol (BT, el 2-hidroxibenzotiazol (OHBT, y el 2-metilbenzotiazol (MeBT son conocidos como agentes tóxicos y poco biodegradables. La adsorción con carbón activado se plantea como una opción atractiva para la remoción de estos contaminantes. Sin embargo, existen dudas acerca del efecto de las propiedades químicas superficiales del carbón activado sobre la capacidad de adsorción de estos compuestos. Para el estudio se utilizó carbón activado granular Filtrasorb-400 modificado con el objetivo de obtener carbones con diferentes propiedades químicas superficiales. Las series de carbones activados fueron obtenidas por pretratamiento por desoxigenación y por oxidación con ozono a diferentes tiempos de contacto. El incremento en la concentración de los grupos oxigenados superficiales produce una disminución en la capacidad de adsorción de los tres contaminantes ensayados. Los resultados sugieren que el mecanismo de adsorción transcurre principalmente a través de las interacciones de dispersión π-π entre los electrones del plano basal del carbón y el anillo aromático de los benzotiazoles. A valores de pH mayores al valor del pH de carga cero de la superficie del carbón activado (pH PZC, la capacidad de adsorción del carbón activado disminuye debido a la aparición de interacciones electrostáticas repulsivas entre los grupos superficiales oxigenados ionizados y las moléculas ionizadas de los benzotiazoles.Benzothiazoles, such as benzothiazole (BT, 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (OHBT, and 2-methylbenzothiazole (MeBT are toxic and poorly biodegradable organic compounds, frequently present in wastewater from rubber related applications. Activated carbon adsorption has been identified as an attractive treatment to removing those contaminants. This paper presents experimental results on the effect of chemical surface

  11. Surface State of Carbon Fibers Modified by Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunxia GUO; Jie LIU; Jieying LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers was modified by electrochemical oxidation. The modification effect on carbon fibers surface was explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that on the modified surface of carbon fibers, the carbon contents decreased by 9.7% and the oxygen and nitrogen contents increased by 53.8% and 7.5 times, respectively. The surface roughness and the hydroxyl and carbonyl contents also increased. The surface orientation index was reduced by 1.5%which decreased tensile strength of carbon fibers by 8.1%, and the microcrystalline dimension also decreased which increased the active sites of carbon fiber surface by 78%. The physical and chemical properties of carbon fibers surface were modified through the electrochemical oxidative method, which improved the cohesiveness between the fibers and resin matrix and increased the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy composite (CFRP) over 20%.

  12. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  13. Surface analysis of plasma grafted carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and wetting measurements. The surface of carbon fiber was modified by means of plasma graft silsesquioxane. The oxygen/carbon and silicon/carbon ratio increased rapidly after treatments. Fitting the C 1s, O 1s, and Si 2p spectra demonstrated that new photopeaks were emerged, which were indicated C-Si, Si-O groups, respectively. The degree of surface roughness and the wettability of carbon fiber surface were both increased by plasma graft silsesquioxane. The results may shed some light on the design of the appropriate surface structure, which could react with resin, and the manufacture of the carbon fiber reinforced composites

  14. Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Camphoric Carbon by Thermal-CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical properties and surface study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The chemical properties of the CNTs were conducted using FTIR spectroscopy and PXRD analysis. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs.

  15. Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Camphoric Carbon by Thermal-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Chemical properties and surface study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The chemical properties of the CNTs were conducted using FTIR spectroscopy and PXRD analysis. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs.

  16. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, Charter D.; Freedman, Andrew

    1990-02-01

    Studies of the thermal and photon-induced surface chemistry of dimethyl cadmium (DMCd) and dimethyl tellurium (DMTe) on GaAs(100) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed for substrate temperatures in the range of 123 K to 473 K. Results indicate that extremely efficient conversion of admixtures of DMTe and DMCd to CdTe can be obtained using low power (5 - 10 mJ cm-2) 193 nm laser pulses at substrate temperatures of 123 K. Subsequent annealing at 473 K produces an epitaxial film.

  17. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  18. Dissolved black carbon in Antarctic lakes: Chemical signatures of past and present sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Alia L.; Jaffé, Rudolf; Ding, Yan; McKnight, Diane M.

    2016-06-01

    The perennially ice-covered, closed-basin lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, serve as sentinels for understanding the fate of dissolved black carbon from glacial sources in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that dissolved black carbon can persist in freshwater and saline surface waters for thousands of years, while preserving the chemical signature of the original source materials. The ancient brines of the lake bottom waters have retained dissolved black carbon with a woody chemical signature, representing long-range transport of black carbon from wildfires. In contrast, the surface waters are enriched in contemporary black carbon from fossil fuel combustion. Comparison of samples collected 25 years apart from the same lake suggests that the enrichment in anthropogenic black carbon is recent. Differences in the chemical composition of dissolved black carbon among the lakes are likely due to biogeochemical processing such as photochemical degradation and sorption on metal oxides.

  19. KOH活化法高比表面积竹质活性炭的制备与表征%Preparation and characterization of high specific surface area activated carbon from bamboo by chemical activation with KOH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀芳; 张会平; 陈焕钦

    2006-01-01

    以竹屑为原料,研究了KOH活化法高比表面积活性炭的制备工艺.分别考察了浸渍比、活化温度、活化时间等工艺参数对产品吸附性能的影响,并提出了可能的活化机理.在所研究的实验条件下,最佳的制备工艺是浸渍比1.0,活化温度800℃,活化时间2h.所得到的活性炭产品的比表面积和孔容可达2996m2/g和1.64cm3/g.该产品附加值高,在吸附领域特别是在双电层电容器的电极材料领域有广阔的应用前景.%High specific surface area activated carbon was prepared from bamboo by chemical activation with KOH. The influence of activation parameters on the final products was investigated by varying the KOH/bamboo ratio, activation temperature and hold time. The samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K. The specific surface area and pore volume of activated carbon were calculated by BET and t-plot method. The possible activation mechanism was also proposed. Under the experimental conditions, the optimum conditions for preparing high specific surface area activated carbon are at a KOH/precursor ratio of 1.0, an activation temperature of 800℃ and a hold time of 2h. With these experimental conditions, an activated carbon with a BET surface area of 2996m2/g and a total pore volume of 1.64cm3/g was produced. The product is a novel material for adsorption and for the application in electric double-layer capacitors.

  20. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Chemical Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Arunpama B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional thermal conductivity gauges (e.g. Pirani gauges) lend themselves to applications such as leak detectors, or in gas chromatographs for identifying various gas species. However, these conventional gauges are physically large, operate at high power, and have a slow response time. A single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-based chemical sensing gauge relies on differences in thermal conductance of the respective gases surrounding the CNT as it is voltage-biased, as a means for chemical identification. Such a sensor provides benefits of significantly reduced size and compactness, fast response time, low-power operation, and inexpensive manufacturing since it can be batch-fabricated using Si integrated-circuit (IC) process technology.

  1. Cell behaviour on chemically microstructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnani, Agnese; Priamo, Alfredo; Pasqui, Daniela; Barbucci, Rolando

    2003-03-03

    Micropatterned surfaces with different chemical topographies were synthesised in order to investigate the influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell behaviour. The microstructured materials were synthesised by photoimmobilising natural Hyaluronan (Hyal) and its sulphated derivative (HyalS), both adequately functionalised with a photorective moiety, on glass substrates. Four different grating patterns (10, 25, 50 and 100 {mu}m) were used to pattern the hyaluronan. The micropatterned samples were analysed by Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate the chemistry and the topography of the surfaces. The spectroscopic and microscopic analysis of the microstructured surfaces revealed that the photoimmobilisation process was successful, demonstrating that the photomask patterns were well reproduced on the sample surface. The influence of chemical topographies on the cell behaviour was then analysed. Human and 3T3 fibroblasts, bovine aortic and human (HGTFN line) endothelial cells were used and their behaviour on the micropatterned surfaces was analysed in terms of adhesion, proliferation, locomotion and orientation. Both chemical and topographical controls were found to be important for cell guidance. By decreasing the stripe dimensions, a more fusiform shape of cell was observed. At the same time, the cell locomotion and orientation parallel to the structure increased. However, differences in cell behaviour were detected according to both cell type and micropattern dimensions.

  2. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  3. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  4. Preliminary studies of epoxidized palm oil as sizing chemical for carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epoxidized palm oil is derived from palm oil through chemical reaction with peracetic acid. Preliminary studies to coat carbon fibers have shown promising result towards applying natural product in carbon fibre composites. Mechanical studies of sized carbon fibers with epoxidized palm oil showed significant increase in tensile and interfacial shear strength. Surface morphology of sized or coated carbon fibers with epoxidized palm oil reveals clear increase in root means square-roughness (RMS). This indicates the change of the surface topography due to sized or coated carbon fibers with epoxidized palm oil. (author)

  5. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  6. Synthesis of chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites and their application in large volumetric capacitance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kwon, Soongeun; Lee, Dongwook; Yoon, Dong-Myung; Park, Young Min; Benayad, Anass; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Jong Se

    2013-12-17

    Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm(-3) ) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes.

  7. Surface plasma functionalization influences macrophage behavior on carbon nanowalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surfaces of carbon nanowall samples as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were treated with oxygen or nitrogen plasma to improve their wettability and to functionalize their surfaces with different functional groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle results illustrated the effective conversion of the carbon nanowall surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and the incorporation of various amounts of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen functional groups during the treatments. The early inflammatory responses elicited by un-treated and modified carbon nanowall surfaces were investigated by quantifying tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha released by attached RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence studies were employed to investigate the changes in macrophage morphology and adhesive properties, while MTT assay was used to quantify cell proliferation. All samples sustained macrophage adhesion and growth. In addition, nitrogen plasma treatment was more beneficial for cell adhesion in comparison with un-modified carbon nanowall surfaces. Instead, oxygen plasma functionalization led to increased macrophage adhesion and spreading suggesting a more activated phenotype, confirmed by elevated cytokine release. Thus, our findings showed that the chemical surface alterations which occur as a result of plasma treatment, independent of surface wettability, affect macrophage response in vitro. - Highlights: • N2 and O2 plasma treatments alter the CNW surface chemistry and wettability. • Cells seeded on CNW scaffolds are viable and metabolically active. • Surface functional groups, independent of surface wettability, affect cell response. • O2 plasma treatment of CNW leads to a more activated macrophage phenotype

  8. Surface plasma functionalization influences macrophage behavior on carbon nanowalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ion, Raluca [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Vizireanu, Sorin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Stancu, Claudia Elena [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Luculescu, Catalin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Cimpean, Anisoara, E-mail: anisoara.cimpean@bio.unibuc.ro [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 91-95 Spl. Independentei, 050095 Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, Gheorghe [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor, PO Box MG-36, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-03-01

    The surfaces of carbon nanowall samples as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were treated with oxygen or nitrogen plasma to improve their wettability and to functionalize their surfaces with different functional groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle results illustrated the effective conversion of the carbon nanowall surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and the incorporation of various amounts of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen functional groups during the treatments. The early inflammatory responses elicited by un-treated and modified carbon nanowall surfaces were investigated by quantifying tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha released by attached RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence studies were employed to investigate the changes in macrophage morphology and adhesive properties, while MTT assay was used to quantify cell proliferation. All samples sustained macrophage adhesion and growth. In addition, nitrogen plasma treatment was more beneficial for cell adhesion in comparison with un-modified carbon nanowall surfaces. Instead, oxygen plasma functionalization led to increased macrophage adhesion and spreading suggesting a more activated phenotype, confirmed by elevated cytokine release. Thus, our findings showed that the chemical surface alterations which occur as a result of plasma treatment, independent of surface wettability, affect macrophage response in vitro. - Highlights: • N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} plasma treatments alter the CNW surface chemistry and wettability. • Cells seeded on CNW scaffolds are viable and metabolically active. • Surface functional groups, independent of surface wettability, affect cell response. • O{sub 2} plasma treatment of CNW leads to a more activated macrophage phenotype.

  9. Nanoscale Etching and Indentation of Silicon Surfaces with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzegilenko, Fedor N.; Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of nanolithography of silicon and germanium surfaces with bare carbon nanotube tips of scanning probe microscopy devices is considered with large scale classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations employing Tersoff's reactive many-body potential for heteroatomic C/Si/Ge system. Lithography plays a key role in semiconductor manufacturing, and it is expected that future molecular and quantum electronic devices will be fabricated with nanolithographic and nanodeposition techniques. Carbon nanotubes, rolled up sheets of graphene made of carbon, are excellent candidates for use in nanolithography because they are extremely strong along axial direction and yet extremely elastic along radial direction. In the simulations, the interaction of a carbon nanotube tip with silicon surfaces is explored in two regimes. In the first scenario, the nanotubes barely touch the surface, while in the second they are pushed into the surface to make "nano holes". The first - gentle scenario mimics the nanotube-surface chemical reaction induced by the vertical mechanical manipulation of the nanotube. The second -digging - scenario intends to study the indentation profiles. The following results are reported in the two cases. In the first regime, depending on the surface impact site, two major outcomes outcomes are the selective removal of either a single surface atom or a surface dimer off the silicon surface. In the second regime, the indentation of a silicon substrate by the nanotube is observed. Upon the nanotube withdrawal, several surface silicon atoms are adsorbed at the tip of the nanotube causing significant rearrangements of atoms comprising the surface layer of the silicon substrate. The results are explained in terms of relative strength of C-C, C-Si, and Si-Si bonds. The proposed method is very robust and does not require applied voltage between the nanotube tips and the surface. The implications of the reported controllable etching and hole-creating for

  10. Friction Properties of Surface-Fluorinated Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wal, R. L. Vander; Miyoshi, K.; Street, K. W.; Tomasek, A. J.; Peng, H.; Liu, Y.; Margrave, J. L.; Khabashesku, V. N.

    2005-01-01

    Surface modification of the tubular or sphere-shaped carbon nanoparticles through chemical treatment, e.g., fluorination, is expected to significantly affect their friction properties. In this study, a direct fluorination of the graphene-built tubular (single-walled carbon nanotubes) structures has been carried out to obtain a series of fluorinated nanotubes (fluoronanotubes) with variable C(n)F (n =2-20) stoichiometries. The friction coefficients for fluoronanotubes, as well as pristine and chemically cut nanotubes, were found to reach values as low as 0.002-0.07, according to evaluation tests run in contact with sapphire in air of about 40% relative humidity on a ball-on-disk tribometer which provided an unidirectional sliding friction motion. These preliminary results demonstrate ultra-low friction properties and show a promise in applications of surface modified nanocarbons as a solid lubricant.

  11. Thermo-Chemical Modification of Low-Dimensional Carbons: an Infrared Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniak, S.; Trykowski, G.; Walczyk, M.; Richert, M.

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the structure of various carbon materials generated by thermal treatment were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra of different commercially-available carbon materials (activated carbon, carbon black, carbon paper, powdered graphite, expanded graphite, multi-walled carbon nanotubes), as well as carbon film obtained by cellulose foil carbonization, were compared and discussed. The complicated nature of the absorption bands in the 1650-1500 cm-1 region suggests that aromatic ring bands and double bond (C=C) vibrations overlap C=O stretching vibration bands and OH binding vibration bands in different environmental surroundings and represent their mutual interactions. The band in the 1430-1440 cm-1 region observed for some carbon materials ("as received" - graphite, graphitized carbon black, carbon nanotubes), and as result of their thermal treatment (activated carbon) is probably due to antisymmetric stretching vibrations of polynuclear aromatic structures, which seems to be characteristic for more ordered aromatic carbon units (graphene-like) made from well-stacked graphite crystallites. The relative intensity of these bands depends on the degree of carbon material graphitization and can reflect the difference in their chemical reactivity and thermal durability. The changes in the relative intensity of the bands during thermal treatment can be interpreted as the result of the destruction of various surface functionalities, graphitization of the amorphous phase of carbon, and finally, by reactions between the freshly annealed carbon surface with oxygen and water molecules present in air (after contact at ambient temperature).

  12. Surface chemical studies of chemical vapour deposited diamond thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalime diamond grown by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques has emerged in recent years as a new material with applications in such areas as optics, electronics, radiation detectors, chemical sensors and electrochemistry. A main aim of this thesis has been to advance current knowledge of the surface chemical properties of CVD diamond to underpin the development of our understanding of the properties and potential applications of this material. Cl2 is found to adsorb dissociatively on the clean, hydrogen-free diamond surface up to sub-monolayer coverage with a sticking probability of ∼1.2x10-3. Adsorption is a non-activated process, and the sticking probability and extent of coverage decreased with increasing temperature. This was shown to contrast with the behaviour found for the interaction of chlorine with the hydrogenated diamond surface where increased sticking probabilities and saturation surface coverages were observed, and where the reactivity also increased with temperature. Thermal desorption of atomic Cl occurred over a broad temperature range m both chemisorption systems, indicating the presence of more than one binding state. Atomic hydrogen was successful in efficiently etching the bound Cl from the surface. XeF2 was found to adsorb dissociatively onto the clean diamond surface to give up to monolayer coverages of F, which formed two distinct binding states. The first state, populated at low coverage, was predominantly covalent in character, while the second state, occurring at high surface coverages, had more ionic bonding character. Pre-hydrogenation of the diamond surface increased the reactive sticking probability observed, but decreased the extent of coverage by blocking reactive sites. The semi-ionic F was readily etched by atomic hydrogen, and underwent thermal desorption at temperatures as low as 300 deg C. The covalent form was more stable, being seemingly resistant to etching and persistent to high temperatures

  13. Carbon Nanotube Based Chemical Sensors for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2009-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using photolithography and thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to nitrogen dioxide, acetone, benzene, nitrotoluene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing of carbon nanotubes in our sensor platform can be understood by intra- and inter-tube electron modulation in terms of charge transfer mechanisms. As a result of the charge transfer, the conductance of p-type or hole-richer SWNTs in air will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost. Additionally, a wireless capability of such a sensor chip can be used for networked mobile and fixed-site detection and warning systems for military bases, facilities and battlefield areas.

  14. Osteoblast cell response to surface-modified carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the interaction of cells with modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential biomedical applications, the MWCNTs were chemically modified with carboxylic acid groups (–COOH), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer and biomimetic apatite on their surfaces. Additionally, human osteoblast MG-63 cells were cultured in the presence of the surface-modified MWCNTs. The metabolic activities of osteoblastic cells, cell proliferation properties, as well as cell morphology were studied. The surface modification of MWCNTs with biomimetic apatite exhibited a significant increase in the cell viability of osteoblasts, up to 67.23%. In the proliferation phases, there were many more cells in the biomimetic apatite-modified MWCNT samples than in the MWCNTs–COOH. There were no obvious changes in cell morphology in osteoblastic MG-63 cells cultured in the presence of these chemically-modified MWCNTs. The surface modification of MWCNTs with apatite achieves an effective enhancement of their biocompatibility.

  15. Self-Assembly of Graphene on Carbon Nanotube Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaiyuan; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Li, Xufan; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhang, Litong; Xie, Sishen; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-08-01

    The rolling up of a graphene sheet into a tube is a standard visualization tool for illustrating carbon nanotube (CNT) formation. However, the actual processes of rolling up graphene sheets into CNTs in laboratory syntheses have never been demonstrated. Here we report conformal growth of graphene by carbon self-assembly on single-wall and multi-wall CNTs using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane without the presence of metal catalysts. The new graphene layers roll up into seamless coaxial cylinders encapsulating the existing CNTs, but their adhesion to the primary CNTs is weak due to the existence of lattice misorientation. Our study shows that graphene nucleation and growth by self-assembly of carbon on the inactive carbon basal plane of CNTs occurs by a new mechanism that is markedly different from epitaxial growth on metal surfaces, opening up the possibility of graphene growth on many other non-metal substrates by simple methane CVD.

  16. Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Future space nuclear power systems will require radiator technology to dissipate excess heat created by a nuclear reactor. Large radiator fins with circulating coolant are in development for this purpose and an investigation of how to make them most efficient is underway. Maximizing the surface area while minimizing the mass of such radiator fins is critical for obtaining the highest efficiency in dissipating heat. Processes to develop surface roughness are under investigation to maximize the effective surface area of a radiator fin. Surface roughness is created through several methods including oxidation and texturing. The effects of atomic oxygen impingement on carbon-carbon surfaces are currently being investigated for texturing a radiator surface. Early studies of atomic oxygen impingement in low Earth orbit indicate significant texturing due to ram atomic oxygen. The surface morphology of the affected surfaces shows many microscopic cones and valleys which have been experimentally shown to increase radiation emittance. Further study of this morphology proceeded in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Atomic oxygen experiments on the LDEF successfully duplicated the results obtained from materials in spaceflight by subjecting samples to 4.5 eV atomic oxygen from a fixed ram angle. These experiments replicated the conical valley morphology that was seen on samples subjected to low Earth orbit.

  17. Jilin Chemical Fiber Group Launches Its Largest Carbon Fiber Preject

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flora

    2011-01-01

    China's carbon fiber precursor production line with 5,000 tons of annual output was put into operation in Jilin Chemical Fiber Group on November 18th this year, creating the maximum production capacity currently in China, for which Jilin Chemical Fiber Group become China's largest carbon fiber precursor production base, The smooth operation of the project has laid a solid foundation for promoting China's carbon fiber industry steady, rapid, and healthy development,

  18. Chemical oscillation in electrochemical oxidation of methanol on Pt surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on dual path reaction mechanism, a nonlinear dynamics model reflecting the potential oscilla- tion in electrooxidation of methanol on Pt surface was established. The model involves three variables, the electrode potential (e), the surface coverage of carbon monoxide (x), and adsorbed water (y). The chemical reactions and electrode potential were coupled together through the rate constant ki = exp(ai(e ? ei)). The analysis to the established model discloses the following: there are different kinetics be- haviors in different ranges of current densities. The chemical oscillation in methanol electrooxidation is assigned to two aspects, one from poison mediate CO of methanol electrooxidation, which is the in- duced factor of the chemical oscillation, and the other from the oxygen-containing species, such as H2Oa. The formation and disappearance of H2Oa deeply depend on the electrode potential, and directly cause the chemical oscillation. The established model makes clear that the potential oscillation in methanol electrooxidation is the result of the feedback of electrode potential e on the reactions in- volving poison mediates CO and oxygen-containing species H2Oa. The numerical analysis of the estab- lished model successfully explains why the potential oscillation in methanol galvanostatic oxidation on a Pt electrode only happens in a certain range of current densities but not at any current density.

  19. Chemical oscillation in electrochemical oxidation of methanol on Pt surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LanLan; WEI ZiDong; QI XueQiang; SUN CaiXin; YIN GuangZhi

    2008-01-01

    Based on dual path reaction mechanism, a nonlinear dynamics model reflecting the potential oscilla-tion in electrooxidation of methanol on Pt surface was established. The model involves three variables, the electrode potential (e), the surface coverage of carbon monoxide (x), and adsorbed water (y). The chemical reactions and electrode potential were coupled together through the rate constant k1= exp(a e-e1)). The analysis to the established model discloses the following: there are different kinetics be-haviors in different ranges of current densities. The chemical oscillation in methanol electrooxidation is assigned to two aspects, one from poison mediate CO of methanol electrooxidallon, which is the in-duced factor of the chemical oscillation, and the other from the oxygen-containing species, such as H2Oa. The formation and disappearance of H2Oa deeply depend on the electrode potential, and directly cause the chemical oscillation. The established model makes clear that the potential oscillation in methanol electrooxidation is the result of the feedback of electrode potential e on the reactions in-volving poison mediates CO and oxygen-containing species H2Oa. The numerical analysis of the estab-lished model successfully explains why the potential oscillation in methanol galvanostatic oxidation on a Pt electrode only happens in a certain range of current densities but not at any current density.

  20. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  1. Moving contact line on chemically patterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Qian, Tiezheng; Sheng, Ping

    We simulate the moving contact line in two-dimensional chemically patterned channels using a diffuse-interface model with the generalized Navier boundary condition. The motion of the fluidslip behaviour of the contact line. The extra dissipation induced by this oscillatory contact-line motion is significant and increases rapidly with the wettability contrast of the pattern. A critical value of the wettability contrast is identified above which the effect of diffusion becomes important, leading to the interesting behaviour of fluid-fluid interface breaking, with the transport of the non-wetting fluid being assisted and mediated by rapid diffusion through the wetting fluid. Near the critical value, the time-averaged extra dissipation scales as U, the displacement velocity. By decreasing the period of the pattern, we show the solid surface to be characterized by an effective contact angle whose value depends on the material characteristics and composition of the patterned surfaces.

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials: Surface Structure and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Z. A.; Shabanova, T. A.; Mofa, N. N.; Glagolev, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a classification of individual nanoparticles on the basis of the form of the surface and the internal architectural packing for investigations carried out with the help of transmission electron microscopy. The investigated samples contain individual nanoparticles of seven kinds in different ratios: rounded, tubular, fibrous, fi lm, "veil," "active" particles and "particles with regular geometric contours." The classification was made on the basis of an analysis of the results of investigations of the surfaces and internal architectural packing of carbon particles obtained in different physiochemical processes (carbonization, carburizing, arc discharge, mechanochemical treatment, plasma chemistry, and in carbon-containing fl ames). For the source materials, we used waste of farming products and widely distributed mineral raw materials.

  3. Mechano-activated surface modification of calcium carbonate in wet stirred mill and its properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Surface modification of calcium carbonate particles using sodium stearate(SDS) as a modification agent incorporated with the simultaneous wet ultra-fine grinding in the laboratory stirred mill was investigated. The physical properties and application properties of modified calcium carbonate were measured and evaluated. The action mechanism between SDS and calcium carbonate in the modification was studied by infrared spectrometry(IR) and X-ray photoelectron energy spectroscopy(XPS). The results indicate that the crushing mechanic force intensity can obviously influence the modification effect of calcium carbonate because of mechano-chemical effect. The hydrophilic surface of calcium carbonate is turned into hydrophobic after modification. The properties of polyethylene(PE) filled by modified calcium carbonate powder is markedly improved. And the adsorption of SDS could occur by chemical reaction with calcium carbonate surface.

  4. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, P., E-mail: pegonzal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Urones-Garrote, E. [Centro Nacional de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Avila-Brande, D.; Otero-Diaz, L.C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} bond content Almost-Equal-To 95%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Textural parameters show high surface area ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 m{sup 2}/g) and pore width of 1.3-1.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 Degree-Sign C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} content Almost-Equal-To 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm{sup 3} (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m{sup 2}/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm{sup 2}) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  5. Wetting films on chemically patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakashev, Stoyan I; Stöckelhuber, Klaus W; Tsekov, Roumen

    2011-11-15

    The behavior of thin wetting films on chemically patterned surfaces was investigated. The patterning was performed by means of imprinting of micro-grid on methylated glass surface with UV-light (λ=184.8 nm). Thus imprinted image of the grid contained hydrophilic cells and hydrophobic bars on the glass surface. For this aim three different patterns of grids were utilized with small, medium and large size of cells. The experiment showed that the drainage of the wetting aqueous films was not affected by the type of surface patterning. However, after film rupturing in the cases of small and medium cells of the patterned grid the liquid from the wetting film underwent fast self-organization in form of regularly ordered droplets covering completely the cells of the grid. The droplets reduced significantly their size upon time due to evaporation. In the cases of the largest cell grid, a wet spot on the place of the imprinted grid was formed after film rupturing. This wet spot disassembled slowly in time. In addition, formation of a periodical zigzag three-phase contact line (TPCL) was observed. This is a first study from the planned series of studies on this topic. PMID:21875710

  6. The performance of supercapacitor electrodes developed from chemically activated carbon produced from waste tea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inal, I. Isil Gurten; Holmes, Stuart M.; Banford, Anthony; Aktas, Zeki

    2015-12-01

    Highly microporous and mesoporous activated carbons were produced from waste tea for application as supercapacitor electrodes, utilising a chemical activation method involving treatment with either K2CO3 or H3PO4. The area, pore structure characteristics and surface functionality of the activated carbons were evaluated to investigate the influence on electrochemical performance. The performance of the activated carbons as supercapacitor electrodes was tested by cyclic voltammetry (CV), impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) measurements, in an aqueous electrolyte. The results showed that the pore structure and type of the activated carbon have significant impact on the supercapacitor performance. Both waste tea-based activated carbon electrodes showed good cyclic stability. However, despite its lower specific surface area the highly microporous activated carbon produced with K2CO3, exhibited much better capacitive performance than that of the mesoporous activated carbon produced with H3PO4.

  7. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said bicontinuous micro-emulsion into contact with a substrate; and (iii) subjecting said metal nanoparticles and a gaseous carbon source to chemical vapor deposition, thus forming carbon nanostructures...

  8. Effects of Surface Treatment of Activated Carbon on Its Surface and Cr(VI) Adsorption Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Jin; Jang, Yu Sin [Advanced Materials Division., Korea Research Institute of Chimical Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In this work, the effect of surface treatments on activated carbons (ACs) has been studied in the context of gas and liquid adsorption behaviors. The chemical solutions used in this experiment were 35% sodium hydroxide, and these were used for the acidic and basic treatments, respectively. The surface properties have been determined by pH, acid-base values, and FT-IR. The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) ion on activated carbons have been studied with the 5 mg/l concentration at ambient temperature. N{sub 2} adsorption isotherm characteristics, which include the specific surface area, micro pore volume, and microporosity, were determined by BET and Boer's-plot methods. In case of the acidic treatment of activated carbons, it was observed that the adsorption of Cr(VI) ion was more effective due to the increase acid value (or acidic functional group) of activated carbon surfaces. However, the basic treatment on activated carbons was caused no significant effects, probably due to the decreased specific surface area and total pore volume. 27 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule’s ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a “rolling ball” algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called “ShiftASA” that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation

  10. Single-wall carbon nanotube chemical attachment at platinum electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contés-de-Jesús, Enid J.; Lebrón-Colón, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques were used to adsorb 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on platinum electrodes in order to obtain an amino-terminated SAM as the base for the chemical attachment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A physico-chemical, morphological and electrochemical characterizations of SWCNTs attached onto the modified Pt electrodes was done by using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The SWNTs/4-ATP/Pt surface had regions of small, medium, and large thickness of carbon nanotubes with heights of 100-200 nm, 700 nm to 1.5 μm, and 1.0-3.0 μm, respectively. Cyclic voltammetries (CVs) in sulfuric acid demonstrated that attachment of SWNTs on 4-ATP/Pt is markedly stable, even after 30 potential cycles. CV in ruthenium hexamine was similar to bare Pt electrodes, suggesting that SWNTs assembly is similar to a closely packed microelectrode array.

  11. Single-wall carbon nanotube chemical attachment at platinum electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contes-de-Jesus, Enid J. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, PO Box 23346, San Juan 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A. [NASA John H. Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Scibioh, M. Aulice [Department of Chemistry and Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, PO Box 23346, San Juan 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Cabrera, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@uprrp.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, PO Box 23346, San Juan 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico)

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques were used to adsorb 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on platinum electrodes in order to obtain an amino-terminated SAM as the base for the chemical attachment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A physico-chemical, morphological and electrochemical characterizations of SWCNTs attached onto the modified Pt electrodes was done by using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The SWNTs/4-ATP/Pt surface had regions of small, medium, and large thickness of carbon nanotubes with heights of 100-200 nm, 700 nm to 1.5 {mu}m, and 1.0-3.0 {mu}m, respectively. Cyclic voltammetries (CVs) in sulfuric acid demonstrated that attachment of SWNTs on 4-ATP/Pt is markedly stable, even after 30 potential cycles. CV in ruthenium hexamine was similar to bare Pt electrodes, suggesting that SWNTs assembly is similar to a closely packed microelectrode array.

  12. Control of Photoluminescence of Carbon Nanodots via Surface Functionalization using Para-substituted Anilines

    OpenAIRE

    Woosung Kwon; Sungan Do; Ji-Hee Kim; Mun Seok Jeong; Shi-Woo Rhee

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) are a kind of fluorescent carbon nanomaterials, composed of polyaromatic carbon domains surrounded by amorphous carbon frames, and have attracted a great deal of attention because of their interesting properties. There are still, however, challenges ahead such as blue-biased photoluminescence, spectral broadness, undefined energy gaps and etc. In this report, we chemically modify the surface of C-dots with a series of para-substituted anilines to control their photolu...

  13. Effect of pore structure and surface chemical properties on adsorption properties of activated carbons%孔结构和表面化学性质对活性炭吸附性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立恒; 辜敏; 鲜学福

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of CO2,CH4 and N2 on three granular activated carbons(GAC-C,GAC-P and GAC-T) were determined at room temperature.Pore structure and surface chemical properties of granular activated carbons were characterized,and the effect of them on adsorption properties was investigated.The results showed that the relationships of gases adsorption capacity and uptake coefficient on granular activated carbons were CO2〉CH4〉N2,because of the differences of adsorption mechanism,pore structure,surface functional groups and molecular polarity.The adsorption capacities of CH4 and N2 were mainly controlled by micropore volume of activated carbon,and the differences of N2 and CO2 adsorption capacity were affected by micropores from 0.572 to 2.0 nm and pores from 0.4 to 6.0 nm,respectively.And uptake coefficient of CH4,was more relational with mesopore and macropore,while uptake coefficients of N2 and CO2 were mainly controlled by micropore and macropore,respectively.%测定了室温下3种活性炭(GAC-C、GAC-P和GAC-T)对CO2、CH4和N2的吸附性能,并对颗粒活性炭孔结构和表面化学性质进行了表征,探讨了孔结构和表面化学性质对活性炭吸附性能的影响。结果表明:由于吸附机理、孔结构、表面含氧官能团和分子极性的差异,CO2、CH4和N2在活性炭上的饱和吸附量和吸附常数的关系为CO2〉CH4〉N2;CH4和N2的饱和吸附量主要受活性炭微孔孔容的影响,N2和CO2饱和吸附量的差异分别是由0.572~2.0 nm的微孔和0.4~6 nm的孔引起的;CH4吸附常数主要受较大中孔和大孔影响,N2吸附常数与微孔密切相关,大孔对CO2的吸附常数影响最大。

  14. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  15. Low-temperature facile synthesis of graphene and graphene-carbon nanotubes hybrid on dielectric surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various carbon based nanostructures (graphene, graphene-CNTs hybrid and three-dimensional (3D) carbon network) have been grown separately on low-temperature (600 °C) substrates by using a chemical vapor deposition system with a two-heating reactor. The two-heating reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating C atoms and provide a simple method for low-temperature deposition. Morphology and electrical properties of the carbon based nanostructures can be controlled by the substrate surfaces. A relatively flat surface is beneficial for the synthesis of graphene and surfaces with nanodots are required to directly grow graphene-carbon nanotube hybrids. A chemical vapor deposition mechanism dependent on the temperature gradient is proposed, suggesting that the transfer-free carbon nanostructures can be deposited on different substrates. These results open an easy way for direct and high-efficiency deposition of various carbon nanostructures on the low-temperature dielectric substrates. (papers)

  16. Physico-chemical characterization of powdered activated carbons obtained by thermo-chemical conversion of brown municipal waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Milan Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cones of the European Black pine and Horse chestnut kernel, regarded as brown municipal waste, was utilized in this work as a precursor for powdered activated carbons. Chemical activation was employed at 500°C in inert atmosphere of nitrogen. Standard physico-chemical analyses were performed to examine obtained products. FTIR method was employed to determine fuctional groups which were found to be typical for activated carbons. Acidic oxygen groups were quantitatively determined using Boehm titrations. It was established that carboxylic groups on pine cone activated carbon, and phenolic groups on chestnut kernel activated carbon were dominant from all acidic oxygen groups. Since both contact pH and pHPZC were determined to be fairly acidic, it could be concluded that obtained activated carbons belong to L-type. Shape and layout of micrometer dimensioned particles were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Particles of different shapes and dimensions along with small cracks and wide crevices and voids were noticed. Textural analysis was used to determine specific surface area and pore distribution of obtained activated carbons. Obtained products possess highly developed surface area and wide pore distribution.

  17. Physical and chemical properties of selected agricultural byproduct-based activated carbons and their ability to adsorb geosmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chilton; Losso, Jack N; Marshall, Wayne E; Rao, Ramu M

    2002-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate selected physical and chemical properties of agricultural byproduct-based activated carbons made from pecan shells and sugarcane bagasse, and compare those properties to a commercial coal-based activated carbon as well as to compare the adsorption efficiency of these carbons for geosmin. Comparison of the physical and chemical properties of pecan shell- and bagasse-based carbons to the commercial carbon, Calgon Filtrasorb 400, showed that pecan shell carbon, but not the bagasse carbon, compared favorably to Filtrasorb 400, especially in terms of surface area, bulk density, ash and attrition. A carbon dosage study done in a model system showed the amount of geosmin adsorbed to be greater for Filtrasorb 400 and the bagasse-based carbon at low carbon concentrations than for the pecan shell carbons, but geosmin adsorption was similar in all carbons at higher carbon dosages. Application of the Freundlich isotherm model to the adsorption data showed that carbons made by steam activation of pecan shells or sugarcane bagasse had geosmin adsorption characteristics most like those of the commercial carbon. In terms of physical, chemical and adsorptive properties, steam-activated pecan shell carbon most resembled the commercial carbon and has the potential to replace Filtrasorb 400 in applications involving removal of geosmin from aqueous environments.

  18. Apparatus to measure chemical wear of carbon brushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosky, P. G.; Peters, H. C.; Spiro, C. L.; Lamby, E. J.; McKee, D. W.

    1985-07-01

    It has been inferred for several years that the wear of a carbon brush at a sliding interface of a dc machine is influenced by chemical factors. Previously, the difficulties of isolating and measuring chemical factors in such circumstances have discouraged specific verification. An apparatus is described that hermetically seals a selected polarity brush and uses an artificial atmosphere of humidified oxygen and argon to simulate air. By monitoring the ratio of mass spectrometric peaks of CO+2 to 36Ar+, a consistent rise is observed in the amount of CO2 present. The amount of carbon thus gasified exceeded 25% of the total carbon lost.

  19. Chemical surface tuning electrocatalysis of redox-active nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Nan; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    This work focuses on electron transfer (ET) and electrocatalysis of inorganic hybrid Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs, 6 nm) immobilized on different chemical surfaces. Through surface self-assembly chemistry, we have enabled to tune chemical properties of the electrode surface. Stable immobili...

  20. Physical and chemical characterization of surfaces of nitrogen implanted steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studied steels are of industrial type (42CD4, 100C6, Z200C13). Very often, the low carbon steel XCO6 has been used as a reference material. The aim of the research is to understand and to explain the mechanisms of wear resistance to improvement. A good characterization of the implanted layer is thus necessary. It implies to establish the distribution profiles of the implanted ions to identify the chemical and structural state of the phases created during implantation as a function of various implantation parameters (dose, temperature). Temperature is the particularly parameter. Its influence is put in evidence both during implantation and during annealings under vacuum. Nitrogen distribution profiles are performed thanks to the non destructive 15N(p,αγ)12C nuclear reaction. The chemical state of the Fe-N phases formed by implantation is determined using first Electron Conversion Moessbauer Spectroscopy and secondly, as a complement, using grazing angle X ray diffraction. The detected compounds are ε-nitrides, ε-carbonitrides, (N) - martensite and α-Fe16N2 whose evolution is carefully followed versus temperature. The diffraction technique reveals a texture of the implanted layer. This preferentiel orientation is found to be temperature dependent but dose independent. The carbon presence at the surface is studied as a function of implantation conditions (vacuum, temperature, dose). Carbon profiling is obtained using α backscattering (12C(α,α') reaction at 5,7 MeV). Thus is achieved a complete characterization of the implanted zone whose evolution as a function of implantation parameters (especially temperature) is correlated with tribological results

  1. Riemann Surfaces of Carbon as Graphene Nanosolenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fangbo; Yu, Henry; Sadrzadeh, Arta; Yakobson, Boris I

    2016-01-13

    Traditional inductors in modern electronics consume excessive areas in the integrated circuits. Carbon nanostructures can offer efficient alternatives if the recognized high electrical conductivity of graphene can be properly organized in space to yield a current-generated magnetic field that is both strong and confined. Here we report on an extraordinary inductor nanostructure naturally occurring as a screw dislocation in graphitic carbons. Its elegant helicoid topology, resembling a Riemann surface, ensures full covalent connectivity of all graphene layers, joined in a single layer wound around the dislocation line. If voltage is applied, electrical currents flow helically and thus give rise to a very large (∼1 T at normal operational voltage) magnetic field and bring about superior (per mass or volume) inductance, both owing to unique winding density. Such a solenoid of small diameter behaves as a quantum conductor whose current distribution between the core and exterior varies with applied voltage, resulting in nonlinear inductance.

  2. Surface modification, characterization and adsorptive properties of a coconut activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coconut activated carbon was modified using chemical methods. Different concentration of nitric acid oxidation of the conventional sample produced samples with weakly acidic functional groups. The oxidized samples were characterized by scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, Bothem method, pH titration, adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and the adsorption mechanism of activated carbons was investigated. The results showed that BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbons were decreased after oxidization process, while acidic functional groups were increased. The surface morphology of oxidized carbons looked clean and eroded which was caused by oxidization of nitric acid. The oxidized carbons showed high adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and chemical properties of activated carbon played an important role in adsorption of metal ions and organic pollutants.

  3. Surface modification, characterization and adsorptive properties of a coconut activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xincheng; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Kang; Xie, Xinping; Hu, Yiming

    2012-08-01

    A coconut activated carbon was modified using chemical methods. Different concentration of nitric acid oxidation of the conventional sample produced samples with weakly acidic functional groups. The oxidized samples were characterized by scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, Bothem method, pH titration, adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and the adsorption mechanism of activated carbons was investigated. The results showed that BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbons were decreased after oxidization process, while acidic functional groups were increased. The surface morphology of oxidized carbons looked clean and eroded which was caused by oxidization of nitric acid. The oxidized carbons showed high adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and chemical properties of activated carbon played an important role in adsorption of metal ions and organic pollutants.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon nanofibers on Co and Cu Catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eunsil; Kim, Jongwon; Lee, Changseop [Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study reports on the synthesis of carbon nanofibers via chemical vapor deposition using Co and Cu as catalysts. In order to investigate the suitability of their catalytic activity for the growth of nanofibers, we prepared catalysts for the synthesis of carbon nanofibers with Cobalt nitrate and Copper nitrate, and found the optimum concentration of each respective catalyst. Then we made them react with Aluminum nitrate and Ammonium Molybdate to form precipitates. The precipitates were dried at a temperature of 110 .deg. C in order to be prepared into catalyst powder. The catalyst was sparsely and thinly spread on a quartz tube boat to grow carbon nanofibers via thermal chemical vapor deposition. The characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were analyzed through SEM, EDS, XRD, Raman, XPS, and TG/DTA, and the specific surface area was measured via BET. Consequently, the characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were greatly influenced by the concentration ratio of metal catalysts. In particular, uniform carbon nanofibers of 27 nm in diameter grew when the concentration ratio of Co and Cu was 6:4 at 700 .deg. C of calcination temperature; carbon nanofibers synthesized under such conditions showed the best crystallizability, compared to carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts under different concentration ratios, and revealed 1.26 high amorphicity as well as 292 m{sup 2}g{sup -1} high specific surface area.

  5. Carbon loss and chemical changes from permafrost collapse in the northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Cuicui; Zhang, Tingjun; Zhang, Xiankai; Li, Lili; Guo, Hong; Zhao, Qian; Cao, Lin; Wu, Qingbai; Cheng, Guodong

    2016-07-01

    Permafrost collapse, known as thermokarst, can alter soil properties and carbon emissions. However, little is known regarding the effects of permafrost collapse in upland landscapes on the biogeochemical processes that affect carbon balance. In this study, we measured soil carbon and physiochemical properties at a large thermokarst feature on a hillslope in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. We categorized surfaces into three different microrelief patches based on type and extent of collapse (control, drape, and exposed areas). Permafrost collapse resulted in substantial decreases of surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, with losses of 29.6 ± 4.2% and 28.9 ± 3.1% for carbon and nitrogen, respectively, in the 0-10 cm soil layer. Laboratory incubation experiments indicated that control soil had significantly higher CO2 production rates than that of drapes. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that exposed soils accumulated some organic matter due to their low position within the feature, which was accompanied by substantial changes in the chemical structure and characteristics of the soil carbon. Exposed soils had higher hydrocarbon and lignin/phenol backbone content than in control and drape soils in the 0-10 cm layer. This study demonstrates that permafrost collapse can cause abundant carbon and nitrogen loss, potentially from mineralization, leaching, photodegradation, and lateral displacement. These results demonstrate that permafrost collapse redistributes the soil organic matter, changes its chemical characteristics, and leads to losses of organic carbon due to the greenhouse gas emission.

  6. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth Ep Gisquet, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  7. Evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces. Variation of elongation is achieved by depositing droplets on surfaces with varying ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripe widths. Elongated droplets evaporate faster than more spherical droplets. Bo

  8. Chemically enhanced self-sputtering of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results obtained for graphite self-sputtering, in the presence of thermal atomic hydrogen, show that Chemically Enhanced Self-Sputtering (CES) can exceed unity erosion yield even at normal angles of incidence. CES yields were found to depend on the ΦC+/ΦHo flux ratio and graphite temperature, with peak erosion occurring at about 800K. No dependence on angle of incidence was observed

  9. Potential for carbon adsorption on concrete: surface XPS analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselbach, Liv M; Ma, Shuguo

    2008-07-15

    The concrete industry is a contributor to the global carbon cycle particularly with respect to the contribution of carbon dioxide in the manufacturing of cement (calcination). The reverse reaction of carbonation is known to occur in concrete, but is usually limited to exterior surfaces exposed to carbon dioxide and humidity in the air. As alternate concrete uses expand which have more surface area, such as crushed concrete for recycling, it is important to understand surface adsorption of carbon dioxide and the positive impacts it might have on the carbon cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used in this study to evaluate carbon species on hydrated cement mortar surfaces. Initial estimates for carbon absorption in concrete using othertechniques predictthe potential for carbonate species to be a fraction of the calcination stoichiometric equivalent The XPS results indicate that there is a rapid and substantial uptake of carbon dioxide on the surfaces of these mortars, sometimes exceeding the calcination stoichiometric equivalents, indicative of carbon dioxide surface complexation species. On pure calcite, the excess is on the order of 30%. This accelerated carbon dioxide surface adsorption phenomenon may be importantfor determining novel and effective carbon sequestration processes using recycled concrete. PMID:18754389

  10. Densification and microstructure of carbon/carbon composites prepared by chemical vapor infiltration using ethanol as precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber felts with uniform initial bulk density of 0.47 g·cm-3 was investigated at the ethanol partial pressures of 5-20 kPa,as well as the temperatures of 1050,1100,1150 and 1200°C.Ethanol,diluted by nitrogen,was employed as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon.Polarized light microscopy(PLM),scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to study the texture of pyrolytic carbon deposited at various temperatures.A change from medium-to high-textured pyrolytic carbon was observed in the sample infiltrated at 1050°C.Whereas,homogeneous high-textured pyrolytic carbons were deposited at the temperatures of 1100,1150 and 1200°C.Extinction angles of 19°-21° were determined for different regions in the samples densified at the temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1200°C.Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surface after bending test indicated that the prepared carbon/carbon composite samples exhibited a pseudo-plastic fracture behavior.In addition,fracture behavior of the carbon/carbon samples was obviously effected by their infiltration temperature.The fracture mode of C/C composites was transformed from shearing failure to tensile breakage with increasing infiltration temperature. Results of this study show that ethanol is a promising carbon source to synthesize carbon/carbon composites with homogeneously high-textured pyrolytic carbon over a wide range of temperatures(from 1100 to 1200°C).

  11. Apparatus and process for the surface treatment of carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Ozcan, Soydan; Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-05-17

    A method for surface treating a carbon-containing material in which carbon-containing material is reacted with decomposing ozone in a reactor (e.g., a hollow tube reactor), wherein a concentration of ozone is maintained throughout the reactor by appropriate selection of at least processing temperature, gas stream flow rate, reactor dimensions, ozone concentration entering the reactor, and position of one or more ozone inlets (ports) in the reactor, wherein the method produces a surface-oxidized carbon or carbon-containing material, preferably having a surface atomic oxygen content of at least 15%. The resulting surface-oxidized carbon material and solid composites made therefrom are also described.

  12. Carbon dioxide chemistry on the surface of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodyss, Robert; Piao, Sophie; Malaska, Michael; Cable, Morgan

    2016-10-01

    Titan possesses many of the basic elements of habitability, including a rich organic chemistry. However, the thick atmosphere of Titan shields the surface from radiation, which makes the incorporation of oxygen into organic compounds difficult, due to a reducing environment and low temperatures that slow chemical reactions. These obstacles may be overcome by impacts or cryovolcanic heating of ice, which would mix organics with liquid water and allow chemical reactions that can incorporate oxygen. However, reactions involving oxygen can occur on Titan without invoking such unusual conditions. We show that the reaction of carbon dioxide with amines can lead to oxygenated organics at Titan's surface without the need for external energy input, via the carbamation reaction: R-NH2 + CO2 → R-NH-COOH. Using a combination of micro-Raman spectroscopy and UHV FTIR spectroscopy, we examine the reaction products and kinetics of the carbamation reaction for a variety of primary and secondary amines. We have observed carbamic acid formation in mixtures of methylamine, ethylamine and dibutylamine with CO2 at cryogenic temperatures. This indicates that both primary and secondary amines can undergo carbamation at low temperatures. Reaction was observed with methylamine as low as 40 K, and with ethylamine at 100 K, demonstrating that carbamation is fast at Titan surface temperatures. We will present data on the kinetics of the carbamation reaction for a variety of amines, as well as estimates of the quantity of carbamic acids that may be produced on Titan's surface and in the atmosphere.

  13. Effect of the nature the carbon precursor on the physico-chemical characteristics of the resulting activated carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon materials, including amorphous carbon, graphite, carbon nanospheres (CNSs) and different types of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) [platelet, herringbone and ribbon], were chemically activated using KOH. The pore structure of carbon materials was analyzed using N2/77 K adsorption isotherms. The presence of oxygen groups was analyzed by temperature programmed desorption in He and acid-base titration. The structural order of the materials was studied by X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed oxidation. The morphology and diameter distribution of CNFs and CNSs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The materials were also characterized by temperature-desorption programmed of H2 and elemental composition. The ways in which the different structures were activated are described, showing the type of pores generated. Relationships between carbon yield, removed carbon, activation degree and graphitic character were also examined. The oxygen content in the form of oxygen-containing surface groups increased after the activation giving qualitative information about them. The average diameter of both CNFs and CNSs was decreased after the activation process as consequence of the changes produced on the material surface.

  14. Surface chemical studies of chemical vapour deposited diamond thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Proffitt, S

    2001-01-01

    could not easily be correlated to the bulk film properties. It is suggested that electron emission arises from the graphite component of graphite- diamond grain boundaries that are present in the nanocrystalline films. species. The adsorbed O and Cl species are more strongly bound to the K layer than they are to the diamond substrate, so thermal desorption of K from the K/CI/diamond or K/O/diamond surface results also in the simultaneous loss ofO and Cl. The phosphorus precursor trisdimethylaminophosphine (TDMAP) has a negligible reactive sticking probability on the clean diamond surface. This can be increased by thermal cracking of the gas phase precursor by a heated filament, resulting in non-activated adsorption to produce an adlayer containing a mixture of surface-bound ligands and phosphorus containing species. The ligands were readily lost upon heating, leaving P, some of which was lost from the surface at higher temperatures. Pre-hydrogenation of the diamond surface inhibited the uptake of cracked TDMA...

  15. Carbon Nanotube-Based Chemical Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, M

    2016-04-27

    The need to sense gases and vapors arises in numerous scenarios in industrial, environmental, security and medical applications. Traditionally, this activity has utilized bulky instruments to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the constituents of the gas mixture. It is ideal to use sensors for this purpose since they are smaller in size and less expensive; however, their performance in the field must match that of established analytical instruments in order to gain acceptance. In this regard, nanomaterials as sensing media offer advantages in sensitivity, preparation of chip-based sensors and construction of electronic nose for selective detection of analytes of interest. This article provides a review of the use of carbon nanotubes in gas and vapor sensing. PMID:26959284

  16. Carbon Nanomaterials: Applications in Physico-chemical Systemsand Biosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwar Sharon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, various forms of carbon and carbon nanomaterials (CNMs and a new approach to classify them on the basis of sp2-sp3 configuration are presented. Utilising the concept of junction formation (like p:n junction a concept is developed to explain the special reactivity of nanosized carbon materials. Geometric consideration of chiral and achiral symmetry of single-walled carbon nanotubes is presented which is also responsible for manifesting special propertiesof carbon nanotubes. A brief introduction to various common synthesis techniques of CNMs is given. These is increased chemical and biological activities have resulted in many engineer ednanoparticles, which are being designed for specific purposes, including diagnostic or the rapeuticmedical uses and environmental remediation.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.460-485, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1668

  17. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2004-08-02

    The April-June 2004 quarter was dedicated to the establishment of monitoring systems for all the new research areas. Hydrology and water quality monitoring continues to be conducted on all areas as does weather data pertinent to the research. Studies assessing specific questions pertaining to carbon flux has been established and the invasion of the vegetation by small mammals is being quantified. The approval of two experimental practices associated with this research by the United States Office of Surface Mining was a major accomplishment during this period of time. These experimental practices will eventually allow for tree planting on long steep slopes with loose grading systems and for the use of loose dumped spoil on mountain top removal areas with no grading in the final layer of rooting material for tree establishment.

  18. Carbon Footprint Calculations: An Application of Chemical Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treptow, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Topics commonly taught in a general chemistry course can be used to calculate the quantity of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere by various human activities. Each calculation begins with the balanced chemical equation for the reaction that produces the CO[subscript 2] gas. Stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the ideal gas law, and dimensional…

  19. Anthropogenic chemical carbon cycle for a sustainable future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Goeppert, Alain

    2011-08-24

    Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time, millions of years, can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. The burning of our diminishing fossil fuel reserves is accompanied by large anthropogenic CO(2) release, which is outpacing nature's CO(2) recycling capability, causing significant environmental harm. To supplement the natural carbon cycle, we have proposed and developed a feasible anthropogenic chemical recycling of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is captured by absorption technologies from any natural or industrial source, from human activities, or even from the air itself. It can then be converted by feasible chemical transformations into fuels such as methanol, dimethyl ether, and varied products including synthetic hydrocarbons and even proteins for animal feed, thus supplementing our food chain. This concept of broad scope and framework is the basis of what we call the Methanol Economy. The needed renewable starting materials, water and CO(2), are available anywhere on Earth. The required energy for the synthetic carbon cycle can come from any alternative energy source such as solar, wind, geothermal, and even hopefully safe nuclear energy. The anthropogenic carbon dioxide cycle offers a way of assuring a sustainable future for humankind when fossil fuels become scarce. While biosources can play a limited role in supplementing future energy needs, they increasingly interfere with the essentials of the food chain. We have previously reviewed aspects of the chemical recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether. In the present Perspective, we extend the discussion of the innovative and feasible anthropogenic carbon cycle, which can be the basis of progressively liberating humankind from its dependence on diminishing fossil fuel reserves while also controlling harmful CO(2) emissions to the atmosphere. We also

  20. Anthropogenic chemical carbon cycle for a sustainable future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Goeppert, Alain

    2011-08-24

    Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time, millions of years, can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. The burning of our diminishing fossil fuel reserves is accompanied by large anthropogenic CO(2) release, which is outpacing nature's CO(2) recycling capability, causing significant environmental harm. To supplement the natural carbon cycle, we have proposed and developed a feasible anthropogenic chemical recycling of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is captured by absorption technologies from any natural or industrial source, from human activities, or even from the air itself. It can then be converted by feasible chemical transformations into fuels such as methanol, dimethyl ether, and varied products including synthetic hydrocarbons and even proteins for animal feed, thus supplementing our food chain. This concept of broad scope and framework is the basis of what we call the Methanol Economy. The needed renewable starting materials, water and CO(2), are available anywhere on Earth. The required energy for the synthetic carbon cycle can come from any alternative energy source such as solar, wind, geothermal, and even hopefully safe nuclear energy. The anthropogenic carbon dioxide cycle offers a way of assuring a sustainable future for humankind when fossil fuels become scarce. While biosources can play a limited role in supplementing future energy needs, they increasingly interfere with the essentials of the food chain. We have previously reviewed aspects of the chemical recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether. In the present Perspective, we extend the discussion of the innovative and feasible anthropogenic carbon cycle, which can be the basis of progressively liberating humankind from its dependence on diminishing fossil fuel reserves while also controlling harmful CO(2) emissions to the atmosphere. We also

  1. Effect of chemical treatments on hydrogen storage behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the hydrogen storage behaviors of chemically treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated. The surface properties of the functionalized MWNTs were confirmed by Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, the Boehm titration method, and zeta-potential measurements. The hydrogen storage capacity of the MWNTs was evaluated at 298 K and 100 bar. In the experimental results, it was found that the chemical treatments introduced functional groups onto the MWNT surfaces. The amount of hydrogen storage was enhanced, by acidic surface treatment, to 0.42 wt.% in the acidic-treated MWNTs compared with 0.26 wt.% in the as-received MWNTs. Meanwhile, the basic surface treatment actually reduced the hydrogen storage capacity, to 0.24 wt.% in the basic-treated MWNTs sample. Consequently, it could be concluded that hydrogen storage is greatly influenced by the acidic characteristics of MWNT surfaces, resulting in enhanced electron acceptor-donor interaction at interfaces.

  2. Plasma-chemical surface engineering of wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sokołowska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Wood infiltrated with nano-silica hydrosol forms a “weak”, irregular composite of components bound with hydrogen bonds only. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of low-energy ions bombardment on the structure and properties of the surface of this composite. The aim of these investigations was to produce a shallow “buried” layer of a dense wood-ceramic composite on a wood surface .Design/methodology/approach: D.c. glow-discharge in N2/H2 (9:11 atmosphere under a pressure of 4hPa was the source of ions. A beech plate was placed on the cathode. The temperature of wood was 200°C. The material collected from the wood-silica composite surface was investigated with FTIR spectroscopy and SEM observations. The surface energy was determined with the use of contact angle measurements.Findings: The ions influenced silica only. The nano-particles underwent sintering changing its medium size twice and a small I.R. peak of N2 trapped in SiO2 suggest the possibility of silica nitriding. A buried, continual surface layer of sintered silica did not form. The surface energy of the “wood-silica” plate was slightly decreased after plasma treatment.Research limitations/implications: The results proved the possibility of plasma treatment of wood even in a d.c. glow-discharge under low pressure. Silica sintering, a difficult process which in a thermal way has to be carried out at a temperature of 1000°C, taking place in a plasma at a temperature of 200°C showed the very special nature of an influence of ions.Originality/value: The plasma surface treatment of wood in the d.c. glow-discharge (GD under reduced pressure has not been investigated. There are only publications about glow-dielectric-barrier-discharge (GDBD at atmospheric pressure applications for wood surface modification. The energy of ions in GDBD is much smaller than that of ions in GD and therefore the application of glow discharge under reduced pressure to

  3. Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; MA Weiwei; CAI Lan

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal silicon was found to be very beneficial to the growth of aligned carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with C2H2 as carbon source. A thin film of Ni served as catalyst was deposited on the Si substrate by the K575X Peltier Cooled High Resolution Sputter Coater before growth. The growth properties of carbon nanotubes were studied as a function of the Ni catalyst layer thickness. The diameter, growth rate and areal density of the carbon nanotubes were controlled by the initial thickness of the catalyst layer. Steric hindrance between nanotubes forces them to grow in well-aligned manner at an initial stage of growth. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that nanotubes grew by a tip growth mechanism.

  4. Heterogeneously Catalysed Chemical Reactions in Carbon Dioxide Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musko, Nikolai E.

    the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated aldehydes in carbon dioxide medium. It was found that supported tungstosilicic acid catalysts and acidic resin Amberlyst-15 are very effective for performing aldol reactions. The positive influence of temperature and CO2-content on catalyst activity was studied...... useful for the phase behaviour investigations. The direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from methanol and CO2 has been investigated for quite a long time, however hardly any sufficiently active catalysts have been found so far. Nevertheless, optimisation of the phase equilibria of the reaction mixture...... studies of catalytic chemical reactions in dense and supercritical carbon dioxide have been complemented by the theoretical calculations of phase equilibria using advanced thermodynamic models. In the recent years, the use of compressed carbon dioxide as innovative, non-toxic and non-flammable, cheap...

  5. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Binbin, E-mail: changbinbin806@163.com; Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng, E-mail: baochengyang@yahoo.com

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  6. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  7. Structure of adsorbed monolayers. The surface chemical bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper attempts to provide a summary of what has been learned about the structure of adsorbed monolayers and about the surface chemical bond from molecular surface science. While the surface chemical bond is less well understood than bonding of molecules in the gas phase or in the solid state, our knowledge of its properties is rapidly accumulating. The information obtained also has great impact on many surface science based technologies, including heterogeneous catalysis and electronic devices. It is hoped that much of the information obtained from studies at solid-gas interfaces can be correlated with molecular behavior at solid-liquid interfaces. 31 references, 42 figures, 1 table

  8. Reprogramming cellular signaling machinery using surface-modified carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ling; Jiang, Cuijuan; Yan, Bing

    2015-03-16

    Nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), interact with cells and are easily internalized, causing various perturbations to cell functions. The mechanisms involved in such perturbations are investigated by a systematic approach that utilizes modified CNTs and various chemical-biological assays. Three modes of actions are (1) CNTs bind to different cell surface receptors and perturb different cell signaling pathways; (2) CNTs bind to a receptor with different affinity and, therefore, strengthen or weaken signals; (3) CNTs enter cells and bind to soluble signaling proteins involved in a signaling pathway. Understanding of such mechanisms not only clarifies how CNTs cause cytotoxicity but also demonstrates a useful method to modulate biological/toxicological activities of CNTs for their various industrial, biomedical, and consumer applications. PMID:25536342

  9. Reprogramming cellular signaling machinery using surface-modified carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wu, Ling; Jiang, Cuijuan; Yan, Bing

    2015-03-16

    Nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), interact with cells and are easily internalized, causing various perturbations to cell functions. The mechanisms involved in such perturbations are investigated by a systematic approach that utilizes modified CNTs and various chemical-biological assays. Three modes of actions are (1) CNTs bind to different cell surface receptors and perturb different cell signaling pathways; (2) CNTs bind to a receptor with different affinity and, therefore, strengthen or weaken signals; (3) CNTs enter cells and bind to soluble signaling proteins involved in a signaling pathway. Understanding of such mechanisms not only clarifies how CNTs cause cytotoxicity but also demonstrates a useful method to modulate biological/toxicological activities of CNTs for their various industrial, biomedical, and consumer applications.

  10. Surface modification of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber and its interaction with imide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Bing [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Lab Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang Xiaoshu [Centre for Materials Analysis, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lu Yun [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Lab Coordination Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)]. E-mail: yunlu@nju.edu.cn

    2006-12-30

    In this work, sized polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers were chemically modified with nitric acid and maleic anhydride (MA) in order to improve the interaction between carbon fiber surface and polyimide matrix. Bismaleimide (BMI) was selected as a model compound of polyimide to react with modified carbon fiber. The surface characteristic changing after modification and surface reaction was investigated by element analysis (EA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The results indicated that the modification of carbon fiber surface with MA might follow the Diels Alder reaction mechanism. In the surface reaction between modified fibers and BMI, among the various surface functional groups, the hydroxyl group provided from phenolic hydroxyl group and bridged structure on carbon fiber may be the most effective group reacted with imide structure. The results may shed some light on the design of the appropriate surface structure, which could react with polyimide, and the manufacture of the carbon fiber-reinforced polyimide matrix composites.

  11. Surface Chemical Functionalization based on Plasma Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Ricciardi, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials research has undergone a variety of evolutionary developments in recent years. In this perspective, bulk materials properties and biomechanics took relevance in view of the stringent mechanical and tribological demands of the bio-implants. However, such issues cannot be the sole determinants of clinical outcome. Interest in bulk properties has inevitably shifted to the important consideration of the surface with the interfacial phenomena, conditioning their performance. These eve...

  12. Surface-functionalized mesoporous carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng; Gorka, Joanna; Mayes, Richard T.

    2016-02-02

    A functionalized mesoporous carbon composition comprising a mesoporous carbon scaffold having mesopores in which polyvinyl polymer grafts are covalently attached, wherein said mesopores have a size of at least 2 nm and up to 50 nm. Also described is a method for producing the functionalized mesoporous composition, wherein a reaction medium comprising a precursor mesoporous carbon, vinyl monomer, initiator, and solvent is subjected to sonication of sufficient power to result in grafting and polymerization of the vinyl monomer into mesopores of the precursor mesoporous carbon. Also described are methods for using the functionalized mesoporous carbon, particularly in extracting metal ions from metal-containing solutions.

  13. Improvement of carbon fiber surface properties using electron beam irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced advance composites have been used for struetural applications, mainly on account of their mechanical properties. The main factor for a good mechanical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composite is the interfacial interaction between its components, which are carbon fiber and polymeric matrix. The aim of this study is to improve the surface properties of the carbon fiber using ionizing radiation from an electron beam to obtain better adhesion properties in the resultant composite. EB radiation was applied on the carbon fiber itself before preparing test specimens for the mechanical tests. Experimental results showed that EB irradiation improved the tensile strength of carbon fiber samples. The maximum value in tensile strength was reached using doses of about 250kGy. After breakage, the morphology aspect of the tensile specimens prepared with irradiated and non-irradiated carbon fibers were evaluated. SEM micrographs showed modifications on the carbon fiber surface.

  14. Wetting behaviour of carbon nitride nanostructures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon nitride films were prepared by using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system by altering the electrode distance. • The effect of electrode distance on surface morphology, surface roughness, chemical bonding and hydrophobic behaviour has been studied. • Hydrophobic behaviour were studied by measuring contact angle and calculating surface energy. • CNx nanostructures show super-hydrophobic behaviour. • We report a tunable transition of hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic behaviour of film as electrode distance is reduced. - Abstract: Tuning the wettability of various coating materials by simply controlling the deposition parameters is essential for various specific applications. In this work, carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited on silicon (1 1 1) substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition employing parallel plate electrode configuration. Effects of varying the electrode distance (DE) on the films’ structure and bonding properties were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The wettability of the films was analyzed using water contact angle measurements. At high DE, the CNx films’ surface was smooth and uniform. This changed into fibrous nanostructures when DE was decreased. Surface roughness of the films increased with this morphological transformation. Nitrogen incorporation increased with decrease in DE which manifested the increase in both relative intensities of C=N to C=C and N−H to O−H bonds. sp2-C to sp3-C ratio increased as DE decreased due to greater deformation of sp2 bonded carbon at lower DE. The films’ characteristics changed from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic with the decrease in DE. Roughness ratio, surface porosity and surface energy calculated from contact angle measurements were strongly dependent on the morphology, surface

  15. Nanotextured gold coatings on carbon nanofiber scaffolds as ultrahigh surface-area electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    COLAVITA, PAULA

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED High surface area metal electrodes are desirable for applications in energy storage and energy conversion. Here, the formation and electrochemical characterization of a hybrid material made by electroless deposition of gold onto a scaffolding of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers is described. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers, ~80 nm in diameter, provided mechanical support and electrical contact to the highly textured nanoscale gold coatings. By chemically functionalizing ...

  16. Low carbon fuel and chemical production from waste gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, S.; Liew, F.M.; Daniell, J.; Koepke, M. [LanzaTech, Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    LanzaTech has developed a gas fermentation platform for the production of alter native transport fuels and commodity chemicals from carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide containing gases. LanzaTech technology uses these gases in place of sugars as the carbon and energy source for fermentation thereby allowing a broad spectrum of resources to be considered as an input for product synthesis. At the core of the Lanzatech process is a proprietary microbe capable of using gases as the only carbon and energy input for product synthesis. To harness this capability for the manufacture of a diverse range of commercially valuable products, the company has developed a robust synthetic biology platform to enable a variety of novel molecules to be synthesised via gas fermentation. LanzaTech initially focused on the fermentation of industrial waste gases for fuel ethanol production. The company has been operating pilot plant that uses direct feeds of steel making off gas for ethanol production for over 24 months. This platform technology has been further successfully demonstrated using a broad range of gas inputs including gasified biomass and reformed natural gas. LanzaTech has developed the fermentation, engineering and control systems necessary to efficiently convert gases to valuable products. A precommercial demonstration scale unit processing steel mill waste gases was commissioned in China during the 2{sup nd} quarter of 2012. Subsequent scale-up of this facility is projected for the 2013 and will represent the first world scale non-food based low carbon ethanol project. More recently LanzaTech has developed proprietary microbial catalysts capable of converting carbon dioxide in the presence of hydrogen directly to value added chemicals, where-in CO{sub 2} is the sole source of carbon for product synthesis. Integrating the LanzaTech technology into a number of industrial facilities, such as steel mills, oil refineries and other industries that emit Carbon bearing

  17. Enhancing the Properties of Carbon and Gold Substrates by Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Anne Harnisch

    2002-06-27

    The properties of both carbon and gold substrates are easily affected by the judicious choice of a surface modification protocol. Several such processes for altering surface composition have been published in literature. The research presented in this thesis primarily focuses on the development of on-column methods to modify carbon stationary phases used in electrochemically modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC). To this end, both porous graphitic carbon (PGC) and glassy carbon (GC) particles have been modified on-column by the electroreduction of arenediazonium salts and the oxidation of arylacetate anions (the Kolbe reaction). Once modified, the carbon stationary phases show enhanced chromatographic performance both in conventional liquid chromatographic columns and EMLC columns. Additionally, one may also exploit the creation of aryl films to by electroreduction of arenediazonium salts in the creation of nanostructured materials. The formation of mercaptobenzene film on the surface of a GC electrode provides a linking platform for the chemisorption of gold nanoparticles. After deposition of nanoparticles, the surface chemistry of the gold can be further altered by self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation via the chemisorption of a second thiol species. Finally, the properties of gold films can be altered such that they display carbon-like behavior through the formation of benzenehexathiol (BHT) SAMs. BHT chemisorbs to the gold surface in a previously unprecedented planar fashion. Carbon and gold substrates can be chemically altered by several methodologies resulting in new surface properties. The development of modification protocols and their application in the analytical arena is considered herein.

  18. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and

  19. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  20. Carbon nanosheets by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in CH4-Ar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employ a new gas mixture of CH4-Ar to fabricate carbon nanosheets by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at the growth temperature of less than 500 deg. C. The catalyst-free nanosheets possess flower-like structures with a large amount of sharp edges, which consist of a few layers of graphene sheets according to the observation by transmission electron microscopy. These high-quality carbon nanosheets demonstrated a faster electron transfer between the electrolyte and the nanosheet surface, due to their edge defects and graphene structures.

  1. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors: Consideration of cost and chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zheng; Weizhong Qian; Chaojie Cui; Guanghui Xu; Mengqiang Zhao; Guili Tian; Fei Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this topic,we first discussed the requirement and performance of supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electrode,including specific surface area,purity and cost.Then we reviewed the preparation technique of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in relatively large scale by chemical vapor deposition method.Its catalysis on the decomposition of methane and other carbon source,the reactor type and the process control strategies were discussed.Special focus was concentrated on how to increase the yield,selectivity,and purity of SWNTs and how to inhibit the formation of impurities,including amorphous carbon,multiwalled CNTs and the carbon encapsulated metal particles,since these impurities seriously influenced the performance of SWNTs in supercapacitors.Wish it be helpful to further decrease its product cost and for the commercial use in supercapacitors.

  2. Optical measurements of chemically heterogeneous particulate surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Nataliya; Gritsevich, Maria; Zubko, Evgenij; Hakala, Teemu; Peltoniemi, Jouni I.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally study light scattering by particulate surfaces consisting of two high-contrast materials. Using the Finnish Geodetic Institute field goniospectropolarimeter, reflectance and degree of linear polarization are measured in dark volcanic sand, bright salt (NaCl) and bright ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3); and in mixtures of bright and dark components. We found that the light-scattering response monotonically changes with volume ratio of dark and bright components. In contrast to previous finding, we do not detect an enhancement of the negative polarization amplitude in two-component high-contrast mixtures. Two-component mixtures reveal an inverse correlation between maximum of their linear polarization and reflectance near backscattering, the so-called Umov effect. In log-log scales this inverse correlation takes a linear form for the dark and moderate-dark samples, while for the brightest samples there is a noticeable deviation from the linear trend.

  3. Localized nonequilibrium nanostructures in surface chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, M; Ipsen, M; Mikhailov, A S; Ertl, G [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Nonequilibrium localized stationary structures of submicrometre and nanometre sizes can spontaneously develop under reaction conditions on a catalytic surface. These self-organized structures emerge because of the coupling between the reaction and a structural phase transition in the substrate. Depending on the reaction conditions they can either correspond to densely covered spots (islands), inside which the reaction predominantly proceeds, or local depletions (holes) in a dense adsorbate layer with a very small reactive output in comparison to the surroundings. The stationary localized solutions are constructed using the singular perturbation approximation. These results are compared with numerical simulations, where special adaptive grid algorithms and numerical continuation of stationary profiles are used. Numerical investigations beyond the singular perturbation limit are also presented.

  4. Controls on dissolved organic carbon quantity and chemical character in temperate rivers of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kevin W.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Salisbury, Joseph; Huntington, Thomas; Aiken, George

    2013-04-01

    the processes controlling the transfer and chemical composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems is crucial to understanding the carbon cycle and the effects of DOC on water quality. Previous studies have identified watershed-scale controls on bulk DOC flux and concentration among small basins but fewer studies have explored controls among large basins or simultaneously considered the chemical composition of DOC. Because the chemical character of DOC drives riverine biogeochemical processes such as metabolism and photodegradation, accounting for chemical character in watershed-scale studies will improve the way bulk DOC variability in rivers is interpreted. We analyzed DOC quantity and chemical character near the mouths of 17 large North American rivers, primarily between 2008 and 2010, and identified watershed characteristics that controlled variability. We quantified DOC chemical character using both specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254) and XAD-resin fractionation. Mean DOC concentration ranged from 2.1 to 47 mg C L-1 and mean SUVA254 ranged from 1.3 to 4.7 L mg C-1 m-1. We found a significant positive correlation between basin wetland cover and both bulk DOC concentration (R2 = 0.78; p river systems with long surface water residence times. However, synoptic DOC sampling of both quantity and character throughout river networks will be needed to more rigorously test this finding. The inclusion of DOC chemical character will be vital to achieving a more complete understanding of bulk DOC dynamics in large river systems.

  5. Chemical Reactions in the Processing of Mosi2 + Carbon Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lee, Kang N.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1993-01-01

    Hot-pressing of MoSi2 powders with carbon at high temperatures reduces the siliceous grain boundary phase in the resultant compact. The chemical reactions in this process were examined using the Knudsen cell technique. A 2.3 wt pct oxygen MoSi2 powder and a 0.59 wt pct oxygen MoSi2 powder, both with additions of 2 wt pct carbon, were examined. The reduction of the siliceous grain boundary phase was examined at 1350 K and the resultant P(SiO)/P(CO) ratios interpreted in terms of the SiO(g) and CO(g) isobars on the Si-C-O predominance diagram. The MoSi2 + carbon mixtures were then heated at the hot-pressing temperature of 2100 K. Large weight losses were observed and could be correlated with the formation of a low-melting eutectic and the formation and vaporization of SiC.

  6. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Horizontally Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T. Cole

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor has been developed to synthesis horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes. The width of the aligning sheath was modelled based on a collisionless, quasi-neutral, Child’s law ion sheath where these estimates were empirically validated by direct Langmuir probe measurements, thereby confirming the proposed reactors ability to extend the existing sheath fields by up to 7 mm. A 7 mbar growth atmosphere combined with a 25 W plasma permitted the concurrent growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes with electric fields of the order of 0.04 V μm−1 with linear packing densities of up to ~5 × 104 cm−1. These results open up the potential for multi-directional in situ alignment of carbon nanotubes providing one viable route to the fabrication of many novel optoelectronic devices.

  7. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan;

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...

  8. Analytical evaluation of the solid rocket motor nozzle surface recession by the alumina-carbon reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yutaka; 松川 豊; 佐藤 裕

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the chemical ablation of a solid rocket motor nozzle ablator by the alumina-carbon reaction is presented. An application of it to a typical solid rocket motor with a graphite nozzle ablator indicates a large influence of the reaction on the nozzle surface recession.

  9. Surface Chemical Properties of Colloids in Main Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAYI-JIE; YUANCHAO-LIANG

    1991-01-01

    Surface chemical properties of soil colloids are the important factor affecting soil fertility and genesis.To provide scientific basis for soil genetic classification,promotion of soil fertility and reasonable fertilizqation,the specific surface area and electric charge of soil colloids in relation to clay minerals and organic matter are further discussed on the basis of the results obtained from the studies on surface chemical properties of soil colloids in five main soils of China.Results from the studies show that the effect of clay minerals and organic matter on the surface chemical properties of soil colloids is very complicated because the siloxane surface,hydrated oxide surface and organic matter surface do not exist separately,but they are always mixed together and influenced each other.The understanding of the relationship among clay minerals,organic matter and surface chemical properties of soil colloids depends upon further study of the relevant disciplines of soil science,especially the study on the mechanisms of organo-mineral complexes.

  10. 2011 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Stair

    2011-02-11

    The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is dedicated to promoting and advancing the fundamental science of interfacial chemistry and physics by providing surface scientists with the foremost venue for presentation and discussion of research occurring at the frontiers of their fields.

  11. Improvement on the electrochemical characteristics of graphite anodes by coating of the pyrolytic carbon using tumbling chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical characteristics of graphite coated with pyrolytic carbon materials using tumbling chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process have been studied for the active material of anodes in lithium ion secondary batteries. Coating of pyrolytic carbons on the surface of graphite particles, which tumble in a rotating reactor tube, was performed through the pyrolysis of liquid propane gas (LPG). The surface morphology of these graphite particles coated with pyrolytic carbon has been observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface of graphite particles can well be covered with pyrolytic carbon by tumbling CVD. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image of these carbon particles shows that the core part is highly ordered carbon, while the shell part is disordered carbon. We have found that the new-type carbon obtained from tumbling CVD has a uniform core (graphite)-shell (pyrolytic carbon) structure. The electrochemical property of the new-type carbons has been examined using a charge-discharge cycler. The coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite can effectively reduce the initial irreversible capacity by 47.5%. Cyclability and rate-capability of theses carbons with the core-shell structure are much better than those of bare graphite. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) spectra, it is found that the coating of pyrolytic carbon on the surface of graphite causes the decrease of the contact resistance in the carbon electrodes, which means the formation of solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer is suppressed. We suggest that coating of pyrolytic carbon by the tumbling CVD is an effective method in improving the electrochemical properties of graphite electrodes for lithium ion secondary batteries

  12. Hydrotalcites: a highly efficient ecomaterial for effluent treatment originated from carbon nanotubes chemical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, O. L.; Stéfani, D.; Parizotto, N. V.; Souza Filho, A. G.

    2011-07-01

    It has been reported that a mixture of carboxylated carbonaceous fragments (CCFs), so called oxidation debris, are generated during carbon nanotubes chemical processing using oxidant agents such as HNO3. The elimination of these fragments from carbon nanotubes surface has been point out to be a crucial step for an effective functionalization of the nanotubes as well as for improving the material. However, this process can introduce a potential environmental problem related water contamination because these CCFs can be viewed as a mixture of carbonaceous polyaromatic systems similar to humic substances and dissolved organic matter (DOM). The negative aspects of humic substances and DOM to water quality and wastewater treatment are well known. Since carbon nanotubes industry expands at high rates it is expected that effluent containing oxidation debris will increase since HNO3 chemical processing is the most applied method for purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes. In this work, we have demonstrated that Hydrotalcites (HT) are highly efficient to remove oxidation debris from effluent solution originated from HNO3-treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The strategy presented here is a contribution towards green chemistry practices and life cycle studies in carbon nanotubes field.

  13. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  14. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  15. Chemical changes induced on a TiO{sub 2} surface by electron bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergara, L.I. [Laboratorio de Superficies e Interfaces, Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina); Passeggi, M.C.G. [Laboratorio de Superficies e Interfaces, Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: mpggih@intec.unl.edu.ar; Ferron, J. [Laboratorio de Superficies e Interfaces, Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, (S3000GLN) Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Materiales, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, (S3000AOM) Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2007-09-14

    We study the TiO{sub 2} (Ti{sup 4+}) chemical reduction induced by electron bombardment using Auger electron spectroscopy and factor analysis. We show that the electron irradiation of a TiO{sub 2} sample is characterized by the appearance of a lower Ti oxidation state, Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Ti{sup 3+}), followed by a further deposition of carbon, which is present inevitably in the environment even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The appearance of C over the surface is found to be a complex mechanism which affects the reduction process through passivation of the electron-induced oxygen desorption and formation of titanium carbide. For very high irradiation doses, we also found that the chemical changes on the surface are stopped due to the deposition of carbon in a graphitic form.

  16. Chemical changes induced on a TiO2 surface by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the TiO2 (Ti4+) chemical reduction induced by electron bombardment using Auger electron spectroscopy and factor analysis. We show that the electron irradiation of a TiO2 sample is characterized by the appearance of a lower Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+), followed by a further deposition of carbon, which is present inevitably in the environment even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The appearance of C over the surface is found to be a complex mechanism which affects the reduction process through passivation of the electron-induced oxygen desorption and formation of titanium carbide. For very high irradiation doses, we also found that the chemical changes on the surface are stopped due to the deposition of carbon in a graphitic form

  17. Surface modified carbon nanoparticle papers and applications on polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xilian

    Free-standing paper like materials are usually employed as protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, and electronic or optoelectric components. Free-standing papers made from carbon nanoparticles have drawn increased interest because they have a variety of superior chemical and physical characteristics, such as light weight, high intrinsic mechanical properties, and extraordinary high electrical conductivity. Nanopapers fabricated from 1- D shape carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising reinforcing materials for polymer composites, because the highly porous CNF and CNT nanopapers (porosity ˜80% and ˜70% respectively) can be impregnated with matrix polymers. In the first part of this work, polyaniline (PANI) was used to functionalize the surface of CNFs, and the resultant carbon nanopapers presented impressive mechanical strength and electrical conductivity that it could be used in the in-mold coating (IMC)/ injection molding process to achieve high electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness. Aniline modified (AF) CNT nanopapers were used as a 3D network in gas separation membranes. The resultant composite membranes demonstrated better and stable CO2 permeance and CO 2/H2 selectivity in a high temperature (107°C) and high pressure (15-30 atm) gas separation process, not achievable by conventional polymer membranes. In the second part, we demonstrated that 2-D graphene (GP) or graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could be tightly packed into a film which was impermeable to most gases and liquids. GP or GO nanopapers could be coated on polymer composites. In order to achieve well-dispersed single-layer graphene in aqueous medium, we developed a facile approach to synthesize functional GP bearing benzenesulfonic acid groups which allow the preparation of nanopapers by water based assembly. With the optimized processing conditions, our best GP nanopapers could reach

  18. Characterization of Surface Chemical States of a Thick Insulator: Chemical State Imaging on MgO Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yeonjin; Cho, Sangwan; Noh, Myungkeun; Whang, Chung-Nam; Jeong, Kwangho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2005-02-01

    We report a surface characterization tool that can be effectively used to investigate the chemical state and subtle radiation damage on a thick insulator surface. It has been used to examine the MgO surface of a plasma display panel (PDP) consisting of a stack of insulator layers of approximately 51 μm thickness on a 2-mm-thick glass plate. The scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM) image of the insulating MgO surface was obtained by using the difference in Au 4f peak shift due to the surface charging at each pixel, where a Au adlayer of approximately 15 {\\AA} thickness was formed on the surface to overcome the serious charging shift of the peak position and the spectral deterioration in the photoelectron spectra. The observed contrast in the SPEM image reveals the chemical modification of the underlying MgO surface induced by the plasma discharge damage. The chemical state analysis of the MgO surface was carried out by comparing the Mg 2p, C 1s and O 1s photoemission spectra collected at each pixel of the SPEM image. We assigned four suboxide phases, MgO, MgCO3, Mg(OH)2 and Mg1+, on the initial MgO surface, where the Mg(OH)2 and Mg1+ phases vanished rapidly as the discharge-induced surface damage began.

  19. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  20. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on model carbon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, V.; Lupi, L.; Hudait, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. The origin of the soot and its oxidation and aging modulate its ice nucleation ability, however, it is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature consistent with those of soot in experiments, and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. A characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. We investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism. References: L. Lupi, A. Hudait and V. Molinero, J. Am. Chem. Soc

  1. What are the active carbon species during graphene chemical vapor deposition growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Haibo; Tao, Xiao-Ming; Ding, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The dissociation of carbon feedstock is a crucial step for understanding the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. Using first-principles calculations, we performed a comprehensive theoretical study for the population of various active carbon species, including carbon monomers and various radicals, CHi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4), on four representative transition-metal surfaces, Cu(111), Ni(111), Ir(111) and Rh(111), under different experimental conditions. On the Cu surface, which is less active, the population of CH and C monomers at the subsurface is found to be very high and thus they are the most important precursors for graphene CVD growth. On the Ni surface, which is more active than Cu, C monomers at the subsurface dominate graphene CVD growth under most experimental conditions. In contrast, on the active Ir and Rh surfaces, C monomers on the surfaces are found to be very stable and thus are the main precursors for graphene growth. This study shows that the mechanism of graphene CVD growth depends on the activity of catalyst surfaces and the detailed graphene growth process at the atomic level can be controlled by varying the temperature or partial pressure of hydrogen.

  2. Surface chemistry of metal catalyst under carbon nanotube growth conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Tyson Cody

    The catalyst nanoparticle is critical to the yield, type, and diameter in the growth and nucleation of carbon nanotubes. The objective of this study is focused on determining what changes take place with the catalyst chemistry under growth conditions typically seen in chemical vapor deposition, CVD, experiments. It is well known that catalyst poisoning can occur and in turn effects the catalytic activity of the nanoparticle. A complete description of this mechanism is as of yet undetermined. In order to elucidate this process iron films were deposited onto Si substrates that contained a support layer of Al2O3 or SiO2. These samples were investigated with various surface chemistry techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). In addition, structural characteristics were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface techniques were used in-situ in order to observe chemistries that might not be observable outside a CVD reactor. Two sets of experiments were performed on the silica and alumina supports. The first consisted of carbon nanotube growth at near atmospheric pressure, while the second was performed under vacuum. The oxide support was shown to have an affect on the type of nanotubes grown under identical conditions. The silica support films produced more MWNT, while the alumina support films produced more SWNT. This difference was due to the amount of ripening that takes place on the oxide supports. Also in-situ XPS revealed differences in the chemistry of iron catalyst during growth and these differences were attributed to substrate interactions between alumina and iron. Finally, in-situ XPS analysis showed no evidence of carbides or oxides acting as a catalyst during the nucleation process.

  3. Turbulent Chemical Diffusion in Convectively Bounded Carbon Flames

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot; Bildsten, Lars; Timmes, F X; Burns, Keaton J; Vasil, Geoffrey M; Oishi, Jeffrey S; Brown, Benjamin P

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that mixing induced by convective overshoot can disrupt the inward propagation of carbon deflagrations in super-asymptotic giant branch stars. To test this theory, we study an idealized model of convectively bounded carbon flames with 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the Boussinesq equations using the pseudospectral code Dedalus. Because the flame propagation timescale is $\\sim 10^5$ times longer than the convection timescale, we approximate the flame as fixed in space, and only consider its effects on the buoyancy of the fluid. By evolving a passive scalar field, we derive a turbulent chemical diffusivity produced by the convection as a function of height, $D_t(z)$. Convection can stall a flame if the chemical mixing timescale, set by the turbulent chemical diffusivity, $D_t$, is shorter than the flame propagation timescale, set by the thermal diffusivity, $\\kappa$, i.e., when $D_t>\\kappa$. However, we find $D_t<\\kappa$ for most of the flame because convective plumes are not dense enoug...

  4. Surface properties of activated carbon from different raw materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang XiangLan; Zhang Yan; Liu Qiong; Zhou Wei

    2012-01-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) with different surface properties were prepared from different raw materials.N2 adsorption,pH value,Boehm titration,Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) and FTIR were employed to characterize the pore structure and surface chemical properties of the ACs.The results show that AC from bituminous coal (AC-B) has more meso-pores,higher pH value,more carboxylic groups and basic site than ACs from coconut shell and hawthorn(AC-C,AC-H).Oxygen in the mixture gas has great effect on SO2 catalytic oxidation/oxidation ability of AC-B.In the absence of oxygen,the adsorbed SO2 on AC-B is 0.16 mmol/g and the conversion ratio of adsorbed SO2 to SO3 is 22,07%; while in the presence of oxygen,the adsorbed amount of SO2 is 0.42 mmol/g,and all of the adsorbed SO2 was totally converted to SO3.This feature of AC-B is consistent with its higher pH value,basic site and the reaction ability with H2 from TPR.The conversion ratios of SO2 absorbed on both AC-C and AC-H were 100%,respectively.

  5. Chemical splitting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to enhance electrochemical capacitance for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlu; Li, Tongtao; Zhang, Xinlin; Zhong, Qineng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Jiamu

    2014-06-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were chemically split and self-assembled to a flexible porous paper made of graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs). The morphology and microstructure of the pristine MWCNTs and GONRs were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. And the specific surface area and porosity structure were measured by N2 adsorption-desorption. The longitudinally split MWCNTs show an enhancement in specific capacitance from 21 F g-1 to 156 F g-1 compared with the pristine counterpart at 0.1 A g-1 in a 6 M KOH aqueous electrolytes. The electrochemical experiments prove that the chemical splitting of MWCNTs will make inner carbon layers opened and exposed to electrochemical double layers, which can effectively improve the electrochemical capacitance for supercapacitors.

  6. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savilov, Serguei V., E-mail: savilov@chem.msu.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Desyatov, Andrey V. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (Russian Federation); Hui, Xia [Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology (China); Aldoshin, Serguei M. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Physical and Chemical Engineering (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S{sub BET} values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition.

  7. Chemically and biologically modified activated carbon sorbents for the removal of lead ions from aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Osman, Maher M; Ahmed, Somia B

    2012-01-01

    A method is described for hybridization of the adsorption and biosorption characteristics of chemically treated commercial activated carbon and baker's yeast, respectively, for the formation of environmental friendly multifunctional sorbents. Activated carbon was loaded with baker's yeast after acid-base treatment. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy were used to characterize these sorbents. Moreover, the sorption capabilities for lead (II) ions were evaluated. A value of 90 μmol g(-1) was identified as the maximum sorption capacity of activated carbon. Acid-base treatment of activated carbon was found to double the sorption capacity (140-180 μmol g(-1)). Immobilization of baker's yeast on the surface of activated carbon sorbents was found to further improve the sorption capacity efficiency of lead to 360, 510 and 560 μmol g(-1), respectively. Several important factors such as pH, contact time, sorbent dose, lead concentration and interfering ions were examined. Lead sorption process was studied and evaluated by several adsorption isotherms and found to follow the Langmuir and BET models. The potential applications of various chemically and biologically modified sorbents and biosorbents for removal of lead from real water matrices were also investigated via multistage micro-column technique and the results referred to excellent recovery values of lead (95.0-99.0 ± 3.0-5.0 %).

  8. Surface modification of silica-coated zirconia by chemical treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, Christie Ying Kei, E-mail: yklung@graduate.hku.hk [Dental Materials Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kukk, Edwin, E-mail: ekukk@utu.fi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Turku (Finland); Haegerth, Toni, E-mail: tjhage@utu.fi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Turku (Finland); Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka, E-mail: jpmat@hku.hk [Dental Materials Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-01

    Zirconia surface modification by various chemical treatments after silica coating by sandblasting was investigated in this study. The surface of silica-coated dental zirconia was hydroxylated by treatment with different acids at room temperature for 4 h, rinsed with deionized water and air-dried. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Shifts in binding energies for Zr 3d{sub 5/2} and Si 2p peaks were observed after treatment with acids, thereby showing a change in the chemical states of zirconium and silicon on the surface layer of silica-coated zirconia. The XPS analysis revealed that the silica-coated zirconia (SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) surfaces had changed to hydrous silica-coated zirconia (SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O). One-way ANOVA analysis revealed there was significant difference in both surface roughness parameters of silica-coated zirconia after chemical treatments and the surface topography varied depending on the acid treatment.

  9. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Uspal, W E; Dietrich, S; Tasinkevych, M

    2016-01-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governi...

  10. Influence of feedstock chemical composition on product formation and characteristics derived from the hydrothermal carbonization of mixed feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaowei; Berge, Nicole D

    2014-08-01

    As the exploration of the carbonization of mixed feedstocks continues, there is a distinct need to understand how feedstock chemical composition and structural complexity influence the composition of generated products. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the carbonization of pure compounds, mixtures of the pure compounds, and complex feedstocks comprised of the pure compounds (e.g., paper, wood). Results indicate that feedstock properties do influence carbonization product properties. Carbonization product characteristics were predicted using results from the carbonization of the pure compounds and indicate that recovered solids energy contents are more accurately predicted than solid yields and the carbon mass in each phase, while predictions associated with solids surface functional groups are more difficult to predict using this linear approach. To more accurately predict carbonization products, it may be necessary to account for feedstock structure and/or additional feedstock properties. PMID:24907571

  11. Effects of Temperature on Polymer/Carbon Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfireda, Allison; Lara, Liana; Homer, Margie; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Kisor, Adam; Ryan, Margaret; Zhou, Hanying; Shevade, Abhijit; James, Lim; Manatt, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on the effects of temperature, polymer molecular weight, and carbon loading on the electrical resistances of polymer/carbon-black composite films. The experiment were performed in a continuing effort to develop such films as part of the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose), that would be used to detect, identify, and quantify parts-per-million (ppm) concentration levels of airborne chemicals in the space shuttle/space station environments. The polymers used in this study were three formulations of poly(ethylene oxide) [PEO] that had molecular weights of 20 kilodaltons, 600 kilodaltons, and 1 megadalton, respectively. The results of one set of experiments showed a correlation between the polymer molecular weight and the percolation threshold. In a second set of experiments, differences among the temperature dependences of resistance were observed for different carbon loadings; these differences could be explained by a change in the conduction mechanism. In a third set of experiments, the responses of six different polymer/carbon composite sensors to three analytes (water vapor, methanol, methane) were measured as a function of temperature (28 to 36 C). For a given concentration of each analyte, the response of each sensor decreased with increasing temperature, in a manner different from those of the other sensors.

  12. Band bending and electrical transport at chemically modified silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopinski, Greg; Ward, Tim; Hul'Ko, Oleksa; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2002-03-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and electrical transport measurements have been used to investigate how various chemical modifications give rise to band bending and alter the conductivity of Si(111) surfaces. HREELS is a sensitive probe of band bending through observations of the low frequency free carrier plasmon mode. For hydrogen terminated surfaces, prepared by the standard etch in ammonium flouride, HREELS measurements on both n and n+ substrates are consistent with nearly flat bands. Chlorination of these surfaces results in substantial upward band bending due to the strong electron withdrawing nature of the chlorine, driving the surface into inversion. The presence of this inversion layer on high resistivity n-type samples is observed through a substantial enhancement of the surface conductivity (relative to the H-terminated surface), as well as through broadening of the quasi-elastic peak in the HREELS measurements. We have also begun to examine organically modified silicon surfaces, prepared by various wet chemical reactions with the H-terminated surface. Decyl modified Si(111) surfaces are seen to exhibit a small degree of band bending, attributed to extrinsic defect states cause by a small degree of oxidation accompanying the modification reaction. The prospects of using conductivity as an in-situ monitor of the rate of these reactions will be discussed.

  13. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively.

  14. Doping level influence on chemical surface of diamond electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, A. F.; Baldan, M. R.; Ferreira, N. G.

    2013-04-01

    The modification of surface bond termination promoted by the doping level on diamond electrodes is analyzed. The films were prepared by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique using the standard mixture of H2/CH4 with an extra H2 flux passing through a bubbler containing different concentrations of B2O3 dissolved in methanol. Diamond morphology and quality were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy techniques while the changes in film surfaces were analyzed by contact angle, cyclic voltammetry and synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The boron-doped diamond (BDD) films hydrophobicity, reversibility, and work potential window characteristics were related to their physical properties and chemical surface, as a function of the doping level. From the Mott-Schottky plots (MSP) and XPS analyzes, for the lightly (1018 cm-3) and highly (1020 cm-3) BDD films, the relationship between the BDD electrochemical responses and their surface bond terminations is discussed.

  15. Carbon impurities on graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Jinglei; Fuhrer, Michael S., E-mail: michael.fuhrer@monash.edu [Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111, USA and School of Physics, Monash University, 3800 Victoria (Australia)

    2014-07-28

    We report nanocrystalline carbon impurities coexisting with graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on platinum. For certain growth conditions, we observe micron-size island-like impurity layers which can be mistaken for second graphene layers in optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The island orientation depends on the crystalline orientation of the Pt, as shown by electron backscatter diffraction, indicating growth of carbon at the platinum surface below graphene. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy indicates that in addition to uniform single-crystal graphene, our sample is decorated with nanocrystalline carbon impurities with a spatially inhomogeneous distribution. The impurity concentration can be reduced significantly by lowering the growth temperature. Raman spectra show a large D peak, however, electrical characterization shows high mobility (∼8000 cm{sup 2}/Vs), indicating a limitation for Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic quality of graphene.

  16. Electrocatalysis of chemically synthesized noble metal nanoparticles on carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ling; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs), such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) NPs are promising catalysts for dioxygen reduction and oxidation of molecules such as formic acid and ethanol in fuel cells. Carbon nanomaterials are ideal supporting materials for electrochemical catalysts due to their good...... conductivity, chemical inertness and low cost. Improvement of catalytic efficiency and stability of the NPs is, however, essential for their wider applications in electrochemical energy conversion/storage. The activities of noble metal catalysts depend not only on their size, composition, and shapes but also...

  17. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  18. Synthesis and chemical modification of carbon nanostructures for materials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Amanda Lynn

    This dissertation explores the structure, chemical reactivities, electromagnetic response, and materials properties of various carbon nanostructures, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphite, and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Efficient production and modification of these unique structures, each with their own distinct properties, will make them more accessible for applications in electronics, materials, and biology. A method is reported for controlling the permittivity from 1--1000 MHz of SWCNT-polymer composites (0.5 wt%) for radio frequency applications including passive RF antenna structures and EMI shielding. The magnitude of the real permittivity varied between 20 and 3.3, decreasing as higher fractions of functionalized-SWCNTs were added. The microwave absorbing properties and subsequent heating of carbon nanotubes were used to rapidly cure ceramic composites. With less than 1 wt% carbon nanotube additives and 30--40 W of directed microwave power (2.45 GHz), bulk composite samples reached temperatures above 500°C within 1 min. Graphite oxide (GO) polymer nanocomposites were developed at 1, 5, and 10 wt% for the purpose of evaluating the flammability reduction and materials properties of the resulting systems. Microscale oxygen consumption calorimetry revealed that addition of GO reduced the total heat release in all systems, and GO-polycarbonate composites demonstrated very fast self-extinguishing times in vertical open flame tests. A simple solution-based oxidative process using potassium permanganate in sulfuric acid was developed for producing nearly 100% yield of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by lengthwise cutting and unraveling of MWCNT sidewalls. Subsequent chemical reduction of the GNRs resulted in restoration of electrical conductivity. The GNR synthetic conditions were investigated in further depth, and an improved method which utilized a two-acid reaction medium was found to produce GNRs with

  19. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 x 1017 and 5 x 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 deg. C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  20. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, M.; Román, R.; Maffiotte, C.; González-Casablanca, J.; Perez, R.; Hole, D.

    2009-05-01

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 °C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  1. Surface Modification of Nitinol by Chemical and Electrochemical Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhendi; Wei, Xiaojin; Cao, Peng; Gao, Wei

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, Nitinol, an equiatomic binary alloy of nickel and titanium, was surface modified for its potential biomedical applications by chemical and electrochemical etching. The main objective of the surface modification is to reduce the nickel content on the surface of Nitinol and simultaneously to a rough surface microstructure. As a result, better biocompatibility and better cell attachment would be achieved. The effect of the etching parameters was investigated, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). The corrosion property of modified Nitinol surfaces was investigated by electrochemical work station. After etching, the Ni content in the surface layer has been reduced and the oxidation of Ti has been enhanced.

  2. Chemical treatment of zinc surface and its corrosion inhibition studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Rajappa; T V Venkatesha; B M Praveen

    2008-02-01

    The surface treatment of zinc and its corrosion inhibition was studied using a product (BTSC) formed in the reaction between benzaldehyde and thiosemicarbozide. The corrosion behaviour of chemically treated zinc surface was investigated in aqueous chloride–sulphate medium using galvanostatic polarization technique. Zinc samples treated in BTSC solution exhibited good corrosion resistance. The measured electrochemical data indicated a basic modification of the cathode reaction during corrosion of treated zinc. The corrosion protection may be explained on the basis of adsorption and formation of BTSC film on zinc surface. The film was binding strongly to the metal surface through nitrogen and sulphur atoms of the product. The formation of film on the zinc surface was established by surface analysis techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM–EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  3. Plasmon-mediated chemical surface functionalization at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Mai; Lamouri, Aazdine; Salameh, Chrystelle; Lévi, Georges; Grand, Johan; Boubekeur-Lecaque, Leïla; Mangeney, Claire; Félidj, Nordin

    2016-04-28

    Controlling the surface grafting of species at the nanoscale remains a major challenge, likely to generate many opportunities in materials science. In this work, we propose an original strategy for chemical surface functionalization at the nanoscale, taking advantage of localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitation. The surface functionalization is demonstrated through aryl film grafting (derived from a diazonium salt), covalently bonded at the surface of gold lithographic nanostripes. The aryl film is specifically grafted in areas of maximum near field enhancement, as confirmed by numerical calculation based on the discrete dipole approximation method. The energy of the incident light and the LSP wavelength are shown to be crucial parameters to monitor the aryl film thickness of up to ∼30 nm. This robust and versatile strategy opens up exciting prospects for the nanoscale confinement of functional layers on surfaces, which should be particularly interesting for molecular sensing or nanooptics.

  4. Simulating the Formation of Carbon-rich Molecules on an idealised Graphitic Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, David W

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the presence of complex molecules, including carbon-bearing and organic molecules, in the interstellar medium. Much of this evidence comes to us from studies of chemical composition, photo- and mass-spectroscopy in cometary, meteoritic and asteroid samples, indicating a need to better understand the surface chemistry of astrophysical objects. There is also considerable interest in the origins of life-forming and life-sustaining molecules on Earth. Here, we perform reactive molecular dynamics simulations to probe the formation of carbon-rich molecules and clusters on carbonaceous surfaces resembling dust grains and meteoroids. Our results show that large chains form on graphitic surfaces at low temperatures (100K - 500K) and smaller fullerene-like molecules form at higher temperatures (2000K - 3000K). The formation is faster on the surface than in the gas at low temperatures but slower at high temperatures as surface interactions prevent small clusters from coagulation. We fi...

  5. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, M; Dulieu, F

    2014-07-01

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O2) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N2 on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  6. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  7. Structural and surface features of multiwall carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hembram, K.P.S.S., E-mail: hembram@isu.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore, 560064 (India); Rao, G. Mohan [Department of Instrumentation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India)

    2011-04-15

    We present the direct evidence of defective and disorder places on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), visualizing the presence of amorphous carbon at those sites. These defective surfaces being higher in energy are the key features of functionalization with different materials. The interaction of the {pi} orbital electrons of different carbon atoms of adjacent layers is more at the bent portion, than that of regular portion of the CNT. Hence the tubular structure of the bent portion of nanotubes is spaced more than that of regular portion of the nanotubes, minimizing the stress.

  8. Structural and surface features of multiwall carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Rao, G. Mohan

    2011-04-01

    We present the direct evidence of defective and disorder places on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), visualizing the presence of amorphous carbon at those sites. These defective surfaces being higher in energy are the key features of functionalization with different materials. The interaction of the π orbital electrons of different carbon atoms of adjacent layers is more at the bent portion, than that of regular portion of the CNT. Hence the tubular structure of the bent portion of nanotubes is spaced more than that of regular portion of the nanotubes, minimizing the stress.

  9. Local Chemical Reactivity of a Metal Alloy Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Scheffler, Matthias

    1995-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of a metal alloy surface is studied by density functional theory investigating the interaction of H2 with NiAl(110). The energy barrier for H2 dissociation is largely different over the Al and Ni sites without, however, reflecting the barriers over the single component metal...

  10. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M. [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O. [M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 2 Tereshchenkivska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Puziy, A.M., E-mail: alexander.puziy@ispe.kiev.ua [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 Degree-Sign C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S{sub BET} = 2081 m{sup 2}/g, V{sub tot} = 1.1 cm{sup 3}/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  11. Chemical erosion of carbon at ITER relevant plasma fluxes: Results from the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, G. J.; Westerhout, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Rapp, J.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical erosion of carbon was investigated in the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI for ITER divertor relevant hydrogen plasma flux densities 10(23) < Gamma < 10(25) m(-2) s(-1). The erosion was analyzed in situ by optical emission spectroscopy and post mortem by surface profilometry. The ex

  12. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  13. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7–8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π–π electron donor–acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion

  14. Effect of nanoporous carbon surface chemistry on the removal of endocrine disruptors from water phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Carla B; Seredych, Mykola; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Nascimento, Ronaldo F; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2015-07-01

    Wood-based activated carbon and its sulfur-doped counterpart were used as adsorbents of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDC) from aqueous solution. Adsorption process was carried out in dynamic conditions and Thomas model was used to predict the performance of the column. The results showed a good fitting of the theoretical curve to the experimental data. S-doped carbon exhibited a higher adsorption capacity of trimethoprim (TMP) and smaller of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and diclofenac (DCF) in comparison with the carbon with no sulfur incorporated into the matrix. The surface features of the initial carbons and those exposed to EDC were evaluated in order to derive the adsorption mechanism and elucidate the role of surface features. An increase in the amount of TMP from a low concentration solution (10 mg/L) on sulfur-doped carbon was linked to acid-base interactions and the reactive adsorption/oxidation of TMP. A decrease in SMX and DCF after sulfur doping was explained by a considerable increase in surface hydrophobicity, which does not favor the retention of polar DCF and SMX molecules. When the adsorption was measured from a high concentration solution at equilibrium conditions at the dark or under solar light irradiation different trends in the adsorption capacities were found. This was linked to the photoactivity of carbons and the degradation of EDC in the pore system promoted by visible light followed by the adsorption of the products of surface reactions. PMID:25527089

  15. Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser irradiation on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Enrique Vigueras; López, Susana Hernández; Camacho López, Marco A.; Contreras, Delfino Reyes; Farías-Mancilla, Rurik; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G.; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A.; Zaragoza-Contreras, E. Armando

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the nanosecond (Nd: YAG-1064 nm) laser pulse effect on the optical and morphological properties of chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Two suspensions of MWCNT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were prepared, one was submitted to laser pulses for 10 min while the other (blank) was only mechanically homogenized during the same time. Following the laser irradiation, the suspension acquired a yellow-amber color, in contrast to the black translucent appearance of the blank. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed this observation, showing the blank a higher absorption. Additionally, photoluminescence measurements exhibited a broad blue-green emission band both in the blank and irradiated suspension when excited at 369 nm, showing the blank a lower intensity. However, a modification in the excitation wavelength produced a violet to green tuning in the irradiated suspension, which did not occur in the blank. Lastly, the electron microscopy analysis of the treated nanotubes showed the abundant formation of amorphous carbon, nanocages, and nanotube unzipping, exhibiting the intense surface modification produced by the laser pulse. Nanotube surface modification and the coexistence with the new carbon nanostructures were considered as the conductive conditions for optical properties modification.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of carbon migration in W1-1.0C steel in plasma surface chromizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    W1-1.0C steel was chromized at 1173 K with double glow plasma surface alloying process, and the distribution of Fe, Cr,and C contents in the chromized layer was measured using glow discharge spectrum analysis (GDA).The behavior and mechanism of carbon migration during the formation of chromized layer were studied through thermodynamic analysis and calculation.The gradient of carbon chemical potential was regarded as the driving force of carbon migration.An equation was derived to describe the carbon content varying with the chromium content within the carbon-rich region.The calculated results from the equation approximated closely to the experimental ones.

  17. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M.; Bondarev, Igor V.

    2011-11-15

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  18. Chemical and carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, R.; Wassenaar, L.I.; Spiker, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantage of a combined use of chemical and isotopic tools to understand the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycle in a regional confined methanogenic aquifer. DOC concentration and carbon isotopic data demonstrate that the soil zone is a primary carbon source of groundwater DOC in areas close to recharge zones. An in-situ DOC source linked to organic rich sediments present in the aquifer matrix is controlling the DOC pool in the central part of the groundwater flow system. DOC fractions, 13C-NMR on fulvic acids and 14C data on DOC and CH4 support the hypothesis that the in-situ DOC source is a terrestrial organic matter and discard the Ordovician bedrock as a source of DOC. ?? 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  19. Surface characterisation of carbon fibre recycled using fluidised bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, G.; Pickering, S. J.; Walker, G. S.; Wong, K. H.; Rudd, C. D.

    2008-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the surface of carbon fibres recycled using a high-temperature fluidised bed. The interfacial shear strength of the recycled carbon fibres with epoxy resin was examined using a micro-droplet test. The corresponding as received carbon fibres were used as control samples. It was shown that the recycling process converted some of the surface hydroxyl groups into carbonyl and carboxylic groups due to the effect of heat in atmosphere of air. The overall O/C ratio was not changed significantly. The interfacial shear strength with epoxy resin was not affected by the change of surface oxygen composition. It was also shown that surface texture may play a dominant role in interfacial bonding performance.

  20. Chemically Conjugated Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene for Carrier Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Kang; Kim, Soo Min; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-03-15

    Nanocarbons such as fullerene and carbon nanotubes (CNT) in late 20th century have blossomed nanoscience and nanotechnology in 21st century, which have been further proliferated by the new finding of graphene and have indeed opened a new carbon era. Several new branches of research, for example, zero-dimensional nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanowires, and two-dimensional insulating hexagonal boron nitride, and semiconducting and metallic transition metal dichalcogenides including the recently emerging black phosphorus, have been explored and numerous unprecedented quantum mechanical features have been revealed, that have been hardly accessible otherwise. Extensive research has been done on devices and applications related to such materials. Many experimental instruments have been developed with high sensitivity and improved spatial and temporal resolution to detect such tiny objects. The need for multidisciplinary research has been growing stronger than ever, which will be the tradition in the next few decades. In this Account, we will demonstrate an example of multidisciplinary effort of utilizing CNTs and graphene for electronics by modulating electronic structures. While there are several methods of modifying electronic structures of nanocarbons such as gate bias, contact metal, and conventional substitutional doping, we focus on chemical doping approaches here. We first introduce the concept of chemical doping on CNTs and graphene in terms of electronegativity of molecules and electrochemical potential of CNTs and graphene. To understand the relationship of electrochemical potential of CNTs and graphene to electronegativity of molecules, we propose a simple water bucket model: how to fill or drain water (electrons in CNTs or graphene) in the bucket (density of states) by the chemical dopants. The doping concept is then demonstrated experimentally by tracking the absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

  1. Scaling and Removal of Calcium Carbonate on Electroless Plating Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The scaling process of calcium carbonate on a low-energy heat transfer surface-electroless plating surface was investigated in a simulated cooling water system. Owing to the very low surface energy, the electroless plating surface exhibited less scaling susceptibility. A longer induction period and a lower scaling rate were obtained on the low-energy surface compared to copper surface under identical conditions. The calcite particles obtained on the electroless plating surface during the induction period were larger in size than those on copper surface because fewer crystals formed and grew at the same time on the low-energy surface. With increasing surface temperature, the induction period reduced and the scaling rate increased for the low-energy surface. When initial surface temperature was fixed, an increase in fluid velocity would reduce the induction period and increase the scaling rate due to the diffusion effect. However, when the heat flux was fixed, an increase in fluid velocity would decrease the surface temperature, and lead to a longer induction period and a lower scaling rate. The removal experiments of calcium carbonate scale indicated that during post induction period, the detachment was not obvious, while during the induction period, apparent removal of crystal particles was obtained on the electroless plating surface owing to the weak adhesion force. The more frequently the transient high hydrodynamic force acted, the more the detached crystal particles were.

  2. Scanning Auger and XPS studies of fracture surfaces of B4C hot pressed with excess carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of boron carbide materials was hot pressed with 0-7% excess carbon. The strength of each material was determined by four point bending, and found to decrease from about 600 MPa to 300 MPa as the carbon content increased from 0% to 7%. Diamond indentation yielded hardness values that decreased from 28.3 to 25.0 GPa and toughness values that increased over the same carbon range. Each sample was fractured in situ in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and examined by scanning Auger microanalysis (SAM) and XPS to determine both the elemental and chemical state distributions. For the samples with excess carbon, localized carbon rich regions are observed on fracture surfaces by SAM. XPS reveals a 50% enhancement of excess carbon on the fracture surface compared to the bulk for the sample with 7% excess carbon

  3. Chemical properties of surface peat on forest land in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kõlli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical properties of surface peat cover (SPC were studied in the context of Estonian pedoecological conditions. SPC comprises the superficial layers of fens (Group 1 and transitional bogs (Group 2, together with slightly acid peaty mull / strongly acid peaty moder (Group 3 and very strongly acid peaty mor (Group 4 layers overlying mineral soils. Thus, it spans organic soils, namely Histosols (Groups 1 and 2; together with Histic Gleysols (Group 3 and Histic Podzols (Group 4, which are developmentally intermediate between organic and mineral soils. Moderately acid eutrophic (Group 1 and very strongly acid mesotrophic (Group 2 peats (forest litter layers excluded were uniformly characterised up to 40 cm depth; whereas for Groups 3 and 4 we examined the full thickness of available peat layers, which ranged from 10 to 30 cm. The results show that Al, K and heavy metal contents are significantly higher and organic carbon content is lower in Histic Soils (3, 4 than in Histosols (1, 2. The amounts of Ca, Mg, Mn and Fe are significantly higher and C:N ratio, exchangeable acidity and content of free H+ lower in less acidic (1, 3 than in more acidic (2, 4 soil types. The total concentration of elements (excluding heavy metals extracted by nitro-hydrochloric acid (aqua regia is considerably higher in less acidic soils, at 28–45 g kg-1 (1, 3 versus 10–12 g kg-1 (2, 4; and mean contents of individual elements decrease in the order Ca(51% > Fe(20% > S(10% ≥ Al(10% > Mg(3% ≥ P(3% > K(2% > Mn(1% > Na(<1%. The most abundant heavy metals are Pb (12–33 mg kg-1, Zn (7–41 mg kg-1, Cu (3–12 mg kg-1, Cr (2–23 mg kg-1 and Ni (2–8 mg kg-1; Cd and Hg contents are very low, ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 mg kg-1. The dominant exchangeable basic cations are Ca2+ (78–93% and Mg2+ (7–15%, and the peat contains much smaller amounts of K+ (1–6% and Na+ (<2%. The total exchangeable acidic cations (1–14 cmol kg-1 are dominated by H+ (51–83% and Al3

  4. Direct measurement of surface carbon concentrations. [in lunar soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filleux, C.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of surface concentrations of carbon in lunar soils and soil breccias provide information on the origin of carbon in the regolith. The reaction C-12 (d, p sub zero) is used to measure 'surface' and 'volume' concentrations in lunar samples. This method has a depth resolution of 1 micron, which permits only a 'surface' and a 'volume' component to be measured. Three of four Apollo 16 double drive tube samples show a surface carbon concentration of about 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm, whereas the fourth sample gave 4 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. It can be convincingly shown that the measured concentration does not originate from fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon contaminants. Surface adsorbed layers of CO or CO2 are removed by a sputter cleaning procedure using a 2-MeV F beam. It is shown that the residual C concentration of 8 by 10 to the 14th power/sq cm cannot be further reduced by increased F fluence, and it is therefore concluded that it is truly lunar. If one assumes that the measured surface C concentration is a steady-state concentration determined only by a balance between solar-wind implantation and sputtering, a sputter erosion rate of 0.1 A/yr is obtained. However, it would be more profitable to use an independently derived sputter erosion rate to test the hypothesis of a solar-wind origin of the surface carbon.

  5. Surface selective membranes for carbon dioxide separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.; Myers, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    In this study, hybrid membranes have been developed for the selective separation of CO2 from mixtures containing H2. Beginning with commercially available Pall alumina membrane tubes with nominal pore diameter of 5 nm, hybrids were produced by silation with a variety of functionalities designed to facilitate the selective adsorption of CO2 onto the pore surface. The goal is to produce a membrane which can harness the power of surface diffusion to give the selectivity of polymer membranes with the permeance of inorganic membranes.

  6. Tailoring the Surface Chemistry of Zeolite Templated Carbon by Electrochemical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Berenguer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One option to optimize carbon materials forsupercapacitor applications is the generation ofsurface functional groups that contribute to thepseudocapacitance without losing the designedphysical properties. This requires suitablefunctionalization techniques able to selectivelyintroduce a given amount of electroactive oxygengroups. In this work, the influence of the chemical andelectrochemical oxidation methods, on the chemicaland physical properties of a zeolite templated carbon(ZTC, as a model carbon material, have beenstudied and compared. Although both oxidationmethods generally produce a loss of the originalZTC physical properties with increasing amount ofoxidation, the electrochemical method shows muchbetter controllability and, unlike chemical treatments,enables the generation of a large number of oxygengroups (O = 11000- 3300 μmol/g, with a higherproportion of active functionalities, while retaining ahigh surface area (ranging between 1900-3500 m2/g,a high microporosity and an ordered 3-D structure.

  7. Surface chemical composition of human maxillary first premolar as assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface chemical composition of dental enamel has been postulated as a contributing factor in the variation of bond strength of brackets bonded to teeth, and hence, the probability of bracket failure during orthodontic treatment. This study systematically investigated the chemical composition of 98 bonding surfaces of human maxillary premolars using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to ascertain compositional differences between right and left first premolars. The major elements detected in all samples were calcium, phosphorus, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. Surface compositions were highly variable between samples and several elements were found to be highly correlated. No statistical significant difference in the chemical composition of the maxillary right and left first premolars was found (p > 0.05). Knowledge of the chemical composition of enamel surfaces will facilitate future studies that relate this information to the variations in dental enamel bond strength

  8. Chemical Reactions and Kinetics of the Carbon Monoxide Coupling in the Presence of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fandong Meng; Genhui Xu; Zhenhua Li; Pa Du

    2002-01-01

    The chemical reactions and kinetics of the catalytic coupling reaction of carbon monoxide to diethyl oxalate were studied in the presence of hydrogen over a supported palladium catalyst in the gaseous phase at the typical coupling reaction conditions. The experiments were performed in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that hydrogen only reacts with ethyl nitrite to form ethanol, and kinetic studies revealed that the rate-determining step is the surface reaction of adsorbed hydrogen and the ethoxy radical (EtO-). A kinetic model is proposed and a comparison of the observed and calculated conversions showed that the rate expressions are of rather high confidence.

  9. Simulating the formation of carbon-rich molecules on an idealized graphitic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David W.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the presence of complex molecules, including carbon-bearing and organic molecules, in the interstellar medium. Much of this evidence comes to us from studies of chemical composition, photo- and mass spectroscopy in cometary, meteoritic and asteroid samples, indicating a need to better understand the surface chemistry of astrophysical objects. There is also considerable interest in the origins of life-forming and life-sustaining molecules on the Earth. Here, we perform reactive molecular dynamics simulations to probe the formation of carbon-rich molecules and clusters on carbonaceous surfaces resembling dust grains and meteoroids. Our results show that large chains form on graphitic surfaces at low temperatures (100-500 K) and smaller fullerene-like molecules form at higher temperatures (2000-3000 K). The formation is faster on the surface than in the gas at low temperatures but slower at high temperatures as surface interactions prevent small clusters from coagulation. We find that for efficient formation of molecular complexity, mobility about the surface is important and helps to build larger carbon chains on the surface than in the gas phase at low temperatures. Finally, we show that the temperature of the surface strongly determines what kind of structures forms and that low turbulent environments are needed for efficient formation.

  10. Surface modification on PMMA : PVDF polyblend: hardening under chemical environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bajpai; V Mishra; Pragyesh Agrawal; S C Datt

    2002-02-01

    The influence of chemical environment on polymers include the surface alteration as well as other deep modifications in surface layers. The surface hardening, as an effect of organic liquids on poly(methyl methacrylate): poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PMMA: PVDF), which is one of the few known miscible blends, has been detected using microhardness testing. Organic liquids like acetone, toluene, xylene and benzene were introduced on the surface of blend specimens for different durations. Vickers microhardness (v) was measured for treated and untreated specimens. The study reveals both hardening and plasticization of specimens at different exposure times. The degree of surface hardening is maximum under acetone treatment. All the specimens exhibit surface hardening at an exposure time of 1 h with all the four liquids. This feature is prominent with longer exposures for specimens with increasing content of PVDF. However, the degree of hardening decreases with the time of exposure in the respective environments. In general, acetone and toluene impart surface hardening, whereas, xylene and benzene soften the specimen. PMMA: PVDF (83 : 17) blend exhibits surface hardening under all the four treatments when compared with the respective untreated specimens.

  11. Surface structure and optical property of amorphous carbon nanotubes hybridized with cadmium selenide quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kim Han, E-mail: kimhan8419@gmail.com; Johan, Mohd Rafie [University of Malaya, Nanomaterials Engineering Research Group, Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Malaysia)

    2013-09-15

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes ({alpha}-CNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at low temperature. The as-synthesized {alpha}-CNTs were then hybridized with cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) through a simple chemical process. Raman spectra reveal the amorphous nature of the {alpha}-CNTs surface. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the amorphous phase of carbon and the formation of CdSe QDs crystalline phase. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM) indicate that the successfully formed hybridized {alpha}-CNTs-CdSe QDs possess an average outer diameter in the range of 110-130 nm. The CdSe QDs fall in the size range of 15-40 nm. UV-visible spectroscopy showed quantum confinement effect due to the attachment of CdSe QDs on the surface of {alpha}-CNTs.

  12. Limiting factors for carbon based chemical double layer capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M. Frank; Johnson, C.; Owens, T.; Stevens, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Chemical Double Layer (CDL) capacitor improves energy storage density dramatically when compared with conventional electrolytic capacitors. When compared to batteries, the CDL Capacitor is much less energy dense; however, the power density is orders of magnitude better. As a result, CDL-battery combinations present an interesting pulse power system with many potential applications. Due to the nature of the CDL it is inherently a low voltage device. The applications of the CDL can be tailored to auxiliary energy and burst mode storages which require fast charge/discharge cycles. Typical of the applications envisioned are power system backup, directed energy weapons concepts, electric automobiles, and electric actuators. In this paper, we will discuss some of the general characteristics of carbon-based CDL technology describing the structure, performance parameters, and methods of construction. Further, analytical and experimental results which define the state of the art are presented and described in terms of impact on applications.

  13. Inhibition effect of phosphorus-based chemicals on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhanhui; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) could supply a viable alternative water resource for cooling water systems. Inorganic salts in the concentrated cooling water pose a great challenge to corrosion control chemicals. In this study, the inhibition effect of 1-hydroxy ethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) and 2-phosphonobutane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (PBTCA) on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary-treated MWW was investigated by the means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition effect increased with increasing concentration of inhibitors. The corrosion rates of carbon steel were 1.5, 0.8, 0.2 and 0.5 mm a(-1) for blank, HEDP, ATMP and PBTCA samples at 50 mg L(-1), respectively. The phosphorus-based chemicals could adsorb onto the surface of the carbon steel electrode, form a coat of protective film and then protect the carbon steel from corrosion in the test solution.

  14. Raman spectra of electrochemically hydrogenated diamond like carbon surface

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Hari Shankar; Datta, Jagannath; Sen, Pintu; Ghosh, Uday Chand; Ray, Nihar Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to distinguish between the Raman spectrum of pristine hydrogenated diamond like carbon (PHDLC) and that of electrochemically hydrogenated diamond like carbon (ECHDLC). The enhancement of the background photoluminescence (PL) in the Raman spectrum and broadening of PL spectrum of ECHDLC are identified to be due to increase of sp3 C-H density onto the PHDLC surface, during novel electrochemical process of hydrogenation of sp2 C=C into sp3 C-H.

  15. Surface nanosegregation of the chemical composition of complex oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of theoretical and experimental studies in the field of surface nanosegregation of chemical composition of oxides SrTiO3, LiNbO3, LiTaO3, Gd2(MoO4)3, KNbO3, PbFe0.5Nb0.5O3, induced by temperature and other factors, is provided. Results of experimental studies of the relevant oxide monocrystals by the methods of electron spectrometry and model presentations suggest diffusion mechanism of segregation. It proved possible to predict the character of changes in surface composition of the oxides on the basis of the models considered

  16. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  17. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Binbin; Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-01

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl2 using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl2 at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of -SO3H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N2 adsorption-desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of -SO3H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of -SO3H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and -SO3H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles.

  18. A major biopolymeric component to dissolved organic carbon in surface sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Repeta, Daniel J.; Chen, Robert F.

    1997-05-01

    Organic carbon dissolved in sea water is an important component of the global carbon cycle1. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean's surface mixed layer are at least twice those in the deep sea2,3, because of the production of soluble carbon compounds by marine algae in the euphotic zone4,5. But very little is known about the chemical composition of DOC, and the connection between photosynthetic production and DOC accumulation is not well understood6,7. Here we report the chemical characterization of macromolecular DOC at several sites in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Neutral sugars, acetate and lipids show similar distributions, suggesting that these constituents are linked together in a common macromolecular structure. Chemical linkage patterns between the oligosaccharide portions of dissolved organic matter subjected to ultrafiltration are highly specific, with little variation between ocean basins. We show that laboratory culture experiments on the decomposition of algal exudate produce macromolecular organic matter with similar compositions and linkage characteristics. We propose that a significant fraction of DOC in sea surface water consists of structurally related and biosynthetically derived acyl oligosaccharides that persist after more labile organic matter has been degraded.

  19. Surface charging, discharging and chemical modification at a sliding contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Kusano, Yukihiro; Morgen, Per;

    2012-01-01

    -ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experiments were performed on the disk surface of a ball-on-rotating-disk apparatus; using a glass disk and a Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) ball arrangement, and a polyester disks and a diamondlike carbon (DLC) coated steel ball arrangement. The capacitive probe...... is designed to perform highly resolved measurements, which is sensitive to relative change in charge density on the probed surface. For glass and Teflon arrangement, electrical measurements show that the ball track acquires non-uniform charging. Here not only the increase in charge density, but interestingly...... are also able to comment on the behavior and the charge decay time in the ambient air-like condition, once the sliding contact is discontinued. XPS analysis showed a marginal deoxidation effect on the polyester disks due to the charging and discharging of the surfaces. Moreover, these XPS results clearly...

  20. Surface chemical modification for exceptional wear life of MEMS materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. Arvind; Satyanarayana, N.; Sinha, Sujeet Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) are built at micro/nano-scales. At these scales, the interfacial forces are extremely strong. These forces adversely affect the smooth operation and cause wear resulting in the drastic reduction in wear life (useful operating lifetime) of actuator-based devices. In this paper, we present a surface chemical modification method that reduces friction and significantly extends the wear life of the two most popular MEMS structural materials namely, silicon and SU-8 polymer. The method includes surface chemical treatment using ethanolamine-sodium phosphate buffer, followed by coating of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) nanolubricant on (i) silicon coated with SU-8 thin films (500 nm) and (ii) MEMS process treated SU-8 thick films (50 μm). After the surface chemical modification, it was observed that the steady-state coefficient of friction of the materials reduced by 4 to 5 times and simultaneously their wear durability increased by more than three orders of magnitude (> 1000 times). The significant reduction in the friction coefficients is due to the lubrication effect of PFPE nanolubricant, while the exceptional increase in their wear life is attributed to the bonding between the -OH functional group of ethanolamine treated SU-8 thin/thick films and the -OH functional group of PFPE. The surface chemical modification method acts as a common route to enhance the performance of both silicon and SU-8 polymer. It is time-effective (process time ≤ 11 min), cost-effective and can be readily integrated into MEMS fabrication/assembly processes. It can also work for any kind of structural material from which the miniaturized devices are/can be made.

  1. Surface chemical modification for exceptional wear life of MEMS materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arvind Singh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS are built at micro/nano-scales. At these scales, the interfacial forces are extremely strong. These forces adversely affect the smooth operation and cause wear resulting in the drastic reduction in wear life (useful operating lifetime of actuator-based devices. In this paper, we present a surface chemical modification method that reduces friction and significantly extends the wear life of the two most popular MEMS structural materials namely, silicon and SU-8 polymer. The method includes surface chemical treatment using ethanolamine-sodium phosphate buffer, followed by coating of perfluoropolyether (PFPE nanolubricant on (i silicon coated with SU-8 thin films (500 nm and (ii MEMS process treated SU-8 thick films (50 μm. After the surface chemical modification, it was observed that the steady-state coefficient of friction of the materials reduced by 4 to 5 times and simultaneously their wear durability increased by more than three orders of magnitude (> 1000 times. The significant reduction in the friction coefficients is due to the lubrication effect of PFPE nanolubricant, while the exceptional increase in their wear life is attributed to the bonding between the -OH functional group of ethanolamine treated SU-8 thin/thick films and the -OH functional group of PFPE. The surface chemical modification method acts as a common route to enhance the performance of both silicon and SU-8 polymer. It is time-effective (process time ≤ 11 min, cost-effective and can be readily integrated into MEMS fabrication/assembly processes. It can also work for any kind of structural material from which the miniaturized devices are/can be made.

  2. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Minissale

    2014-01-01

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O$_2$) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80 $\\%$ at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-...

  3. Chemical composition and surface charge properties of montmorillonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-wen; HU Min; HU Yue-hua

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the cell parameter and chemical composition on the surface charge properties of five kinds of different colour montmorillonites were studied. The results indicate that the surface isoelectric point(IEP) of the montmorillonite shows positive correlation with the mass fractions of Fe2O3 and K20, but it has little relation to the mass fractions of other chemical compositions. At around pH=6.8, the surface zeta potential of the montmorillonite shows the negative relationship with the mass fractions of Fe2O3 and MgO, but it does not linearly correlate to the mass fractions of other chemical compositions. Cell parameter(b0) of the montmofillonite expresses negative linear relationship with mass fractions of K2O and Na2O, so does c0sinβ with mass fractions of SiO2 and Fe2O3. And there is no specific relationship between bo and IEP of different montmori Uonites, but there is positive correlation between c0sinβ and IEP of different montmorillonite samples.

  4. In-situ observations of catalyst dynamics during surface-bound carbon nanotube nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Du, G;

    2007-01-01

    We present atomic-scale, video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy and in situ time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of surface-bound catalytic chemical vapor deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. We observe that transition metal catalyst...... nanoparticles on SiOx support show crystalline lattice fringe contrast and high deformability before and during nanotube formation. A single-walled carbon nanotube nucleates by lift-off of a carbon cap. Cap stabilization and nanotube growth involve the dynamic reshaping of the catalyst nanocrystal itself....... For a carbon nanofiber, the graphene layer stacking is determined by the successive elongation and contraction of the catalyst nanoparticle at its tip....

  5. Method for in-situ cleaning of carbon contaminated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Grunow, Philip; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2006-12-12

    Activated gaseous species generated adjacent a carbon contaminated surface affords in-situ cleaning. A device for removing carbon contamination from a surface of the substrate includes (a) a housing defining a vacuum chamber in which the substrate is located; (b) a source of gaseous species; and (c) a source of electrons that are emitted to activate the gaseous species into activated gaseous species. The source of electrons preferably includes (i) a filament made of a material that generates thermionic electron emissions; (ii) a source of energy that is connected to the filament; and (iii) an electrode to which the emitted electrons are attracted. The device is particularly suited for photolithography systems with optic surfaces, e.g., mirrors, that are otherwise inaccessible unless the system is dismantled. A method of removing carbon contaminants from a substrate surface that is housed within a vacuum chamber is also disclosed. The method employs activated gaseous species that react with the carbon contaminants to form carbon containing gaseous byproducts.

  6. The Mechanism of Surface Chemical Kinetics of Dissolution of Minerals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭凯旋; 张哲儒; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the mechanism of dissolution reaction kinetics of minerals in aqueous solution based on the theory of surface chemistry.Surface chemical catalysis would lead to an obvous decrease in active energy of dissolution reaction of minerals.The dissolution rate of minerals is controlled by suface adsorption,surface exchange reaction and desorption,depending on pH of the solution and is directly proportional to δHn0+,When controlled by surface adsorption,i.e.,nθ=1,the dissolution rate will decrease with increasing pH;when controlled by surface exchane reaction,i.e.,nθ=0,the dissolution rate is independent of pH;when controlled by desorption,nθis a positive decimal between 0 and 1 in acidic solution and a negative decimal between-1 and 0 in alkaline solution.Dissolution of many minerals is controlled by surface adsorption and/or surface exchange reactions under acid conditions and by desorption under alkaline conditions.

  7. Chemical surface modification of glass beads for the treatment of paper machine process waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jradi, Khalil, E-mail: khalil.jradi@uqtr.c [Centre de Recherche en Pates et Papiers, Universite du Quebec a Trois Rivieres, 3351 boul. des forges, C.P. 500, Trois Rivieres, QC, G9A-5H7 (Canada); Daneault, Claude [Canada Research Chair in Value-Added Paper Manufacturing (Canada); Chabot, Bruno [Centre de Recherche en Pates et Papiers, Universite du Quebec a Trois Rivieres, 3351 boul. des forges, C.P. 500, Trois Rivieres, QC, G9A-5H7 (Canada)

    2011-04-29

    Adsorption of detrimental contaminants on a solid sorbent is proposed to remove these contaminants from process waters to increase water recycling and reduce effluent loads in the papermaking industry. A self-assembly process of attaching (covalent grafting) cationic aminosilane molecules to glass beads was investigated. The existence and the hydrolytic stability of self-assembled monolayers and multilayers were confirmed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Effects of reaction time and curing on aminosilane layer structures are also discussed. The curing step after silanization seems to be crucial in the hydrophobization of the quaternary ammonium silane coated onto glass beads, and curing could affect the final chemical structure of the ammonium groups of grafted organosilane. Results indicated that modified glass beads have a strong hydrophobicity, which is attributed to the hydrophobic property of the longest carbon chain grafted onto the glass surface. Adsorption of a model contaminant (stearic acid) onto chemically modified glass beads was determined using colloidal titration. Hydrophobic interactions could be the main driving force involved between the long carbon chains of stearic acid and the carbon chains of the aminosilane layers on glass bead surfaces. Finally, self-assembly processes applied onto glass beads may have two promising applications for papermaking and self-cleaning systems.

  8. Chemical surface modification of glass beads for the treatment of paper machine process waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption of detrimental contaminants on a solid sorbent is proposed to remove these contaminants from process waters to increase water recycling and reduce effluent loads in the papermaking industry. A self-assembly process of attaching (covalent grafting) cationic aminosilane molecules to glass beads was investigated. The existence and the hydrolytic stability of self-assembled monolayers and multilayers were confirmed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Effects of reaction time and curing on aminosilane layer structures are also discussed. The curing step after silanization seems to be crucial in the hydrophobization of the quaternary ammonium silane coated onto glass beads, and curing could affect the final chemical structure of the ammonium groups of grafted organosilane. Results indicated that modified glass beads have a strong hydrophobicity, which is attributed to the hydrophobic property of the longest carbon chain grafted onto the glass surface. Adsorption of a model contaminant (stearic acid) onto chemically modified glass beads was determined using colloidal titration. Hydrophobic interactions could be the main driving force involved between the long carbon chains of stearic acid and the carbon chains of the aminosilane layers on glass bead surfaces. Finally, self-assembly processes applied onto glass beads may have two promising applications for papermaking and self-cleaning systems.

  9. Physico-chemical characterization of powdered activated carbons obtained by thermo-chemical conversion of brown municipal waste

    OpenAIRE

    Momčilović Milan Z.; Purenović Milovan M.; Miljković Milena N.; Bojić Aleksandar Lj.; Zarubica Aleksandra R.; Ranđelović Marjan S.

    2011-01-01

    Cones of the European Black pine and Horse chestnut kernel, regarded as brown municipal waste, was utilized in this work as a precursor for powdered activated carbons. Chemical activation was employed at 500°C in inert atmosphere of nitrogen. Standard physico-chemical analyses were performed to examine obtained products. FTIR method was employed to determine fuctional groups which were found to be typical for activated carbons. Acidic oxygen groups were quantitatively determined using B...

  10. Growth processes and surface properties of diamondlike carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we compare the deposition processes and surface properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films from filtered pulsed cathodic arc discharge (PCAD) and hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-plasma source ion implantation. The ion energy distributions (IEDs) of filtered-PCAD at various filter inductances and Ar gas pressures were measured using an ion energy analyzer. The IEDs of the carbon species in the absence of background gas and at low gas pressures are well fitted by shifted Maxwellian distributions. Film hardness and surface properties show a clear dependence on the IEDs. ta-C films with surface roughness at an atomic level and thin (0.3-0.9 nm) graphitelike layers at the film surfaces were deposited at various filter inductances in the highly ionized plasmas with the full width at half maximum ion energy distributions of 9-16 eV. The a-C:H films deposited at higher H/C ratios of reactive gases were covered with hydrogen and sp3 bonded carbon-enriched layers due to the simultaneous interaction of hydrocarbon species and atomic hydrogen. The effects of deposited species and ion energies on film surface properties were analyzed. Some carbon species have insufficient energies to break the delocalized π(nC) bonds at the graphitelike film surface, and they can govern film formation via surface diffusion and coalescence of nuclei. Dangling bonds created by atomic hydrogen lead to uniform chemisorption of hydrocarbon species from the ECR plasmas. The deposition processes of ta-C and a-C:H films are discussed on the basis of the experimental results

  11. Morphological forms of carbon and their utilizations at formation of iron casting surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jelínek

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Model pyrolysis made possible to identify three solid products of carbonaceous additives. Lustrous carbon is the most important form of the pyrolysis carbon. With its structure and physical and chemical properties it comes near to graphite. Amorphous carbon with turbo-stratic lattice, higher oxireactivity, and lower protective function against liquid metal comes near to carbon black. Semicoke also plays a non-negligible role. All forms of carbon have an important representation in oolitized quartz grain also during forming the casting surface. While amorphous carbon is formed directly from the gaseous phase by homogeneous nucleation, lustrous carbon, with regard to similarity of lattices with quartz, is formed by heterogeneous nucleation on grains. High covering power and low oxireactivity give its highest protecting power of the mould face. New experimental equipment made possible to check a possibility of use of new composite bentonite binders containing „process carbon“(graphite, anthracite, amorphous carbon. The BTEX content in exhalations and in waste sands too was considerably decreased with high smoothness of castings.

  12. Surface characterization of silver and palladium modified glassy carbon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aleksandra A Perić-Grujić; Olivera M Nešković; Miomir V Veljković; Zoran V Laušević; Mila D Laušević

    2007-12-01

    In this work, the influence of silver and palladium on the surface of undoped, boron doped and phosphorus doped glassy carbon has been studied. The silver and palladium concentrations in solution, after metal deposition, were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The morphology of metal coatings was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. In order to investigate the nature and thermal stability of surface oxygen groups, temperature-programmed desorption method combined with mass spectrometric analyses, was performed. The results obtained have shown that silver and palladium spontaneously deposit from their salt solutions at the surface of glassy carbon samples. Silver deposits have dendrite structure, whilst palladium forms separate clusters. The highest amount of both silver and palladium deposits at the surface of sample containing the highest quantity of surface oxide complexes. It has been concluded that carboxyl groups and structure defects are responsible for metal reduction. Calculated desorption energies have shown that the surface modification by metal deposition leads to the formation of more stable surface of undoped and doped glassy carbon samples.

  13. Chemical components andmicrotopography of (100) surface for orthopyroxene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    XPS and AES depth composition profile studies were carried on to understand chemical components of (100) surfaces for Chengde hypersthene from Hebei Province, China, and Bamble enstatite from Norway. Also, to understand the microtopography of them the AFM observation was carried on. There are obvious differences between chemical components of (100) surface and those of mineral inner. Compared with inner mineral Si4+ proportion in total cations has no distinguished variation, whereas Ca2+ and Al3+ proportions increase respectively, and Mg2+ proportion decreases. AES depth composition profile of 2000s shows that at a depth of 70 nm the atomic concentrations (%) for each element (except Si in Chengde hypersthene) slightly go up and down, but the average values have no obvious change. On the profile, the atomic concentrations (%) of Al and Si for Chengde hypersthene present a compensated relationship. Obviously, the Si and Al must have the relationship of isomorphic replacement on the (100) surface. The image of AFM shows that there is hillock growth on the (100) surface in the layered form of the polygon with 0 to several hundreds nm in thickness. The growth is a sort of secondary phyllosilicate minerals. The observation of the above-mentioned phenomenon and the recognition on the above regularities are benefit for understanding of the mechanism for weathering and water-rock reactions.

  14. CO2 adsorption on chemically modified activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Burcu Selen; Aksoylu, A Erhan

    2013-05-15

    CO2 adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon was improved by using HNO3 oxidation, air oxidation, alkali impregnation and heat treatment under helium gas atmosphere. The surface functional groups produced were investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were determined by gravimetric analyses for 25-200°C temperature range. DRIFTS studies revealed the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the HNO3 oxidized adsorbents. Increased aromatization and uniform distribution of the Na particles were observed on the samples prepared by Na2CO3 impregnation onto HNO3 oxidized AC support. The adsorption capacities of the nonimpregnated samples were increased by high temperature helium treatments or by increasing the adsorption temperature; both leading to decomposition of surface oxygen groups, forming sites that can easily adsorb CO2. The adsorption capacity loss due to cyclic adsorption/desorption procedures was overcome with further surface stabilization of Na2CO3 modified samples with high temperature He treatments. With Na2CO3 impregnation the mass uptakes of the adsorbents at 20 bars and 25 °C were improved by 8 and 7 folds and at 1 bar were increased 15 and 16 folds, on the average, compared to their air oxidized and nitric acid oxidized supports, respectively. PMID:23500788

  15. Limnological characteristics of Northern and Central Yakutian lakes (Siberia) – Physical and chemical properties of surface sediments and water samples

    OpenAIRE

    Kausche, Moritz

    2008-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of surface sediments and waters of 65 lakes in Northern and Central Yakutia were analysed. The studies included hydrochemical analyses as well as sedimentological, organic and inorganic geochemical analyses, the analysis of stable carbon isotope ratios and the analysis of magnetic susceptibilities. The objectives of this work were a) to characterise Yakutian lakes by their waters and surface sediments. Additionally, the geographical setting, i.e. the clima...

  16. Intracellular degradation of chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes using a long-term primary microglial culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy, Cyrill; Hadad, Caroline; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-12-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) have been used in proof-of-concept studies to alleviate debilitating neurological conditions. Previous in vivo observations in brain tissue have suggested that microglia - acting as resident macrophages of the brain - play a critical role in the internalization of f-CNTs and their partial in situ biodegradation following a stereotactic administration in the cortex. At the same time, several reports have indicated that immune cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils and even macrophages could participate in the processing of carbon nanomaterials via oxidation processes leading to degradation, with surface properties acting as modulators of CNT biodegradability. In this study we questioned whether degradability of f-CNTs within microglia could be modulated depending on the type of surface functionalization used. We investigated the kinetics of degradation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) functionalized via different chemical strategies that were internalized within isolated primary microglia over three months. A cellular model of rat primary microglia that can be maintained in cell culture for a long period of time was first developed. The Raman structural signature of the internalized f-CNTs was then studied directly in cells over a period of up to three months, following a single exposure to a non-cytotoxic concentration of three different f-CNTs (carboxylated, aminated and both carboxylated and aminated). Structural modifications suggesting partial but continuous degradation were observed for all nanotubes irrespective of their surface functionalization. Carboxylation was shown to promote more pronounced structural changes inside microglia over the first two weeks of the study.Chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) have been used in proof-of-concept studies to alleviate debilitating neurological conditions. Previous in vivo observations in brain tissue have suggested that microglia - acting as

  17. Resonant photoactivation of cadmium sulfide and its effect on the surface chemical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, Alessio; Fabbri, Barbara; Gaiardo, Andrea; Guidi, Vincenzo; Malagù, Cesare

    2014-06-01

    Photo-enhanced surface chemical activity of cadmium sulfide gives rise to a wide class of surface-dependent phenomena, such as heterogeneous photocatalysis, chemoresistivity, and chemiluminescence, which have several technological and scientific applications. In this work, the photochemical properties of nanostructured cadmium sulfide films are investigated by means of electrical conductance measurements in controlled atmosphere, while irradiated by light of wavelengths ranging from 400 to 645 nm. Chemisorption of benzene, carbon monoxide, methane, ethanol, and hydrogen sulfide onto CdS surface has been analyzed as a function of the wavelength, in a gas concentration range of the order of parts per million. It resulted that the increase of photoconductance with gas adsorption is resonant with the bandgap energy. It turns out that this resonant enhancement of the surface chemical activity can be of advantage for all the optical and chemical mechanisms that depend upon it. An interpretation of these results, in terms of electronic optical transitions and Fermi level shift induced by light, is proposed.

  18. Droplet condensation on chemically homogeneous and heterogeneous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Amir; Moosavi, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nucleation and growth of condensing droplets on horizontal surfaces are investigated via a 2-D double distribution function thermal lattice Boltzmann method. First, condensation on completely uniform surface is investigated and different mechanisms which cause dropwise and filmwise condensation are studied. The results reveal the presence of cooled vapor layer instability in the condensation on completely smooth surfaces. In the second step, condensation on chemically heterogeneous surfaces is investigated. Moreover, the effect of non-uniformity in the surface temperature is also studied. The results indicate that the vapor layer instability and the nucleation start from the heterogeneities. The effects of different numbers of heterogeneities, their distance, and hydrophobicity on the condensation are also inspected. It is shown that by increasing the hydrophobicity of the heterogeneities and considering an optimum space between the heterogeneities, maximum condensation performance can be achieved. Finally, condensation on wettability gradient surfaces is studied and the effects of the gradient form and contact angle of the core region on the condensation are studied. It is shown that hydrophobicity of the core region plays a key role in increasing the condensation performance. A heat transfer analysis and flow dynamics of dropwise condensation as a function of time is also presented and it is shown that the results are in good agreements with the previous theoretical and experimental results.

  19. Chemically Modified Ordered Mesoporous Carbon/Polyaniline Composites for Electrochemical Capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Ling-bin; ZHANG Jing; CAI Jian-jun; YANG Zhen-sheng; LUO Yong-chun; KANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Chemically modified ordered mesoporous carbon CMK-3 materials were prepared by means of an easy wet-oxidative method in 2 mol/L nitric acid aqueous solution. A large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups were introduced onto the CMK-3 surface. Modified CMK-3(m-CMK-3) and aniline monomer were polymerized via an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization method. Morphological characterizations of m-CMK-3/PANI (polyaniline) composites were carried out via field emission scanning electron microscopy(SEM). Their electrochemical properties were investigated with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The m-CMK-3/PANI composites have excellent properties in capacitance, and the highest specific capacitance(SC) value was up to 489 F/g, suggesting their potential application in the electrode material for electrochemical capacitors.

  20. Fiber Optic Chemical Nanosensors Based on Engineered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Consales

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, a review of the development of high-performance optochemical nanosensors based on the integration of carbon nanotubes with the optical fiber technology is presented. The paper first provide an overview of the amazing features of carbon nanotubes and their exploitation as highly adsorbent nanoscale materials for gas sensing applications. Successively, the attention is focused on the operating principle, fabrication, and characterization of fiber optic chemosensors in the Fabry-Perot type reflectometric configuration, realized by means of the deposition of a thin layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs upon the distal end of standard silica optical fibers. This is followed by an extensive review of the excellent sensing capabilities of the realized SWCNTs-based chemical nanosensors against volatile organic compounds and other pollutants in different environments (air and water and operating conditions (room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The experimental results reported here reveal that ppm and sub-ppm chemical detection limits, low response times, as well as fast and complete recovery of the sensor responses have been obtained in most of the investigated cases. This evidences the great potentialities of the proposed photonic nanosensors based on SWCNTs to be successfully employed for practical environmental monitoring applications both in liquid and vapor phase as well as for space. Furthermore, the use of novel SWCNTs-based composites as sensitive fiber coatings is proposed to enhance the sensing performance and to improve the adhesion of carbon nanotubes to the fiber surface. Finally, new advanced sensing configurations based on the use of hollow-core optical fibers coated and partially filled by carbon nanotubes are also presented.

  1. An operando surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) study of carbon deposition on SOFC anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Lee, Jung-pil; Ding, Dong; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Park, Soojin; Liu, Meilin

    2015-09-01

    Thermally robust and chemically inert Ag@SiO2 nanoprobes are employed to provide the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect for an in situ/operando study of the early stage of carbon deposition on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The enhanced sensitivity to carbon enables the detection of different stages of coking, offering insights into intrinsic coking tolerance of material surfaces. Application of a thin coating of gadolinium doped ceria (GDC) enhances the resistance to coking of nickel surfaces. The electrochemically active Ni-YSZ interface appears to be more active for hydrocarbon reforming, resulting in the accumulation of different hydrocarbon molecules, which can be readily removed upon the application of an anodic current. Operando SERS is a powerful tool for the mechanistic study of coking in SOFC systems. It is also applicable to the study of other catalytic and electrochemical processes in a wide range of conditions. PMID:25599129

  2. Surface modification of carbon fibers and its effect on the fiber–matrix interaction of UHMWPE based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukov, D.I., E-mail: dil_chukov@yahoo.com; Stepashkin, A.A.; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Both chemical and thermal treatments of UKN 5000 carbon fibers allow one to obtain well-developed surface. • The changes of structure and properties of VMN-4 fibers after both thermal and chemical oxidation are insignificant due to more perfect initial structure of these fibers. • The oxidative treatment of carbon fibers allows one to improve the interfacial interaction in the UHMWPE-based composites. • The oxidative treatment of the fibers allows one to a triple increase of Young’s modulus of the modified fibers reinforced UHMWPE composites. -- Abstract: The PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were subjected to thermal and chemical oxidation under various conditions. The variation in the surface morphology of carbon fibers after surface treatment was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the tensile strength of carbon fibers changed after surface modification. The interaction between the fibers and the matrix OF ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was characterized by the Young modulus of produced composites. It was shown that the Young modulus of composites reinforced with modified carbon fibers was significantly higher than that of composites reinforced with non-modified fibers.

  3. Surface Carbonization of Mo-La2O3 Cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The carbonized structures of Mo-La2O3 cathode specimens have been investigated by means of FE SEM and XRD, respectively. The substructure of carbonized layer in the Mo-La2O3 cathode has been found for the first time. The results showed that the carbonized layer with uniform Mo2C was helpful to emission,while the demixing carbonized layer with a compact MoC outside layer was harmful to emission. The uniform Mo2C layer consists of coarse particles with lots of grain boundary crevices as well as holes arranging perpendic ular to the wire axle and up to surface, which was beneficial to the migration of activated rare-earth in activa tion and operating.

  4. Surface modification of commercial tin coatings by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L.J.; Sood, D.K.; Manory, R.R. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Commercial TiN coatings of about 2 {mu}m thickness on high speed steel substrates were implanted at room temperature with 95 keV carbon ions at nominal doses between 1 x 10{sup 17} - 8x10{sup 17} ions cm{sup -2}. Carbon ion implantation induced a significant improvement in ultramicrohardness, friction coefficient and wear properties. The surface microhardness increases monotonically by up to 115% until a critical dose is reached. Beyond this dose the hardness decreases, but remains higher than that of unimplanted sample. A lower friction coefficient and a longer transition period towards a steady state condition were obtained by carbon ion implantation. The changes in tribomechanical properties are discussed in terms of radiation damage and possible formation of a second phase rich in carbon. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Deposition of carbon nanotubes onto aramid fibers using as-received and chemically modified fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Uicab, O.; Avilés, F.; Gonzalez-Chi, P. I.; Canché-Escamilla, G.; Duarte-Aranda, S.; Yazdani-Pedram, M.; Toro, P.; Gamboa, F.; Mazo, M. A.; Nistal, A.; Rubio, J.

    2016-11-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) oxidized by an acid treatment were deposited on the surface of as-received commercial aramid fibers containing a surface coating ("sizing"), and fibers modified by either a chlorosulfonic treatment or a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acids. The surface of the aramid fiber activated by the chemical treatments presents increasing density of CO, COOH and OH functional groups. However, these chemical treatments reduced the tensile mechanical properties of the fibers, especially when the nitric and sulfuric acid mixture was used. Characterization of the MWCNTs deposited on the fiber surface was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy mapping and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These characterizations showed higher areal concentration and more homogeneous distribution of MWCNTs over the aramid fibers for as-received fibers and for those modified with chlorosulfonic acid, suggesting the existence of interaction between the oxidized MWCNTs and the fiber coating. The electrical resistance of the MWCNT-modified aramid yarns comprising ∼1000 individual fibers was in the order of MΩ/cm, which renders multifunctional properties.

  6. Inhibition of surface bound carbonate stabilization of tetragonal zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard; Almdal, Kristoffer; Lelieveld, A. van

    2011-01-01

    and water in order to increase the transformation rate in the zirconia crystals. It was found possible to limit the reaction by reacting the surface carbonates with alcohols, a thiol and a primary amide prior to reaction with water. It was also concluded that di- and trialcohols are able to stabilize...

  7. Surface modification of oil fly ash and its application in selective capturing of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaumi, Ali L.; Hussien, Ibnelwaleed A.; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    2013-02-01

    Oil fly ash from power generation plants was activated with 30% NH4OH and used for selective adsorption of carbon dioxide from CO2/N2 mixture. The treated samples were characterized for their surface area, morphology, crystalline phase, chemical composition and surface functional groups. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis showed an increase in the carbon contents from 45 to 73 wt% as a result of leaching out metal oxides. XRD proved that chemical activation of ash resulted in diminishing of major crystalline phases of zeolite, and other alumino-silicates leaving only quartz and mullite. BET analysis showed an increase in surface area from 59 to 318 m2/g after chemical activation and the pore volume increased from 0.0368 to 0.679 cm3/g. This increase in pore volume is supported by the results of SEM, where more micropores were opened with well-defined particle sizes and porous structure. The TGA of the treated fly ash showed stability at higher temperature as the weight loss decreased with increasing temperature. For treated ash, the FTIR displayed new peaks of amine functional group. The treated ash was used for the removal of CO2 from CO2/N2 mixture and the maximum adsorption/capturing capacity was found to be 240 mg/g. This capacity increases with increase in initial gas concentration, inlet flow rate and temperature suggesting the endothermic nature of the interaction between the gas molecules and the surface of the ash.

  8. Adsorption of ciprofloxacin on surface-modified carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabineiro, S A C; Thavorn-Amornsri, T; Pereira, M F R; Figueiredo, J L

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption capacity of ciprofloxacin (CPX) was determined on three types of carbon-based materials: activated carbon (commercial sample), carbon nanotubes (commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes) and carbon xerogel (prepared by the resorcinol/formaldehyde approach at pH 6.0). These materials were used as received/prepared and functionalised through oxidation with nitric acid. The oxidised materials were then heat treated under inert atmosphere (N2) at different temperatures (between 350 and 900°C). The obtained samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -196 °C, determination of the point of zero charge and by temperature programmed desorption. High adsorption capacities ranging from approximately 60 to 300 mgCPxgC(-1) were obtained (for oxidised carbon xerogel, and oxidised thermally treated activated carbon Norit ROX 8.0, respectively). In general, it was found that the nitric acid treatment of samples has a detrimental effect in adsorption capacity, whereas thermal treatments, especially at 900 °C after oxidation, enhance adsorption performance. This is due to the positive effect of the surface basicity. The kinetic curves obtained were fitted using 1st or 2nd order models, and the Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the equilibrium isotherms obtained. The 2nd order and the Langmuir models, respectively, were shown to present the best fittings.

  9. An AES and LEED study of carbon and oxygen sorption on copper surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Oda, O.; Hanekamp, L.J.; Bootsma, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The sorption of carbon and oxygen on cooper surfaces has been studied by AES and LEED. The carbon coverage has been estimated by measuring the substrate Auger peak attenuation upon changing the carbon coverage and by studying the coadsorption of oxygen and carbon on the surface. The effect of carbon on the background of derivative spectra is also reported.

  10. Release of Crude Oil from Silica and Calcium Carbonate Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Wei; Stenby, Erling Halfdan;

    2016-01-01

    on the bare surfaces, surfaces with an adsorbed oil layer, and surfaces after being exposed to aqueous salt solutions. This showed that the silica surface became more hydrophobic after oil adsorption, while the wettability of the calcium carbonate surface was not significantly changed by adsorption of an oil...... oil was investigated by exposing the surfaces with an adsorbed oil layer to a series of NaCl and CaCl2 solutions of decreasing salt concentrations. Here, it was found that the oil release from silica was achieved only by injections of low-salinity solutions, and it is suggested that this observation...... or reduction in ion bridging in the presence of high-salinity NaCl, while the low-salinity effect again was attributed to an expansion of the electrical double layer....

  11. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katerina ZAHARIEVA; Gheorghi VISSOKOV; Janis GRABIS; Slavcho RAKOVSKY

    2012-01-01

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, car- bides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis.

  12. Carbon-13 magnetic resonance chemical shift additivity relationships of clinically used furocoumarins and furchromones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of various clinically used furocoumarins and furochromones have been studied. The assignments of carbon chemical shift values were based on the theory of chemical shift, additivity rules, SFORD spectra and model compounds. (author)

  13. The energetic and chemical fingerprints of persistent soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Pierre; Plante, Alain F.; Cécillon, Lauric; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Baudin, François; Bernard, Sylvain; Christensen, Bent T.; Fernandez, Jose M.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Le Guillou, Corentin; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of soil organic carbon (SOC) persistence is needed to better predict SOC vulnerability to global change. The absence of convincing physical or chemical procedures to define, characterize or isolate relatively labile versus persistent SOC pools makes the study of persistent SOC difficult. Long-term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments, in which C inputs have been stopped for several decades, provide a unique opportunity to study persistent SOC without the inherent artefacts induced by extraction procedures, the hypothesis being that SOC is gradually enriched in persistent C with time as labile components decompose. We determined the evolution of thermal and chemical characteristics of bulk SOC in five LTBF experiments across Europe: Askov (DK), Grignon (FR), Rothamsted (UK), Ultuna (SW) and Versailles (FR), using a multi-technique approach involving Rock-Eval pyrolysis, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRIFT-MIRS), and Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). Results of Rock-Eval and TG analyses showed that the temperature needed to combust the SOC increased with bare fallow duration at all sites. Conversely, SOC energy density (in mJ mg-1 C) measured by DSC decreased with bare fallow duration. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results showed that hydrogen index (HI) tended to decrease with bare fallow duration whereas the oxygen index (OI) did not show consistent trends across sites. NEXAFS signals presented little differences and were dominated by carboxyl peak. Nonetheless, NEXAFS results showed a trend of increasing carboxyl groups and decreasing ketone and amide groups with bare fallow duration. Due to the mineral matrix, only a reduced part of the DRIFT-MIRS signals has been used. We observed that the bulk chemistry of aliphatic SOC (CH3 vs. CH2 functional groups) showed different trends for the different sites. Our results showed that in spite of the heterogeneity of

  14. Hierarchical Porous and High Surface Area Tubular Carbon as Dye Adsorbent and Capacitor Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Ji, Tuo; Brisbin, Logan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2015-06-10

    Hierarchically porous tubular carbon (HPTC) with large surface area of 1094 m(2)/g has been successfully synthesized by selectively removing lignin from natural wood. No templates or chemicals are involved during the process. By further KOH activation, surface area of activated HPTC reaches up to 2925 m(2)/g. These materials show unprecedented high adsorption capacity toward organic dyes (methylene blue, 838 mg/g; methyl orange, 264 mg/g) and large electrochemical capacitance of >200 F/g. The sustainable feature of the wood precursor and demonstrated superior adsorption and energy storage properties allow promising applications of the processed materials in energy and environmental related fields. PMID:25980528

  15. Carbon compounds in the atmosphere and their chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Martišová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The essay dissert on compounds of carbon in the atmosphere and its reaction. The most important are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane. Included among important compounds of carbon are volatile organic substances, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and dioxin. Carbon dioxide and methane representing greenhouse gases have also indispensable meaning. As they, together with water vapour, nitrogen monoxide and other gases are causing the major part of greenhouse effect. Primarily because of...

  16. Can environmental conditions trigger cyanobacterial surfaces and following carbonate formation: implication for biomineralization and biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, C.; Dittrich, M.; Zhu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview what kind of the factors may trigger carbonate formations at the cell surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. As examples, we will present the results from our recent studies on formation of calcium carbonates, dolomites and bio-cements. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the Synechococcuscell envelope are recognized key players in the nucleation of carbonates in marine and freshwater environments. Yet, little is known about a nutrient contents control over the molecular composition of Synechococcus cell envelope, and consequently, biomineralization. In the first study, we investigated how a variation of the phosphorus (P) in the growth media can lead to changes in the surface reactivity of the cells and impact their ability to form carbonates. The objective of the second study is to gain insights into the spatial distribution of cyanobacterial EPS and dolomite from different sediment layers of Khor Al-Adaid sabkha (Qatar). Here, we characterized microbial mats on molecular level in respect of organic and inorganic components using in-situ 2D Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used. Additionally, 2D chemical maps of sediment layers documented spectral characterizations of minerals and organic matter of microbial origins at high spatial resolution. Finally, we will show the results from the experiments with auto-phototrophic cyanobacteria Gloeocapsa PCC73106, which habitat on the monument surfaces, towards its application for bio-concrete, a product of microbial carbonate precipitation. We studied the biomineralization in biofilm forming Gloeocapsa PCC73106 on the concrete surface as a pre-requirement for microbial carbonate precipitation. Biomineralization on the concrete surface by live cells and killed cells were compared with that under the abiotic condition. Our experiments allow us to conclude that environmental conditions play a significant role in the control of

  17. Effect of chemical potential on the computer simulation of hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hong; WANG Shaoqing; CHENG Huiming

    2004-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo molecular simulations were carried out for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that variations in chemical potential may result in a great change in the hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms of single-walled carbon nanotubes at 298.15 K were calculated using a modified chemical potential, and the result obtained is closer to the experimental results. By comparing the experimental and simulation results, it is proposed that chemical adsorption may exist for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy study of metallic nanocluster arrangement at the surface of reactively sputtered amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the results of the arrangement of isolated surface metallic nanoclusters embedded in amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thin films, studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. As a model system we used gold-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Au), due to the lack of reactivity between carbon and gold. The a-C:H/Au samples are obtained by simultaneous magnetron sputtering of Au target by argon and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of methane. Photoelectron spectroscopy with x-ray and ultraviolet excitation has been employed for surface studies that comprise as-deposited sample spectra recordings, measurements at off-normal takeoff angle, in situ in-depth profiling by Ar+ ion etching, and thiophene adsorption at the sample surface. The results of these extended studies firmly support previously drawn conclusions [I. R. Videnovic, V. Thommen, P. Oelhafen, D. Mathys, M. Dueggelin, and R. Guggenheim, Appl. Phys. Lett 80, 2863 (2002)] that by deposition on electrically grounded substrates one obtains samples with topmost Au clusters covered with a thin layer of a-C:H. Introducing a dc substrate bias voltage results in bald Au clusters on the surface and increased sp2/sp3 coordinated carbon ratio in the a-C:H matrix

  19. Role of the surface chemistry of activated carbons in dye removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua-lei; Zhen, Wen-juan; Zhu, Qian; Wu, Xiao-bin; Chang, Zhi-dong; Li, Wen-jun

    2015-07-01

    Commercial activated carbons were modified by a series of chemical or physical treatments using H2O2, NH3, and heating under N2 flow without notably changing their pore structures. The resultant carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and Bohem titration and then used to remove Ponceau 4R, methyl orange and brilliant blue from aqueous solutions. Surface chemistry was found to play a significantly different role in removing these three compounds. The removal of anionic Ponceau 4R increases with increasing carbon surface basicity due to the predominant dispersive interaction mechanism. In contrast, surface chemistry has little effect on the removal of anionic methyl orange, which can be explained by two parallel mechanisms involving electrostatic and dispersive interactions due to the basic amine group in a dye molecule. The influence of surface chemistry on the removal of amphoteric brilliant blue dye can also be ignored due to a weak interaction between the carbons and dye molecules, which is resulted from strong cohesive energy from electrostatic forces inside amphoteric dye molecules.

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of carbon fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Michelsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    /O2 and Ar plasma treatments, mainly attributed to an increase in the density of the C-O single bond at the carbon fibre surfaces. The O/C ratio increased to 0.182 after 1-s He plasma treatment, and remained approximately constant after longer treatment. After exposure in an ambient air at room...... temperature for a month the O/C ratio at the plasma treated surfaces decreased to 0.151, which is close to that of the untreated ones. It can be attributed to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contamination at the plasma treated surfaces....

  1. Calibration of carbonate composition using micro-Raman analysis: application to planetary surface exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rividi, Nicolas; van Zuilen, Mark; Philippot, Pascal; Ménez, Bénédicte; Godard, Gaston; Poidatz, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Stromatolite structures in Early Archean carbonate deposits form an important clue for the existence of life in the earliest part of Earth's history. Since Mars is thought to have had similar environmental conditions early in its history, the question arises as to whether such stromatolite structures also evolved there. Here, we explore the capability of Raman spectroscopy to make semiquantitative estimates of solid solutions in the Ca-Mg-Fe(+Mn) carbonate system, and we assess its use as a rover-based technique for stromatolite characterization during future Mars missions. Raman microspectroscopy analysis was performed on a set of carbonate standards (calcite, ankerite, dolomite, siderite, and magnesite) of known composition. We show that Raman band shifts of siderite-magnesite and ankerite-dolomite solid solutions display a well-defined positive correlation (r(2) > 0.9) with the Mg# = 100 x Mg/(Mg + Fe + Mn + Ca) of the carbonate analyzed. Raman shifts calibrated as a function of Mg# were used in turn to evaluate the chemical composition of carbonates. Raman analysis of a suite of carbonates (siderite, sidero-magnesite, ankerite, and dolomite) of hydrothermal and sedimentary origin from the ca. 3.2 Ga old Barite Syncline, Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa, and from the ca. 3.5 Ga old Dresser Formation, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, show good compositional agreement with electron microprobe analyses. These results indicate that Raman spectroscopy can provide direct information on the composition and structure of carbonates on planetary surfaces.

  2. Adhesion enhancement of Al coatings on carbon/epoxy composite surfaces by atmospheric plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhesion strengths between aluminium thin film coatings and manufactured carbon/epoxy composite surfaces were measured by assessing fracture tensile strengths using pull-off tests. The effect of the substrate roughness (nm to μm) of these composite surfaces on adhesion was studied by examining the surface free energies and adhesion strengths. The adhesion strengths of the coatings varied significantly. To improve the coating adhesion, each composite surface was treated with atmospheric plasma prior to deposition, which resulted in an increase in the surface free energy from approximately 40 mJ/m2 to 70 mJ/m2 because the plasma pretreatment led to the formation of hydrophilic C-O and C=O bonds on the composite surfaces, as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The adhesion strengths of the coatings were enhanced for all surface roughnesses studied. In our study, the effect of mechanical adhesion due to roughness was separated from the effect of modifying the chemical bonds with plasma activation. The adhesion ability of the pure resin was relatively weak. Increasing the surface roughness largely improved the adhesion of the resin surface. Plasma treatment of the pure resin also increased the surface adhesion. Our study shows that plasma activation effectively enhances the adhesion of manufactured composites, even when the surface roughness is on the order of microns. The ageing of the surface activation was also investigated, and the results demonstrate that atmospheric plasma has potential for use in the pretreatment of composite materials.

  3. Carbon deposition on nickel ferrites and nickel-magnetite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon deposition on Commercial Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (CAGR) fuel cladding and heat exchanger surfaces lowers heat transfer efficiency and increases fuel pin temperatures. Several types of deposit have been identified including both thin dense layers and also low density columnar deposits with filamentary or convoluted laminar structure. The low-density types are often associated with particles containing iron, nickel or manganese. To identify the role of nickel in the deposition process surfaces composed of nickel-iron spinels or metallic nickel/magnetite mixtures have been exposed to γ radiation in a gas environment simulating that in the reactor. Examination of these surfaces by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) have shown that while metallic nickel (Ni(O)) catalyses the formation of filamentary low density carbon deposits, the presence of divalent nickel (Ni(II)) sites in spinel type oxides is associated only with dense deposits. (author)

  4. Titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework for chemical fixation of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    A titanium-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (Ti-ZIF) with high surface area and porous morphology was synthesized and itsefficacy was demonstrated in the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide.

  5. Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers-carbon nanowalls by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Atsuto; Tanaka, Kei; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Ueda, Kazuyuki; Ghosh, Pradip; Tanemura, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VA-CNFs)-carbon nanowalls (CNWs) have been prepared on a silicon (Si) substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The VA-CNFs-CNWs were formed at bias voltage of - 185 V, whereas conventional VA-CNFs were synthesized under conditions of high bias voltages. Degenerated CNWs with turbostratic graphite structure were created on amorphous carbon layer around CNFs like a flag attached to a pole, which is evidenced by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Electron field emission characteristics of VA-CNFs-CNWs with unique microstructure, fabricated on the Si substrate, were primarily investigated. As a result, the VA-CNFs-CNWs showed the turn-on and the threshold fields of 1.7 V x microm(-1) and 3.35 V x microm(-1) with current densities of 10 nA x cm(-2) and 1 microA x cm(-2), respectively. The field enhancement factor beta was estimated to be 1059 by using Fowler-Nordheim theory. PMID:23755628

  6. High Surface Area of Nano Pores Activated Carbon Derived From Agriculture Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the high surface area of nano pores activated carbon rice husk originated from local biomass was investigated. The comparison in terms of surface area, porosity and behavior in electrochemical analysis with commercial activated carbon was studied in details. The nano pores activated carbon rice husk was synthesis using consecutive of carbonization and activation under purified nitrogen and carbon dioxide purge. Interestingly, the surface area and capacity of the nano pores activated carbon rice indicated higher in comparison to commercial activated carbon. This indicated that the nano pores activated carbon has potential to be developed further as an alternative material in reducing suspension on commercial activated carbon. (author)

  7. Effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wei [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Gu Aijuan, E-mail: ajgu@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Liang Guozheng, E-mail: lgzheng@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Yuan Li [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy (EP) resin composite is studied. Aqueous ammonia was applied to modify the surfaces of CFs. The morphologies and chemical compositions of original CFs and treated CFs (a-CFs) were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Compared with the smooth surface of original CF, the surface of a-CF has bigger roughness; moreover, the roughness increases with the increase of the treating time. On the other hand, no obvious change in chemical composition takes place, indicating that the treating mechanism of CFs by aqueous ammonia is to physically change the morphologies rather than chemical compositions. In order to investigate the effect of surface roughness on the interfacial properties of CF/EP composites, the wettability and Interfacial Shear Strength (IFSS) were measured. Results show that with the increase of the roughness, the wettabilities of CFs against both water and ethylene glycol improves; in addition, the IFSS value of composites also increases. These attractive phenomena prove that the surface roughness of CFs can effectively overcome the poor interfacial adhesions between CFs and organic matrix, and thus make it possible to fabricate advanced composites based on CFs.

  8. A REVIEW OF OXYGEN-CONTAINING SURFACE GROUPS AND SURFACE MODIFICATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yongwen; LI Zhong; XI Hongxia; XIA Qibin

    2004-01-01

    This review focused on the recent reports related to the function, characterization and modification of oxygen-containing surface groups of activated carbon (AC). The Oxygen-containing surface groups were briefly described, and the most frequently used techniques for characterization of the oxygen-containing surface groups on ACs were also briefly stated. A detailed discussion of the effects of the oxygen-containing surface groups on the adsorptive capacity of AC was given. The recent progresses in modification of the oxygen-containing surface groups of AC were also reviewed.

  9. INTERACTION-MEDIATED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON ACICULAR SILICA-COATED α-Fe CATALYST BY CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixiang Wang; Guoqing Ning; Fei Wei; Guohua Luo

    2003-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with 20 nm outer diameter were prepared by chemical vapor deposition of ethylene using ultrafine surface-modified acicular α-Fe catalyst particles. The growth mechanism of MWNTs on the larger catalyst particles are attributed to the interaction between the Fe nanoparticles with the surface-modified silica layer. This interaction-mediated growth mechanism is illustrated by studying the electronic, atomic and crystal properties of surface-modified catalysts and MWNTs products by characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Raman spectra.

  10. The Chemical Origin of SEY at Technical Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Larciprete, R; Commisso, M; Flammini, R; Cimino, R

    2013-01-01

    The secondary emission yield (SEY) properties of colaminated Cu samples for LHC beam screens are correlated to the surface chemical composition determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface of the "as received" samples is characterized by the presence of significant quantities of contaminating adsorbates and by the maximum of the SEY curve (dmax) being as high as 2.2. After extended electron scrubbing at kinetic energy of 10 and 500 eV, the dmax value drops to the ultimate values of 1.35 and 1.1, respectively. In both cases the surface oxidized phases are significantly reduced, whereas only in the sample scrubbed at 500 eV the formation of a graphitic-like C layer is observed. We find that the electron scrubbing of technical Cu surfaces can be described as occurring in two steps, where the first step consists in the electron induced desorption of weakly bound contaminants that occurs indifferently at 10 and at 500 eV and corresponds to a partial decrease of dmax, and the second step, activated b...

  11. Palladium nanoparticles on hierarchical carbon surfaces: A new architecture for robust nano-catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijwani, Hema; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    2012-12-01

    Surface activity of heterogeneous catalysts can be enhanced if their sizes are reduced to nanometers. However, loose nanomaterials pose potential health and environmental risks. This issue has been addressed by attachment of palladium nanoparticles on multi-scale hierarchical carbon supports that have exceptionally high surface area per volume. The supports consist of porous carbon foam whose surface has been either chemically functionalized, or morphologically altered by grafting of carbon-nanotubes. It is seen that whereas chemical functionalization does provide some increase in nano-catalyst loading, morphological modification is significantly more powerful. It has the potential to create orders of magnitude increase in catalytic activity within the same overall volume. The synthesis techniques have been investigated in sufficient detail to provide significant control over the density and size of nanoparticles. Abundant distribution of nanoparticles is observed even within the deeper pores of the microcellular foam. The nanoparticles are seen to be metallic Pd having face centered cubic structure. Additionally, the nano-particles and nanotubes are durable, and remain attached to the base support after long periods of rapid rotation in water. These robust hybrid structures show promise in future applications such as sensors, water purification systems, fuel cell electrodes and hydrogen storage sponges.

  12. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Chemical agent detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.; Morrisey, Kevin; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    In the past decade, the Unites States and its allies have been challenged by a different kind of warfare, exemplified by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although suicide bombings are the most often used form of terror, military personnel must consider a wide range of attack scenarios. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of several chemical agents measured in a generic tap water. Repeat measurements were performed to establish statistical error associated with SERS obtained using the sol-gel coated vials.

  14. The interaction of oxygen and carbon monoxide with a carbided Ni(111) surface

    OpenAIRE

    Geus, John W.; Vink, T.J.; Zandvoort, M.M.J. van; Gijzeman, O.L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ethylene on Ni(111) at 250°C is shown to lead to carbon deposition on and - in a later stage - below the surface. Independent of the amount of carbon below the surface, CO is adsorbed with an isosteric heat of adsorption of 105 kJ/mol. The surface carbon reacts with oxygen at 250°C. The reaction rate is independent of the surface carbon coverage and first order in oxygen pressure. The subsurface carbon segregates to the surface after removal of the surface carbon ...

  15. Preparation of surface-functionalized porous clay heterostructures via carbonization of soft-template and their adsorption performance for toluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuebo; Su, Xiaoli; Xu, Zhen; Wen, Ke; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    A new type of surface-functionalized porous clay heterostructures (SF-PCH) was synthesized via carbonization of the template agents with sulfuric acid. The converted carbons deposited on the porous surface of the SF-PCH samples and changed their surface chemical properties. The composites possessed a maximum carbon content of 5.35%, a large specific surface area of 428 m2/g and micropore volume of approximately 0.2 cm3/g. The layered and porous structure of SF-PCH was retained after carbonization and calcination when sulfuric acid solution with a mild concentration was used. Analysis by XPS confirmed that the carbonaceous matter in the pore channels was functionalized with various organic groups, including carbonaceous, nitrogenous, and sulfated groups. Both the surface chemical property and structural characteristic of adsorbents have effects on the adsorption properties of SF-PCH for toluene. The SF-PCH samples exhibited a stronger adsorption affinity to toluene compared with untreated PCH in the low pressure region, which is more valuable in the practical applications. These results demonstrate that carbonization of soft-template is a feasible process for the surface modification of PCH, enabling the resulting composites to become promising candidates for application in toluene emission control.

  16. Effects of pore structure on the high-performance capacitive deionization using chemically activated carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji Sun; Kim, Jong Gu; Lee, Young-Seak

    2014-03-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) electrodes were constructed from activated carbon fibers prepared using electrospinning and chemical activation. The CDI efficiencies of these electrodes were studied as a function of their specific surface areas, pore volumes and pore sizes via salt ion adsorption. The specific surface areas increased approximately 90 fold and the pore volume also increased approximately 26 fold with the use of greater amounts of the chemical activation agent. There was a relative increase in the mesopore fraction with higher porosity. A NaCI solution was passed through a prepared CDI system, and the salt removal efficiency of the CDI system was determined by the separation of the Na+ and Cl- ions toward the anode and cathode. The CDI efficiency increased with greater specific surface areas and pore volumes. In addition, the efficiency per unit pore volume increased with a reduction in the micropore fraction, resulting in the suppressed overlapping effect. In conclusion, the obtained improvements in CDI efficiency were mainly attributed to mesopores, but the micropores also played an important role in the high-performance CDI under conditions of high applied potential and high ion concentrations. PMID:24745222

  17. ZnO Functionalization of Surface Pre-treated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Methane Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare carbon nanotubes (CNTs) cannot be used to sense most gases due to poor bonding between the chemically inert graphitic surface and the different compounds CNTs are exposed to. Consequently, for gas sensing applications, functionalization of CNTs with reactive compounds is req...

  18. Application of phosphating techniques to aluminium and carbon steel surfaces using nitro guanidine as oxidizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate coatings are inorganic crystalline deposits laid down uniformly on properly prepared surfaces by a chemical reaction with the treated base metal. The reaction consists in dissolving some surface metal by acid attack and then causing surface neutralization of the phosphate solution with consequent precipitation of the phosphate coating. Phosphate coatings do not provide appreciable corrosion protection in themselves. They are useful mainly as a base for paints, ensuring good adherence of paint to steel and decreasing the tendency for corrosion to under cut the paint film at scratches or other defects. In this work firstly were realized phosphate on standard carbon steel, employing technical of cold phosphate (at 40 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 30 minutes) and hot phosphate (at 88 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 15 minutes), where with this last were obtained the best results. Both methods used phosphate solutions of Zn/Mn and using as catalyst Nitro guanidine. Aluminium surfaces were phosphate used solutions of Cr and as catalyst Sodium bi fluoride. The phosphating on this surface were realized at temperature of 50 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 10 minutes. In this work were obtained a new phosphate coatings on steel surfaces, these coatings were realized with a phosphate solution manufactured with the precipitates gathered during the hot phosphating on carbon steel. These coatings show excellent physical characteristics and of corrosion resistance. Were determined the physical testings of the coatings phosphate obtained on carbon steel and aluminium surfaces. These testing were: roughness, thickness, microhardness and adhesion. The best results were showed in carbon steel phosphate with precipitated solutions. The technical of analysis for activation with thermic neutrons was used to determine the phosphate coatings composition. Finally, corrosion testings were realized by means of two methods

  19. Structural and surface modifications of carbon nanotubes when submitted to high temperature annealing treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillejos, E. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Bachiller-Baeza, B. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Cadenas, M.; Gallegos-Suarez, E. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Ramos, I. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Guerrero-Ruiz, A. [Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamargo-Martinez, K., E-mail: katia@incar.csic.es [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Martinez-Alonso, A.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), pristine and heat-treated at 2873 K, were comparatively characterized using HRTEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, Raman spectroscopy and immersion calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing at 2873 K produced removal of amorphous phases, ordering of graphene layers and structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immersion enthalpies in organic liquids indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between aromatic molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a chemical vapour deposition procedure using acetylene as source of carbon, iron pentacarbonyl as catalyst and an inert carrier gas. An aliquot of these MWCNTs was heat-treated at 2873 K under inert atmosphere (Ar). The two carbon nanotube samples where characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, Raman spectroscopy, and immersion calorimetry in toluene, methanol and methylcyclohexane. HRTEM images confirmed that high-temperature treatment removed amorphous carbon, the graphene layers being better graphitized, and also some structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores took place. Immersion enthalpies in toluene, in which molecules are present as aromatic functions, indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between such molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs.

  20. Immobilization of carbon nanotubes and metallophthalocyanines on conductive surfaces by electrochemical means for electroanalytical purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez Granados, S. [Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris (France). Unite de Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique; Guanajuato Univ. Guanajuato (Mexico). Inst. de Investigaciones Cientificas; Richard, C.; Griveau, S.; Bedioui, F. [Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris (France). Unite de Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique; Zagal, J.H. [Santiago Univ. de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2008-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been touted as viable candidates for the design of new electrode materials because of their high conductivity and high specific surface area. This study explored the use of electrochemical methods to immobilize single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on glassy carbon (GC) in a stable and controlled fashion. Two electrochemical routes were investigated to get the stable immobilization of nanotubes, notably (1) electropolymerization of conducting polymers in presence of SWCNT, and (2) the electrochemical grafting of diazonium salts in presence of SWCNT. The objective was to obtain chemically and mechanically stable composite GC/SWCNT electrodes. The electrochemical performances and reactivity of the electrodes were analyzed by voltammetry and by scanning electrochemical microscopy. The optimized immobilization methods were then applied to the conception of electrocatalysts hybrids, by co-immobilization of nanotubes with well-known redox catalyst metallocomplexes for activation of the electro-oxidation of biologically relevant thiol. The study showed that the nanocomposite material based on the combined use of metallophthalocynines, functionalized SWCNTs and electropolymerizable matrices enables the assembly of highly stable electrodes with better electrocatalytic oxidation of thiols. This fast procedure to modify glassy carbon (GC) electrode using commercially available cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) and tetrasulfonated nickel phthalocyanine (NiTSPc), oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes SWCNT and electropolymerized polypyrrole or diazonium derivatives. It was concluded that the electrodes are highly stable and the tailored hybrid surfaces improves electron transfer. 4 refs.

  1. Electroanalysis using macro-, micro-, and nanochemical architectures on electrode surfaces. Bulk surface modification of glassy carbon microspheres with gold nanoparticles and their electrical wiring using carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xuan; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Salter, Chris; Crossley, Alison; Compton, Richard G

    2006-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (approximately 30-60 nm in diameter) were deposited onto the surface of glassy carbon microspheres (10-20 microm) through electroless plating to produce bulk (i.e., gram) quantities of nanoparticle surface-modified microspheres. The gold nanoparticle-modified powder was then characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The voltammetric response of a macroelectrode consisting of a film of gold nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon microspheres, bound together and "wired-up" using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), was investigated. We demonstrate that by intelligently exploiting both nano- and microchemical architectures and wiring up the electroactive centers using MWCNTs in this way, we can obtain macroelectrode voltammetric behavior while only using approximately 1% by mass of the expensive gold material that would be required to construct the equivalent gold film macrodisk electrode. The potential utility of electrodes constructed using chemical architectures such as this was demonstrated by applying them to the analytical determination of arsenic(III) concentration. An optimized limit of detection of 2.5 ppb was obtained.

  2. Carbon cycle, chemical erosion of continents and transfers to the oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study tries to define the processes that control the CO2 consumption due to the chemical erosion of continents, to appreciate the spatial-temporal fluxes of consumed CO2, and to estimate the transfers of dissolved mineral carbon from the continents to the oceans. Complementary approaches using different scales of time and space are necessary to study all these processes. Chemical alteration of minerals from continental rocks is due to the carbonic acid indirectly produced by atmospheric CO2 via the photosynthesis and the degradation of organic matter in soils. The transfer of dissolved CO2 towards the oceans is done by the drainage waters of the river basins. Continental erosion develops at the interfaces of the biosphere, atmosphere and ocean reservoirs and is controlled by numerous geological, hydro-climatical, biological and anthropic factors. Seasonal variations of CO2 consumption has been studied for the Garonne (France), Congo and Ubangui basins to determine the mechanisms that control this consumption. A predictive model has been developed to simulate the consumed CO2 fluxes on continental surfaces for which the spatial distribution of lithology and drainage is known. This model has been validated using available data from the Garonne (France), Congo and Amazone basins. (J.S.). 272 refs., 78 figs., 41 tabs., 1 annexe

  3. Oxidation of CO and Methanol on Pd-Ni Catalysts Supported on Different Chemically-Treated Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Calderón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, palladium-nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers were synthesized, with metal contents close to 25 wt % and Pd:Ni atomic ratios near to 1:2. These catalysts were previously studied in order to determine their activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction. Before the deposition of metals, the carbon nanofibers were chemically treated in order to generate oxygen and nitrogen groups on their surface. Transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEM images revealed particle diameters between 3 and 4 nm, overcoming the sizes observed for the nanoparticles supported on carbon black (catalyst Pd-Ni CB 1:2. From the CO oxidation at different temperatures, the activation energy Eact for this reaction was determined. These values indicated a high tolerance of the catalysts toward the CO poisoning, especially in the case of the catalysts supported on the non-chemically treated carbon nanofibers. On the other hand, apparent activation energy Eap for the methanol oxidation was also determined finding—as a rate determining step—the COads diffusion to the OHads for the catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers. The results here presented showed that the surface functional groups only play a role in the obtaining of lower particle sizes, which is an important factor in the obtaining of low CO oxidation activation energies.

  4. Chemical surface modification of porous silicon with palladium and characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanungo, J.; Maji, S.; Saha, H. [IC Design and Fabrication Centre, Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Basu, S., E-mail: sukumar_basu@yahoo.co.u [IC Design and Fabrication Centre, Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2010-03-15

    Porous silicon (PS) was formed on p-type crystalline silicon of (1 0 0) orientation and 2-5 OMEGA cm resistivity by the electrochemical anodization method using HF and ethanol as the electrolyte. Adjusting the current density and the HF concentration in the electrolyte the porosity of the samples were varied from 40% to 60%. The porous silicon surface was modified with PdCl{sub 2} solution by a low cost chemical method. Both the unmodified and the modified PS were thoroughly characterized by the EDAX analysis, the digital X-ray image mapping and the XPS study. Electrical characteristics were performed by the I-V measurements for both the lateral and the sandwich structures using Al metal contact. The I-V characteristics of the modified PS for all the porosity were more reproducible compared to the unmodified PS surfaces. It was further observed that the conductivity increased with the increasing porosity for the Pd-modified surfaces whereas it decreased for the unmodified PS.

  5. Ocean Surface Carbon Dioxide Fugacity Observed from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiaosu

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and validated a statistical model to estimate the fugacity (or partial pressure) of carbon dioxide (CO2) at sea surface (pCO2sea) from space-based observations of sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll, and salinity. More than a quarter million in situ measurements coincident with satellite data were compiled to train and validate the model. We have produced and made accessible 9 years (2002-2010) of the pCO2sea at 0.5 degree resolutions daily over the global ocean. The results help to identify uncertainties in current JPL Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) model-based and bottom-up estimates over the ocean. The utility of the data to reveal multi-year and regional variability of the fugacity in relation to prevalent oceanic parameters is demonstrated.

  6. Adventitious Carbon on Primary Sample Containment Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; Fries, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Future missions that return astromaterials with trace carbonaceous signatures will require strict protocols for reducing and controlling terrestrial carbon contamination. Adventitious carbon (AC) on primary sample containers and related hardware is an important source of that contamination. AC is a thin film layer or heterogeneously dispersed carbonaceous material that naturally accrues from the environment on the surface of atmospheric exposed metal parts. To test basic cleaning techniques for AC control, metal surfaces commonly used for flight hardware and curating astromaterials at JSC were cleaned using a basic cleaning protocol and characterized for AC residue. Two electropolished stainless steel 316L (SS- 316L) and two Al 6061 (Al-6061) test coupons (2.5 cm diameter by 0.3 cm thick) were subjected to precision cleaning in the JSC Genesis ISO class 4 cleanroom Precision Cleaning Laboratory. Afterwards, the samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Improved Composites Using Crosslinked, Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotube Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit exceptional tensile strength and stiffness; however, these properties have not translated well to the macroscopic scale. Premature failure of bulk CNT materials under tensile loading occurs due to the relatively weak frictional forces between adjacent CNTs, leading to poor load transfer through the material. When used in polymer matrix composites (PMCs), the weak nanotube-matrix interaction leads to the CNTs providing less than optimal reinforcement.Our group is examining the use of covalent crosslinking and surface modification as a means to improve the tensile properties of PMCs containing carbon nanotubes. Sheet material comprised of unaligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was used as a drop-in replacement for carbon fiber in the composites. A variety of post-processing methods have been examined for covalently crosslinking the CNTs to overcome the weak inter-nanotube shear interactions, resulting in improved tensile strength and modulus for the bulk sheet material. Residual functional groups from the crosslinking chemistry may have the added benefit of improving the nanotube-matrix interaction. Composites prepared using these crosslinked, surface-modified nanotube sheet materials exhibit superior tensile properties to composites using the as received CNT sheet material.

  8. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  9. Effects of Surface-modification of Carbon Black on the Characteristics of Polymerized Toner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ho; Kim, Dae Su [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon black was surface-modified to prepare styrene-based suspension polymerized toner with excellent carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles. Carbon black was oxidized first to introduce hydroxyl groups on the surfaces, then esterification between the hydroxyl groups and carboxyl groups of organic acids (oleic acid, palmitic acid, acrylic acid) was followed to obtain organically surface-modified carbon black. The surface-modification of carbon black was confirmed by FTIR. Apparent carbon black dispersibility in the monomer mixture of the binder resin was tested and the particle size of dispersed carbon black was measured by particle size analyzer. Optical micrographs showed that carbon black dispersibility inside toner particles was improved considerably when the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid was used. The polymerized toner prepared with the carbon black surface-modified with oleic acid showed ideal particle size and size distribution as a toner.

  10. Characterization and use of high surface area activated carbons prepared from cane pith for liquid-phase adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonaceous adsorbents with controllable surface areas were chemically activated with KOH at 780 deg. C from char that had been carbonized from cane pith at 450 deg. C. The pore properties including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and mean pore diameter of these activated carbons were characterized and derived using the t-plot method based on N2 adsorption isotherms. The activated cane pith carbons, with KOH/char ratios of 2-6, exhibited BET surface areas ranging from 912 to 2299 m2 g-1. The scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations revealed that the surface morphology of honeycombed holes on all activated cane pith carbons was significantly influenced by the KOH/char ratio. The adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms of acid blue 74, methylene blue, basic brown 1, p-nitrophenol, p-chlorophenol, p-cresol, and phenol from water at 30 deg. C on the activated carbons were studied. The adsorption kinetics were suitably described by a simplified kinetic model, the Elovich equation. All adsorption equilibrium isotherms were in agreement with the Langmuir equation, and were used to compare the covered area (S c/S p) of the activated carbons at different KOH/char ratios. The high-surface-area activated carbons were proven to be promising adsorbents for pollution control and for other applications

  11. Influence of Structure and Surface Chemistry of Porous Carbon Electrodes on Supercapacitor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatkin, Boris

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors, which rely on electrosorption of ions in nanostructured carbon electrodes, can supplement or even replace traditional batteries in energy harvesting and storage applications. While supercapacitors offer > 10 kW/kg power densities, their ~5 Wh/kg energy densities are insufficient for many automotive and grid storage applications. Most prior efforts have focused on novel high-performing ionic liquid electrolytes and porous carbons with tunable pore diameters and high specific surface areas. However, existing research lacks fundamental understanding of the influence of surface heterogeneity and disorder, such as graphitic defects and functional groups, on key electrosorption properties at electrode-electrolyte interfaces. These interactions significantly impact charge accumulation densities, ion transport mechanisms, and electrolyte breakdown processes. Subsequently, they must be investigated to optimize ion screening, charge mobilities, and operating voltage windows of the devices. The research in this dissertation examined the influence of surface functional groups and structural ordering on capacitance, electrosorption dynamics, and electrochemical stability of external and internal surface of carbon electrodes. High-temperature vacuum annealing, air oxidation, hydrogenation, and amination were used to tune pore surface compositions and decouple key structural and chemical properties of carbide-derived carbons. The approach combined materials characterization by a variety of techniques, neutron scattering studies of ion dynamics, electrochemical testing, and MD simulations to investigate the fundamental intermolecular interactions and dynamics of ions electrosorption in different pore architectures and on planar graphene surfaces. Contrary to expected results and existing theories, defect removal via defunctionalization and graphitization decreased capacitance. Hydrogenated surfaces benefitted electrosorption, while oxygen

  12. Creation of surface defects on carbon nanofibers by steam treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengfeng; Shao; Min; Pang; Wei; Xia; Martin; Muhler; Changhai; Liang

    2013-01-01

    A direct strategy for the creation of defects on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed by steam treatment.Nitrogen physisorption,XRD,Raman spectra,SEM and TEM analyses proved the existence of the new defects on CNFs.BET surface area of CNFs after steam treatment was enhanced from 20 to 378 m2/g.Pd catalysts supported on CNFs were also prepared by colloidal deposition method.The different activity of Pd/CNFs catalysts in the partial hydrogenation of phenylacetylene further demonstrated the diverse surfaces of CNFs could be formed by steam treatment.

  13. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive. PMID:25531980

  14. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive.

  15. Evaluation of chemical surface treatment methods for mitigation of PWSCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its mission to propose innovative and safe technologies to mitigate Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), EPRI recently initiated a program to evaluate potential new chemical surface treatments that might delay the occurrence of PWSCC such that no failure of components would be observed during their lifetime. Among the initial screening of more than thirty technologies, seven were selected for a more detailed review. The selected technologies were: nickel and nickel alloy plating, organic inhibitors, chromium-based inhibitors, silicon carbide, titanium-based inhibitors, rare earth metal (REM)-based inhibitors and encapsulation. The conclusions of the review of these technologies were that two of them were worth pursuing, titanium-based and REM-based inhibitors, and that evaluating the radiological consequences of injecting these products in the primary system, as well as assessing their efficacy to mitigate PWSCC, should be prioritized as the next required steps in qualification for implementation. (authors)

  16. Surface acoustic wave sensing of VOCs in harsh chemical environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-06-01

    The measurement of VOC concentrations in harsh chemical and physical environments is a formidable task. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor has been designed for this purpose and its construction and testing are described in this paper. Included is a detailed description of the design elements specific to operation in 300{degree}C steam and HCl environments including temperature control, gas handling, and signal processing component descriptions. In addition, laboratory temperature stability was studied and a minimum detection limit was defined for operation in industrial environments. Finally, a description of field tests performed on steam reforming equipment at Synthetica Technologies Inc. of Richmond, CA is given including a report on destruction efficiency of CCl{sub 4} in the Synthetica moving bed evaporator. Design improvements based on the field tests are proposed.

  17. Fabrication of a multifunctional carbon nanotube "cotton" yarn by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao-Hua; Li, Ya-Li; Feng, Jian-Min; Kang, Yan-Ru; Han, Shuai-Shuai

    2012-09-21

    A continuous cotton-like carbon nanotube fiber yarn, consisting of multiple threads of high purity double walled carbon nanotubes, was fabricated in a horizontal CVD gas flow reactor with water vapor densification by the direct chemical vapor deposition spinning process. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous shrinking of the CNT sock-like assembly in the gas flow. This allows well controlled continuous winding of the dense thread inside the reactor. The CNT yarn is quite thick (1-3 mm), has a highly porous structure (99%) while being mechanically strong and electrically conductive. The water vapor interaction leads to homogeneous oxidation of the CNTs, offering the yarn oxygen-functionalized surfaces. The unique structure and surface of the CNT yarn provide it multiple processing advantages and properties. It can be mechanically engineered into a dense yarn, infiltrated with polymers to form a composite and mixed with other yarns to form a blend, as demonstrated in this research. Therefore, this CNT yarn can be used as a "basic yarn" for various CNT based structural and functional applications.

  18. Effect of MWCNT surface and chemical modification on in vitro cellular response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta; Menaszek, Elzbieta [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics (Poland); Syeda, Tahmina Bahar; Misra, Anil; Alavijeh, Mohammad [Pharmidex Pharmaceutical Services (United Kingdom); Adu, Jimi [University of Brighton, School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences (United Kingdom); Blazewicz, Stanislaw, E-mail: blazew@agh.edu.pl [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with diameter in the range of 10-30 nm) before and after chemical surface functionalisation on macrophages response. The study has shown that the detailed analysis of the physicochemical properties of this particular form of carbon nanomaterial is a crucial issue to interpret properly its impact on the cellular response. Effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) characteristics, including purity, dispersity, chemistry and dimension upon the nature of the cell environment-material interaction were investigated. Various techniques involving electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been employed to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the materials. The results demonstrate that the way of CNT preparation prior to biological tests has a fundamental impact on their behavior, cell viability and the nature of cell-nanotube interaction. Chemical functionalisation of CNTs in an acidic ambient (MWCNT-Fs) facilitates interaction with cells by two possible mechanisms, namely, endocytosis/phagocytosis and by energy-independent passive process. The results indicate that MWCNT-F in macrophages may decrease the cell proliferation process by interfering with the mitotic apparatus without negative consequences on cell viability. On the contrary, the as-prepared MWCNTs, without any surface treatment produce the least reduction in cell proliferation with reference to control, and the viability of cells exposed to this sample was substantially reduced with respect to control. A possible explanation of such a phenomenon is the presence of MWCNT's agglomerates surrounded by numerous cells releasing toxic substances.

  19. Effect of MWCNT surface and chemical modification on in vitro cellular response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with diameter in the range of 10–30 nm) before and after chemical surface functionalisation on macrophages response. The study has shown that the detailed analysis of the physicochemical properties of this particular form of carbon nanomaterial is a crucial issue to interpret properly its impact on the cellular response. Effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) characteristics, including purity, dispersity, chemistry and dimension upon the nature of the cell environment–material interaction were investigated. Various techniques involving electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been employed to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the materials. The results demonstrate that the way of CNT preparation prior to biological tests has a fundamental impact on their behavior, cell viability and the nature of cell–nanotube interaction. Chemical functionalisation of CNTs in an acidic ambient (MWCNT-Fs) facilitates interaction with cells by two possible mechanisms, namely, endocytosis/phagocytosis and by energy-independent passive process. The results indicate that MWCNT-F in macrophages may decrease the cell proliferation process by interfering with the mitotic apparatus without negative consequences on cell viability. On the contrary, the as-prepared MWCNTs, without any surface treatment produce the least reduction in cell proliferation with reference to control, and the viability of cells exposed to this sample was substantially reduced with respect to control. A possible explanation of such a phenomenon is the presence of MWCNT’s agglomerates surrounded by numerous cells releasing toxic substances.

  20. Studies of the Surface Treatment and Sizing of Carbon Fiber Surfaces on the Mechanical Properties of Composites Containing Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Peter M. A.; Lease, Kevin B.; Locke, James E.; Tomblin, John S.; Wang, Youqi

    1996-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composites are materials where carbon fibers are used to reinforce a matrix to produce a light and strong material with important applications in the aerospace industry. There are many aspects of the preparation of these materials that would benefit from a study which combines the research of groups involved in the production, testing and analysis of these materials, and studies of the basic surface chemistry involved. This final reports presents the results of a project that has developed a collaboration between groups in all three of the major research universities in the State of Kansas, and promises to lead to a collaborative program that covers the major aspects of composite development and application. Sherwood has provided initial fiber surface treatment and sizing together with fiber and composite surface analysis; Lease, Tomblin and Wang have worked together toward the goal of preparing pre-preg and fabrication of laminated panels; Locke has developed computational models to evaluate the effect of surface treatment (and chemistry) on mechanical properties; Lease, Tomblin and Wang have worked together to perform all necessary mechanical testing. The research has been focused on materials that would benefit the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) program. The group has visited Dr. Howard Maars and his colleagues at NASA Langley, and has focused their studies on the NASA requirements discussed in this meeting. An important development, requested by NASA scientists, has been the acquisition and study of K3B as a matrix material for the composites. The project has led to the successful acquisition and surface analysis of K3B, together with the successful deposition of this material onto surface oxidized carbon fibers. Mechanical testing, modelling and the construction of composite preparation equipment has been achieved during the grant period.

  1. Structural characteristics of surface-functionalized nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon films and effective adjustment to cell attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Min; Yu, Jian-Can; Qian, Guo-Dong; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) films prepared by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology are functionalized with various chemical molecules including dopamine (DA), 3-Aminobenzeneboronic acid (APBA), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and the impacts of surface functionalities on the surface morphologies, compositions, microstructures, and cell compatibility of the DLC:N films are systematically investigated. We demonstrate that the surface groups of DLC:N have a significant effect on the surface and structural properties of the film. The activity of PC12 cells depends on the particular type of surface functional groups of DLC:N films regardless of surface roughness and wettability. Our research offers a novel way for designing functionalized carbon films as tailorable substrates for biosensors and biomedical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51272237, 51272231, and 51010002) and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant Nos. 2012M520063, 2013T60587, and Bsh1201016).

  2. Numerical simulation of isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克智; 李贺军; 姜开宇

    2000-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is highly inefficient and requires long processing time. These limitations add considerably to the cost of fabrication and restrict the application of this material. Efforts have been made to study the CVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by computer simulation and predict the process parameters, density, porosity, etc. According to the characteristics of CVI process, the basic principle of FEM and mass transport, the finite element model has been established. Incremental finite element equations and the elemental stiffness matrices have been derived for the first time. The finite element program developed by the authors has been used to simulate the ICVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. Computer color display of simulated results can express the densification and distributions of density and porosity in preform clearly. The influence of process parameters on the densification of prefo

  3. Surface modification of multiwall carbon nanotubes by sulfonitric treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Sofía; Rendtorff, Nicolás M.; Aglietti, Esteban F.; Sakka, Yoshio; Suárez, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used for electronic, mechanical, and optical devices due to their unique structural and quantum characteristics. The species generated by oxidation on the surface of these materials permit binding new reaction chains, which improves the dispersibility, processing and compatibility with other materials. Even though different acid treatments and applications of these CNT have been reported, relatively few research studies have focused on the relationship between the acid treatment and the formation of nanodefects, specific oxidized species or CNT surface defects. In this work, multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) oxidation at 90 °C was characterized in order to determine the acid treatment effect on the surface. It was found that oxidized species are already present in MWCNT without an acid treatment, but there are not enough to cause water-based dispersion. The species were identified and quantified by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Also, transmission electron microscopy observations showed not only modifications of the oxidized species, but also morphological damage on the surfaces of MWCNT after being subjected to the acid treatment. This effect was also confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The acid treatment generates higher oxidized species, decreasing the zeta potential in the whole pH range.

  4. Surface aging phenomena in multidimensional sp2 carbon allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yun-Hsiang; Santos, Sergio; Chiesa, Matteo

    Despite the current interest in the scientific community in exploiting divergent surface properties of graphitic carbon allotropes, conclusive differentiation remains elusive even when dealing with parameters as fundamental as adhesion. Here we set out to provide conclusive experimental evidence on the time evolution of the surface properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), graphene monolayer (GML) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as we expose these materials to airborne contaminants, by providing 1) statistically significant results based on large data-sets, i.e. thousands of force measurements, and 2) errors sufficiently self-consistent to treat the comparison between data-sets in atomic force microscopy measurements. We first consider HOPG as a model system and then employ our results to draw conclusions from the GML and MWCNT samples. We find that, in terms of surface properties and thus regarding surface functionality, aged HOPG and GML are more similar than aged HOPG and cleaved HOPG. The state of the HOPG samples is also as relevant for the comparison between HOPG and MWCNTs.

  5. Molecular simulation of multi-component adsorption processes related to carbon capture in a high surface area, disordered activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Di Biase, Emanuela; Sarkisov, Lev

    2015-01-01

    We employ a previously developed model of a high surface area activated carbon, based on a random packing of small fragments of a carbon sheet, functionalized with hydroxyl surface groups, to explore adsorption of water and multicomponent mixtures under conditions representing typical carbon capture processes. Adsorption of water is initialized and proceeds through the growth of clusters around the surface groups, in a process predominantly governed by hydrogen bond interactions. In contrast,...

  6. Carbon nanostructures and networks produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowlgi, N.K.K.; Koper, G.J.M.; Van Raalten, R.A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a method for manufacturing crystalline carbon nanostructures and/or a network of crystalline carbon nanostructures, comprising: (i) providing a bicontinuous micro-emulsion containing metal nanoparticles having an average particle size between 1and 100nm; (ii) bringing said

  7. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Organic Chemicals from Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris

    1983-01-01

    Carbon Monoxide obtained from coal may serve as the source for a wide variety of organic compounds. Several of these compounds are discussed, including phosgene, benzaldehyde, methanol, formic acid and its derivatives, oxo aldehydes, acrylic acids, and others. Commercial reactions of carbon monoxide are highlighted in a table. (JN)

  8. The interaction of oxygen and carbon monoxide with a carbided Ni(111) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, John W.; Vink, T.J.; Zandvoort, M.M.J. van; Gijzeman, O.L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ethylene on Ni(111) at 250°C is shown to lead to carbon deposition on and - in a later stage - below the surface. Independent of the amount of carbon below the surface, CO is adsorbed with an isosteric heat of adsorption of 105 kJ/mol. The surface carbon reacts with oxyg

  9. Characterization of a surface modified carbon cryogel and a carbon supported Pt catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILJANA M. BABIĆ

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon cryogel, synthesized by carbonization of a resorcinol/formaldehyde cryogel and oxidized in nitric acid, was used as catalyst support for Pt nano-particles. The Pt/C catalyst was prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG solution. Characterization by nitrogen adsorption showed that the carbon cryogel support and the Pt/C catalyst were mesoporous materials with high specific surface areas (SBET > 400 m2 g-1 and large mesoporous volumes. X-Ray diffraction of the catalyst demonstrated the successful reduction of the Pt precursor to metallic form. TEM Images of the Pt/C catalyst and Pt particle size distribution showed that the mean Pt particle size was about 3.3 nm. Cyclic voltammetry (CV experiments at various scan rates (from 2 to 200 mV s-1 were performed in 0.5 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution. The large capacitance of the oxidized carbon cryogel electrode, which arises from a combination of the double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, associated with the participation of surface redox-type reactions was demonstrated. For the oxidized carbon cryogel, the total specific capacitance determined by 1/C vs. ν0.5 extrapolation method was found to be 386 F g-1. The hydrogen oxidation reaction at the investigated Pt/C catalyst proceeded as an electrochemically reversible, two-electron direct discharge reaction.

  10. Photonic gas sensors exploiting directly the optical properties of hybrid carbon nanotube localized surface plasmon structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Allsop; Raz Arif; Ron Neal; Kyriacos Kalli; Vojtěch Kundrát; Aleksey Rozhin; Phil Culverhouse

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the modification of the optical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) resulting from a chemical reaction triggered by the presence of a specific compound (gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2)) and show this mechanism has important consequences for chemical sensing.CNTs have attracted significant research interest because they can be functionalized for a particular chemical,yielding a specific physical response which suggests many potential applications in the fields of nanotechnology and sensing.So far,however,utilizing their optical properties for this purpose has proven to be challenging.We demonstrate the use of localized surface plasmons generated on a nanostructured thin film,resembling a large array of nano-wires,to detect changes in the optical properties of the CNTs.Chemical selectivity is demonstrated using CO2 in gaseous form at room temperature.The demonstrated methodology results additionally in a new,electrically passive,optical sensing configuration that opens up the possibilities of using CNTs as sensors in hazardous/explosive environments.

  11. Chemical Characterization of Stabilized and Carbonized Polyacrylonitrile (PAN Fibers Treated with Oleic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh Shahrul Nizam Md

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile (PAN fiber is the best precursor for carbon fibers due to high carbon content after heat treatment. After the polymer was spun into fibers, the fibers will undergo pretreatment process with chemical solution known as post spinning treatment. Post spinning will directly affect conversion of PAN fiber to carbon fiber. Oleic acid was used as post spinning treatment chemical solution to PAN fibers. The pretreated PAN fiber will be heated at 250°C and 800°C. The fibers were studied using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS and DSC to study the chemical change during heat treatment. PAN fibers treated with oleic acid have reduced the cyclization energy and increase oxygen and carbon content leading to high performance carbon fibers.

  12. A review of chemical absorption of carbon dioxide for biogas upgrading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fouad RH Abdeen; Maizirwan Mel; Mohammed Saedi Jami; Sany Izan Ihsan; Ahmad Faris Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Significant attention has been given to biogas production, purification and upgrading as a renewable and clean fuel supplement. Biogas is a product of an anaerobic digestion process comprising methane, carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of other gases. Biogas purification removes trace gases in biogas for safe utilisation. Biogas upgrading produces methane-rich biogas by removing bulk carbon dioxide from the gas mixture. Several carbon dioxide removal techniques can be applied for biogas upgrading. However, chemical absorption of carbon dioxide for biogas upgrading is of special significance due to its operation at ambient or near ambient temperature and pressure, thus reducing energy consumption. This paper reviews the chemical absorption of carbon dioxide using amine scrubbing, caustic solvent scrubbing, and amino acid salt solution scrubbing. Each of these tech-niques for biogas upgrading is discussed. The paper concludes that an optimised implementation of the chemical absorption techniques for biogas upgrading requires further research.

  13. Synthesis of high surface area carbon adsorbents prepared from pine sawdust-Onopordum acanthium L. for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Torrellas, S; Muñoz, M; Zazo, J A; Casas, J A; García, J

    2016-12-01

    Chemically activated carbon materials prepared from pine sawdust-Onopordum acanthium L. were studied for the removal of diclofenac and naproxen from aqueous solution. Several carbons, using different proportions of precursors were obtained (carbon C1 to carbon C5) and the chemical modification by liquid acid and basic treatments of C1 were carried out. The textural properties of the carbons, evaluated by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, revealed that the treatments with nitric acid and potassium hydroxide dramatically reduced the specific surface area and the pore volume of the carbon samples. The surface chemistry characterization, made by thermal programmed decomposition studies, determination of isoelectric point and Boehm's titration, showed the major presence of lactone and phenol groups on the activated carbons surface, being higher the content when the acidic strength of the carbon increased. Diclofenac and naproxen kinetic data onto C1 carbon followed pseudo-second order model. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of C1 and the modified carbons were well described by both Sips and GAB isotherm equations. The highest adsorption capacity was found for naproxen onto C1 activated carbon, 325 mg g(-1), since the liquid acid and basic functionalization of the carbon led to a severe decreasing in the adsorption removal of the target compounds. PMID:27604753

  14. Aqueous dispersions of oligomer-grafted carbon nanomaterials with controlled surface charge and minimal framework damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng; Chen, Shu; Menzel, Robert; Goode, Angela D.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Functionalised carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), with an undamaged carbon framework and controlled physiochemical properties, are desirable for a wide range of scientific studies and commercial applications. The use of a thermochemical grafting approach provides a versatile means to functionalise both multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon black (CB) nanoparticles without altering their inherent structure. The functionalisation process was investigated by employing various types of grafting monomers; to improve water solubility, reagents were chosen that introduced ionic character either intrinsically or after further chemical reaction. The degree of grafting for both MWCNTs and CB ranged from 3 to 27 wt%, as established by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the structural framework of the MWNTs was unaffected by the thermochemical treatment. The effectiveness of the surface modification was demonstrated by significantly improved dispersibility and stability in water, and further quantified by zeta-potential analysis. The concentration of stable, individualised, grafted MWNTs in water ranged from 30 to 80 µg mL−1, whereas functionalised CB (CB) in water showed improved dispersibility up to ~460 µg mL−1 after centrifugation at 10, 000 g for 15 minutes. The successful preparation of structurally identical but differently functionalised nanoparticles panels, with high water compatibility and minimal framework damage, are useful for controlled experiments. For example, they can be used to explore the relationship between toxicological effects and specific physiochemical properties, such as surface charge and geometry. PMID:25254653

  15. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  16. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000 °C growth temperature

  17. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on mesoporous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx (x=0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds covalently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  18. The over-step coalescence of carbon atoms on copper surface in the CVD growth of graphene: density functional calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ways in which carbon atoms coalesce over the steps on copper (111 surface are ascertained by density functional theory (DFT calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD growth of graphene. Two strategies, (1 by putting carbon atoms on and under the steps separately and (2 by importing additional carbon atoms between the ones separated by the steps, have been attempted to investigate if an over-step coalescence of carbon atoms could take place. Based on analyses about the optimized configurations and adsorption energies of carbon atoms nearby the steps, as well as the energy evolution curve of the system throughout the geometry optimizations process, we determined the main way in which graphene grows over the steps continuously: the carbon atoms, adsorbed additionally on the locations between the already existing ones which are separated by the steps, link them (these carbon atoms separated by the steps together. The direct over-step coalescence of the carbon atoms separated by the steps is very difficult, although the energy barrier preventing their coalescence can be weakened by importing carbon atoms on and under the steps gradually. Our results imply potential applications in directing the fabrication of graphene with particular structure by controlling the surface topography of copper substrate.

  19. Interaction between Palladium Nanoparticles and Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Surface Functionalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Bingsen; Shao, Lidong; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    It is crucial to accurately describe the interaction between the surface functionality and the supported metal catalyst because it directly determines the activity and selectivity of a catalytic reaction. It is, however, challenging with a metal-carbon catalytic system owing to the ultrafine...... degrees C. We focus on probing the effects of oxygen and nitrogen-containing functional groups on supported palladium nanoparticles (NPs) in the model catalytic system. The stability of palladium NPs supported on CNTs depends strongly on the surface properties of CNTs. Moreover, the oxygen......-containing functional groups on the CNT surfaces, such as carboxylic acids and anhydrides, have an even stronger interaction with palladium NPs than the nitrogen-containing counterparts. Our work contributes to elucidation of the complex metal-carbon interaction and unlocks potential in activity and selectivity control...

  20. Control of the grafting of hybrid polyoxometalates on metal and carbon surfaces: toward submonolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gam Derouich, Sarra; Rinfray, Corentin; Izzet, Guillaume; Pinson, Jean; Gallet, Jean-Jacques; Kanoufi, Frédéric; Proust, Anna; Combellas, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    A Keggin-type POM is attached to gold or glassy carbon surfaces by electro(chemical) or peptidic coupling. In addition to demonstrating the robust attachment of the POMs (by electrochemistry, XPS, and IRRAS), the surface concentration, layer thickness, and rate constant for electron transfer from the surface to the POMs have been measured. The use of such complementary techniques is mandatory to characterize the modified electrodes properly. Whatever the grafting method, experimental conditions are found to allow monolayer or submonolayer coverage. Besides covalently grafted species, additional electrostatically bonded POMs are present in the film. Cathodic polarization allows removing them to get a grafted film that is stable with time and potential, which is a requirement in the design of molecular memories.

  1. Surface Catalytic Efficiency of Advanced Carbon Carbon Candidate Thermal Protection Materials for SSTO Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for advanced ceramic thermal protection systems was calculated using arc-jet data. Coefficients for both oxygen and nitrogen atom recombination on the surfaces of these systems were obtained to temperatures of 1650 K. Optical and chemical stability of the candidate systems to the high energy hypersonic flow was also demonstrated during these tests.

  2. Influence of hydrogen on chemical vapour synthesis of different carbon nanostructures using propane as precursor and nickel as catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Sahoo; H Mamgain; C Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The role of hydrogen in the catalytic chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes using sputtered nickel thin film as a catalyst is explained in this work. The growth of different carbon nanostructures with the variation in the precursor gas content was studied by keeping all other process parameters constant and using sputtered Ni thin film as a catalyst. The catalyst granule size, its external morphology and the resulting products were analysed. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and carbon nanoribbons (CNRs) were observed under different growth conditions. The different conditions of growth leading to form tubes, fibres or ribbons were analysed by varying the flow ratio of propane and hydrogen gas during the high temperature growth. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies confirmed the above structures under different growth conditions. The role of hydrogen on the surface passivation behaviour of the Ni catalyst and its correlative effect on the growth of carbon nanostructures is analysed. This direct approach can, in principle, be used to synthesize different types of carbon nanostructures by tailoring the hydrogen concentration.

  3. Al current collector surface treatment and carbon nano tubes influences on Carbon / Carbon super-capacitors performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portet, C.; Taberna, P.L.; Simon, P. [Universite Paul Sabatier, CIRIMAT-LCMIE, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2004-07-01

    Performances of 4 cm{sup 2} carbon/carbon super-capacitors cells using Al current collectors foils in organic electrolyte are presented; the improvement of electrode material has been investigated. In a first part, a surface treatment of the Al current collector is proposed in order to improve contact surface between the current collector and the active material leading to an internal resistance decrease. The process consists in an etching of the Al foil and is followed by a carbonaceous sol-gel deposit. Galvano-static cycling and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy measurements of super-capacitors all assembled with treated Al foil were tested over 10,000 cycles: an ESR of 0.5 {omega} cm{sup 2} and a capacitance of 95 F g{sup -1} of activated carbon are obtained and performances remain stable during cycling. The second part is devoted to the study of Carbon Nano Tubes (CNTs) adding into the active material on the performances of super-capacitors. A content of 15% of CNTs appears to be the best composition; the ESR is 0.4 {omega} cm{sup 2} (20% lowered as compared to a cell using activated carbon based electrode) and the capacitance remain high 93 F g{sup -1} of carbonaceous active material. (authors)

  4. Plasmon-assisted photoluminescence enhancement of single-walled carbon nanotubes on metal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sakashita, Takerou; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsuda, Kazunari; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated photoluminescence (PL) enhancement in single carbon nanotubes using localized surface plasmons. Single nanotube spectroscopy revealed triple the PL intensity enhancement for carbon nanotubes on rough Au surfaces as on fused silica surfaces. The PL enhancement depends on the excitation wavelength and distance between the carbon nanotubes and the Au surface. The degree of PL enhancement is determined by the electric field enhancement from the localized surface plasmon and the en...

  5. Surface morphology, cohesive and adhesive properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon nanocomposite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), SiOx containing a-C:H (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx (a-C:H:N/SiOx) thin films were deposited on chromium thin film coated glass using a closed drift ion beam source. Acetylene gas, hexamethyldisiloxane and hydrogen or 20% nitrogen/hydrogen mixture were used as precursors. Resulting hydrogenated carbon thin film surface morphology as well as their cohesive and adhesive properties were studied using progressive loading scratch tests followed by optical microscopy analysis. Surface analysis was also performed using atomic force microscopy via topography, surface morphology parameter, height distribution histogram and bearing ratio curve based hybrid parameter measurements. The a-C:H/SiOx and a-C:H:N/SiOx thin films showed better mechanical strength as compared to the conventional a-C:H films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of these films. It showed increased amounts of silicon and absence of terminal oxygenated carbon bonds in a-C:H:N/SiOx thin film which was attributed to its improved mechanical properties.

  6. Reproducibly creating hierarchical 3D carbon to study the effect of Si surface functionalization on the oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuze; Flores, Jose F.; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Guo, Jinghua; Chuang, Yi-De; Lu, Jennifer Q.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new method to reproducibly fabricate functional 3D carbon structures directly on a current collector, e.g. stainless steel. The 3D carbon platform is formed by direct growth of upright arrays of carbon nanofiber bundles on a roughened surface of stainless steel via the seed-assisted approach. Each bundle consists of about 30 individual carbon nanofibers with a diameter of 18 nm on average. We have found that this new platform offers adequate structural integrity. As a result, no reduction of the surface area during downstream chemical functionalization was observed. With a fixed and reproducible 3D structure, the effect of the chemistry of the grafted species on the oxygen reduction reaction has been systematically investigated. This investigation reveals for the first time that non-conductive Si with an appropriate electronic structure distorts the carbon electronic structure and consequently enhances ORR electrocatalysis. The strong interface provides excellent electron connectivity according to electrochemical analysis. This highly reproducible and stable 3D platform can serve as a stepping-stone for the investigation of the effect of carbon surface functionalization on electrochemical reactions in general.We report a new method to reproducibly fabricate functional 3D carbon structures directly on a current collector, e.g. stainless steel. The 3D carbon platform is formed by direct growth of upright arrays of carbon nanofiber bundles on a roughened surface of stainless steel via the seed-assisted approach. Each bundle consists of about 30 individual carbon nanofibers with a diameter of 18 nm on average. We have found that this new platform offers adequate structural integrity. As a result, no reduction of the surface area during downstream chemical functionalization was observed. With a fixed and reproducible 3D structure, the effect of the chemistry of the grafted species on the oxygen reduction reaction has been systematically investigated. This

  7. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean timeseries sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30 year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these

  8. Surface Cleaning or Activation?Control of Surface Condition Prior to Thermo-Chemical Heat Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brigitte Haase; Juan Dong; Jens Heinlein

    2004-01-01

    Actual heat treatment processes must face increasing specifications with reference to process quality, safety and results in terms of reproducibility and repeatability. They can be met only if the parts' surface condition is controlled during manufacturing and, especially, prior to the treatment. An electrochemical method for the detection of a steel part's surface condition is presented, together with results, consequences, and mechanisms concerning surface pre-treatment before the thermochemical process. A steel surface's activity or passivity can be detected electrochemically, independently from the chemical background. The selected method was the recording of potential vs. time curves at small constant currents, using a miniaturized electrochemical cell, a (nearly) non-destructive electrolyte and a potentio-galvanostatic setup. The method enables to distinguish types of surface contamination which do not interfere with the thermochemical process, from passive layers which do and must be removed. Whereas some types of passive layers can be removed using conventional cleaning processes and agents, others are so stable that their effects can only be overcome by applying an additional activation pre-treatment, e.g. oxynitriding.

  9. Dense Seismic Recordings of Two Surface-Detonated Chemical Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, K. D.; Hale, J. M.; Burlacu, R.; Goddard, K. J.; Trow, A.; Linville, L. M.; Stein, J. R.; Drobeck, D.; Leidig, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the summer of 2015 two controlled chemical explosions were carried out near Dugway, Utah. The 2 June 2015 explosion consisted of 30,000 lbs of ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and the 22 July 2015 explosion consisted of 60,000 lbs of ANFO. The explosion centroids were 1-2 m above the Earth's surface and both created significant craters in the soft desert alluvium. To better understand the seismic source associated with surface explosions, we deployed an array of wireless, three-component, short-period (5 Hz corner frequency) seismometers for several days around each shot. For the first explosion, 46 receivers were deployed in a "lollipop" geometry that had a sparse ring at a radius of 1 km, and a dense stem with 100 m spacing for distances of 0.5-4.5 km. For the second explosion, 48 receivers were deployed similarly, but with a dense ring spaced in azimuthal increments of 10 degrees at a distance of 1 km, and a sparse stem (~500 m spacing) that extended to a distance of nearly 6 km. A rich variety of phases were recorded including direct P waves, refracted and reflected P waves, nearly monochromatic air-coupled Rayleigh waves, normally dispersed fundamental mode Rayleigh waves (Rg), primary airblast arrivals, some secondary airblast arrivals, and possibly tertiary airblast arrivals. There is also evidence of converted S waves on the radial components and possibly direct S energy on the radial and transverse components, although the transverse energy does not always possess a simple, coherent move-out with distance, implying that it might have a scattering origin. To aid in the phase identification, especially of the apparent SH and Love energy, we are currently performing tau-p, f-k, and particle motion analysis.

  10. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  11. Effects of rf power on chemical composition and surface roughness of glow discharge polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; He, Xiaoshan; Chen, Guo; Wang, Tao; Tang, Yongjian; He, Zhibing

    2016-03-01

    The glow discharge polymer (GDP) films for laser fusion targets were successfully fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at different radio frequency (rf) powers. The films were deposited using trans-2-butene (T2B) mixed with hydrogen as gas sources. The composition and state of plasma were diagnosed by quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and Langmuir probe during the deposition process. The composition, surface morphology and roughness were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and white-light interferometer (WLI), respectively. Based on these observation and analyses, the growth mechanism of defects in GDP films were studied. The results show that, at low rf power, there is a larger probability for secondary polymerization and formation of multi-carbon C-H species in the plasma. In this case, the surface of GDP film turns to be cauliflower-like. With the increase of rf power, the degree of ionization is high, the relative concentration of smaller-mass hydrocarbon species increases, while the relative concentration of larger-mass hydrocarbon species decreases. At higher rf power, the energy of smaller-mass species are high and the etching effects are strong correspondingly. The GDP film's surface roughness shows a trend of decrease firstly and then increase with the increasing rf power. At rf power of 30 W, the surface root-mean-square roughness (Rq) drops to the lowest value of 12.8 nm, and no "void" defect was observed.

  12. Equilibrium thermodynamic analyses of methanol production via a novel Chemical Looping Carbon Arrestor process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel Chemical Looping Carbon Arrestor Reforming process has been developed. • Energy efficiency of the process is found to be ∼64–70%. • The process emits only about 0.14 mole of carbon dioxide per mole of methanol. • The process offers an efficient and low-emission option for methanol production. - Abstract: Methanol economy is considered as an alternative to hydrogen economy due to the better handling and storage characteristics of methanol fuel than liquid hydrogen. This paper is concerned about a comprehensive equilibrium thermodynamic analysis carried out on methanol production via an innovative Chemical Looping Carbon Arrestor/Reforming process being developed at the University of Newcastle in order to reduce both energy consumption and carbon emissions. The detailed simulation revealed thermodynamic limitations within the Chemical Looping Carbon Reforming process however on the other hand it also confirmed that the new concept is a low energy requirement and low emission option compared to other methanol production technologies. Specifically, the mass and energy balance study showed that the Chemical Looping Carbon Reforming process typically consumes approximately 0.76–0.77 mole methane, 0.25–0.27 mole carbon dioxide, 0.49–0.50 mole water, and 0.51 mole iron oxide (in a chemical looping manner) per mole of methanol production. Moreover, the energy efficiency of Chemical Looping Carbon Reforming process was found to be ∼64–70% and its emission profile was found as low as 0.14 mole carbon dioxide per mole of methanol, which is about 82–88% less than the conventional methanol production process and well below the emission levels of other emerging methanol production technologies

  13. Surface modification of multi-wall carbon nanotube with ultraviolet-curable hyperbranched polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface modification is a general and efficient approach to improve the compatibility of carbon nanotube (CNT) with various matrixes. Here we report the modification of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with hyperbranched polymer which contains UV reactive functional groups. The modification promotes the incorporation of CNT into UV-curable resin, and when cured under UV irradiation to form a homogeneous film, the CNT will be chemically bonded with the matrix by crosslinking photopolymerization. For the unique mechanical properties of CNT, the mechanical properties of the cured MWCNT/UV-curable resin film were greatly improved compared with pure resin film as indicated by the increasing of Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness

  14. Charge effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on their surface functionalization by photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javanbakht, Taraneh [Ecole Polytechnique of Montreal, Department of Chemical Engineering (Canada); Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri [University of Mons, Laboratory of NMR and Molecular Imaging (Belgium); Raphael, Wendell; Tavares, Jason Robert, E-mail: jason.tavares@polymtl.ca [Ecole Polytechnique of Montreal, Department of Chemical Engineering (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Diverse applications of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in the chemical and biomedical industry depend on their surface properties. In this paper, we investigate the effect of initial surface charge (bare, positively and negatively charged SPIONs) on the resulting physicochemical properties of the particles following treatment through photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). Transmission electron microscopy shows a nanometric polymer coating on the SPIONs and contact angle measurements with water demonstrate that their surface became non-polar following functionalization using PICVD. FTIR and XPS data confirm the change in the chemical composition of the treated SPIONs. Indeed, XPS data reveal an initial charge-dependent increase in the surface oxygen content in the case of treated SPIONs. The O/C percentage ratios of the bare SPIONs increase from 1.7 to 1.9 after PICVD treatment, and decrease from 1.7 to 0.7 in the case of negatively charged SPIONs. The ratio remains unchanged for positively charged SPIONs (1.7). This indicates that bare and negatively charged SPIONs showed opposite preference for the oxygen or carbon attachment to their surface during their surface treatment. These results reveal that both the surface charge and stereochemical effects have determinant roles in the polymeric coating of SPIONs with PICVD. Our findings suggest that this technique is appropriate for the treatment of nanoparticles.Graphical Abstract.

  15. Charge effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on their surface functionalization by photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diverse applications of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in the chemical and biomedical industry depend on their surface properties. In this paper, we investigate the effect of initial surface charge (bare, positively and negatively charged SPIONs) on the resulting physicochemical properties of the particles following treatment through photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). Transmission electron microscopy shows a nanometric polymer coating on the SPIONs and contact angle measurements with water demonstrate that their surface became non-polar following functionalization using PICVD. FTIR and XPS data confirm the change in the chemical composition of the treated SPIONs. Indeed, XPS data reveal an initial charge-dependent increase in the surface oxygen content in the case of treated SPIONs. The O/C percentage ratios of the bare SPIONs increase from 1.7 to 1.9 after PICVD treatment, and decrease from 1.7 to 0.7 in the case of negatively charged SPIONs. The ratio remains unchanged for positively charged SPIONs (1.7). This indicates that bare and negatively charged SPIONs showed opposite preference for the oxygen or carbon attachment to their surface during their surface treatment. These results reveal that both the surface charge and stereochemical effects have determinant roles in the polymeric coating of SPIONs with PICVD. Our findings suggest that this technique is appropriate for the treatment of nanoparticles.Graphical Abstract

  16. Immobilization of redox mediators on functionalized carbon nanotube: A material for chemical sensor fabrication and amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D R Shobha Jeykumari; S Senthil Kumar; S Sriman Narayanan

    2005-10-01

    Chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with redox mediators, namely, toluidine blue and thionin have been carried out and the performance of graphite electrode modified with functionalized carbon nanotubes is described. Mechanical immobilization of functionalized single-walled nanotube (SWNT) on graphite electrode was achieved by gently rubbing the electrode surface on carbon nanotubes supported on a glass slide. The electrochemical behaviour of the modified electrodes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The SWNT-modified electrodes showed excellent electrocatalytic effect for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. A decrease in overvoltage was observed as well as an enhanced peak current compared to a bare graphite electrode for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic current was found to be directly proportional to the amount of hydrogen peroxide taken.

  17. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  18. Chemical erosion of different carbon composites under ITER-relevant plasma conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Borodin, D.; Al, R.S.; Brezinsek, S.; Hoen, Mhjt; Kirschner, A.; Lisgo, S.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Philipps, V.; van de Pol, M.J.; Shumack, A. E.; De Temmerman, G.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Wright, G. M.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Rapp, J.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the chemical erosion of different carbon composites in Pilot-PSI at ITER-relevant hydrogen plasma fluxes (similar to 10(24) m(-2) s(-1)) and low electron temperatures (T-e similar to 1 eV). Optical emission spectroscopy on the CH A-X band was used to characterize the chemical sputter

  19. Carbon Nanofibers (CNFs) Surface Modification to Fabricate Carbon Nanofibers_Nanopaper Integrated Polymer Composite Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Zhao, Ziwei; Deng, Chao; Liu, Fa; Li, Dejia; Fang, Liangchao; Zhang, Dan; Castro Jose M; Chen, Feng; Lee, L James

    2016-06-01

    Carbon Nanofibers (CNFs) have shown great potential to improve the physical and mechanical properties of conventional Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites (FRPCs) surface. Excellent dispersion CNFs into water or polymer matrix was very crucial to get good quality CNFs enhanced FRPCs. Because of the hydrophobic properties of CNFs, we apply the reversible switching principles to transfer the hydrophobic surface into hydrophilic surface by growing polyaniline nanograss on the surface of CNFs which was carried out in hydrochloric acid condition. Incorporating CNFs into FRPCs as a surface layer named CNFs Nanopaper to increase the erosion resistance and electrical conductivity in this research which was very important in the wind energy field. In order to get high quality dispersed CNFs suspension, a sonication unit was used to detangle and uniform disperse the functionalized CNFs. A filter with vacuum pressure used to filter the suspension of CNFs onto Carbon veil to make CNFs Nanopaper. Vacuum Aided Resin Transfer Modeling (VARTM) process was used to fabricate Nano-enhanced FRPCs samples. In order to characterize the mechanical properties, three point bending experiment was measured. The flexural strength capacity and deformation resistance and behavior were compared and analyzed. In this paper, we discussed the methods used and provided experimental parameter and experimental results.

  20. Carbon Nanofibers (CNFs) Surface Modification to Fabricate Carbon Nanofibers_Nanopaper Integrated Polymer Composite Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Zhao, Ziwei; Deng, Chao; Liu, Fa; Li, Dejia; Fang, Liangchao; Zhang, Dan; Castro Jose M; Chen, Feng; Lee, L James

    2016-06-01

    Carbon Nanofibers (CNFs) have shown great potential to improve the physical and mechanical properties of conventional Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites (FRPCs) surface. Excellent dispersion CNFs into water or polymer matrix was very crucial to get good quality CNFs enhanced FRPCs. Because of the hydrophobic properties of CNFs, we apply the reversible switching principles to transfer the hydrophobic surface into hydrophilic surface by growing polyaniline nanograss on the surface of CNFs which was carried out in hydrochloric acid condition. Incorporating CNFs into FRPCs as a surface layer named CNFs Nanopaper to increase the erosion resistance and electrical conductivity in this research which was very important in the wind energy field. In order to get high quality dispersed CNFs suspension, a sonication unit was used to detangle and uniform disperse the functionalized CNFs. A filter with vacuum pressure used to filter the suspension of CNFs onto Carbon veil to make CNFs Nanopaper. Vacuum Aided Resin Transfer Modeling (VARTM) process was used to fabricate Nano-enhanced FRPCs samples. In order to characterize the mechanical properties, three point bending experiment was measured. The flexural strength capacity and deformation resistance and behavior were compared and analyzed. In this paper, we discussed the methods used and provided experimental parameter and experimental results. PMID:27427606

  1. The chemical composition of carbon stars: The R-type stars

    OpenAIRE

    Zamora, Olga; Abia, Carlos; PLEZ, Bertrand; Dominguez, Inmaculada; Cristallo, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to shed some light on the problem of the formation of carbon stars of R-type from a detailed study of their chemical composition. We use high-resolution and high signal-to-noise optical spectra of 23 R-type stars selected from the Hipparcos catalogue. The chemical analysis is made using spectral synthesis in LTE and state-of-the-art carbon-rich spherical model atmospheres. We derive their CNO content (including the carbon isotopic ratio), average metallicity, lithium, ...

  2. Nano surface generation of grinding process using carbon nano tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Prabhu; B K Vinayagam

    2010-12-01

    Nano surface finish has become an important parameter in the semiconductor, optical, electrical and mechanical industries. The materials used in these industries are classified as difficult to machine materials such as ceramics, glasses and silicon wafers. Machining of these materials up to nano accuracy is a great challenge in the manufacturing industry. Finishing of micro components such as micro-moulds, micro-lenses and micro-holes need different processing techniques. Conventional finishing methods used so far become almost impossible or cumbersome. In this paper, a nano material especially multi wall carbon nano tube is used in the machining process like grinding to improve the surface characteristics from micro to nano level.

  3. Chemical characterization and dynamics of particulate combined amino acids in Pacific surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, Ayumi; Tanoue, Eiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) in surface water plays an essential role in maintaining marine ecosystem and is a complex mixture of living POM (organisms) and non-living POM (detritus). Transformation of organic constituents of organisms to detritus may be the most active part in the decomposition processes of organic matter in marine biogeochemistry. Distribution and chemical fractionation of particulate combined amino acids (PCAAs) in surface waters from Southern Ocean to tropical waters along a transect of 170°W were examined to clarify the transfer processes of organic constituents of organisms to detritus. The observational facts may be summarized as follows. 1) Degradation Index (DI) based on principal component analysis of amino acid composition of bulk PCAAs agreed with the traditional degradation indicators of bulk POM, i.e., PCAAs-carbon (C)/particulate organic carbon (POC), PCAAs-nitrogen (N)/particulate nitrogen (PN) and C/N. 2) PCAAs were distinguished into 3 fractions, i.e., Urea-soluble, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-soluble and SDS/Urea-insoluble fractions, by means of solubility against reagents frequently used for protein extraction from biological samples. Proportions of PCAAs of the 3 fractions to bulk PCAAs were almost constant, although concentrations of the PCAAs of 3 fractions as well as bulk in seawater varied two orders of magnitude over the transect. 3) There was no significant difference among DI values of the 3 fractions, although molecular mass distributions of the Urea-soluble and SDS-soluble fractions determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were different. The results indicated that no one fraction was particularly susceptible to degradation and that there is a common mechanism for transferring and maintaining the similar chemical quality of bulk POM over the transect.

  4. Preparation of carbon nanotubes with different morphology by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi av., 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansurov, Zulkhair [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi av., 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmoldin, S.Zh. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ibragimov Street 11, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2010-04-15

    In this work we present a part of our results about the preparation of carbon nanotube with different morphologies by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition MPECVD. Well aligned, curly, carbon nanosheets, coiled carbon sheets and carbon microcoils have been prepared. We have investigated the effect of the different growth condition parameters such as the growth temperature, pressure and the hydrogen to methane flow rate ratio on the morphology of the carbon nanotubes. The results showed that there is a great dependence of the morphology of carbon nanotubes on these parameters. The yield of the carbon microcoils was high when the growth temperature was 700 C. There is a linear relation between the growth rate and the methane to hydrogen ratio. The effect of the gas pressure on the CNTs was also studied. Our samples were investigated by scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Surface analysis of zinc-porphyrin functionalized carbon nano-onions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Valentina; Ceccone, Giacomo; Giordani, Silvia

    2015-03-10

    Multishell fullerenes, known as carbon nano-onions (CNOs), are an interesting class of carbon-based nanomaterials. They display several unique properties, such as a large surface area to volume ratio, a low density, and a graphitic multilayer morphology, which have made them appealing for several applications in many fields, including biology. Chemical functionalization of CNOs dramatically enhances their solubility and attenuates their inflammatory properties, thereby increasing their applicability especially in the fields of biology and medicine. CNOs functionalized with fluorescent probes can be used for cellular imaging. In this article, detailed surface characterization of CNOs functionalized with a zinc porphyrin (ZnTPP) as the fluorescent probe is presented. In particular, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provide a detailed surface characterization of the organic functionalities introduced via "click chemistry" and clearly demonstrate the success of the CNOs functionalization process. XPS data reveal the presence of Zn and N, whilst ToF-SIMS is able to identify specific fragments related to the presence of the ZnTPP, such as the quasimolecular mass peak [C32N4H20Zn](+) and the molecular mass peak [C44N4H28Zn](+). Moreover, ions fragments deriving from the triazole ring formed by the click chemistry reaction have been identified by ToF-SIMS analysis, proving unambiguously the covalent binding of the fluorescent molecules to the CNOs surfaces.

  6. VERIFICATION OF THE EFFECT OF CONCRETE SURFACE PROTECTION ON THE PERMEABILITY OF ACID GASES USING ACCELERATED CARBONATION DEPTH TEST IN AN ATMOSPHERE OF 98% CO2

    OpenAIRE

    JIŘÍ NOVÁK; MICHAL STEHLÍK

    2011-01-01

    Carbonation is one of the corrosion processes negatively influencing the properties of mature concrete. It is caused by a chemical reaction between carbon dioxide infiltrating the surface of a concrete structure and the minerals of the mastic cement. The surface of a concrete structure can be protected from the effects of atmospheric CO2 by coating with modern waterborne epoxy dispersions. Out of the four types of dispersions tested (dispersion A – CHS Epoxy 200 V 55 + hardener Telalit 180, 2...

  7. Surface functional groups and redox property of modified activated carbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xianglan; Deng Shengfu; Liu Qiong; Zhang Yan; Cheng Lei

    2011-01-01

    A series of activated carbons (ACs) were prepared using HNO3, H2O2 and steam as activation agents with the aim to introduce functional groups to carbon surface in the ACs preparation process. The effects of concentration of activation agent, activation time on the surface functional groups and redox property of ACs were characterized by Temperature Program Desorption (TPD) and Cyclic Voitammetry (CV). Results showed that lactone groups of ACs activated by HNO3 increase with activation time, and the carboxyl groups increase with the concentration of HNO3. Carbonyl/quinine groups of ACs activated by H2O2 increase with the activation time and the concentration of H2O2, although the acidic groups decrease with the concentration of H2O2. The redox property reflected by CV at 0 and 0.5 V is different with any kinds of oxygen functional groups characterized by TPD, but it is consistent with the SO2 catalytic oxidization/oxidation properties indicated by TPR.

  8. Reaction from Dimethyl Carbonate to Diphenyl Carbonate. 1. Experimental Determination of the Chemical Equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haubrock, J.; Raspe, M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Kooijman, H.A.; Taylor, R.; Hogendoorn, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    New experimental equilibrium data of the reaction of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and phenol to methyl phenyl carbonate (MPC) and the subsequent disproportion and transesterification reaction of MPC to diphenyl carbonate (DPC) are presented and interpreted in terms of the reaction equilibrium coefficien

  9. Preparation of porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk by leaching ash and chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiduzzaman, Md; Sadrul Islam, A K M

    2016-01-01

    Preparation porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk char study has been conducted in this study. Rice husk char contains high amount silica that retards the porousness of bio-char. Porousness of rice husk char could be enhanced by removing the silica from char and applying heat at high temperature. Furthermore, the char is activated by using chemical activation under high temperature. In this study no inert media is used. The study is conducted at low oxygen environment by applying biomass for consuming oxygen inside reactor and double crucible method (one crucible inside another) is applied to prevent intrusion of oxygen into the char. The study results shows that porous carbon is prepared successfully without using any inert media. The adsorption capacity of material increased due to removal of silica and due to the activation with zinc chloride compared to using raw rice husk char. The surface area of porous carbon and activated carbon are found to be 28, 331 and 645 m(2) g(-1) for raw rice husk char, silica removed rice husk char and zinc chloride activated rice husk char, respectively. It is concluded from this study that porous bio-char and activated carbon could be prepared in normal environmental conditions instead of inert media. This study shows a method and possibility of activated carbon from agro-waste, and it could be scaled up for commercial production. PMID:27536531

  10. Preparation of porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk by leaching ash and chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiduzzaman, Md; Sadrul Islam, A K M

    2016-01-01

    Preparation porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk char study has been conducted in this study. Rice husk char contains high amount silica that retards the porousness of bio-char. Porousness of rice husk char could be enhanced by removing the silica from char and applying heat at high temperature. Furthermore, the char is activated by using chemical activation under high temperature. In this study no inert media is used. The study is conducted at low oxygen environment by applying biomass for consuming oxygen inside reactor and double crucible method (one crucible inside another) is applied to prevent intrusion of oxygen into the char. The study results shows that porous carbon is prepared successfully without using any inert media. The adsorption capacity of material increased due to removal of silica and due to the activation with zinc chloride compared to using raw rice husk char. The surface area of porous carbon and activated carbon are found to be 28, 331 and 645 m(2) g(-1) for raw rice husk char, silica removed rice husk char and zinc chloride activated rice husk char, respectively. It is concluded from this study that porous bio-char and activated carbon could be prepared in normal environmental conditions instead of inert media. This study shows a method and possibility of activated carbon from agro-waste, and it could be scaled up for commercial production.

  11. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest Grown via Chemical Vapor Deposition from Iron Catalyst Nanoparticles, by XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Madaan, Nitesh; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique chemical and physical properties. Herein, we report an XPS analysis of a forest of multiwalled CNTs using monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Survey scans show only one element: carbon. The carbon 1s peak is centered 284.5 eV. The C 1s envelope also shows the expected π → π* shake-up peak at ca. 291 eV. The valence band and carbon KVV Auger signals are presented. When patterned, the CNT forests can be used as a template for subsequent deposition of metal oxides to make thin layer chromatography plates.1-3

  12. Role of surface chemistry in modified ACF (activated carbon fiber)-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zheng, Di; Zhang, Yitao

    2016-10-01

    A commercial activated carbon fiber (ACF-0) was modified by three different methods: nitration treatment (ACF-N), heat treatment (ACF-H) and heat treatment after nitration (ACF-NH), and the effects of textural and chemical properties on the ability of the metal-free ACF-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5), an azo dye being difficultly adsorbed onto ACF, in aqueous solution were investigated in this work. Surface density of functional groups, surface area changes, surface morphology and the chemical state inside ACF samples were characterized by Boehm titration, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy in couple with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. XPS spectra deconvolution was applied to figure out the importance of surface nitrogen-containing function groups. We found that π-π, pyridine and amine have promoting effect on the catalytic oxidation while the -NO2 has inhibitory effect on the ACF/PMS systems for RB5 destroy. Sustainability and renewability of the typical ACF-NH for catalytic oxidation of RB5 were also discussed in detail. Information about our conclusions are useful to control and improve the performance of ACF-catalyzed PMS oxidation for organic pollutants in wastewater treatment.

  13. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change. PMID:24892495

  14. Quantitative Analysis on Carbon Migration in Double-Glow Discharge Plasma Surface Alloying Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-xia; WANG Cong-zeng; ZHANG Wen-quan; SU Xue-kuan

    2004-01-01

    Carbon migration is of great significance in double-glow discharge plasma surface alloying process, but literature of quantitative analysis about carbon migration is relatively scarce. In this paper differential equations of the carbon and metal concentration distribution were established. By means of differential equations carbon migration was described and a numerical solution was acquired. The computational results fit the experiment results quite well.

  15. Surface and sub-surface degradation of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites under dry and wet reciprocating sliding

    OpenAIRE

    Dhieb, H.; Buijnsters, J.G.; Eddoumy, F.; Vázquez, Luis; Celis, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of water on the sub-surface degradation of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite is examined. The correlation between the debonding of carbon fibers at the fiber-epoxy interface, and the wear behavior of the carbon fiber composite are discussed based on an in-depth analysis of the worn surfaces. We demonstrate that a reciprocating sliding performed along an anti-parallel direction to the fiber orientation under dry conditions results in a large degradation by debondi...

  16. Functional carbons and carbon nanohybrids for the catalytic conversion of biomass to renewable chemicals in the condensed phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthiesen, John; Hoff, Thomas; Liu, Chi; Pueschel, Charles; Rao, Radhika; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The production of chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass provides opportunities to synthesize chemicals with new functionalities and grow a more sustainable chemical industry. However, new challenges emerge as research transitions from petrochemistry to biorenewable chemistry. Compared to petrochemisty, the selective conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates requires most catalytic reactions to take place at low temperatures (< 300°C) and in the condensed phase to prevent reactants and products from degrading. The stability of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid water above the normal boiling point represents one of the major challenges to overcome. Herein, we review some of the latest advances in the field with an emphasis on the role of carbon materials and carbon nanohybrids in addressing this challenge.

  17. Functional carbons and carbon nanohybrids for the catalytic conversion of biomass to renewable chemicals in the condensed phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Matthiesen; Thomas Hoff; Chi Liu; Charles Pueschel; Radhika Rao; Jean-Philippe Tessonnier

    2014-01-01

    The production of chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass provides opportunities to synthesize chemicals with new functionalities and grow a more sustainable chemical industry. However, new challenges emerge as research transitions from petrochemistry to biorenewable chemistry. Com-pared to petrochemisty, the selective conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates requires most catalytic reactions to take place at low temperatures (<300 °C) and in the condensed phase to pre-vent reactants and products from degrading. The stability of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid water above the normal boiling point represents one of the major challenges to overcome. Herein, we review some of the latest advances in the field with an emphasis on the role of carbon materials and carbon nanohybrids in addressing this challenge.

  18. Surface modification of activated carbons for CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pevida, C. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: cpevida@incar.csic.es; Plaza, M.G.; Arias, B.; Fermoso, J.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    The reduction of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions to address the consequences of climate change is a matter of concern for all developed countries. In the short term, one of the most viable options for reducing carbon emissions is to capture and store CO{sub 2} at large stationary sources. Adsorption with solid sorbents is one of the most promising options. In this work, two series of materials were prepared from two commercial activated carbons, C and R, by heat treatment with gaseous ammonia at temperatures in the 200-800 deg. C range. The aim was to improve the selectivity and capacity of the sorbents to capture CO{sub 2}, by introducing basic nitrogen-functionalities into the carbons. The sorbents were characterised in terms of texture and chemical composition. Their surface chemistry was studied through temperature-programmed desorption tests and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The capture performance of the carbons was evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analyser to record mass uptakes by the samples when exposed to a CO{sub 2} atmosphere.

  19. Evaluation of the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoblast on a calcium carbonate coating on titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yi; Jiang Tao; Zhou Yi; Zhang Zhen; Wang Zhejun [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering, Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Tong Hua; Shen Xinyu [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang Yining, E-mail: wang.yn@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering, Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-07-20

    Titanium has been reported to have some limitations in dental and orthopaedic clinical application. This study described a coating process using a simple chemical method to prepare calcium carbonate coatings on smooth titanium (STi) and sandblasted and acid-etched titanium (SATi), and evaluated the biological response of the materials in vitro. The surfaces of STi, SATi, calcium carbonate coated STi (CC-STi) and calcium carbonate coated SATi (CC-SATi) were characterized for surface roughness, contact angles, surface morphology and surface chemistry. The morphology of MG63 cells cultured on the surfaces was observed by SEM and Immuno-fluorescence staining. Cell attachment/proliferation was assessed by MTT assay, and cell differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. MG63 was found to attach favorably to calcium carbonate crystals with longer cytoplasmic extensions on CC-STi and CC-SATi, resulting in lower cell proliferation but higher ALP activity when compared to STi and SATi respectively. Moreover, CC-SATi is more favorable than CC-STi in terms of biological response. In conclusion, the calcium carbonate coatings on titanium were supposed to improve the osteointegration process and stimulate osteoblast differentiation, especially in early stage. And this method could possibly be a feasible alternative option for future clinical application. Highlights: {yields} Calcium carbonate coatings were prepared on titanium substrates. {yields} The coating process is simple and cost-effective. {yields} Calcium carbonate coating could induce differentiation toward an osteoblastic phenotype. {yields} Calcium carbonate coating could enhance the osteointegration process especially in early stage.

  20. Evaluation of the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoblast on a calcium carbonate coating on titanium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium has been reported to have some limitations in dental and orthopaedic clinical application. This study described a coating process using a simple chemical method to prepare calcium carbonate coatings on smooth titanium (STi) and sandblasted and acid-etched titanium (SATi), and evaluated the biological response of the materials in vitro. The surfaces of STi, SATi, calcium carbonate coated STi (CC-STi) and calcium carbonate coated SATi (CC-SATi) were characterized for surface roughness, contact angles, surface morphology and surface chemistry. The morphology of MG63 cells cultured on the surfaces was observed by SEM and Immuno-fluorescence staining. Cell attachment/proliferation was assessed by MTT assay, and cell differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. MG63 was found to attach favorably to calcium carbonate crystals with longer cytoplasmic extensions on CC-STi and CC-SATi, resulting in lower cell proliferation but higher ALP activity when compared to STi and SATi respectively. Moreover, CC-SATi is more favorable than CC-STi in terms of biological response. In conclusion, the calcium carbonate coatings on titanium were supposed to improve the osteointegration process and stimulate osteoblast differentiation, especially in early stage. And this method could possibly be a feasible alternative option for future clinical application. Highlights: → Calcium carbonate coatings were prepared on titanium substrates. → The coating process is simple and cost-effective. → Calcium carbonate coating could induce differentiation toward an osteoblastic phenotype. → Calcium carbonate coating could enhance the osteointegration process especially in early stage.

  1. Radiation-curing of acrylate composites including carbon fibres: A customized surface modification for improving mechanical performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Arnaud; Pietras-Ozga, Dorota; Ponsaud, Philippe; Kowandy, Christelle; Barczak, Mariusz; Defoort, Brigitte; Coqueret, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    The lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured acrylate-based composites reinforced with carbon-fibre with respect to the thermosettable analogues was investigated from the viewpoint of chemical interactions at the interface between the matrix and the carbon material. XPS analysis of representative commercial carbon fibres revealed the presence of a significant amount of chemical functions potentially exerting an adverse effect on the initiation and propagation of the free radical polymerization initiated under high energy radiation. The EB-induced polymerization of n-butyl acrylate as a simple model monomer was conducted in the presence of various aromatic additives exhibiting a strong inhibiting effect, whereas thiols efficiently sensitize the initiation mechanism and undergo transfer reactions. A method based on the surface modification of sized fibres by thiomalic acid is proposed for overcoming the localized inhibition phenomenon and for improving the mechanical properties of the resulting acrylate-based composites.

  2. Carbon out-diffusion mechanism for direct graphene growth on a silicon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct growth of graphene on silicon (Si) through chemical vapor deposition has predominantly focused on surface-mediated processes due to the low carbon (C) solubility in Si. However, a considerable quantity of C atoms was incorporated in Si and formed Si1−xCx alloy with a reduced lattice dimension even in the initial stage of direct graphene growth. Subsequent high temperature annealing promoted active C out-diffusion, resulting in the formation of a graphitic layer on the Si surface. Furthermore, the significantly low thermal conductivity of the Si1−xCx alloy shows that the incorporated C atoms affect the properties of a semiconductor adjacent to the graphene. These findings provide a key guideline for controlling desirable properties of graphene and designing hybrid semiconductor/graphene architectures for various applications

  3. Plasma Polymerized Thin Films of Maleic Anhydride and 1,2-methylenedioxybenzene for Improving Adhesion to Carbon Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Joanna Maria; Goutianos, Stergios; Kingshott, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    Low power 2-phase AC plasma polymerization has been used to surface modify glassy carbon substrates that are used as an experimental model for carbon fibers in reinforced composites. In order to probe the role of carboxylic acid density on the interfacial adhesion strength a combination...... acid are present on the MDOB surface as a result of the fragmentation processes in the plasma. Chemical and physical changes were investigated as a function of plasma power at constant polymerization time. Surface chemistry analysis was perfonned with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and attenuated...... total veflectanc~ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the thickness of the plasma films and to monitor the surface roughness for the different polymerization conditions. Finally, preliminary results of fracture energy measurements of the plasma modified...

  4. Surface and Adsorption Properties of Activated Carbon Fabric Prepared from Cellulosic Polymer: Mixed Activation Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhati, Surendra; Mahur, J. S.; Choubey, O. N. [Barkatullah Univ., Bhopal (India); Dixit, Mahur Savita [Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopla (India)

    2013-02-15

    In this study, activated carbon fabric was prepared from a cellulose-based polymer (viscose rayon) via a combination of physical and chemical activation (mixed activation) processes by means of CO{sub 2} as a gasifying agent and surface and adsorption properties were evaluated. Experiments were performed to investigate the consequence of activation temperature (750, 800, 850 and 925 .deg. C), activation time (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes) and CO{sub 2} flow rate (100, 200, 300 and 400 mL/min) on the surface and adsorption properties of ACF. The nitrogen adsorption isotherm at 77 K was measured and used for the determination of surface area, total pore volume, micropore volume, mesopore volume and pore size distribution using BET, t-plot, DR, BJH and DFT methods, respectively. It was observed that BET surface area and TPV increase with rising activation temperature and time due to the formation of new pores and the alteration of micropores into mesopores. It was also found that activation temperature dominantly affects the surface properties of ACF. The adsorption of iodine and CCl{sub 4} onto ACF was investigated and both were found to correlate with surface area.

  5. A facile electrodeposition process to fabricate corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic surface on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; He, Yi; Luo, Pingya; Chen, Xi; Liu, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Superhydrophobic Fe film with hierarchical micro/nano papillae structures is prepared on C45 steel surface by one-step electrochemical method. The superhydrophobic surface was measured with a water contact angle of 160.5 ± 0.5° and a sliding angle of 2 ± 0.5°. The morphology of the fabricated surface film was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and the surface structure seems like accumulated hierarchical micro-nano scaled particles. Furthermore, according to the results of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the chemical composition of surface film was iron complex with organic acid. Besides, the electrochemical measurements showed that the superhydrophobic surface improved the corrosion resistance of carbon steel in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution significantly. The superhydrophobic layer can perform as a barrier and provide a stable air-liquid interface which inhibit penetration of corrosive medium. In addition, the as-prepared steel exhibited an excellent self-cleaning ability that was not favor to the accumulation of contaminants.

  6. Investigation of Black Carbon Effects on Precipitation and Surface Hydrology over the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, H. L. R.; Liou, K. N.; Gu, Y.; Fovell, R. G.; Li, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The current Exceptional Drought (US Drought Monitor) over the western United States warrants an in-depth investigation of possible causes of decreased precipitation and surface hydrology. Black carbon (BC), being the most radiatively-absorptive of any aerosol species, has the potential to semi-directly influence atmospheric physics and dynamics. Aloft, BC can exacerbate the aridity in some areas while increasing precipitation in other locations. On the surface, BC can also alter surface hydrology parameters such as surface runoff and snow water equivalent. In this study, we examine the role of BC and its possible effect on spatial precipitation redistribution and surface hydrology west of and over the Rocky Mountains from an online and coupled meteorological and chemical perspective. In particular, we utilize the Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model at the horizontal resolution of 30 km, employing the Fu-Liou-Gu plane-parallel radiation scheme and a three-dimensional radiation parameterization over mountainous areas to account for BC feedback with clouds, radiation, local circulation, and precipitation. Preliminary results of a January 2005 low pressure system show the inclusion of BC increases (decreases) precipitation on the windward (leeward) side of the Transverse and Peninsular Ranges, and the Sierra Nevada. Results also show BC contributes to an increase in surface runoff on the windward side of the Transverse and Peninsular Ranges, the Sierra Nevada, and Rocky Mountains, but a decrease in snow water equivalent over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains.

  7. How relevant is chemical recalcitrance for predicting climatic effects on mineral soil carbon stocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Torn, M. S.; Trumbore, S.

    2011-12-01

    The role of chemical recalcitrance in mediating the effect of warming on soil carbon stocks has been a focus of research efforts aimed toward the larger goal of prediction of carbon loss from soils in the 21st century. Arrhenius kinetics provides a theoretical basis for the prediction that reaction of chemically recalcitrant carbon compounds (those with higher activation energy) should be more temperature sensitive than compounds with faster turnover rates (lower activation energy). This relationship has even been integrated into models of soil carbon dynamics. However, since chemically recalcitrant compounds have, by definition, slower turnover rates, their response to warming should ultimately be far smaller than those of faster turnover compounds in terms of overall respiratory loss (Sierra 2011). Regardless of the relative temperature sensitivity of recalcitrant soil carbon, it remains an open question how important enhanced decomposition of chemically recalcitrant carbon in mineral soils is for potential feedbacks between warming and soil carbon stocks. To lend insight to this question, we present a series of incubation warming experiments with soils from two forest Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) sites. Because of the distinct carbon isotope (radiocarbon free) signature of the CO2 fumigation gas, soil carbon in elevated CO2 plots has incorporated a decade of labeled carbon. By measuring the radiocarbon signature of flux, which reflects FACE label carbon in CO2 elevated plots, and the atmospheric history of radiocarbon in CO2 control plots, we attributed warming-induced increases in flux rates to soil carbon pools of different ages. Much of our knowledge about decomposition of recalcitrant compounds comes from litter decomposition, where chemical recalcitrance is the presumed control on decomposition rates. By comparing the response of litter and mineral soils to warming, we infer the role of chemical recalcitrance in mineral soils. Flux rates from both organic

  8. Synthesis of iron-based chemical looping sorbents integrated with pH swing carbon mineral sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ray; Lee, Dong Hyun; Fan, Liang-Shih; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2009-12-01

    The previously developed pH swing carbon mineral sequestration immobilizes the gaseous CO2 into a thermodynamically stable solid, MgCO3, using Mg-bearing minerals such as serpentine. This mineral carbonation technology is particularly promising since it generates value-added solid products: high surface area silica, iron oxide, and magnesium carbonate, while providing a safe and permanent storage option for CO2. By carefully controlling the pH of the system, these solids products can be produced with high purity. This study focuses on the synthesis of iron oxide particles as a chemical looping sorbent in order to achieve the integration between carbon capture and storage technologies. Since the solubility of Fe in aqueous phase is relatively low at neutral pH, the effect of the weak acid and chelating agents on the extraction of Fe from serpentine was investigated. The synthesized iron-based chemical looping sorbent was found to be as effective as commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles at converting syngas into high purity H2, while producing a sequestration-ready CO2 stream. PMID:19908801

  9. Influence of surface vacancy defects on the carburisation of Fe 110 surface by carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Aurab; Bouhali, Othmane; Mousseau, Normand; Becquart, Charlotte S; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-07-28

    Adsorption and dissociation of gaseous carbon monoxide (CO) on metal surfaces is one of the most frequently occurring processes of carburisation, known as primary initiator of metal dusting corrosion. Among the various factors that can significantly influence the carburisation process are the intrinsic surface defects such as single surface vacancies occurring at high concentrations due to their low formation energy. Intuitively, adsorption and dissociation barriers of CO are expected to be lowered in the vicinity of a surface vacancy, due to the strong attractive interaction between the vacancy and the C atom. Here the adsorption energies and dissociation pathways of CO on clean and defective Fe 110 surface are explored by means of density functional theory. Interestingly, we find that the O adatom, resulting from the CO dissociation, is unstable in the electron-deficit neighbourhood of the vacancy due to its large electron affinity, and raises the barrier of the carburisation pathway. Still, a full comparative study between the clean surface and the vacancy-defected surface reveals that the complete process of carburisation, starting from adsorption to subsurface diffusion of C, is more favourable in the vicinity of a vacancy defect. PMID:27475389

  10. Influence of surface vacancy defects on the carburisation of Fe 110 surface by carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Aurab; Bouhali, Othmane; Mousseau, Normand; Becquart, Charlotte S.; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption and dissociation of gaseous carbon monoxide (CO) on metal surfaces is one of the most frequently occurring processes of carburisation, known as primary initiator of metal dusting corrosion. Among the various factors that can significantly influence the carburisation process are the intrinsic surface defects such as single surface vacancies occurring at high concentrations due to their low formation energy. Intuitively, adsorption and dissociation barriers of CO are expected to be lowered in the vicinity of a surface vacancy, due to the strong attractive interaction between the vacancy and the C atom. Here the adsorption energies and dissociation pathways of CO on clean and defective Fe 110 surface are explored by means of density functional theory. Interestingly, we find that the O adatom, resulting from the CO dissociation, is unstable in the electron-deficit neighbourhood of the vacancy due to its large electron affinity, and raises the barrier of the carburisation pathway. Still, a full comparative study between the clean surface and the vacancy-defected surface reveals that the complete process of carburisation, starting from adsorption to subsurface diffusion of C, is more favourable in the vicinity of a vacancy defect.

  11. Converting chemical energy into electricity through a functionally cooperating device with diving-surfacing cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mengmeng; Cheng, Mengjiao; Ju, Guannan; Zhang, Yajun; Shi, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A smart device that can dive or surface in aqueous medium has been developed by combining a pH-responsive surface with acid-responsive magnesium. The diving-surfacing cycles can be used to convert chemical energy into electricity. During the diving-surfacing motion, the smart device cuts magnetic flux lines and produces a current, demonstrating that motional energy can be realized by consuming chemical energy of magnesium, thus producing electricity. PMID:25146589

  12. Investigation of chemical and physical properties of carbon nanotubes and their effects on cell biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used for a variety of applications from nanocircuits, to hydrogen storage devices, and from designing optical fibers to forming conductive plastics. Recently, their functionalization with biomolecules led to exciting biological and biomedical applications in drug delivery or bioimaging. However, because of CNTs interactions with biological systems and their ability to translocate and persist into the circulatory and lymphatic systems and biological tissues, concerns about CNTs intrinsic toxicity have risen. It is thus necessary to develop and implement sensitive analysis technologies that allow investigation of CNTs toxicity upon uptake into a biological system. This thesis provides a comprehensive guide of experiments that have been performed during my Ph.D. tenure at West Virginia University in the Department of Chemical Engineering, in the group of Prof. Cerasela Zoica Dinu. Briefly: Chapter one presents a systematic study of the CNTs physical and chemical properties and how these properties are changed upon exposure to chemical agents normally used during their cleaning and purification processes. Also, this chapter shows how acid oxidation treatment leads to improved CNTs biocompatibility. Specifically, by incubating CNTs in a strong acid mixture we created a user-defined library of CNTs samples with different characteristics as recorded using Raman energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, or solubility tests. Systematically characterized CNTs were subsequently tested for their biocompatibility in relation to human epithelial cells or enzymes. Such selected examples are building pertinent relationships between CNTs biocompatibility and their intrinsic properties by showing that acid oxidation treatment lowers CNTs toxicity making CNTs feasible platforms to be used for biomedical applications or the next generation of biosensors. (Publication: Chenbo Dong, Alan S Campell, Reem Eldawud, Gabriela Perhinschi, and

  13. Comparison of chemical hydrogeology of the carbonate peninsulas of Florida and Yucatan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, W.; Hanshaw, B.B.

    1970-01-01

    Aquifers of the peninsulas of Florida and northern Yucatan are Tertiary marine carbonate formations showing many lithologic and faunal similarities. In addition, the tropical to subtropical climates of the two areas are similar, each having annual rainfall of about 1000 to 1500 mm. Despite similarities in these fundamental controls, contrasts in the hydrologic and geochemical systems are numerous and striking. For example, Florida has many rivers; Yucatan has none. Maximum thickness of fresh ground water in Florida is about 700 meters; in the Yucatan it is less than 70 meters. In Florida the gradient of the potentiometric surface averages about 1 meter per kilometer; in the Yucatan it is exceedingly low, averaging about 0.02 meter per kilometer. In Florida the chemical character of water changes systematically downgradient, owing to solution of minerals of the aquifer and corresponding increases in total dissolved solids, sulfate, calcium, and Mg-Ca ratio; in the Yucatan no downgradient change exists, and dominant processes controlling the chemical character of the water are solution of minerals and simple mixing of the fresh water and the body of salt water that underlies the peninsula at shallow depth. Hydrologic and chemical differences are caused in part by the lower altitude of the Yucatan plain. More important, however, these differences are due to the lack of an upper confining bed in Yucatan that is hydrologically equivalent to the Hawthorn Formation of Florida. The Hawthorn cover prevents recharge and confines the artesian water except where it is punctured by sinkholes, but sands and other unconsolidated sediments fill sinkholes and cavities and impede circulation. In the Yucatan the permeability of the entire section is so enormous that rainfall immediately infiltrates to the water table and then moves laterally to discharge areas along the coasts. ?? 1970.

  14. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility. PMID:25630300

  15. Synthesis and Growth Mechanism of Carbon Filaments by Chemical Vapor Deposition without Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhe Liu; Feng Li; Shuo Bai

    2009-01-01

    Carbon filaments with diameter from several to hundreds micrometers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition of methane without catalyst. The morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the carbon filament were investigated by scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical testing. The results show that the carbon filament is inverted cone shape and grows up along the gas flow direction. The stem of it is formed of annular carbon layers arranged in a tree ring structure while the head is made up of concentrical layers. The tensile strength of the carbon filament is increased after graphitization for the restructuring and growing large of graphene. The growth mechanism of carbon filament was proposed according to the results of two series of experiments with different deposition time and intermittent deposition cycles.

  16. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition growth of carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivan R. Singh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of various input parameters on the production of carbon nanostructures using a simple microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique has been investigated. The technique utilises a conventional microwave oven as the microwave energy source. The developed apparatus is inexpensive and easy to install and is suitable for use as a carbon nanostructure source for potential laboratory-based research of the bulk properties of carbon nanostructures. A result of this investigation is the reproducibility of specific nanostructures with the variation of input parameters, such as carbon-containing precursor and support gas flow rate. It was shown that the yield and quality of the carbon products is directly controlled by input parameters. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyse the carbon products; these were found to be amorphous, nanotubes and onion-like nanostructures.

  17. Growth of Large-Area Single- and Bi-Layer Graphene by Controlled Carbon Precipitation on Polycrystalline Ni Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Reina, Alfonso; Thiele, Stefan; Jia, Xiaoting; Bhaviripudi, Sreekar; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Schaefer, Juergen A.; Kong, Jing

    2009-01-01

    We report graphene films composed mostly of one or two layers of graphene grown by controlled carbon precipitation on the surface of polycrystalline Ni thin films during atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Controlling both the methane concentration during CVD and the substrate cooling rate during graphene growth can significantly improve the thickness uniformity. As a result, one- or two- layer graphene regions occupy up to 87% of the film area. Single layer coverage accounts for 5%–...

  18. Hydrologic regulation of chemical weathering and the geologic carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K; Chamberlain, C P

    2014-03-28

    Earth's temperature is thought to be regulated by a negative feedback between atmospheric CO2 levels and chemical weathering of silicate rocks that operates over million-year time scales. To explain variations in the strength of the weathering feedback, we present a model for silicate weathering that regulates climatic and tectonic forcing through hydrologic processes and imposes a thermodynamic limit on weathering fluxes, based on the physical and chemical properties of river basins. Climate regulation by silicate weathering is thus strongest when global topography is elevated, similar to the situation today, and lowest when global topography is more subdued, allowing planetary temperatures to vary depending on the global distribution of topography and mountain belts, even in the absence of appreciable changes in CO2 degassing rates.

  19. Selective Tuning of a Particular Chemical Reaction on Surfaces through Electrical Resonance: An ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Masood; Shin, Dongbin; Ruoff, Rodney; Park, Noejung

    2015-12-17

    We used ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) to investigate the effect of a monochromatic oscillating electric field in resonance with a particular molecular vibration on surfaces. As a case study, AIMD simulations were carried out for hydroxyl functional groups on graphene. When the frequency of the applied field matches with the C-OH vibration frequency, the amplitude is monotonically amplified, leading to a complete desorption from the surface, overcoming the substantial barrier. This suggests the possibility of activating a particular bond without damaging the remaining surface. We extended this work to the case of the amination of sp(2)-bonded carbon surfaces and discussed the general perspective that, in general, an unfavorable chemical process can be activated by applying an external electric field with an appropriate resonance frequency.

  20. C1-carbon sources for chemical and fuel production by microbial gas fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürre, Peter; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2015-12-01

    Fossil resources for production of fuels and chemicals are finite and fuel use contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming. Thus, sustainable fuel supply, security, and prices necessitate the implementation of alternative routes to the production of chemicals and fuels. Much attention has been focussed on use of cellulosic material, particularly through microbial-based processes. However, this is still costly and proving challenging, as are catalytic routes to biofuels from whole biomass. An alternative strategy is to directly capture carbon before incorporation into lignocellulosic biomass. Autotrophic acetogenic, carboxidotrophic, and methanotrophic bacteria are able to capture carbon as CO, CO2, or CH4, respectively, and reuse that carbon in products that displace their fossil-derived counterparts. Thus, gas fermentation represents a versatile industrial platform for the sustainable production of commodity chemicals and fuels from diverse gas resources derived from industrial processes, coal, biomass, municipal solid waste (MSW), and extracted natural gas. PMID:25841103

  1. THE IMPROVEMENT OF ELECTRON FIELD EMISSION FROM AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS DUE TO HYDROGEN PLASMA CHEMICAL ANNEALING EFFECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Xu; X.H. Huang; L. Wang; W. Li; K.J. Chen; J.B. Xu

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were fabricated by using layer-by-layer deposi-tion method and hydrogen dilution method in a small d.c.-assisted plasma enhancedchemical vapor deposition system. It was found that the hydrogen plasma treatmentcould change the sp2/sp3 ratio to some extent by chemical etching. The improvementsof field emission characteristics were observed compared with that from conventionallydeposited a-C films, which can be attributed to the large field enhancement effect dueto the inhomogeneous distribution of nanometer scale sp2 clusters and the reductionof the surface emission barrier due to the hydrogen termination.

  2. Direct Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes STM Tips by Liquid Catalyst-Assisted Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Kuei Tung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and facile method to make carbon nanotube (CNT tips for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM is presented. Cobalt (Co particles, as catalysts, are electrochemically deposited on the apex of tungsten (W STM tip for CNT growth. It is found that the quantity of Co particles is well controlled by applied DC voltage, concentration of catalyst solution, and deposition time. Using optimum growth condition, CNTs are successfully synthesized on the tip apex by catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CA-MPECVD. A HOPG surface is clearly observed at an atomic scale using the present CNT-STM tip.

  3. Vegetation change impacts on soil organic carbon chemical composition in subtropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Meng, Miaojing; Zhang, Jinchi; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) might strongly affect the global carbon cycle as it controls the SOC decomposition rate. Vegetation change associated with long-term land use changes is known to strongly impact the chemical composition of SOC; however, data on the impacts of vegetation change following disturbance events of short durations and succession that occur frequently in forest ecosystems via diverse management objectives on SOC chemical composition are negligible. Here we examined the impacts of vegetation changes on the chemical composition of SOC by sampling soils of native broad-leaved forests, planted mixed broad-leaved and coniferous forests, and tea gardens in eastern China. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify SOC chemical composition. We found that among all components of SOC chemical composition, alkyl carbon (C) and aryl C were more liable to change with vegetation than other SOC components. Soil pH was negatively correlated to the relative abundances of alkyl C and N-alkyl C, and Shannon’s index of overstory plant species was positively correlated to the relative abundances of phenolic C and aromaticity. Our results suggest that vegetation changes following short disturbance events and succession may strongly alter SOC chemical composition in forest ecosystems.

  4. Vegetation change impacts on soil organic carbon chemical composition in subtropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoping; Meng, Miaojing; Zhang, Jinchi; Chen, Han Y H

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) might strongly affect the global carbon cycle as it controls the SOC decomposition rate. Vegetation change associated with long-term land use changes is known to strongly impact the chemical composition of SOC; however, data on the impacts of vegetation change following disturbance events of short durations and succession that occur frequently in forest ecosystems via diverse management objectives on SOC chemical composition are negligible. Here we examined the impacts of vegetation changes on the chemical composition of SOC by sampling soils of native broad-leaved forests, planted mixed broad-leaved and coniferous forests, and tea gardens in eastern China. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to quantify SOC chemical composition. We found that among all components of SOC chemical composition, alkyl carbon (C) and aryl C were more liable to change with vegetation than other SOC components. Soil pH was negatively correlated to the relative abundances of alkyl C and N-alkyl C, and Shannon's index of overstory plant species was positively correlated to the relative abundances of phenolic C and aromaticity. Our results suggest that vegetation changes following short disturbance events and succession may strongly alter SOC chemical composition in forest ecosystems. PMID:27403714

  5. Field-Emission from Chemically Functionalized Diamond Surfaces: Does Electron Affinity Picture Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Miyazaki, Takehide; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Okushi, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-03-01

    By means of the time-dependent density functional electron dynamics, we have revisited the field-emission efficiency of chemically functionalized diamond (100) surfaces. In order to achieve high efficiency and high (chemical) stability, proper chemical species are needed to terminate diamond surfaces. Hydrogen (H) termination is well known to achieve the negative electron affinity (NEA) of diamond surface which indeed enhances field emission performance than that of clean surface with positive electron affinity (PEA). Yet, the durability of H-terminated diamond surface was concerned for long-time operation of the field-emission. Meantime, oxidation, or hydroxyl (OH) termination was considered to achieve chemical stability of the surface but presence of oxygen (O) atom should reduce the emission efficiency. Recently, H- OH-co-terminated surface is reported as NEA and was expected to achieve both emission efficiency and chemical stability. However, our simulation showed that emission efficiency of the H- OH- co-terminated surface is much lower than clean surface with PEA, thus we note that the electron affinity cannot be a unique measure to determine the emission efficiency. In this talk, we introduce necessity of new concept to understand the emission efficiency which needs to know detailed potential profile from bulk to vacuum through surface, which is strongly dependent on the surface chemical functionalization. This work was supported by ALCA project conducted by Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  6. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  7. Surface chemical composition analysis of heat-treated bamboo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan-dan; Yu, Yang-lun; Zhang, Ya-mei; Yu, Wen-ji; Gao, Jian-min

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the effect of heat treatment on the chemical composition of bamboo slivers was studied. The chemical properties of the samples were examined by chemical analysis. Results showed a decrease in the contents of holocellulose and α-cellulose, as well as an increase in the contents of lignin and extractives. Changes in the chemical structure of bamboo components were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FTIR spectroscopy results indicated that hemicellulose contents decrease, whereas lignin contents increase after heat treatment. Ester formation linked to lignin decreased the hygroscopicity of the bamboo samples and consequently improved their dimensional stability and durability. XPS spectroscopy results showed that hemicelluloses and celluloses are relatively more sensitive to the heating process than lignin. As a consequence, hemicellulose and cellulose contents decreased, whereas lignin contents increased during heat treatment. The results obtained in this study provide useful information for the future utilization of heat-treated bamboo.

  8. Immobilization of carbon nanotubes on functionalized graphene film grown by chemical vapor deposition and characterization of the hybrid material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the surface functionalization of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition and fabrication of a hybrid material combining multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene (CNT–G). Amine-terminated self-assembled monolayers were prepared on graphene by the UV-modification of oxidized groups introduced onto the film surface. Amine-termination led to effective interaction with functionalized CNTs to assemble a CNT–G hybrid through covalent bonding. Characterization clearly showed no defects of the graphene film after the immobilization reaction with CNT. In addition, the hybrid graphene material revealed a distinctive CNT–G structure and p–n type electrical properties. The introduction of functional groups on the graphene film surface and fabrication of CNT–G hybrids with the present technique could provide an efficient, novel route to device fabrication. (paper)

  9. Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and their Synthesis via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kiowski, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor was designed, built and used to grow vertically and horizontally aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The as-grown nanotubes were investigated on a single tube level using nearinfrared photoluminescence (PL) microscopy as well as Raman, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy of individual, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a specialized PL set-up was constructed.

  10. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  11. Surface-induced patterns from evaporating droplets of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hongbo

    2011-06-07

    Evaporation of aqueous droplets of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with a physisorbed layer of humic acid (HA) on a partially hydrophilic substrate induces the formation of a film of CNTs. Here, we investigate the role that the global geometry of the substrate surfaces has on the structure of the CNT film. On a flat mica or silica surface, the evaporation of a convex droplet of the CNT dispersion induces the well-known "coffee ring", while evaporation of a concave droplet (capillary meniscus) of the CNT dispersion in a wedge of two planar mica sheets or between two crossed-cylinder sheets induces a large area (>mm 2) of textured or patterned films characterized by different short- and long-range orientational and positional ordering of the CNTs. The resulting patterns appear to be determined by two competing or cooperative sedimentation mechanisms: (1) capillary forces between CNTs giving micrometer-sized filaments parallel to the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and (2) fingering instability at the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and subsequent pinning of CNTs on the surface giving micrometer-sized filaments of CNTs perpendicular to this boundary line. The interplay between substrate surface geometry and sedimentation mechanisms gives an extra control parameter for manipulating patterns of self-assembling nanoparticles at substrate surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. From Detailed Description of Chemical Reacting Carbon Particles to Subgrid Models for CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the development and validation of a sub-model for the partial oxidation of a spherical char particle moving in an air/steam atmosphere. The particle diameter is 2 mm. The coal particle is represented by moisture- and ash-free nonporous carbon while the coal rank is implemented using semi-global reaction rate expressions taken from the literature. The submodel includes six gaseous chemical species (O2, CO2, CO, H2O, H2, N2. Three heterogeneous reactions are employed, along with two homogeneous semi-global reactions, namely carbon monoxide oxidation and the water-gas-shift reaction. The distinguishing feature of the subgrid model is that it takes into account the influence of homogeneous reactions on integral characteristics such as carbon combustion rates and particle temperature. The sub-model was validated by comparing its results with a comprehensive CFD-based model resolving the issues of bulk flow and boundary layer around the particle. In this model, the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the energy and species conservation equations were used to solve the problem by means of the pseudo-steady state approach. At the surface of the particle, the balance of mass, energy and species concentration was applied including the effect of the Stefan flow and heat loss due to radiation at the surface of the particle. Good agreement was achieved between the sub-model and the CFD-based model. Additionally, the CFD-based model was verified against experimental data published in the literature (Makino et al. (2003 Combust. Flame 132, 743-753. Good agreement was achieved between numerically predicted and experimentally obtained data for input conditions corresponding to the kinetically controlled regime. The maximal discrepancy (10% between the experiments and the numerical results was observed in the diffusion-controlled regime. Finally, we discuss the influence of the Reynolds number, the ambient O2 mass fraction and the ambient

  13. Evaluation of chemical and structural properties of germanium-carbon coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Hossein, E-mail: h.jamali@mut-es.ac.ir; Mozafarinia, Reza; Eshaghi, Akbar

    2015-10-15

    Germanium-carbon coatings were deposited on silicon and glass substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using three different flow ratios of GeH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4} precursors. Elemental analysis, structural evaluation and microscopic investigation of coatings were performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Based on the results, the coatings exhibited a homogeneous and dense structure free of pores with a very good adhesion to substrate. The structural evaluation revealed that the germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of a Ge-rich composite material containing the amorphous and crystalline germanium and amorphous carbon with the mixture of Ge–Ge, Ge–C, C–C, Ge–H and C–H bonds. The result suggested that the amorphisation of the coatings could be increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow rate ratio and subsequently increasing C amount incorporated into the coating. - Highlights: • Germanium-carbon coatings were prepared by PECVD technique. • The germanium-carbon coatings were a kind of composite material. • The amorphisation of the coatings were increased with raising CH{sub 4}:GeH{sub 4} flow ratio.

  14. Effect of chemical treatment on the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, Mingxing; Alam, Mina Rastegar; Kim, Gyutae; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, Urszula; Roth, Siegmar [School of Electrical Engineering, WCU Flexible Nano-Systems, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Carbon nanotube networks showing superior electric properties, high chemical stability, strong mechanical properties, and flexibility are also known to exhibit thermoelectric effects. However, the experimental thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of pristine carbon nanotubes is typically in the range of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}, which is still not attractive for thermal energy conversion applications. In this work, we show possible ways to improve the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of chemical treatments. In this study, we primarily investigated the effect of chemical treatment on the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power (TEP) of the entangled network of nanotubes, also, known as ''buckypaper''. This chemical treatment increased the electrical conductivity due to p-type doping, thereby, showing a decrease in the TEP given by the Seebeck coefficient, whereas the n-type dopants changed the sign and value of the TEP from about 40 to -40 {mu}V K{sup -1}. Neutral polymers, in terms of doping, such as PVDF, PMMA, PVA, PS, and PC, were expected to hinder phonon transport through the nanotube network, increasing the Seebeck coefficient up to ca. 50 {mu}V K{sup -1}. Our results reveal the importance of chemical doping determining the sign and the magnitude of the TEP, and role of the polymer matrix in the development of more effective thermoelectric composites based on carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Effect of chemical treatment on the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube networks showing superior electric properties, high chemical stability, strong mechanical properties, and flexibility are also known to exhibit thermoelectric effects. However, the experimental thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of pristine carbon nanotubes is typically in the range of 10-3-10-2, which is still not attractive for thermal energy conversion applications. In this work, we show possible ways to improve the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of chemical treatments. In this study, we primarily investigated the effect of chemical treatment on the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power (TEP) of the entangled network of nanotubes, also, known as ''buckypaper''. This chemical treatment increased the electrical conductivity due to p-type doping, thereby, showing a decrease in the TEP given by the Seebeck coefficient, whereas the n-type dopants changed the sign and value of the TEP from about 40 to -40 μV K-1. Neutral polymers, in terms of doping, such as PVDF, PMMA, PVA, PS, and PC, were expected to hinder phonon transport through the nanotube network, increasing the Seebeck coefficient up to ca. 50 μV K-1. Our results reveal the importance of chemical doping determining the sign and the magnitude of the TEP, and role of the polymer matrix in the development of more effective thermoelectric composites based on carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, M., E-mail: mar@sbi.aau.dk [Department of Energy and Environment, Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København SV (Denmark); Fojan, P.; Gurevich, L. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Skjernvej 4, DK-9220 Aalborg East (Denmark); Afshari, A. [Department of Energy and Environment, Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University, A.C. Meyers Vænge 15, 2450 København SV (Denmark)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Successful surface modification procedures on aluminium samples were performed involving formation of the layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol (PEG) via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. • The groups of surfaces with hydrophobic behavior were found to follow the Wenzel model. • A transition from Cassie–Baxter's to Wenzel's regime was observed due to changing of the surface roughness upon mechanical polishing in aluminium samples. - Abstract: Aluminium alloys are some of the predominant metals in industrial applications such as production of heat exchangers, heat pumps. They have high heat conductivity coupled with a low specific weight. In cold working conditions, there is a risk of frost formation on the surface of aluminium in the presence of water vapour, which can lead to the deterioration of equipment performance. This work addresses the methods of surface modification of aluminium and their effect of the underlying surface morphology and wettability, which are the important parameters for frost formation. Three groups of real-life aluminium surfaces of different morphology: unpolished aluminium, polished aluminium, and aluminium foil, were subjected to surface modification procedures which involved the formation of a layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types of surface modifications the contact angle of water droplets on aluminium samples can be varied from 12° to more than 120°. A crossover from Cassie–Baxter to Wenzel regime upon changing the surface

  17. A nucleation and growth model of vertically-oriented carbon nanofibers or nanotubes by plasma-enhanced catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, C S; Senger, A; Le Normand, F

    2006-05-01

    Carbon nanofibers are grown by direct current and hot filaments-activated catalytic chemical vapor deposition while varying the power of the hot filaments. Observations of these carbon nanofibers vertically oriented on a SiO2 (8 nm thick)/Si(100) substrate covered with Co nanoparticles (10-15 nm particle size) by Scanning Electron and Transmission Electron Microscopies show the presence of a graphitic "nest" either on the surface of the substrate or at the end of the specific nanofiber that does not encapsulate the catalytic particle. Strictly in our conditions, the activation by hot filaments is required to grow nanofibers with a C2H2 - H2 gas mixture, as large amounts of amorphous carbon cover the surface of the substrate without using hot filaments. From these observations as well as data of the literature, it is proposed that the nucleation of carbon nanofibers occurs through a complex process involving several steps: carbon concentration gradient starting from the catalytic carbon decomposition and diffusion from the surface of the catalytic nanoparticles exposed to the activated gas and promoted by energetic ionic species of the gas phase; subsequent graphitic condensation of a "nest" at the interface of the Co particle and substrate. The large concentration of highly reactive hydrogen radicals mainly provided by activation with hot filaments precludes further spreading out of this interfacial carbon nest over the entire surface of the substrate and thus selectively orientates the growth towards the condensation of graphene over facets that are perpendicular to the surface. Carbon nanofibers can then be grown within the well-known Vapor-Liquid-Solid process. Thus the effect of energetic ions and highly reactive neutrals like atomic hydrogen in the preferential etching of carbon on the edge of graphene shells and on the broadening of the carbon nanofiber is underlined.

  18. Numerical simulation of isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is highly inefficient and requires long processing time. These limitations add considerably to the cost of fabrication and restrict the application of this material. Efforts have been made to study the CVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by computer simulation and predict the process parameters, density, porosity, etc. According to the characteristics of CVI process, the basic principle of FEM and mass transport, the finite element model has been established. Incremental finite element equations and the elemental stiffness matrices have been derived for the first time. The finite element program developed by the authors has been used to simulate the ICVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. Computer color display of simulated results can express the densification and distributions of density and porosity in preform clearly. The influence of process parameters on the densification of preform has been analyzed. The numerically simulated and experimental results give a good agreement.

  19. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, M.; Fojan, P.; Gurevich, L.; Afshari, A.

    2014-03-01

    Aluminium alloys are some of the predominant metals in industrial applications such as production of heat exchangers, heat pumps. They have high heat conductivity coupled with a low specific weight. In cold working conditions, there is a risk of frost formation on the surface of aluminium in the presence of water vapour, which can lead to the deterioration of equipment performance. This work addresses the methods of surface modification of aluminium and their effect of the underlying surface morphology and wettability, which are the important parameters for frost formation. Three groups of real-life aluminium surfaces of different morphology: unpolished aluminium, polished aluminium, and aluminium foil, were subjected to surface modification procedures which involved the formation of a layer of hydrophilic hyperbranched polyethyleneglycol via in situ polymerization, molecular vapour deposition of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types of surface modifications the contact angle of water droplets on aluminium samples can be varied from 12° to more than 120°. A crossover from Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel regime upon changing the surface roughness was also observed.

  20. Chemical imaging of surfaces with the scanning electrochemical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, A J; Fan, F R; Pierce, D T; Unwin, P R; Wipf, D O; Zhou, F

    1991-10-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy is a scanning probe technique that is based on faradaic current changes as a small electrode is moved across the surface of a sample. The images obtained depend on the sample topography and surface reactivity. The response of the scanning electrochemical microscope is sensitive to the presence of conducting and electroactive species, which makes it useful for imaging heterogeneous surfaces. The principles and instrumentation used to obtain images and surface reaction-kinetic information are discussed, and examples of applications to the study of electrodes, minerals, and biological samples are given. PMID:17739954

  1. Surface resistivity of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films: Existence of intrinsic graphene on its surface

    OpenAIRE

    Tinchev, Savcho

    2013-01-01

    Surface resistivity of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films was measured as a function of the applied electrical field. The measured dependence shows a sharp ambipolar peak near zero gate voltage. Furthermore, we found that in some samples sheet resistance at the peak is as low as 7.5 k{\\Omega}/sq. This value is the same order of magnitude as the sheet resistance of a defect free graphene monolayer. Therefore a conclusion is made that an intrinsic graphene with dimensions of at least millimete...

  2. Growth of straight carbon nanotubes by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOTO; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    Straight carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) catalyzed by Mo-Fe alloy catalyst on silica supporting substrate at 700 ℃. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the straight CNTs are well graphitized with no attached amorphous carbon. Mo-Fe alloy catalyst particles play a very crucial role in the growth of straight CNTs. The straight carbon nanotubes contain much less defects than the curved nanotubes and might have potential applications for nanoelectrical devices in the future. The simple synthesis of straight CNTs may have benefit for large-scale productions.

  3. Synthesis of carbon nanotube array using corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corona discharge plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with the features of atmospheric pressure and low temperature has been developed to synthesize the carbon nanotube array. The array was synthesized from methane and hydrogen mixture in anodic aluminum oxide template channels in that cobalt was electrodeposited at the bottom. The characterization results by the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the array consists of carbon nanotubes with the diameter of about 40 nm and the length of more than 4 -m, and the carbon nanotubes are mainly restrained within the channels of templates.

  4. Electromechanical Behavior of Chemically Reduced Graphene Oxide and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Material

    OpenAIRE

    Benchirouf, Abderrahmane; Müller, Christian; Kanoun, Olfa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose strain-sensitive thin films based on chemically reduced graphene oxide (GO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) without adding any further surfactants. In spite of the insulating properties of the thin-film-based GO due to the presence functional groups such as hydroxyl, epoxy, and carbonyl groups in its atomic structure, a significant enhancement of the film conductivity was reached by chemical reduction with hydro-iodic acid. By optimizing the MWCNT content,...

  5. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10 wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300 °C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O3 attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides

  6. Synthesis and characterization of well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马旭村; 徐贵昌; 王恩哥

    2000-01-01

    Well-aligned carbon nitrogen nanotube films have been synthesized successfully on meso-porous silica substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MWPCVD) method. Studies on their morphology, structure, and composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively, indicate that these nanotubes consist of linearly polymerized carbon nitrogen nanobells, and the nitrogen atoms have been doped into carbon netweork to form a new structure C1-xNx( x = 0.16±0.01). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results of the samples further demonstrate that carbon bonds cova-lently with nitrogen in all the carbon nitrogen nanotube films.

  7. Ion-radical intermediates of the radiation-chemical transformations of organic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Sosulin, Ilya S.; Saenko, Elizaveta V.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    The spectral features and reactions of ion-radical intermediates produced from organic carbonates in low-temperature matrices were investigated by EPR spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations. It was shown that radical cations of diethyl carbonate and dimethyl carbonate underwent intramolecular hydrogen transfer to yield alkyl-type species, as was suggested previously. Meanwhile, radical cation of EC demonstrates a ring cleavage even at 77 K, while radical cation of PC is probably intrinsically stable and undergo an ion-molecule reaction with a neighboring neutral molecule in dimers or associates. Radical anions were obtained in glassy matrices of diethyl ether or perdeuteroethanol. The radical anions of linear carbonates show photoinduced fragmentation to yield the corresponding alkyl radicals; such process may also occur directly under radiolysis. Radical anions of cyclic carbonates are relatively stable and yield only trace amounts of fragmentation products under similar conditions.

  8. Surface reactions of molecular and atomic oxygen with carbon phosphide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, Justin; Torres, Jessica; Wolfe, Glenn; d'Agostino, Alfred; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2005-11-01

    The surface reactions of atomic and molecular oxygen with carbon phosphide films have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Carbon phosphide films were produced by ion implantation of trimethylphosphine into polyethylene. Atmospheric oxidation of carbon phosphide films was dominated by phosphorus oxidation and generated a carbon-containing phosphate surface film. This oxidized surface layer acted as an effective diffusion barrier, limiting the depth of phosphorus oxidation within the carbon phosphide film to phosphorus atoms as well as the degree of phosphorus oxidation. For more prolonged AO exposures, a highly oxidized phosphate surface layer formed that appeared to be inert toward further AO-mediated erosion. By utilizing phosphorus-containing hydrocarbon thin films, the phosphorus oxides produced during exposure to AO were found to desorb at temperatures >500 K under vacuum conditions. Results from this study suggest that carbon phosphide films can be used as AO-resistant surface coatings on polymers.

  9. Electron field emission characteristics of nano-catkin carbon films deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Guang-Rui; Wu Bao-Jia; Jin Zhe; Ito Toshimichi

    2008-01-01

    This paper reported that the nano-catkin carbon films were prepared on Si substrates by means of electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition in a hydrogen and methane mixture.The surface morphology and the structure of the fabricated films were characterized by using scanning electron microscopes and Raman spectroscopy,respectively.The stable field emission properties with a low threshold field of 5V/μm corresponding to a current density of about 1μA/cm2 and a current density of 3.2mA/cm2 at an electric field of 10V/μm were obtained from the carbon film deposited at CH4 concentration of 8%.The mechanism that the threshold field decreased with the increase of the CH4 concentration and the high emission current appeared at the high CH4 concentration was explained by using the Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  10. Electron field emission characteristics of nano-catkin carbon films deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guang-Rui; Wu, Bao-Jia; Jin, Zhe; Ito, Toshimichi

    2008-02-01

    This paper reported that the nano-catkin carbon films were prepared on Si substrates by means of electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition in a hydrogen and methane mixture. The surface morphology and the structure of the fabricated films were characterized by using scanning electron microscopes and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The stable field emission properties with a low threshold field of 5V/μm corresponding to a current density of about 1μA/cm2 and a current density of 3.2mA/cm2 at an electric field of 10V/μm were obtained from the carbon film deposited at CH4 concentration of 8%. The mechanism that the threshold field decreased with the increase of the CH4 concentration and the high emission current appeared at the high CH4 concentration was explained by using the Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  11. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral; Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid;

    2014-01-01

    of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types...

  12. Alignment of liquid crystals : on geometrically and chemically modified surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    This thesis consists of two main parts. The first part describes a new model to explain the complex role of surface materials and surface geometry in the liquid crystal (LC) alignment, which has been a subject of intensive debate over the last 40 years. The second part presents a potentially cost ef

  13. Surface Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Thermal-CVD of Camphor Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Surface morphology study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature, which indirectly maybe cost effective. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs. The camphoric hydrocarbons not only found acts as the precursors but also enhances the production rate and the quality of CNTs.

  14. Carbon Capture via Chemical-Looping Combustion and Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Marcus; Mattisson, Tobias; Ryden, Magnus; Lyngfelt, Anders

    2006-10-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology with inherent separation of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. The technique involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier which transfers oxygen from combustion air to the fuel, and hence a direct contact between air and fuel is avoided. Two inter-connected fluidized beds, a fuel reactor and an air reactor, are used in the process. In the fuel reactor, the metal oxide is reduced by the reaction with the fuel and in the air reactor; the reduced metal oxide is oxidized with air. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and almost pure stream of CO{sub 2} is obtained when water is condensed. Considerable research has been conducted on CLC in the last decade with respect to oxygen carrier development, reactor design, system efficiencies and prototype testing. The technique has been demonstrated successfully with both natural gas and syngas as fuel in continuous prototype reactors based on interconnected fluidized beds within the size range 0.3 - 50 kW, using different types of oxygen carriers based on the metals Ni, Co, Fe, Cu and Mn. From these tests it can be established that almost complete conversion of the fuel can be obtained and 100% CO{sub 2} capture is possible. Further, two different types of chemical-looping reforming (CLR) have been presented in recent years. CLR is a technology to produce hydrogen with inherent CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents an overview of the research performed on CLC and CLR highlights the current status of the technology.

  15. Influence of carbonate intercalation in the surface-charging behavior of Zn-Cr layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, R., E-mail: rrojas@mail.fcq.unc.edu.ar [INFIQC, Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Barriga, C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica e Ingenieria Quimica, Edificio Marie Curie, Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); De Pauli, C.P. [INFIQC, Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Avena, M.J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of interlayer composition in the surface charge and reactivity of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) has been explored. With this purpose, a chloride-intercalated Zn-Cr-LDH has been synthesized by the constant pH coprecipitation method and afterwards exchanged with carbonate to obtain solids with different Cl{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ratios. The solids structure has been characterized by elemental chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy, while its surface-charging behavior and reactivity have been studied by acid-base potentiometric titrations and electrophoretic mobility determinations. The chloride-intercalated sample shows an increasing hydroxyl adsorption with increasing pH and decreasing support electrolyte concentration and the particles present positive electrophoretic mobility in the measured pH range. As carbonate content increases in the samples, the total OH{sup -} uptake diminishes and the samples show an isoelectric point at pH around 10. When the gallery is totally occupied by carbonate anions, the OH uptake vs. pH curves registered at different electrolyte concentrations merge at around pH 10. A LDH-water interface model has been used to give an interpretation to the experimental data. The model indicates that as carbonate content increases, the sample behavior becomes similar to that of a metal (hydr)oxide and that surface (bi)carbonate anions undergo acid-base reactions.

  16. Surface chemical characterization of PM{sub 10} samples by XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atzei, Davide, E-mail: datzei@unica.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università di Cagliari, Complesso Universitario di Monserrato, S.S. 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Fantauzzi, Marzia; Rossi, Antonella [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università di Cagliari, Complesso Universitario di Monserrato, S.S. 554 Bivio per Sestu, I-09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Fermo, Paola [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi Milano, Via Golgi 19, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Piazzalunga, Andrea [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi Milano, Via Golgi 19, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Ambiente e del territorio, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, I-20122 Milano (Italy); Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Samples of particulate matter (PM) collected in the city of Milan during wintertime were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal optical transmittance (TOT), ionic chromatography (IC) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in order to compare quantitative bulk analysis and surface analysis. In particular, the analysis of surface carbon is here presented following a new approach for the C1s curve fitting aiming this work to prove the capability of XPS to discriminate among elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) and to quantify the carbon-based compounds that might be present in the PM. Since surface of urban PM is found to be rich in carbon it is important to be able to distinguish between the different species. XPS results indicate that aromatic and aliphatic species are adsorbed on the PM surface. Higher concentrations of (EC) are present in the bulk. Also nitrogen and sulfur were detected on the surfaces and a qualitative and quantitative analysis is provided. Surface concentration of sulfate ion is equal to that found by bulk analysis; moreover surface analysis shows an additional signal due to organic sulfur not detectable by the other methods. Surface appears to be also enriched in nitrogen.

  17. Chemical sensors using coated or doped carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  18. Common Wet Chemical Agents for Purifying Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasel Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification and functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are challenging but vital for their effective applications in various fields including water purification technologies, optoelectronics, biosensors, fuel cells, and electrode arrays. The currently available purification techniques, often complicated and time consuming, yielded shortened and curled MWCNTs that are not suitable for applications in certain fields such as membrane technologies, hybrid catalysis, optoelectronics, and sensor developments. Here we described the H2O2 synergy on the actions of HCl and KOH in purifying and functionalizing pristine MWCNTs. The method (HCl/H2O2 showed 100% purification yield as compared to HCl and KOH/H2O2 with purification yields 93.46 and 3.92%, respectively. We probed the findings using transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscope, Raman spectroscope, thermal gravimetric analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction. The study is a new avenue for simple, rapid, low cost, and scalable purification of pristine MWCNTs for application in versatile fields.

  19. An efficient synthesis of graphenated carbon nanotubes over the tailored mesoporous molecular sieves by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Tailored 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 with large pores was synthesized successfully. ► The new hybrid g-CNTs in large scale were synthesized using Ni/KIT-6 by CVD method. ► The use of mesoporous material by CVD method would be an ideal choice to prepare g-CNTs at reasonable cost. ► This type of g-CNTs might be a new avenue for nano-electronic applications. - Abstract: The new hybrid of graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs) was superior to either CNTs or graphene. Mesoporous 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 were synthesized hydrothermally through organic template route and then were used as catalytic template for the production of g-CNTs using acetylene as a carbon precursor by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The deposited new hybrid carbon materials were purified and analyzed by various physico-chemical techniques such as XRD, TGA, SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The graphitization of CNTs was confirmed by TGA and HRTEM studies. Thermal stability, surface morphology, and structural morphology of these materials were revealed by TGA, SEM and TEM analysis, respectively. Moreover, the tailored mesoporous Ni/KIT-6 molecular sieves were found to possess better quality and massive quantity of g-CNTs produced compared to other catalytic template route

  20. An efficient synthesis of graphenated carbon nanotubes over the tailored mesoporous molecular sieves by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atchudan, R. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, CEG Campus, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); Joo, Jin., E-mail: joojin@knu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pandurangan, A., E-mail: pandurangan_a@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, CEG Campus, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Tailored 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 with large pores was synthesized successfully. ► The new hybrid g-CNTs in large scale were synthesized using Ni/KIT-6 by CVD method. ► The use of mesoporous material by CVD method would be an ideal choice to prepare g-CNTs at reasonable cost. ► This type of g-CNTs might be a new avenue for nano-electronic applications. - Abstract: The new hybrid of graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs) was superior to either CNTs or graphene. Mesoporous 3D cubic Ni/KIT-6 were synthesized hydrothermally through organic template route and then were used as catalytic template for the production of g-CNTs using acetylene as a carbon precursor by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The deposited new hybrid carbon materials were purified and analyzed by various physico-chemical techniques such as XRD, TGA, SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The graphitization of CNTs was confirmed by TGA and HRTEM studies. Thermal stability, surface morphology, and structural morphology of these materials were revealed by TGA, SEM and TEM analysis, respectively. Moreover, the tailored mesoporous Ni/KIT-6 molecular sieves were found to possess better quality and massive quantity of g-CNTs produced compared to other catalytic template route.

  1. Chemical Modification: an Effective Way of Avoiding the Collapse of SWNTs on Al Surface Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, J.; Xue, Q. Z.; Yan, K. Y.;

    2009-01-01

    The rapid collapse of intrinsic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) on the aluminum surface is observed using molecular dynamics simulation. The collapsing threshold is similar to 10 angstrom, and the length has no influence on its collapse. Furthermore, we report that the structural stability...... basically maintain the cylindrical structure in our described systems. The results also show that, to avoid SWNTs collapse by chemical modification, the longer and larger SWNTs are, the more modification coverage SWNTs require. and vice versa. Our method allows potentially used modified SWNTs...

  2. The effect of surface oxides on multi-walled carbon nanotube aqueous colloidal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Billy

    Carbonaceous nanomaterials are being produced and integrated into consumer products and specialized applications at an accelerating rate. Recently, however, concerns have increased about the environmental, health and safety risks of these nanomaterials, particularly those chemically functionalized to enhance their aqueous colloidal stability and biocompatibility. In this dissertation research, I have investigated the role that surface-oxide concentration plays in the aqueous colloidal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), a prominent class of engineered nanomaterials. To vary the concentration of surface oxides on the MWCNTs' surface, pristine (unmodified) tubes were treated with a wet-chemical oxidant (e.g., HNO3, H2SO4 /HNO3, KMnO4); the concentration of surface oxides imparted was measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In conjunction with XPS, previously developed chemical derivatization techniques were used to determine the distribution of hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl functional groups present on the MWCNTs' surface. The length distribution and structural integrity of pristine and oxidized MWCNTs were characterized using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. To examine the aqueous colloidal stability and aggregation properties of oxidized MWCNTs, sedimentation and time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) experiments were conducted on neat (i.e., ideal) suspensions prepared by prolonged sonication of MWCNTs in Milli-Q water. Over a range of environmentally relevant pH values (4--9) and electrolyte (NaCL, CaCl2) concentrations (0.001--1.000 M), the aggregation and colloidal properties of MWCNTs were found to agree with the basic tenants of DLVO theory, in that ( i) more highly oxidized, negatively charged MWCNTs remained stable over a wider range of solution conditions than lowly oxidized tubes, ( ii) oxidized MWCNTs adhered to the empirical Schulze-Hardy rule, and (iii) in early

  3. Influence of Chemical and Physical Properties of Activated Carbon Powders on Oxygen Reduction and Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2013-06-03

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders made from different precursor materials (coal, peat, coconut shell, hardwood, and phenolic resin) were electrochemically evaluated as oxygen reduction catalysts and tested as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). AC powders were characterized in terms of surface chemistry and porosity, and their kinetic activities were compared to carbon black and platinum catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) tests. Cathodes using the coal-derived AC had the highest power densities in MFCs (1620 ± 10 mW m-2). Peat-based AC performed similarly in MFC tests (1610 ± 100 mW m-2) and had the best catalyst performance, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.17 V, and n = 3.6 electrons used for oxygen reduction. Hardwood based AC had the highest number of acidic surface functional groups and the poorest performance in MFC and catalysis tests (630 ± 10 mW m-2, Eonset = -0.01 V, n = 2.1). There was an inverse relationship between onset potential and quantity of strong acid (pKa < 8) functional groups, and a larger fraction of microporosity was negatively correlated with power production in MFCs. Surface area alone was a poor predictor of catalyst performance, and a high quantity of acidic surface functional groups was determined to be detrimental to oxygen reduction and cathode performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Use of chemically activated cotton nut shell carbon for the removal of fluoride contaminated drinking water:Kinetics evaluation☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajan Mariappan; Raj Vairamuthu; Alagumuthu GanapathY

    2015-01-01

    Chemically activated cotton nut shell carbons (CTNSCs) were prepared by different chemicals and they were used for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. Effects of adsorption time, adsorbent dose, pH of the solution, initial concentration of fluoride, and temperature of the solution were studied with equilibrium, ther-modynamics and kinetics of the adsorption process by various CTNSC adsorbents. It showed that the chemical y activated CTNSCs can effectively remove fluoride from the solution. The adsorption equilibrium data correlate well with the Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption of fluoride by the chemical y activated CTNSC is spon-taneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo first order, pseudo second order and intra particle diffusion kinetic models were applied to test the experimental data. The pseudo second order kinetic model provided a better correlation of the experimental data in comparison with the pseudo-first-order and intra particle diffusion models. A mechanism of fluoride adsorption associating chemisorption and physisorption processes is presented allowing the discussion of the variations in adsorption behavior between these materials in terms of specific surface area and porosity. These data suggest that chemically activated CTNSCs are promising materials for fluoride sorption.

  5. Carbon fiber masculinity: Disability and surfaces of homosociality

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey-Moody, Anna Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I am concerned with instances in which carbon fiber extends performances of masculinity that are attached to particular kinds of hegemonic male bodies. In examining carbon fiber as a prosthetic form of masculinity, I advance three main arguments. Firstly, carbon fiber can be a site of the supersession of disability that is affected through masculinized technology. Disability can be ‘overcome’ through carbon fiber. Disability is often culturally coded as feminine (Pedersen, 2001;...

  6. The influence of carbon surface chemistry on supported palladium nanoparticles in heterogeneous reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuxiao; Zhang, Liyun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Feng, Zhenbao; Shi, Wen; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2016-10-15

    The surface chemistry of nanocarbon support can tailor chemical properties of precious metal nanoparticle/nanocarbon hybrid catalyst in heterogeneous reactions. We report on modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) support with ionic liquid-derived carbonaceous surface for palladium nanoparticle (Pd NPs) decoration and their actions in different heterogeneous reactions. The surface chemistry of support materials was characterized in detail, and the influence of which on the formation and distribution of metal particles was further investigated. Three different types of reactions including Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, CO oxidation and phenol reduction were examined in terms of reactivity and selectivity. The roles of substituted nitrogen in graphitic lattice and grafted groups on the carbon surface were exploited. Nitrogen-doping can give rise to changes in electronic properties of supported metals, and the Lewis basicity of the doped nitrogen atoms can favor the adsorption of acidic reactants in phenol reduction. The grafted groups derived a negative impact to the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, due to the involvement of larger reactant molecules, despite that they could prevent significant sintering of Pd NPs in the CO oxidation. PMID:27442144

  7. Diamond-like carbon films synthesized on bearing steel surface by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xi; TANG Bao-yin; WANG Lang-ping; WANG Xiao-feng; YU Yong-hao; SUN Tao; HU Li-guo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) on 9Cr18 bearing steel surface. Influences of working gas pressure and pulse width of the bias voltage on properties of the thin film were investigated. The chemical compositions of the as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The micro-hardness, friction and wear behavior, corrosion resistance of the samples were evaluated, respectively. Compared with uncoated substrates, micro-hardness results reveal that the maximum is increased by 88.7%. In addition, the friction coefficient decreases to about 0.1, and the corrosion resistance of treated coupons surface are improved significantly.

  8. Chemical and Molecular Characterization of Biofilm on Metal Surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.

    of fouling. This is generally defined as the development of the conditioning film or molecular film (Loeb and Neihof, 1977; Characklis and Escher, 1988; Taylor et al., 1997). The adsorbed organic matter is not present as a continuous layer but forms a... generally exhibit a negative charge on their surfaces. In order to avoid this repulsive barrier, microorganisms produce exopolymeric substances and/or other cellular appendages which help the microorganisms to develop contact with surfaces and form biofilm...

  9. Chemical studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, C

    2001-01-01

    WCl sub 6 has also been introduced into arc-vapourised SWNTs. Chapter 6 gives the details for all the experimental work of the thesis. of H sub 2 have also been studied. Chapter four describes the various processes used to purify arc-vapourised SWNTs on a laboratory scale. Two potentially scalable processes have also been studied. Both acid and gas oxidants have been used to purify SWNTs grown in the CVD method. The chemical resistance of CVD SWNTs (48 h of conc. HNO sub 3 treatment) has been shown for the first time. Various assembly behaviours of purified SWNTs, including loop and spiral structures, straight long bundles or somewhat aligned structures, are also described. Chapter five presents the filling of arc-vapourised SWNTs with LnX sub n (X = Cl, Br and I, n = 2 or 3) using the capallarity method at high temperature (570-910 deg C). The first example of a polycrystalline structure within SWNTs filled with a single material (SmCl sub 3) has been provided. Fullerenes within SWNTs in the SWNT samples ext...

  10. Chemical production from waste carbon monoxide: its potential for energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Schiefelbein, G.F.; Molton, P.M.; Li, C.T.; Elliott, D.C.; Baker, E.G.

    1977-11-01

    Results of a study of the potential for energy conservation by producing chemicals from by-product or waste carbon monoxide (CO) from industrial sources are summarized. Extensive compilations of both industrial sources and uses for carbon monoxide were developed and included. Reviews of carbon monoxide purification and concentration technology and preliminary economic evaluations of carbon monoxide concentration, pipeline transportation and utilization of CO in the synthesis of ammonia and methanol are included. Preliminary technical and economic feasibility studies were made of producing ammonia and methanol from the by-product CO produced by a typical elemental phosphorus plant. Methanol synthesis appears to be more attractive than ammonia synthesis when using CO feedstock because of reduced water gas shift and carbon dioxide removal requirements. The economic studies indicate that methanol synthesis from CO appears to be competitive with conventional technology when the price of natural gas exceeds $0.82/million Btu, while ammonia synthesis from CO is probably not competitive until the price of natural gas exceeds $1.90/million Btu. It is concluded that there appears to be considerable potential for energy conservation in the chemical industry, by collecting CO rather than flaring it, and using it to make major chemicals such as ammonia and methanol.

  11. Microscale chemical and electrostatic surface patterning of Dow Cyclotene by N 2 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.-Q.; Poulin, S.; Martinu, L.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.; Zabeida, O.; Sacher, E.

    2005-04-01

    Using TEM grids as masks, we have chemically modified selected areas of the surface of Dow Cyclotene, a low permittivity polymer, by a N 2 plasma (chemical surface patterning), grafting a maximum of ˜3% N; this was verified by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and TOF-S-SIMS (time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry) chemical imaging. Contact mode AFM (atomic force microscopy) studies of the modified surface morphology show unexpected, initially large, values of both etch depth and friction in the treated areas, which decrease on exposure to atmosphere; similar results were absent in tapping mode images. When Cu, which forms nanoclusters on Cyclotene, was deposited by evaporation onto freshly etched Cyclotene, the large etch depth and friction in the etched areas decreased to much lower values. The depth and friction differences occurring on surface modification, which were revealed through our use of patterning, are apparent, and are, in fact, caused by enhanced electrostatic interaction of the chemically modified surface with the AFM tip, as confirmed by the tapping mode data. Some of the electrostatic surface charge, introduced by the positively charged species chemically modifying the Cyclotene surface, is reduced by subsequent charge neutralization. XPS has shown this to be due to the oxidation of these surface charges on atmospheric exposure, initially ˜70%, to form alcohol, carbonyl and carboxylic acid groups. Contact mode AFM imaging of plasma-patterned surfaces is revealed as an excellent tool for the high-resolution characterization of such surfaces.

  12. Fenton-Driven Chemical Regeneration of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon -- A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    MTBE-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) underwent 3 adsorption/oxidation cycles. Pilot-scale columns were intermittently placed on-line at a ground water pump and treat facility, saturated with MTBE, and regenerated with H2O2 under different chemical, physical, and operational...

  13. Surface chemical reactions induced by well-controlled molecular beams: translational energy and molecular orientation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Michio, E-mail: okada@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.j, E-mail: mokada@cw.osaka-u.ac.j [Renovation Center of Instruments for Science Education and Technology, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 and 1-2 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2010-07-07

    I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams suggest that the translational energy of the incident molecules plays a significant role. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. Oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility for controlling surface chemical reactions by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of achieving material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for creating new materials on surfaces with well-controlled chemical reactions. (topical review)

  14. Localized surface plasmon fiber device coated with carbon nanotubes for the specific detection of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsop, T.; Arif, R.; Neal, R.; Kalli, K.; Kundrát, V.; Rozhin, A.; Culverhouse, P.; Webb, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    We explored the potential of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating working in conjunction with a recently developed localized surface plasmon (LSP) device (based upon a nanostructured thin film consisting of of nano-wires of platinum) with ultra-high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding index. The uncoated LSP sensor's transmission resonances exhibited a refractive index sensitivity of Δλ/Δn ~ -6200nm/RIU and ΔΙ/Δn ~5900dB/RIU, which is the highest reported spectral sensitivity of a fiber optic sensor to bulk index changes within the gas regime. The complete device provides the first demonstration of the chemically specific gas sensing capabilities of CNTs utilizing their optical characteristics. This is proven by investigating the spectral response of the sensor before and after the adhesion of CNTs to alkane gases along with carbon dioxide. The device shows a distinctive spectral response in the presence of gaseous CO2 over and above what is expected from general changes in the bulk refractive index. This fiber device yielded a limit of detection of 150ppm for CO2 at a pressure of one atmosphere. Additionally the adhered CNTs actually reduce sensitivity of the device to changes in bulk refractive index of the surrounding medium. The polarization properties of the LSP sensor resonances are also investigated and it is shown that there is a reduction in the overall azimuthal polarization after the CNTs are applied. These optical devices offer a way of exploiting optically the chemical selectivity of carbon nanotubes, thus providing the potential for real-world applications in gas sensing in many inflammable and explosive environments.

  15. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  16. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA.

  17. Chemical characteristics of surface colour of birch veneer (Betula pendula)

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Julkaistu vain painettuna, saatavuus katso Bibid. Published only in printed form, availability see Bibid This thesis investigates the discoloration of veneer produced from silver birch (Betula pendula) logs by means of biochemical and chemical analyses on the veneer and sap obtained from wood which was soaked at varying temperatures (20-70 ˚C). Drastic colour development was confirmed from the sap squeezed from green birch wood. The results from biochemical tests on the sap by sodium dodec...

  18. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  19. Understanding the physical and chemical properties of carbon-based granular fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, David J.

    Coal and oil have been used as fuel sources for centuries, but the way they have been used has not fundamentally changed: coal is ground into pieces then burned, and oil is distilled into various liquid fractions that are then burned. This dissertation explores newer methods of utilizing those fuel sources. Coal gasification is the process where coal is heated in a low oxygen environment so that the solid carbon is converted into a mixture of gaseous products. But some aspects of gasification, such as the role of catalysts and the structural evolution of coal particles throughout the reaction, remain unclear. These aspects were studied by analyzing, ex situ, the physical and chemical changes of coal feedstock samples extracted from a fluidized bed gasifier at various times throughout gasification. The changes in feed particle composition and size distribution composition showed that the gasification reaction rate was slower than the gas diffusion rates inside the coal particle at a typical catalytic gasification temperature of 800oC. Detailed composition analysis of samples with and without added catalyst showed that the catalyst increased the overall reaction rate by promoting the dissociative oxidation of the coal by gas phase oxidants, which provided more active sites for carbon-carbon bond breakage. The conclusions drawn from studying the feedstock can be combined with the data from in situ analysis of the gasification reactor to provide a fuller picture of the gasification process. Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a carbonaceous solid produced during oil distillation. Though petcoke could be an important energy source, its use is hindered by practical and environmental concerns. Producing a slurry with petcoke and water has been studied as an alternative method for utilizing petcoke, but the effective use of petcoke slurries requires that they have low viscosity while remaining stable against settling of the particles due to gravity. These rheological properties

  20. Chemically-induced Jahn-Teller ordering on manganite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Zheng; Lin, Wenzhi; Burton, J. D.; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.; Fuchigami, K.; Shen, Jian; Snijders, P. C.; Ward, T. Z.; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Physical and electrochemical phenomena at the surfaces of transition metal oxides and their coupling to local functionality remains one of the enigmas of condensed matter physics. Understanding the emergent physical phenomena at surfaces requires the capability to probe the local composition, map order parameter fields, and establish their coupling to electronic properties. Here we demonstrate that measuring the sub 30 pm displacements of atoms from high-symmetry positions in the atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) allows the physical order parameter fields to be visualized in real space on the single atom level. Here, this local crystallographic analysis is applied to the in-situ grown manganite surfaces. In particular, using direct bond-angle mapping we report direct observation of structural domains on manganite surfaces, and trace their origin to surface-chemistry-induced stabilization of ordered Jahn-Teller displacements. Density functional calculations provide insight into the intriguing interplay between the various degrees of freedom now resolved on the atomic level. Research was supported by MSED and CNMS, which are sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Chemically induced Jahn-Teller ordering on manganite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Zheng; Lin, Wenzhi; Burton, J D; Fuchigami, K; Snijders, P C; Ward, T Z; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y; Shen, J; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Baddorf, Arthur P

    2014-01-01

    Physical and electrochemical phenomena at the surfaces of transition metal oxides and their coupling to local functionality remains one of the enigmas of condensed matter physics. Understanding the emergent physical phenomena at surfaces requires the capability to probe the local composition, map order parameter fields and establish their coupling to electronic properties. Here we demonstrate that measuring the sub-30-pm displacements of atoms from high-symmetry positions in the atomically resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy allows the physical order parameter fields to be visualized in real space on the single-atom level. Here, this local crystallographic analysis is applied to the in-situ-grown manganite surfaces. In particular, using direct bond-angle mapping we report direct observation of structural domains on manganite surfaces, and trace their origin to surface-chemistry-induced stabilization of ordered Jahn-Teller displacements. Density functional calculations provide insight into the intriguing interplay between the various degrees of freedom now resolved on the atomic level. PMID:25058540

  2. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  3. Physical and Electrical Characteristics of Carbon Nanotube Network Field-Effect Transistors Synthesized by Alcohol Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Lung Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been explored in nanoelectronics to realize desirable device performances. Thus, carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (CNTNFETs have been developed directly by means of alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD method using Co-Mo catalysts in this work. Various treated temperatures, growth time, and Co/Mo catalysts were employed to explore various surface morphologies of carbon nanotube networks (CNTNs formed on the SiO2/n-type Si(100 stacked substrate. Experimental results show that most semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks with 5–7 nm in diameter and low disorder-induced mode (D-band were grown. A bipolar property of CNTNFETs synthesized by ACCVD and using HfO2 as top-gate dielectric was demonstrated. Various electrical characteristics, including drain current versus drain voltage (Id-Vd, drain current versus gate voltage (Id-Vg, mobility, subthreshold slope (SS, and transconductance (Gm, were obtained.

  4. Effect of chemical vapor infiltration treatment on the wave-absorbing performance of carbon fiber/cement composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Short carbon fibers were treated at high temperatures around 1100℃ through chemical vapor infiltration technology.A thinner layer ofpyrocarbon was deposited on the fiber surface.The dispersion of carbon fibers in a cement matrix and the mechanical properties of carbon fiber/cement composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other tests.The reflectivity of electromagnetic waves by the composites was measured in the frequency range of 8.0-18 GHz for different carbon fiber contents of 0.2wt%,0.4wt%,0.6wt% ,and 1.0wt%.The results show that the reflectivity tends to increase with the increase of fiber content above 0.4wt%.The minimum reflectivity is -19.3 dB and the composites exhibit wave-absorbing performances.After pyrocarbon is deposited on the fiber,all the reflectivity data are far greater.They are all above -10 dB and display mainly wave-reflecting performances.

  5. New Synthesis of Pt-Ru Nanoparticles on Surface Modified Carbon Vulcane XC-72 as an Effective Catalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmad; Nozad; Golikand; Sajjad; Sadaghat; Sharehjini; Mohammad; Yari

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Pt-Ru nanoparticles are synthesised on the surface oxidized carbon Vulcane XC-72 as catalyst support by chemically anchoring Pt and Ru onto the surface of modified carbon vulcane XC-72 (by refluxing in 70% HNO3 at 120 ℃ for 12 h to introduce surface functional groups) .The nanoparticles of Pt and Ru are synthesized by reduction of H2PtCl6 and K4Ru(CN)6 with sodium borohydride in a 5.5 buffer solution of sodium citrate,the complexation of citrate with metal ions is beneficial to the formati...

  6. The surface properties of carbon fibers and their adhesion to organic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, W. D.; Drzal, L. T.

    1987-01-01

    The state of knowledge of the surface properties of carbon fibers is reviewed, with emphasis on fiber/matrix adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Subjects treated include carbon fiber structure and chemistry, techniques for the study of the fiber surface, polymer/fiber bond strength and its measurement, variations in polymer properties in the interphase, and the influence of fiber matrix adhesion on composite mechanical properties. Critical issues are summarized and search recommendations are made.

  7. High capacity mercury adsorption on freshly ozone-treated carbon surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Manchester, Shawn; Wang, Xuelei; Kulaots, Indrek; Gao, Yuming; Hurt, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    A set of carbon materials was treated by a choice of common oxidizers to investigate the mercury capture capacities at varying temperature conditions. It was found that ozone treatment dramatically increases the mercury capture capacity of carbon surfaces by factors up to 134, but the activity is easily destroyed by exposure to the atmosphere, to water vapor, or by mild heating. Freshly ozone-treated carbon surfaces are shown to oxidize iodide to iodine in solution and this ability fades with...

  8. Effects of Surface Area and Flow Rate on Marine Bacterial Growth in Activated Carbon Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Shimp, Robert J.; Pfaender, Frederic K.

    1982-01-01

    The colonization of granular activated carbon columns by bacteria can have both beneficial and potentially detrimental consequences. Bacterial growth on the carbon surface can remove adsorbed organics and thus partially regenerate the carbon bed. However, growth can also increase the levels of bacteria in the column effluents, which can adversely affect downstream uses of the treated water. This study of a sand column and several activated carbon columns demonstrated that considerable marine ...

  9. Effect of bead milling on chemical and physical characteristics of activated carbons pulverized to superfine sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partlan, Erin; Davis, Kathleen; Ren, Yiran; Apul, Onur Guven; Mefford, O Thompson; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2016-02-01

    Superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) is an adsorbent material with particle size between roughly 0.1-1 μm. This is about an order of magnitude smaller than conventional powdered activated carbon (PAC), typically 10-50 μm. S-PAC has been shown to outperform PAC for adsorption of various drinking water contaminants. However, variation in S-PAC production methods and limited material characterization in prior studies lead to questions of how S-PAC characteristics deviate from that of its parent PAC. In this study, a wet mill filled with 0.3-0.5 mm yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide grinding beads was used to produce S-PAC from seven commercially available activated carbons of various source materials, including two coal types, coconut shell, and wood. Particle sizes were varied by changing the milling time, keeping mill power, batch volume, and recirculation rate constant. As expected, mean particle size decreased with longer milling. A lignite coal-based carbon had the smallest mean particle diameter at 169 nm, while the wood-based carbon had the largest at 440 nm. The wood and coconut-shell based carbons had the highest resistance to milling. Specific surface area and pore volume distributions were generally unchanged with increased milling time. Changes in the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) and oxygen content of the milled carbons were found to correlate with an increasing specific external surface area. However, the isoelectric point (pH(IEP)), which measures only external surfaces, was unchanged with milling and also much lower in value than pH(PZC). It is likely that the outer surface is easily oxidized while internal surfaces remain largely unchanged, which results in a lower average pH as measured by pH(PZC). PMID:26657354

  10. Role of surface-electrical properties on the cell-viability of carbon thin films grown in nanodomain morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Amjed; Kumar, Manish; Yoon, Seokyoung; Lee, Jung Heon; Tajima, Satomi; Hori, Masaru; Geon Han, Jeon

    2016-07-01

    Carbon thin films, having a combination of unique physical and chemical properties, exhibit an interesting biocompatibility and biological response to living entities. Here, the carbon films are developed in the morphology form of nano-domains with nanoscale inter-domain separations, tuned by plasma conditions in the facing target magnetron sputtering process. The wettability and surface energy are found to have a close relation to the inter-domain separations. The chemical structure of carbon films exhibited the relative enhancement of sp3 in comparison to sp2 with the increase of domain separations. The cell-viability of these films shows promising results for L929 mouse fibroblast and Saos-2 bone cells, when inter-domain separation is increased. Electrical conductivity and surface energy are identified to play the key role in different time-scales during the cell-proliferation process. The contribution from electrical conductivity is dominant in the beginning of the cultivation, whereas with the passage of time (~3–5 d) the surface energy takes control over conductivity to enhance the cell proliferation.

  11. Surface chemical structure of titania-silica nanocomposite powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG LuYan; SUN YanPing; XU BingShe

    2008-01-01

    Titania-silica (TS) nanocomposite powder with three different composite structures, containing 10-30 mol% SiO2 in each structure, have been prepared by sol-gel processes. The surface characteristics of these titania-silica samples have been investigated by X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The study for all TS oxides annealed at 773 and 1173 K showed: an abnormal surface enrichment in Si increased with increasing annealing tem-perature; the Ti3+, Ti2+, Si3+ and Si2+ oxides coexisted with Ti4+ and Si4+ oxides, and the contents of these TilSi suboxides increased with increasing SiO2 content and annealing temperature; there was a layer rich in O on the topmost surface and the excess O could be attributed to the chem-adsorption of H2O; different composite structures could lead to different contents of Ti/Si suboxides. These results indi-cated that the surface of TS oxide powder derived by sol-gel process was a double layer with enriched O first and then SiOx/TiOy(x, y<2). Ti/Si suboxides could result from the thermal diffusion of Ti4+ and Si4+, which might be induced by the strong interaction between Ti4+ and Si4+.

  12. Fabrication of micro carbon pillar by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 罗迎社; 李立君; 钟琦文; 李新华; 殷水平

    2008-01-01

    Argon ion laser was used as the induced light source and ethane(C2H4) was selected as the precursor gas,in the variety ranges of laser power from 0.5 W to 4.5 W and the pressure of the precursor gas from 225×133.3 Pa to 680×133.3 Pa,the experiments of laser induced chemical vapor deposition were proceeded for fabrication of micro carbon pillar.In the experiments,the influences of power of laser and pressure of work gas on the diameter and length of micro carbon pillar were investigated,the variety on averaged growth rate of carbon pillar with the laser irradiation time and moving speed of focus was discussed.Based on experiment data,the micro carbon pillar with an aspect ratio of over 500 was built through the method of moving the focus.

  13. Chemically Driven Printed Textile Sensors Based on Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Skrzetuska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The unique properties of graphene, such as the high elasticity, mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, very high electrical conductivity and transparency, make them it an interesting material for stretchable electronic applications. In the work presented herein, the authors used graphene and carbon nanotubes to introduce chemical sensing properties into textile materials by means of a screen printing method. Carbon nanotubes and graphene pellets were dispersed in water and used as a printing paste in the screen printing process. Three printing paste compositions were prepared—0%, 1% and 3% graphene pellet content with a constant 3% carbon nanotube mass content. Commercially available materials were used in this process. As a substrate, a twill woven cotton fabric was utilized. It has been found that the addition of graphene to printing paste that contains carbon nanotubes significantly enhances the electrical conductivity and sensing properties of the final product.

  14. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'This report summarizes the results of work done during the first 1.3 years of a three year project. During the first nine months effort focussed on the design, construction and testing of a closed recirculating system that can be used to study photochemistry in supercritical carbon dioxide at pressures up to 5,000 psi and temperatures up to about 50 C. This was followed by a period of work in which the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene and acetone in supercritical, liquid, and gaseous carbon dioxide containing dissolved oxygen was demonstrated. The photocatalyst was titanium dioxide supported on glass spheres. This was the first time it was possible to observe photocatalytic oxidation in a supercritical fluid and to compare reaction in the three fluid phases of a solvent. This also demonstrated that it is possible to purify supercritical and liquid carbon dioxide using photochemical oxidation with no chemical additions other than oxygen. The oxidation of benzene produced no intermediates detectable using on line spectroscopic analysis or by gas chromatographic analysis of samples taken from the flow system. The catalyst surface did darken as the reaction proceeded indicating that oxidation products were accumulating on the surface. This is analogous to the behavior of aromatic compounds in air phase photocatalytic oxidation. The reaction of acetone under similar conditions resulted in the formation of low levels of by-products. Two were identified as products of the reaction of acetone with itself (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one and 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone) using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer detector. Two other by-products also appear to be from the self-reaction of acetone. By-products of this type had not been observed in prior studies of the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of acetone. The by-products that have been observed can also be oxidized under the treatment conditions. The above results establish that photocatalytic oxidation of

  15. SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND CUTTING FORCES IN CRYOGENIC TURNING OF CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. YAP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cryogenic liquid nitrogen on surface roughness, cutting forces, and friction coefficient of the machined surface when machining of carbon steel S45C in wet, dry and cryogenic condition was studied through experiments. The experimental results show that machining with liquid nitrogen increases the cutting forces, reduces the friction coefficient, and improves the chips produced. Beside this, conventional machining with cutting fluid is still the most suitable method to produce good surface in high speed machining of carbon steel S45C whereas dry machining produced best surface roughness in low speed machining. Cryogenic machining is not able to replace conventional cutting fluid in turning carbon steel.

  16. Carbon activation process for increased surface accessibility in electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Daniel H.; Eisenmann, Erhard T.

    2001-01-01

    A process for making carbon film or powder suitable for double capacitor electrodes having a capacitance of up to about 300 F/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. This is accomplished by treating in aqueous nitric acid for a period of about 5 to 15 minutes thin carbon films obtained by carbonizing carbon-containing polymeric material having a high degree of molecular directionality, such as polyimide film, then heating the treated carbon film in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a non-graphitizing temperature of at least 350.degree. C. for about 20 minutes, and repeating alternately the nitric acid step and the heating step from 7 to 10 times. Capacitors made with this carbon may find uses ranging from electronic devices to electric vehicle applications.

  17. TPR system: a powerful technique to monitor carbon nanotube formation during chemical vapour deposition; Sistema RTP: uma tecnica poderosa para o monitoramento da formacao de nanotubos de carbono durante o processo por deposicao de vapor quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tristao, Juliana Cristina; Moura, Flavia Cristina Camilo; Lago, Rochel Montero, E-mail: rochel@ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DQ/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Sapag, Karim [Universidade Nacional de San Luis (Argentina). Lab. de Ciencias de Superficies y Medios Porosos

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction) system is used as a powerful tool to monitor carbon nanotubes production during CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition), The experiments were carried out using catalyst precursors based on Fe-Mo supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and methane as carbon source. As methane reacts on the Fe metal surface, carbon is deposited and H2 is produced. TPR is very sensitive to the presence of H2 and affords information on the temperature where catalyst is active to form different forms of carbon, the reaction kinetics, the catalyst deactivation and carbon yields. (author)

  18. Economic Evaluations for the Carbon Dioxide-involved Production of High-value Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic evaluation of the manufacturing technology of high-value chemicals through the carbonation reaction of carbon dioxide contained in the flue gas was performed, and analysis of the IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and whole profit along the production plan of the final product was conducted. Through a carbonation reaction with sodium hydroxide that is generated from electrolysis and by using carbon dioxide in the combustion gas that is generated in the power plant, it is possible to get a high value products such as sodium bicarbonate compound and also to reduce the carbon dioxide emission simultaneously. The IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and NPV (Net Present Value) methods were used for the economic evaluation of the process which could handle carbon dioxide of 100 tons per day in the period of the 20 years of plant operation. The results of economic evaluation showed that the IRR of baseline case of technology was 67.2% and the profit that obtained during the whole operation period (20 years) was 346,922 million won based on NPV value. When considering ETS due to the emissions trading enforcement that will be activated in 2015, the NPV was improved to a 6,000 million won. Based on this results, it could be concluded that this CO2 carbonation technology is an cost-effective technology option for the reduction of greenhouse gas

  19. Economic Evaluations for the Carbon Dioxide-involved Production of High-value Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Dong Woog; Jang, Se Gyu; Kwak, No-Sang; Lee, In Young; Jang, Kyung Ryoung; Shim, Jae-Goo [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Shin [Korea East-West Power Co. LTD, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Economic evaluation of the manufacturing technology of high-value chemicals through the carbonation reaction of carbon dioxide contained in the flue gas was performed, and analysis of the IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and whole profit along the production plan of the final product was conducted. Through a carbonation reaction with sodium hydroxide that is generated from electrolysis and by using carbon dioxide in the combustion gas that is generated in the power plant, it is possible to get a high value products such as sodium bicarbonate compound and also to reduce the carbon dioxide emission simultaneously. The IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and NPV (Net Present Value) methods were used for the economic evaluation of the process which could handle carbon dioxide of 100 tons per day in the period of the 20 years of plant operation. The results of economic evaluation showed that the IRR of baseline case of technology was 67.2% and the profit that obtained during the whole operation period (20 years) was 346,922 million won based on NPV value. When considering ETS due to the emissions trading enforcement that will be activated in 2015, the NPV was improved to a 6,000 million won. Based on this results, it could be concluded that this CO2 carbonation technology is an cost-effective technology option for the reduction of greenhouse gas.

  20. Support effect on carbon nanotube growth by methane chemical vapor deposition on cobalt catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the support on carbon nanotube production by methane chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on cobalt catalysts was investigated. N2 physisorption, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and H2 and CO chemisorption techniques were used to characterize the structure of cobalt catalysts supported on different metal oxides (Al2O3, SiO2, Nb2O5 and TiO2). Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used for the characterization and quantification of produced carbon species. On carbon nanotube growth, the catalyst produced three main carbon species: amorphous carbon, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). The characterization techniques showed that the catalyst selectivity to each kind of nanotube depended on the cobalt particle size distribution, which was influenced by the textural properties of the support. Co/TiO2 showed the highest selectivity towards single wall nanotube formation. This high selectivity results from the narrow size distribution of cobalt particles on TiO2. (author)

  1. Growth Model, Synthesis of Carbon nanostructures and Alteration of Surface properties Using Them

    OpenAIRE

    Naha, Sayangdev

    2008-01-01

    Flame synthesis is recognized as a much cheaper and higher throughput process for carbon nanotube/nanofiber (CNT/CNF) production compared to conventional catalytic processes like chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Nanostructured carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes and nanofibers, exhibit superhydrophobic behavior over a range of pH values, including for corrosive liquids. Part of this research reports the development of a rapid on-demand process for the synthesis of superhydrophobic surf...

  2. Microscopy and surface chemical investigations of dyed cellulose textiles

    OpenAIRE

    Chettra, Satinderjeet Kaur

    2006-01-01

    Cotton is a vital material for the textile industry, providing the fundamental raw component for the manufacture of numerous and varied garments. It has been thoroughly characterised both in terms of its constitution; behaviour under a variety of environmental and manufacturing conditions; and several mechanisms by which it takes up dyestuffs. Recently the availability of a range of high-performance surface analysis tools has allowed researchers to begin to assess the contribution of the surf...

  3. Effects of ion bombardment on chemical interactions at SiC surface and Al/SiC interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation into the SiC surface and its interaction with aluminum, in particular, focusing on the effect of ion bombardment and adsorption of oxygen, is described. Stoichiometric and carbon rich and SiC surfaces were produced and analyzed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cubic SiC shows preferential sputtering under Ar ion bombardment, leading to carbon rich surface, whereas high temperature annealing also causes carbon rich surface. Activity of these surfaces was compared with oxygen and aluminum adsorption. Stoichiometrically sputtered surface showed vastly increased oxygen affinity, whereas carbon-rich sputtered surfaces did not. Aluminum deposition caused significant Al-C interaction for the stoichiometric ion-bombarded surface. Aluminum carbide was induced catalytically upon heating in the presence of oxygen. Carbon-rich surfaces had, however, no significant interactions with as-deposited Al due to strong surface C-C bonds

  4. Surface chemical changes of atmospheric pressure plasma treated rabbit fibres important for felting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánová, Vlasta; Slavíček, Pavel; Stupavská, Monika; Jurmanová, Jana; Černák, Mirko

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment as a suitable procedure for in-line industrial application of rabbit fibres pre-treatment. Changes of rabbit fibre properties due to the plasma treatment were studied in order to develop new technology of plasma-based treatment before felting. Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge (DCSBD) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used for plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy was used for determination of the fibres morphology before and after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used for evaluation of reactive groups. The concentration of carbon decreased and conversely the concentration of nitrogen and oxygen increased after plasma treatment. Aging effect of plasma treated fibres was also investigated. Using Washburn method the significant increase of fibres wettability was observed after plasma treatment. New approach of pre-treatment of fibres before felting using plasma was developed. Plasma treatment of fibres at atmospheric pressure can replace the chemical method which consists of application of strong acids on fibres.

  5. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Surface-Sediment Carbonate in Bosten Lake (Xinjiang, China) and its Controlling Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chengjun; Steffen MISCHKE; ZHENG Mianping; Alexander PROKOPENKO; GUO Fangqin; FENG Zhaodong

    2009-01-01

    and carbonate mineralogy influence of the surface-sediment carbonate in Bosten Lake. The lake water residence time and the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and the water body control the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbonate sediment. In addition, organic matter pollution and decomposition result in the abnormally low carbon isotope values of the lake surface-sediment carbonate.

  6. Modelling the spectro-photometric and chemical evolution of Low Surface Brightness spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, L. B. van den; de Blok, W J G

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) spiral galaxies by means of their observed spectro-photometric and chemical properties. We present preliminary results for Johnson-Cousins UBVRI magnitudes and stellar [O/H] abundance ratios using a galactic chemical evolution model incorporating a detailed metallicity dependent set of stellar input data covering all relevant stages of stellar evolution. Comparison of our model results with observ...

  7. Integrated biological chemical approach for the identification of polyaromatic mutagens in surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    GALLAMPOIS Christine

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters are essential for human life, to supply of drinking water and as an important resource for agricultural, industrial and recreational activities. However, tonnes of pollutants enter these surface waters every year. Amongst the substances discharged into the environment, a large number are known to be mutagenic. Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is a tool to identify chemicals responsible for the observed toxic effects. It is based on a combination of chemical and biological analysi...

  8. Modifying surface properties of diamond-like carbon films via nanotexturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbella, C; Portal-Marco, S; Rubio-Roy, M; Bertran, E; Andujar, J L [FEMAN Group, IN2UB, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Oncins, G [Serveis CientIfico-Tecnics, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Marti i Franques s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Vallve, M A; Ignes-Mullol, J, E-mail: corberoc@hotmail.com [SOC and SAM Group, IN2UB, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-05

    Diamond-like amorphous carbon (DLC) films have been grown by pulsed-dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on silicon wafers, which were previously patterned by means of colloidal lithography. The substrate conditioning comprised two steps: first, deposition of a self-assembled monolayer of silica sub-micrometre spheres ({approx}300 nm) on monocrystalline silicon ({approx}5 cm{sup 2}) by Langmuir-Blodgett technique, which acted as lithography template; second, substrate patterning via ion beam etching (argon) of the colloid samples (550 eV) at different incidence angles. The plasma deposition of a DLC thin film on the nanotextured substrates resulted in hard coatings with distinctly different surface properties compared with planar DLC. Also, in-plane anisotropy was generated depending on the etching angle. The samples were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The anisotropy introduced by the texture was evidenced in the surface properties, as shown by the directional dependences of wettability (water contact angle) and friction coefficient. The latter was measured using a nanotribometer and a lateral force microscope. These two techniques showed how the nanopatterns influenced the tribological properties at different scales of load and contact area. This fabrication technique finds applications in the industry of microelectromechanical systems, anisotropic tribological coatings, nanoimprint lithography, microfluidics, photonic crystals, and patterned surfaces for biomedicine.

  9. Modifying surface properties of diamond-like carbon films via nanotexturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, C.; Portal-Marco, S.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Bertran, E.; Oncins, G.; Vallvé, M. A.; Ignés-Mullol, J.; Andújar, J. L.

    2011-10-01

    Diamond-like amorphous carbon (DLC) films have been grown by pulsed-dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on silicon wafers, which were previously patterned by means of colloidal lithography. The substrate conditioning comprised two steps: first, deposition of a self-assembled monolayer of silica sub-micrometre spheres (~300 nm) on monocrystalline silicon (~5 cm2) by Langmuir-Blodgett technique, which acted as lithography template; second, substrate patterning via ion beam etching (argon) of the colloid samples (550 eV) at different incidence angles. The plasma deposition of a DLC thin film on the nanotextured substrates resulted in hard coatings with distinctly different surface properties compared with planar DLC. Also, in-plane anisotropy was generated depending on the etching angle. The samples were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The anisotropy introduced by the texture was evidenced in the surface properties, as shown by the directional dependences of wettability (water contact angle) and friction coefficient. The latter was measured using a nanotribometer and a lateral force microscope. These two techniques showed how the nanopatterns influenced the tribological properties at different scales of load and contact area. This fabrication technique finds applications in the industry of microelectromechanical systems, anisotropic tribological coatings, nanoimprint lithography, microfluidics, photonic crystals, and patterned surfaces for biomedicine.

  10. Modifying surface properties of diamond-like carbon films via nanotexturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like amorphous carbon (DLC) films have been grown by pulsed-dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on silicon wafers, which were previously patterned by means of colloidal lithography. The substrate conditioning comprised two steps: first, deposition of a self-assembled monolayer of silica sub-micrometre spheres (∼300 nm) on monocrystalline silicon (∼5 cm2) by Langmuir-Blodgett technique, which acted as lithography template; second, substrate patterning via ion beam etching (argon) of the colloid samples (550 eV) at different incidence angles. The plasma deposition of a DLC thin film on the nanotextured substrates resulted in hard coatings with distinctly different surface properties compared with planar DLC. Also, in-plane anisotropy was generated depending on the etching angle. The samples were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The anisotropy introduced by the texture was evidenced in the surface properties, as shown by the directional dependences of wettability (water contact angle) and friction coefficient. The latter was measured using a nanotribometer and a lateral force microscope. These two techniques showed how the nanopatterns influenced the tribological properties at different scales of load and contact area. This fabrication technique finds applications in the industry of microelectromechanical systems, anisotropic tribological coatings, nanoimprint lithography, microfluidics, photonic crystals, and patterned surfaces for biomedicine.

  11. Chemical Composition of Polymer Surfaces Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy and Complementary Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancso, G. Julius; Hillborg, Henrik; Schönherr, Holger

    2005-01-01

    In this article we review the recent developments in the field of high resolution lateral mapping of the surface chemical composition of polymers by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other complementary imaging techniques. The different AFM approaches toward nanometer scale mapping with chemical sen

  12. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotope separation by plasma chemical reactions in carbon monoxide glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of carbon and oxygen isotopes in CO glow discharge has been studied. The isotope enrichment in the products was measured by quadru-pole mass spectrometer. The reaction yield and empirical formula of solid phase products were determined by the gas-volumetric analysis. The stable products obtained in our experiment are CO2 and solid polymers formed on the discharge wall. The polymer consists of both carbon and oxygen and the oxygen/carbon mole ratio in the polymer is 0.35±0.05. Thi isotope enrichment coefficients show a strong negative dependence on discharge current though the relative reaction yields have an opposite tendency. Consequently, the maximum isotope enrichment coefficients for 13C in wall deposit of 2.31 and for 18O in CO2 of 1.37 are obtained when the discharge current and the reaction yields are minimum in our experimental range. The experimental results of isotope enrichment have been compared with theoretical values estimated by an analytical model of literature. The dilution mechanism of the isotope enrichment of stable products is inferred from the isotopic distributions of 13C and 18O in products and theoretical predictions for isotope enrichment. (author)

  14. Surface characterization in composite and titanium bonding: Carbon fiber surface treatments for improved adhesion to thermoplastic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of anodization in NaOH, H2SO4, and amine salts on the surface chemistry of carbon fibers was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surfaces of carbon fibers after anodization in NaOH and H2SO4 were examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), angular dependent XPS, UV absorption spectroscopy of the anodization bath, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and polar/dispersive surface energy analysis. Hercules AS-4, Dexter Hysol XAS, and Union Carbide T-300 fibers were examined by STEM, angular dependent XPS, and breaking strength measurement before and after commercial surface treatment. Oxygen and nitrogen were added to the fiber surfaces by anodization in amine salts. Analysis of the plasmon peak in the carbon 1s signal indicated that H2SO4 anodization affected the morphological structure of the carbon fiber surface. The work of adhesion of carbon fibers to thermoplastic resins was calculated using the geometric mean relationship. A correlation was observed between the dispersive component of the work of adhesion and the interfacial adhesion.

  15. Optimum BET surface areas for activated carbon produced from textile sewage sludges and its application as dye removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacan, Erdal

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this experimental study is to determine optimum preparation conditions for activated carbons obtained from textile sewage sludge (TSS) for removal of dyes from aqueous solutions. The textile sewage sludge activated carbon (TSSAC) was prepared by chemical activation with potassium hydroxide using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The most influential factor on each experimental design responses was identified via ANNOVA analysis. Based on the central composite design (CCD), quadratic model was developed to correlate the preparation variables for one response which is the Brunauer-Emmelt-Teller (BET) surface area. RSM based on a three-variable CCD was used to determine the effect of pyrolyzed temperature (400-700 °C), carbonization time (45-180 min) and KOH: weight of TSS (wt%) impregnation ratio (0.5:1-1.5:1) on BET surface area. According to the results, pyrolyzed temperature and impregnation ratio were found as the significant factors for maximizing the BET surface area. The major effect which influences the BET surface area was found as pyrolyzed temperature. Both carbonization time and impregnation ratio of KOH had no significant effect. The optimum conditions for preparing TSSAC, based on response surface and contour plots, were found as follows: pyrolyzed temperature 700 °C, carbonization time of 45 min and chemical impregnation ratio of 0.5. The maximum and optimum BET surface area of TSSAC were found as 336 m(2)/g and 310.62 m(2)/g, respectively. Synozol Blue reactive (RSB) and Setapers Yellow-Brown (P2RFL) industrial textile dyes adsorption capacities were investigated. As expected the TSSAC which has the biggest BET surface area (336 m(2)/g) adsorbed dye best. The maximum (RSB) and (P2RFL) uptake capacities were found as 8.5383 mg/g and 5.4 mg/g, respectively. The results of this study indicated the applicability of TSSAC for removing industrial dyes from aqueous solution.

  16. Influence of pH on Chemical Forms of Phosphate Adfsorbed on Gothite Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUFAN; WANGDIAN-FEN; 等

    1995-01-01

    Chemical forms of the phosphate adsorbed on goethite surfaces and characteristics of the coordinate groups which exchange with P on goethite surfaces in solutions with different pll values were investigated.Results showed that the chemical forms of P on goethite surfaces changed from the dominance of monodentate corrdination to that of bidentate one with increasing pH of the solution.By influencing types of phosphate ions in solutions,pH affected the chemical forms of P on goethite surfaces,The amount of OH- displaced by phosphae on goethite surfaces was the most at pH 7.0,the second at pH 9.0,and the least at pH 4.5.

  17. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DLIL technique and etching were used for functionalization of Ti grade 2 surface. • Modification was performed on semi-finished flat and curved Ti surfaces. • Modification results in periodic multimodal (micro and nano-size) Ti topography. - Abstract: The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone–implants interactions

  18. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwaśniak, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Pura, J., E-mail: jaroslawpura@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Zwolińska, M.; Wieciński, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Skarżyński, H.; Olszewski, L. [Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw (Poland); World Hearing Center, Kajetany (Poland); Marczak, J. [Military University of Technology, Institute of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland); Garbacz, H.; Kurzydłowski, K.J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • DLIL technique and etching were used for functionalization of Ti grade 2 surface. • Modification was performed on semi-finished flat and curved Ti surfaces. • Modification results in periodic multimodal (micro and nano-size) Ti topography. - Abstract: The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone–implants interactions.

  19. Surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates pretreated by alkali hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xueping; Jiang, Yan; Rong, Xianjian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Shuangfei; Nie, Shuangxi

    2016-09-01

    The surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates by alkali hydrogen peroxide pretreatment (AHPP) were investigated in this study. The results tended to manifest that AHPP prior to enzymatic and chemical treatment was potential for improving accessibility and reactivity of bamboo substrates. The inorganic components, organic solvent extractives and acid-soluble lignin were effectively removed by AHPP. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the surface of bamboo chips had less lignin but more carbohydrate after pre-treatment. Fiber surfaces became etched and collapsed, and more pores and debris on the substrate surface were observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Brenauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) results showed that both of pore volume and surface area were increased after AHPP. Although XRD analysis showed that AHPP led to relatively higher crystallinity, pre-extraction could overall enhance the accessibility of enzymes and chemicals into the bamboo structure. PMID:27311789

  20. Chemical Structure of Carbon Nitride Films Prepared by MW-ECR Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; GAO Peng; DING Wan-yu; LI Xin; DENG Xin-lu; DONG Chuang

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were prepared by plasma-enhanced DC magnetron sputtering using twinned microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Chemical structure of deposited films was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the deposition rate is strongly affected by direct current bias, and the films are mainly composed of a single amorphous carbon nitride phase with N/C ratio close to C3N4, and the bonding is predominantly of C-N type.

  1. Chemical Structure of Carbon Nitride Films Prepared by MW-ECR Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUJun,GAOPeng; DINGWan-yu; LIXin; DENGXin-lu; DONGChuang

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were prepared by plasma-enhanced DC magnetron sputtering using twinned microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Chemical structure of deposited films was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transtorm infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that the deposition rate is strongly affected by direct current bias, and the films are mainly composed of a single amorphous carbon nitride phase with N/C ratio close to C3N4, and the bonding is predominantly of C-N type.

  2. Synthesis and oxidation behavior of boron-substituted carbon powders by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Boron-substituted carbon powder, BxC1-x with x up to 0.17, has been successfully synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The boron concentration in prepared BxC1-x samples can be controlled by varying the relative proportions of methane and diborane. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectrum confirm the successful synthesis of an amorphous BC5 compound, which consists of 10―20 nm particles with disk-like morphology. Thermogravimetry measurement shows that BC5 compound starts to oxidize ap-proximately at 620℃ and has a higher oxidation resistance than carbon.

  3. Factorial Based Response Surface Modeling with Confidence Intervals for Optimizing Thermal Optical Transmission Analysis of Atmospheric Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate how thermal-optical transmission analysis (TOT) for refractory light-absorbing carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was optimized with empirical response surface modeling. TOT employs pyrolysis to distinguish the mass of black carbon (BC) from organic carbon (...

  4. Parameterizing A Surface Water Model for Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The unique electronic, mechanical, and structural properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has lead to increasing production of these versatile materials; currently, the use of carbon-based nanomaterials in consumer products is second only to that of nano-scale silver. Although ther...

  5. [Effect of physico-chemical characteristics of activated carbon on the adsorption of organic pollutants in natural water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Yi; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Jian-Kun; Yuan, Hong-Lin; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the adsorption characteristics of two synthetic organic compounds (SOCs), i. e., methyl parathion(MP) and trichloroethylene (TCE), and natural organic matter (NOM) on powdered activated carbons (PAC) in natural water were studied. On the basis of fully characterizing the physical and chemical characteristics of PAC, the effect of physical and chemical properties of PAC on the adsorption of low molecular weight SOCs in natural water was studied by correlation analysis. The effect of molecular weight fractionation on the adsorption of NOM on PAC was investigated using high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). It was found that, compared to the surface chemistry, the physical property (pore properties) of PAC was the critical factor to determine its adsorption capacity of MP and TCE in natural water. The adsorption of the low molecular weight SOC and NOM with apparent molecular weight (AMW) < 500 on PAC was primarily impacted by the micropore surface area, and that of NOM with 500 < AMW < 3 000 was affected by the mesopore surface area combined with the mesopore size distribution. PMID:21528573

  6. On the chemical dynamics of extracellular polysaccharides in the high Arctic surface microlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface microlayer (SML represents a unique system of which the physicochemical characteristics may differ from those of the underlying subsurface seawater (SSW. Within the Arctic pack ice area, the SML has been characterized as enriched in small colloids of biological origin, resulting from extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS. During the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS in August 2008, particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM, DOM samples were collected and chemically characterized from the SML and the corresponding SSW at an open lead centered at 87.5° N and 5° E. Total organic carbon was persistently enriched in the SML with a mean enrichment factor (EF of 1.45 ± 0.41, whereas sporadic depletions of dissolved carbohydrates and amino acids were observed. Monosaccharide compositional analysis reveals that EPS in the Arctic lead was formed mainly of distinctive heteropolysaccharides, enriched in xylose, fucose and glucose. The mean concentrations of total hydrolysable neutral sugars in SSW were 94.9 ± 37.5 nM in high molecular weight (HMW DOM and 64.4 ± 14.5 nM in POM. The enrichment of polysaccharides in the SML appeared to be a common feature, with EFs ranging from 1.7 to 7.0 for particulate polysaccharides and 3.5 to 12.1 for polysaccharides in the HMW DOM fraction. A calculated monosaccharide yield suggests that polymers in the HMW DOM fraction were scavenged, without substantial degradation, into the SML. Bubble scavenging experiments showed that newly aggregated particles could be formed abiotically by coagulation of low molecular weight nanometer-sized gels. Experimentally-generated aerosol particles were enriched in polysaccharides by factors of 22–70, relative to the source seawater. We propose that bubble scavenging of surface-active polysaccharides was one of the possible mechanisms for the enrichment of polysaccharides in the SML.

  7. Photogeneration of singlet oxygen by the phenothiazine derivatives covalently bound to the surface-modified glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacha-Grzechnik, Agata; Piwowar, Katarzyna; Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Koscielniak, Piotr; Szuber, Jacek; Zak, Jerzy K.

    2016-05-01

    The selected group of four amine-derivatives of phenothiazine was covalently grafted to the glassy carbon surface in the four-step procedure consisting of the electrochemical reduction of the diazonium salt followed by the electrochemical and chemical post-modification steps. The proposed strategy involves the bonding of linker molecule to which the photosensitizer is attached. The synthesized organic layers were characterized by means of cyclic voltammetry, XPS and Raman Spectroscopy. It was shown that the phenothiazines immobilized via proposed strategy retain their photochemical properties and are able to generate 1O2 when activated by the laser radiation. The effectiveness of in situ singlet oxygen generation by those new solid photoactive materials was determined by means of UVVis spectroscopy. The reported, covalently modified solid surfaces may find their application as the singlet oxygen photogenerators in the fine chemicals' synthesis or in the wastewater treatment.

  8. Inverse modeling of carbon monoxide surface emissions using Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory network observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    PéTron, Gabrielle; Granier, Claire; Khattatov, Boris; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Yudin, Valery; Müller, Jean-Francois; Gille, John

    2002-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) inverse modeling scheme is used to constrain the direct surface emissions of carbon monoxide CO. A priori estimates of CO emissions are taken from various inventories and are included in the IMAGES model to compute the distribution of CO. The modeled CO mixing ratios are compared with observations at 39 CMDL stations, averaged over the years 1990-1996. The interannual variability of CO sources is therefore ignored. We show that the method used (time-dependent synthesis inversion) is able to adjust the surface fluxes on a monthly basis in order to improve the agreement between the observed and the modeled CO mixing ratios at the stations. The Earth surface is divided into regions. The spatial distribution of CO sources is fixed inside each of these regions. The inversion scheme optimizes the intensities of the emissions fluxes for the following processes: technological activities, forest and savanna burning, agricultural waste burning and fuelwood use, soil/vegetation emissions, and oceanic emissions. The inversion significantly reduces the uncertainties on the surface sources over Europe, North America and Asia. The most striking result is the increase (almost by a factor of 2) of CO flux from Asia in all a posteriori scenarios. The uncertainties on the Southern Hemisphere emissions remain large after the inversion, because the current observational surface network is too sparse at these latitudes. The inversion, moreover, shifts the peak in biomass burning emissions in the Southern Hemisphere by one month. This temporal shift ensures a better match of the observed and modeled CO seasonal cycle at the Ascension Island station. We also attempted to optimize the annual and global productions of CO due to methane and NMHC. With the current set of data, the scheme was not able to differentiate between these two sources, and hence only the total chemical production of CO can be optimized.

  9. Development of a directly patterned low-surface-energy polymer brush in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Abhinav; Paik, Marvin Y; Ober, Christopher K

    2009-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a sustainable solvent because it is nonflammable, exhibits a relatively low toxicity, and is naturally abundant. As a selective, nonpolar solvent, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an ideal fit for the development of low-surface-energy polymers. The development of directly patterned poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) (PTFEMA) brushes in scCO2 was investigated. PTFEMA, in particular, was selected over other fluorinated polymers because of its very high electron-beam (e-beam) sensitivity. PTFEMA brushes were grown on silicon substrates via controlled surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization of TFEMA. Surface analysis techniques including ellipsometry, contact-angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the thickness, hydrophilicity, roughness, and chemical composition of the polymer brushes. PTFEMA brushes were directly patterned in a single step using e-beam lithography and were processed in an environmentally benign scCO2 solvent. Tapping-mode AFM imaging confirmed the successful e-beam patterning and development of these brushes. The sensitivity of PTFEMA brushes toward direct patterning with the e-beam, followed by scCO2 development, was studied and compared to development in tetrahydrofuran solvent. Using this direct-patterning method, followed by dry development in scCO2, highly resolved nanostructured polymer brush lines down to 78 nm could be prepared. This method can be generalized to prepare fluorinated low-surface-energy polymer brush surfaces in a single step for various applications. PMID:20355827

  10. PALADYN, a comprehensive land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    PALADYN is presented, a new comprehensive and computationally efficient land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model designed to be used in Earth system models of intermediate complexity for long-term simulations and paleoclimate studies. The model treats in a consistent manner the interaction between atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation and soil through the fluxes of energy, water and carbon. Energy, water and carbon are conserved. The model explicitly treats permafrost, both in physical processes and as important carbon pool. The model distinguishes 9 surface types of which 5 are different vegetation types, bare soil, land ice, lake and ocean shelf. Including the ocean shelf allows to treat continuous changes in sea level and shelf area associated with glacial cycles. Over each surface type the model solves the surface energy balance and computes the fluxes of sensible, latent and ground heat and upward shortwave and longwave radiation. It includes a single snow layer. The soil model distinguishes between three different macro surface types which have their own soil column: vegetation and bare soil, ice sheet and ocean shelf. The soil is vertically discretized into 5 layers where prognostic equations for temperature, water and carbon are consistently solved. Phase changes of water in the soil are explicitly considered. A surface hydrology module computes precipitation interception by vegetation, surface runoff and soil infiltration. The soil water equation is based on Darcy's law. Given soil water content, the wetland fraction is computed based on a topographic index. Photosynthesis is computed using a light use efficiency model. Carbon assimilation by vegetation is coupled to the transpiration of water through stomatal conductance. The model includes a dynamic vegetation module with 5 plant functional types competing for the gridcell share with their respective net primary productivity. Each macro surface type has its own carbon pools represented by a litter, a fast

  11. Investigation of carbonized layer on surface of NaAlSi glass fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are presented and discussed experimental results about carbonate shell on the sodium rich alumosilicate (NaAlSi) glass fibers and carbonization in wet air atmosphere and water uptake kinetic of such fiber fabrics. The analyzes of water uptake kinetic by regression technique, leaching and heating of carbonized glass fabrics helped to separate stages of fast and slow processes between fiber and carbonate shell and air atmosphere. The shell contains mixture of trona and hydrated sodium carbonate. Heating converts both substances to sodium carbonate. The weight uptake after heating encounters two fast exponential processes associated with water absorption on the surface of carbonated shell and its diffusion into volume. The slow process associates with CO2 and H2O absorption from air, hydration and sodium carbonate conversion to trona

  12. The evolution of chemical nature on U–0.79 wt.%Ti surface during vacuum annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Peng [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Luo, Lizhu [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Zhao, Yawen; Fu, Xiaoguo [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ao, Bingyun; Bai, Bin [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Wang, Xiaolin, E-mail: xlwang@caep.cn [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: The evolution of the U–0.79Ti alloy surface character during vacuum annealing. - Highlights: • The evolution of surface character of U–0.79Ti during vacuum annealing was in situ studied by XPS. • The formation and later decomposition of an oxycarbide layer were observed during the vacuum annealing from R.T. to 700 °C. • A surface segregation of titanium was noticed during high-T heat-treatment in vacuum. - Abstract: The evolution of the oxide-overlayer's chemical nature on the surface of U–0.79 wt.%Ti alloy during vacuum annealing has been examined in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A specimen sheet of the alloy covered by oxide films is heated from room temperature to 700 °C in vacuum. It is found that the UO{sub 2+x} outer oxide layer starts to be reduced to UO{sub 2} at 200 °C. Between 300 and 400 °C, an oxycarbide (UO{sub x}C{sub y}) layer is observed due to the reaction between UO{sub 2} and carbon. Above 500 °C, UO{sub x}C{sub y} decomposes and the surface covered oxide layer starts to be reduced to the metallic state, meanwhile, a thermal driven segregation of Ti to the surface is also observed.

  13. Chemical Cleavage of Layered Carbon Nitride with Enhanced Photoluminescent Performances and Photoconduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2015-12-22

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon dots (C-dots) have various alluring properties and potential applications, but they are often limited by unsatisfied optical performance such as low quantum yield, ambiguous fluorescence emission mechanism, and narrow emission wavelength. Herein, we report that bulk polymeric carbon nitride could be utilized as a layered precursor to prepare carbon nitride nanostructures such as nanorods, nanoleaves and quantum dots by chemical tailoring. As doped carbon materials, these carbon nitride nanostructures not only intrinsically emitted UV lights but also well inherited the explicit photoluminescence mechanism of the bulk pristine precursor, both of which were rarely reported for GQDs and C-dots. Especially, carbon nitride quantum dots (CNQDs) had a photoluminescence quantum yield (QY) up to 46%, among the highest QY for metal-free quantum dots so far. As examples, the CNQDs were utilized as a photoluminescence probe for rapid detection of Fe(3+) with a detection limit of 1 μM in 2 min and a photoconductor in an all-solid-state device. This work would open up an avenue for doped nanocarbon in developing photoelectrical devices and sensors.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of high quality graphene films from carbon dioxide atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Andrew James; Weber, Nils Eike; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Kettner, Michel; Weitz, R Thomas; Wünsch, Josef R; Müllen, Klaus; Sachdev, Hermann

    2015-01-27

    The realization of graphene-based, next-generation electronic applications essentially depends on a reproducible, large-scale production of graphene films via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We demonstrate how key challenges such as uniformity and homogeneity of the copper metal substrate as well as the growth chemistry can be improved by the use of carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide enriched gas atmospheres. Our approach enables graphene film production protocols free of elemental hydrogen and provides graphene layers of superior quality compared to samples produced by conventional hydrogen/methane based CVD processes. The substrates and resulting graphene films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman microscopy, sheet resistance and transport measurements. The superior quality of the as-grown graphene films on copper is indicated by Raman maps revealing average G band widths as low as 18 ± 8 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation. In addition, high charge carrier mobilities of up to 1975 cm(2)/(V s) were observed for electrons in transferred films obtained from a carbon dioxide based growth protocol. The enhanced graphene film quality can be explained by the mild oxidation properties of carbon dioxide, which at high temperatures enables an uniform conditioning of the substrates by an efficient removal of pre-existing and emerging carbon impurities and a continuous suppression and in situ etching of carbon of lesser quality being co-deposited during the CVD growth. PMID:25398132

  15. Influence of anodic surface treatment of activated carbon on adsorption and ion exchange properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.J.; Kim, K.D.

    1999-10-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment of activated carbon on adsorption and ion exchange characteristics was investigated in the condition of 35 wt% NaOH electrolyte for 60 s. The acid and base values were determined by a titration technique, and surface and pore structures were studied in terms of BET volumetric measurement with N{sub 2} adsorption. The ion exchange capacity of the anodized activated carbons was characterized by a dry weight capacity technique. It was observed that an increase in current intensity leads to an increase in the surface functional groups of activated carbons, resulting in increasing pH, acid-base values, and anion-cation exchange capacities, without significant change of surface and pore structures (i.e., specific surface area, total pore volume, micropore volume, and average pore diameter). Also, anodically treated activated carbons are more effectively evaluated on the base value or cation exchange capacity than on the oppose properties in this electrolytic system.

  16. Preparation of macroporous carbon nanofibers with macroscopic openings in the surfaces and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungwon; Moon, Geon Dae; Jeong, Unyong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei Universivty, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kipoong; Kim, Young-Rok [Institute of Life Sciences and Resources and Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Won, Yong Sun; Yoon, Yeo-Joo; Park, Sung Soo, E-mail: ujeong@yonsei.ac.k [Corporate R and D Institute, Samsung Electro-Mechanics, 314 Maetan 3-Dong, Yeongtong-Gu, Suwon, Gyunggi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-04

    Macroporous carbon nanofibers with mesoscale surface openings were produced by electrospinning. During the electrospinning of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution including crosslinked polymer colloids, the polymer colloids were concentrated in the center of PAN fibers. Carbonization left interconnected spherical pores inside the carbon fibers and mesoscale openings in the fiber surfaces. The existence of surface openings facilitated inward diffusion of various solvent molecules, nanoparticles, and large molecules such as proteins. The porous fibers could be dispersed in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents and materials, which enabled production of polymer composites in which the fibers and polymers were interpenetrating through the pores. Silica coating on the macroporous carbon fibers enriched the surface chemistry to effectively immobilize proteins helped by easy diffusion through surface openings.

  17. The interaction of human endothelial cells with chemical gradient surfaces during exposure to flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Moorlag, HE; Schakenraad, JM; Van der Meer, J; Van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Olij, WJV; Anderson, HR

    1998-01-01

    In this study, the position bound shape, spreading, detachment and migration of adhering HUVEC endothelial cells on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS) chemical gradient surfaces was investigated during exposure to flow in a parallel plate flow chamber in the presence of` serum proteins. Gradient surfaces

  18. Surface of Lactic Acid Bacteria: Relationships between Chemical Composition and Physicochemical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Boonaert, C J; Rouxhet, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The surface chemical composition and physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity and zeta potential) of two lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetilactis and Lactobacillus helveticus, have been investigated using cells harvested in exponential or stationary growth phase. The surface composition determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was converted into a molecular composition in terms of proteins, polysaccharides, and hydrocarbonlike compounds. The conce...

  19. Trends in the chemical properties in early transition metal carbide surfaces: A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitchin, J.R.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Barteau, M.A.;

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present density functional theory (DFT) investigations of the physical, chemical and electronic structure properties of several close-packed surfaces of early transition metal carbides, including beta-Mo2C(0 0 0 1), and the (1 1 1) surfaces of TiC, VC, NbC, and TaC. The results...

  20. Complementary surface charge for enhanced capacitive deionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Porada, S.; Omosebi, A.; Liu, K.L.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Landon, J.

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available activated carbon cloth electrodes are treated using nitric acid and ethylenediamine solutions, resulting in chemical surface charge enhanced carbon electrodes for capacitive deionization (CDI) applications. Surface charge enhanced electrodes are then configured in a CDI cel